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Sample records for potential functional imaging

  1. Image-potential states and work function of graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niesner, Daniel; Fauster, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Image-potential states of graphene on various substrates have been investigated by two-photon photoemission and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. They are used as a probe for the graphene-substrate interaction and resulting changes in the (local) work function. The latter is driven by the work function difference between graphene and the substrate. This results in a charge transfer which also contributes to core-level shifts in x-ray photoemission. In this review article, we give an overview over the theoretical models and the experimental data for image-potential states and work function of graphene on various substrates. (topical review)

  2. B-Spline potential function for maximum a-posteriori image reconstruction in fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Dilipkumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An iterative image reconstruction technique employing B-Spline potential function in a Bayesian framework is proposed for fluorescence microscopy images. B-splines are piecewise polynomials with smooth transition, compact support and are the shortest polynomial splines. Incorporation of the B-spline potential function in the maximum-a-posteriori reconstruction technique resulted in improved contrast, enhanced resolution and substantial background reduction. The proposed technique is validated on simulated data as well as on the images acquired from fluorescence microscopes (widefield, confocal laser scanning fluorescence and super-resolution 4Pi microscopy. A comparative study of the proposed technique with the state-of-art maximum likelihood (ML and maximum-a-posteriori (MAP with quadratic potential function shows its superiority over the others. B-Spline MAP technique can find applications in several imaging modalities of fluorescence microscopy like selective plane illumination microscopy, localization microscopy and STED.

  3. Self-consistent density functional calculation of the image potential at a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J; Alvarellos, J E; Chacon, E; GarcIa-Gonzalez, P

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the exchange-correlation (XC) potential at a metal surface has an image-like asymptotic behaviour given by -1/4(z-z 0 ), where z is the coordinate perpendicular to the surface. Using a suitable fully non-local functional prescription, we evaluate self-consistently the XC potential with the correct image behaviour for simple jellium surfaces in the range of metallic densities. This allows a proper comparison between the corresponding image-plane position, z 0 , and other related quantities such as the centroid of an induced charge by an external perturbation. As a by-product, we assess the routinely used local density approximation when evaluating electron density profiles, work functions, and surface energies by focusing on the XC effects included in the fully non-local description

  4. Self-consistent density functional calculation of the image potential at a metal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain); Alvarellos, J E [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain); Chacon, E [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); GarcIa-Gonzalez, P [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-04

    It is well known that the exchange-correlation (XC) potential at a metal surface has an image-like asymptotic behaviour given by -1/4(z-z{sub 0}), where z is the coordinate perpendicular to the surface. Using a suitable fully non-local functional prescription, we evaluate self-consistently the XC potential with the correct image behaviour for simple jellium surfaces in the range of metallic densities. This allows a proper comparison between the corresponding image-plane position, z{sub 0}, and other related quantities such as the centroid of an induced charge by an external perturbation. As a by-product, we assess the routinely used local density approximation when evaluating electron density profiles, work functions, and surface energies by focusing on the XC effects included in the fully non-local description.

  5. Coulomb Green's function and image potential near a cylindrical diffuse interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Changfeng; Huang, Qiongwei; Deng, Shaozhong

    2015-12-01

    In a preceding paper [Comput. Phys. Commun. 184 (1): 51-59, 2013], we revisited the problem of calculating Coulomb Green's function and image potential near a planar diffuse interface within which the dielectric permittivity of the inhomogeneous medium changes continuously along one Cartesian direction in a transition layer between two dissimilar dielectric materials. In the present paper, we consider a cylindrical diffuse interface within which the dielectric permittivity changes continuously along the radial direction instead. First we propose a specific cylindrical diffuse interface model, termed the quasi-harmonic diffuse interface model, that can admit analytical solution for the Green's function in terms of the modified Bessel functions. Then and more importantly we develop a robust numerical method for building Green's functions for any cylindrical diffuse interface models. The main idea of the numerical method is, after dividing a diffuse interface into multiple sublayers, to approximate the dielectric permittivity profile in each one of the sublayers by one of the quasi-harmonic functional form rather than simply by a constant value as one would normally do. Next we describe how to efficiently compute well-behaved ratios, products, and logarithmic derivatives of the modified Bessel functions so as to avoid direct evaluations of individual modified Bessel functions in our formulations. Finally we conduct numerical experiments to show the effectiveness of the quasi-harmonic diffuse interface model in overcoming the divergence of the image potential, to validate the numerical method in terms of its accuracy and convergence, and to demonstrate its capability for computing Green's functions for any cylindrical diffuse interface models.

  6. Functional and molecular imaging with MRI: potential applications in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthurs, Owen J.; Gallagher, Ferdia A.

    2011-01-01

    MRI is a very versatile tool for noninvasive imaging and it is particularly attractive as an imaging technique in paediatric patients given the absence of ionizing radiation. Recent advances in the field of MRI have enabled tissue function to be probed noninvasively, and increasingly MRI is being used to assess cellular and molecular processes. For example, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI has been used to assess tissue vascularity, diffusion-weighted imaging can quantify molecular movements of water in tissue compartments and MR spectroscopy provides a quantitative assessment of metabolite levels. A number of targeted contrast agents have been developed that bind specifically to receptors on the vascular endothelium or cell surface and there are several MR methods for labelling cells and tracking cellular movements. Hyperpolarization techniques have the capability of massively increasing the sensitivity of MRI and these have been used to image tissue pH, successful response to drug treatment as well as imaging the microstructure of the lungs. Although there are many challenges to be overcome before these techniques can be translated into routine paediatric imaging, they could potentially be used to aid diagnosis, predict disease outcome, target biopsies and determine treatment response noninvasively. (orig.)

  7. A pilot study investigating whether focusing on body functionality can protect women from the potential negative effects of viewing thin-ideal media images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleva, Jessica M; Veldhuis, Jolanda; Martijn, Carolien

    2016-06-01

    This pilot study explored whether focusing on body functionality (i.e., everything the body can do) can protect women from potential harmful effects of exposure to thin-ideal images. Seventy women (Mage=20.61) completed an assignment wherein they either described the functionality of their body or the routes that they often travel (control). Afterward, participants were exposed to a series of thin-ideal images. Appearance and functionality satisfaction were measured before the assignment; appearance and functionality satisfaction, self-objectification, and body appreciation were measured after exposure. Results showed that participants who focused on body functionality experienced greater functionality satisfaction and body appreciation compared to control participants. Therefore, focusing on body functionality could be a beneficial individual-level technique that women can use to protect and promote a positive body image in the face of thin-ideal images. Research including a condition wherein participants are exposed to (product-only) control images is necessary to draw firmer conclusions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Imaging visual function of the human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marg, E.

    1988-01-01

    Imaging of human brain structure and activity with particular reference to visual function is reviewed along with methods of obtaining the data including computed tomographic (CT) scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and positron emission tomography (PET). The literature is reviewed and the potential for a new understanding of brain visual function is discussed. PET is reviewed from basic physical principles to the most recent visual brain findings with oxygen-15. It is shown that there is a potential for submillimeter localization of visual functions with sequentially different visual stimuli designed for the temporal separation of the responses. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), a less expensive substitute for PET, is also discussed. MRS is covered from basic physical principles to the current state of the art of in vivo biochemical analysis. Future possible clinical applications are discussed. Improved understanding of the functional neural organization of vision and brain will open a window to maps and circuits of human brain function.119 references

  9. Bench to bedside molecular functional imaging in translational cancer medicine: to image or to imagine?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, A.; Goh, V.; Basu, S.; Vaish, R.; Weeks, A.J.; Thakur, M.H.; Cook, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing research on malignant and normal cell biology has substantially enhanced the understanding of the biology of cancer and carcinogenesis. This has led to the development of methods to image the evolution of cancer, target specific biological molecules, and study the anti-tumour effects of novel therapeutic agents. At the same time, there has been a paradigm shift in the field of oncological imaging from purely structural or functional imaging to combined multimodal structure–function approaches that enable the assessment of malignancy from all aspects (including molecular and functional level) in a single examination. The evolving molecular functional imaging using specific molecular targets (especially with combined positron-emission tomography [PET] computed tomography [CT] using 2- [ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose [FDG] and other novel PET tracers) has great potential in translational research, giving specific quantitative information with regard to tumour activity, and has been of pivotal importance in diagnoses and therapy tailoring. Furthermore, molecular functional imaging has taken a key place in the present era of translational cancer research, producing an important tool to study and evolve newer receptor-targeted therapies, gene therapies, and in cancer stem cell research, which could form the basis to translate these agents into clinical practice, popularly termed “theranostics”. Targeted molecular imaging needs to be developed in close association with biotechnology, information technology, and basic translational scientists for its best utility. This article reviews the current role of molecular functional imaging as one of the main pillars of translational research. -- Highlights: •Molecular functional imaging (MFI) gives insight into the tumor biology and intratumoral heterogeneity. •It has potential role in identifying radiomic signatures associated with underlying gene-expression. •Radiomics can be used to create a road map

  10. Functional imaging of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Fumiko

    1984-01-01

    An image processing technique for functional imaging of the pancreas was developed and is here reported. In this paper, clinical efficacy of the technique for detecting pancreatic abnormality is evaluated in comparison with conventional pancreatic scintigraphy and CT. For quantitative evaluation, functional rate, i.e. the rate of normal functioning pancreatic area, was calculated from the functional image and subtraction image. Two hundred and ninety-five cases were studied using this technique. Conventional image had a sensitivity of 65 % and a specificity of 78 %, while the use of functional imaging improved sensitivity to 88 % and specificity to 88 %. The mean functional rate in patients with pancreatic disease was significantly lower (33.3+-24.5 in patients with chronic pancreatitis, 28.1+-26.9 in patients with acute pancreatitis, 43.4+-22.3 in patients with diabetes mellitus, 20.4+-23.4 in patients with pancreatic cancer) than the mean functional rate in cases without pancreatic disease (86.4+-14.2). It is suggested that functional image of the pancreas reflecting pancreatic exocrine function and functional rate is a useful indicator of pancreatic exocrine function. (author)

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) and expert testimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulich, Ronald; Maciewicz, Raymond; Scrivani, Steven J

    2009-03-01

    Medical experts frequently use imaging studies to illustrate points in their court testimony. This article reviews how these studies impact the credibility of expert testimony with judges and juries. The apparent "objective" evidence provided by such imaging studies can lend strong credence to a judge's or jury's appraisal of medical expert's testimony. However, as the court usually has no specialized scientific expertise, the use of complex images as part of courtroom testimony also has the potential to mislead or at least inappropriately bias the weight given to expert evidence. Recent advances in brain imaging may profoundly impact forensic expert testimony. Functional magnetic resonance imaging and other physiologic imaging techniques currently allow visualization of the activation pattern of brain regions associated with a wide variety of cognitive and behavioral tasks, and more recently, pain. While functional imaging technology has a valuable role in brain research and clinical investigation, it is important to emphasize that the use of imaging studies in forensic matters requires a careful scientific foundation and a rigorous legal assessment.

  12. Multidimensional digital image representations using generalized Kaiser-Bessel window functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewitt, R M

    1990-10-01

    Inverse problems that require the solution of integral equations are inherent in a number of indirect imaging applications, such as computerized tomography. Numerical solutions based on discretization of the mathematical model of the imaging process, or on discretization of analytic formulas for iterative inversion of the integral equations, require a discrete representation of an underlying continuous image. This paper describes discrete image representations, in n-dimensional space, that are constructed by the superposition of shifted copies of a rotationally symmetric basis function. The basis function is constructed using a generalization of the Kaiser-Bessel window function of digital signal processing. The generalization of the window function involves going from one dimension to a rotationally symmetric function in n dimensions and going from the zero-order modified Bessel function of the standard window to a function involving the modified Bessel function of order m. Three methods are given for the construction, in n-dimensional space, of basis functions having a specified (finite) number of continuous derivatives, and formulas are derived for the Fourier transform, the x-ray transform, the gradient, and the Laplacian of these basis functions. Properties of the new image representations using these basis functions are discussed, primarily in the context of two-dimensional and three-dimensional image reconstruction from line-integral data by iterative inversion of the x-ray transform. Potential applications to three-dimensional image display are also mentioned.

  13. Potential brain imaging using near field radiomety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikonomou, A; Karanasiou, I S; Uzunoglu, N K

    2009-01-01

    During the past decades there has been a tremendous increase throughout the scientific community for developing methods of understanding human brain functionality, as diagnosis and treatment of diseases and malfunctions could be effectively developed through understanding of how the brain works. In parallel, research effort is driven on minimizing drawbacks of existing imaging techniques including potential risks from radiation and invasive attributes of the imaging methodologies. Towards that direction, we are proposing a near filed radiometry imaging system for intracranial applications. The methodology is based on the fact that human tissues emit chaotic thermal type radiation at temperatures above the absolute zero. Using a phase shifted antenna array system, resolution, detection depth and sensitivity are increased. Several different setups are theoretically investigated and compared, so as to make the proposed system useful for clinical applications. Combining previous research as well as new findings, the possibility of using the proposed system as a complementary method for brain imaging is discussed in the present paper.

  14. Self-calibrated correlation imaging with k-space variant correlation functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Edalati, Masoud; Du, Xingfu; Wang, Hui; Cao, Jie J

    2018-03-01

    Correlation imaging is a previously developed high-speed MRI framework that converts parallel imaging reconstruction into the estimate of correlation functions. The presented work aims to demonstrate this framework can provide a speed gain over parallel imaging by estimating k-space variant correlation functions. Because of Fourier encoding with gradients, outer k-space data contain higher spatial-frequency image components arising primarily from tissue boundaries. As a result of tissue-boundary sparsity in the human anatomy, neighboring k-space data correlation varies from the central to the outer k-space. By estimating k-space variant correlation functions with an iterative self-calibration method, correlation imaging can benefit from neighboring k-space data correlation associated with both coil sensitivity encoding and tissue-boundary sparsity, thereby providing a speed gain over parallel imaging that relies only on coil sensitivity encoding. This new approach is investigated in brain imaging and free-breathing neonatal cardiac imaging. Correlation imaging performs better than existing parallel imaging techniques in simulated brain imaging acceleration experiments. The higher speed enables real-time data acquisition for neonatal cardiac imaging in which physiological motion is fast and non-periodic. With k-space variant correlation functions, correlation imaging gives a higher speed than parallel imaging and offers the potential to image physiological motion in real-time. Magn Reson Med 79:1483-1494, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Potential Applications of Flat-Panel Volumetric CT in Morphologic, Functional Small Animal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Greschus

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive radiologic imaging has recently gained considerable interest in basic, preclinical research for monitoring disease progression, therapeutic efficacy. In this report, we introduce flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpVCT as a powerful new tool for noninvasive imaging of different organ systems in preclinical research. The three-dimensional visualization that is achieved by isotropic high-resolution datasets is illustrated for the skeleton, chest, abdominal organs, brain of mice. The high image quality of chest scans enables the visualization of small lung nodules in an orthotopic lung cancer model, the reliable imaging of therapy side effects such as lung fibrosis. Using contrast-enhanced scans, fpVCT displayed the vascular trees of the brain, liver, kidney down to the subsegmental level. Functional application of fpVCT in dynamic contrast-enhanced scans of the rat brain delivered physiologically reliable data of perfusion, tissue blood volume. Beyond scanning of small animal models as demonstrated here, fpVCT provides the ability to image animals up to the size of primates.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of respiratory movement and lung function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetzlaff, R.; Eichinger, M.

    2009-01-01

    Lung function measurements are the domain of spirometry or plethysmography. These methods have proven their value in clinical practice, nevertheless, being global measurements the functional indices only describe the sum of all functional units of the lung. Impairment of only a single component of the respiratory pump or of a small part of lung parenchyma can be compensated by unaffected lung tissue. Dynamic imaging can help to detect such local changes and lead to earlier adapted therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) seems to be perfect for this application as it is not hampered by image distortion as is projection radiography and it does not expose the patient to potentially harmful radiation like computed tomography. Unfortunately, lung parenchyma is not easy to image using MRI due to its low signal intensity. For this reason first applications of MRI in lung function measurements concentrated on the movement of the thoracic wall and the diaphragm. Recent technical advances in MRI however might allow measurements of regional dynamics of the lungs. (orig.) [de

  17. Prussian blue nanocubes: multi-functional nanoparticles for multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jason R.; Dumani, Diego S.; Kubelick, Kelsey P.; Luci, Jeffrey; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2017-03-01

    Imaging modalities utilize contrast agents to improve morphological visualization and to assess functional and molecular/cellular information. Here we present a new type of nanometer scale multi-functional particle that can be used for multi-modal imaging and therapeutic applications. Specifically, we synthesized monodisperse 20 nm Prussian Blue Nanocubes (PBNCs) with desired optical absorption in the near-infrared region and superparamagnetic properties. PBNCs showed excellent contrast in photoacoustic (700 nm wavelength) and MR (3T) imaging. Furthermore, photostability was assessed by exposing the PBNCs to nearly 1,000 laser pulses (5 ns pulse width) with up to 30 mJ/cm2 laser fluences. The PBNCs exhibited insignificant changes in photoacoustic signal, demonstrating enhanced robustness compared to the commonly used gold nanorods (substantial photodegradation with fluences greater than 5 mJ/cm2). Furthermore, the PBNCs exhibited superparamagnetism with a magnetic saturation of 105 emu/g, a 5x improvement over superparamagnetic iron-oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles. PBNCs exhibited enhanced T2 contrast measured using 3T clinical MRI. Because of the excellent optical absorption and magnetism, PBNCs have potential uses in other imaging modalities including optical tomography, microscopy, magneto-motive OCT/ultrasound, etc. In addition to multi-modal imaging, the PBNCs are multi-functional and, for example, can be used to enhance magnetic delivery and as therapeutic agents. Our initial studies show that stem cells can be labeled with PBNCs to perform image-guided magnetic delivery. Overall, PBNCs can act as imaging/therapeutic agents in diverse applications including cancer, cardiovascular disease, ophthalmology, and tissue engineering. Furthermore, PBNCs are based on FDA approved Prussian Blue thus potentially easing clinical translation of PBNCs.

  18. When structure affects function--the need for partial volume effect correction in functional and resting state magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukart, Juergen; Bertolino, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Both functional and also more recently resting state magnetic resonance imaging have become established tools to investigate functional brain networks. Most studies use these tools to compare different populations without controlling for potential differences in underlying brain structure which might affect the functional measurements of interest. Here, we adapt a simulation approach combined with evaluation of real resting state magnetic resonance imaging data to investigate the potential impact of partial volume effects on established functional and resting state magnetic resonance imaging analyses. We demonstrate that differences in the underlying structure lead to a significant increase in detected functional differences in both types of analyses. Largest increases in functional differences are observed for highest signal-to-noise ratios and when signal with the lowest amount of partial volume effects is compared to any other partial volume effect constellation. In real data, structural information explains about 25% of within-subject variance observed in degree centrality--an established resting state connectivity measurement. Controlling this measurement for structural information can substantially alter correlational maps obtained in group analyses. Our results question current approaches of evaluating these measurements in diseased population with known structural changes without controlling for potential differences in these measurements.

  19. Pre-clinical functional magnetic resonance imaging. Pt. II. The heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messner, Nadja M.; Zoellner, Frank G.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine

    2014-07-01

    One third of all deaths worldwide in 2008 were caused by cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and the incidence of CVD related deaths rises ever more. Thus, improved imaging techniques and modalities are needed for the evaluation of cardiac morphology and function. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) is a minimally invasive technique that is increasingly important due to its high spatial and temporal resolution, its high soft tissue contrast and its ability of functional and quantitative imaging. It is widely accepted as the gold standard of cardiac functional analysis. In the short period of small animal MRI, remarkable progress has been achieved concerning new, fast imaging schemes as well as purpose-built equipment. Dedicated small animal scanners allow for tapping the full potential of recently developed animal models of cardiac disease. In this paper, we review state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance imaging techniques and applications in small animals at ultra-high fields (UHF).

  20. Towards functional 3D T-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, Bradley; Wang, Shaohong; Gray, Doug; Abbott, Derek; Zhang, X-C

    2002-01-01

    We review the recent development of T-ray computed tomography, a terahertz imaging technique that allows the reconstruction of the three-dimensional refractive index profile of weakly scattering objects. Terahertz pulse imaging is used to obtain images of the target at multiple projection angles and the filtered backprojection algorithm enables the reconstruction of the object's frequency-dependent refractive index. The application of this technique to a biological bone sample and a plastic test structure is demonstrated. The structure of each target is accurately resolved and the frequency-dependent refractive index is determined. The frequency-dependent information may potentially be used to extract functional information from the target, to uniquely identify different materials or to diagnose medical conditions

  1. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  2. Discrete imaging models for three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography using radially symmetric expansion functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Schoonover, Robert W; Su, Richard; Oraevsky, Alexander; Anastasio, Mark A

    2014-05-01

    Optoacoustic tomography (OAT), also known as photoacoustic tomography, is an emerging computed biomedical imaging modality that exploits optical contrast and ultrasonic detection principles. Iterative image reconstruction algorithms that are based on discrete imaging models are actively being developed for OAT due to their ability to improve image quality by incorporating accurate models of the imaging physics, instrument response, and measurement noise. In this work, we investigate the use of discrete imaging models based on Kaiser-Bessel window functions for iterative image reconstruction in OAT. A closed-form expression for the pressure produced by a Kaiser-Bessel function is calculated, which facilitates accurate computation of the system matrix. Computer-simulation and experimental studies are employed to demonstrate the potential advantages of Kaiser-Bessel function-based iterative image reconstruction in OAT.

  3. Functional imaging of the pancreas. Image processing techniques and clinical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Fumiko

    1984-02-01

    An image processing technique for functional imaging of the pancreas was developed and is here reported. In this paper, clinical efficacy of the technique for detecting pancreatic abnormality is evaluated in comparison with conventional pancreatic scintigraphy and CT. For quantitative evaluation, functional rate, i.e. the rate of normal functioning pancreatic area, was calculated from the functional image and subtraction image. Two hundred and ninety-five cases were studied using this technique. Conventional image had a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 78%, while the use of functional imaging improved sensitivity to 88% and specificity to 88%. The mean functional rate in patients with pancreatic disease was significantly lower (33.3 +- 24.5 in patients with chronic pancreatitis, 28.1 +- 26.9 in patients with acute pancreatitis, 43.4 +- 22.3 in patients with diabetes mellitus, 20.4 +- 23.4 in patients with pancreatic cancer) than the mean functional rate in cases without pancreatic disease (86.4 +- 14.2). It is suggested that functional image of the pancreas reflecting pancreatic exocrine function and functional rate is a useful indicator of pancreatic exocrine function.

  4. Physiology for the pulmonary functional imager

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    Levin, David L., E-mail: levin.david@mayo.edu [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Schiebler, Mark L. [Department of Radiology, UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53792-3252 (United States); Hopkins, Susan R., E-mail: shopkins@ucsd.edu [Division of Physiology 0623A, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • An understanding of the relevant pulmonary physiology is crucial to functional lung imaging. • Spatial resolution for pulmonary functional imaging can be substantially less than that used for anatomic/clinical imaging. • Regional deformation of the lung under the influence of gravity significantly affects the measurement of pulmonary perfusion. • Large vessels identified on perfusion imaging do not represent local blood flow. • Pulmonary diseases are typically characterized by a change in the matching of ventilation and perfusion. - Abstract: As pulmonary functional imaging moves beyond the realm of the radiologist and physicist, it is important that imagers have a common language and understanding of the relevant physiology of the lung. This review will focus on key physiological concepts and pitfalls relevant to functional lung imaging.

  5. Physiology for the pulmonary functional imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, David L.; Schiebler, Mark L.; Hopkins, Susan R.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An understanding of the relevant pulmonary physiology is crucial to functional lung imaging. • Spatial resolution for pulmonary functional imaging can be substantially less than that used for anatomic/clinical imaging. • Regional deformation of the lung under the influence of gravity significantly affects the measurement of pulmonary perfusion. • Large vessels identified on perfusion imaging do not represent local blood flow. • Pulmonary diseases are typically characterized by a change in the matching of ventilation and perfusion. - Abstract: As pulmonary functional imaging moves beyond the realm of the radiologist and physicist, it is important that imagers have a common language and understanding of the relevant physiology of the lung. This review will focus on key physiological concepts and pitfalls relevant to functional lung imaging.

  6. PET imaging for brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Described are the principle of PET and its characteristics, imaging of human brain function, mapping of detailed human cerebral functions and PET imaging of nerve transmission. Following compounds labeled by positron emitters are used for PET imaging of brain functions: for blood flow and oxygen metabolism, 15 O-O 2 gas, water and carbon dioxide; for energy metabolism, 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose; and for nerve transmission functions in receptor binding, transporter, transmitter synthesis and enzyme, 11 C- or 18 F-dopamine, serotonin and their analogues, and acetylcholine analogues. For brain mapping, examples of cognition tasks, results and their statistics are presented with images for blood flow. Nerve transmissions in schizophrenia and Alzheimer disease are imaged with labeled analogues of dopamine and acetylcholine, respectively. PET is becoming more and more important in the field of psychiatric science particularly in the coming society of increasing aged people. (N.I.)

  7. [Future perspectives for diagnostic imaging in urology: from anatomic and functional to molecular imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macis, Giuseppe; Di Giovanni, Silvia; Di Franco, Davide; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    The future approach of diagnostic imaging in urology follows the technological progress, which made the visualization of in vivo molecular processes possible. From anatomo-morphological diagnostic imaging and through functional imaging molecular radiology is reached. Based on molecular probes, imaging is aimed at assessing the in vivo molecular processes, their physiology and function at cellular level. The future imaging will investigate the complex tumor functioning as metabolism, aerobic glycolysis in particular, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, metastatic potential, hypoxia, apoptosis and receptors expressed by neoplastic cells. Methods for performing molecular radiology are CT, MRI, PET-CT, PET-MRI, SPECT and optical imaging. Molecular ultrasound combines technological advancement with targeted contrast media based on microbubbles, this allowing the selective registration of microbubble signal while that of stationary tissues is suppressed. An experimental study was carried out where the ultrasound molecular probe BR55 strictly bound to prostate tumor results in strong enhancement in the early phase after contrast, this contrast being maintained in the late phase. This late enhancement is markedly significant for the detection of prostatic cancer foci and to guide the biopsy sampling. The 124I-cG250 molecular antibody which is strictly linked to cellular carbonic anhydrase IX of clear cell renal carcinoma, allows the acquisition of diagnostic PET images of clear cell renal carcinoma without biopsy. This WG-250 (RENCAREX) antibody was used as a therapy in metastatic clear cell renal carcinoma. Future advancements and applications will result in early cancer diagnosis, personalized therapy that will be specific according to the molecular features of cancer and leading to the development of catheter-based multichannel molecular imaging devices for cystoscopy-based molecular imaging diagnosis and intervention.

  8. Connotation and category of functional-molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tianran; Tian Jiahe

    2007-01-01

    Function and molecular lmaging represent medical imaging' s direction. The review article introduce function and molecular's concept and category and its characteristic. Comparing with traditionary classics radiology, function and molecular imaging have many features, such as micro-mount and specificity and quantitative. There are many technology about function and molecular imaging. Function and molecular imaging is important ingredient of modern medical and play a considerable role. (authors)

  9. Potential Applications of PET/MR Imaging in Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman; Nkoulou, René

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances in hybrid PET/MR imaging have opened new perspectives for cardiovascular applications. Although cardiac MR imaging has gained wider adoption for routine clinical applications, PET images remain the reference in many applications for which objective analysis of metabolic and physiologic parameters is needed. In particular, in cardiovascular diseases-more specifically, coronary artery disease-the use of quantitative and measurable parameters in a reproducible way is essential for the management of therapeutic decisions and patient follow-up. Functional MR images and dynamic assessment of myocardial perfusion from transit of intravascular contrast medium can provide useful criteria for identifying areas of decreased myocardial perfusion or for assessing tissue viability from late contrast enhancement of scar tissue. PET images, however, will provide more quantitative data on true tissue perfusion and metabolism. Quantitative myocardial flow can also lead to accurate assessment of coronary flow reserve. The combination of both modalities will therefore provide complementary data that can be expected to improve the accuracy and reproducibility of diagnostic procedures. But the true potential of hybrid PET/MR imaging may reside in applications beyond the domain of coronary artery disease. The combination of both modalities in assessment of other cardiac diseases such as inflammation and of other systemic diseases can also be envisioned. It is also predicted that the 2 modalities combined could help characterize atherosclerotic plaques and differentiate plaques with a high risk of rupture from stable plaques. In the future, the development of new tracers will also open new perspectives in evaluating myocardial remodeling and in assessing the kinetics of stem cell therapy in myocardial infarction. New tracers will also provide new means for evaluating alterations in cardiac innervation, angiogenesis, and even the assessment of reporter gene technologies

  10. Transfer function analysis of radiographic imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, C.E.; Doi, K.

    1979-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental aspects of the techniques of transfer function analysis used in radiographic imaging systems are reviewed. The mathematical principles of transfer function analysis are developed for linear, shift-invariant imaging systems, for the relation between object and image and for the image due to a sinusoidal plane wave object. The other basic mathematical principle discussed is 'Fourier analysis' and its application to an input function. Other aspects of transfer function analysis included are alternative expressions for the 'optical transfer function' of imaging systems and expressions are derived for both serial and parallel transfer image sub-systems. The applications of transfer function analysis to radiographic imaging systems are discussed in relation to the linearisation of the radiographic imaging system, the object, the geometrical unsharpness, the screen-film system unsharpness, other unsharpness effects and finally noise analysis. It is concluded that extensive theoretical, computer simulation and experimental studies have demonstrated that the techniques of transfer function analysis provide an accurate and reliable means for predicting and understanding the effects of various radiographic imaging system components in most practical diagnostic medical imaging situations. (U.K.)

  11. Functional brain imaging in the clinical assessment of consciousness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Rafii

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings suggest that functional brain imaging might be used to identify consciousness in patients diagnosed with persistent vegetative state and minimally conscious state. Michael Rafii and James Brewer discuss the potential for fMRI's wider implementation in clinical practice, and associated caveats.

  12. Application of a Noise Adaptive Contrast Sensitivity Function to Image Data Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Scott J.

    1989-08-01

    The visual contrast sensitivity function (CSF) has found increasing use in image compression as new algorithms optimize the display-observer interface in order to reduce the bit rate and increase the perceived image quality. In most compression algorithms, increasing the quantization intervals reduces the bit rate at the expense of introducing more quantization error, a potential image quality degradation. The CSF can be used to distribute this error as a function of spatial frequency such that it is undetectable by the human observer. Thus, instead of being mathematically lossless, the compression algorithm can be designed to be visually lossless, with the advantage of a significantly reduced bit rate. However, the CSF is strongly affected by image noise, changing in both shape and peak sensitivity. This work describes a model of the CSF that includes these changes as a function of image noise level by using the concepts of internal visual noise, and tests this model in the context of image compression with an observer study.

  13. Extending Ripley's K-Function to Quantify Aggregation in 2-D Grayscale Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Amgad

    Full Text Available In this work, we describe the extension of Ripley's K-function to allow for overlapping events at very high event densities. We show that problematic edge effects introduce significant bias to the function at very high densities and small radii, and propose a simple correction method that successfully restores the function's centralization. Using simulations of homogeneous Poisson distributions of events, as well as simulations of event clustering under different conditions, we investigate various aspects of the function, including its shape-dependence and correspondence between true cluster radius and radius at which the K-function is maximized. Furthermore, we validate the utility of the function in quantifying clustering in 2-D grayscale images using three modalities: (i Simulations of particle clustering; (ii Experimental co-expression of soluble and diffuse protein at varying ratios; (iii Quantifying chromatin clustering in the nuclei of wt and crwn1 crwn2 mutant Arabidopsis plant cells, using a previously-published image dataset. Overall, our work shows that Ripley's K-function is a valid abstract statistical measure whose utility extends beyond the quantification of clustering of non-overlapping events. Potential benefits of this work include the quantification of protein and chromatin aggregation in fluorescent microscopic images. Furthermore, this function has the potential to become one of various abstract texture descriptors that are utilized in computer-assisted diagnostics in anatomic pathology and diagnostic radiology.

  14. Brain imaging and brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokoloff, L.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a survey of the applications of imaging studies of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism to the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Contributors review imaging techniques and strategies for measuring regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism, for mapping functional neural systems, and for imaging normal brain functions. They then examine the applications of brain imaging techniques to the study of such neurological and psychiatric disorders as: cerebral ischemia; convulsive disorders; cerebral tumors; Huntington's disease; Alzheimer's disease; depression and other mood disorders. A state-of-the-art report on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and central nervous system rounds out the book's coverage

  15. Resting functional imaging tools (MRS, SPECT, PET and PCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Naalt, J

    2015-01-01

    Functional imaging includes imaging techniques that provide information about the metabolic and hemodynamic status of the brain. Most commonly applied functional imaging techniques in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) include magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET) and perfusion CT (PCT). These imaging modalities are used to determine the extent of injury, to provide information for the prediction of outcome, and to assess evidence of cerebral ischemia. In TBI, secondary brain damage mainly comprises ischemia and is present in more than 80% of fatal cases with traumatic brain injury (Graham et al., 1989; Bouma et al., 1991; Coles et al., 2004). In particular, while SPECT measures cerebral perfusion and MRS determines metabolism, PET is able to assess both perfusion and cerebral metabolism. This chapter will describe the application of these techniques in traumatic brain injury separately for the major groups of severity comprising the mild and moderate to severe group. The application in TBI and potential difficulties of each technique is described. The use of imaging techniques in children will be separately outlined. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A randomised-controlled trial investigating potential underlying mechanisms of a functionality-based approach to improving women's body image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleva, Jessica M; Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Halliwell, Emma; Martijn, Carolien; Stuijfzand, Bobby G; Treneman-Evans, Georgia; Rumsey, Nichola

    2018-06-01

    Focusing on body functionality is a promising technique for improving women's body image. This study replicates prior research in a large novel sample, tests longer-term follow-up effects, and investigates underlying mechanisms of these effects (body complexity and body-self integration). British women (N = 261) aged 18-30 who wanted to improve their body image were randomised to Expand Your Horizon (three online body functionality writing exercises) or an active control. Trait body image was assessed at Pretest, Posttest, 1-week, and 1-month Follow-Up. To explore whether changes in body complexity and body-self integration 'buffer' the impact of negative body-related experiences, participants also completed beauty-ideal media exposure. Relative to the control, intervention participants experienced improved appearance satisfaction, functionality satisfaction, body appreciation, and body complexity at Posttest, and at both Follow-Ups. Neither body complexity nor body-self integration mediated intervention effects. Media exposure decreased state body satisfaction among intervention and control participants, but neither body complexity nor body-self integration moderated these effects. The findings underscore the value of focusing on body functionality for improving body image and show that effects persist one month post-intervention. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional Imaging and Migraine: New Connections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwedt, Todd J.; Chong, Catherine D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Over the last several years, a growing number of brain functional imaging studies have provided insights into mechanisms underlying migraine. This manuscript reviews the recent migraine functional neuroimaging literature and provides recommendations for future studies that will help fill knowledge gaps. Recent Findings Positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have identified brain regions that might be responsible for mediating the onset of a migraine attack and those associated with migraine symptoms. Enhanced activation of brain regions that facilitate processing of sensory stimuli suggests a mechanism by which migraineurs are hypersensitive to visual, olfactory, and cutaneous stimuli. Resting state functional connectivity MRI studies have identified numerous brain regions and functional networks with atypical functional connectivity in migraineurs, suggesting that migraine is associated with aberrant brain functional organization. Summary fMRI and PET studies that have identified brain regions and brain networks that are atypical in migraine have helped to describe the neurofunctional basis for migraine symptoms. Future studies should compare functional imaging findings in migraine to other headache and pain disorders and should explore the utility of functional imaging data as biomarkers for diagnostic and treatment purposes. PMID:25887764

  18. Functional magnetic resonance imaging by visual stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yukiko; Negoro, Kiyoshi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori; Hashida, Masahiro

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated functional magnetic resonance images obtained in 8 healthy subjects in response to visual stimulation using a conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging system with multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging. Activation in the visual cortex was clearly demonstrated by the multi-slice experiment with a task-related change in signal intensity. In addition to the primary visual cortex, other areas were also activated by a complicated visual task. Multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging offers high temporal resolution and allows the three-dimensional analysis of brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides a useful noninvasive method of mapping brain function. (author)

  19. Hyperpolarized Porous Silicon Nanoparticles: Potential Theragnostic Material for ²⁹Si Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyeonglim; Choi, Ikjang; Whiting, Nicholas; Hu, Jingzhe; Luu, Quy Son; Pudakalakatti, Shivanand; McCowan, Caitlin; Kim, Yaewon; Zacharias, Niki; Lee, Seunghyun; Bhattacharya, Pratip; Lee, Youngbok

    2018-05-20

    Porous silicon nanoparticles have recently garnered attention as potentially-promising biomedical platforms for drug delivery and medical diagnostics. Here, we demonstrate porous silicon nanoparticles as contrast agents for ²⁹Si magnetic resonance imaging. Size-controlled porous silicon nanoparticles were synthesized by magnesiothermic reduction of silica nanoparticles and were surface activated for further functionalization. Particles were hyperpolarized via dynamic nuclear polarization to enhance their ²⁹Si MR signals; the particles demonstrated long ²⁹Si spin-lattice relaxation (T₁) times (~ 25 mins), which suggests potential applicability for medical imaging. Furthermore, ²⁹Si hyperpolarization levels were sufficient to allow ²⁹Si MRI in phantoms. These results underscore the potential of porous silicon nanoparticles that, when combined with hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging, can be a powerful theragnostic deep tissue imaging platform to interrogate various biomolecular processes in vivo. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Lung function imaging methods in Cystic Fibrosis pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołodziej, Magdalena; de Veer, Michael J; Cholewa, Marian; Egan, Gary F; Thompson, Bruce R

    2017-05-17

    Monitoring of pulmonary physiology is fundamental to the clinical management of patients with Cystic Fibrosis. The current standard clinical practise uses spirometry to assess lung function which delivers a clinically relevant functional readout of total lung function, however does not supply any visible or localised information. High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) is a well-established current 'gold standard' method for monitoring lung anatomical changes in Cystic Fibrosis patients. HRCT provides excellent morphological information, however, the X-ray radiation dose can become significant if multiple scans are required to monitor chronic diseases such as cystic fibrosis. X-ray phase-contrast imaging is another emerging X-ray based methodology for Cystic Fibrosis lung assessment which provides dynamic morphological and functional information, albeit with even higher X-ray doses than HRCT. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-ionising radiation imaging method that is garnering growing interest among researchers and clinicians working with Cystic Fibrosis patients. Recent advances in MRI have opened up the possibilities to observe lung function in real time to potentially allow sensitive and accurate assessment of disease progression. The use of hyperpolarized gas or non-contrast enhanced MRI can be tailored to clinical needs. While MRI offers significant promise it still suffers from poor spatial resolution and the development of an objective scoring system especially for ventilation assessment.

  1. Potentials and limits of modern tomographic methods (CT, MR, PET) in molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hentschel, M.; Paul, D.; Moser, E.; Brink, I.

    2007-01-01

    The present survey gives an introduction into the basics of computed tomography, magnetic resonance tomography and positron emission tomography. The current potentials of these methods in relation to their temporal, spatial and contrast resolutions as well as their sensitivities within clinical routine and experimental studies (in vitro, ex vivo) will be presented. Computed tomography constitutes the anatomical reference method with well defined contrast, high spatial resolution but low sensitivity (10 -2 mol/l) for functional and molecular imaging. Magnetic resonance tomography represents the anatomical method for research with variable tissue contrast, physiological image information, highest spatial resolution but moderate sensitivity (10 -3 -10 -5 mol/l) for functional and molecular imaging. Positron emission tomography offers good suitability for molecular imaging due to highest sensitivity (10 -11 -10 -12 mol/l). However, the spatial resolution of positron emission tomography is low. (orig.)

  2. Excitation and characterization of image potential state electrons on quasi-free-standing graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Li, Yunzhe; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Jin, Wencan; Dadap, Jerry I.; Hybertsen, Mark S.; Osgood, Richard M.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the band structure of image potential states in quasi-free-standing graphene (QFG) monolayer islands using angle-resolved two-photon-photoemission spectroscopy. Direct probing by low-energy electron diffraction shows that QFG is formed following oxygen intercalation into the graphene-Ir(111) interface. Despite the apparent decoupling of the monolayer graphene from the Ir substrate, we find that the binding energy of the n =1 image potential state on these QFG islands increases by 0.17 eV, as compared to the original Gr/Ir(111) interface. We use calculations based on density-functional theory to construct an empirical, one-dimensional potential that quantitatively reproduces the image potential state binding energy and links the changes in the interface structure to the shift in energy. Specifically, two factors contribute comparably to this energy shift: a deeper potential well arising from the presence of intercalated oxygen adatoms and a wider potential well associated with the increase in the graphene-Ir distance. While image potential states have not been observed previously on QFG by photoemission, our paper now demonstrates that they may be strongly excited in a well-defined QFG system produced by oxygen intercalation. This opens an opportunity for studying the surface electron dynamics in QFG systems, beyond those found in typical nonintercalated graphene-on-substrate systems.

  3. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the kidneys; Funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie der Nieren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzman, R.S.; Wittsack, H.J. [Universitaetsklinik Duesseldorf, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Duesseldorf (Germany); Notohamiprodjo, M. [Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Interest in functional renal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has significantly increased in recent years. This review article provides an overview of the most important functional imaging techniques and their potential clinical applications for assessment of native and transplanted kidneys, with special emphasis on the clarification of renal tumors. (orig.) [German] Die funktionelle MRT der Nieren hat in den letzten Jahren zunehmend an Bedeutung gewonnen. In diesem Uebersichtsartikel werden die wichtigsten funktionellen Untersuchungstechniken vorgestellt und deren potenzielle klinische Bedeutung zur Evaluation von Nieren und Transplantatnieren hervorgehoben, wobei ein besonderes Augenmerk auf die Abklaerung von Nierentumoren gelegt wird. (orig.)

  4. Microwave tomography of extremities: 2. Functional fused imaging of flow reduction and simulated compartment syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, Serguei; Nair, Bindu; Kellam, James; Williams, Thomas; Quinn, Michael; Sizov, Yuri; Nazarov, Alexei; Pavlovsky, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging has recently expanded into the dual- or multi-modality fusion of anatomical and functional imaging modalities. This significantly improves the diagnostic power while simultaneously increasing the cost of already expensive medical devices or investigations and decreasing their mobility. We are introducing a novel imaging concept of four-dimensional (4D) microwave tomographic (MWT) functional imaging: three dimensional (3D) in the spatial domain plus one dimensional (1D) in the time, functional dynamic domain. Instead of a fusion of images obtained by different imaging modalities, 4D MWT fuses absolute anatomical images with dynamic, differential images of the same imaging technology. The approach was successively validated in animal experiments with short-term arterial flow reduction and a simulated compartment syndrome in an initial simplified experimental setting using a dedicated MWT system. The presented fused images are not perfect as MWT is a novel imaging modality at its early stage of the development and ways of reading reconstructed MWT images need to be further studied and understood. However, the reconstructed fused images present clear evidence that microwave tomography is an emerging imaging modality with great potentials for functional imaging.

  5. Pulmonary functional MR imaging for COPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a slowly progressive disease characterized by airflow limitation, cough, sputum production, and, at later stages, dyspnea. COPD is currently the fourth-leading cause of mortality and the twelfth-leading cause of disability, and by the year 2020 it is expected to be the third-leading cause of death and the fifth-leading cause of disability worldwide. The diagnosis of COPD largely relies on a history of exposure to noxious stimuli and abnormal lung function test results. Since the pathology of COPD varies and the molecular mechanisms are only slightly understood, the diagnosis and stage assessment of COPD have relied on the results of pulmonary function test. In addition, CT and nuclear medicine study are utilized for assessment of regional morphological and functional abnormalities. Recently, pulmonary functional MR imaging is suggested as a new technique for assessment of regional physiopathologic information in various pulmonary diseases including COPD, pulmonary thromboembolism, lung cancer and interstitial lung diseases. This review article covers the brief description of theory and clinical application of contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging; hyperpolarized noble gas MR imaging and oxygen-enhanced MR imaging in COPD subjects. We believe that further basic studies as well as clinical applications of this new technique will define the real significance of pulmonary functional MR imaging for the future of pulmonary functional imaging and its usefulness for diagnosis and patients' management in COPD. (author)

  6. Presurgical functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an important and novel neuroimaging modality for patients with brain tumors. By non-invasive measurement, localization and lateralization of brain activiation, most importantly of motor and speech function, fMRI facilitates the selection of the most appropriate and sparing treatment and function-preserving surgery. Prerequisites for the diagnostic use of fMRI are the application of dedicated clinical imaging protocols and standardization of the respective imaging procedures. The combination with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) also enables tracking and visualization of important fiber bundles such as the pyramidal tract and the arcuate fascicle. These multimodal MR data can be implemented in computer systems for functional neuronavigation or radiation treatment. The practicability, accuracy and reliability of presurgical fMRI have been validated by large numbers of published data. However, fMRI cannot be considered as a fully established modality of diagnostic neuroimaging due to the lack of guidelines of the responsible medical associations as well as the lack of medical certification of important hardware and software components. This article reviews the current research in the field and provides practical information relevant for presurgical fMRI. (orig.) [de

  7. Three-dimensional reconstruction of functional brain images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Masato; Shoji, Kazuhiko; Kojima, Hisayoshi; Hirano, Shigeru; Naito, Yasushi; Honjo, Iwao

    1999-01-01

    We consider PET (positron emission tomography) measurement with SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping) analysis to be one of the most useful methods to identify activated areas of the brain involved in language processing. SPM is an effective analytical method that detects markedly activated areas over the whole brain. However, with the conventional presentations of these functional brain images, such as horizontal slices, three directional projection, or brain surface coloring, makes understanding and interpreting the positional relationships among various brain areas difficult. Therefore, we developed three-dimensionally reconstructed images from these functional brain images to improve the interpretation. The subjects were 12 normal volunteers. The following three types of images were constructed: routine images by SPM, three-dimensional static images, and three-dimensional dynamic images, after PET images were analyzed by SPM during daily dialog listening. The creation of images of both the three-dimensional static and dynamic types employed the volume rendering method by VTK (The Visualization Toolkit). Since the functional brain images did not include original brain images, we synthesized SPM and MRI brain images by self-made C++ programs. The three-dimensional dynamic images were made by sequencing static images with available software. Images of both the three-dimensional static and dynamic types were processed by a personal computer system. Our newly created images showed clearer positional relationships among activated brain areas compared to the conventional method. To date, functional brain images have been employed in fields such as neurology or neurosurgery, however, these images may be useful even in the field of otorhinolaryngology, to assess hearing and speech. Exact three-dimensional images based on functional brain images are important for exact and intuitive interpretation, and may lead to new developments in brain science. Currently, the surface

  8. Three-dimensional reconstruction of functional brain images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Masato; Shoji, Kazuhiko; Kojima, Hisayoshi; Hirano, Shigeru; Naito, Yasushi; Honjo, Iwao [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We consider PET (positron emission tomography) measurement with SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping) analysis to be one of the most useful methods to identify activated areas of the brain involved in language processing. SPM is an effective analytical method that detects markedly activated areas over the whole brain. However, with the conventional presentations of these functional brain images, such as horizontal slices, three directional projection, or brain surface coloring, makes understanding and interpreting the positional relationships among various brain areas difficult. Therefore, we developed three-dimensionally reconstructed images from these functional brain images to improve the interpretation. The subjects were 12 normal volunteers. The following three types of images were constructed: routine images by SPM, three-dimensional static images, and three-dimensional dynamic images, after PET images were analyzed by SPM during daily dialog listening. The creation of images of both the three-dimensional static and dynamic types employed the volume rendering method by VTK (The Visualization Toolkit). Since the functional brain images did not include original brain images, we synthesized SPM and MRI brain images by self-made C++ programs. The three-dimensional dynamic images were made by sequencing static images with available software. Images of both the three-dimensional static and dynamic types were processed by a personal computer system. Our newly created images showed clearer positional relationships among activated brain areas compared to the conventional method. To date, functional brain images have been employed in fields such as neurology or neurosurgery, however, these images may be useful even in the field of otorhinolaryngology, to assess hearing and speech. Exact three-dimensional images based on functional brain images are important for exact and intuitive interpretation, and may lead to new developments in brain science. Currently, the surface

  9. Functional imaging - a new tool for X-ray functional diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, M.; Erbe, W.; Sonne, B.; Hoehne, K.H.; Nicolae, G.C.; Pfeiffer, G.

    1978-05-01

    The method of functional imaging is applied to X-ray angiograms. Functional images are generated by inserting at each point of an X-ray image a computed grey value proportional to a dynamic parameter (such as blood velocity) instead of the recorded X-ray absorption value. For this purpose a new system for angiographic image processing has been developed. First results show that the method is a tool to extract more information about the blood dynamics in organs in an easier and faster way than with the conventional angiographic technique. (orig.)

  10. Grafting of [(64)Cu]-TPPF20 porphyrin complex on Functionalized nano-porous MCM-41 silica as a potential cancer imaging agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Feizi, Shahzad; Jalilian, Amir R; Hejrani, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Mesoporous silica, MCM-41, functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) was investigated as a potential drug delivery system, using [(64)Cu]-5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis penta fluorophenyl porphyrin complex. [(64)Cu]-TPPF20 complex was grafted on functionalized MCM-41. The product was characterized by paper chromatography, FTIR spectroscopy, low angle X-ray diffraction, CHN and TGA/DTA analyses and atomic force microscopy. The biological evaluations of the grafted complex, [(64)Cu]-TPPF20@NH2-MCM-41, were done in Fibrosarcoma tumor-bearing Sprague-Dawley rats using scarification studies and Sopha DST-XL Dual-Head SPECT system. The actual loading amount of aminopropyl groups was found about 1.6mmol per gram of final silica. The specific activity of the final compound was found to be 3Ci/g. Amine functionalized MCM-41 was found to be a good platform for theranostic radiopharmaceuticals such as copper-64 complexes. Considering the accumulation of the tracer in tumor cells, fast wash-out from normal tissues, the short half-life copper-64 and less imposed radiation doses to patients, [(64)Cu]-TPPF20@NH2-MCM-41 can potentially be a suitable candidate for tumor imaging applications and future PET studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Theranostic GO-based nanohybrid for tumor induced imaging and potential combinational tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Si-Yong; Feng, Jun; Rong, Lei; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Si; Liu, Xiang-Ji; Luo, Guo-Feng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2014-02-12

    Graphene oxide (GO)-based theranostic nanohybrid is designed for tumor induced imaging and potential combinational tumor therapy. The anti-tumor drug, Doxorubicin (DOX) is chemically conjugated to the poly(ethylenimine)-co-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEI-PEG) grafted GO via a MMP2-cleavable PLGLAG peptide linkage. The therapeutic efficacy of DOX is chemically locked and its intrinsic fluorescence is quenched by GO under normal physiological condition. Once stimulated by the MMP2 enzyme over-expressed in tumor tissues, the resulting peptide cleavage permits the unloading of DOX for tumor therapy and concurrent fluorescence recovery of DOX for in situ tumor cell imaging. Attractively, this PEI-bearing nanohybrid can mediate efficient DNA transfection and shows great potential for combinational drug/gene therapy. This tumor induced imaging and potential combinational therapy will open a window for tumor treatment by offering a unique theranostic approach through merging the diagnostic capability and pathology-responsive therapeutic function. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Multidisciplinary Functional MR Imaging for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Kon; Jang, Yun Jin; Cho, Gyung Goo

    2009-01-01

    Various functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques are used for evaluating prostate cancer including diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast- enhanced MR imaging, and MR spectroscopy. These techniques provide unique information that is helpful to differentiate prostate cancer from non-cancerous tissue and have been proven to improve the diagnostic performance of MRI not only for cancer detection, but also for staging, post-treatment monitoring, and guiding prostate biopsies. However, each functional MR imaging technique also has inherent challenges. Therefore, in order to make accurate diagnoses, it is important to comprehensively understand their advantages and limitations, histologic background related with image findings, and their clinical relevance for evaluating prostate cancer. This article will review the basic principles and clinical significance of functional MR imaging for evaluating prostate cancer

  13. Advantages in functional imaging of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mier, Walter; Mier, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    As neuronal pathologies cause only minor morphological alterations, molecular imaging techniques are a prerequisite for the study of diseases of the brain. The development of molecular probes that specifically bind biochemical markers and the advances of instrumentation have revolutionized the possibilities to gain insight into the human brain organization and beyond this-visualize structure-function and brain-behavior relationships. The review describes the development and current applications of functional brain imaging techniques with a focus on applications in psychiatry. A historical overview of the development of functional imaging is followed by the portrayal of the principles and applications of positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), two key molecular imaging techniques that have revolutionized the ability to image molecular processes in the brain. We conclude that the juxtaposition of PET and fMRI in hybrid PET/MRI scanners enhances the significance of both modalities for research in neurology and psychiatry and might pave the way for a new area of personalized medicine.

  14. Functional cardiac imaging: positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullani, N.A.; Gould, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Dynamic cardiovascular imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease by providing information about the function of the heart. During the past 30 years, cardiovascular imaging has evolved from the simple chest x-ray and fluoroscopy to such sophisticated techniques as invasive cardiac angiography and cinearteriography and, more recently, to noninvasive cardiac CT scanning, nuclear magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography, which reflect more complex physiologic functions. As research tools, CT, NMR, and PET provide quantitative information on global as well as regional ventricular function, coronary artery stenosis, myocardial perfusion, glucose and fatty acid metabolism, or oxygen utilization, with little discomfort or risk to the patient. As imaging modalities become more sophisticated and more oriented toward clinical application, the prospect of routinely obtaining such functional information about the heart is becoming realistic. However, these advances are double-edged in that the interpretation of functional data is more complex than that of the anatomic imaging familiar to most physicians. They will require an enhanced understanding of the physiologic and biochemical processes, as well as of the instrumentation and techniques for analyzing the data. Of the new imaging modalities that provide functional information about the heart, PET is the most useful because it quantitates the regional distribution of radionuclides in vivo. Clinical applications, interpretation of data, and the impact of PET on our understanding of cardiac pathophysiology are discussed. 5 figures

  15. Functional connectivity of the rodent brain using optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara Codina, Edgar

    The aim of this thesis is to apply functional connectivity in a variety of animal models, using several optical imaging modalities. Even at rest, the brain shows high metabolic activity: the correlation in slow spontaneous fluctuations identifies remotely connected areas of the brain; hence the term "functional connectivity". Ongoing changes in spontaneous activity may provide insight into the neural processing that takes most of the brain metabolic activity, and so may provide a vast source of disease related changes. Brain hemodynamics may be modified during disease and affect resting-state activity. The thesis aims to better understand these changes in functional connectivity due to disease, using functional optical imaging. The optical imaging techniques explored in the first two contributions of this thesis are Optical Imaging of Intrinsic Signals and Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging, together they can estimate the metabolic rate of oxygen consumption, that closely parallels neural activity. They both have adequate spatial and temporal resolution and are well adapted to image the convexity of the mouse cortex. In the last article, a depth-sensitive modality called photoacoustic tomography was used in the newborn rat. Optical coherence tomography and laminar optical tomography were also part of the array of imaging techniques developed and applied in other collaborations. The first article of this work shows the changes in functional connectivity in an acute murine model of epileptiform activity. Homologous correlations are both increased and decreased with a small dependence on seizure duration. These changes suggest a potential decoupling between the hemodynamic parameters in resting-state networks, underlining the importance to investigate epileptic networks with several independent hemodynamic measures. The second study examines a novel murine model of arterial stiffness: the unilateral calcification of the right carotid. Seed-based connectivity analysis

  16. Machine Learning Applications to Resting-State Functional MR Imaging Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, John M; Eder, Maxwell; Flood, William C; Dhami, Devendra Singh; Natarajan, Sriraam; Whitlow, Christopher T

    2017-11-01

    Machine learning is one of the most exciting and rapidly expanding fields within computer science. Academic and commercial research entities are investing in machine learning methods, especially in personalized medicine via patient-level classification. There is great promise that machine learning methods combined with resting state functional MR imaging will aid in diagnosis of disease and guide potential treatment for conditions thought to be impossible to identify based on imaging alone, such as psychiatric disorders. We discuss machine learning methods and explore recent advances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging at 3 tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klarhoefer, M.

    2001-03-01

    changes due to brain activity in a functional study with visual stimulation. Most of the performed experiments took advantage of the higher SNR and functional contrast at the high magnetic field strength of 3 T, compared to in clinical routine used field strengths of 1.5 T and below. On the other hand, single-shot imaging techniques showed increased susceptibility artefacts. In conclusion, the various experiments performed within this thesis highlight the potential of MRI to obtain a plurality of information by choosing appropriate imaging sequences that may be used in future clinical studies. (author)

  18. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MADU

    systems and ultra fast imaging techniques, such as echo planar imaging (EPI ) ... is used to understand brain organization, assessing of neurological status, and ..... J C 1998 Functional MRI studies of motor recovery after stroke;. NeuroImage 7 ...

  19. Structural imaging of mild traumatic brain injury may not be enough: overview of functional and metabolic imaging of mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Samuel S; Bales, James W; Edward Dixon, C; Hwang, Misun

    2017-04-01

    A majority of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) present as mild injury with no findings on conventional clinical imaging methods. Due to this difficulty of imaging assessment on mild TBI patients, there has been much emphasis on the development of diffusion imaging modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). However, basic science research in TBI shows that many of the functional and metabolic abnormalities in TBI may be present even in the absence of structural damage. Moreover, structural damage may be present at a microscopic and molecular level that is not detectable by structural imaging modality. The use of functional and metabolic imaging modalities can provide information on pathological changes in mild TBI patients that may not be detected by structural imaging. Although there are various differences in protocols of positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), electroencephalography (EEG), and magnetoencephalography (MEG) methods, these may be important modalities to be used in conjunction with structural imaging in the future in order to detect and understand the pathophysiology of mild TBI. In this review, studies of mild TBI patients using these modalities that detect functional and metabolic state of the brain are discussed. Each modality's advantages and disadvantages are compared, and potential future applications of using combined modalities are explored.

  20. Projected potential profiles across interfaces obtained by reconstructing the exit face wave function from through focal series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Koch, Christoph T.; Ruehle, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    An iterative method for reconstructing the exit face wave function from a through focal series of transmission electron microscopy image line profiles across an interface is presented. Apart from high-resolution images recorded with small changes in defocus, this method works also well for a large defocus range as used for Fresnel imaging. Using the phase-object approximation the projected electrostatic as well as the absorptive potential profiles across an interface are determined from this exit face wave function. A new experimental image alignment procedure was developed in order to align images with large relative defocus shift. The performance of this procedure is shown to be superior to other image alignment procedures existing in the literature. The reconstruction method is applied to both simulated and experimental images

  1. Gadolinium(III-DOTA Complex Functionalized with BODIPY as a Potential Bimodal Contrast Agent for MRI and Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Ceulemans

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis and characterization of a novel gadolinium(III DOTA complex functionalized with a boron-dipyrromethene derivative (BODIPY is described. The assembly of the complex relies on azide diazotransfer chemistry in a copper tube flow reactor. The azide thus formed is coupled directly with an alkyne via click chemistry, resulting into a paramagnetic and luminescent gadolinium(III complex. Luminescent data and relaxometric properties of the complex have been evaluated, suggesting the potential applicability of the complexes as a bimodal contrast agent for magnetic resonance and optical imaging. The complex displays a bright emission at 523 nm with an absorption maximum of 507 nm and high quantum yields of up to 83% in water. The proton relaxivity of the complex measured at 310 K and at frequencies of 20 and 60 MHz had the values of 3.9 and 3.6 s−1·mM−1, respectively.

  2. Preliminary results for positron emission mammography: real-time functional breast imaging in a conventional mammography gantry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, I.; Majewski, S.; Weisenberger, A.; Markowitz, A.; Aloj, L.; Majewski, L,; Danforth, D.; Mulshine, J.; Cowan, K.; Zujewski, J.; Chow, C.; Jones, E.; Chang, V.; Berg, W.; Frank, J.

    1996-01-01

    In order to optimally integrate radiotracer breast imaging within the breast clinic, anatomy and pathology should be easily correlated with functional nuclear medicine breast images. As a first step in the development of a hybrid functional/anatomic breast imaging platform with biopsy capability, a conventional X-ray mammography gantry was modified to image the compressed brest with positron emitters. Phantom studies with the positron emission mammography (PEM) device showed that a 1-cc hot spot could be detected within 5 min. A preliminary clinical trial demonstrated in vivo visualization of primary breast cancer within 4 min. For sites where positron-emitting radionuclides are available, PEM promises to achieve low-cost directed functional examination of breast abnormalities, with potential for achieving X-ray correlation and image-guided biopsy. (orig.)

  3. Factors Influencing Mean Inner Potentials As Studied Using Electron Holography and Density Functional Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pennington, Robert S.

    reflect properties of the specimen. The phase can yield quantitative measurements of nanoscale electric and magnetic potentials. One such electrostatic potential is called the mean inner potential. The mean inner potential is the average electrostatic potential measured between the bulk of a material...... to analyze diffraction effects on the amplitude and the phase. There is relatively good comparison between image simulation and experimental data, but the experimental absorption parameter is found to differ between strongly and weakly diffracting conditions. Density functional theory simulations of the mean...

  4. Effects of image charges, interfacial charge discreteness, and surface roughness on the zeta potential of spherical electric double layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zecheng; Xing, Xiangjun; Xu, Zhenli

    2012-07-21

    We investigate the effects of image charges, interfacial charge discreteness, and surface roughness on spherical electric double layer structures in electrolyte solutions with divalent counterions in the setting of the primitive model. By using Monte Carlo simulations and the image charge method, the zeta potential profile and the integrated charge distribution function are computed for varying surface charge strengths and salt concentrations. Systematic comparisons were carried out between three distinct models for interfacial charges: (1) SURF1 with uniform surface charges, (2) SURF2 with discrete point charges on the interface, and (3) SURF3 with discrete interfacial charges and finite excluded volume. By comparing the integrated charge distribution function and the zeta potential profile, we argue that the potential at the distance of one ion diameter from the macroion surface is a suitable location to define the zeta potential. In SURF2 model, we find that image charge effects strongly enhance charge inversion for monovalent interfacial charges, and strongly suppress charge inversion for multivalent interfacial charges. For SURF3, the image charge effect becomes much smaller. Finally, with image charges in action, we find that excluded volumes (in SURF3) suppress charge inversion for monovalent interfacial charges and enhance charge inversion for multivalent interfacial charges. Overall, our results demonstrate that all these aspects, i.e., image charges, interfacial charge discreteness, their excluding volumes, have significant impacts on zeta potentials of electric double layers.

  5. Subband/Transform MATLAB Functions For Processing Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, D.

    1995-01-01

    SUBTRANS software is package of routines implementing image-data-processing functions for use with MATLAB*(TM) software. Provides capability to transform image data with block transforms and to produce spatial-frequency subbands of transformed data. Functions cascaded to provide further decomposition into more subbands. Also used in image-data-compression systems. For example, transforms used to prepare data for lossy compression. Written for use in MATLAB mathematical-analysis environment.

  6. Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging techniques to probe muscle structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malis, Vadim

    Structural and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies of skeletal muscle allow the elucidation of muscle physiology under normal and pathological conditions. Continuing on the efforts of the Muscle Imaging and Modeling laboratory, the focus of the thesis is to (i) extend and refine two challenging imaging modalities: structural imaging using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and functional imaging based on Velocity Encoded Phase Contrast Imaging (VE-PC) and (ii) apply these methods to explore age related structure and functional differences of the gastrocnemius muscle. Diffusion Tensor Imaging allows the study of tissue microstructure as well as muscle fiber architecture. The images, based on an ultrafast single shot Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) sequence, suffer from geometric distortions and low signal to noise ratio. A processing pipeline was developed to correct for distortions and to improve image Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). DTI acquired on a senior and young cohort of subjects were processed through the pipeline and differences in DTI derived indices and fiber architecture between the two cohorts were explored. The DTI indices indicated that at the microstructural level, fiber atrophy was accompanied with a reduction in fiber volume fraction. At the fiber architecture level, fiber length and pennation angles decreased with age that potentially contribute to the loss of muscle force with age. Velocity Encoded Phase Contrast imaging provides tissue (e.g. muscle) velocity at each voxel which allows the study of strain and Strain Rate (SR) under dynamic conditions. The focus of the thesis was to extract 2D strain rate tensor maps from the velocity images and apply the method to study age related differences. The tensor mapping can potentially provide unique information on the extracellular matrix and lateral transmission the role of these two elements has recently emerged as important determinants of force loss with age. In the cross sectional study on

  7. The potential of functional MRI as a biomarker in early Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sperling, Reisa

    2011-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a relative newcomer in the field of biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). fMRI has several potential advantages, particularly for clinical trials, as it is a non-invasive imaging technique that does not require the injection of contrast agent or radiation exposure and thus can be repeated many times during a longitudinal study. fMRI has relatively high spatial and reasonable temporal resolution, and can be acquired in the same session as stru...

  8. Time-dependent image potential at a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alducin, M.; Diez Muino, R.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2003-01-01

    Transient effects in the image potential induced by a point charge suddenly created in front of a metal surface are studied. The time evolution of the image potential is calculated using linear response theory. Two different time scales are defined: (i) the time required for the creation of the image potential and (ii) the time it takes to converge to its stationary value. Their dependence on the distance of the charge to the surface is discussed. The effect of the electron gas damping is also analyzed. For a typical metallic density, the order of magnitude of the creation time is 0.1 fs, whereas for a charge created close to the surface the convergence time is around 1-2 fs

  9. Potential use and challenges of functional connectivity mapping in intractable epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Todd Constable

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the use of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data to assess functional connectivity in the human brain for surgical planning in intractable epilepsy. This approach has the potential to predict outcomes for a given surgical procedure based on the pre-surgical functional organization of the brain. Functional connectivity can also identify cortical regions that are organized differently in epilepsy patients either as a direct function of the disease or through indirect compensatory responses. Functional connectivity mapping can also potentially help identify epileptogenic tissue, whether this is a single focal location or a network of seizure-generating tissues and this information can assist in guiding the implantation of electrodes for invasive monitoring. This review covers the basics of connectivity analysis and discusses particular issues associated with analyzing such data. These issues include how to define nodes, as well as differences between connectivity analyses of individual nodes, groups of nodes, and whole-brain assessment at the voxel level. The need for arbitrary thresholds in some connectivity analyses is discussed and a solution to this problem is reviewed. Overall, functional connectivity analysis is becoming an important tool for assessing functional brain organization in surgical planning in epilepsy.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and brain functional exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bihan, D.; CEA, 91 - Orsay

    1997-01-01

    The utilization of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging for functional analysis of the brain is presented: the oxygenated and deoxygenated blood flowing in the brain do not have the same effect on NMR images; the oxygenated blood, related to brain activity, may be detected and the corresponding activity zone in the brain, identified; functional NMR imaging could be used to gain a better understanding of functional troubles linked to neurological or psychiatric diseases

  11. Brain atlas for functional imaging. Clinical and research applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowinski, W.L.; Thirunavuukarasuu, A.; Kennedy, D.N

    2001-01-01

    This CD-ROM: Allows anatomical and functional images to be loaded and registered. Enables interactive placement of the Talairach landmarks in 3D Space. Provides automatic data-to-atlas warping based on the Talairaich proportional gridsystem transformation. Real-time interactive warping for fine tuning is also available. Allows the user to place marks on the activation loci in the warped functional images, display these marks with the atlas, and edit them in three planes. Mark placement is assisted by image thresholding. Provides simultaneous display of the atlas, anatomical image and functional image within one interactively blended image. Atlas-data blending and anatomical-functional image blending are controlled independently. Labels the data by means of the atlas. The atlas can be flipped left/right so that Brodmann's areas and gyri can be labeled on both hemispheres. Provides additional functions such as friendly navigation, cross-referenced display, readout of the Talairach coordinates and intensities, load coordinates, save, on-line help. (orig.)

  12. Brain atlas for functional imaging. Clinical and research applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowinski, W.L.; Thirunavuukarasuu, A.; Kennedy, D.N

    2001-07-01

    This CD-ROM: Allows anatomical and functional images to be loaded and registered. Enables interactive placement of the Talairach landmarks in 3D Space. Provides automatic data-to-atlas warping based on the Talairaich proportional gridsystem transformation. Real-time interactive warping for fine tuning is also available. Allows the user to place marks on the activation loci in the warped functional images, display these marks with the atlas, and edit them in three planes. Mark placement is assisted by image thresholding. Provides simultaneous display of the atlas, anatomical image and functional image within one interactively blended image. Atlas-data blending and anatomical-functional image blending are controlled independently. Labels the data by means of the atlas. The atlas can be flipped left/right so that Brodmann's areas and gyri can be labeled on both hemispheres. Provides additional functions such as friendly navigation, cross-referenced display, readout of the Talairach coordinates and intensities, load coordinates, save, on-line help. (orig.)

  13. The brain, a choice subject for radioisotopic functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziere, B.

    1996-01-01

    Progresses realized in the use of radioisotopes and in tomographic imaging techniques have permitted to access to the visualization of the human body functions. The application of this radioisotopic functional imaging (or emission tomography functional imaging) has been particularly fruitful in the study of brain functioning. This method is the only exploratory method for the biochemical aspects of the cerebral functioning and is used both by the physiologist and the therapist. (J.S.)

  14. Endoscopic device for functional imaging of the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Simon; Lohani, Sweyta; Martell, Bret; Soliz, Peter; Ts'o, Dan

    2011-03-01

    Non-invasive imaging of retinal function based on the recording of spatially distributed reflectance changes evoked by visual stimuli has to-date been performed primarily using modified commercial fundus cameras. We have constructed a prototype retinal functional imager, using a commercial endoscope (Storz) for the frontend optics, and a low-cost back-end that includes the needed dichroic beam splitter to separate the stimulus path from the imaging path. This device has been tested to demonstrate its performance for the delivery of adequate near infrared (NIR) illumination, intensity of the visual stimulus and reflectance return in the imaging path. The current device was found to be capable of imaging reflectance changes of 0.1%, similar to that observable using the modified commercial fundus camera approach. The visual stimulus (a 505nm spot of 0.5secs) was used with an interrogation illumination of 780nm, and a sequence of imaged captured. At each pixel, the imaged signal was subtracted and normalized by the baseline reflectance, so that the measurement was ΔR/R. The typical retinal activity signal observed had a ΔR/R of 0.3-1.0%. The noise levels were measured when no stimulus was applied and found to vary between +/- 0.05%. Functional imaging has been suggested as a means to provide objective information on retina function that may be a preclinical indicator of ocular diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. The endoscopic approach promises to yield a significantly more economical retinal functional imaging device that would be clinically important.

  15. Functional mesoporous silica nanoparticles for bio-imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Bong Geun; Kim, Jaeyun

    2018-03-22

    Biomedical investigations using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have received significant attention because of their unique properties including controllable mesoporous structure, high specific surface area, large pore volume, and tunable particle size. These unique features make MSNs suitable for simultaneous diagnosis and therapy with unique advantages to encapsulate and load a variety of therapeutic agents, deliver these agents to the desired location, and release the drugs in a controlled manner. Among various clinical areas, nanomaterials-based bio-imaging techniques have advanced rapidly with the development of diverse functional nanoparticles. Due to the unique features of MSNs, an imaging agent supported by MSNs can be a promising system for developing targeted bio-imaging contrast agents with high structural stability and enhanced functionality that enable imaging of various modalities. Here, we review the recent achievements on the development of functional MSNs for bio-imaging applications, including optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT), ultrasound imaging, and multimodal imaging for early diagnosis. With further improvement in noninvasive bio-imaging techniques, the MSN-supported imaging agent systems are expected to contribute to clinical applications in the future. This article is categorized under: Diagnostic Tools > In vivo Nanodiagnostics and Imaging Nanotechnology Approaches to Biology > Nanoscale Systems in Biology. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Functional MRI brain imaging studies using the Contact Heat Evoked Potential Stimulator (CHEPS in a human volunteer topical capsaicin pain model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy R

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ravikiran Shenoy1, Katherine Roberts1, Anastasia Papadaki2, Donald McRobbie2, Maarten Timmers3, Theo Meert3, Praveen Anand11Peripheral Neuropathy Unit, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College London; 2Imaging Sciences Department, Charing Cross Hospital, London, United Kingdom; 3Johnson and Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, Beerse, BelgiumAbstract: Acute application of topical capsaicin produces spontaneous burning and stinging pain similar to that seen in some neuropathic states, with local hyperalgesia. Use of capsaicin applied topically or injected intradermally has been described as a model for neuropathic pain, with patterns of activation in brain regions assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and positron emission tomography. The Contact Heat Evoked Potential Stimulator (CHEPS is a noninvasive clinically practical method of stimulating cutaneous A-delta nociceptors. In this study, topical capsaicin (1% was applied to the left volar forearm for 15 minutes of twelve adult healthy human volunteers. fMRI scans and a visual analog pain score were recorded during CHEPS stimulation precapsaicin and postcapsaicin application. Following capsaicin application there was a significant increase in visual analog scale (mean ± standard error of the mean; precapsaicin 26.4 ± 5.3; postcapsaicin 48.9 ± 6.0; P < 0.0001. fMRI demonstrated an overall increase in areas of activation, with a significant increase in the contralateral insular signal (mean ± standard error of the mean; precapsaicin 0.434 ± 0.03; postcapsaicin 0.561 ± 0.07; P = 0.047. The authors of this paper recently published a study in which CHEPS-evoked A-delta cerebral potential amplitudes were found to be decreased postcapsaicin application. In patients with neuropathic pain, evoked pain and fMRI brain responses are typically increased, while A-delta evoked potential amplitudes are decreased. The protocol of recording fMRI following CHEPS stimulation

  17. Approximate self-consistent potentials for density-functional-theory exchange-correlation functionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cafiero, Mauricio; Gonzalez, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    We show that potentials for exchange-correlation functionals within the Kohn-Sham density-functional-theory framework may be written as potentials for simpler functionals multiplied by a factor close to unity, and in a self-consistent field calculation, these effective potentials find the correct self-consistent solutions. This simple theory is demonstrated with self-consistent exchange-only calculations of the atomization energies of some small molecules using the Perdew-Kurth-Zupan-Blaha (PKZB) meta-generalized-gradient-approximation (meta-GGA) exchange functional. The atomization energies obtained with our method agree with or surpass previous meta-GGA calculations performed in a non-self-consistent manner. The results of this work suggest the utility of this simple theory to approximate exchange-correlation potentials corresponding to energy functionals too complicated to generate closed forms for their potentials. We hope that this method will encourage the development of complex functionals which have correct boundary conditions and are free of self-interaction errors without the worry that the functionals are too complex to differentiate to obtain potentials

  18. Resting functional imaging tools (MRS, SPECT, PET and PCT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Naalt, Joukje; Grafman, Jordan; Salazar, Andres M

    2015-01-01

    Functional imaging includes imaging techniques that provide information about the metabolic and hemodynamic status of the brain. Most commonly applied functional imaging techniques in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) include magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), single photon emission

  19. Radiologic imaging of the renal parenchyma structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Nicolas; Merville, Pierre; Combe, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Radiologic imaging has the potential to identify several functional and/or structural biomarkers of acute and chronic kidney diseases that are useful diagnostics to guide patient management. A renal ultrasound examination can provide information regarding the gross anatomy and macrostructure of the renal parenchyma, and ultrasound imaging modalities based on Doppler or elastography techniques can provide haemodynamic and structural information, respectively. CT is also able to combine morphological and functional information, but the use of CT is limited due to the required exposure to X-ray irradiation and a risk of contrast-induced nephropathy following intravenous injection of a radio-contrast agent. MRI can be used to identify a wide range of anatomical and physiological parameters at the tissue and even cellular level, such as tissue perfusion, oxygenation, water diffusion, cellular phagocytic activity, tissue stiffness, and level of renal filtration. The ability of MRI to provide valuable information for most of these parameters within a renal context is still in development and requires more clinical experience, harmonization of technical procedures, and an evaluation of reliability and validity on a large scale.

  20. Measurement and imaging of brain function using MRI, MEG, and TMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iramina, Keiji

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews functional imaging techniques in neuroscience such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) functional MRI (fMRI), magnetoencephalogray (MEG), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). fMRI and MEG allow the neuronal activity of the brain to be measured non-invasively. MEG detects an electrical activity as neuronal activity, while, fMRI detects a hemodynamic response as neuronal activity. TMS is the application of a brief magnetic pulse or a train of pulses to the skull, which results in the induction of a local electric current in the underlying surface of the brain, thereby producing a localized axonal depolarization. As a non-invasive and effective method to make reversible lesions in the human brain, TMS has a long and successful history. All of these techniques have major potential for applications in the neuroscience and medicine. (author)

  1. Functional imaging of the pelvic floor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienemann, Andreas E-mail: andreaslienemann@web.de; Fischer, Tanja

    2003-08-01

    Introduction/Objective: Pelvic floor dysfunction and associated pelvic organ prolapse represent a major problem in our present-day society, mostly afflicting parous women. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is assuming an increasingly important role in the more accurate delineation of the extent of the problem. This article briefly reviews one of the main radiological methods for the dynamic evaluation of the pelvic floor: functional cine MRI. Methods and Material: Out of the literature the smallest common denominator for functional cine MRI can be defined as follows: high field system; patient either in supine or sitting position; fast gradient echo sequence; midsagittal slice orientation; either a stack of slices or repeated measurements at the same slice position with the patient at rest or straining; image analysis using the pubococcygeal reference line. Results: All except two publications stress the usefulness of functional cine MRI in the evaluation of patients with organ descent and prolapse. This well accepted method allows for the visualization of all relevant structures in the anterior, middle and posterior compartment. It is especially useful in the detection of enteroceles, and provides a reliable postoperative follow-up tool. Isolated urinary or stool incontinence are not an indication for functional cine MRI, as is the case in patients with equivocal clinical findings. To date it does not allow for real 3D imaging of the pelvic floor or sufficient determination of fascial defects. Discussion: Functional cine MRI of the pelvic floor is a promising new imaging method for the detection of organ descent and prolapse in patients with equivocal clinical findings. The combination of function and morphology allows for an innovative view of the pelvic floor, and thus adds to our understanding of the various interactions of the structures.

  2. How the blind "see" Braille: lessons from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadato, Norihiro

    2005-12-01

    What does the visual cortex of the blind do during Braille reading? This process involves converting simple tactile information into meaningful patterns that have lexical and semantic properties. The perceptual processing of Braille might be mediated by the somatosensory system, whereas visual letter identity is accomplished within the visual system in sighted people. Recent advances in functional neuroimaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, have enabled exploration of the neural substrates of Braille reading. The primary visual cortex of early-onset blind subjects is functionally relevant to Braille reading, suggesting that the brain shows remarkable plasticity that potentially permits the additional processing of tactile information in the visual cortical areas.

  3. Restoration and functional analysis of nuclear medicine images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendt, R.E. III.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear medicine physician uses visual interpretation of a movie-like display of the beating human heart to detect wall motion abnormalities which might be related to impaired cardiac function. The present work is directed toward extracting more information from the heart motion study, and presenting it in a useful manner. A spatially adaptive smoothing routine using a quadtree image representation gives an improvement in mean squared error compared to the S9 smoother commonly used for nuclear medicine studies. Functional images show the two-dimensional distribution of parameters of the heart motion. The most popular, the first harmonic phase functional image, formed from the first Fourier harmonic fit to each pixel time-activity curve, is subject to significant artifacts which make a simple interpretation of it difficult. A multi-harmonic approximation is more accurate and offers a wealth of unique parameters with which to construct more directly meaningful functional images

  4. Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy: Enabling Routine Functional Brain Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, Meryem A; Selb, Juliette J; Huppert, Theodore J; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Boas, David A

    2017-12-01

    Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) maps human brain function by measuring and imaging local changes in hemoglobin concentrations in the brain that arise from the modulation of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism by neural activity. Since its advent over 20 years ago, researchers have exploited and continuously advanced the ability of near infrared light to penetrate through the scalp and skull in order to non-invasively monitor changes in cerebral hemoglobin concentrations that reflect brain activity. We review recent advances in signal processing and hardware that significantly improve the capabilities of fNIRS by reducing the impact of confounding signals to improve statistical robustness of the brain signals and by enhancing the density, spatial coverage, and wearability of measuring devices respectively. We then summarize the application areas that are experiencing rapid growth as fNIRS begins to enable routine functional brain imaging.

  5. Neuroendocrine tumours of the head and neck: anatomical, functional and molecular imaging and contemporary management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Navaraj; Prestwich, Robin; Chowdhury, Fahmid; Patel, Chirag

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the head and neck are rare neoplasms and can be of epithelial or non-epithelial differentiation. Although the natural history of NETs is variable, it is crucial to establish an early diagnosis of these tumours as they can be potentially curable. Conventional anatomical imaging and functional imaging using radionuclide scintigraphy and positron emission tomography/computed tomography can be complementary for the diagnosis, staging and monitoring of treatment response. This article describes and illustrates the imaging features of head and neck NETs, discusses the potential future role of novel positron-emitting tracers that are emerging into clinical practice and reviews contemporary management of these tumours. Familiarity with the choice of imaging techniques and the variety of imaging patterns and treatment options should help guide radiologists in the management of this rare but important subgroup of head and neck neoplasms. PMID:24240099

  6. Merits and limitations of functional imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    The functional image is a powerful tool to look at physiologic information. It is ideally suited to the radiotracer method which measures regional physiology. It is ideal for regional analysis, providing a format which nicely complements the more traditional and anatomically oriented data displays. The functional image must be used intelligently, however, with the user aware of its limitations and of the meaning of indices which it is measuring. (orig.)

  7. Imaging Mitochondrial Redox Potential and Its Possible Link to Tumor Metastatic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin Z.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular redox states can regulate cell metabolism, growth, differentiation, motility, apoptosis, signaling pathways, and gene expressions etc. Growing body of literature suggest importance of redox status for cancer progression. While most studies on redox state were done on cells and tissue lysates, it is important to understand the role of redox state in tissue in vivo/ex vivo and image its heterogeneity. Redox scanning is a clinically-translatable method for imaging tissue mitochondrial redox potential with a submillimeter resolution. Redox scanning data in mouse models of human cancers demonstrate a correlation between mitochondrial redox state and tumor metastatic potential. I will discuss the significance of this correlation and possible directions for future research. PMID:22895837

  8. Functional imaging of the semantic system: retrieval of sensory-experienced and verbally learned knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noppeney, Uta; Price, Cathy J

    2003-01-01

    This paper considers how functional neuro-imaging can be used to investigate the organization of the semantic system and the limitations associated with this technique. The majority of the functional imaging studies of the semantic system have looked for divisions by varying stimulus category. These studies have led to divergent results and no clear anatomical hypotheses have emerged to account for the dissociations seen in behavioral studies. Only a few functional imaging studies have used task as a variable to differentiate the neural correlates of semantic features more directly. We extend these findings by presenting a new study that contrasts tasks that differentially weight sensory (color and taste) and verbally learned (origin) semantic features. Irrespective of the type of semantic feature retrieved, a common semantic system was activated as demonstrated in many previous studies. In addition, the retrieval of verbally learned, but not sensory-experienced, features enhanced activation in medial and lateral posterior parietal areas. We attribute these "verbally learned" effects to differences in retrieval strategy and conclude that evidence for segregation of semantic features at an anatomical level remains weak. We believe that functional imaging has the potential to increase our understanding of the neuronal infrastructure that sustains semantic processing but progress may require multiple experiments until a consistent explanatory framework emerges.

  9. Imaging Brain Function with Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy in Unconstrained Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana B. Balardin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the neural correlates of motor and cognitive processes under naturalistic experimentation is challenging due to the movement constraints of traditional brain imaging technologies. The recent advent of portable technologies that are less sensitive to motion artifacts such as Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS have been made possible the study of brain function in freely-moving participants. In this paper, we describe a series of proof-of-concept experiments examining the potential of fNIRS in assessing the neural correlates of cognitive and motor processes in unconstrained environments. We show illustrative applications for practicing a sport (i.e., table tennis, playing a musical instrument (i.e., piano and violin alone or in duo and performing daily activities for many hours (i.e., continuous monitoring. Our results expand upon previous research on the feasibility and robustness of fNIRS to monitor brain hemodynamic changes in different real life settings. We believe that these preliminary results showing the flexibility and robustness of fNIRS measurements may contribute by inspiring future work in the field of applied neuroscience.

  10. SU-G-IeP3-08: Image Reconstruction for Scanning Imaging System Based On Shape-Modulated Point Spreading Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruixing; Yang, LV [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan (China); Xu, Kele [College of Electronical Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan (China); Zhu, Li [Institute of Electrostatic and Electromagnetic Protection, Mechanical Engineering College, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Deconvolution is a widely used tool in the field of image reconstruction algorithm when the linear imaging system has been blurred by the imperfect system transfer function. However, due to the nature of Gaussian-liked distribution for point spread function (PSF), the components with coherent high frequency in the image are hard to restored in most of the previous scanning imaging system, even the relatively accurate PSF is acquired. We propose a novel method for deconvolution of images which are obtained by using shape-modulated PSF. Methods: We use two different types of PSF - Gaussian shape and donut shape - to convolute the original image in order to simulate the process of scanning imaging. By employing deconvolution of the two images with corresponding given priors, the image quality of the deblurred images are compared. Then we find the critical size of the donut shape compared with the Gaussian shape which has similar deconvolution results. Through calculation of tightened focusing process using radially polarized beam, such size of donut is achievable under same conditions. Results: The effects of different relative size of donut and Gaussian shapes are investigated. When the full width at half maximum (FWHM) ratio of donut and Gaussian shape is set about 1.83, similar resolution results are obtained through our deconvolution method. Decreasing the size of donut will favor the deconvolution method. A mask with both amplitude and phase modulation is used to create a donut-shaped PSF compared with the non-modulated Gaussian PSF. Donut with size smaller than our critical value is obtained. Conclusion: The utility of donutshaped PSF are proved useful and achievable in the imaging and deconvolution processing, which is expected to have potential practical applications in high resolution imaging for biological samples.

  11. Visceral Afferent Pathways and Functional Brain Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart W.G. Derbyshire

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of functional imaging to study painful sensations has generated considerable interest regarding insight into brain dysfunction that may be responsible for functional pain such as that suffered in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. This review provides a brief introduction to the development of brain science as it relates to pain processing and a snapshot of recent functional imaging results with somatic and visceral pain. Particular emphasis is placed on current hypotheses regarding dysfunction of the brain-gut axis in IBS patients. There are clear and interpretable differences in brain activation following somatic as compared with visceral noxious sensation. Noxious visceral distension, particularly of the lower gastrointestinal tract, activates regions associated with unpleasant affect and autonomic responses. Noxious somatic sensation, in contrast, activates regions associated with cognition and skeletomotor responses. Differences between IBS patients and control subjects, however, were far less clear and interpretable. While this is in part due to the newness of this field, it also reflects weaknesses inherent within the current understanding of IBS. Future use of functional imaging to examine IBS and other functional disorders will be more likely to succeed by describing clear theoretical and clinical endpoints.

  12. Imaging of brain function based on the analysis of functional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This Study observed the relevant brain areas activated by acupuncture at the Taichong acupoint (LR3) and analyzed the functional connectivity among brain areas using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore the acupoint specificity of the Taichong acupoint. Methods: A total of 45 ...

  13. Estimating variability in functional images using a synthetic resampling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maitra, R.; O'Sullivan, F.

    1996-01-01

    Functional imaging of biologic parameters like in vivo tissue metabolism is made possible by Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Many techniques, such as mixture analysis, have been suggested for extracting such images from dynamic sequences of reconstructed PET scans. Methods for assessing the variability in these functional images are of scientific interest. The nonlinearity of the methods used in the mixture analysis approach makes analytic formulae for estimating variability intractable. The usual resampling approach is infeasible because of the prohibitive computational effort in simulating a number of sinogram. datasets, applying image reconstruction, and generating parametric images for each replication. Here we introduce an approach that approximates the distribution of the reconstructed PET images by a Gaussian random field and generates synthetic realizations in the imaging domain. This eliminates the reconstruction steps in generating each simulated functional image and is therefore practical. Results of experiments done to evaluate the approach on a model one-dimensional problem are very encouraging. Post-processing of the estimated variances is seen to improve the accuracy of the estimation method. Mixture analysis is used to estimate functional images; however, the suggested approach is general enough to extend to other parametric imaging methods

  14. Exploring brain function with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Salle, F.; Formisano, E.; Linden, D.E.J.; Goebel, R.; Bonavita, S.; Pepino, A.; Smaltino, F.; Tedeschi, G.

    1999-01-01

    Since its invention in the early 1990s, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has rapidly assumed a leading role among the techniques used to localize brain activity. The spatial and temporal resolution provided by state-of-the-art MR technology and its non-invasive character, which allows multiple studies of the same subject, are some of the main advantages of fMRI over the other functional neuroimaging modalities that are based on changes in blood flow and cortical metabolism. This paper describes the basic principles and methodology of fMRI and some aspects of its application to functional activation studies. Attention is focused on the physiology of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast mechanism and on the acquisition of functional time-series with echo planar imaging (EPI). We also provide an introduction to the current strategies for the correction of signal artefacts and other image processing techniques. In order to convey an idea of the numerous applications of fMRI, we will review some of the recent results in the fields of cognitive and sensorimotor psychology and physiology

  15. Exploring brain function with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Salle, F.; Formisano, E.; Linden, D.E.J.; Goebel, R.; Bonavita, S.; Pepino, A.; Smaltino, F.; Tedeschi, G

    1999-05-01

    Since its invention in the early 1990s, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has rapidly assumed a leading role among the techniques used to localize brain activity. The spatial and temporal resolution provided by state-of-the-art MR technology and its non-invasive character, which allows multiple studies of the same subject, are some of the main advantages of fMRI over the other functional neuroimaging modalities that are based on changes in blood flow and cortical metabolism. This paper describes the basic principles and methodology of fMRI and some aspects of its application to functional activation studies. Attention is focused on the physiology of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast mechanism and on the acquisition of functional time-series with echo planar imaging (EPI). We also provide an introduction to the current strategies for the correction of signal artefacts and other image processing techniques. In order to convey an idea of the numerous applications of fMRI, we will review some of the recent results in the fields of cognitive and sensorimotor psychology and physiology.

  16. Pulmonary ventilation imaging and function studies with krypton-81m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, E.; Mayron, L.W.; Gergans, G.A.; Friedman, A.M.; Gindler, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Chronic obstructive lung disease is a significant entity throughout the world. It is etiologically related to smoking, air pollution and mining. To arrest asymptomatic disease, early diagnosis is required, implying an efficacious, reliable and available methodology, which has the potential for screening suspect populations. Krypton-81m is a 13-second radionuclide that emits a 190 keV gamma ray; it may be produced from a rubidium-81-krypton-81m generator and delivery system, devised, produced and evaluated by the authors. The generator effluent, in gaseous form, may be continually inhaled by a subject while static equilibrium images and dynamic studies of ventilation are produced with a gamma scintillation camera system. The wash-in of /sup 81m/Kr produces heterogeneous images, the activity being proportional to regional ventilation due to rapid decay. Minimal ventilatory delays are detectable. Normal subjects and patients with obstructive lung disease have been evaluated by static equilibrium and dynamic studies. The sensitivity of /sup 81m/Kr studies is currently being compared with various other pulmonary function tests, to evaluate its potential as an appropriate screening technique

  17. Structural and functional imaging: Particularities in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiron, C.; Hertz-Pannier, L.; Chiron, C.; Hertz-Pannier, L.; Chiron, C.; Hertz-Pannier, L.

    2008-01-01

    Surgery of partial epilepsies in childhood has largely benefited from the recent advances of imaging techniques, which carry a triple goal: (1) to contribute to the localization of the epilepsy onset zone, (2) to detect and delineate an underlying lesion, and (3) to study the spatial relationship between the epileptogenic zone and the neighboring functional cortex, in order to select patients and plan the resection. This noninvasive pre-surgical imaging workup must be compared to clinical and electrical data to estimate the postoperative prognosis, while invasive techniques such as SEEG, cortical stimulations, and IAT often remain indispensable in difficult cases, i.e., in cryptogenic epilepsies. As in adults, advances in MRI allow us to detect more and more subtle underlying lesions, but this requires repeating MR studies during early childhood and using adapted sequence parameters to account for ongoing myelination. Ictal SPECT and PET imaging prove especially useful in planning depth electrode placement when video-EEG is not contributive, when MRI looks normal or shows multiple abnormalities, or in cases of discrepant findings. Multimodal imaging greatly enhances the sensitivity of all of these techniques. Finally, functional MRI of motor and language functions provide noninvasive cortical mapping of essential functions, using age-adapted paradigms, in cooperating children from age five to six and from IQs around 60. (authors)

  18. Structural and functional imaging: Particularities in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiron, C.; Hertz-Pannier, L. [Hop Necker Enfants Malad, INSERM, Serv Neuropediat, U663, F-75015 Paris (France); Chiron, C.; Hertz-Pannier, L. [UnivParis 05, F-75005 Paris (France); Chiron, C.; Hertz-Pannier, L. [CEA, I2BM, Neurospin, SHFJ, F-91191 Orsay (France)

    2008-07-01

    Surgery of partial epilepsies in childhood has largely benefited from the recent advances of imaging techniques, which carry a triple goal: (1) to contribute to the localization of the epilepsy onset zone, (2) to detect and delineate an underlying lesion, and (3) to study the spatial relationship between the epileptogenic zone and the neighboring functional cortex, in order to select patients and plan the resection. This noninvasive pre-surgical imaging workup must be compared to clinical and electrical data to estimate the postoperative prognosis, while invasive techniques such as SEEG, cortical stimulations, and IAT often remain indispensable in difficult cases, i.e., in cryptogenic epilepsies. As in adults, advances in MRI allow us to detect more and more subtle underlying lesions, but this requires repeating MR studies during early childhood and using adapted sequence parameters to account for ongoing myelination. Ictal SPECT and PET imaging prove especially useful in planning depth electrode placement when video-EEG is not contributive, when MRI looks normal or shows multiple abnormalities, or in cases of discrepant findings. Multimodal imaging greatly enhances the sensitivity of all of these techniques. Finally, functional MRI of motor and language functions provide noninvasive cortical mapping of essential functions, using age-adapted paradigms, in cooperating children from age five to six and from IQs around 60. (authors)

  19. Green function iterative solution of ground state wave function for Yukawa potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhao

    2003-01-01

    The newly developed single trajectory quadrature method is applied to solve central potentials. First, based on the series expansion method an exact analytic solution of the ground state for Hulthen potential and an approximate solution for Yukawa potential are obtained respectively. Second, the newly developed iterative method based on Green function defined by quadratures along the single trajectory is applied to solve Yukawa potential using the Coulomb solution and Hulthen solution as the trial functions respectively. The results show that a more proper choice of the trial function will give a better convergence. To further improve the convergence the iterative method is combined with the variational method to solve the ground state wave function for Yukawa potential, using variational solutions of the Coulomb and Hulthen potentials as the trial functions. The results give much better convergence. Finally, the obtained critical screen coefficient is applied to discuss the dissociate temperature of J/ψ in high temperature QGP

  20. Time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chen; Libisch, Florian; Peng, Qing; Carter, Emily A.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a time-dependent potential-functional embedding theory (TD-PFET), in which atoms are grouped into subsystems. In TD-PFET, subsystems can be propagated by different suitable time-dependent quantum mechanical methods and their interactions can be treated in a seamless, first-principles manner. TD-PFET is formulated based on the time-dependent quantum mechanics variational principle. The action of the total quantum system is written as a functional of the time-dependent embedding potential, i.e., a potential-functional formulation. By exploiting the Runge-Gross theorem, we prove the uniqueness of the time-dependent embedding potential under the constraint that all subsystems share a common embedding potential. We derive the integral equation that such an embedding potential needs to satisfy. As proof-of-principle, we demonstrate TD-PFET for a Na 4 cluster, in which each Na atom is treated as one subsystem and propagated by time-dependent Kohn-Sham density functional theory (TDDFT) using the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA). Our results agree well with a direct TDDFT calculation on the whole Na 4 cluster using ALDA. We envision that TD-PFET will ultimately be useful for studying ultrafast quantum dynamics in condensed matter, where key regions are solved by highly accurate time-dependent quantum mechanics methods, and unimportant regions are solved by faster, less accurate methods

  1. Supplementary value of functional imaging in forensic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Siroos; Sonneck-Koenne, Charlotte; Bruecke, Thomas; Aryana, Kamran; Knoll, Peter; Zakavi, Rasoul

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of functional imaging for forensic purposes. We reviewed a few outpatient cases that were sent to our department for examination after traumatic events and one case with neuropsychic disturbances. Functional imaging showed signs of traumatic lesions in the skeletal system, of brain metabolism and of renal failure. Functional disturbances following traumatic events are in some cases more important than morphological abnormalities. Targeted scintigraphic examinations could be applied for visualisation of traumatic lesions or evaluation of functional disturbances caused by traumatic events. These examinations can be used as evidence in the courtroom.

  2. Novel axolotl cardiac function analysis method using magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanches, Pedro Gomes; Op 't Veld, Roel C.; de Graaf, Wolter; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Grüll, Holger

    2017-01-01

    The salamander axolotl is capable of complete regeneration of amputated heart tissue. However, non-invasive imaging tools for assessing its cardiac function were so far not employed. In this study, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is introduced as a non-invasive technique to image heart function

  3. Novel axolotl cardiac function analysis method using magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanches, P.G.; Op ‘t Veld, R.C.; de Graaf, W.; Strijkers, G.J.; Grüll, H.

    2017-01-01

    The salamander axolotl is capable of complete regeneration of amputated heart tissue. However, non-invasive imaging tools for assessing its cardiac function were so far not employed. In this study, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is introduced as a noninvasive technique to image heart function of

  4. Functional imaging in oncology. Clinical applications. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, Antonio [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology; MRI Health Time Group, Jaen (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Univ. (Spain). Clinica Girona - Hospital Sta. Caterina; Hygino da Cruz, L. Celso Jr. (ed.) [CDPI and IRM, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology; Rossi, Santiago E. [Centro de Diagnostico, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-06-01

    Easy-to-read manual on new functional imaging techniques in oncology. Explains current clinical applications and outlines future avenues. Includes numerous high-quality illustrations to highlight the major teaching points. In the new era of functional and molecular imaging, both currently available imaging biomarkers and biomarkers under development are expected to lead to major changes in the management of oncological patients. This two-volume book is a practical manual on the various imaging techniques capable of delivering functional information on cancer, including diffusion MRI, perfusion CT and MRI, dual-energy CT, spectroscopy, dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, PET, and hybrid modalities. This second volume considers the applications and benefits of these techniques in a wide range of tumor types, including their role in diagnosis, prediction of treatment outcome, and early evaluation of treatment response. Each chapter addresses a specific malignancy and is written by one or more acclaimed experts. The lucid text is complemented by numerous high-quality illustrations that highlight key features and major teaching points.

  5. Functional imaging in oncology. Clinical applications. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, Antonio; Vilanova, Joan C.

    2014-01-01

    Easy-to-read manual on new functional imaging techniques in oncology. Explains current clinical applications and outlines future avenues. Includes numerous high-quality illustrations to highlight the major teaching points. In the new era of functional and molecular imaging, both currently available imaging biomarkers and biomarkers under development are expected to lead to major changes in the management of oncological patients. This two-volume book is a practical manual on the various imaging techniques capable of delivering functional information on cancer, including diffusion MRI, perfusion CT and MRI, dual-energy CT, spectroscopy, dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, PET, and hybrid modalities. This second volume considers the applications and benefits of these techniques in a wide range of tumor types, including their role in diagnosis, prediction of treatment outcome, and early evaluation of treatment response. Each chapter addresses a specific malignancy and is written by one or more acclaimed experts. The lucid text is complemented by numerous high-quality illustrations that highlight key features and major teaching points.

  6. Image based rendering of iterated function systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van J.J.; Saupe, D.

    2004-01-01

    A fast method to generate fractal imagery is presented. Iterated function systems (IFS) are based on repeatedly copying transformed images. We show that this can be directly translated into standard graphics operations: Each image is generated by texture mapping and blending copies of the previous

  7. Computational medical imaging and hemodynamics framework for functional analysis and assessment of cardiovascular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kelvin K L; Wang, Defeng; Ko, Jacky K L; Mazumdar, Jagannath; Le, Thu-Thao; Ghista, Dhanjoo

    2017-03-21

    Cardiac dysfunction constitutes common cardiovascular health issues in the society, and has been an investigation topic of strong focus by researchers in the medical imaging community. Diagnostic modalities based on echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, chest radiography and computed tomography are common techniques that provide cardiovascular structural information to diagnose heart defects. However, functional information of cardiovascular flow, which can in fact be used to support the diagnosis of many cardiovascular diseases with a myriad of hemodynamics performance indicators, remains unexplored to its full potential. Some of these indicators constitute important cardiac functional parameters affecting the cardiovascular abnormalities. With the advancement of computer technology that facilitates high speed computational fluid dynamics, the realization of a support diagnostic platform of hemodynamics quantification and analysis can be achieved. This article reviews the state-of-the-art medical imaging and high fidelity multi-physics computational analyses that together enable reconstruction of cardiovascular structures and hemodynamic flow patterns within them, such as of the left ventricle (LV) and carotid bifurcations. The combined medical imaging and hemodynamic analysis enables us to study the mechanisms of cardiovascular disease-causing dysfunctions, such as how (1) cardiomyopathy causes left ventricular remodeling and loss of contractility leading to heart failure, and (2) modeling of LV construction and simulation of intra-LV hemodynamics can enable us to determine the optimum procedure of surgical ventriculation to restore its contractility and health This combined medical imaging and hemodynamics framework can potentially extend medical knowledge of cardiovascular defects and associated hemodynamic behavior and their surgical restoration, by means of an integrated medical image diagnostics and hemodynamic performance analysis framework.

  8. Imaging-based liver function tests. Past, present and future; Bildgestuetzte Leberfunktionstests. Stand der Technik und zukuenftige Entwicklungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisel, D.; Hamm, B.; Denecke, T. [Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Luedemann, L. [Essen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics

    2015-10-15

    question to be answered is how the results may be affected by renal function and the presence of hyperbilirubinemia. As more results from clinical evaluation including comparison with postoperative liver function data become available, image-based liver function tests, especially with use of Gd-EOB as the contrast medium, have the potential to add another dimension to preoperative imaging.

  9. Functional imaging in oncology. Biophysical basis and technical approaches. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, Antonio [Health Time Group, Jaen (Spain); University Hospitals, Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Vilanova, Joan C. [Clinica Girona - Hospital Sta. Caterina, Girona (Spain); Hygino da Cruz, L. Celso Jr. [CDPI and IRM, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology; Rossi, Santiago E. (ed.) [Centro de Diagnostico, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-07-01

    Easy-to-read manual on new functional imaging techniques in oncology. Explains current clinical applications and outlines future avenues. Includes numerous high-quality illustrations to highlight the major teaching points. In the new era of functional and molecular imaging, both currently available imaging biomarkers and biomarkers under development are expected to lead to major changes in the management of oncological patients. This well-illustrated two-volume book is a practical manual on the various imaging techniques capable of delivering functional information on cancer, including preclinical and clinical imaging techniques, based on US, CT, MRI, PET and hybrid modalities. This first volume explains the biophysical basis for these functional imaging techniques and describes the techniques themselves. Detailed information is provided on the imaging of cancer hallmarks, including angiogenesis, tumor metabolism, and hypoxia. The techniques and their roles are then discussed individually, covering the full range of modalities in clinical use as well as new molecular and functional techniques. The value of a multiparametric approach is also carefully considered.

  10. Functional imaging in oncology. Biophysical basis and technical approaches. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, Antonio; Hygino da Cruz, L. Celso Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Easy-to-read manual on new functional imaging techniques in oncology. Explains current clinical applications and outlines future avenues. Includes numerous high-quality illustrations to highlight the major teaching points. In the new era of functional and molecular imaging, both currently available imaging biomarkers and biomarkers under development are expected to lead to major changes in the management of oncological patients. This well-illustrated two-volume book is a practical manual on the various imaging techniques capable of delivering functional information on cancer, including preclinical and clinical imaging techniques, based on US, CT, MRI, PET and hybrid modalities. This first volume explains the biophysical basis for these functional imaging techniques and describes the techniques themselves. Detailed information is provided on the imaging of cancer hallmarks, including angiogenesis, tumor metabolism, and hypoxia. The techniques and their roles are then discussed individually, covering the full range of modalities in clinical use as well as new molecular and functional techniques. The value of a multiparametric approach is also carefully considered.

  11. Form or function: Does focusing on body functionality protect women from body dissatisfaction when viewing media images?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulgrew, Kate E; Tiggemann, Marika

    2018-01-01

    We examined whether shifting young women's ( N =322) attention toward functionality components of media-portrayed idealized images would protect against body dissatisfaction. Image type was manipulated via images of models in either an objectified body-as-object form or active body-as-process form; viewing focus was manipulated via questions about the appearance or functionality of the models. Social comparison was examined as a moderator. Negative outcomes were most pronounced within the process-related conditions (body-as-process images or functionality viewing focus) and for women who reported greater functionality comparison. Results suggest that functionality-based depictions, reflections, and comparisons may actually produce worse outcomes than those based on appearance.

  12. Functional brain imaging - baric and clinical questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mager, T.; Moeller, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The advancing biological knowledge of disease processes plays a central part in the progress of modern psychiatry. An essential contribution comes from the functional and structural brain imaging techniques (CT, MRI, SPECT, PET). Their application is important for biological oriented research in psychiatry and there is also a growing relevance in clinical aspects. This development is taken into account by recent diagnostic classification systems in psychiatry. The capabilities and limitations of functional brain imaging in the context of research and clinic will be presented and discussed by examples and own investigations. (orig.) [de

  13. General Approach to Identifying Potential Targets for Cancer Imaging by Integrated Bioinformatics Analysis of Publicly Available Genomic Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongliang Yang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging has moved to the forefront of drug development and biomedical research. The identification of appropriate imaging targets has become the touchstone for the accurate diagnosis and prognosis of human cancer. Particularly, cell surface- or membrane-bound proteins are attractive imaging targets for their aberrant expression, easily accessible location, and unique biochemical functions in tumor cells. Previously, we published a literature mining of potential targets for our in-house enzyme-mediated cancer imaging and therapy technology. Here we present a simple and integrated bioinformatics analysis approach that assembles a public cancer microarray database with a pathway knowledge base for ascertaining and prioritizing upregulated genes encoding cell surface- or membrane-bound proteins, which could serve imaging targets. As examples, we obtained lists of potential hits for six common and lethal human tumors in the prostate, breast, lung, colon, ovary, and pancreas. As control tests, a number of well-known cancer imaging targets were detected and confirmed by our study. Further, by consulting gene-disease and protein-disease databases, we suggest a number of significantly upregulated genes as promising imaging targets, including cell surface-associated mucin-1, prostate-specific membrane antigen, hepsin, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, and folate receptors. By integrating pathway analysis, we are able to organize and map “focused” interaction networks derived from significantly dysregulated entity pairs to reflect important cellular functions in disease processes. We provide herein an example of identifying a tumor cell growth and proliferation subnetwork for prostate cancer. This systematic mining approach can be broadly applied to identify imaging or therapeutic targets for other human diseases.

  14. Electric Potential and Electric Field Imaging with Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Ed

    2016-01-01

    The technology and techniques for remote quantitative imaging of electrostatic potentials and electrostatic fields in and around objects and in free space is presented. Electric field imaging (EFI) technology may be applied to characterize intrinsic or existing electric potentials and electric fields, or an externally generated electrostatic field may be used for (illuminating) volumes to be inspected with EFI. The baseline sensor technology, electric field sensor (e-sensor), and its construction, optional electric field generation (quasistatic generator), and current e-sensor enhancements (ephemeral e-sensor) are discussed. Demonstrations for structural, electronic, human, and memory applications are shown. This new EFI capability is demonstrated to reveal characterization of electric charge distribution, creating a new field of study that embraces areas of interest including electrostatic discharge mitigation, crime scene forensics, design and materials selection for advanced sensors, dielectric morphology of structures, inspection of containers, inspection for hidden objects, tether integrity, organic molecular memory, and medical diagnostic and treatment efficacy applications such as cardiac polarization wave propagation and electromyography imaging.

  15. Functional Principal Component Analysis and Randomized Sparse Clustering Algorithm for Medical Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Nan; Jiang, Junhai; Guo, Shicheng; Xiong, Momiao

    2015-01-01

    Due to the advancement in sensor technology, the growing large medical image data have the ability to visualize the anatomical changes in biological tissues. As a consequence, the medical images have the potential to enhance the diagnosis of disease, the prediction of clinical outcomes and the characterization of disease progression. But in the meantime, the growing data dimensions pose great methodological and computational challenges for the representation and selection of features in image cluster analysis. To address these challenges, we first extend the functional principal component analysis (FPCA) from one dimension to two dimensions to fully capture the space variation of image the signals. The image signals contain a large number of redundant features which provide no additional information for clustering analysis. The widely used methods for removing the irrelevant features are sparse clustering algorithms using a lasso-type penalty to select the features. However, the accuracy of clustering using a lasso-type penalty depends on the selection of the penalty parameters and the threshold value. In practice, they are difficult to determine. Recently, randomized algorithms have received a great deal of attentions in big data analysis. This paper presents a randomized algorithm for accurate feature selection in image clustering analysis. The proposed method is applied to both the liver and kidney cancer histology image data from the TCGA database. The results demonstrate that the randomized feature selection method coupled with functional principal component analysis substantially outperforms the current sparse clustering algorithms in image cluster analysis. PMID:26196383

  16. Methods of filtering the graph images of the functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олександр Григорович Бурса

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical aspects of cleaning raster images of scanned graphs of functions from digital, chromatic and luminance distortions by using computer graphics techniques have been considered. The basic types of distortions characteristic of graph images of functions have been stated. To suppress the distortion several methods, providing for high-quality of the resulting images and saving their topological features, were suggested. The paper describes the techniques developed and improved by the authors: the method of cleaning the image of distortions by means of iterative contrasting, based on the step-by-step increase in image contrast in the graph by 1%; the method of small entities distortion restoring, based on the thinning of the known matrix of contrast increase filter (the allowable dimensions of the nucleus dilution radius convolution matrix, which provide for the retention of the graph lines have been established; integration technique of the noise reduction method by means of contrasting and distortion restoring method of small entities with known σ-filter. Each method in the complex has been theoretically substantiated. The developed methods involve treatment of graph images as the entire image (global processing and its fragments (local processing. The metrics assessing the quality of the resulting image with the global and local processing have been chosen, the substantiation of the choice as well as the formulas have been given. The proposed complex methods of cleaning the graphs images of functions from grayscale image distortions is adaptive to the form of an image carrier, the distortion level in the image and its distribution. The presented results of testing the developed complex of methods for a representative sample of images confirm its effectiveness

  17. Correlation between single-trial visual evoked potentials and the blood oxygenation level dependent response in simultaneously recorded electroencephalography-functional magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglø, Dan; Pedersen, Henrik; Rostrup, Egill

    2012-01-01

    in different occipital and extraoccipital cortical areas not explained by the boxcar regressor. The results suggest that the P1-N2 regressor is the best EEG-based regressor to model the visual paradigm, but when looking for additional effects like habituation or attention modulation that cannot be modeled......To compare different electroencephalography (EEG)-based regressors and their ability to predict the simultaneously recorded blood oxygenation level dependent response during blocked visual stimulation, simultaneous EEG-functional magnetic resonance imaging in 10 healthy volunteers was performed....... The performance of different single-trial EEG regressors was compared in terms of predicting the measured blood oxygenation level dependent response. The EEG-based regressors were the amplitude and latency of the primary positive (P1) and negative (N2) peaks of the visual evoked potential, the combined P1-N2...

  18. Functional mapping of the sensorimotor cortex: combined use of magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, and motor evoked potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, T.; Fujii, K.; Fukui, M.; Mizushima, A.; Matsumoto, S.; Hasuo, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Tobimatsu, S.

    1995-01-01

    Combined use of magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI), and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was carried out on one patient in an attempt to localise precisely a structural lesion to the central sulcus. A small cyst in the right frontoparietal region was thought to be the cause of generalised seizures in an otherwise asymptomatic woman. First the primary sensory cortex was identified with magnetic source imaging (MSI) of somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using MEG and MRI. Second, the motor area of the hand was identified using f-MRI during handsqueezing. Then transcranial magnetic stimulation localised the hand motor area on the scalp, which was mapped onto the MRI. There was a good agreement between MSI, f-MRI and MEP as to the location of the sensorimotor cortex and its relationship to the lesion. Multimodality mapping techniques may thus prove useful in the precise localisation of cortical lesions, and in the preoperative determination of the best treatment for peri-rolandic lesions. (orig.)

  19. Functional mapping of the sensorimotor cortex: combined use of magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, and motor evoked potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morioka, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fujii, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fukui, M. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Mizushima, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Matsumoto, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Hasuo, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Tobimatsu, S. [Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurological Inst., Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    Combined use of magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI), and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was carried out on one patient in an attempt to localise precisely a structural lesion to the central sulcus. A small cyst in the right frontoparietal region was thought to be the cause of generalised seizures in an otherwise asymptomatic woman. First the primary sensory cortex was identified with magnetic source imaging (MSI) of somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using MEG and MRI. Second, the motor area of the hand was identified using f-MRI during handsqueezing. Then transcranial magnetic stimulation localised the hand motor area on the scalp, which was mapped onto the MRI. There was a good agreement between MSI, f-MRI and MEP as to the location of the sensorimotor cortex and its relationship to the lesion. Multimodality mapping techniques may thus prove useful in the precise localisation of cortical lesions, and in the preoperative determination of the best treatment for peri-rolandic lesions. (orig.)

  20. Regularized image denoising based on spectral gradient optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukić, Tibor; Lindblad, Joakim; Sladoje, Nataša

    2011-01-01

    Image restoration methods, such as denoising, deblurring, inpainting, etc, are often based on the minimization of an appropriately defined energy function. We consider energy functions for image denoising which combine a quadratic data-fidelity term and a regularization term, where the properties of the latter are determined by a used potential function. Many potential functions are suggested for different purposes in the literature. We compare the denoising performance achieved by ten different potential functions. Several methods for efficient minimization of regularized energy functions exist. Most are only applicable to particular choices of potential functions, however. To enable a comparison of all the observed potential functions, we propose to minimize the objective function using a spectral gradient approach; spectral gradient methods put very weak restrictions on the used potential function. We present and evaluate the performance of one spectral conjugate gradient and one cyclic spectral gradient algorithm, and conclude from experiments that both are well suited for the task. We compare the performance with three total variation-based state-of-the-art methods for image denoising. From the empirical evaluation, we conclude that denoising using the Huber potential (for images degraded by higher levels of noise; signal-to-noise ratio below 10 dB) and the Geman and McClure potential (for less noisy images), in combination with the spectral conjugate gradient minimization algorithm, shows the overall best performance

  1. The Effect of Image Potential on the Current-Voltage Characteristics of a Ferritin-layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunjung Bang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Considering for the concept of power storage systems, such as those used to supply power to microelectronic devices, ferritins have aroused a lot of interests for applications in bioelectrochemical devices. And electron transfer rates from the proteins to electrode surface are key determinants of overall performance and efficiency of the ferritin-based devices. Here we have investigated the electron transport mechanism of ferritin layer which was immobilized on an Au electrode. The current-voltage (I-V curves are obtained by a conductive atomic force microscope (c-AFM as a function of contact area between AFM tip and the ferritin layer. In the low voltage region, I-V curves are affected by both Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and image force. On the other hand, the experimental results are consistent with a Simmons model in a high voltage region, indicating that, as the voltage increases, the image potential has a dominant effect on the electron transport mechanism. These results are attributed to the film-like character of the ferritin layer, which generates an image potential to lower the barrier height in proportion to the voltage increment.

  2. New developments in paediatric cardiac functional ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Korte, Chris L; Nillesen, Maartje M; Saris, Anne E C M; Lopata, Richard G P; Thijssen, Johan M; Kapusta, Livia

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound imaging can be used to estimate the morphology as well as the motion and deformation of tissues. If the interrogated tissue is actively deforming, this deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as 'strain imaging'. Tissue can also be deformed by applying an internal or external force and the resulting, induced deformation is a function of the mechanical tissue characteristics. In combination with the load applied, these strain maps can be used to estimate or reconstruct the mechanical properties of tissue. This technique was named 'elastography' by Ophir et al. in 1991. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaque characterisation, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. Rather than using the conventional video format (DICOM) image information, radio frequency (RF)-based ultrasound methods enable estimation of the deformation at higher resolution and with higher precision than commercial methods using Doppler (tissue Doppler imaging) or video image data (2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so it has to be considered a 1D technique. Recently, this method has been extended to multiple directions and precision further improved by using spatial compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. Using similar techniques, the blood velocity and flow can be determined. RF-based techniques are also beneficial for automated segmentation of the ventricular cavities. In this paper, new developments in different techniques of quantifying cardiac function by strain imaging, automated segmentation, and methods of performing blood flow imaging are reviewed and their application in paediatric cardiology is discussed.

  3. Potential-functional embedding theory for molecules and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen; Carter, Emily A

    2011-11-21

    We introduce a potential-functional embedding theory by reformulating a recently proposed density-based embedding theory in terms of functionals of the embedding potential. This potential-functional based theory completes the dual problem in the context of embedding theory for which density-functional embedding theory has existed for two decades. With this potential-functional formalism, it is straightforward to solve for the unique embedding potential shared by all subsystems. We consider charge transfer between subsystems and discuss how to treat fractional numbers of electrons in subsystems. We show that one is able to employ different energy functionals for different subsystems in order to treat different regions with theories of different levels of accuracy, if desired. The embedding potential is solved for by directly minimizing the total energy functional, and we discuss how to efficiently calculate the gradient of the total energy functional with respect to the embedding potential. Forces are also derived, thereby making it possible to optimize structures and account for nuclear dynamics. We also extend the theory to spin-polarized cases. Numerical examples of the theory are given for some homo- and hetero-nuclear diatomic molecules and a more complicated test of a six-hydrogen-atom chain. We also test our theory in a periodic bulk environment with calculations of basic properties of bulk NaCl, by treating each atom as a subsystem. Finally, we demonstrate the theory for water adsorption on the MgO(001)surface.

  4. Functional imaging of the sensorimotor cortex using an ultra-fast MR imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoda, Akira; Nakajima, Yasoichi; Sato, Kiyoshi; Katayama, Jin; Machida, Yoshio; Nozaki, Seiji; Makita, Jun-ichi.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess changes in brain activity during a motor task and variable sensory stimulation using echo planar imaging, which represents the fastest clinically useful imaging technique available. The subjects of this study were 11 healthy volunteers, 4 males and 11 females, with an average of 26.4 years. The subjects were instructed to tap the fingers of one hand as the motor task. Compressed air was applied 5 times a second as 'simple' sensory stimulation. Simple figures were drawn on the subjects palm as 'complex' sensory stimulation. In all cases, functional imaging was performed by T 2 * -weighted echo planar imaging (TE=53 msec, TR=3000 msec, flip angle=90 degrees, matrix 64 x 64, FOV=205 mm, slice thickness=8 mm) alternately at rest and during the task (intervals: 30 sec). A total of 60 images was collected in 3 minutes. Images obtained by subtracting images at rest and during the task were analyzed. Almost all subjects showed a transient signal increase in the contralateral paracentral region during simple sensory stimulation. Continuous signal increases in the contra- and/or ipsi-lateral para-central region were observed durirg complex sensory stimulation. Some exhibited signal increases in the parietal or frontal association cortex, but they disappeared when subject's attention was distracted during stimulation. All subjects displayed signal increases in the contralateral para-central region during the motor task. Some of them exhibited signal increases in the medial frontal area (supplementary motor area) and ipsilateral para-central region. These results suggest that the signal increases of functional MRI reflect not only simple reactions to stimulation but higher cerebral function as well. (J.P.N.)

  5. Progress in clinical research and application of resting state functional brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Miaomiao; Ni Hongyan

    2013-01-01

    Resting state functional brain imaging experimental design is free of stimulus task and offers various parametric maps through different data-driven post processing methods with endogenous BOLD signal changes as the source of imaging. Mechanism of resting state brain activities could be extensively studied with improved patient compliance and clinical application compared with task related functional brain imaging. Also resting state functional brain imaging can be used as a method of data acquisition, with implicit neuronal activity as a kind of experimental design, to reveal characteristic brain activities of epileptic patient. Even resting state functional brain imaging data processing method can be used to analyze task related functional MRI data, opening new horizons of task related functional MRI study. (authors)

  6. External marker-based fusion of functional and morphological images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kremp, S.; Schaefer, A.; Alexander, C.; Kirsch, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    The fusion of image data resulting from methods oriented toward morphology like CT, MRI with functional information coming from nuclear medicine (SPECT, PET) is frequently applied to allow for a better association between functional findings and anatomical structures. A new software was developed to provide image fusion using PET, SPECT, MRI and CT data within a short processing periode for brain as well as whole body examinations in particular thorax and abdomen. The software utilizes external markers (brain) or anatomical landmarks (thorax) for correlation. The fusion requires a periode of approx. 15 min. The examples shown emphasize the high gain in diagnostic information by fusing image data of anatomical and functional methods. (orig.) [de

  7. Tunneling in a self-consistent dynamic image potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudberg, B.G.R.; Jonson, M.

    1991-01-01

    We have calculated the self-consistent effective potential for an electron tunneling through a square barrier while interacting with surface plasmons. This potential reduces to the classical image potential in the static limit. In the opposite limit, when the ''velocity'' of the tunneling electron is large, it reduces to the unperturbed square-barrier potential. For a wide variety of parameters the dynamic effects on the transmission coefficient T=|t 2 | can, for instance, be related to the Buettiker-Landauer traversal time for tunneling, given by τ BL =ℎ|d lnt/dV|

  8. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abbreviations used: BOLD, Blood oxygenation level dependent; CBF, cerebral blood flow; fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging; EPI, eco-planar imaging; FOV, field of view; MRI, Magnetic resonance imaging; MRS, magnetic resonance spectroscopy;. PET, position emission tomography; rCBF, regional cerebral ...

  9. Functional MR imaging of the cervical spine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allmann, K.H.; Uhl, M.; Uhrmeister, P.; Neumann, K.; Langer, M.; Kempis, J. von

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate functional MR imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) involving the cervical spine. Material and Methods: We used a device that allows MR examination to be made of the cervical spine in infinitely variable degrees of flexion and extension. Dynamic functional MR imaging was performed on 25 patients with RA. Results: Functional MR imaging was able to show the degree of vertebral instability of the occipito-atlantal or atlanto-axial level as well as the subaxial level. By performing functional MR imaging, we were able to demonstrate the extent of synovial tissue around the dens, and the impingement and displacement of the spinal cord during flexion and extension. The basilar impression, the cord impingement into the foramen magnum, the cord compression, the slipping of vertebrae, and the angulation of the cord were all much more evident in functional than in static MR imaging. Conclusion: Functional MR imaging provided additional information in patients with RA, and is valuable in patients who have a normal MR study in the neutral position and yet have signs of a neurological deficit. Functional MR imaging is important in the planning of stabilizing operations of the cervical spine. (orig.)

  10. Athermal electron distribution probed by femtosecond multiphoton photoemission from image potential states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrini, Gabriele; Giannetti, Claudio; Pagliara, Stefania; Banfi, Francesco; Galimberti, Gianluca; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2005-01-01

    Image potential states are populated through indirect, scattering-mediated multiphoton absorption induced by femtosecond laser pulses and revealed by single-photon photoemission. The measured effective mass is significantly different from that obtained with direct, resonant population. These features reveal a strong coupling of the electrons residing in the image potential state, outside the solid, with the underlying hot electron population created by the laser pulse. The coupling is mediated by a many-body scattering interaction between the image potential state electrons and bulk electrons in highly excited states

  11. Role of intensity transformation function for enhancement of bone scintigraphic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Dhiman, Vishali; Sharma, Akshima; ArunRaj, Sreedharan Thankarajan; Baghel, Vivek; Patel, Chetan; Sharma, Param Dev; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2018-03-29

    The bone scintigraphic image might exceed the dynamic range (the ratio between the highest and the lowest brightness a monitor is capable of displaying) of display monitor. In this case, a high intensity area, and loss of the details of other structures in the displayed image makes the clinical interpretation a challenging task. We have investigated the role of intensity transformation function for enhancement of these types of images. Methods: Forty high dynamic range bone scintigraphic images were processed using intensity transformation (IT) function. The IT function has two parameters: threshold and slope. Keeping the threshold equal to mean counts of the image, the value of slope was varied from 1 to 20. In-house application program written in MATLAB R2013b was used to process images. Twenty output images corresponding to one input image were visually inspected by two experienced nuclear medicine (NM) physicians to select diagnostic quality images, and from their selection the standardized slope (value of slope parameter) that produced maximum numbers of diagnostic images was determined. They also rated the image quality of input and output images (at standardized slope) on scale 1 to 5 [where 1 is for poor and 5 if for the excellent diagnostic quality]. Student's t-test was used to test the significance of difference between the mean image quality score assigned to input and processed images at significance level α = 0.05. Results: The application of IT functions with standardized parameters significantly improved the quality of high dynamic range bone scintigraphic images ( P enhancement. Copyright © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  12. The apport of functional cerebral imaging in the psychiatric pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maktouf, Ch.; Kotzki, P.O.; Humbert, Th.

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in medical brain imaging using structural and functional brain imaging techniques have contributed to the investigation of the living human brain. These new techniques hold great promise for the evaluation and understanding mental disorders. We report the position emission tomography (PET) and the more widely available single emission photon (SPECT) studies, as functional brain imaging, to assess regional cerebral metabolism and blood flow in psychiatric illness. (author)

  13. Functional Store Image and Corporate Social Responsibility Image: A Congruity Analysis on Store Loyalty

    OpenAIRE

    Jamaliah Mohd. Yusof; Rosidah Musa; Sofiah Abd. Rahman

    2011-01-01

    With previous studies that examined the importance of functional store image and CSR, this study is aimed at examining their effects in the self-congruity model in influencing store loyalty. In particular, this study developed and tested a structural model in the context of retailing industry on the self-congruity theory. Whilst much of the self-congruity studies have incorporated functional store image, there has been lack of studies that examined social responsibility i...

  14. Image potential resonances of the aluminum (100) surface; Bildpotentialresonanzen der Aluminium-(100)-Oberflaeche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Matthias

    2011-07-08

    Image-potential resonances on the (100) surface of pure Aluminum are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experiments are conducted both energy- and time-resolved using the method of two-photon photoemission spectroscopy. The main attention of the theoretical examination and extensive numerical calculations is devoted to the interaction between surface and bulk states. Image-potential resonances on Al(100) are a system in which a complete series of discrete Rydberg states strongly couples to a continuum of states. As a simple metal it also provides a good opportunity to test theoretical models of the structure of the potential at metal surfaces. This work represents the first high-resolution investigation of image-potential resonances with such strong resonance character. For the first time, it is demonstrated experimentally that isolated image-potential resonances exist on an Aluminum surface. On the (100) surface of Aluminum the second through fifth image-potential resonance are resolved and both, their energies and lifetimes are measured. The binding energies of the image-potential resonances form a Rydberg series of states {epsilon}{sub n}=-(0,85 eV)/((n+a){sup 2}). Within the accuracy of the measurement it is not necessary to introduce a quantum defect a (a=0.022{+-}0.035). Using angle-resolved two-photon photoemission spectroscopy the effective mass of electrons in the second image-potential resonance is measured to 1.01{+-}0.11 electron masses. The lifetimes of the resonances increase as {tau}{sub n} = (1.0{+-}0.2)fs.n{sup 3} starting from n=2. Calculations using the density matrix formalism show that the experimentally observed lifetimes can be explained well by electrons decaying into the bulk. The effect of resonance trapping leads to extended lifetimes in the process. Contrary to common theoretical models of image-potential states at metal surfaces the first image-potential resonance cannot be observed in two-photon photoemission on Al(100

  15. Blurred image restoration using knife-edge function and optimal window Wiener filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shudao; Yan, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Motion blur in images is usually modeled as the convolution of a point spread function (PSF) and the original image represented as pixel intensities. The knife-edge function can be used to model various types of motion-blurs, and hence it allows for the construction of a PSF and accurate estimation of the degradation function without knowledge of the specific degradation model. This paper addresses the problem of image restoration using a knife-edge function and optimal window Wiener filtering. In the proposed method, we first calculate the motion-blur parameters and construct the optimal window. Then, we use the detected knife-edge function to obtain the system degradation function. Finally, we perform Wiener filtering to obtain the restored image. Experiments show that the restored image has improved resolution and contrast parameters with clear details and no discernible ringing effects. PMID:29377950

  16. A critical evaluation of validity and utility of translational imaging in pain and analgesia: Utilizing functional imaging to enhance the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Jaymin; Geber, Christian; Hargreaves, Richard; Birklein, Frank; Borsook, David

    2018-01-01

    Assessing clinical pain and metrics related to function or quality of life predominantly relies on patient reported subjective measures. These outcome measures are generally not applicable to the preclinical setting where early signs pointing to analgesic value of a therapy are sought, thus introducing difficulties in animal to human translation in pain research. Evaluating brain function in patients and respective animal model(s) has the potential to characterize mechanisms associated with pain or pain-related phenotypes and thereby provide a means of laboratory to clinic translation. This review summarizes the progress made towards understanding of brain function in clinical and preclinical pain states elucidated using an imaging approach as well as the current level of validity of translational pain imaging. We hypothesize that neuroimaging can describe the central representation of pain or pain phenotypes and yields a basis for the development and selection of clinically relevant animal assays. This approach may increase the probability of finding meaningful new analgesics that can help satisfy the significant unmet medical needs of patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Voltage imaging to understand connections and functions of neuronal circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antic, Srdjan D.; Empson, Ruth M.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying brain functions such as cognition and emotions requires monitoring of membrane voltage at the cellular, circuit, and system levels. Seminal voltage-sensitive dye and calcium-sensitive dye imaging studies have demonstrated parallel detection of electrical activity across populations of interconnected neurons in a variety of preparations. A game-changing advance made in recent years has been the conceptualization and development of optogenetic tools, including genetically encoded indicators of voltage (GEVIs) or calcium (GECIs) and genetically encoded light-gated ion channels (actuators, e.g., channelrhodopsin2). Compared with low-molecular-weight calcium and voltage indicators (dyes), the optogenetic imaging approaches are 1) cell type specific, 2) less invasive, 3) able to relate activity and anatomy, and 4) facilitate long-term recordings of individual cells' activities over weeks, thereby allowing direct monitoring of the emergence of learned behaviors and underlying circuit mechanisms. We highlight the potential of novel approaches based on GEVIs and compare those to calcium imaging approaches. We also discuss how novel approaches based on GEVIs (and GECIs) coupled with genetically encoded actuators will promote progress in our knowledge of brain circuits and systems. PMID:27075539

  18. Adaptive iterated function systems filter for images highly corrupted with fixed - Value impulse noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugavadivu, P.; Eliahim Jeevaraj, P. S.

    2014-06-01

    The Adaptive Iterated Functions Systems (AIFS) Filter presented in this paper has an outstanding potential to attenuate the fixed-value impulse noise in images. This filter has two distinct phases namely noise detection and noise correction which uses Measure of Statistics and Iterated Function Systems (IFS) respectively. The performance of AIFS filter is assessed by three metrics namely, Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR), Mean Structural Similarity Index Matrix (MSSIM) and Human Visual Perception (HVP). The quantitative measures PSNR and MSSIM endorse the merit of this filter in terms of degree of noise suppression and details/edge preservation respectively, in comparison with the high performing filters reported in the recent literature. The qualitative measure HVP confirms the noise suppression ability of the devised filter. This computationally simple noise filter broadly finds application wherein the images are highly degraded by fixed-value impulse noise.

  19. Method for estimating modulation transfer function from sample images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiga, Rino; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Terada, Yasuko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Mizutani, Ryuta

    2018-02-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) represents the frequency domain response of imaging modalities. Here, we report a method for estimating the MTF from sample images. Test images were generated from a number of images, including those taken with an electron microscope and with an observation satellite. These original images were convolved with point spread functions (PSFs) including those of circular apertures. The resultant test images were subjected to a Fourier transformation. The logarithm of the squared norm of the Fourier transform was plotted against the squared distance from the origin. Linear correlations were observed in the logarithmic plots, indicating that the PSF of the test images can be approximated with a Gaussian. The MTF was then calculated from the Gaussian-approximated PSF. The obtained MTF closely coincided with the MTF predicted from the original PSF. The MTF of an x-ray microtomographic section of a fly brain was also estimated with this method. The obtained MTF showed good agreement with the MTF determined from an edge profile of an aluminum test object. We suggest that this approach is an alternative way of estimating the MTF, independently of the image type. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional imaging of sleep vertex sharp transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, John M; Caporro, Matteo; Haneef, Zulfi; Yeh, Hsiang J; Buttinelli, Carla; Lenartowicz, Agatha; Mumford, Jeanette A; Parvizi, Josef; Poldrack, Russell A

    2011-07-01

    The vertex sharp transient (VST) is an electroencephalographic (EEG) discharge that is an early marker of non-REM sleep. It has been recognized since the beginning of sleep physiology research, but its source and function remain mostly unexplained. We investigated VST generation using functional MRI (fMRI). Simultaneous EEG and fMRI were recorded from seven individuals in drowsiness and light sleep. VST occurrences on EEG were modeled with fMRI using an impulse function convolved with a hemodynamic response function to identify cerebral regions correlating to the VSTs. A resulting statistical image was thresholded at Z>2.3. Two hundred VSTs were identified. Significantly increased signal was present bilaterally in medial central, lateral precentral, posterior superior temporal, and medial occipital cortex. No regions of decreased signal were present. The regions are consistent with electrophysiologic evidence from animal models and functional imaging of human sleep, but the results are specific to VSTs. The regions principally encompass the primary sensorimotor cortical regions for vision, hearing, and touch. The results depict a network comprising the presumed VST generator and its associated regions. The associated regions functional similarity for primary sensation suggests a role for VSTs in sensory experience during sleep. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Image analysis in the evaluation of the physiological potential of maize seeds1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crislaine Aparecida Gomes Pinto

    Full Text Available The Seed Analysis System (SAS is used in the image analysis of seeds and seedlings, and has the potential for use in the control of seed quality. The aim of this research was to adapt the methodology of image analysis of maize seedlings by SAS, and to verify the potential use of this equipment in the evaluation of the physiological potential of maize seeds. Nine batches of two maize hybrids were characterised by means of the following tests and determinations: germination, first count, accelerated ageing, cold test, seedling emergence at 25 and 30ºC, and speed of emergence index. The image analysis experiment was carried out in a factorial scheme of 9 batches x 4 methods of analysis of the seedling images (with and without the use of NWF as substrate, and with and without manual correction of the images. Images of the seedlings were evaluated using the average lengths of the coleoptile, roots and seedlings; and by the automatic and manual indices of vigour, uniformity and growth produced by the SAS. Use of blue NWF afffects the initial development of maize seedlings. The physiological potential of maize seeds can be evaluated in seedlings which are seeded on white paper towels at a temperature of 25 °C and evaluated on the third day. Image analysis should be carried out with the SAS software using automatic calibration and with no correction of the seedling images. Use of SAS equipment for the analysis of seedling images is a potential tool in evaluating the physiological quality of maize seeds.

  2. Time Eigenstates for Potential Functions without Extremal Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabino Torres-Vega

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In a previous paper, we introduced a way to generate a time coordinate system for classical and quantum systems when the potential function has extremal points. In this paper, we deal with the case in which the potential function has no extremal points at all, and we illustrate the method with the harmonic and linear potentials.

  3. Mechanical characterization of articular cartilage by combining magnetic resonance imaging and finite-element analysis-a potential functional imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julkunen, P; Korhonen, R K; Nissi, M J; Jurvelin, J S

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a method for non-invasive characterization of cartilage composition and structure. We aimed to see whether T 1 and T 2 relaxation times are related to proteoglycan (PG) and collagen-specific mechanical properties of articular cartilage. Specifically, we analyzed whether variations in the depthwise collagen orientation, as assessed by the laminae obtained from T 2 profiles, affect the mechanical characteristics of cartilage. After MRI and unconfined compression tests of human and bovine patellar cartilage samples, fibril-reinforced poroviscoelastic finite-element models (FEM), with depthwise collagen orientations implemented from quantitative T 2 maps (3 laminae for human, 3-7 laminae for bovine), were constructed to analyze the non-fibrillar matrix modulus (PG specific), fibril modulus (collagen specific) and permeability of the samples. In bovine cartilage, the non-fibrillar matrix modulus (R = -0.64, p 1 . In bovine cartilage, T 2 correlated positively with the initial fibril modulus (R = 0.62, p = 0.05). In human cartilage, the initial fibril modulus correlated negatively (R = -0.61, p 2 . Based on the simulations, cartilage with a complex collagen architecture (5 or 7 laminae), leading to high bulk T 2 due to magic angle effects, provided higher compressive stiffness than tissue with a simple collagen architecture (3 laminae). Our results suggest that T 1 reflects PG-specific mechanical properties of cartilage. High T 2 is characteristic to soft cartilage with a classical collagen architecture. Contradictorily, high bulk T 2 can also be found in stiff cartilage with a multilaminar collagen fibril network. By emerging MRI and FEM, the present study establishes a step toward functional imaging of articular cartilage

  4. Development of Optically Active Nanostructures for Potential Applications in Sensing, Therapeutics and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Padmanabh

    Materials at nanoscale are finding manifold applications in the various fields like sensing, plasmonics, therapeutics, to mention a few. Large amount of development has taken place regarding synthesis and exploring the novel applications of the various types of nanomaterials like organic, inorganic and hybrid of both. Yet, it is believed that the full potential of different nanomaterials is yet to be fully established stimulating researchers to explore more in the field of nanotechnology. Building on the same premise, in the following studies we have developed the nanomaterials in the class of optically active nanoparticles. First part of the study we have successfully designed, synthesized, and characterized Ag-Fe3O4 nanocomposite substrate for potential applications in quantitative Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) measurements. Quantitative SERS-based detection of dopamine was performed successfully. In subsequent study, facile, single-step synthesis of polyethyleneimine (PEI) coated lanthanide based NaYF4 (Yb, Er) nanoparticles was developed and their application as potential photodynamic therapy agent was studied using excitations by light in near infra-red and visible region. In the following and last study, synthesis and characterization of the conjugated polymer nanoparticles was attempted successfully. Functionalization of the conjugated nanoparticles, which is a bottleneck for their potential applications, was successfully performed by encapsulating them in the silica nanoparticles, surface of which was then functionalized by amine group. Three types of optically active nanoparticles were developed for potential applications in sensing, therapeutics and imaging.

  5. Functional Neuro-Imaging and Post-Traumatic Olfactory Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Richard J.; Sheehan, William; Thurber, Steven; Roberts, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate via a research literature survey the anterior neurological significance of decreased olfactory functioning following traumatic brain injuries. Materials and Methods: A computer literature review was performed to locate all functional neuro-imaging studies on patients with post-traumatic anosmia and other olfactory deficits. Results: A convergence of findings from nine functional neuro-imaging studies indicating evidence for reduced metabolic activity at rest or relative hypo-perfusion during olfactory activations. Hypo-activation of the prefrontal regions was apparent in all nine post-traumatic samples, with three samples yielding evidence of reduced activity in the temporal regions as well. Conclusions: The practical ramifications include the reasonable hypothesis that a total anosmic head trauma patient likely has frontal lobe involvement. PMID:21716782

  6. Functional Imaging: CT and MRI

    OpenAIRE

    van Beek, Edwin JR; Hoffman, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Numerous imaging techniques permit evaluation of regional pulmonary function. Contrast-enhanced CT methods now allow assessment of vasculature and lung perfusion. Techniques using spirometric controlled MDCT allow for quantification of presence and distribution of parenchymal and airway pathology, Xenon gas can be employed to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and rapid bolus injections of iodinated contrast agent can provide quantitative measure of regional parenchymal perfusion. Advan...

  7. Reporter gene imaging: potential impact on therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serganova, Inna; Blasberg, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)-based molecular-genetic imaging in living organisms has enjoyed exceptional growth over the past 5 years; this is particularly striking since it has been identified as a new discipline only within the past decade. Positron emission tomography is one of three imaging technologies (nuclear, magnetic resonance and optical) that has begun to incorporate methods that are established in molecular and cell biology research. The convergence of these disciplines and the wider application of multi-modality imaging are at the heart of this success story. Most current molecular-genetic imaging strategies are 'indirect,' coupling a 'reporter gene' with a complimentary 'reporter probe.' Reporter gene constructs can be driven by constitutive promoter elements and used to monitor gene therapy vectors and the efficacy of trans gene targeting and transduction, as well as to monitor adoptive cell-based therapies. Inducible promoters can be used as 'sensors' to regulate the magnitude of reporter gene expression and can be used to provide information about endogenous cell processes. Reporter systems can also be constructed to monitor mRNA stabilization and specific protein-protein interactions. Promoters can be cell specific and restrict transgene expression to certain tissue and organs. The translation of reporter gene imaging to specific clinical applications is discussed. Several examples that have potential for patient imaging studies in the near future include monitoring adenoviral-based gene therapy, oncolytic herpes virus therapy, adoptive cell-based therapies and Salmonella-based tumor-targeted cancer therapy and imaging. The primary translational applications of noninvasive in vivo reporter gene imaging are likely to be (a) quantitative monitoring of the gene therapy vector and the efficacy of transduction in clinical protocols, by imaging the location, extent and duration of transgene expression; (b) monitoring cell trafficking, targeting

  8. Surface-functionalized nanoparticles for biosensing and imaging-guided therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Win, Khin Yin; Liu, Shuhua; Teng, Choon Peng; Zheng, Yuangang; Han, Ming-Yong

    2013-03-01

    In this article, the very recent progress of various functional inorganic nanomaterials is reviewed including their unique properties, surface functionalization strategies, and applications in biosensing and imaging-guided therapeutics. The proper surface functionalization renders them with stability, biocompatibility and functionality in physiological environments, and further enables their targeted use in bioapplications after bioconjugation via selective and specific recognition. The surface-functionalized nanoprobes using the most actively studied nanoparticles (i.e., gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, upconversion nanoparticles, and magnetic nanoparticles) make them an excellent platform for a wide range of bioapplications. With more efforts in recent years, they have been widely developed as labeling probes to detect various biological species such as proteins, nucleic acids and ions, and extensively employed as imaging probes to guide therapeutics such as drug/gene delivery and photothermal/photodynamic therapy.

  9. Imaging insights into basal ganglia function, Parkinson's disease, and dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoessl, A Jon; Lehericy, Stephane; Strafella, Antonio P

    2014-08-09

    Recent advances in structural and functional imaging have greatly improved our ability to assess normal functions of the basal ganglia, diagnose parkinsonian syndromes, understand the pathophysiology of parkinsonism and other movement disorders, and detect and monitor disease progression. Radionuclide imaging is the best way to detect and monitor dopamine deficiency, and will probably continue to be the best biomarker for assessment of the effects of disease-modifying therapies. However, advances in magnetic resonance enable the separation of patients with Parkinson's disease from healthy controls, and show great promise for differentiation between Parkinson's disease and other akinetic-rigid syndromes. Radionuclide imaging is useful to show the dopaminergic basis for both motor and behavioural complications of Parkinson's disease and its treatment, and alterations in non-dopaminergic systems. Both PET and MRI can be used to study patterns of functional connectivity in the brain, which is disrupted in Parkinson's disease and in association with its complications, and in other basal-ganglia disorders such as dystonia, in which an anatomical substrate is not otherwise apparent. Functional imaging is increasingly used to assess underlying pathological processes such as neuroinflammation and abnormal protein deposition. This imaging is another promising approach to assess the effects of treatments designed to slow disease progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bedside functional brain imaging in critically-ill children using high-density EEG source modeling and multi-modal sensory stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Eytan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute brain injury is a common cause of death and critical illness in children and young adults. Fundamental management focuses on early characterization of the extent of injury and optimizing recovery by preventing secondary damage during the days following the primary injury. Currently, bedside technology for measuring neurological function is mainly limited to using electroencephalography (EEG for detection of seizures and encephalopathic features, and evoked potentials. We present a proof of concept study in patients with acute brain injury in the intensive care setting, featuring a bedside functional imaging set-up designed to map cortical brain activation patterns by combining high density EEG recordings, multi-modal sensory stimulation (auditory, visual, and somatosensory, and EEG source modeling. Use of source-modeling allows for examination of spatiotemporal activation patterns at the cortical region level as opposed to the traditional scalp potential maps. The application of this system in both healthy and brain-injured participants is demonstrated with modality-specific source-reconstructed cortical activation patterns. By combining stimulation obtained with different modalities, most of the cortical surface can be monitored for changes in functional activation without having to physically transport the subject to an imaging suite. The results in patients in an intensive care setting with anatomically well-defined brain lesions suggest a topographic association between their injuries and activation patterns. Moreover, we report the reproducible application of a protocol examining a higher-level cortical processing with an auditory oddball paradigm involving presentation of the patient's own name. This study reports the first successful application of a bedside functional brain mapping tool in the intensive care setting. This application has the potential to provide clinicians with an additional dimension of information to manage

  11. Use of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography-Based Ventilation Imaging to Correlate Lung Dose and Function With Clinical Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Tucker, Susan L.; Liao, Zhongxing; Guerrero, Thomas; Martel, Mary K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)-based ventilation is an emerging imaging modality that can be used in the thoracic treatment planning process. The clinical benefit of using ventilation images in radiation treatment plans remains to be tested. The purpose of the current work was to test the potential benefit of using ventilation in treatment planning by evaluating whether dose to highly ventilated regions of the lung resulted in increased incidence of clinical toxicity. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment 4DCT data were used to compute pretreatment ventilation images for 96 lung cancer patients. Ventilation images were calculated using 4DCT data, deformable image registration, and a density-change based algorithm. Dose–volume and ventilation-based dose function metrics were computed for each patient. The ability of the dose–volume and ventilation-based dose–function metrics to predict for severe (grade 3+) radiation pneumonitis was assessed using logistic regression analysis, area under the curve (AUC) metrics, and bootstrap methods. Results: A specific patient example is presented that demonstrates how incorporating ventilation-based functional information can help separate patients with and without toxicity. The logistic regression significance values were all lower for the dose–function metrics (range P=.093-.250) than for their dose–volume equivalents (range, P=.331-.580). The AUC values were all greater for the dose–function metrics (range, 0.569-0.620) than for their dose–volume equivalents (range, 0.500-0.544). Bootstrap results revealed an improvement in model fit using dose–function metrics compared to dose–volume metrics that approached significance (range, P=.118-.155). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study that attempts to correlate lung dose and 4DCT ventilation-based function to thoracic toxicity after radiation therapy. Although the results were not significant at the .05 level, our data suggests

  12. Functionalized Nanolipobubbles Embedded Within a Nanocomposite Hydrogel: a Molecular Bio-imaging and Biomechanical Analysis of the System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufamadi, Maluta S; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Modi, Girish; Naidoo, Dinesh; Iyuke, Sunny E; Pillay, Viness

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the use of molecular bio-imaging systems and biomechanical dynamics to elucidate the fate of a nanocomposite hydrogel system prepared by merging FITC-labeled nanolipobubbles within a cross-linked hydrogel network. The nanocomposite hydrogel system was characterized by size distribution analysis and zeta potential as well as shears thinning behavior, elastic modulus (G'), viscous loss moduli (G"), TEM, and FTIR. In addition, molecular bio-imaging via Vevo ultrasound and Cell-viZio techniques evaluated the stability and distribution of the nanolipobubbles within the cross-linked hydrogel. FITC-labeled and functionalized nanolipobubbles had particle sizes between 135 and 158 nm (PdI = 0.129 and 0.190) and a zeta potential of -34 mV. TEM and ultrasound imaging revealed the uniformity and dimensional stability of the functionalized nanolipobubbles pre- and post-embedment into the cross-linked hydrogel. Biomechanical characterization of the hydrogel by shear thinning behavior was governed by the polymer concentration and the cross-linker, glutaraldehyde. Ultrasound analysis and Cell-viZio bio-imaging were highly suitable to visualize the fluorescent image-guided nanolipobubbles and their morphology post-embedment into the hydrogel to form the NanoComposite system. Since the nanocomposite is intended for targeted treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, the distribution of the functionalized nanolipobubbles into PC12 neuronal cells was also ascertained via confocal microscopy. Results demonstrated effective release and localization of the nanolipobubbles within PC12 neuronal cells. The molecular structure of the synthetic surface peptide remained intact for an extended period to ensure potency for targeted delivery from the hydrogel ex vivo. These findings provide further insight into the properties of nanocomposite hydrogels for specialized drug delivery.

  13. Functional brain imaging of gastrointestinal sensation in health and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lukas Van Oudenhove; Steven J Coen; Qasim Aziz

    2007-01-01

    It has since long been known, from everyday experience as well as from animal and human studies, that psychological processes-both affective and cognitiveexert an influence on gastrointestinal sensorimotor function. More specifically, a link between psychological factors and visceral hypersensitivity has been suggested,mainly based on research in functional gastrointestinal disorder patients. However, until recently, the exact nature of this putative relationship remained unclear,mainly due to a lack of non-invasive methods to study the (neurobiological) mechanisms underlying this relationship in non-sleeping humans. As functional brain imaging, introduced in visceral sensory neuroscience some 10 years ago, does provide a method for in vivo study of brain-gut interactions, insight into the neurobiological mechanisms underlying visceral sensation in general and the influence of psychological factors more particularly,has rapidly grown. In this article, an overview of brain imaging evidence on gastrointestinal sensation will be given, with special emphasis on the brain mechanisms underlying the interaction between affective & cognitive processes and visceral sensation. First, the reciprocal neural pathways between the brain and the gut (braingut axis) will be briefly outlined, including brain imaging evidence in healthy volunteers. Second, functional brain imaging studies assessing the influence of psychological factors on brain processing of visceral sensation in healthy humans will be discussed in more detail.Finally, brain imaging work investigating differences in brain responses to visceral distension between healthy volunteers and functional gastrointestinal disorder patients will be highlighted.

  14. Multiple image x-radiography for functional lung imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulakh, G. K.; Mann, A.; Belev, G.; Wiebe, S.; Kuebler, W. M.; Singh, B.; Chapman, D.

    2018-01-01

    Detection and visualization of lung tissue structures is impaired by predominance of air. However, by using synchrotron x-rays, refraction of x-rays at the interface of tissue and air can be utilized to generate contrast which may in turn enable quantification of lung optical properties. We utilized multiple image radiography, a variant of diffraction enhanced imaging, at the Canadian light source to quantify changes in unique x-ray optical properties of lungs, namely attenuation, refraction and ultra small-angle scatter (USAXS or width) contrast ratios as a function of lung orientation in free-breathing or respiratory-gated mice before and after intra-nasal bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) instillation. The lung ultra small-angle scatter and attenuation contrast ratios were significantly higher 9 h post lipopolysaccharide instillation compared to saline treatment whereas the refraction contrast decreased in magnitude. In ventilated mice, end-expiratory pressures result in an increase in ultra small-angle scatter contrast ratio when compared to end-inspiratory pressures. There were no detectable changes in lung attenuation or refraction contrast ratio with change in lung pressure alone. In effect, multiple image radiography can be applied towards following optical properties of lung air-tissue barrier over time during pathologies such as acute lung injury.

  15. Role of functional imaging in the development and refinement of invasive neuromodulation for psychiatric disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nolan; R; Williams; Joseph; J; Taylor; Kayla; Lamb; Colleen; A; Hanlon; E; Baron; Short; Mark; S; George

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation(DBS) is emerging as a pow-erful tool for the alleviation of targeted symptoms in treatment-resistant neuropsychiatric disorders. Despite the expanding use of neuropsychiatric DBS, the mecha-nisms responsible for its effects are only starting to be elucidated. Several modalities such as quantitative elec-troencephalography as well a intraoperative recordings have been utilized to attempt to understand the under-pinnings of this new treatment modality, but functional imaging appears to offer several unique advantages. Functional imaging techniques like positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomog-raphy and functional magnetic resonance imaging have been used to examine the effects of focal DBS on activ-ity in a distributed neural network. These investigations are critical for advancing the field of invasive neuro-modulation in a safe and effective manner, particularly in terms of defining the neuroanatomical targets and refining the stimulation protocols. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current functional neuroim-aging findings from neuropsychiatric DBS implantation for three disorders: treatment-resistant depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and Tourette syndrome. All of the major targets will be discussed(Nucleus ac-cumbens, anterior limb of internal capsule, subcallosal cingulate, Subthalamic nucleus, Centromedial nucleus of the thalamus-Parafasicular complex, frontal pole, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). We will also address some apparent inconsistencies within this literature, and suggest potential future directions for this promis-ing area.

  16. Fifty Years of Technological Innovation: Potential and Limitations of Current Technologies in Abdominal Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenberger, Ulrike I; Morelli, John; Budjan, Johannes; Henzler, Thomas; Sourbron, Steven; Bock, Michael; Riffel, Philipp; Hernando, Diego; Ong, Melissa M; Schoenberg, Stefan O

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important modality for the diagnosis of intra-abdominal pathology. Hardware and pulse sequence developments have made it possible to derive not only morphologic but also functional information related to organ perfusion (dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI), oxygen saturation (blood oxygen level dependent), tissue cellularity (diffusion-weighted imaging), and tissue composition (spectroscopy). These techniques enable a more specific assessment of pathologic lesions and organ functionality. Magnetic resonance imaging has thus transitioned from a purely morphologic examination to a modality from which image-based disease biomarkers can be derived. This fits well with several emerging trends in radiology, such as the need to accurately assess response to costly treatment strategies and the need to improve lesion characterization to potentially avoid biopsy. Meanwhile, the cost-effectiveness, availability, and robustness of computed tomography (CT) ensure its place as the current workhorse for clinical imaging. Although the lower soft tissue contrast of CT relative to MRI is a long-standing limitation, other disadvantages such as ionizing radiation exposure have become a matter of public concern. Nevertheless, recent technical developments such as dual-energy CT or dynamic volume perfusion CT also provide more functional imaging beyond morphology.The aim of this article was to review and discuss the most important recent technical developments in abdominal MRI and state-of-the-art CT, with an eye toward the future, providing examples of their clinical utility for the evaluation of hepatic and renal pathologies.

  17. MR imaging of kidneys: functional evaluation using F-15 perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grattan-Smith, J. Damien; Jones, Richard A.; Little, Stephen; Perez-Bayfield, Marcos R.; Broecker, Bruce; Smith, Edwin A.; Scherz, Hal C.; Kirsch, Andrew J.

    2003-01-01

    Children with hydronephrosis are typically investigated by a combination of diuretic renal scintigraphy, ultrasound, and voiding cystourethrography. Unfortunately, there is no gold standard to assess obstruction. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced MR urography in the investigation of children with hydronephrosis to define urinary tract anatomy, to calculate differential renal function and to assess urinary tract obstruction. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed in 40 children with unilateral hydronephrosis. There were 14 girls and 26 boys with an age range of 1 month to 14 years (mean 1.4 years). The information from traditional imaging modalities was compared to the information obtained from the single MR study. The anatomic imaging with MR urography was superior to other modalities. The split renal function was estimated with MR urography by calculating the volume of enhancing renal parenchyma and was comparable to renal scintigraphy (r=0.98). By using surgery versus non-surgery as the decision point, with MR urography the sensitivity was 100%, specificity 71%, positive predictive value 86%, negative predictive value 100%, and diagnostic efficiency 90%. For renal scintigraphy the sensitivity was 96%, the specificity 56%, positive predictive value 76%, negative predictive value 90%, and diagnostic efficiency 79%. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR urography provides superior anatomic and functional information when compared with ultrasound and diuretic renal scintigraphy. The information is gathered in a single study that does not use ionizing radiation. It is likely that MR urography will replace renal scintigraphy in the evaluation of hydronephrosis in children. (orig.)

  18. MR imaging of kidneys: functional evaluation using F-15 perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grattan-Smith, J. Damien; Jones, Richard A.; Little, Stephen [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University School of Medicine, 1001 Johnson Ferry Road, GA 30342, Atlanta (United States); Perez-Bayfield, Marcos R.; Broecker, Bruce; Smith, Edwin A.; Scherz, Hal C.; Kirsch, Andrew J. [Department of Pediatric Urology, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University School of Medicine, GA 30342, Atlanta (United States)

    2003-05-01

    Children with hydronephrosis are typically investigated by a combination of diuretic renal scintigraphy, ultrasound, and voiding cystourethrography. Unfortunately, there is no gold standard to assess obstruction. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced MR urography in the investigation of children with hydronephrosis to define urinary tract anatomy, to calculate differential renal function and to assess urinary tract obstruction. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed in 40 children with unilateral hydronephrosis. There were 14 girls and 26 boys with an age range of 1 month to 14 years (mean 1.4 years). The information from traditional imaging modalities was compared to the information obtained from the single MR study. The anatomic imaging with MR urography was superior to other modalities. The split renal function was estimated with MR urography by calculating the volume of enhancing renal parenchyma and was comparable to renal scintigraphy (r=0.98). By using surgery versus non-surgery as the decision point, with MR urography the sensitivity was 100%, specificity 71%, positive predictive value 86%, negative predictive value 100%, and diagnostic efficiency 90%. For renal scintigraphy the sensitivity was 96%, the specificity 56%, positive predictive value 76%, negative predictive value 90%, and diagnostic efficiency 79%. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR urography provides superior anatomic and functional information when compared with ultrasound and diuretic renal scintigraphy. The information is gathered in a single study that does not use ionizing radiation. It is likely that MR urography will replace renal scintigraphy in the evaluation of hydronephrosis in children. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging research progress on brain functional reorganization after peripheral nerve injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weiwei; Liu Hanqiu

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of functional magnetic resonance imaging technology the brain plasticity and functional reorganization are hot topics in the central nervous system imaging studies. Brain functional reorganization and rehabilitation after peripheral nerve injury may have certain regularity. In this paper, the progress of brain functional magnetic resonance imaging technology and its applications in the world wide clinical and experimental researches of the brain functional reorganization after peripheral nerve injury is are reviewed. (authors)

  20. SU-E-J-86: Lobar Lung Function Quantification by PET Galligas and CT Ventilation Imaging in Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eslick, E; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P; Bailey, D; Bailey, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the lobar lung function using the novel PET Galligas ([68Ga]-carbon nanoparticle) ventilation imaging and the investigational CT ventilation imaging in lung cancer patients pre-treatment. Methods: We present results on our first three lung cancer patients (2 male, mean age 78 years) as part of an ongoing ethics approved study. For each patient a PET Galligas ventilation (PET-V) image and a pair of breath hold CT images (end-exhale and end-inhale tidal volumes) were acquired using a Siemens Biograph PET CT. CT-ventilation (CT-V) images were created from the pair of CT images using deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms and the Hounsfield Unit (HU) ventilation metric. A comparison of ventilation quantification from each modality was done on the lobar level and the voxel level. A Bland-Altman plot was used to assess the difference in mean percentage contribution of each lobe to the total lung function between the two modalities. For each patient, a voxel-wise Spearmans correlation was calculated for the whole lungs between the two modalities. Results: The Bland-Altman plot demonstrated strong agreement between PET-V and CT-V for assessment of lobar function (r=0.99, p<0.001; range mean difference: −5.5 to 3.0). The correlation between PET-V and CT-V at the voxel level was moderate(r=0.60, p<0.001). Conclusion: This preliminary study on the three patients data sets demonstrated strong agreement between PET and CT ventilation imaging for the assessment of pre-treatment lung function at the lobar level. Agreement was only moderate at the level of voxel correlations. These results indicate that CT ventilation imaging has potential for assessing pre-treatment lobar lung function in lung cancer patients

  1. Current Trends in Intraoperative Optical Imaging for Functional Brain Mapping and Delineation of Lesions of Language Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Neal; Uhleman, Falk; Sheth, Sameer A.; Bookheimer, Susan; Martin, Neil; Toga, Arthur W.

    2009-01-01

    Resection of a cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM), epileptic focus, or glioma, ideally has a prerequisite of microscopic delineation of the lesion borders in relation to the normal gray and white matter that mediate critical functions. Currently, Wada testing and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are used for preoperative mapping of critical function, whereas electrical stimulation mapping (ESM) is used for intraoperative mapping. For lesion delineation, MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) are used preoperatively, whereas microscopy and histological sectioning are used intraoperatively. However, for lesions near eloquent cortex, these imaging techniques may lack sufficient resolution to define the relationship between the lesion and language function, and thus not accurately determine which patients will benefit from neurosurgical resection of the lesion without iatrogenic aphasia. Optical techniques such as intraoperative optical imaging of intrinsic signals (iOIS) show great promise for the precise functional mapping of cortices, as well as delineation of the borders of AVMs, epileptic foci, and gliomas. Here we first review the physiology of neuroimaging, and then progress towards the validation and justification of using intraoperative optical techniques, especially in relation to neurosurgical planning of resection AVMs, epileptic foci, and gliomas near or in eloquent cortex. We conclude with a short description of potential novel intraoperative optical techniques. PMID:18786643

  2. Whole-slide imaging in pathology: the potential impact on PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Steven C.

    2007-03-01

    Pathology, the medical specialty charged with the evaluation of macroscopic and microscopic aspects of disease, is increasingly turning to digital imaging. While the conventional tissue blocks and glass slides form an "archive" that pathology departments must maintain, digital images acquired from microscopes or digital slide scanners are increasingly used for telepathology, consultation, and intra-facility communication. Since many healthcare facilities are moving to "enterprise PACS" with departments in addition to radiology using the infrastructure of such systems, some understanding of the potential of whole-slide digital images is important. Network and storage designers, in particular, are very likely to be impacted if a significant number of such images are to be moved on, or stored (even temporarily) in, enterprise PACS. As an example, a typical commercial whole-slide imaging system typically generates 15 gigabytes per slide scanned (per focal plane). Many of these whole-slide scanners have a throughput of 1000 slides per day. If that full capacity is used and all the resulting digital data is moved to the enterprise PACS, it amounts to 15 terabytes per day; the amount of data a large radiology department might generate in a year or two. This paper will review both the clinical scenarios of whole-slide imaging as well as the resulting data volumes. The author will emphasize the potential PACS infrastructure impact of such huge data volumes.

  3. Characterization of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) in low contrast helical abdominal imaging via a transfer function based method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Da; Li, Xinhua; Liu, Bob

    2012-03-01

    Since the introduction of ASiR, its potential in noise reduction has been reported in various clinical applications. However, the influence of different scan and reconstruction parameters on the trade off between ASiR's blurring effect and noise reduction in low contrast imaging has not been fully studied. Simple measurements on low contrast images, such as CNR or phantom scores could not explore the nuance nature of this problem. We tackled this topic using a method which compares the performance of ASiR in low contrast helical imaging based on an assumed filter layer on top of the FBP reconstruction. Transfer functions of this filter layer were obtained from the noise power spectra (NPS) of corresponding FBP and ASiR images that share the same scan and reconstruction parameters. 2D transfer functions were calculated as sqrt[NPSASiR(u, v)/NPSFBP(u, v)]. Synthesized ACR phantom images were generated by filtering the FBP images with the transfer functions of specific (FBP, ASiR) pairs, and were compared with the ASiR images. It is shown that the transfer functions could predict the deterministic blurring effect of ASiR on low contrast objects, as well as the degree of noise reductions. Using this method, the influence of dose, scan field of view (SFOV), display field of view (DFOV), ASiR level, and Recon Mode on the behavior of ASiR in low contrast imaging was studied. It was found that ASiR level, dose level, and DFOV play more important roles in determining the behavior of ASiR than the other two parameters.

  4. Functional requirements for a central research imaging data repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Thomas; Gruetz, Romanus; Dickmann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The current situation at many university medical centers regarding the management of biomedical research imaging data leaves much to be desired. In contrast to the recommendations of the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the German Council of Sciences and Humanities regarding the professional management of research data, there are commonly many individual data pools for research data in each institute and the management remains the responsibility of the researcher. A possible solution for this situation would be to install local central repositories for biomedical research imaging data. In this paper, we developed a scenario based on abstracted use-cases for institutional research undertakings as well as collaborative biomedical research projects and analyzed the functional requirements that a local repository would have to fulfill. We determined eight generic categories of functional requirements, which can be viewed as a basic guideline for the minimum functionality of a central repository for biomedical research imaging data.

  5. Analysis of a multi-frequency electromagnetic imaging functional for thin, crack-like electromagnetic inclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Won-Kwang

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a non-iterative multi-frequency subspace migration imaging algorithm was developed based on an asymptotic expansion formula for thin, curve-like electromagnetic inclusions and the structure of singular vectors in the Multi-Static Response (MSR) matrix. The present study examines the structure of subspace migration imaging functional and proposes an improved imaging functional weighted by the frequency. We identify the relationship between the imaging functional and Bessel functions ...

  6. Experimental evaluation and basis function optimization of the spatially variant image-space PSF on the Ingenuity PET/MR scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A.; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The Ingenuity time-of-flight (TF) PET/MR is a recently developed hybrid scanner combining the molecular imaging capabilities of PET with the excellent soft tissue contrast of MRI. It is becoming common practice to characterize the system's point spread function (PSF) and understand its variation under spatial transformations to guide clinical studies and potentially use it within resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Furthermore, due to the system's utilization of overlapping and spherical symmetric Kaiser-Bessel basis functions during image reconstruction, its image space PSF and reconstructed spatial resolution could be affected by the selection of the basis function parameters. Hence, a detailed investigation into the multidimensional basis function parameter space is needed to evaluate the impact of these parameters on spatial resolution. Methods: Using an array of 12 × 7 printed point sources, along with a custom made phantom, and with the MR magnet on, the system's spatially variant image-based PSF was characterized in detail. Moreover, basis function parameters were systematically varied during reconstruction (list-mode TF OSEM) to evaluate their impact on the reconstructed resolution and the image space PSF. Following the spatial resolution optimization, phantom, and clinical studies were subsequently reconstructed using representative basis function parameters. Results: Based on the analysis and under standard basis function parameters, the axial and tangential components of the PSF were found to be almost invariant under spatial transformations (∼4 mm) while the radial component varied modestly from 4 to 6.7 mm. Using a systematic investigation into the basis function parameter space, the spatial resolution was found to degrade for basis functions with a large radius and small shape parameter. However, it was found that optimizing the spatial resolution in the reconstructed PET images, while having a good basis function

  7. Experimental evaluation and basis function optimization of the spatially variant image-space PSF on the Ingenuity PET/MR scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A., E-mail: Fotis.Kotasidis@unige.ch [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland and Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Zaidi, Habib [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Centre, Geneva University, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Ingenuity time-of-flight (TF) PET/MR is a recently developed hybrid scanner combining the molecular imaging capabilities of PET with the excellent soft tissue contrast of MRI. It is becoming common practice to characterize the system's point spread function (PSF) and understand its variation under spatial transformations to guide clinical studies and potentially use it within resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Furthermore, due to the system's utilization of overlapping and spherical symmetric Kaiser-Bessel basis functions during image reconstruction, its image space PSF and reconstructed spatial resolution could be affected by the selection of the basis function parameters. Hence, a detailed investigation into the multidimensional basis function parameter space is needed to evaluate the impact of these parameters on spatial resolution. Methods: Using an array of 12 × 7 printed point sources, along with a custom made phantom, and with the MR magnet on, the system's spatially variant image-based PSF was characterized in detail. Moreover, basis function parameters were systematically varied during reconstruction (list-mode TF OSEM) to evaluate their impact on the reconstructed resolution and the image space PSF. Following the spatial resolution optimization, phantom, and clinical studies were subsequently reconstructed using representative basis function parameters. Results: Based on the analysis and under standard basis function parameters, the axial and tangential components of the PSF were found to be almost invariant under spatial transformations (∼4 mm) while the radial component varied modestly from 4 to 6.7 mm. Using a systematic investigation into the basis function parameter space, the spatial resolution was found to degrade for basis functions with a large radius and small shape parameter. However, it was found that optimizing the spatial resolution in the reconstructed PET images, while having a good basis

  8. Functional imaging of microdomains in cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, James; Jamal, Ghadir; Tilley, Mark; Davis, Ben; McKenzie, Graeme; Vere, Kelly; Somekh, Michael G; O'Shea, Paul; Harris, Helen

    2008-10-01

    The presence of microdomains or rafts within cell membranes is a topic of intense study and debate. The role of these structures in cell physiology, however, is also not yet fully understood with many outstanding problems. This problem is partly based on the small size of raft structures that presents significant problems to their in vivo study, i.e., within live cell membranes. But the structure and dynamics as well as the factors that control the assembly and disassembly of rafts are also of major interest. In this review we outline some of the problems that the study of rafts in cell membranes present as well as describing some views of what are considered the generalised functions of membrane rafts. We point to the possibility that there may be several different 'types' of membrane raft in cell membranes and consider the factors that affect raft assembly and disassembly, particularly, as some researchers suggest that the lifetimes of rafts in cell membranes may be sub-second. We attempt to review some of the methods that offer the ability to interrogate rafts directly as well as describing factors that appear to affect their functionality. The former include both near-field and far-field optical approaches as well as scanning probe techniques. Some of the advantages and disadvantages of these techniques are outlined. Finally, we describe our own views of raft functionality and properties, particularly, concerning the membrane dipole potential, and describe briefly some of the imaging strategies we have developed for their study.

  9. Initial experience of functional imaging of upper urinary tract neoplasm by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Soichiro; Masuda, Hitoshi; Saito, Kazutaka; Kawakami, Satoru; Kihara, Kazunori; Ishii, Chikako

    2008-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides functional information widely used in the diagnosis of acute cerebral stroke. We reported our initial experience of this imaging technique of upper urinary tract (UUT) urothelial carcinoma (UC). Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was carried out in 10 consecutive patients with suspected UUT UC. With conventional imaging, seven were diagnosed as having renal pelvic tumors and two were highly suspected of having UUT UC. These nine patients were diagnosed histopathologically as having renal pelvic UC by subsequent operation. The last patient was confirmed as experiencing benign stenosis. DW MRI was obtained with a 1.5-T MR imager without a breath-holding sequence. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of renal parenchyma, dilated collecting system, and tumor were calculated. The differences were analyzed using Wilcoxon t-test. On DW MRI, all nine tumors showed hyperintensity with negligible urinary intensity. Two cases of highly suspected UUT UC with unclear conventional MRI had high signal intensity and contrast. The case of benign stenosis had negative DW MRI. The median (range) ADC value of the tumor (0.803 [0.412-0.958] x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) was significantly lower than those of the dilated collecting system (2.19 [1.42-2.40] x 10 -3 ) and renal parenchyma (1.28 [0.922-1.45] x 10 -3 , respectively (P<0.01 and P<0.01). This is the first report on the application of DW MRI for a series of UUT UC. With this technique, a clear demonstration of UUT UC could be obtained. Moreover, this imaging technique is potentially useful to identify small lesions if they have a low diffusion coefficient. (author)

  10. Zeta-function approach to Casimir energy with singular potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khusnutdinov, Nail R.

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of zeta-function approach the Casimir energy for three simple model system: single delta potential, step function potential and three delta potentials are analyzed. It is shown that the energy contains contributions which are peculiar to the potentials. It is suggested to renormalize the energy using the condition that the energy of infinitely separated potentials is zero which corresponds to subtraction all terms of asymptotic expansion of zeta-function. The energy obtained in this way obeys all physically reasonable conditions. It is finite in the Dirichlet limit, and it may be attractive or repulsive depending on the strength of potential. The effective action is calculated, and it is shown that the surface contribution appears. The renormalization of the effective action is discussed

  11. Functional DNA-containing nanomaterials: cellular applications in biosensing, imaging, and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hao; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Lv, Yifan; Gong, Liang; Wang, Ruowen; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Ronghua; Tan, Weihong

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA performs a vital function as a carrier of genetic code, but in the field of nanotechnology, DNA molecules can catalyze chemical reactions in the cell, that is, DNAzymes, or bind with target-specific ligands, that is, aptamers. These functional DNAs with different modifications have been developed for sensing, imaging, and therapeutic systems. Thus, functional DNAs hold great promise for future applications in nanotechnology and bioanalysis. However, these functional DNAs face challenges, especially in the field of biomedicine. For example, functional DNAs typically require the use of cationic transfection reagents to realize cellular uptake. Such reagents enter the cells, increasing the difficulty of performing bioassays in vivo and potentially damaging the cell's nucleus. To address this obstacle, nanomaterials, such as metallic, carbon, silica, or magnetic materials, have been utilized as DNA carriers or assistants. In this Account, we describe selected examples of functional DNA-containing nanomaterials and their applications from our recent research and those of others. As models, we have chosen to highlight DNA/nanomaterial complexes consisting of gold nanoparticles, graphene oxides, and aptamer-micelles, and we illustrate the potential of such complexes in biosensing, imaging, and medical diagnostics. Under proper conditions, multiple ligand-receptor interactions, decreased steric hindrance, and increased surface roughness can be achieved from a high density of DNA that is bound to the surface of nanomaterials, resulting in a higher affinity for complementary DNA and other targets. In addition, this high density of DNA causes a high local salt concentration and negative charge density, which can prevent DNA degradation. For example, DNAzymes assembled on gold nanoparticles can effectively catalyze chemical reactions even in living cells. And it has been confirmed that DNA-nanomaterial complexes can enter cells more easily than free single

  12. Studies on renal function in the elderly by analysis of radioisotope renal images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohishi, Yukihiko

    1990-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the potential of radionuclide renal imagings for examining senile renal function in a total of 178 subjects. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with Tc-99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid (Tc-DMSA) was performed in the senile group (60-87 years) and in the adult group to determine renal uptake rate of Tc-DMSA and renal volume. Renography studies with I-131 hippuran (n=100) and Tc-99m diethylentriaminepentaacetic acid (Tc-DTPA) (n=20) were also performed for deconvolution analysis. Mean transit time (MTT) was mainly assessed as one of the retention function parameters. Blood residual rates (R15%) at fifteen minutes were also investigated. Renal volume and renal uptake rate for healthy persons were significantly lower in the senile group (n=17) than the adult group (n=24), 205±50 ml vs 225±27 ml; and 22±5% vs 26±2%. I-133 hippuran renography in healthy persons (n=35) showed a tendency toward higher MTT values with aging; however, there was no significant difference among age groups. R15%, obtained by I-133 hippuran renograms, tended to be higher with aging in age groups of persons younger than 70 years. A decreased number of effective nephrons was considered to result in higher R15% values even when aged persons had normal MTT values of I-131 hippuran. Split renal function values for healthy persons, calculated by the two radionuclide imagings, were lower in the senile group than the adult group, suggesting the usefulness of radionuclide imagings in renal function examination. (N.K.)

  13. What are the potential benefits of clinical beta-cell imaging in diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göke, Burkhard

    2010-05-01

    Previously, studies of the endocrine pancreatic beta-cell were mainly performed ex vivo by morphological means. This data supported the analysis of pathophysiological changes in the pancreatic islet during insults such as diabetes mellitus. Metabolic testing of the pancreatic islet by assaying hormone parameters such als plasma insulin or C-peptide combined with more or less sophisticated calculations allowed conclusions about states of insulin resistance or secretory failure. It also allowed certain correlations of endocrine function with beta-cell mass. Today, with firmer pathophysiological concepts about beta-cell failure, modern protocols of islet transplantation, and drugs on the market coming with promises of preservation or even expansion of beta-cell mass in diabetes mellitus it has become very attractive to search for tools measuring beta-cell mass, if possible even repeatingly in the same organism in vivo. From a clinical point of view, the potential of pancreatic beta-cell mass imaging technologies is looked upon with high expectations. Methodologically, the decisive question is whether it is likely that future beta-cell imaging will provide significant advantages over the metabolic methods already in hand. With new in vivo tools, studies of beta-cell mass and function may offer even new approaches stratifying patients to anti-diabetic therapies.

  14. Functional imaging in the Neuroscience. The role of PET, MR and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulham, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Functional imaging is commonly used to describe imaging techniques that provide data about aspects of tissue metabolism, such as glucose / protein metabolism, metabolite concentrations, neuro receptor density and blood flow / perfusion / diffusion when compared with the depiction of anatomy obtained with Computed Tomography (CT) and clinical Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging. In the neuroscience this is a rapidly evolving area and unlike in the past where imaging of the nervous system was carried out by neuroradiologists participants in this dynamic field now come from diverse backgrounds and include basic scientists, clinicians, psychologists, physicists and chemists. PET and SPECT combine the principles of the tracer kinetic method and tomographic (as in CT) image reconstruction. A mathematical model can be derived to describe the biochemical process (in picomolar concentrations) under study and the raw counts of radioactivity that are detected by the scanner can be converted into units of physiological function in-vivo e.g. cerebral metabolic rate for glucose and receptor density. These techniques, using a variety of ligands, have been employed for evaluation of cerebral blood flow / volume, oxygen utilization / metabolism, glucose metabolism, amino acid transport / metabolism, protein synthesis, the dopaminergic, opiate, benzodiazepine, cholinergic and serotonergic systems and for brain mapping in humans. Meanwhile, the term 'functional MR imaging' encompasses MR spectroscopy, echoplanar imaging, diffusion tensor imaging and techniques that rely on the change in blood oxygenation levels to provide an indirect image of neuronal activity (referred to as fMRI). Unlike PET and SPECT, however, these data are obtained without using ionising radiation. In MRS, signals are obtained from nuclei (in mM concentrations) that are constituents of molecules other than water that provide the signal in clinical MR imaging; fibre tract directions have been depicted with

  15. Transfer function analysis of positron-emitting tracer imaging system (PETIS) data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keutgen, N.; Matsuhashi, S.; Mizuniwa, C.; Ito, T.; Fujimura, T.; Ishioka, N.S.; Watanabe, S.; Sekine, T.; Uchida, H.; Hashimoto, S.

    2002-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the two-dimensional image data obtained with the positron-emitting tracer imaging system (PETIS) for plant physiology has been carried out using a transfer function analysis method. While a cut leaf base of Chinese chive (Allium tuberosum Rottler) or a cut stem of soybean (Glycine max L.) was immersed in an aqueous solution containing the [ 18 F] F - ion or [ 13 N]NO 3 - ion, tracer images of the leaf of Chinese chive and the trifoliate of soybean were recorded with PETIS. From the time sequence of images, the tracer transfer function was estimated from which the speed of tracer transport and the fraction moved between specified image positions were deduced

  16. Application of Improved Wavelet Thresholding Function in Image Denoising Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qi Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Wavelet analysis is a time – frequency analysis method, time-frequency localization problems are well solved, this paper analyzes the basic principles of the wavelet transform and the relationship between the signal singularity Lipschitz exponent and the local maxima of the wavelet transform coefficients mold, the principles of wavelet transform in image denoising are analyzed, the disadvantages of traditional wavelet thresholding function are studied, wavelet threshold function, the discontinuity of hard threshold and constant deviation of soft threshold are improved, image is denoised through using the improved threshold function.

  17. Energy functionals for medical image segmentation: choices and consequences

    OpenAIRE

    McIntosh, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging continues to permeate the practice of medicine, but automated yet accurate segmentation and labeling of anatomical structures continues to be a major obstacle to computerized medical image analysis. Though there exists numerous approaches for medical image segmentation, one in particular has gained increasing popularity: energy minimization-based techniques, and the large set of methods encompassed therein. With these techniques an energy function must be chosen, segmentations...

  18. Paramagnetic metal complexes as potential relaxation agents for NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coroiu, Ilioara; Demco, D. E.; Darabont, Al.; Bogdan, M.

    1997-01-01

    The development of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging technique as a clinical diagnostic modality has prompted the need for a new class of pharmaceuticals. These drugs must be administered to a patient in order to enhance the image contrast between the normal and diseased tissue and/or indicate the status of organ function or blood flow. Paramagnetic compounds are presently undergoing extensive evaluation as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These agents increase contrast in MRI by differentially localizing in tissue where they increase the relaxation rates of nearby water protons. The longitudinal R 1 and transverse R 2 relaxivities were measured as a function of molar concentrations for some new paramagnetic complexes like the following: dysprosium, erbium and gadolinium citrates, gadolinium methylene diphosphonate, dysprosium and gadolinium iminodiacetate, manganese para-aminobenzoate and copper nicotinate. The available theoretical approaches for quantitative understanding are presented. (authors)

  19. Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma: Current Functional and Future Molecular Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchet, Elise M.; Martucci, Victoria; Pacak, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Paragangliomas are neural crest-derived tumors, arising either from chromaffin sympathetic tissue (in adrenal, abdominal, intra-pelvic, or thoracic paraganglia) or from parasympathetic tissue (in head and neck paraganglia). They have a specific cellular metabolism, with the ability to synthesize, store, and secrete catecholamines (although most head and neck paragangliomas do not secrete any catecholamines). This disease is rare and also very heterogeneous, with various presentations (e.g., in regards to localization, multifocality, potential to metastasize, biochemical phenotype, and genetic background). With growing knowledge, notably about the pathophysiology and genetic background, guidelines are evolving rapidly. In this context, functional imaging is a challenge for the management of paragangliomas. Nuclear imaging has been used for exploring paragangliomas for the last three decades, with MIBG historically as the first-line exam. Tracers used in paragangliomas can be grouped in three different categories. Agents that specifically target catecholamine synthesis, storage, and secretion pathways include: 123 and 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (123/131I-MIBG), 18F-fluorodopamine (18F-FDA), and 18F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-FDOPA). Agents that bind somatostatin receptors include 111In-pentetreotide and 68Ga-labeled somatostatin analog peptides (68Ga-DOTA-TOC, 68Ga-DOTA-NOC, 68Ga-DOTA-TATE). The non-specific agent most commonly used in paragangliomas is 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG). This review will first describe conventional scintigraphic exams that are used for imaging paragangliomas. In the second part we will emphasize the interest in new PET approaches (specific and non-specific), considering the growing knowledge about genetic background and pathophysiology, with the aim of understanding how tumors behave, and optimally adjusting imaging technique for each tumor type.

  20. Behaviors of cost functions in image registration between 201Tl brain tumor single-photon emission computed tomography and magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soma, Tsutomu; Takaki, Akihiro; Teraoka, Satomi; Ishikawa, Yasushi; Murase, Kenya; Koizumi, Kiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    We studied the behaviors of cost functions in the registration of thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) brain tumor single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images, as the similarity index of image positioning. A marker for image registration [technetium-99m ( 99m Tc) point source] was attached at three sites on the heads of 13 patients with brain tumor, from whom 42 sets of 99m Tc- 201 Tl SPECT (the dual-isotope acquisition) and MR images were obtained. The 201 Tl SPECT and MR images were manually registered according to the markers. From the positions where the two images were registered, the position of the 201 Tl SPECT was moved to examine the behaviors of the three cost functions, i.e., ratio image uniformity (RIU), mutual information (MI), and normalized MI (NMI). The cost functions MI and NMI reached the maximum at positions adjacent to those where the SPECT and MR images were manually registered. As for the accuracy of image registration in terms of the cost functions MI and NMI, on average, the images were accurately registered within 3 deg of rotation around the X-, Y-, and Z-axes, and within 1.5 mm (within 2 pixels), 3 mm (within 3 pixels), and 4 mm (within 1 slice) of translation to the X-, Y-, and Z-axes, respectively. In terms of rotation around the Z-axis, the cost function RIU reached the minimum at positions where the manual registration of the two images was substantially inadequate. The MI and NMI were suitable cost functions in the registration of 201 Tl SPECT and MR images. The behavior of the RIU, in contrast, was unstable, being unsuitable as an index of image registration. (author)

  1. Internuclear potentials from heavy ion fusion excitation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkelund, J.R.; Huizenga, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    A discussion is given of the determination of internuclear potentials from heavy ion fusion excitation functions. It is found that this calculation is complicated by the difficulties involved in a calculation of the frictional energy loss and by the problem of measurement of excitation function with sufficient accuracy to closely define the barrier radius. Any quantitative comparisons made between the nuclear potential derived from fusion data and theoretical nuclear potentials depend upon the solutions of the above problems. 15 references

  2. Metal-oxo containing polymer nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablico, Michele Huelar

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greatly revolutionized the way diseases are detected and treated, as it is a non-invasive imaging modality solely based on the interaction of radiowaves and hydrogen nuclei in the presence of an external magnetic field. It is widely used today for the diagnosis of diseases as it offers an efficient method of mapping structure and function of soft tissues in the body. Most MRI examinations utilize paramagnetic materials known as contrast agents, which enhance the MR signal by decreasing the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times of the surrounding water protons in biological systems. This results into increased signal intensity differences thereby allowing better interpretation and analysis of pathological tissues. Contrast agents function by lowering the T1 or lowering the T2, resulting into bright and dark contrasts, respectively. The most common MRI contrast agents that are in clinical use today are gadolinium chelates and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, both of which have their own advantages in terms of contrast enhancement properties. In the past few years, however, there has been interest in utilizing metal-containing clusters for MRI contrast enhancement as these materials bridge the gap between the constrained structure and magnetic properties of the gadolinium chelates with the superparamagnetic behavior of the iron oxide nanoparticles. Recently, metallic clusters containing Mn and Fe metal centers have received increased attention mainly because of their potential for high spin states and benign nature. In the quest to further develop novel imaging agents, this research has focused on investigating the use of metal-oxo clusters as potential contrast agents for MRI. The primary goal of this project is to identify clusters that meet the following criteria: high paramagnetic susceptibility, water-soluble, stable, cheap, contain environmentally benign metals, and easily derivatized. This work is

  3. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have been performed on 20 right handed volunteers at 1.5 Tesla using echo planar imaging (EPI) protocol. Index finger tapping invoked localized activation in the primary motor area. Consistent and highly reproducible activation in the primary motor area was observed ...

  4. Unevenness on aerosol inhalation lung images and lung function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Takeo; Isawa, Toyoharu; Hirano, Tomio; Ebina, Akio; Shiraishi, Koichiro; Konno, Kiyoshi

    1985-01-01

    The unevenness or inhomogeneity of aerosol deposition patterns on radioaerosol inhalation lung images has been interpreted rather qualitatively in the clinical practice. We have reported our approach to quantitatively analyze the radioactive count distribution on radioaerosol inhalation lung images in relation to the actual lung function data. We have defined multiple indexes to express the shape and the unevenness of the count distribution of the lung images. To reduce as much as possible the number of indexes to be used in the regression functions, the method of selection of variables was introduced to the multiple regression analysis. Because some variables showed greater coefficients of simple correlation, while others did not, multicollinearity of variables had to be taken into consideration. For this reason, we chose a principal components regression analysis. The multiple regression function for each item of pulmonary function data thus established from analysis of 67 subjects appeared usable as a predictor of the actual lung function: for example, % VC (vital capacity) could be estimated by using four indexes out of the multiple ones with a coefficient of multiple correlation (R) of 0.753, and FEVsub(1.0) % (forced expiratory volume in one second divided by forced expiratory volume), by 7 indexes with R = 0.921. Pulmonary function data regarding lung volumes and lung mechanics were estimated more accurately with greater R's than those for lung diffusion, but even in the latter the prediction was still statistically significant at p less than 0.01. We believe the multiple regression functions thus obtained are useful for estimating not only the overall but also the regional function of the lungs. (author)

  5. Pre-clinical functional magnetic resonance imaging. Pt. I. The kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoellner, Frank G.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Zimmer, Fabian; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine

    2014-07-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing worldwide. In Europe alone, at least 8% of the population currently has some degree of CKD. CKD is associated with serious comorbidity, reduced life expectancy, and high economic costs; hence, the early detection and adequate treatment of kidney disease is important. Pre-clinical research can not only give insights into the mechanisms of the various kidney diseases but it also allows for investigating the outcome of new drugs developed to treat kidney disease. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides non-invasive access to tissue and organ function in animal models. Advantages over classical animal research approaches are numerous: the same animal might be repeatedly imaged to investigate a progress or a treatment of disease over time. This has also a direct impact on animal welfare and the refinement of classical animal experiments as the number of animals in the studies might be reduced. In this paper, we review current state of the art in functional magnetic resonance imaging with a focus on pre-clinical kidney imaging.

  6. Pre-clinical functional magnetic resonance imaging. Pt. I. The kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoellner, Frank G.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Zimmer, Fabian; Schad, Lothar R.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing worldwide. In Europe alone, at least 8% of the population currently has some degree of CKD. CKD is associated with serious comorbidity, reduced life expectancy, and high economic costs; hence, the early detection and adequate treatment of kidney disease is important. Pre-clinical research can not only give insights into the mechanisms of the various kidney diseases but it also allows for investigating the outcome of new drugs developed to treat kidney disease. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides non-invasive access to tissue and organ function in animal models. Advantages over classical animal research approaches are numerous: the same animal might be repeatedly imaged to investigate a progress or a treatment of disease over time. This has also a direct impact on animal welfare and the refinement of classical animal experiments as the number of animals in the studies might be reduced. In this paper, we review current state of the art in functional magnetic resonance imaging with a focus on pre-clinical kidney imaging.

  7. Imaging of carotid artery disease: from luminology to function?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillard, J.H. [University Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2003-10-01

    There have been tremendous advances in our ability to image atheromatous disease, particularly in the carotid artery, which is accessible and large enough to image. The repertoire of methodology available is growing, giving anatomical information on luminal narrowing which is approaching the level at which conventional carotid angiography will become very uncommon as CT and contrast-enhanced MR angiographic techniques become the norm. More exciting is the tentative ability to perform functional plaque imaging addressing enhancement patterns and macrophage activity using MR or positron-emission tomography techniques. These techniques, once rigorously evaluated, may, in addition to complex mathematical modelling of plaque, eventually allow us to assess true plaque risk. Time will best judge whether we will be able to move from the use of simple luminology to assessment of plaque function. (orig.)

  8. Imaging of carotid artery disease: from luminology to function?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillard, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    There have been tremendous advances in our ability to image atheromatous disease, particularly in the carotid artery, which is accessible and large enough to image. The repertoire of methodology available is growing, giving anatomical information on luminal narrowing which is approaching the level at which conventional carotid angiography will become very uncommon as CT and contrast-enhanced MR angiographic techniques become the norm. More exciting is the tentative ability to perform functional plaque imaging addressing enhancement patterns and macrophage activity using MR or positron-emission tomography techniques. These techniques, once rigorously evaluated, may, in addition to complex mathematical modelling of plaque, eventually allow us to assess true plaque risk. Time will best judge whether we will be able to move from the use of simple luminology to assessment of plaque function. (orig.)

  9. Novel axolotl cardiac function analysis method using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Gomes Sanches

    Full Text Available The salamander axolotl is capable of complete regeneration of amputated heart tissue. However, non-invasive imaging tools for assessing its cardiac function were so far not employed. In this study, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is introduced as a non-invasive technique to image heart function of axolotls. Three axolotls were imaged with magnetic resonance imaging using a retrospectively gated Fast Low Angle Shot cine sequence. Within one scanning session the axolotl heart was imaged three times in all planes, consecutively. Heart rate, ejection fraction, stroke volume and cardiac output were calculated using three techniques: (1 combined long-axis, (2 short-axis series, and (3 ultrasound (control for heart rate only. All values are presented as mean ± standard deviation. Heart rate (beats per minute among different animals was 32.2±6.0 (long axis, 30.4±5.5 (short axis and 32.7±4.9 (ultrasound and statistically similar regardless of the imaging method (p > 0.05. Ejection fraction (% was 59.6±10.8 (long axis and 48.1±11.3 (short axis and it differed significantly (p = 0.019. Stroke volume (μl/beat was 133.7±33.7 (long axis and 93.2±31.2 (short axis, also differed significantly (p = 0.015. Calculations were consistent among the animals and over three repeated measurements. The heart rate varied depending on depth of anaesthesia. We described a new method for defining and imaging the anatomical planes of the axolotl heart and propose one of our techniques (long axis analysis may prove useful in defining cardiac function in regenerating axolotl hearts.

  10. Implementation of digital image encryption algorithm using logistic function and DNA encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryadi, MT; Satria, Yudi; Fauzi, Muhammad

    2018-03-01

    Cryptography is a method to secure information that might be in form of digital image. Based on past research, in order to increase security level of chaos based encryption algorithm and DNA based encryption algorithm, encryption algorithm using logistic function and DNA encoding was proposed. Digital image encryption algorithm using logistic function and DNA encoding use DNA encoding to scramble the pixel values into DNA base and scramble it in DNA addition, DNA complement, and XOR operation. The logistic function in this algorithm used as random number generator needed in DNA complement and XOR operation. The result of the test show that the PSNR values of cipher images are 7.98-7.99 bits, the entropy values are close to 8, the histogram of cipher images are uniformly distributed and the correlation coefficient of cipher images are near 0. Thus, the cipher image can be decrypted perfectly and the encryption algorithm has good resistance to entropy attack and statistical attack.

  11. Imaging insights into basal ganglia function, Parkinson’s disease, and dystonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoessl, A. Jon; Lehericy, Stephane; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in structural and functional imaging have greatly improved our ability to assess normal functions of the basal ganglia, diagnose parkinsonian syndromes, understand the pathophysiology of parkinsonism and other movement disorders, and detect and monitor disease progression. Radionuclide imaging is the best way to detect and monitor dopamine deficiency, and will probably continue to be the best biomarker for assessment of the effects of disease-modifying therapies. However, advances in magnetic resonance enable the separation of patients with Parkinson’s disease from healthy controls, and show great promise for differentiation between Parkinson’s disease and other akinetic-rigid syndromes. Radionuclide imaging is useful to show the dopaminergic basis for both motor and behavioural complications of Parkinson’s disease and its treatment, and alterations in non-dopaminergic systems. Both PET and MRI can be used to study patterns of functional connectivity in the brain, which is disrupted in Parkinson’s disease and in association with its complications, and in other basal-ganglia disorders such as dystonia, in which an anatomical substrate is not otherwise apparent. Functional imaging is increasingly used to assess underlying pathological processes such as neuroinflammation and abnormal protein deposition. This imaging is another promising approach to assess the effects of treatments designed to slow disease progression. PMID:24954673

  12. Electric Potential and Electric Field Imaging with Dynamic Applications & Extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Ed

    2017-01-01

    The technology and methods for remote quantitative imaging of electrostatic potentials and electrostatic fields in and around objects and in free space is presented. Electric field imaging (EFI) technology may be applied to characterize intrinsic or existing electric potentials and electric fields, or an externally generated electrostatic field made be used for volumes to be inspected with EFI. The baseline sensor technology (e-Sensor) and its construction, optional electric field generation (quasi-static generator), and current e- Sensor enhancements (ephemeral e-Sensor) are discussed. Critical design elements of current linear and real-time two-dimensional (2D) measurement systems are highlighted, and the development of a three dimensional (3D) EFI system is presented. Demonstrations for structural, electronic, human, and memory applications are shown. Recent work demonstrates that phonons may be used to create and annihilate electric dipoles within structures. Phonon induced dipoles are ephemeral and their polarization, strength, and location may be quantitatively characterized by EFI providing a new subsurface Phonon-EFI imaging technology. Results from real-time imaging of combustion and ion flow, and their measurement complications, will be discussed. Extensions to environment, Space and subterranean applications will be presented, and initial results for quantitative characterizing material properties are shown. A wearable EFI system has been developed by using fundamental EFI concepts. These new EFI capabilities are demonstrated to characterize electric charge distribution creating a new field of study embracing areas of interest including electrostatic discharge (ESD) mitigation, manufacturing quality control, crime scene forensics, design and materials selection for advanced sensors, combustion science, on-orbit space potential, container inspection, remote characterization of electronic circuits and level of activation, dielectric morphology of

  13. Correlative studies of structural and functional imaging in primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panegyres, P K; McCarthy, M; Campbell, A; Lenzo, N; Fallon, M; Thompson, J

    2008-01-01

    To compare and contrast structural and functional imaging in primary progressive aphasia (PPA). A cohort of 8 patients diagnosed with PPA presenting with nonfluency were prospectively evaluated. All patients had structural imaging in the form of MRI and in 1 patient CAT scanning on account of a cardiac pacemaker. All patients had single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. SPECT and PET imaging had 100% correlation. Anatomical imaging was abnormal in only 6 of the 8 patients. Wernicke's area showed greater peak Z score reduction and extent of area affected than Broca's area (McNemar paired test: P = .008 for Z score reduction; P = .0003 for extent). PET scanning revealed significant involvement of the anterior cingulum. Functional imaging in PPA: (a) identified more patients correctly than anatomic imaging highlighting the importance of SPECT and PET in the diagnosis; and (b) demonstrated the heterogeneous involvement of disordered linguistic networks in PPA suggesting its syndromic nature.

  14. Bold-Independent Computational Entropy Assesses Functional Donut-Like Structures in Brain fMRI Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, James F; Ramanna, Sheela; Tozzi, Arturo; İnan, Ebubekir

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a novel method for the measurement of information level in fMRI (functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging) neural data sets, based on image subdivision in small polygons equipped with different entropic content. We show how this method, called maximal nucleus clustering (MNC), is a novel, fast and inexpensive image-analysis technique, independent from the standard blood-oxygen-level dependent signals. MNC facilitates the objective detection of hidden temporal patterns of entropy/information in zones of fMRI images generally not taken into account by the subjective standpoint of the observer. This approach befits the geometric character of fMRIs. The main purpose of this study is to provide a computable framework for fMRI that not only facilitates analyses, but also provides an easily decipherable visualization of structures. This framework commands attention because it is easily implemented using conventional software systems. In order to evaluate the potential applications of MNC, we looked for the presence of a fourth dimension's distinctive hallmarks in a temporal sequence of 2D images taken during spontaneous brain activity. Indeed, recent findings suggest that several brain activities, such as mind-wandering and memory retrieval, might take place in the functional space of a four dimensional hypersphere, which is a double donut-like structure undetectable in the usual three dimensions. We found that the Rényi entropy is higher in MNC areas than in the surrounding ones, and that these temporal patterns closely resemble the trajectories predicted by the possible presence of a hypersphere in the brain.

  15. SLO-infrared imaging of the macula and its correlation with functional loss and structural changes in patients with Stargardt disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasakis, Anastasios; Fishman, Gerald A; Lindeman, Martin; Genead, Mohamed A; Zhou, Wensheng

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To correlate the degree of functional loss with structural changes in patients with Stargardt disease. Methods Eighteen eyes of 10 Stargardt patients were studied. Scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) infrared images were compared to corresponding spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) scans. Additionally, SLO microperimetry was performed and results were superimposed on SLO infrared images and in selected cases on fundus autofluorescence (FAF) images. Results Seventeen of 18 eyes showed a distinct hypo-reflective foveal and/or perifoveal area with distinct borders on SLO-infrared images which was less evident on funduscopy and incompletely depicted in FAF images. This hypo-reflective zone corresponded to areas of significantly elevated psychophysical thresholds on microperimetry testing, in addition to thinning of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), disorganization or loss of the photoreceptor cell inner-outer segment (IS-OS) junction and external limiting membrane (ELM) on SD-OCT. Conclusion SLO-infrared fundus images are useful for depicting retinal structural changes in Stargardt patients. An SD-OCT/SLO microperimetry device allows for a direct correlation of structural abnormalities with functional defects that will likely be applicable for the determination of retinal areas for potential improvement of retinal function in these patients during future clinical trials and for the monitoring of the diseases' natural history. PMID:21293320

  16. Functional imaging reveals movement preparatory activity in the vegetative state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan A Bekinschtein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Vegetative State (VS is characterized by the absence of awareness of self or the environment and preserved autonomic functions. The diagnosis relies critically on the lack of consistent signs of purposeful behavior in response to external stimulation. Yet, given that patients with disorders of consciousness often exhibit fragmented movement patterns, voluntary actions may go unnoticed. Here we designed a simple motor paradigm that could potentially detect residual conscious awareness in VS patients with mild to severe brain damage by examining the neural correlates of motor preparation in response to verbal commands. Twenty-four patients who met the diagnostic criteria for VS were recruited for this study. Eleven of these patients showing preserved auditory evoked potentials underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to test for basic speech processing. Five of these patients, who showed word related activity, were included in a second fMRI study aimed at detecting functional changes in premotor cortex elicited by specific verbal instructions to move either their left or their right hand. Despite the lack of overt muscle activity, two patients out of five activated the dorsal premotor cortex contralateral to the instructed hand, consistent with movement preparation. Given that movement preparation in response to a motor command is a sign of purposeful behavior, our results are consistent with residual conscious awareness in these patients. We believe that the identification of positive results with fMRI using this simple task, may complement the clinical assessment by helping attain a more precise diagnosis in patients with disorders of consciousness.

  17. Hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging: Preliminary evaluation of phenotyping potential in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, Lindsay; Kirby, Miranda; Etemad-Rezai, Roya; Wheatley, Andrew; McCormack, David G.; Parraga, Grace

    2011-01-01

    Rationale and objectives: Emphysema and small airway obstruction are the pathological hallmarks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this pilot study in a small group of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients was to quantify hyperpolarized helium-3 ( 3 He) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) functional and structural measurements and to explore the potential role for 3 He MRI in detecting the lung structural and functional COPD phenotypes. Materials and methods: We evaluated 20 ex-smokers with stage I (n = 1), stage II (n = 9) and stage III COPD (n = 10). All subjects underwent same-day plethysmography, spirometry, 1 H MRI and hyperpolarized 3 He MRI at 3.0 T. 3 He ventilation defect percent (VDP) was generated from 3 He static ventilation images and 1 H thoracic images and the 3 He apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was derived from diffusion-weighted MRI. Results: Based on the relative contribution of normalized ADC and VDP, there was evidence of a predominant 3 He MRI measurement in seven patients (n = 3 mainly ventilation defects or VDP dominant (VD), n = 4 mainly increased ADC or ADC dominant (AD)). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significantly lower ADC for subjects with predominantly elevated VDP (p = 0.02 compared to subjects with predominantly elevated ADC; p = 0.008 compared to mixed group) and significantly decreased VDP for subjects with predominantly elevated ADC (p = 0.003, compared to mixed group). Conclusion: In this small pilot study, a preliminary analysis shows the potential for 3 He MRI to categorize or phenotype COPD ex-smokers, providing good evidence of feasibility for larger prospective studies.

  18. Improved Density Functional Tight Binding Potentials for Metalloid Aluminum Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    unlimited IMPROVED DENSITY-FUNCTIONAL TIGHT BINDING POTENTIALS FOR METALLOID ALUMINUM CLUSTERS by Joon H. Kim June 2016 Thesis Advisor...DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE IMPROVED DENSITY-FUNCTIONAL TIGHT BINDING POTENTIALS FOR METALLOID ALUMINUM CLUSTERS 5. FUNDING...repulsive potentials for use in density-functional tight binding (DFTB) simulations of low-valence aluminum metalloid clusters . These systems are under

  19. Secondary control for microgrids using potential functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehrizi-Sani, A.; Iravani, R. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Issues with power grids include reliability, aging infrastructure, limited use of communications, efficiency, and low asset utilization. The smart grid involves a vision of the future electric system. Core elements of the smart grid include information technology, communication, and power electronic devices. This presentation discussed and compared the current grid with the smart grid and presented operational requirements of the microgrid. The concept of potential functions for secondary control based on availability of communication within the microgrid was introduced. The smart grid vision requires the microgrid to remain in operation even when islanded. The existing primary control does not guarantee stable islanded operation. Other topics that were discussed included primary and secondary control; proposed secondary control; the control hierarchy; and advantages and differences over conventional methods. A case study involving different scenarios was presented. It was concluded that the microgrid central controller minimizes each potential function to determine the set points of the corresponding distributed energy resources unit associated with the minimum of the potential function. tabs., figs.

  20. Longitudinal three-dimensional visualisation of autoimmune diabetes by functional optical coherence imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berclaz, Corinne; Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Szlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: It is generally accepted that structural and functional quantitative imaging of individual islets would be beneficial to elucidate the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. We here introduce functional optical coherence imaging (FOCI) for fast, label-free monitoring of beta cell destr...

  1. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the frontal eye fields during saccadic eye movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Atsushi; Takagi, Mineo; Abe, Haruki; Nakajima, Takashi; Miyauchi, Satoru.

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated activity-induced signal intensity changes in the human cerebral cortex during horizontal saccadic eye movements using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on the blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast method. Compared with central fixation, significant signal increases were observed bilaterally in the middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 8) during saccadic conditions. The location of the activated area was consistent with that of previously reported frontal eye fields (FEF). These results suggest that fMRI has potential merit for the study of cortical control of eye movements in humans. (author)

  2. Imaging Cajal's neuronal avalanche: how wide-field optical imaging of the point-spread advanced the understanding of neocortical structure-function relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frostig, Ron D; Chen-Bee, Cynthia H; Johnson, Brett A; Jacobs, Nathan S

    2017-07-01

    This review brings together a collection of studies that specifically use wide-field high-resolution mesoscopic level imaging techniques (intrinsic signal optical imaging; voltage-sensitive dye optical imaging) to image the cortical point spread (PS): the total spread of cortical activation comprising a large neuronal ensemble evoked by spatially restricted (point) stimulation of the sensory periphery (e.g., whisker, pure tone, point visual stimulation). The collective imaging findings, combined with supporting anatomical and electrophysiological findings, revealed some key aspects about the PS including its very large (radius of several mm) and relatively symmetrical spatial extent capable of crossing cytoarchitectural borders and trespassing into other cortical areas; its relationship with underlying evoked subthreshold activity and underlying anatomical system of long-range horizontal projections within gray matter, both also crossing borders; its contextual modulation and plasticity; the ability of its relative spatiotemporal profile to remain invariant to major changes in stimulation parameters; its potential role as a building block for integrative cortical activity; and its ubiquitous presence across various cortical areas and across mammalian species. Together, these findings advance our understanding about the neocortex at the mesoscopic level by underscoring that the cortical PS constitutes a fundamental motif of neocortical structure-function relationship.

  3. Functional imaging of the lung using a gaseous contrast agent: {sup 3}Helium-magnetic resonance imaging; Funktionelle Bildgebung der Lunge mit gasfoermigem Kontrastmittel: {sup 3}Helium-Magnetresonanztomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gast, K.K.; Heussel, C.P. [Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Klinikum der Johannes Gutenberg-Univ., Mainz (Germany); Schreiber, W.G. [AG Medizinische Physik, Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Klinikum der Johannes Gutenberg-Univ., Mainz (Germany); Kauczor, H.U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    Current imaging methods of the lung concentrate on morphology as well as on the depiction of the pulmonary parenchyma. The need of an advanced and more subtle imaging technology compared to conventional radiography is met by computed topograhy as the method of choice. Nevertheless, computed tomography yields very limited functional information. This is to be derived from arterial blood gas analysis, spirometry and body plethysmography. These methods, however, lack the scope for regional allocation of any pathology. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lung has been advanced by the use of hyperpolarised {sup 3}Helium as an inhaled gaseous contrast agent. The inhalation of the gas provides functional data by distribution, diffusion and relaxation of its hyperpolarised state. Because anatomical landmarks of the lung can be visualised as well, functional information can be linked with regional information. Furthermore, the method provides high spatial and temporal resolution and lacks the potential side-effects of ionising radiation. Four different modalities have been established: 1. Spin density imaging studies the distribution of gas, normally after a single inhalation of contrast gas in inspiratory breath hold. 2. Dynamic cine imaging studies the distribution of gas with respect to regional time constants of pulmonary gas inflow. 3. Diffusion weighted imaging can exhibit the presence and severity of pulmonary airspace enlargement, as in pulmonary emphysema. 4. Oxygen sensitive imaging displays intrapulmonary oxygen partial pressure and its distribution. Currently, the method is limited by comparably high costs and limited availability. As there have been recent developments which might bring this modality closer to clinical use, this review article will comprise the methodology as well as the current state of the art and standard of knowledge of magnetic resonance imaging of the lung using hyperpolarised {sup 3}Helium. (orig.)

  4. Computing volume potentials for noninvasive imaging of cardiac excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Graaf, A W Maurits; Bhagirath, Pranav; van Driel, Vincent J H M; Ramanna, Hemanth; de Hooge, Jacques; de Groot, Natasja M S; Götte, Marco J W

    2015-03-01

    In noninvasive imaging of cardiac excitation, the use of body surface potentials (BSP) rather than body volume potentials (BVP) has been favored due to enhanced computational efficiency and reduced modeling effort. Nowadays, increased computational power and the availability of open source software enable the calculation of BVP for clinical purposes. In order to illustrate the possible advantages of this approach, the explanatory power of BVP is investigated using a rectangular tank filled with an electrolytic conductor and a patient specific three dimensional model. MRI images of the tank and of a patient were obtained in three orthogonal directions using a turbo spin echo MRI sequence. MRI images were segmented in three dimensional using custom written software. Gmsh software was used for mesh generation. BVP were computed using a transfer matrix and FEniCS software. The solution for 240,000 nodes, corresponding to a resolution of 5 mm throughout the thorax volume, was computed in 3 minutes. The tank experiment revealed that an increased electrode surface renders the position of the 4 V equipotential plane insensitive to mesh cell size and reduces simulated deviations. In the patient-specific model, the impact of assigning a different conductivity to lung tissue on the distribution of volume potentials could be visualized. Generation of high quality volume meshes and computation of BVP with a resolution of 5 mm is feasible using generally available software and hardware. Estimation of BVP may lead to an improved understanding of the genesis of BSP and sources of local inaccuracies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Automatic selection of resting-state networks with functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Francesca eStorti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during a resting-state condition can reveal the co-activation of specific brain regions in distributed networks, called resting-state networks, which are selected by independent component analysis (ICA of the fMRI data. One of the major difficulties with component analysis is the automatic selection of the ICA features related to brain activity. In this study we describe a method designed to automatically select networks of potential functional relevance, specifically, those regions known to be involved in motor function, visual processing, executive functioning, auditory processing, memory, and the default-mode network. To do this, image analysis was based on probabilistic ICA as implemented in FSL software. After decomposition, the optimal number of components was selected by applying a novel algorithm which takes into account, for each component, Pearson's median coefficient of skewness of the spatial maps generated by FSL, followed by clustering, segmentation, and spectral analysis. To evaluate the performance of the approach, we investigated the resting-state networks in 25 subjects. For each subject, three resting-state scans were obtained with a Siemens Allegra 3 T scanner (NYU data set. Comparison of the visually and the automatically identified neuronal networks showed that the algorithm had high accuracy (first scan: 95%, second scan: 95%, third scan: 93% and precision (90%, 90%, 84%. The reproducibility of the networks for visual and automatic selection was very close: it was highly consistent in each subject for the default-mode network (≥ 92% and the occipital network, which includes the medial visual cortical areas (≥ 94%, and consistent for the attention network (≥ 80%, the right and/or left lateralized frontoparietal attention networks, and the temporal-motor network (≥ 80%. The automatic selection method may be used to detect neural networks and reduce subjectivity in ICA

  6. Imaging electron wave functions inside open quantum rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, F; Hackens, B; Pala, M G; Ouisse, T; Sellier, H; Wallart, X; Bollaert, S; Cappy, A; Chevrier, J; Bayot, V; Huant, S

    2007-09-28

    Combining scanning gate microscopy (SGM) experiments and simulations, we demonstrate low temperature imaging of the electron probability density |Psi|(2)(x,y) in embedded mesoscopic quantum rings. The tip-induced conductance modulations share the same temperature dependence as the Aharonov-Bohm effect, indicating that they originate from electron wave function interferences. Simulations of both |Psi|(2)(x,y) and SGM conductance maps reproduce the main experimental observations and link fringes in SGM images to |Psi|(2)(x,y).

  7. Measurement of nuclear potentials from fusion excitation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, J.R.; Birkelund, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The basis for measuring nuclear potentials from fusion excitation functions at energies above barrier is reviewed. It is argued that because of experimental and conceptual problems fusion excitation functions at high energies cannot lead to model independent measurements of internuclear potential at small separations. The Al 27 + Ne 20 reaction previously analyzed by others is used as an example of problems arising from the inability to distinguish complete and incomplete fusion in experimental data

  8. Point spread functions and deconvolution of ultrasonic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalitz, Christoph; Pohle-Fröhlich, Regina; Michalk, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    This article investigates the restoration of ultrasonic pulse-echo C-scan images by means of deconvolution with a point spread function (PSF). The deconvolution concept from linear system theory (LST) is linked to the wave equation formulation of the imaging process, and an analytic formula for the PSF of planar transducers is derived. For this analytic expression, different numerical and analytic approximation schemes for evaluating the PSF are presented. By comparing simulated images with measured C-scan images, we demonstrate that the assumptions of LST in combination with our formula for the PSF are a good model for the pulse-echo imaging process. To reconstruct the object from a C-scan image, we compare different deconvolution schemes: the Wiener filter, the ForWaRD algorithm, and the Richardson-Lucy algorithm. The best results are obtained with the Richardson-Lucy algorithm with total variation regularization. For distances greater or equal twice the near field distance, our experiments show that the numerically computed PSF can be replaced with a simple closed analytic term based on a far field approximation.

  9. Potential uses of terahertz pulse imaging in dentistry: caries and erosion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbottom, Christopher; Crawley, David A.; Cole, Bryan E.; Arnone, Donald D.; Wallace, Vincent P.; Pepper, Michael

    2002-06-01

    TeraHertz Pulse Imaging (TPI) is a relatively new imaging modality for medical and dental imaging. The aim of the present study was to make a preliminary assessment of the potential uses of TPI in clinical dentistry, particularly in relation to caries detection and the detection and monitoring of erosion. Images were obtained in vitro using a new TPI system developed by TeraView Ltd. We present data showing that TPI in vitro images of approximal surfaces of whole teeth demonstrate a distinctive shadowing in the presence of natural carious lesions in enamel. The thickness of this enamel shadowing appears to be related to lesion depth. The use of non-ionizing radiation to image such lesions non-destructively in vitro represents a significant step towards such measurements in vivo. In addition, data is presented which indicates that TPI may have a potential role in the detection and monitoring of enamel erosion. In vitro experiments on whole incisor teeth show that TPI is capable of detecting relatively small artificially induced changes in the buccal or palatal surface of the enamel of these teeth. Imaging of enamel thickness at such a resolution without ionizing radiation would represent a significant breakthrough if applicable in vivo.

  10. [Functional magnetic resonance imaging in psychiatry and psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derntl, B; Habel, U; Schneider, F

    2010-01-01

    technical improvements, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become the most popular and versatile imaging method in psychiatric research. The scope of this manuscript is to briefly introduce the basics of MR physics, the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast as well as the principles of MR study design and functional data analysis. The presentation of exemplary studies on emotion recognition and empathy in schizophrenia patients will highlight the importance of MR methods in psychiatry. Finally, we will demonstrate insights into new developments that will further boost MR techniques in clinical research and will help to gain more insight into dysfunctional neural networks underlying cognitive and emotional deficits in psychiatric patients. Moreover, some techniques such as neurofeedback seem promising for evaluation of therapy effects on a behavioral and neural level.

  11. Methods for processing and analysis functional and anatomical brain images: computerized tomography, emission tomography and nuclear resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazoyer, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    The various methods for brain image processing and analysis are presented and compared. The following topics are developed: the physical basis of brain image comparison (nature and formation of signals intrinsic performance of the methods image characteristics); mathematical methods for image processing and analysis (filtering, functional parameter extraction, morphological analysis, robotics and artificial intelligence); methods for anatomical localization (neuro-anatomy atlas, proportional stereotaxic atlas, numerized atlas); methodology of cerebral image superposition (normalization, retiming); image networks [fr

  12. Artificial potential functions for highway driving with collision avoidance

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf , Michael T.; Burdick, Joel W.

    2008-01-01

    We present a set of potential function components to assist an automated or semi-automated vehicle in navigating a multi-lane, populated highway. The resulting potential field is constructed as a superposition of disparate functions for lane- keeping, road-staying, speed preference, and vehicle avoidance and passing. The construction of the vehicle avoidance potential is of primary importance, incorporating the structure and protocol of laned highway driving. Particularly, the shape and dimen...

  13. Image features dependant correlation-weighting function for efficient PRNU based source camera identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Mayank; Gupta, Bhupendra

    2018-04-01

    For source camera identification (SCI), photo response non-uniformity (PRNU) has been widely used as the fingerprint of the camera. The PRNU is extracted from the image by applying a de-noising filter then taking the difference between the original image and the de-noised image. However, it is observed that intensity-based features and high-frequency details (edges and texture) of the image, effect quality of the extracted PRNU. This effects correlation calculation and creates problems in SCI. For solving this problem, we propose a weighting function based on image features. We have experimentally identified image features (intensity and high-frequency contents) effect on the estimated PRNU, and then develop a weighting function which gives higher weights to image regions which give reliable PRNU and at the same point it gives comparatively less weights to the image regions which do not give reliable PRNU. Experimental results show that the proposed weighting function is able to improve the accuracy of SCI up to a great extent. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cardiac function and perfusion dynamics measured on a beat-by-beat basis in the live mouse using ultra-fast 4D optoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Steven J.; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    The fast heart rate (~7 Hz) of the mouse makes cardiac imaging and functional analysis difficult when studying mouse models of cardiovascular disease, and cannot be done truly in real-time and 3D using established imaging modalities. Optoacoustic imaging, on the other hand, provides ultra-fast imaging at up to 50 volumetric frames per second, allowing for acquisition of several frames per mouse cardiac cycle. In this study, we combined a recently-developed 3D optoacoustic imaging array with novel analytical techniques to assess cardiac function and perfusion dynamics of the mouse heart at high, 4D spatiotemporal resolution. In brief, the heart of an anesthetized mouse was imaged over a series of multiple volumetric frames. In another experiment, an intravenous bolus of indocyanine green (ICG) was injected and its distribution was subsequently imaged in the heart. Unique temporal features of the cardiac cycle and ICG distribution profiles were used to segment the heart from background and to assess cardiac function. The 3D nature of the experimental data allowed for determination of cardiac volumes at ~7-8 frames per mouse cardiac cycle, providing important cardiac function parameters (e.g., stroke volume, ejection fraction) on a beat-by-beat basis, which has been previously unachieved by any other cardiac imaging modality. Furthermore, ICG distribution dynamics allowed for the determination of pulmonary transit time and thus additional quantitative measures of cardiovascular function. This work demonstrates the potential for optoacoustic cardiac imaging and is expected to have a major contribution toward future preclinical studies of animal models of cardiovascular health and disease.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of respiratory movement and lung function; Magnetresonanztomographie der Atembewegung und Lungenfunktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tetzlaff, R. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Radiologie (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Medizinische und Biologische Informatik, Heidelberg (Germany); Eichinger, M. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Radiologie (E010), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    Lung function measurements are the domain of spirometry or plethysmography. These methods have proven their value in clinical practice, nevertheless, being global measurements the functional indices only describe the sum of all functional units of the lung. Impairment of only a single component of the respiratory pump or of a small part of lung parenchyma can be compensated by unaffected lung tissue. Dynamic imaging can help to detect such local changes and lead to earlier adapted therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) seems to be perfect for this application as it is not hampered by image distortion as is projection radiography and it does not expose the patient to potentially harmful radiation like computed tomography. Unfortunately, lung parenchyma is not easy to image using MRI due to its low signal intensity. For this reason first applications of MRI in lung function measurements concentrated on the movement of the thoracic wall and the diaphragm. Recent technical advances in MRI however might allow measurements of regional dynamics of the lungs. (orig.) [German] Die Lungenfunktion wird bislang hauptsaechlich durch die Spirometrie oder Plethysmographie untersucht. Diese Methoden sind zwar sehr leistungsfaehig zur Diagnostik von Lungenerkrankungen, sind jedoch globale Messmethoden, deren Messparameter immer die Summe aller funktionellen Einheiten der Lunge beschreiben. Veraenderungen, die auf eine Teilkomponente der Atempumpe beschraenkt sind oder kleine Teile des Lungengewebes betreffen, koennen durch gesunde Lungenanteile kompensiert werden. Mit dynamischen bildgebenden Verfahren koennten solche regionalen Veraenderungen erfasst und so eine fruehere Therapie ermoeglicht werden. Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) bietet sich hier ideal an, da sie als Schnittbildverfahren weder die Probleme der Bildverzerrung, der Projektionsverfahren noch die Strahlenbelastung der Computertomographie hat. Allerdings wird die MRT der Lunge durch das geringe Signal des

  16. Image Fusion Based on the \\({\\Delta ^{ - 1}} - T{V_0}\\ Energy Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiwei Xie

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a \\({\\Delta^{-1}}-T{V_0}\\ energy function to fuse a multi-spectral image with a panchromatic image. The proposed energy function consists of two components, a \\(TV_0\\ component and a \\(\\Delta^{-1}\\ component. The \\(TV_0\\ term uses the sparse priority to increase the detailed spatial information; while the \\({\\Delta ^{ - 1}}\\ term removes the block effect of the multi-spectral image. Furthermore, as the proposed energy function is non-convex, we also adopt an alternative minimization algorithm and the \\(L_0\\ gradient minimization to solve it. Experimental results demonstrate the improved performance of the proposed method over existing methods.

  17. Magnetic resonance lung function – a breakthrough for lung imaging and functional assessment? A phantom study and clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauh Manfred

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic lung diseases are a major issue in public health. A serial pulmonary assessment using imaging techniques free of ionizing radiation and which provides early information on local function impairment would therefore be a considerably important development. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a powerful tool for the static and dynamic imaging of many organs. Its application in lung imaging however, has been limited due to the low water content of the lung and the artefacts evident at air-tissue interfaces. Many attempts have been made to visualize local ventilation using the inhalation of hyperpolarized gases or gadolinium aerosol responding to MRI. None of these methods are applicable for broad clinical use as they require specific equipment. Methods We have shown previously that low-field MRI can be used for static imaging of the lung. Here we show that mathematical processing of data derived from serial MRI scans during the respiratory cycle produces good quality images of local ventilation without any contrast agent. A phantom study and investigations in 85 patients were performed. Results The phantom study proved our theoretical considerations. In 99 patient investigations good correlation (r = 0.8; p ≤ 0.001 was seen for pulmonary function tests and MR ventilation measurements. Small ventilation defects were visualized. Conclusion With this method, ventilation defects can be diagnosed long before any imaging or pulmonary function test will indicate disease. This surprisingly simple approach could easily be incorporated in clinical routine and may be a breakthrough for lung imaging and functional assessment.

  18. Functional brain imaging; Funktionelle Hirnbildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizewski, E.R. [Medizinische Universitaet Innsbruck, Universitaetsklinik fuer Neuroradiologie, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-02-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive method that has become one of the major tools for understanding human brain function and in recent years has also been developed for clinical applications. Changes in hemodynamic signals correspond to changes in neuronal activity with good spatial and temporal resolution in fMRI. Using high-field MR systems and increasingly dedicated statistics and postprocessing, activated brain areas can be detected and superimposed on anatomical images. Currently, fMRI data are often combined in multimodal imaging, e. g. with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequences. This method is helping to further understand the physiology of cognitive brain processes and is also being used in a number of clinical applications. In addition to the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals, this article deals with the construction of fMRI investigations, selection of paradigms and evaluation in the clinical routine. Clinically, this method is mainly used in the planning of brain surgery, analyzing the location of brain tumors in relation to eloquent brain areas and the lateralization of language processing. As the BOLD signal is dependent on the strength of the magnetic field as well as other limitations, an overview of recent developments is given. Increases of magnetic field strength (7 T), available head coils and advances in MRI analytical methods have led to constant improvement in fMRI signals and experimental design. Especially the depiction of eloquent brain regions can be done easily and quickly and has become an essential part of presurgical planning. (orig.) [German] Mittlerweile ist die funktionelle MRT (fMRT) eine Methode, die nicht mehr nur in der neurowissenschaftlichen Routine verwendet wird. Die fMRT ermoeglicht die nichtinvasive Darstellung der Hirnaktivitaet in guter raeumlicher und zeitlicher Aufloesung unter Ausnutzung der Durchblutungsaenderung aufgrund der erhoehten Nervenzellaktivitaet. Unter

  19. A new methodical approach in neuroscience: assessing inter-personal brain coupling using functional near-infrared imaging (fNIRI hyperscanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix eScholkmann

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the first demonstration of how to simultaneously measure brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI on two subjects about 10 years ago, a new paradigm in neuroscience is emerging: the assessment of the inter-brain coupling between two or more subjects, termed hyperscanning. The hyperscanning approach has the potential to enable a new view on how the brain works and will reveal as yet undiscovered brain functions based on brain-to-brain coupling, since the single-subject setting cannot capture them. In particular, functional near-infrared imaging (fNIRI hyperscanning is a promising new method, offering a cost-effective, easy to apply and reliable technology to measure inter-personal interactions in a natural context. In this short review we report on fNIRI hyperscanning studies published so far and summarize opportunities and challenges for future studies.

  20. Functional and morphological imaging of thyroid associated eye disease. Data evaluation by means of image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainz, H.

    2002-08-01

    Aim: to recognize the structures that show an uptake of a 99mTc-labeled octreotide tracer within the orbit and head in patients with thyroid associated eye disease relying on image fusion. Methods: A series of 18 patients presenting the signs and symptoms of thyroid associated eye disease were studied. Functional imaging was done with 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC, a newly in-house developed tracer. Both whole body as well as single photon emission tomographies (SPECT) of the head were obtained in each patient. Parallel to nuclear medicine imaging, morphological imaging was done using either computed tomography or magnetic resonance. Results: By means of image fusion farther more information on the functional status of the patients was obtained. All areas showing an uptake could be anatomically identified, revealing a series of organs that had not yet been consideren in this disease. The organs presenting tracer uptake showed characteristic forms as described below: - eye glass sign: lacrimal gland and lacrimal ducts - scissors sign: eye muscles, rectus sup. and inf. - arch on CT: muscle displacement - Omega sign: tonsils and salivary glands - W- sign: tonsils and salivary glands Conclusions: By means of image fusion it was possible to recognize that a series of organs of the neck and head express somatostatin receptors. We interpret these results as a sign of inflammation of the lacrimal glands, the lacrimal ducts, the cervical lymphatics, the anterior portions of the extra ocular eye muscles and muscles of the posterior cervical region. Somatostatin uptake in these sturctures reflects the prescence of specific receptors which reflect the immuno regulating function of the peptide. (author)

  1. The role of functional imaging techniques in the dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Young Hoon

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation of dementia in patients with early symptoms of cognitive decline is clinically challenging, but the need for early, accurate diagnosis has become more crucial, since several medication for the treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer' disease are available. Many neurodegenerative diseases produce significant brain function alteration even when structural imaging (CT of MRI) reveal no specific abnormalities. The role of PET and SPECT brain imaging in the initial assessment and differential diagnosis of dementia is beginning to evolve rapidly and growing evidence indicates that appropriate incorporation of PET into the clinical work up can improve diagnostic and prognostic accuracy with respect to Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia in the geriatric population. In the fast few years, studies comparing neuropathologic examination with PET have established reliable and consistent accuracy for diagnostic evaluations using PET - accuracies substantially exceeding those of comparable studies of diagnostic value of SPECT or of both modalities assessed side by side, or of clinical evaluations done without nuclear imaging. This review deals the role of functional brian imaging techniques in the evaluation of dementias and the role of nuclear neuroimaging in the early detection and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

  2. Imaging insights into basal ganglia function, Parkinson’s disease, and dystonia

    OpenAIRE

    Stoessl, A. Jon; Lehericy, Stephane; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in structural and functional imaging have greatly improved our ability to assess normal functions of the basal ganglia, diagnose parkinsonian syndromes, understand the pathophysiology of parkinsonism and other movement disorders, and detect and monitor disease progression. Radionuclide imaging is the best way to detect and monitor dopamine deficiency, and will probably continue to be the best biomarker for assessment of the effects of disease-modifying therapies. However, adva...

  3. Green's functions potential fields on surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Melnikov, Yuri A

    2017-01-01

    This book is comprehensive in its classical mathematical physics presentation, providing the reader with detailed instructions for obtaining Green's functions from scratch. Green's functions is an instrument easily accessible to practitioners who are engaged in design and exploitation of machines and structures in modern engineering practice. To date, there are no books available on the market that are devoted to the Green's function formalism for equations covered in this volume. The reader, with an undergraduate background in applied mathematics, can become an active user of the Green's function approach. For the first time, Green's functions are discussed for a specific class of problems dealing with potential fields induced in thin-wall structures and therefore, the reader will have first-hand access to a novel issue. This Work is accessible to researchers in applied mathematics, mechanics, and relevant disciplines such as engineering, as well as to upper level undergraduates and graduate students.

  4. MR imaging of non-functioning endocrine tumors of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Hiroyuki; Honda, Hiroshi; Kuroiwa, Toshiro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the MR imaging characteristics of patients with non-functioning endocrine tumors of the pancreas. Fourteen patients with these tumors underwent MR imaging. The signal characteristics of the tumor on T 1 -, T 2 -, and contrast-enhanced T 1 -weighted images were evaluated. The enhancement pattern of the tumor on dynamic study was also examined. The degree of stromal fibrosis was evaluated on the pathologic specimen, and was then classified as mild, moderate, or marked fibrosis. On T 1 -weighted images, the tumors were hypointense in 12 of 14 cases. The signals of the tumors on T 2 -weighted images were varied. The tumors were hypointense in 1 case, isointense in 2 cases, hyperintense in 6 cases, and very hyperintense in the other 5 cases. On contrast-enhanced T 1 -weighted images, the tumors were hyperintense in 8 cases and very hyperintense in 5 cases. On T 2 - and contrast-enhanced T 1 -weighted images, 4 of 5 malignant tumors were very hyperintense. Dynamic study revealed prolonged enhancement in 10 of 11 cases. Pathologic analysis revealed moderate or marked fibrosis in 10 of 14 cases, and prolonged enhancement was considered to be related stromal fibrosis. In conclusion, MR imaging findings of non-functioning endocrine tumors of the pancreas vary in relation to pathological variety. Prolonged enhancement of the tumor on dynamic study is considered to be one of the characteristic MR imaging findings that corresponds to stromal fibrosis of the tumor. (author)

  5. Towards real-time diffuse optical tomography for imaging brain functions cooperated with Kalman estimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingyuan; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Dongyuan; Ding, Xuemei; Dan, Mai; Pan, Tiantian; Wang, Yihan; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Zhongxing; Zhang, Limin; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2018-02-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive neuroimaging method to monitor the cerebral hemodynamic through the optical changes measured at the scalp surface. It has played a more and more important role in psychology and medical imaging communities. Real-time imaging of brain function using NIRS makes it possible to explore some sophisticated human brain functions unexplored before. Kalman estimator has been frequently used in combination with modified Beer-Lamber Law (MBLL) based optical topology (OT), for real-time brain function imaging. However, the spatial resolution of the OT is low, hampering the application of OT in exploring some complicated brain functions. In this paper, we develop a real-time imaging method combining diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and Kalman estimator, much improving the spatial resolution. Instead of only presenting one spatially distributed image indicating the changes of the absorption coefficients at each time point during the recording process, one real-time updated image using the Kalman estimator is provided. Its each voxel represents the amplitude of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) associated with this voxel. We evaluate this method using some simulation experiments, demonstrating that this method can obtain more reliable spatial resolution images. Furthermore, a statistical analysis is also conducted to help to decide whether a voxel in the field of view is activated or not.

  6. Hyperpolarized {sup 3}He magnetic resonance imaging: Preliminary evaluation of phenotyping potential in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Lindsay, E-mail: lmathew@imaging.robarts.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Kirby, Miranda, E-mail: mkirby@imaging.robarts.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Etemad-Rezai, Roya, E-mail: Roya.EtemadRezai@lhsc.on.ca [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Western Ontario (Canada); Wheatley, Andrew, E-mail: awheat@imaging.robarts.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London (Canada); McCormack, David G., E-mail: David.McCormack@lhsc.on.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London (Canada); Division of Respirology, Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Lawson Health Research Institute, London (Canada); Parraga, Grace, E-mail: gep@imaging.robarts.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, University of Western Ontario (Canada); Lawson Health Research Institute, London (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Rationale and objectives: Emphysema and small airway obstruction are the pathological hallmarks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this pilot study in a small group of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients was to quantify hyperpolarized helium-3 ({sup 3}He) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) functional and structural measurements and to explore the potential role for {sup 3}He MRI in detecting the lung structural and functional COPD phenotypes. Materials and methods: We evaluated 20 ex-smokers with stage I (n = 1), stage II (n = 9) and stage III COPD (n = 10). All subjects underwent same-day plethysmography, spirometry, {sup 1}H MRI and hyperpolarized {sup 3}He MRI at 3.0 T. {sup 3}He ventilation defect percent (VDP) was generated from {sup 3}He static ventilation images and {sup 1}H thoracic images and the {sup 3}He apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was derived from diffusion-weighted MRI. Results: Based on the relative contribution of normalized ADC and VDP, there was evidence of a predominant {sup 3}He MRI measurement in seven patients (n = 3 mainly ventilation defects or VDP dominant (VD), n = 4 mainly increased ADC or ADC dominant (AD)). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significantly lower ADC for subjects with predominantly elevated VDP (p = 0.02 compared to subjects with predominantly elevated ADC; p = 0.008 compared to mixed group) and significantly decreased VDP for subjects with predominantly elevated ADC (p = 0.003, compared to mixed group). Conclusion: In this small pilot study, a preliminary analysis shows the potential for {sup 3}He MRI to categorize or phenotype COPD ex-smokers, providing good evidence of feasibility for larger prospective studies.

  7. Functional imaging of cerebral cortex activation with a 1.5-T MR imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Chang, Sun Ae; Ha, Choong Kun; Kim, Eun Sang; Kim, Hyung Jin; Chung, Sung Hoon

    1995-01-01

    Most of recent MR imagings of cerebral cortex activation have been performed by using high field magnet above 2-T or echo-planar imaging technique. We report our experience on imaging of cerebral cortex activation with a widely available standard 1.5-T MR. Series of gradient-echo images (TR/TE/flip angle: 80/60/40 .deg. 64 x 128 matrix) were acquired alternatively during the periods of rest and task in five normal volunteers. Finger movement (n = 10;5 right, 5 left) and flashing photic stimulation (n 1) were used as a motor task and a visual task to activate the motor cortex and visual cortex, respectively. Activation images were obtained by subtracting sum of rest images from that of task images. Changes of signal intensity were analyzed over the periods of rest and task. Activation images were obtained in all cases. Changes of signal intensity between rest and task periods were 6.5-14.6%(mean, 10.5%) in the motor cortex and 4.2% in the visual cortex. Functional imaging of cerebral cortex activation could be performed with a widely available 1.5-T MR. Widespread applications of this technique to basic and clinical neuroscience are expected

  8. Functional imaging of cerebral cortex activation with a 1.5-T MR imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Chang, Sun Ae; Ha, Choong Kun; Kim, Eun Sang; Kim, Hyung Jin; Chung, Sung Hoon [Gyeongsang National University, College of Medicine, Jeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-15

    Most of recent MR imagings of cerebral cortex activation have been performed by using high field magnet above 2-T or echo-planar imaging technique. We report our experience on imaging of cerebral cortex activation with a widely available standard 1.5-T MR. Series of gradient-echo images (TR/TE/flip angle: 80/60/40 .deg. 64 x 128 matrix) were acquired alternatively during the periods of rest and task in five normal volunteers. Finger movement (n = 10;5 right, 5 left) and flashing photic stimulation (n 1) were used as a motor task and a visual task to activate the motor cortex and visual cortex, respectively. Activation images were obtained by subtracting sum of rest images from that of task images. Changes of signal intensity were analyzed over the periods of rest and task. Activation images were obtained in all cases. Changes of signal intensity between rest and task periods were 6.5-14.6%(mean, 10.5%) in the motor cortex and 4.2% in the visual cortex. Functional imaging of cerebral cortex activation could be performed with a widely available 1.5-T MR. Widespread applications of this technique to basic and clinical neuroscience are expected.

  9. Functional brain imaging across development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia, Katya

    2013-12-01

    The developmental cognitive neuroscience literature has grown exponentially over the last decade. This paper reviews the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) literature on brain function development of typically late developing functions of cognitive and motivation control, timing and attention as well as of resting state neural networks. Evidence shows that between childhood and adulthood, concomitant with cognitive maturation, there is progressively increased functional activation in task-relevant lateral and medial frontal, striatal and parieto-temporal brain regions that mediate these higher level control functions. This is accompanied by progressively stronger functional inter-regional connectivity within task-relevant fronto-striatal and fronto-parieto-temporal networks. Negative age associations are observed in earlier developing posterior and limbic regions, suggesting a shift with age from the recruitment of "bottom-up" processing regions towards "top-down" fronto-cortical and fronto-subcortical connections, leading to a more mature, supervised cognition. The resting state fMRI literature further complements this evidence by showing progressively stronger deactivation with age in anti-correlated task-negative resting state networks, which is associated with better task performance. Furthermore, connectivity analyses during the resting state show that with development increasingly stronger long-range connections are being formed, for example, between fronto-parietal and fronto-cerebellar connections, in both task-positive networks and in task-negative default mode networks, together with progressively lesser short-range connections, suggesting progressive functional integration and segregation with age. Overall, evidence suggests that throughout development between childhood and adulthood, there is progressive refinement and integration of both task-positive fronto-cortical and fronto-subcortical activation and task-negative deactivation, leading to

  10. IMAGING OF BRAIN FUNCTION BASED ON THE ANALYSIS OF FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY - IMAGING ANALYSIS OF BRAIN FUNCTION BY FMRI AFTER ACUPUNCTURE AT LR3 IN HEALTHY INDIVIDUALS

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Yuying; Lan, Yujun; Qu, Xiaodong; Lin, Kelin; Zhang, Jiping; Qu, Shanshan; Wang, Yanjie; Tang, Chunzhi; Huang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This Study observed the relevant brain areas activated by acupuncture at the Taichong acupoint (LR3) and analyzed the functional connectivity among brain areas using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore the acupoint specificity of the Taichong acupoint. Methods: A total of 45 healthy subjects were randomly divided into the Taichong (LR3) group, sham acupuncture group and sham acupoint group. Subjects received resting state fMRI before acupuncture, a...

  11. NMR imaging of the head-neck region. Topography of function - clinical findings - imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    The book on nmr imaging in the head-neck region offers, on a total of 221 pages, 344 detailed representations with 141 figures and 44 tables. It provides information as to the relevant topography of function, presents clinical findings, explains imaging characteristics and also takes account of spectroscopic procedures. The multifarious methods of investigation are described and discussed in connection with the differential diagnoses. A score of suitable diagnostic measures is assigned to each region of examination. The method's value is assessed against that of other imaging techniques. (orig.) [de

  12. Functional imaging of the multidrug resistance in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Tae

    2001-01-01

    Although diverse mechanisms are involved in multidrug resistance for chemotherapeutic drugs, the development of cellular P-glycoprotein(Pgp) and multidrug-resistance associated protein (MRP) are improtant factors in the chemotherapy failure to cancer. Various detection assays provide information about the presence of drug efflux pumps at the mRNA and protein levels. However these methods do not yield information about dynamic function of Pgp and MRP in vivo. Single photon emission tomograpy (SPECT) and positron emission tomograpy (PET) are available for the detection of Pgp and MRP-mediated transport. 99m Tc-sestaMIBI and other 99m Tc-radiopharmaceuticals are substrates for Pgp and MRP, and have been used in clinical studies of tumor imaging, and to visualize blockade of Pgp-mediated transport after modulation of Pgp pump. Colchicine, verapamil and daunorubicin labeled with 11 C have been evaluated for the quantification of Pgp-mediated transport with PET in vivo and reported to be feasible substrates with which to image Pgp function in tumors. Leukotrienes are specific substrates for MRP and N- (11 C]acetyl-leukotriene E4 provides an opportunity to study MRP function non-invasively in vivo. Results obtained from recent publications are reviewed to confirm the feasibility of using SPECT and PET to study the functionality of MDR transportes in vivo

  13. Functionalized Carbon Nano-scale Drug Delivery Systems From Biowaste Sago Bark For Cancer Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Manaf, Shoriya Aruni; Hegde, Gurumurthy; Mandal, Uttam Kumar; Wui, Tin Wong; Roy, Partha

    2017-01-01

    Nano-scale carbon systems are emerging alternatives in drug delivery and bioimaging applications of which they gradually replace the quantum dots characterized by toxic heavy metal content in the latter application. The work intended to use carbon nanospheres synthesized from biowaste Sago bark for cancer cell imaging applications. This study synthesised carbon nanospheres from biowaste Sago bark using a catalyst-free pyrolysis technique. The nanospheres were functionalized with fluorescent dye coumarin-6 for cell imaging. Fluorescent nanosytems were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X ray, photon correlation spectroscopy and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The average size of carbon nanospheres ranged between 30 and 40 nm with zeta potential of -26.8 ± 1.87 mV. The percentage viability of cancer cells on exposure to nanospheres varied from 91- 89 % for N2a cells and 90-85 % for A-375 cells respectively. Speedy uptake of the fluorescent nanospheres in both N2a and A-375 cells was observed within two hours of exposure. Novel fluorescent carbon nanosystem design following waste-to-wealth approach exhibited promising potential in cancer cell imaging applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. 3-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging-guided tumor resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, W.A. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Depts. of Neurosurgery; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology; University of Minnesota Medical Center (MMC), Minneapolis, MN (United States); Truwit, C.L. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Neurology; Hennepin Country Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-12-15

    Objective: We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of using 3-tesla (T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to guide brain tumor resection. Material and methods: From February 2004 to March 2006, fMRI was performed on 13 patients before surgical resection. Functional imaging was used to identify eloquent cortices for motor (8), speech (3), and motor and speech (2) activation using two different 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. Surgical resection was accomplished using a 1.5-T intraoperative MR system. Appropriate MR scan sequences were performed intraoperatively to determine and maximize the extent of the surgical resection. Results: Tumors included six oligodendrogliomas, three meningiomas, two astrocytomas and two glioblastomas multiforme. The fMRI data was accurate in all cases. After surgery, two patients had hemiparesis, two had worsening of their speech, and one had worsening of speech and motor function. Neurological function returned to normal in all patients within 1 month. Complete resections were possible in 10 patients (77%). Two patients had incomplete resections because of the proximity of their tumors to functional areas. Biopsy was performed in another patient with an astrocytoma in the motor strip. Conclusion: 3-T fMRI was accurate for locating neurologic function before tumor resection near eloquent cortex. (orig.)

  15. 3-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging-guided tumor resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, W.A.; Truwit, C.L.; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN; Hennepin Country Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN

    2006-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of using 3-tesla (T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to guide brain tumor resection. Material and methods: From February 2004 to March 2006, fMRI was performed on 13 patients before surgical resection. Functional imaging was used to identify eloquent cortices for motor (8), speech (3), and motor and speech (2) activation using two different 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. Surgical resection was accomplished using a 1.5-T intraoperative MR system. Appropriate MR scan sequences were performed intraoperatively to determine and maximize the extent of the surgical resection. Results: Tumors included six oligodendrogliomas, three meningiomas, two astrocytomas and two glioblastomas multiforme. The fMRI data was accurate in all cases. After surgery, two patients had hemiparesis, two had worsening of their speech, and one had worsening of speech and motor function. Neurological function returned to normal in all patients within 1 month. Complete resections were possible in 10 patients (77%). Two patients had incomplete resections because of the proximity of their tumors to functional areas. Biopsy was performed in another patient with an astrocytoma in the motor strip. Conclusion: 3-T fMRI was accurate for locating neurologic function before tumor resection near eloquent cortex. (orig.)

  16. Testing an excited-state energy density functional and the associated potential with the ionization potential theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemanadhan, M; Shamim, Md; Harbola, Manoj K

    2014-01-01

    The modified local spin density (MLSD) functional and the related local potential for excited states is tested by employing the ionization potential theorem. The exchange functional for an excited state is constructed by splitting k-space. Since its functional derivative cannot be obtained easily, the corresponding exchange potential is given by an analogy to its ground-state counterpart. Further, to calculate the highest occupied orbital energy ϵ max accurately, the potential is corrected for its asymptotic behaviour by employing the van Leeuwen and Baerends (LB) correction to it. ϵ max so obtained is then compared with the ΔSCF ionization energy calculated using the MLSD functional with self-interaction correction for the orbitals involved in the transition. It is shown that the two match quite accurately. The match becomes even better by tuning the LB correction with respect to a parameter in it. (paper)

  17. Functional Brain Imaging Synthesis Based on Image Decomposition and Kernel Modeling: Application to Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Martinez-Murcia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The rise of neuroimaging in research and clinical practice, together with the development of new machine learning techniques has strongly encouraged the Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD of different diseases and disorders. However, these algorithms are often tested in proprietary datasets to which the access is limited and, therefore, a direct comparison between CAD procedures is not possible. Furthermore, the sample size is often small for developing accurate machine learning methods. Multi-center initiatives are currently a very useful, although limited, tool in the recruitment of large populations and standardization of CAD evaluation. Conversely, we propose a brain image synthesis procedure intended to generate a new image set that share characteristics with an original one. Our system focuses on nuclear imaging modalities such as PET or SPECT brain images. We analyze the dataset by applying PCA to the original dataset, and then model the distribution of samples in the projected eigenbrain space using a Probability Density Function (PDF estimator. Once the model has been built, we can generate new coordinates on the eigenbrain space belonging to the same class, which can be then projected back to the image space. The system has been evaluated on different functional neuroimaging datasets assessing the: resemblance of the synthetic images with the original ones, the differences between them, their generalization ability and the independence of the synthetic dataset with respect to the original. The synthetic images maintain the differences between groups found at the original dataset, with no significant differences when comparing them to real-world samples. Furthermore, they featured a similar performance and generalization capability to that of the original dataset. These results prove that these images are suitable for standardizing the evaluation of CAD pipelines, and providing data augmentation in machine learning systems -e.g. in deep

  18. Analytical potential energy function for the Br + H2 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Yuzuru

    2001-01-01

    Analytical functions with a many-body expansion for the ground and first-excited-state potential energy surfaces for the Br+H 2 system are newly presented in this work. These functions describe the abstraction and exchange reactions qualitatively well, although it has been found that the function for the ground-state potential surface is still quantitatively unsatisfactory. (author)

  19. Efficient nonlinear registration of 3D images using high order co-ordinate transfer functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, D C

    1999-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in image registration for a variety of medical imaging applications. Image registration is achieved through the use of a co-ordinate transfer function (CTF) which maps voxels in one image to voxels in the other image, including in the general case changes in mapped voxel intensity. If images of the same subject are to be registered the co-ordinate transfer function needs to implement a spatial transformation consisting of a displacement and a rigid rotation. In order to achieve registration a common approach is to choose a suitable quality-of-registration measure and devise a method for the efficient generation of the parameters of the CTF which minimize this measure. For registration of images from different subjects more complex transforms are required. In general function minimization is too slow to allow the use of CTFs with more than a small number of parameters. However, provided the images are from the same modality and the CTF can be expanded in terms of an appropriate set of basis functions this paper will show how relatively complex CTFs can be used for registration. The use of increasingly complex CTFs to minimize the within group standard deviation of a set of normal single photon emission tomography brain images is used to demonstrate the improved registration of images from different subjects using CTFs of increasing complexity.

  20. Estimation of regional myocardial sympathetic neuronal function with I-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial images in patients with cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Aizawa, Tadanori; Kato, Kazuzo; Nakano, Hajime; Igarashi, Masaki; Ueno, Takashi; Hirosawa, Koshichiro; Kusakabe, Kiyoko.

    1989-01-01

    Myocardial SPECT images with I-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) were obtained in 10 patients with cardiomyopathy under stable state. For myocardial imaging, MIBG and Tl-201 (Tl) were simultaneously injected and collected. The ratio of MIBG to Tl (M/T ratio) in ROI was obtained with 50% cut off levels in order to eliminate background activity. The patients were divided into three major groups: (l) those who had the M/T ratio ranging from 0.8 to l.20 at rest and had marked defects in the infero-lateral region on delayed MIBG images, where pathophysiologically accelerated regional sympathetic neuronal function was suspected (n=5), (II) those who had increased M/T ratios (l.6 and l.7) in the basal septal wall (n=3), and (III) those who had decreased M/T ratios (0.7 and 0.75) in the apical septal wall, where depletion of myocardial norepinephrine was suspected (n=2). These findings indicate the potential of myocardial MIBG images to evaluate myocardial distribution of norepinephrine, i.e. myocardial sympathetic neuronal function. Certain shortcomings, such as an increased background due to dual isotopes and an increased pulmonary uptake of MIBG, require further study on quantitative methods. (Namekawa, K)

  1. The correlation between evoked spinal cord potentials and magnetic resonance imaging before Surgery in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Kosuke; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Taguchi, Toshihiko; Kato, Yoshihiko; Imajo, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the correlation between electrophysiological examination and MRI diagnosis. Twenty-four patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and evoked spinal cord potentials (ESCPs) before surgery. In all the patients, only the intervertebral level was symptomatic, as shown by ESCPs. ESCPs following median nerve stimulation (MN-ESCPs), transcranial electric stimulation (TCE-ESCPs), and spinal cord stimulation (Spinal-ECSPs) were recorded. The patients were grouped into two groups as follows: group A, all ESCPs were abnormal; group B, normal spinal cord stimulation. Spinal cord transverse area and compression ratio (central and 1/4-lateral anteroposterior diameter divided by transverse diameter) were measured on T1-weighted axial imaging, with abnormal ESCPs as indicators of spinal cord morphology. Central and 1/4-lateral compression ratio was significantly lower in group A. Spinal cord morphology of magnetic resonance imaging is useful for functional diagnosis. (author)

  2. Functional imaging to monitor vascular and metabolic response in canine head and neck tumors during fractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rødal, Jan; Rusten, Espen; Søvik, Åste; Skogmo, Hege Kippenes; Malinen, Eirik

    2013-10-01

    Radiotherapy causes alterations in tumor biology, and non-invasive early assessment of such alterations may become useful for identifying treatment resistant disease. The purpose of the current work is to assess changes in vascular and metabolic features derived from functional imaging of canine head and neck tumors during fractionated radiotherapy. Material and methods. Three dogs with spontaneous head and neck tumors received intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Contrast-enhanced cone beam computed tomography (CE-CBCT) at the treatment unit was performed at five treatment fractions. Dynamic (18)FDG-PET (D-PET) was performed prior to the start of radiotherapy, at mid-treatment and at 3-12 weeks after the completion of treatment. Tumor contrast enhancement in the CE-CBCT images was used as a surrogate for tumor vasculature. Vascular and metabolic tumor parameters were further obtained from the D-PET images. Changes in these tumor parameters were assessed, with emphasis on intra-tumoral distributions. Results. For all three patients, metabolic imaging parameters obtained from D-PET decreased from the pre- to the inter-therapy session. Correspondingly, for two of three patients, vascular imaging parameters obtained from both CE-CBCT and D-PET increased. Only one of the tumors showed a clear metabolic response after therapy. No systematic changes in the intra-tumor heterogeneity in the imaging parameters were found. Conclusion. Changes in vascular and metabolic parameters could be detected by the current functional imaging methods. Vascular tumor features from CE-CBCT and D-PET corresponded well. CE-CBCT is a potential method for easy response assessment when the patient is at the treatment unit.

  3. Epistemic Function and Ontology of Analog and Digital Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Łukaszewicz Alcaraz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The important epistemic function of photographic images is their active role in construction and reconstruction of our beliefs concerning the world and human identity, since we often consider photographs as presenting reality or even the Real itself. Because photography can convince people of how different social and ethnic groups and even they themselves look, documentary projects and the dissemination of photographic practices supported the transition from disciplinary society to the present-day society of control. While both analog and digital images are formed from the same basic materia, the ways in which this matter appears are distinctive. In the case of analog photography, we deal with physical and chemical matter, whereas with digital images we face electronic matter. Because digital photography allows endless modification of the image, we can no longer believe in the truthfulness of digital images.

  4. Structural and functional imaging for vascular targeted photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Buhong; Gu, Ying; Wilson, Brian C.

    2017-02-01

    Vascular targeted photodynamic therapy (V-PDT) has been widely used for the prevention or treatment of vascular-related diseases, such as localized prostate cancer, wet age-related macular degeneration, port wine stains, esophageal varices and bleeding gastrointestinal mucosal lesions. In this study, the fundamental mechanisms of vascular responses during and after V-PDT will be introduced. Based on the V-PDT treatment of blood vessels in dorsal skinfold window chamber model, the structural and functional imaging, which including white light microscopy, laser speckle imaging, singlet oxygen luminescence imaging, and fluorescence imaging for evaluating vascular damage will be presented, respectively. The results indicate that vessel constriction and blood flow dynamics could be considered as the crucial biomarkers for quantitative evaluation of vascular damage. In addition, future perspectives of non-invasive optical imaging for evaluating vascular damage of V-PDT will be discussed.

  5. Evaluation of cardiac function using multi-shot echo planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Tadashi; Tanitame, Nobuko; Hata, Ryoichiro; Hirai, Nobuhiko; Ikeda, Midori; Ono, Chiaki; Fukuoka, Haruhito; Ito, Katsuhide [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we performed multi-shot echo planar imaging (8 shot, TR/TE/FL=55 ms/18 ms/60 degrees) and k-space segmented fast gradient echo sequence (8 views per segment, TR/TE/FL=9.9 ms/1.8 ms/30 degrees) to assess cardiac function in healthy volunteers. Transaxial sections of the entire heart were obtained with both sequences in ECG triggered, breath hold, and with a 256 x 128 matrix. Resulting temporal resolution was 55 ms for echo planar imaging, and 71 ms for k-space segmented fast gradient echo sequence, respectively. Ventricular volume and ejection fraction of both ventricles and left ventricular mass obtained with multi-shot echo planar imaging were assessed in comparison with k-space segmented fast gradient echo sequence. Measurements of left ventricular volume, ejection fraction and mass obtained with multi-shot echo planar imaging demonstrated close correlation with those obtained with k-space segmented fast gradient echo sequence. Right ventricular volumes obtained with echo planar imaging were significantly higher than those obtained with k-space segmented fast gradient echo sequence. This tendency is considered to be due to differing contrast between right ventricular myocardium and fat tissue observed with echo planar imaging relative to that observed with fast gradient echo sequence, because fat suppression is always performed in echo planar images. Multi-shot echo planar imaging can be a reliable tool for measurement of cardiac functional parameters, although wall motion analysis of the left ventricle requires higher temporal resolution and a short axial section. (K.H.)

  6. Pulmonary function-morphologic relationships assessed by SPECT-CT fusion images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary single photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) fusion images provide objective and comprehensive assessment of pulmonary function and morphology relationships at cross-sectional lungs. This article reviewed the noteworthy findings of lung pathophysiology in wide-spectral lung disorders, which have been revealed on SPECT-CT fusion images in 8 years of experience. The fusion images confirmed the fundamental pathophysiologic appearance of lung low CT attenuation caused by airway obstruction-induced hypoxic vasoconstriction and that caused by direct pulmonary arterial obstruction as in acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). The fusion images showed better correlation of lung perfusion distribution with lung CT attenuation changes at lung mosaic CT attenuation (MCA) compared with regional ventilation in the wide-spectral lung disorders, indicating that lung heterogeneous perfusion distribution may be a dominant mechanism of MCA on CT. SPECT-CT angiography fusion images revealed occasional dissociation between lung perfusion defects and intravascular clots in acute PTE, indicating the importance of assessment of actual effect of intravascular colts on peripheral lung perfusion. Perfusion SPECT-CT fusion images revealed the characteristic and preferential location of pulmonary infarction in acute PTE. The fusion images showed occasional unexpected perfusion defects in normal lung areas on CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases and interstitial lung diseases, indicating the ability of perfusion SPECT superior to CT for detection of mild lesions in these disorders. The fusion images showed frequent ''steal phenomenon''-induced perfusion defects extending to the surrounding normal lung of arteriovenous fistulas and those at normal lungs on CT in hepatopulmonary syndrome. Comprehensive assessment of lung function-CT morphology on fusion images will lead to more profound understanding of lung pathophysiology in wide-spectral lung

  7. Determination of myocardial FFA elimination rates by functional images of uncorrected half-time values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, F.C.; Eenige, M.J. van; Wall, E.E. van der; Roos, J.P.; Lingen, A. van; Westera, G.; Hollander, W. den; Heidendal, G.A.K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative method of demarcating regions of interest over the myocardium after administration of 123 I-heptadecanoic acid to patients with coronary artery disease. In a matrix of 32x32 pixels the elimination rates of the radioactivity, which are not corrected for background activity, are visualized per pixel in a functional image. The functional image showed areas in the myocardium with high values of uncorrected elimination rates. These areas corresponded with the tracer defects on the scintigram. Corrected elimination rates obtained from regions of interest of functional images were comparable with those of scintigrams. Thus based on functional images of uncorrected elimination rates a reliable, objective determination of regions of interest over normal and abnormal myocardium can be made. (orig.) [de

  8. Functional imaging of small tissue volumes with diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Alexander D.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2006-03-01

    Imaging of dynamic changes in blood parameters, functional brain imaging, and tumor imaging are the most advanced application areas of diffuse optical tomography (DOT). When dealing with the image reconstruction problem one is faced with the fact that near-infrared photons, unlike X-rays, are highly scattered when they traverse biological tissue. Image reconstruction schemes are required that model the light propagation inside biological tissue and predict measurements on the tissue surface. By iteratively changing the tissue-parameters until the predictions agree with the real measurements, a spatial distribution of optical properties inside the tissue is found. The optical properties can be related to the tissue oxygenation, inflammation, or to the fluorophore concentration of a biochemical marker. If the model of light propagation is inaccurate, the reconstruction process will lead to an inaccurate result as well. Here, we focus on difficulties that are encountered when DOT is employed for functional imaging of small tissue volumes, for example, in cancer studies involving small animals, or human finger joints for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Most of the currently employed image reconstruction methods rely on the diffusion theory that is an approximation to the equation of radiative transfer. But, in the cases of small tissue volumes and tissues that contain low scattering regions diffusion theory has been shown to be of limited applicability Therefore, we employ a light propagation model that is based on the equation of radiative transfer, which promises to overcome the limitations.

  9. Cardiovascular CT angiography in neonates and children : Image quality and potential for radiation dose reduction with iterative image reconstruction techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tricarico, Francesco; Hlavacek, Anthony M.; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Ebersberger, Ullrich; Nance, John W.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Cho, Young Jun; Spears, J. Reid; Secchi, Francesco; Savino, Giancarlo; Marano, Riccardo; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Apfaltrer, Paul

    To evaluate image quality (IQ) of low-radiation-dose paediatric cardiovascular CT angiography (CTA), comparing iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with filtered back-projection (FBP) and estimate the potential for further dose

  10. Testing intermolecular potential functions using transport property data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifford, A.A.; Dickinson, E.; Gray, P.; Scott, A.C.

    1975-01-01

    The viscosity of hydrogen has been measured at eight temperatures from 273 to 1060K, using a capillary-flow viscometer. The results have been used to test the repulsive part of a recently formulated H 2 /H 2 intermolecular potential function, obtained from molecular-beam measurements. Agreement between the experimental and predicted values for viscosity is within 3.5%, which corresponds approximately to the combined quoted uncertainties in the two sets of data. However, if the value of the distance parameter of the potential is reduced by about 1.5%, the agreement obtained is within 0.75% over the whole temperature range. This modified potential function gives better agreement with the available higher temperature viscosities and second virial coefficients. (author)

  11. A polymeric fastener can easily functionalize liposome surfaces with gadolinium for enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cartney E; Shkumatov, Artem; Withers, Sarah G; Yang, Binxia; Glockner, James F; Misra, Sanjay; Roy, Edward J; Wong, Chun-Ho; Zimmerman, Steven C; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2013-11-26

    Common methods of loading magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents into nanoparticles often suffer from challenges related to particle formation, complex chemical modification/purification steps, and reduced contrast efficiency. This study presents a simple, yet advanced process to address these issues by loading gadolinium, an MRI contrast agent, exclusively on a liposome surface using a polymeric fastener. The fastener, so named for its ability to physically link the two functional components together, consisted of chitosan substituted with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) to chelate gadolinium, as well as octadecyl chains to stabilize the modified chitosan on the liposome surface. The assembly strategy, mimicking the mechanisms by which viruses and proteins naturally anchor to a cell, provided greater T1 relaxivity than liposomes loaded with gadolinium in both the interior and outer leaflet. Gadolinium-coated liposomes were ultimately evaluated in vivo using murine ischemia models to highlight the diagnostic capability of the system. Taken together, this process decouples particle assembly and functionalization and, therefore, has considerable potential to enhance imaging quality while alleviating many of the difficulties associated with multifunctional particle fabrication.

  12. Single-Trial Event-Related Potential Based Rapid Image Triage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Yu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Searching for points of interest (POI in large-volume imagery is a challenging problem with few good solutions. In this work, a neural engineering approach called rapid image triage (RIT which could offer about a ten-fold speed up in POI searching is developed. It is essentially a cortically-coupled computer vision technique, whereby the user is presented bursts of images at a speed of 6–15 images per second and then neural signals called event-related potential (ERP is used as the ‘cue’ for user seeing images of high relevance likelihood. Compared to past efforts, the implemented system has several unique features: (1 it applies overlapping frames in image chip preparation, to ensure rapid image triage performance; (2 a novel common spatial-temporal pattern (CSTP algorithm that makes use of both spatial and temporal patterns of ERP topography is proposed for high-accuracy single-trial ERP detection; (3 a weighted version of probabilistic support-vector-machine (SVM is used to address the inherent unbalanced nature of single-trial ERP detection for RIT. High accuracy, fast learning, and real-time capability of the developed system shown on 20 subjects demonstrate the feasibility of a brainmachine integrated rapid image triage system for fast detection of POI from large-volume imagery.

  13. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging in Stargardt Disease: Potential Marker for Disease Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Dysli Chantal; Wolf Sebastian; Hatz Katja; Zinkernagel Martin

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to describe autofluorescence lifetime characteristics in Stargardt disease (STGD) using fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) and to investigate potential prognostic markers for disease activity and progression. METHODS Fluorescence lifetime data of 16 patients with STGD (mean age, 40 years; range, 22-56 years) and 15 age-matched controls were acquired using a fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope based on a Heidelberg Eng...

  14. Methods for modeling and quantification in functional imaging by positron emissions tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    This report presents experiences and researches in the field of in vivo medical imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In particular, advances in terms of reconstruction, quantification and modeling in PET are described. The validation of processing and analysis methods is supported by the creation of data by simulation of the imaging process in PET. The recent advances of combined PET/MRI clinical cameras, allowing simultaneous acquisition of molecular/metabolic PET information, and functional/structural MRI information opens the door to unique methodological innovations, exploiting spatial alignment and simultaneity of the PET and MRI signals. It will lead to an increase in accuracy and sensitivity in the measurement of biological phenomena. In this context, the developed projects address new methodological issues related to quantification, and to the respective contributions of MRI or PET information for a reciprocal improvement of the signals of the two modalities. They open perspectives for combined analysis of the two imaging techniques, allowing optimal use of synchronous, anatomical, molecular and functional information for brain imaging. These innovative concepts, as well as data correction and analysis methods, will be easily translated into other areas of investigation using combined PET/MRI. (author) [fr

  15. Imaging strategies using focusing functions with applications to a North Sea field

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Filho, C. A.; Meles, G. A.; Curtis, A.; Ravasi, M.; Kritski, A.

    2018-04-01

    Seismic methods are used in a wide variety of contexts to investigate subsurface Earth structures, and to explore and monitor resources and waste-storage reservoirs in the upper ˜100 km of the Earth's subsurface. Reverse-time migration (RTM) is one widely used seismic method which constructs high-frequency images of subsurface structures. Unfortunately, RTM has certain disadvantages shared with other conventional single-scattering-based methods, such as not being able to correctly migrate multiply scattered arrivals. In principle, the recently developed Marchenko methods can be used to migrate all orders of multiples correctly. In practice however, using Marchenko methods are costlier to compute than RTM—for a single imaging location, the cost of performing the Marchenko method is several times that of standard RTM, and performing RTM itself requires dedicated use of some of the largest computers in the world for individual data sets. A different imaging strategy is therefore required. We propose a new set of imaging methods which use so-called focusing functions to obtain images with few artifacts from multiply scattered waves, while greatly reducing the number of points across the image at which the Marchenko method need be applied. Focusing functions are outputs of the Marchenko scheme: they are solutions of wave equations that focus in time and space at particular surface or subsurface locations. However, they are mathematical rather than physical entities, being defined only in reference media that equal to the true Earth above their focusing depths but are homogeneous below. Here, we use these focusing functions as virtual source/receiver surface seismic surveys, the upgoing focusing function being the virtual received wavefield that is created when the downgoing focusing function acts as a spatially distributed source. These source/receiver wavefields are used in three imaging schemes: one allows specific individual reflectors to be selected and imaged

  16. Luminescence imaging using radionuclides: a potential application in molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Il An, Gwang; Park, Se-Il; Oh, Jungmin; Kim, Hong Joo; Su Ha, Yeong; Wang, Eun Kyung; Min Kim, Kyeong; Kim, Jung Young; Lee, Jaetae; Welch, Michael J.; Yoo, Jeongsoo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Nuclear and optical imaging are complementary in many aspects and there would be many advantages when optical imaging probes are prepared using radionuclides rather than classic fluorophores, and when nuclear and optical dual images are obtained using single imaging probe. Methods: The luminescence intensities of various radionuclides having different decay modes have been assayed using luminescence imaging and in vitro luminometer. Radioiodinated Herceptin was injected into a tumor-bearing mouse, and luminescence and microPET images were obtained. The plant dipped in [ 32 P]phosphate solution was scanned in luminescence mode. Radio-TLC plate was also imaged in the same imaging mode. Results: Radionuclides emitting high energy β + /β - particles showed higher luminescence signals. NIH3T6.7 tumors were detected in both optical and nuclear imaging. The uptake of [ 32 P]phosphate in plant was easily followed by luminescence imaging. Radio-TLC plate was visualized and radiochemical purity was quantified using luminescence imaging. Conclusion: Many radionuclides with high energetic β + or β - particles during decay were found to be imaged in luminescence mode due mainly to Cerenkov radiation. 'Cerenkov imaging' provides a new optical imaging platform and an invaluable bridge between optical and nuclear imaging. New optical imaging probes could be easily prepared using well-established radioiodination methods. Cerenkov imaging will have more applications in the research field of plant science and autoradiography.

  17. Bilateral renal masses in a 10-year-old girl with renal failure and urinary tract infection: the importance of functional imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbania, Thomas H. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, 505 Parnassus Ave., Box 0628, San Francisco, CA (United States); Kammen, Bamidele F.; Nancarrow, Paul A. [Children' s Hospital and Research Center Oakland, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Oakland, CA (United States); Morrell, Rose Ellen [Children' s Hospital and Research Center Oakland, Department of Nephrology, Oakland, CA (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Renal sonography is a routine step in the evaluation of new onset renal failure. When renal masses are discovered in this setting, functional imaging may be critical. We report a case of bilateral renal masses in a girl with urinary tract infection and renal insufficiency found to have vesicoureteral reflux. Renal scintigraphy revealed these masses to be the only remaining functional renal tissue, preventing potentially harmful resection. (orig.)

  18. Bilateral renal masses in a 10-year-old girl with renal failure and urinary tract infection: the importance of functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbania, Thomas H.; Kammen, Bamidele F.; Nancarrow, Paul A.; Morrell, Rose Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Renal sonography is a routine step in the evaluation of new onset renal failure. When renal masses are discovered in this setting, functional imaging may be critical. We report a case of bilateral renal masses in a girl with urinary tract infection and renal insufficiency found to have vesicoureteral reflux. Renal scintigraphy revealed these masses to be the only remaining functional renal tissue, preventing potentially harmful resection. (orig.)

  19. Non-invasive assessment of the liver using imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorling Thompson, Camilla; Wang, Haolu; Liu, Xin; Liang, Xiaowen; Crawford, Darrell H.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2016-12-01

    Chronic liver disease causes 2,000 deaths in Australia per year and early diagnosis is crucial to avoid progression to cirrhosis and end stage liver disease. There is no ideal method to evaluate liver function. Blood tests and liver biopsies provide spot examinations and are unable to track changes in function quickly. Therefore better techniques are needed. Non-invasive imaging has the potential to extract increased information over a large sampling area, continuously tracking dynamic changes in liver function. This project aimed to study the ability of three imaging techniques, multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, infrared thermography and photoacoustic imaging, in measuring liver function. Collagen deposition was obvious in multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging in fibrosis and cirrhosis and comparable to conventional histology. Infrared thermography revealed a significantly increased liver temperature in hepatocellular carcinoma. In addition, multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging and photoacoustic imaging could both track uptake and excretion of indocyanine green in rat liver. These results prove that non-invasive imaging can extract crucial information about the liver continuously over time and has the potential to be translated into clinic in the assessment of liver disease.

  20. Density-functional errors in ionization potential with increasing system size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittleton, Sarah R.; Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M., E-mail: cisborn@ucmerced.edu [Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, 5200 North Lake Road, Merced, California 95343 (United States); Johnson, Erin R., E-mail: erin.johnson@dal.ca [Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, 5200 North Lake Road, Merced, California 95343 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, 6274 Coburg Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada)

    2015-05-14

    This work investigates the effects of molecular size on the accuracy of density-functional ionization potentials for a set of 28 hydrocarbons, including series of alkanes, alkenes, and oligoacenes. As the system size increases, delocalization error introduces a systematic underestimation of the ionization potential, which is rationalized by considering the fractional-charge behavior of the electronic energies. The computation of the ionization potential with many density-functional approximations is not size-extensive due to excessive delocalization of the incipient positive charge. While inclusion of exact exchange reduces the observed errors, system-specific tuning of long-range corrected functionals does not generally improve accuracy. These results emphasize that good performance of a functional for small molecules is not necessarily transferable to larger systems.

  1. Energy spectra and wave function of trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential as an effective quantum chromodynamics potential in D-dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deta, U. A., E-mail: utamaalan@yahoo.co.id [Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department of Post Graduate Program, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta 57126, Indonesia and Physics Department, State University of Surabaya, Jl. Ketintang, Surabaya 60231 (Indonesia); Suparmi,; Cari,; Husein, A. S.; Yuliani, H.; Khaled, I. K. A.; Luqman, H.; Supriyanto [Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department of Post Graduate Program, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta 57126 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    The Energy Spectra and Wave Function of Schrodinger equation in D-Dimensions for trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential were investigated analytically using Nikiforov-Uvarov method. This potential captures the essential traits of the quark-gluon dynamics of Quantum Chromodynamics. The approximate energy spectra are given in the close form and the corresponding approximate wave function for arbitrary l-state (l ≠ 0) in D-dimensions are formulated in the form of differential polynomials. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The existence of extra dimensions (centrifugal factor) and this potential increase the energy spectra of system.

  2. Functional Imaging of Working Memory and Peripheral Endothelial Function in Middle-Aged Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Mitzi M.; Tarumi, Takashi; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Sugawara, Jun; Swann-Sternberg, Tali; Goudarzi, Katayoon; Haley, Andreana P.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the relationship between a prognostic indicator of vascular health, flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and working memory-related brain activation in healthy middle-aged adults. Forty-two participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing a 2-Back working memory task. Brachial artery…

  3. Dialects in Animals: Evidence, Development and Potential Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Henry

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dialects are one of the parallels that have long been established between human language and animal communication. We discuss the potential functional parallels between human and animal dialects, arguing that in both cases different mechanisms and functions may be at stake where large geographical versus very localized (e.g. social variations are concerned. Birdsong studies in particular, but also recent studies of mammal vocalizations, show that the use of the term “dialect” to refer to within-species vocal variations in animal species is more than a metaphor and that animal dialects offer a possibility to explore the causes and functions of linguistic variation and change, one of the challenges in exploring the origin of diversity of language families. We present here an original view, as our approach was not “primate-centered,” and take into consideration “homoplasy” (analogy as a potential mechanism to explain that different taxa have evolved the same functional response to social constraints.

  4. Measurement of the presampled two-dimensional modulation transfer function of digital imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterly, Kenneth A.; Hangiandreou, Nicholas J.; Schueler, Beth A.; Ritenour, E. Russell

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop methods to measure the presampled two-dimensional modulation transfer function (2D MTF) of digital imaging systems. A custom x-ray 'point source' phantom was created by machining 256 holes with diameter 0.107 mm through a 0.5-mm-thick copper plate. The phantom was imaged several times, resulting in many images of individual x-ray 'spots'. The center of each spot (with respect to the pixel matrix) was determined to subpixel accuracy by fitting each spot to a 2D Gaussian function. The subpixel spot center locations were used to create a 5x oversampled system point spread function (PSF), which characterizes the optical and electrical properties of the system and is independent of the pixel sampling of the original image. The modulus of the Fourier transform of the PSF was calculated. Next, the Fourier function was normalized to the zero frequency value. Finally, the Fourier transform function was divided by the first-order Bessel function that defined the frequency content of the holes, resulting in the presampled 2D MTF. The presampled 2D MTF of a 0.1 mm pixel pitch computed radiography system and 0.2 mm pixel pitch flat panel digital imaging system that utilized a cesium iodide scintillator was measured. Comparison of the axial components of the 2D MTF to one-dimensional MTF measurements acquired using an edge device method demonstrated that the two methods produced consistent results

  5. Functional MR imaging of working memory before neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, A.P.; Groen, G.; Braun, V.

    2007-01-01

    Information concerning the tissue adjacent to a brain tumour is crucial for planning and performing a neurosurgical intervention. In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of functional imaging of working memory in terms of working memory preservation. Working memory performance of 14 patients with prefrontal tumours was tested preoperatively by means of a standardized neuropsychological test battery. Also, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using a so-called two-back paradigm was performed to visualize brain areas related to that task. Working memory areas were reliably detected in all patients. Surgery was then planned on the basis of this information, and the data were used for intra-operative cranial neuronavigation. Three to twelve months after surgery, patients were tested again with the test battery in order to detect possible changes in working memory performance. In 13 cases the memory performance was unchanged, only one female patient had a slight impairment of working memory compared to the pre-operative status. (orig.)

  6. [Computational medical imaging (radiomics) and potential for immuno-oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, R; Limkin, E J; Dercle, L; Reuzé, S; Zacharaki, E I; Chargari, C; Schernberg, A; Dirand, A S; Alexis, A; Paragios, N; Deutsch, É; Ferté, C; Robert, C

    2017-10-01

    The arrival of immunotherapy has profoundly changed the management of multiple cancers, obtaining unexpected tumour responses. However, until now, the majority of patients do not respond to these new treatments. The identification of biomarkers to determine precociously responding patients is a major challenge. Computational medical imaging (also known as radiomics) is a promising and rapidly growing discipline. This new approach consists in the analysis of high-dimensional data extracted from medical imaging, to further describe tumour phenotypes. This approach has the advantages of being non-invasive, capable of evaluating the tumour and its microenvironment in their entirety, thus characterising spatial heterogeneity, and being easily repeatable over time. The end goal of radiomics is to determine imaging biomarkers as decision support tools for clinical practice and to facilitate better understanding of cancer biology, allowing the assessment of the changes throughout the evolution of the disease and the therapeutic sequence. This review will develop the process of computational imaging analysis and present its potential in immuno-oncology. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluating the cancer detection and grading potential of prostatic-zinc imaging: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortesi, M; Chechik, R; Breskin, A; Vartsky, D; Ramon, J; Raviv, G; Volkov, A; Fridman, E

    2009-01-01

    The present work deals with the analysis of prostatic-zinc-concentration images. The goal is to evaluate potential clinically relevant information that can be extracted from such images. In the absence of experimental images, synthetic ones are produced from clinically measured zinc-concentration distributions in certified benign and cancerous tissue samples, classified by the lesion grade. We describe the method for producing the images and model the effect of counting statistics noise. We present in detail the image analysis, which is based on a combination of standard image processing and segmentation tools, optimized for this particular application. The information on lowest zinc value obtained from the image analysis is translated to clinical data such as tumour presence, location, size and grade. Their confidence is evaluated with the help of standard statistical tools such as receiver operating characteristic analysis. The present work predicts a potential for detecting small prostate-cancer lesions, of grade (4+3) and above, with very good specificity and sensitivity. The present analysis further provides data on the pixel size and image counting statistics requested from the trans-rectal probe that will record in vivo prostatic-zinc maps in patients.

  8. Potential clinical impact of radionuclide imaging technologies: highlights of the ITBS 2003 meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itti, Roland E-mail: roland.itti@univ-lyon1.fr

    2004-07-11

    Radiopharmaceuticals are major determinants of progress in Nuclear Medicine. Besides {sup 18}FDG, the most common PET tracer, several other molecules are under evaluation, such as {sup 18}F-fluoride for bone studies, numerous ligands for neurotransmission, {sup 18}F-DOPA for neuro-endocrine tumors or generator produced {sup 68}Ga-peptides for various cancers. Nuclear medicine gradually changes for 'molecular imaging' and medical imaging, which was at the beginning mainly anatomic, has progressed in the direction of functional and metabolic imaging. The present challenge is to achieve some degree of 'in vivo' biochemistry or even histology or genetics. The importance of anatomic/functional image fusion justifies the development of combined PET-CT instrumentation, whose objectives have to be discussed in terms of anatomical landmarks and/or additional clinical information. The question of 'hard' or 'soft' image co-registration remains open, involving not only CT, but also SPECT or MRI. Development of dedicated imaging devices, whether single photon or positron, is of major interest for breast imaging, allowing optimal imaging conditions, with results definitely superior to classical gamma-cameras or PET. The patient population concerned with scintimammography is still controversial, as well as the imaging modalities: FDG or sestaMIBI, planar or tomographic, scintillators or semi-conductors, and the research field remains open. This is also valid for external or per-operative probe systems for tumor or lymph nodes localization.

  9. Neurophysiology of functional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijsden, Pieter; Hyder, Fahmeed; Rothman, Douglas L; Shulman, Robert G

    2009-05-01

    The successes of PET and fMRI in non-invasively localizing sensory functions had encouraged efforts to transform the subjective concepts of cognitive psychology into objective physical measures. The assumption was that mental functions could be decomposed into non-overlapping, context-independent modules that are operated on by separable areas of a computer-like brain. The failures of cognitive modularity and of a very localized phrenology are generally, but not universally, accepted; but in their place, and usually not distinguished from the original revolutionary hopes of clarification, experimental results are being interpreted in terms of rather flexible definitions of both cognitive concepts and the degree of localization. In an alternative approach, we have connected fMRI, (13)C MRS, and electrophysiology measurements of brain energy to connect with observable properties of mental life (i.e., awareness). We illustrate this approach with a sensory stimulation experiment; the degree of localization found in BOLD signals was related to the global energy of the brain which, when manipulated by anesthetics, affected the degree of awareness. The influence of brain energy upon functional imaging maps is changing the interpretations of neuroimaging experiments, from psychological concepts generating computer-like responses to empirical responses dominated by the high brain energy and signaling at rest. In our view "baseline" is an operational term, an adjective that defines a property of a state of the system before it is perturbed by a stimulus. Given the dependence of observable psychological properties upon the "baseline" energy, we believe that it is unnecessarily limiting to define a particular state as the baseline.

  10. Imaging evaluation of potential donors in living-donor liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, G.; Wiebe, E.; Walji, A.H.; Bigam, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplants, originally obtained from deceased donors, can now be harvested from living donors as well. This technique, called living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT), provides an effective alternative means of liver transplantation and is a method of expanding the donor pool in light of the demand and supply imbalance for organ transplants. Imaging plays an important role in LDLT programmes by providing robust evaluation of potential donors to ensure that only anatomically suitable donors with no significant co-existing pathology are selected and that crucial information that allows detailed preoperative planning is available. Imaging evaluation helps to improve the outcome of LDLT for both donors and recipients, by improving the chances of graft survival and reducing the postoperative complication rate. In this review, we describe the history of LDLT and discuss in detail the application of imaging in donor assessment with emphasis on use of modern computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques

  11. Integration of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Filippini, Nicola; Knight, Steven; Talbot, Kevin; Turner, Martin R

    2011-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as a system failure is a concept supported by the finding of consistent extramotor as well as motor cerebral pathology. The functional correlates of the structural changes detected using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry have not been extensively studied. A group of 25 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was compared to healthy control subjects using a multi-modal neuroimaging approach comprising T(1)-weighted, diffusion-weighted and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Using probabilistic tractography, a grey matter connection network was defined based upon the prominent corticospinal tract and corpus callosum involvement demonstrated by white matter tract-based spatial statistics. This 'amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-specific' network included motor, premotor and supplementary motor cortices, pars opercularis and motor-related thalamic nuclei. A novel analysis protocol, using this disease-specific grey matter network as an input for a dual-regression analysis, was then used to assess changes in functional connectivity directly associated with this network. A spatial pattern of increased functional connectivity spanning sensorimotor, premotor, prefrontal and thalamic regions was found. A composite of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging measures also allowed the qualitative discrimination of patients from controls. An integrated structural and functional connectivity approach therefore identified apparently dichotomous processes characterizing the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cerebral network failure, in which there was increased functional connectivity within regions of decreased structural connectivity. Patients with slower rates of disease progression showed connectivity measures with values closer to healthy controls, raising the possibility that functional connectivity increases might not simply represent a

  12. Functional MRI studies of human vision on a clinical imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.S.; Lewine, J.D.; Aine, C.J.; van Hulsteyn, D.; Wood, C.C.; Sanders, J.; Maclin, E.; Belliveau, J.W.; Caprihan, A.

    1992-01-01

    During the past decade, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become the method of choice for imaging the anatomy of the human brain. Recently, Belliveau and colleagues have reported the use of echo planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) to image patterns of neural activity. Here, we report functional MR imaging in response to visual stimulation without the use of contrast agents, and without the extensive hardware modifications required for EPI. Regions of activity were observed near the expected locations of V1, V2 and possibly V3 and another active region was observed near the parietal-occipital sulcus on the superior surface of the cerebrum. These locations are consistent with sources observed in neuromagnetic studies of the human visual response

  13. Detection of potential mosquito breeding sites based on community sourced geotagged images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ankit; Chaudhuri, Usashi; Chaudhuri, Subhasis; Seetharaman, Guna

    2014-06-01

    Various initiatives have been taken all over the world to involve the citizens in the collection and reporting of data to make better and informed data-driven decisions. Our work shows how the geotagged images collected through the general population can be used to combat Malaria and Dengue by identifying and visualizing localities that contain potential mosquito breeding sites. Our method first employs image quality assessment on the client side to reject the images with distortions like blur and artifacts. Each geotagged image received on the server is converted into a feature vector using the bag of visual words model. We train an SVM classifier on a histogram-based feature vector obtained after the vector quantization of SIFT features to discriminate images containing either a small stagnant water body like puddle, or open containers and tires, bushes etc. from those that contain flowing water, manicured lawns, tires attached to a vehicle etc. A geographical heat map is generated by assigning a specific location a probability value of it being a potential mosquito breeding ground of mosquito using feature level fusion or the max approach presented in the paper. The heat map thus generated can be used by concerned health authorities to take appropriate action and to promote civic awareness.

  14. Amygdala real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging neurofeedback for major depressive disorder: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kymberly D; Zotev, Vadim; Phillips, Raquel; Misaki, Masaya; Drevets, Wayne C; Bodurka, Jerzy

    2018-04-23

    Advances in imaging technologies have allowed for the analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging data in real-time (rtfMRI), leading to the development of neurofeedback (nf) training. This rtfMRI-nf training utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) tomographic localization capacity to allow a person to see and regulate the localized hemodynamic signal from his or her own brain. In this review, we summarize the results of several studies that have developed and applied neurofeedback training to healthy and depressed individuals with the amygdala as the neurofeedback target and the goal to increase the hemodynamic response during positive autobiographical memory recall. We review these studies and highlight some of the challenges and advances in developing an rtfMRI-nf paradigm for broader use in psychiatric populations. The work described focuses on our line of research aiming to develop the rtfMRI-nf into an intervention, and includes a discussion of the selection of a region of interest for feedback, selecting a control condition, behavioral and cognitive effects of training, and predicting which participants are most likely to respond well to training. While the results of these studies are encouraging and suggest the clinical potential of amygdala rtfMRI-nf in alleviating symptoms of major depressive disorder, larger studies are warranted to confirm its efficacy. © 2018 The Author. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2018 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  15. Advantages in functional imaging of the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Mier, Walter; Mier, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    As neuronal pathologies cause only minor morphological alterations, molecular imaging techniques are a prerequisite for the study of diseases of the brain. The development of molecular probes that specifically bind biochemical markers and the advances of instrumentation have revolutionized the possibilities to gain insight into the human brain organization and beyond this?visualize structure-function and brain-behavior relationships. The review describes the development and current applicatio...

  16. Single image super-resolution based on approximated Heaviside functions and iterative refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Yu; Huang, Ting-Zhu; Deng, Liang-Jian

    2018-01-01

    One method of solving the single-image super-resolution problem is to use Heaviside functions. This has been done previously by making a binary classification of image components as “smooth” and “non-smooth”, describing these with approximated Heaviside functions (AHFs), and iteration including l1 regularization. We now introduce a new method in which the binary classification of image components is extended to different degrees of smoothness and non-smoothness, these components being represented by various classes of AHFs. Taking into account the sparsity of the non-smooth components, their coefficients are l1 regularized. In addition, to pick up more image details, the new method uses an iterative refinement for the residuals between the original low-resolution input and the downsampled resulting image. Experimental results showed that the new method is superior to the original AHF method and to four other published methods. PMID:29329298

  17. The potential-free approach to the construction of the NN-wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troitsky, V.E.

    1984-01-01

    The traditional approaches to the nonrelativistic NN-interaction use local and nonlocal potentials of the kind defined by different dynamical speculations. The wave functions are obtained then from the Schroedinger equation with the chosen potential. Here the author obtains the wave functions (scattering wave function and bound state wave function) directly from the scattering phases in the frame of a dispersion approach without use of potential. (Auth.)

  18. Prospective, longitudinal, multi-modal functional imaging for radical chemo-IMRT treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer: the INSIGHT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, Liam; Panek, Rafal; McQuaid, Dualta; Dunlop, Alex; Schmidt, Maria; Riddell, Angela; Koh, Dow-Mu; Doran, Simon; Murray, Iain; Du, Yong; Chua, Sue; Hansen, Vibeke; Wong, Kee H.; Dean, Jamie; Gulliford, Sarah; Bhide, Shreerang; Leach, Martin O.; Nutting, Christopher; Harrington, Kevin; Newbold, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Radical chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) is an effective organ-sparing treatment option for patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). Despite advances in treatment for LAHNC, a significant minority of these patients continue to fail to achieve complete response with standard CRT. By constructing a multi-modality functional imaging (FI) predictive biomarker for CRT outcome for patients with LAHNC we hope to be able to reliably identify those patients at high risk of failing standard CRT. Such a biomarker would in future enable CRT to be tailored to the specific biological characteristics of each patients’ tumour, potentially leading to improved treatment outcomes. The INSIGHT study is a single-centre, prospective, longitudinal multi-modality imaging study using functional MRI and FDG-PET/CT for patients with LAHNC squamous cell carcinomas receiving radical CRT. Two cohorts of patients are being recruited: one treated with, and another treated without, induction chemotherapy. All patients receive radical intensity modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy. Patients undergo functional imaging before, during and 3 months after completion of radiotherapy, as well as at the time of relapse, should that occur within the first two years after treatment. Serum samples are collected from patients at the same time points as the FI scans for analysis of a panel of serum markers of tumour hypoxia. The primary aim of the INSIGHT study is to acquire a prospective multi-parametric longitudinal data set comprising functional MRI, FDG PET/CT, and serum biomarker data from patients with LAHNC undergoing primary radical CRT. This data set will be used to construct a predictive imaging biomarker for outcome after CRT for LAHNC. This predictive imaging biomarker will be used in future studies of functional imaging based treatment stratification for patients with LAHNC. Additional objectives are: defining the reproducibility of FI parameters; determining robust

  19. Functional imaging in pre-motor Parkinson’s disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaldi, D.; Picco, A.; Ferrara, M.; Nobili, F.; Famà, F.; Buschiazzo, A.; Morbelli, S.; De Carli, F.

    2014-01-01

    Several non motor symptoms (NMS) can precede the onset of the classical motor Parkinson’s disease (PD) syndrome. The existence of pre-motor and even pre-clinical PD stages has been proposed but the best target population to be screened to disclose PD patients in a pre-clinical, thus asymptomatic, stage is still matter of debate. The REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) often affects PD patients at different stages of the disease and could precede the onset of motor symptoms by several years. However, RBD could also precede other synucleinopathies (namely, dementia with Lewy bodies and multisystem atrophy), and less frequently could be related to other neurological conditions or remain idiopathic. Moreover, not all PD patients exhibit RBD. Despite these caveats, RBD probably represents the best feature to disclose pre-motor PD patients given its high-risk of developing a full motor syndrome. Other clinical clues in the premotor stages of PD undergoing active investigation include hyposmia, depression, and autonomic dysfunction. Effective biomarkers are needed in order to improve the diagnostic accuracy in the pre-motor stage of PD, to monitor disease progression and to plan both pharmacological and non-pharmacological intervention. Functional imaging, in particular radionuclide methodologies, has been often used to investigate dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic features as well as cortical functioning in patients with RBD in its idiopathic form (iRBD) and/or associated with PD. Recently, new tracers to image α-synuclein pathologies are under development. Functional imaging in pre-motor PD, and in particular in iRBD, could improve our knowledge about the underlying mechanisms and the neurodegenerative progress of PD

  20. Investigations of functional and structural changes in migraine with aura by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    technology to study these features of migraine with aura (MA) is functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which has the potential not only to detect, but also to localize hypersensitive cortex. The main objective of this thesis was to investigate the cortical responsivity of patients with MA during.......e. ≥= 90% of auras occurring in the same visual hemifield (study II). To circumvent bias relating to differences between right and left hemispheres (e.g. caused by physiological left/right bias, asymmetry of the visual stimulation or magnetic field inhomogeneity of the scanner), we included an equal number...

  1. Reconstruction of an input function from a dynamic PET water image using multiple tissue curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Yukito; Yamamoto, Yuka; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro

    2016-08-01

    Quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is important for the understanding of normal and pathologic brain physiology. When CBF is assessed using PET with {{\\text{H}}2} 15O or C15O2, its calculation requires an arterial input function, which generally requires invasive arterial blood sampling. The aim of the present study was to develop a new technique to reconstruct an image derived input function (IDIF) from a dynamic {{\\text{H}}2} 15O PET image as a completely non-invasive approach. Our technique consisted of using a formula to express the input using tissue curve with rate constant parameter. For multiple tissue curves extracted from the dynamic image, the rate constants were estimated so as to minimize the sum of the differences of the reproduced inputs expressed by the extracted tissue curves. The estimated rates were used to express the inputs and the mean of the estimated inputs was used as an IDIF. The method was tested in human subjects (n  =  29) and was compared to the blood sampling method. Simulation studies were performed to examine the magnitude of potential biases in CBF and to optimize the number of multiple tissue curves used for the input reconstruction. In the PET study, the estimated IDIFs were well reproduced against the measured ones. The difference between the calculated CBF values obtained using the two methods was small as around  PET imaging. This suggests the possibility of using a completely non-invasive technique to assess CBF in patho-physiological studies.

  2. Microencapsulation of indocyanine green for potential applications in image-guided drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiqiang; Si, Ting; Xu, Ronald X

    2015-02-07

    We present a novel process to encapsulate indocyanine green (ICG) in liposomal droplets at high concentration for potential applications in image-guided drug delivery. The microencapsulation process follows two consecutive steps of droplet formation by liquid-driven coaxial flow focusing (LDCFF) and solvent removal by oil phase dewetting. These biocompatible lipid vesicles may have important applications in drug delivery and fluorescence imaging.

  3. Resting-State Functional MR Imaging for Determining Language Laterality in Intractable Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSalvo, Matthew N; Tanaka, Naoaki; Douw, Linda; Leveroni, Catherine L; Buchbinder, Bradley R; Greve, Douglas N; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2016-10-01

    Purpose To measure the accuracy of resting-state functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in determining hemispheric language dominance in patients with medically intractable focal epilepsies against the results of an intracarotid amobarbital procedure (IAP). Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board, and all subjects gave signed informed consent. Data in 23 patients with medically intractable focal epilepsy were retrospectively analyzed. All 23 patients were candidates for epilepsy surgery and underwent both IAP and resting-state functional MR imaging as part of presurgical evaluation. Language dominance was determined from functional MR imaging data by calculating a laterality index (LI) after using independent component analysis. The accuracy of this method was assessed against that of IAP by using a variety of thresholds. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by using leave-one-out cross validation. Spatial maps of language components were qualitatively compared among each hemispheric language dominance group. Results Measurement of hemispheric language dominance with resting-state functional MR imaging was highly concordant with IAP results, with up to 96% (22 of 23) accuracy, 96% (22 of 23) sensitivity, and 96% (22 of 23) specificity. Composite language component maps in patients with typical language laterality consistently included classic language areas such as the inferior frontal gyrus, the posterior superior temporal gyrus, and the inferior parietal lobule, while those of patients with atypical language laterality also included non-classical language areas such as the superior and middle frontal gyri, the insula, and the occipital cortex. Conclusion Resting-state functional MR imaging can be used to measure language laterality in patients with medically intractable focal epilepsy. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  4. Functional imaging of neurocognitive dysfunction in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, I.; Tost, H.; Ruf, M.; Ende, G.

    2005-01-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurobiological disorder of early childhood onset. Defining symptoms are chronic impairments of attention, impulse control and motor hyperactivity that frequently persist until adulthood. Miscellaneous causes of the disorder have been discussed. Accumulating evidence from imaging- and molecular genetic studies strengthened the theory of ADHS being a predominantly inherited disorder of neurobiological origin. In the last 15 years, non-invasive brain imaging methods were successfully implemented in pediatric research. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies gave major insight into the neurobiological correlates of executive malfunction, inhibitory deficits and psychomotoric soft signs. These findings are in good accordance with brain morphometric data indicating a significant volumetric decrease of major components of striato-thalamo-cortical feedback loops, primarily influencing prefrontal executive functioning (e.g. basal ganglia). Empirical evidence points to a broad array of associated behavioral disturbances like deficient visuomotor abilities and oculomotor dysfunctions. This paper reviews the current empirical evidence derived from prior imaging studies. Special emphasis is given to the relevance of oculomotor dysfunctions in clinical and research settings, as well as their assessment in the MR environment. (orig.) [de

  5. Micro-seismic imaging using a source function independent full waveform inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanchen; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2018-03-01

    At the heart of micro-seismic event measurements is the task to estimate the location of the source micro-seismic events, as well as their ignition times. The accuracy of locating the sources is highly dependent on the velocity model. On the other hand, the conventional micro-seismic source locating methods require, in many cases manual picking of traveltime arrivals, which do not only lead to manual effort and human interaction, but also prone to errors. Using full waveform inversion (FWI) to locate and image micro-seismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. However, full waveform inversion of micro-seismic events faces incredible nonlinearity due to the unknown source locations (space) and functions (time). We developed a source function independent full waveform inversion of micro-seismic events to invert for the source image, source function and the velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with these observed and modeled to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. The extended image for the source wavelet in Z axis is extracted to check the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model. Also, angle gathers is calculated to assess the quality of the long wavelength component of the velocity model. By inverting for the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model simultaneously, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity for synthetic examples used here, like those corresponding to the Marmousi model and the SEG/EAGE overthrust model.

  6. Micro-seismic imaging using a source function independent full waveform inversion method

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hanchen

    2018-03-26

    At the heart of micro-seismic event measurements is the task to estimate the location of the source micro-seismic events, as well as their ignition times. The accuracy of locating the sources is highly dependent on the velocity model. On the other hand, the conventional micro-seismic source locating methods require, in many cases manual picking of traveltime arrivals, which do not only lead to manual effort and human interaction, but also prone to errors. Using full waveform inversion (FWI) to locate and image micro-seismic events allows for an automatic process (free of picking) that utilizes the full wavefield. However, full waveform inversion of micro-seismic events faces incredible nonlinearity due to the unknown source locations (space) and functions (time). We developed a source function independent full waveform inversion of micro-seismic events to invert for the source image, source function and the velocity model. It is based on convolving reference traces with these observed and modeled to mitigate the effect of an unknown source ignition time. The adjoint-state method is used to derive the gradient for the source image, source function and velocity updates. The extended image for the source wavelet in Z axis is extracted to check the accuracy of the inverted source image and velocity model. Also, angle gathers is calculated to assess the quality of the long wavelength component of the velocity model. By inverting for the source image, source wavelet and the velocity model simultaneously, the proposed method produces good estimates of the source location, ignition time and the background velocity for synthetic examples used here, like those corresponding to the Marmousi model and the SEG/EAGE overthrust model.

  7. Infrared scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging of the macula and its correlation with functional loss and structural changes in patients with stargardt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasakis, Anastasios; Fishman, Gerald A; Lindeman, Martin; Genead, Mohamed A; Zhou, Wensheng

    2011-05-01

    To correlate the degree of functional loss with structural changes in patients with Stargardt disease. Eighteen eyes of 10 patients with Stargardt disease were studied. Scanning laser ophthalmoscope infrared images were compared with corresponding spectral-domain optical coherence tomography scans. Additionally, scanning laser ophthalmoscope microperimetry was performed, and results were superimposed on scanning laser ophthalmoscope infrared images and in selected cases on fundus autofluorescence images. Seventeen of 18 eyes showed a distinct hyporeflective foveal and/or perifoveal area with distinct borders on scanning laser ophthalmoscope infrared images, which was less evident on funduscopy and incompletely depicted in fundus autofluorescence images. This hyporeflective zone corresponded to areas of significantly elevated psychophysical thresholds on microperimetry testing, in addition to thinning of the retinal pigment epithelium and disorganization or loss of the photoreceptor cell inner segment-outer segment junction and external-limiting membrane on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Scanning laser ophthalmoscope infrared fundus images are useful for depicting retinal structural changes in patients with Stargardt disease. A spectral-domain optical coherence tomography/scanning laser ophthalmoscope microperimetry device allows for a direct correlation of structural abnormalities with functional defects that will likely be applicable for the determination of retinal areas for potential improvement of retinal function in these patients during future clinical trials and for the monitoring of the diseases' natural history.

  8. Analysis of image heterogeneity using 2D Minkowski functionals detects tumor responses to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Timothy J; Canuto, Holly C; Kettunen, Mikko I; Booth, Thomas C; Hu, De-En; Krishnan, Anant S; Bohndiek, Sarah E; Neves, André A; McLachlan, Charles; Hobson, Michael P; Brindle, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    The acquisition of ever increasing volumes of high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has created an urgent need to develop automated and objective image analysis algorithms that can assist in determining tumor margins, diagnosing tumor stage, and detecting treatment response. We have shown previously that Minkowski functionals, which are precise morphological and structural descriptors of image heterogeneity, can be used to enhance the detection, in T1 -weighted images, of a targeted Gd(3+) -chelate-based contrast agent for detecting tumor cell death. We have used Minkowski functionals here to characterize heterogeneity in T2 -weighted images acquired before and after drug treatment, and obtained without contrast agent administration. We show that Minkowski functionals can be used to characterize the changes in image heterogeneity that accompany treatment of tumors with a vascular disrupting agent, combretastatin A4-phosphate, and with a cytotoxic drug, etoposide. Parameterizing changes in the heterogeneity of T2 -weighted images can be used to detect early responses of tumors to drug treatment, even when there is no change in tumor size. The approach provides a quantitative and therefore objective assessment of treatment response that could be used with other types of MR image and also with other imaging modalities. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Dynamic chest radiography: flat-panel detector (FPD) based functional X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Rie

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic chest radiography is a flat-panel detector (FPD)-based functional X-ray imaging, which is performed as an additional examination in chest radiography. The large field of view (FOV) of FPDs permits real-time observation of the entire lungs and simultaneous right-and-left evaluation of diaphragm kinetics. Most importantly, dynamic chest radiography provides pulmonary ventilation and circulation findings as slight changes in pixel value even without the use of contrast media; the interpretation is challenging and crucial for a better understanding of pulmonary function. The basic concept was proposed in the 1980s; however, it was not realized until the 2010s because of technical limitations. Dynamic FPDs and advanced digital image processing played a key role for clinical application of dynamic chest radiography. Pulmonary ventilation and circulation can be quantified and visualized for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Dynamic chest radiography can be deployed as a simple and rapid means of functional imaging in both routine and emergency medicine. Here, we focus on the evaluation of pulmonary ventilation and circulation. This review article describes the basic mechanism of imaging findings according to pulmonary/circulation physiology, followed by imaging procedures, analysis method, and diagnostic performance of dynamic chest radiography.

  10. [Neuropsychological models of autism spectrum disorders - behavioral evidence and functional imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziobek, Isabel; Bölte, Sven

    2011-03-01

    To review neuropsychological models of theory of mind (ToM), executive functions (EF), and central coherence (CC) as framework for cognitive abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Behavioral and functional imaging studies are described that assess social-cognitive, emotional, and executive functions as well as locally oriented perception in ASD. Impairments in ToM and EF as well as alterations in CC are frequently replicated phenomena in ASD. Especially problems concerning social perception and ToM have high explanatory value for clinical symptomatology. Brain activation patterns differ between individuals with and without ASD for ToM, EF, und CC functions. An approach focussing on reduced cortical connectivity seems to be increasingly favored over explanations focussing on single affected brain sites. A better understanding of the complexities of ASD in future research demands the integration of clinical, neuropsychological, functional imaging, and molecular genetics evidence. Weaknesses in ToM and EF as well as strengths in detail-focussed perception should be used for individual intervention planning.

  11. Quantitative perfusion imaging in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoellner, F.G.; Gaa, T.; Zimmer, F.; Ong, M.M.; Riffel, P.; Hausmann, D.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Weis, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recognized for its superior tissue contrast while being non-invasive and free of ionizing radiation. Due to the development of new scanner hardware and fast imaging techniques during the last decades, access to tissue and organ functions became possible. One of these functional imaging techniques is perfusion imaging with which tissue perfusion and capillary permeability can be determined from dynamic imaging data. Perfusion imaging by MRI can be performed by two approaches, arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. While the first method uses magnetically labelled water protons in arterial blood as an endogenous tracer, the latter involves the injection of a contrast agent, usually gadolinium (Gd), as a tracer for calculating hemodynamic parameters. Studies have demonstrated the potential of perfusion MRI for diagnostics and also for therapy monitoring. The utilization and application of perfusion MRI are still restricted to specialized centers, such as university hospitals. A broad application of the technique has not yet been implemented. The MRI perfusion technique is a valuable tool that might come broadly available after implementation of standards on European and international levels. Such efforts are being promoted by the respective professional bodies. (orig.) [de

  12. Hypercholesterolemia and Myocardial function evaluated via Tissue Doppler Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaru Pavan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To establish a link between hypercholesterolemia and myocardial dysfunction. Background Heart failure is a complex disease involving changes in systolic and diastolic function. Newer echocardiographic imaging modalities may be able to detect discreet changes in myocardial function associated with hypercholesterolemia. Therefore we sought to establish a link between hypercholesterolemia and myocardial dysfunction with tissue Doppler imaging (TDI. Methods Twenty-seven rabbits were studied: 7 were fed normal chow (group 1 and 20 a high cholesterol diet (10 with ezetimibe, 1 mg/kg/day; group 2 and 10 without, group 3. Echocardiographic images were obtained under general anesthesia. Serum cholesterol levels were obtained at baseline, 3 and 6 months and myocardial cholesterol levels measured following euthanasia. Results Doppler measurements, including E/A, E'/A' and S' were significantly lower in group 3 compared to both groups 1 and 2 but no significant differences were noted in chamber sizes or ejection fraction among the groups. Average serum cholesterol was higher in group 3 compared to groups 1 and 2 respectively (495 ± 305 mg/dl vs. 114 ± 95 mg/dl and 87 ± 37 mg/dl; p 2 = 0.17 p = 0.04, r2 = 0.37 p = 0.001 and r2 = 0.24 p = 0.01. Conclusion Cholesterol load in the serum and myocardium was significantly associated with decreased systolic and diastolic function by TDI. Moreover, lipid lowering was protective.

  13. Effects of electroconvulsive therapy on amygdala function in major depression - a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlich, R; Bürger, C; Dohm, K; Grotegerd, D; Opel, N; Zaremba, D; Meinert, S; Förster, K; Repple, J; Schnelle, R; Wagenknecht, C; Zavorotnyy, M; Heindel, W; Kugel, H; Gerbaulet, M; Alferink, J; Arolt, V; Zwanzger, P; Dannlowski, U

    2017-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments for severe depression. However, little is known regarding brain functional processes mediating ECT effects. In a non-randomized prospective study, functional magnetic resonance imaging data during the automatic processing of subliminally presented emotional faces were obtained twice, about 6 weeks apart, in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) before and after treatment with ECT (ECT, n = 24). Additionally, a control sample of MDD patients treated solely with pharmacotherapy (MED, n = 23) and a healthy control sample (HC, n = 22) were obtained. Before therapy, both patient groups equally showed elevated amygdala reactivity to sad faces compared with HC. After treatment, a decrease in amygdala activity to negative stimuli was discerned in both patient samples indicating a normalization of amygdala function, suggesting mechanisms potentially unspecific for ECT. Moreover, a decrease in amygdala activity to sad faces was associated with symptomatic improvements in the ECT sample (r spearman = -0.48, p = 0.044), and by tendency also for the MED sample (r spearman = -0.38, p = 0.098). However, we did not find any significant association between pre-treatment amygdala function to emotional stimuli and individual symptom improvement, neither for the ECT sample, nor for the MED sample. In sum, the present study provides first results regarding functional changes in emotion processing due to ECT treatment using a longitudinal design, thus validating and extending our knowledge gained from previous treatment studies. A limitation was that ECT patients received concurrent medication treatment.

  14. Functional magnetic resonance imaging with ultra-high fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windischberger, C.; Schoepf, V.; Sladky, R.; Moser, E.; Fischmeister, F.P.S.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is currently the primary method for non-invasive functional localization in the brain. With the emergence of MR systems with field strengths of 4 Tesla and above, neuronal activation may be studied with unprecedented accuracy. In this article we present different approaches to use the improved sensitivity and specificity for expanding current fMRT resolution limits in space and time based on several 7 Tesla studies. In addition to the challenges that arise with ultra-high magnetic fields possible solutions will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  15. Physiological basis and image processing in functional magnetic resonance imaging: Neuronal and motor activity in brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rakesh

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is recently developing as imaging modality used for mapping hemodynamics of neuronal and motor event related tissue blood oxygen level dependence (BOLD in terms of brain activation. Image processing is performed by segmentation and registration methods. Segmentation algorithms provide brain surface-based analysis, automated anatomical labeling of cortical fields in magnetic resonance data sets based on oxygen metabolic state. Registration algorithms provide geometric features using two or more imaging modalities to assure clinically useful neuronal and motor information of brain activation. This review article summarizes the physiological basis of fMRI signal, its origin, contrast enhancement, physical factors, anatomical labeling by segmentation, registration approaches with examples of visual and motor activity in brain. Latest developments are reviewed for clinical applications of fMRI along with other different neurophysiological and imaging modalities.

  16. Analytical potential energy function for the Br + H{sub 2} system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosaki, Yuzuru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kizu, Kyoto (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    2001-10-01

    Analytical functions with a many-body expansion for the ground and first-excited-state potential energy surfaces for the Br+H{sub 2} system are newly presented in this work. These functions describe the abstraction and exchange reactions qualitatively well, although it has been found that the function for the ground-state potential surface is still quantitatively unsatisfactory. (author)

  17. Establishment of frame image in dynamic function renal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes, Germano P.; Brunetto, Sergio Q.

    1996-01-01

    Statistical procedures applied to a set of images of renal function study are described to define a region of interest (ROI) on the kidneys's contours. The kidneys geometry is considered to adapt to the emitting area in every frames

  18. High temporal resolution functional MRI using parallel echo volumar imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabrait, C.; Ciuciu, P.; Ribes, A.; Poupon, C.; Dehaine-Lambertz, G.; LeBihan, D.; Lethimonnier, F.; Le Roux, P.; Dehaine-Lambertz, G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To combine parallel imaging with 3D single-shot acquisition (echo volumar imaging, EVI) in order to acquire high temporal resolution volumar functional MRI (fMRI) data. Materials and Methods: An improved EVI sequence was associated with parallel acquisition and field of view reduction in order to acquire a large brain volume in 200 msec. Temporal stability and functional sensitivity were increased through optimization of all imaging parameters and Tikhonov regularization of parallel reconstruction. Two human volunteers were scanned with parallel EVI in a 1.5 T whole-body MR system, while submitted to a slow event-related auditory paradigm. Results: Thanks to parallel acquisition, the EVI volumes display a low level of geometric distortions and signal losses. After removal of low-frequency drifts and physiological artifacts,activations were detected in the temporal lobes of both volunteers and voxel-wise hemodynamic response functions (HRF) could be computed. On these HRF different habituation behaviors in response to sentence repetition could be identified. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of high temporal resolution 3D fMRI with parallel EVI. Combined with advanced estimation tools,this acquisition method should prove useful to measure neural activity timing differences or study the nonlinearities and non-stationarities of the BOLD response. (authors)

  19. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Yue, E-mail: yuecao@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Wang Hesheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Johnson, Timothy D. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Pan, Charlie [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hussain, Hero [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results: There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions: This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which

  20. Acceptance criteria for reprocessed AcuNav catheters: comparison between functionality testing and clinical image assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Alan J; Berry, James M; Wilson, Robert F; Lester, Bruce R

    2009-03-01

    The AcuNav-catheter is a vector-phased array ultrasound catheter that has shown great utility for both diagnosis and electrophysiological interventions. To test the feasibility of limited catheter reuse and to ensure that reprocessed catheters would produce acceptable clinical images, the present study compared the 2-D and Doppler image quality, as determined by clinical assessment, with the catheter's functional status as determined by the FirstCall 2000 transducer tester. Reprocessed catheters from four functional categories, two acceptable and two unacceptable, were used to collect images, 2-D and Doppler, from a porcine heart. The images were blinded and then rated by clinical evaluation. The study found that catheter images from all functional categories were found to be clinically acceptable except for those from the lowest unacceptable category. In addition, examination of tip deflection characteristics showed no significant difference between new and reprocessed catheters. We conclude that reprocessed AcuNav catheters that pass functional tests are able to produce clinical images, 2-D and Doppler, which are equivalent to their new counterparts.

  1. Simultaneous morphological and functional imaging of the honeybee's brain by two-photon microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, A.

    2011-01-01

    Thanks to its rather simply structured but highly performing brain, the honeybee (Apis mellifera) is an important model for neurobiological studies. Therefore there is a great need for new functional imaging modalities adapted to this species. Herein we give a detailed report on the development and performance of a platform for in vivo functional and morphological imaging of the honeybee's brain, focusing on its primary olfactory centres, the antennal lobes (ALs). The experimental setup consists of a two-photon microscope combined with a synchronized odour stimulus generator. Our imaging platform allows to simultaneously obtain both morphological measurements of the ALs functional units, the glomeruli, and in vivo calcium recording of their neural activity. We were able to record the characteristic glomerular response maps to odour stimuli applied to the bee's antennae. Our approach offers several advantages over the commonly used conventional fluorescence microscopy. Two-photon microscopy provides substantial enhancement in both spatial and temporal resolutions, while minimizing photo damage. Calcium recordings show a more than fourfold improvement in the functional signal with respect to the techniques available up to now. Finally, the extended penetration depth, thanks to the infrared excitation, allows the functional imaging of profound glomeruli which have not been optically accessible up to now.

  2. Ultrasound functional imaging in an ex vivo beating porcine heart platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petterson, Niels J.; Fixsen, Louis S.; Rutten, Marcel C. M.; Pijls, Nico H. J.; van de Vosse, Frans N.; Lopata, Richard G. P.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, novel ultrasound functional imaging (UFI) techniques have been introduced to assess cardiac function by measuring, e.g. cardiac output (CO) and/or myocardial strain. Verification and reproducibility assessment in a realistic setting remain major issues. Simulations and phantoms are often unrealistic, whereas in vivo measurements often lack crucial hemodynamic parameters or ground truth data, or suffer from the large physiological and clinical variation between patients when attempting clinical validation. Controlled validation in certain pathologies is cumbersome and often requires the use of lab animals. In this study, an isolated beating pig heart setup was adapted and used for performance assessment of UFI techniques such as volume assessment and ultrasound strain imaging. The potential of performing verification and reproducibility studies was demonstrated. For proof-of-principle, validation of UFI in pathological hearts was examined. Ex vivo porcine hearts (n  =  6, slaughterhouse waste) were resuscitated and attached to a mock circulatory system. Radio frequency ultrasound data of the left ventricle were acquired in five short axis views and one long axis view. Based on these slices, the CO was measured, where verification was performed using flow sensor measurements in the aorta. Strain imaging was performed providing radial, circumferential and longitudinal strain to assess reproducibility and inter-subject variability under steady conditions. Finally, strains in healthy hearts were compared to a heart with an implanted left ventricular assist device, simulating a failing, supported heart. Good agreement between ultrasound and flow sensor based CO measurements was found. Strains were highly reproducible (intraclass correlation coefficients  >0.8). Differences were found due to biological variation and condition of the hearts. Strain magnitude and patterns in the assisted heart were available for different pump action, revealing

  3. Imaging tools to study pharmacology: functional MRI on small rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabeth eJonckers; Disha eShah; Julie eHamaide; Marleen eVerhoye; Annemie eVan Der Linden

    2015-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is an excellent tool to study the effect of pharmacological modulations on brain function in a non-invasive and longitudinal manner. We introduce several blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI techniques, including resting state (rsfMRI), stimulus-evoked (st-fMRI), and pharmacological MRI (phMRI). Respectively, these techniques permit the assessment of functional connectivity during rest as well as brain activation triggered by sensory stimu...

  4. EANM/ESC guidelines for radionuclide imaging of cardiac function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, B.; Lindhardt, T.B.; Acampa, W.

    2008-01-01

    radionuclide ventriculography, gated myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, gated PET, and studies with non-imaging devices for the evaluation of cardiac function. The items covered are presented in 11 sections: clinical indications, radiopharmaceuticals and dosimetry, study acquisition, RV EF, LV EF, LV volumes...

  5. POTENTIALS OF IMAGE BASED ACTIVE RANGING TO CAPTURE DYNAMIC SCENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jutzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining a 3D description of man-made and natural environments is a basic task in Computer Vision and Remote Sensing. To this end, laser scanning is currently one of the dominating techniques to gather reliable 3D information. The scanning principle inherently needs a certain time interval to acquire the 3D point cloud. On the other hand, new active sensors provide the possibility of capturing range information by images with a single measurement. With this new technique image-based active ranging is possible which allows capturing dynamic scenes, e.g. like walking pedestrians in a yard or moving vehicles. Unfortunately most of these range imaging sensors have strong technical limitations and are not yet sufficient for airborne data acquisition. It can be seen from the recent development of highly specialized (far-range imaging sensors – so called flash-light lasers – that most of the limitations could be alleviated soon, so that future systems will be equipped with improved image size and potentially expanded operating range. The presented work is a first step towards the development of methods capable for application of range images in outdoor environments. To this end, an experimental setup was set up for investigating these proposed possibilities. With the experimental setup a measurement campaign was carried out and first results will be presented within this paper.

  6. Image seedling analysis to evaluate tomato seed physiological potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Neumann Silva

    Full Text Available Computerized seedling image analysis are one of the most recently techniques to detect differences of vigor between seed lots. The aim of this study was verify the hability of computerized seedling image analysis by SVIS® to detect differences of vigor between tomato seed lots as information provided by traditionally vigor tests. Ten lots of tomato seeds, cultivar Santa Clara, were stored for 12 months in controlled environment at 20 ± 1 ºC and 45-50% of relative humidity of the air. The moisture content of the seeds was monitored and the physiological potential tested at 0, 6 and 12 months after storage, with germination test, first count of germination, traditional accelerated ageing and with saturated salt solution, electrical conductivity, seedling emergence and with seed vigor imaging system (SVIS®. A completely randomized experimental design was used with four replications. The parameters obtained by the computerized seedling analysis (seedling length and indexes of vigor and seedling growth with software SVIS® are efficient to detect differences between tomato seed lots of high and low vigor.

  7. Evaluation of renal transplant perfusion by functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoletti, R.

    1990-01-01

    Radionuclide angiography (RNA) is used as a noninvasive method for the evaluation of renal transplant perfusion. The computer processing method generally used, based on regions of interest, is unsatisfactory because it does not permit the regional differentiation of perfusion defects. Furthermore, the subjective delineation of the regions of interest introduces considerable inter-observer variation of results. We developed a processing method which is less operator-dependent and permits the evaluation of local defects; it is based on the concept of functional imaging. The method was evaluated in 62 patient examinations, which were subdivided into four groups: Normal transplant perfusion (23 examinations), acute tubular necrose (ATN) (16), cellular rejection (13), and vascular rejection (10). Quantitative results derived from profile curves were combined with visual estimation of the functional images and yielded a synoptic graph which allowed differentiation into three groups: Normal transplant perfusion (sensitivity 0.78, specificity 0.97), ATN or cellular rejection (sens. 0.83, spec. 0.82), and vascular rejection (sens. 0.90, spec. 0.92). (orig.)

  8. Functional MR imaging of working memory in the human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Dong Gyu; Ryu, Jae Wook; Byun, Hong Sik; Lee, Eun Jeong; Chung, Woo In; Cho, Jae Min; Han, Boo Kyung; Choi, Dae Seob

    2000-01-01

    In order to investigate the functional brain anatomy associated with verbal and visual working memory, functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed. In ten normal right handed subjects, functional MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T MR scanner and the EPI BOLD technique. An item recognition task was used for stimulation, and during the activation period of the verbal working memory task, consonant letters were used. During the activation period of the visual working memory task, symbols or diagrams were employed instead of letters. For the post-processing of images, the SPM program was used, with the threshold of significance set at p < .001. We assessed activated brain areas during the two stimulation tasks and compared the activated regions between the two tasks. The prefrontal cortex and secondary visual cortex were activated bilaterally by both verbal and visual working memory tasks, and the patterns of activated signals were similar in both tasks. The superior parietal cortex was also activated by both tasks, with lateralization to the left in the verbal task, and bilaterally without lateralization in the visual task. The inferior frontal cortex, inferior parietal cortex and temporal gyrus were activated exclusively by the verbal working memory task, predominantly in the left hemisphere. The prefrontal cortex is activated by two stimulation tasks, and this is related to the function of the central executive. The language areas activated by the verbal working memory task may be a function of the phonological loop. Bilateral prefrontal and superior parietal cortices activated by the visual working memory task may be related to the visual maintenance of objects, representing visual working memory

  9. Functional MR imaging of working memory in the human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Dong Gyu; Ryu, Jae Wook; Byun, Hong Sik; Lee, Eun Jeong; Chung, Woo In; Cho, Jae Min; Han, Boo Kyung [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dae Seob [Dongguk University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-01

    In order to investigate the functional brain anatomy associated with verbal and visual working memory, functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed. In ten normal right handed subjects, functional MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T MR scanner and the EPI BOLD technique. An item recognition task was used for stimulation, and during the activation period of the verbal working memory task, consonant letters were used. During the activation period of the visual working memory task, symbols or diagrams were employed instead of letters. For the post-processing of images, the SPM program was used, with the threshold of significance set at p < .001. We assessed activated brain areas during the two stimulation tasks and compared the activated regions between the two tasks. The prefrontal cortex and secondary visual cortex were activated bilaterally by both verbal and visual working memory tasks, and the patterns of activated signals were similar in both tasks. The superior parietal cortex was also activated by both tasks, with lateralization to the left in the verbal task, and bilaterally without lateralization in the visual task. The inferior frontal cortex, inferior parietal cortex and temporal gyrus were activated exclusively by the verbal working memory task, predominantly in the left hemisphere. The prefrontal cortex is activated by two stimulation tasks, and this is related to the function of the central executive. The language areas activated by the verbal working memory task may be a function of the phonological loop. Bilateral prefrontal and superior parietal cortices activated by the visual working memory task may be related to the visual maintenance of objects, representing visual working memory.

  10. Structure and potential energy function for Pu22+ ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Quan; Huang Hui; Li Daohua

    2003-01-01

    The theoretical study on Pu 2 2+ using density functional method shows that the molecular ion is metastable. Ground electronic state is 13 Σ g for Pu 2 2+ , the analytic potential energy function is in well agreement with the Z-W function, and the force constants and spectroscopic data have been worked out for the first time

  11. Retrieval of Garstang's emission function from all-sky camera images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Solano Lamphar, Héctor Antonio; Kundracik, František

    2015-10-01

    The emission function from ground-based light sources predetermines the skyglow features to a large extent, while most mathematical models that are used to predict the night sky brightness require the information on this function. The radiant intensity distribution on a clear sky is experimentally determined as a function of zenith angle using the theoretical approach published only recently in MNRAS, 439, 3405-3413. We have made the experiments in two localities in Slovakia and Mexico by means of two digital single lens reflex professional cameras operating with different lenses that limit the system's field-of-view to either 180º or 167º. The purpose of using two cameras was to identify variances between two different apertures. Images are taken at different distances from an artificial light source (a city) with intention to determine the ratio of zenith radiance relative to horizontal irradiance. Subsequently, the information on the fraction of the light radiated directly into the upward hemisphere (F) is extracted. The results show that inexpensive devices can properly identify the upward emissions with adequate reliability as long as the clear sky radiance distribution is dominated by a largest ground-based light source. Highly unstable turbidity conditions can also make the parameter F difficult to find or even impossible to retrieve. The measurements at low elevation angles should be avoided due to a potentially parasitic effect of direct light emissions from luminaires surrounding the measuring site.

  12. Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Language Preoperative Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Paulo; Seixas, Daniela; Deprez, Sabine; Kovacs, Silvia; Peeters, Ronald; Castro, São L.; Sunaert, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a well-known non-invasive technique for the study of brain function. One of its most common clinical applications is preoperative language mapping, essential for the preservation of function in neurosurgical patients. Typically, fMRI is used to track task-related activity, but poor task performance and movement artifacts can be critical limitations in clinical settings. Recent advances in resting-state protocols open new possibilities for pre-surgical mapping of language potentially overcoming these limitations. To test the feasibility of using resting-state fMRI instead of conventional active task-based protocols, we compared results from fifteen patients with brain lesions while performing a verb-to-noun generation task and while at rest. Task-activity was measured using a general linear model analysis and independent component analysis (ICA). Resting-state networks were extracted using ICA and further classified in two ways: manually by an expert and by using an automated template matching procedure. The results revealed that the automated classification procedure correctly identified language networks as compared to the expert manual classification. We found a good overlay between task-related activity and resting-state language maps, particularly within the language regions of interest. Furthermore, resting-state language maps were as sensitive as task-related maps, and had higher specificity. Our findings suggest that resting-state protocols may be suitable to map language networks in a quick and clinically efficient way. PMID:26869899

  13. Point spread function modeling and image restoration for cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hua; Shi Yikai; Huang Kuidong; Xu Zhe

    2015-01-01

    X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CT) has such notable features as high efficiency and precision, and is widely used in the fields of medical imaging and industrial non-destructive testing, but the inherent imaging degradation reduces the quality of CT images. Aimed at the problems of projection image degradation and restoration in cone-beam CT, a point spread function (PSF) modeling method is proposed first. The general PSF model of cone-beam CT is established, and based on it, the PSF under arbitrary scanning conditions can be calculated directly for projection image restoration without the additional measurement, which greatly improved the application convenience of cone-beam CT. Secondly, a projection image restoration algorithm based on pre-filtering and pre-segmentation is proposed, which can make the edge contours in projection images and slice images clearer after restoration, and control the noise in the equivalent level to the original images. Finally, the experiments verified the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methods. (authors)

  14. Multimodality Cardiac Imaging for the Assessment of Left Atrial Function and the Association With Atrial Arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Javier; Bertelsen, Litten; de Knegt, Martina Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Several cardiac imaging modalities are able to visualize the left atrium (LA) and, therefore, allow for quantification of both structural and functional properties of this cardiac chamber. In echocardiography, only the maximal LA volume is included in the assessment of diastolic function at the c......Several cardiac imaging modalities are able to visualize the left atrium (LA) and, therefore, allow for quantification of both structural and functional properties of this cardiac chamber. In echocardiography, only the maximal LA volume is included in the assessment of diastolic function...... atrial fibrillation, which will be a point of focus in this review. Pivotal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies have revealed high correlation between LA fibrosis and risk of atrial fibrillation recurrence after catheter ablation, and subsequent multimodality imaging studies have uncovered...... an inverse relationship between LA reservoir function and degree of LA fibrosis. This has sparked an increased interest into the application of advanced imaging modalities, including both speckle tracking echocardiography and tissue tracking by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Even though increasing...

  15. Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, G.; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    Neurosurgical resection of brain lesions aims to maximize excision while minimizing the risk of permanent injury to the surrounding intact brain tissue and resulting neurological deficits. While direct electrical cortical stimulation at the time of surgery allows the precise identification...... of essential cortex, it cannot provide information preoperatively for surgical planning.Brain imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetoencephalography (MEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are increasingly being used to localize functionally critical cortical......, if the stimulated cortex makes a critical contribution to the brain functions subserving the task. While the relationship between task and functional activation as revealed by fMRI is correlative in nature, the neurodisruptive effect of TMS reflects a causal effect on brain activity.The use of preoperative f...

  16. Optimizing top precision performance measure of content-based image retrieval by learning similarity function

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Ru-Ze

    2017-04-24

    In this paper we study the problem of content-based image retrieval. In this problem, the most popular performance measure is the top precision measure, and the most important component of a retrieval system is the similarity function used to compare a query image against a database image. However, up to now, there is no existing similarity learning method proposed to optimize the top precision measure. To fill this gap, in this paper, we propose a novel similarity learning method to maximize the top precision measure. We model this problem as a minimization problem with an objective function as the combination of the losses of the relevant images ranked behind the top-ranked irrelevant image, and the squared Frobenius norm of the similarity function parameter. This minimization problem is solved as a quadratic programming problem. The experiments over two benchmark data sets show the advantages of the proposed method over other similarity learning methods when the top precision is used as the performance measure.

  17. Optimizing top precision performance measure of content-based image retrieval by learning similarity function

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Ru-Ze; Shi, Lihui; Wang, Haoxiang; Meng, Jiandong; Wang, Jim Jing-Yan; Sun, Qingquan; Gu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we study the problem of content-based image retrieval. In this problem, the most popular performance measure is the top precision measure, and the most important component of a retrieval system is the similarity function used to compare a query image against a database image. However, up to now, there is no existing similarity learning method proposed to optimize the top precision measure. To fill this gap, in this paper, we propose a novel similarity learning method to maximize the top precision measure. We model this problem as a minimization problem with an objective function as the combination of the losses of the relevant images ranked behind the top-ranked irrelevant image, and the squared Frobenius norm of the similarity function parameter. This minimization problem is solved as a quadratic programming problem. The experiments over two benchmark data sets show the advantages of the proposed method over other similarity learning methods when the top precision is used as the performance measure.

  18. Voltage Gated Calcium Channel Activation by Backpropagating Action Potentials Downregulates NMDAR Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Kathrin Theis

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The majority of excitatory synapses are located on dendritic spines of cortical glutamatergic neurons. In spines, compartmentalized Ca2+ signals transduce electrical activity into specific long-term biochemical and structural changes. Action potentials (APs propagate back into the dendritic tree and activate voltage gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs. For spines, this global mode of spine Ca2+ signaling is a direct biochemical feedback of suprathreshold neuronal activity. We previously demonstrated that backpropagating action potentials (bAPs result in long-term enhancement of spine VGCCs. This activity-dependent VGCC plasticity results in a large interspine variability of VGCC Ca2+ influx. Here, we investigate how spine VGCCs affect glutamatergic synaptic transmission. We combined electrophysiology, two-photon Ca2+ imaging and two-photon glutamate uncaging in acute brain slices from rats. T- and R-type VGCCs were the dominant depolarization-associated Ca2+conductances in dendritic spines of excitatory layer 2 neurons and do not affect synaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs measured at the soma. Using two-photon glutamate uncaging, we compared the properties of glutamatergic synapses of single spines that express different levels of VGCCs. While VGCCs contributed to EPSP mediated Ca2+ influx, the amount of EPSP mediated Ca2+ influx is not determined by spine VGCC expression. On a longer timescale, the activation of VGCCs by bAP bursts results in downregulation of spine NMDAR function.

  19. Functional real-time optoacoustic imaging of middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Kneipp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Longitudinal functional imaging studies of stroke are key in identifying the disease progression and possible therapeutic interventions. Here we investigate the applicability of real-time functional optoacoustic imaging for monitoring of stroke progression in the whole brain of living animals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO was used to model stroke in mice, which were imaged preoperatively and the occlusion was kept in place for 60 minutes, after which optoacoustic scans were taken at several time points. RESULTS: Post ischemia an asymmetry of deoxygenated hemoglobin in the brain was observed as a region of hypoxia in the hemisphere affected by the ischemic event. Furthermore, we were able to visualize the penumbra in-vivo as a localized hemodynamically-compromised area adjacent to the region of stroke-induced perfusion deficit. CONCLUSION: The intrinsic sensitivity of the new imaging approach to functional blood parameters, in combination with real time operation and high spatial resolution in deep living tissues, may see it become a valuable and unique tool in the development and monitoring of treatments aimed at suspending the spread of an infarct area.

  20. Full-view 3D imaging system for functional and anatomical screening of the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oraevsky, Alexander; Su, Richard; Nguyen, Ha; Moore, James; Lou, Yang; Bhadra, Sayantan; Forte, Luca; Anastasio, Mark; Yang, Wei

    2018-04-01

    Laser Optoacoustic Ultrasonic Imaging System Assembly (LOUISA-3D) was developed in response to demand of diagnostic radiologists for an advanced screening system for the breast to improve on low sensitivity of x-ray based modalities of mammography and tomosynthesis in the dense and heterogeneous breast and low specificity magnetic resonance imaging. It is our working hypothesis that co-registration of quantitatively accurate functional images of the breast vasculature and microvasculature, and anatomical images of breast morphological structures will provide a clinically viable solution for the breast cancer care. Functional imaging is LOUISA-3D is enabled by the full view 3D optoacoustic images acquired at two rapidly toggling laser wavelengths in the near-infrared spectral range. 3D images of the breast anatomical background is enabled in LOUISA-3D by a sequence of B-mode ultrasound slices acquired with a transducer array rotating around the breast. This creates the possibility to visualize distributions of the total hemoglobin and blood oxygen saturation within specific morphological structures such as tumor angiogenesis microvasculature and larger vasculature in proximity of the tumor. The system has four major components: (i) a pulsed dual wavelength laser with fiberoptic light delivery system, (ii) an imaging module with two arc shaped probes (optoacoustic and ultrasonic) placed in a transparent bowl that rotates around the breast, (iii) a multichannel electronic system with analog preamplifiers and digital data acquisition boards, and (iv) computer for the system control, data processing and image reconstruction. The most important advancement of this latest system design compared with previously reported systems is the full breast illumination accomplished for each rotational step of the optoacoustic transducer array using fiberoptic illuminator rotating around the breast independently from rotation of the detector probe. We report here a pilot case studies

  1. Genome-wide imaging association study implicates functional activity and glial homeostasis of the caudate in smoking addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, David C; Molfese, David L; Jin, Jennifer L; Titus, Alexander J; He, Yixuan; Li, Yafang; Vaissié, Maxime; Viswanath, Humsini; Baldwin, Philip R; Krahe, Ralf; Salas, Ramiro; Amos, Christopher I

    2017-09-19

    Nearly 6 million deaths and over a half trillion dollars in healthcare costs worldwide are attributed to tobacco smoking each year. Extensive research efforts have been pursued to elucidate the molecular underpinnings of smoking addiction and facilitate cessation. In this study, we genotyped and obtained both resting state and task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging from 64 non-smokers and 42 smokers. Smokers were imaged after having smoked normally ("sated") and after having not smoked for at least 12 h ("abstinent"). While abstinent smokers did not differ from non-smokers with respect to pairwise resting state functional connectivities (RSFCs) between 12 brain regions of interest, RSFCs involving the caudate and putamen of sated smokers significantly differed from those of non-smokers (P smoking status (P = 0.015). Moreover, abstinent smokers with lower CR experienced greater withdrawal symptoms (P = 0.024), which suggests CR may be related to smoking urges. Associations between genetic variants and CR, adjusted for smoking status, were identified by genome-wide association study (GWAS). Genes containing or exhibiting caudate-specific expression regulation by these variants were enriched within Gene Ontology terms that describe cytoskeleton functions, synaptic organization, and injury response (P < 0.001, FDR < 0.05). By integrating genomic and imaging data, novel insights into potential mechanisms of caudate activation and homeostasis are revealed that may guide new directions of research toward improving our understanding of addiction pathology.

  2. Approximate Treatment of the Dirac Equation with Hyperbolic Potential Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus, Aysen

    2018-03-01

    The time independent Dirac equation is solved analytically for equal scalar and vector hyperbolic potential function in the presence of Greene and Aldrich approximation scheme. The bound state energy equation and spinor wave functions expressed by the hypergeometric function have been obtained in detail with asymptotic iteration approach. In order to indicate the accuracy of this different approach proposed to solve second order linear differential equations, we present that in the non-relativistic limit, analytical solutions of the Dirac equation converge to those of the Schrödinger one. We introduce numerical results of the theoretical analysis for hyperbolic potential function. Bound states corresponding to arbitrary values of n and l are reported for potential parameters covering a wide range of interaction. Also, we investigate relativistic vibrational energy spectra of alkali metal diatomic molecules in the different electronic states. It is observed that theoretical vibrational energy values are consistent with experimental Rydberg-Klein-Rees (RKR) results and vibrational energies of NaK, K_2 and KRb diatomic molecules interacting with hyperbolic potential smoothly converge to the experimental dissociation limit D_e=2508cm^{-1}, 254cm^{-1} and 4221cm^{-1}, respectively.

  3. Evaluation of cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolism and cerebral function by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Chuzo; Higuchi, Toshihiro; Umeda, Masahiro; Naruse, Shoji; Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Ueda, Satoshi; Furuya, Seiichi.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) method has the unique potentiality of detecting cerebral metabolites, cerebral blood flow and brain functions in a noninvasive fashion. We have developed several MR techniques to detect these cerebral parameters with the use of clinical MRI scanners. By modifying the MR spectroscopy (MRS) technique, both 31 P- and 1 H-MRS data can be obtained from multiple, localized regions (multi-voxel method) of the brain, and the distribution of each metabolite in the brain can be readily visualized by metabolite mapping. The use of diffusion weighted images (DWI) permits visualization of the anisotropy of water diffusion in white matter, and based on the difference of diffusion coefficiency, the differential diagnosis between epidermoid tumor and arachnoid cyst can be made. By employing dynamic-MRI (Dyn-MRI) with Gd-DTPA administration, it is possible to examine the difference in blood circulation between brain tumor tissue and normal tissue, as well as among different types of brain tumors. By using magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) imaging, it has become possible to detect brain tumors, and with a small dose of Gd-DTPA, to visualize the vascular system. Functional MRI (fMRI) visualizes the activated brain by using conventional gradient echo technique on conventional MRI scanners. This method has the unique characteristic of detecting a brain function with high spatial and temporal resolution by using the intrinsic substance. Moreover, the localization of motor and sensory areas was detected by noninvasive means within few minutes. The fMRI procedure will be used in the future to analyze the higher and complex brain functions. In conclusion, multi-modality MR is a powerful technique that is useful for investigating the pathogenesis of many diseases, and provides a noninvasive analytic modality for studying brain function. (author)

  4. Improvement in cognitive and psychosocial functioning and self image among adolescent inpatient suicide attempters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintikka, Ulla; Marttunen, Mauri; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Laukkanen, Eila; Viinamäki, Heimo; Lehtonen, Johannes

    2006-12-29

    Psychiatric treatment of suicidal youths is often difficult and non-compliance in treatment is a significant problem. This prospective study compared characteristics and changes in cognitive functioning, self image and psychosocial functioning among 13 to 18 year-old adolescent psychiatric inpatients with suicide attempts (n = 16) and with no suicidality (n = 39) The two-group pre-post test prospective study design included assessments by a psychiatrist, a psychologist and medical staff members as well as self-rated measures. DSM-III-R diagnoses were assigned using the SCID and thereafter transformed to DSM-IV diagnoses. Staff members assessed psychosocial functioning using the Global Assessment Scale (GAS). Cognitive performance was assessed using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, while the Offer Self-Image Questionnaire (OSIQ) was used to assess the subjects' self-image. ANCOVA with repeated measures was used to test changes from entry to discharge among the suicide attempters and non suicidal patients. Logistic regression modeling was used to assess variables associated with an improvement of 10 points or more in the GAS score. Among suicide attempter patients, psychosocial functioning, cognitive performance and both the psychological self and body-image improved during treatment and their treatment compliance and outcome were as good as that of the non-suicidal patients. Suicidal ideation and hopelessness declined, and psychosocial functioning improved. Changes in verbal cognitive performance were more pronounced among the suicide attempters. Having an improved body-image associated with a higher probability of improvement in psychosocial functioning while higher GAS score at entry was associated with lower probability of functional improvement in both patient groups. These findings illustrate that a multimodal treatment program seems to improve psychosocial functioning and self-image among severely disordered suicidal adolescent inpatients. There were no

  5. Improvement in cognitive and psychosocial functioning and self image among adolescent inpatient suicide attempters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laukkanen Eila

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychiatric treatment of suicidal youths is often difficult and non-compliance in treatment is a significant problem. This prospective study compared characteristics and changes in cognitive functioning, self image and psychosocial functioning among 13 to 18 year-old adolescent psychiatric inpatients with suicide attempts (n = 16 and with no suicidality (n = 39 Methods The two-group pre-post test prospective study design included assessments by a psychiatrist, a psychologist and medical staff members as well as self-rated measures. DSM-III-R diagnoses were assigned using the SCID and thereafter transformed to DSM-IV diagnoses. Staff members assessed psychosocial functioning using the Global Assessment Scale (GAS. Cognitive performance was assessed using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, while the Offer Self-Image Questionnaire (OSIQ was used to assess the subjects' self-image. ANCOVA with repeated measures was used to test changes from entry to discharge among the suicide attempters and non suicidal patients. Logistic regression modeling was used to assess variables associated with an improvement of 10 points or more in the GAS score. Results Among suicide attempter patients, psychosocial functioning, cognitive performance and both the psychological self and body-image improved during treatment and their treatment compliance and outcome were as good as that of the non-suicidal patients. Suicidal ideation and hopelessness declined, and psychosocial functioning improved. Changes in verbal cognitive performance were more pronounced among the suicide attempters. Having an improved body-image associated with a higher probability of improvement in psychosocial functioning while higher GAS score at entry was associated with lower probability of functional improvement in both patient groups. Conclusion These findings illustrate that a multimodal treatment program seems to improve psychosocial functioning and self-image among

  6. [11C]-Acetoacetate PET imaging: a potential early marker for cardiac heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croteau, Etienne; Tremblay, Sébastien; Gascon, Suzanne; Dumulon-Perreault, Véronique; Labbé, Sébastien M.; Rousseau, Jacques A.; Cunnane, Stephen C.; Carpentier, André C.; Bénard, François; Lecomte, Roger

    2014-01-01

    The ketone body acetoacetate could be used as an alternate nutrient for the heart, and it also has the potential to improve cardiac function in an ischemic–reperfusion model or reduce the mitochondrial production of oxidative stress involved in cardiotoxicity. In this study, [ 11 C]-acetoacetate was investigated as an early marker of intracellular damage in heart failure. Methods: A rat cardiotoxicity heart failure model was induced by doxorubicin, Dox(+). [ 14 C]-Acetoacetate, a non-positron (β −) emitting radiotracer, was used to characterize the arterial blood input function and myocardial mitochondrial uptake. Afterward, [ 11 C]-acetoacetate (β +) myocardial PET images were obtained for kinetic analysis and heart function assessment in control Dox(−) (n = 15) and treated Dox(+) (n = 6) rats. The uptake rate (K 1 ) and myocardial clearance rate (k 2 or k mono ) were extracted. Results: [ 14 C]-Acetoacetate in the blood was increased in Dox(+), from 2 min post-injection until the last withdrawal point when the heart was harvested, as well as the uptake in the heart and myocardial mitochondria (unpaired t-test, p < 0.05). PET kinetic analysis of [ 11 C]-acetoacetate showed that rate constants K 1 , k 2 and k mono were decreased in Dox(+) (p < 0.05) combined with a reduction of 24% of the left ventricular ejection fraction (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Radioactive acetoacetate ex vivo analysis [ 14 C], and in vivo kinetic [ 11 C] studies provided evidence that [ 11 C]-acetoacetate can assess heart failure Dox(+). Contrary to myocardial flow reserve (rest–stress protocol), [ 11 C]-acetoacetate can be used to assess reduced kinetic rate constants without requirement of hyperemic stress response. The proposed [ 11 C]-acetoacetate cardiac radiotracer in the investigation of heart disease is novel and paves the way to a potential role for [ 11 C]-acetoacetate in cardiac pathophysiology

  7. Functional image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy planning for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsegmed, Uranchimeg [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakashima, Takeo [Division of Radiation Therapy, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakamura, Yuko; Higaki, Toru [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Imano, Nobuki; Doi, Yoshiko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Ozawa, Shuichi; Murakami, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Awai, Kazuo [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the current planning study is to evaluate the ability of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI)–guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning by using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques in sparing the functional liver tissues during SBRT for hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, 20 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were enrolled. Functional liver tissues were defined according to quantitative liver-spleen contrast ratios ≥ 1.5 on a hepatobiliary phase scan. Functional images were fused with the planning computed tomography (CT) images; the following 2 SBRT plans were designed using a “step-and-shoot” static IMRT technique for each patient: (1) an anatomical SBRT plan optimization based on the total liver; and (2) a functional SBRT plan based on the functional liver. The total prescribed dose was 48 gray (Gy) in 4 fractions. Dosimetric parameters, including dose to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV D{sub 95%}), percentages of total and functional liver volumes, which received doses from 5 to 30 Gy (V5 to V30 and fV5 to fV30), and mean doses to total and functional liver (MLD and fMLD, respectively) of the 2 plans were compared. Compared with anatomical plans, functional image-guided SBRT plans reduced MLD (mean: plan A, 5.5 Gy; and plan F, 5.1 Gy; p < 0.0001) and fMLD (mean: plan A, 5.4 Gy; and plan F, 4.9 Gy; p < 0.0001), as well as V5 to V30 and fV5 to fV30. No differences were noted in PTV coverage and nonhepatic organs at risk (OARs) doses. In conclusion, EOB-MRI–guided SBRT planning using the IMRT technique may preserve functional liver tissues in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

  8. Imaging of the Eustachian tube and its function: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.E.; Tysome, J.R. [Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of ENT Surgery, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Scoffings, D.J. [Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    The Eustachian tube is a complex and inaccessible structure, which maintains middle ear ventilation to facilitate transmission of sound from the tympanic membrane to the cochlea. A renewed interest in treatments for eustachian tube dysfunction has led to a demand for methods of imaging the Eustachian tube, and assessing tube opening non-invasively. This review aims to summarise the use of imaging in the anatomical assessment of the Eustachian tube, and to explore how radiological techniques can be used to assess tube function. A systematic review of the literature was performed with narrative data analysis. With high-resolution images, the soft and bony anatomy of the Eustachian tube can be assessed in detail. CT and MRI are best suited to identifying features associated with obstructive or patulous Eustachian tube dysfunction, though true assessments of function have only been achieved with contrast enhanced radiographs and scintigraphy. A single modality has yet to provide a complete assessment. No test has entered routine clinical use, but further development and research is underway. Significant information can be gained from imaging the Eustachian tube, and as faster acquisition techniques are developed, it is possible that dynamic imaging of tubal opening could play an important role in the assessment of patients with ET dysfunction. (orig.)

  9. Algorithm-enabled exploration of image-quality potential of cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Xiao; Sidky, Emil Y; Pan, Xiaochuan; Pearson, Erik; Pelizzari, Charles; Al-Hallaq, Hania; Bian, Junguo

    2015-01-01

    Kilo-voltage (KV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit mounted onto a linear accelerator treatment system, often referred to as on-board imager (OBI), plays an increasingly important role in image-guided radiation therapy. While the FDK algorithm is currently used for reconstructing images from clinical OBI data, optimization-based reconstruction has also been investigated for OBI CBCT. An optimization-based reconstruction involves numerous parameters, which can significantly impact reconstruction properties (or utility). The success of an optimization-based reconstruction for a particular class of practical applications thus relies strongly on appropriate selection of parameter values. In the work, we focus on tailoring the constrained-TV-minimization-based reconstruction, an optimization-based reconstruction previously shown of some potential for CBCT imaging conditions of practical interest, to OBI imaging through appropriate selection of parameter values. In particular, for given real data of phantoms and patient collected with OBI CBCT, we first devise utility metrics specific to OBI-quality-assurance tasks and then apply them to guiding the selection of parameter values in constrained-TV-minimization-based reconstruction. The study results show that the reconstructions are with improvement, relative to clinical FDK reconstruction, in both visualization and quantitative assessments in terms of the devised utility metrics. (paper)

  10. Sexual Function and Body Image are Similar after Laparoscopy-Assisted and Open Ileal Pouch-Anal Anastomosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Mie Dilling; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Qvist, Niels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) is performed in patients with ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatous polyposis where the majority of patients are sexually active. Laparoscopic surgery is becoming the preferred technique for most colorectal interventions, and we examined posto...... better body image among laparoscopy-treated women, the two surgical techniques seem equal with respect to postoperative sexual function....... postoperative sexual function and body image compared to those after open surgery IPAA. METHODS: Patients treated with IPAA in the period from October 2008 to March 2012 were included. Evaluation of sexual function, body image, and quality of life was performed using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI......), the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), the Body Image Questionnaire (BIQ), and the Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (SIBDQ). RESULTS: We included 72 patients (38 laparoscopy-assisted and 34 open). Response rate was 74 %. There were no differences in demographics, functional outcome...

  11. Imaging Genetics and Genomics in Psychiatry: A Critical Review of Progress and Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Ryan; Salmeron, Betty Jo; Carey, Caitlin E; Agrawal, Arpana; Calhoun, Vince D; Garavan, Hugh; Hariri, Ahmad R; Heinz, Andreas; Hill, Matthew N; Holmes, Andrew; Kalin, Ned H; Goldman, David

    2017-08-01

    Imaging genetics and genomics research has begun to provide insight into the molecular and genetic architecture of neural phenotypes and the neural mechanisms through which genetic risk for psychopathology may emerge. As it approaches its third decade, imaging genetics is confronted by many challenges, including the proliferation of studies using small sample sizes and diverse designs, limited replication, problems with harmonization of neural phenotypes for meta-analysis, unclear mechanisms, and evidence that effect sizes may be more modest than originally posited, with increasing evidence of polygenicity. These concerns have encouraged the field to grow in many new directions, including the development of consortia and large-scale data collection projects and the use of novel methods (e.g., polygenic approaches, machine learning) that enhance the quality of imaging genetic studies but also introduce new challenges. We critically review progress in imaging genetics and offer suggestions and highlight potential pitfalls of novel approaches. Ultimately, the strength of imaging genetics and genomics lies in their translational and integrative potential with other research approaches (e.g., nonhuman animal models, psychiatric genetics, pharmacologic challenge) to elucidate brain-based pathways that give rise to the vast individual differences in behavior as well as risk for psychopathology. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional evaluation of hydronephrosis by diffusion-weighted MR imaging: Relationship between apparent diffusion coefficient and split glomerular filtration rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoshima, S.; Noguchi, K.; Seto, H.; Shimizu, M.; Watanabe, N.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the relationship between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values measured by diffusion-weighted MR imaging and split renal function determined by renal scintigraphy in patients with hydronephrosis. Material and Methods: Diffusion-weighted imaging on a 1.5 T MR unit and renal scintigraphy were performed in 36 patients with hydronephrosis (45 hydronephrotic kidneys, 21 non-hydronephrotic kidneys). ADC values of the individual kidneys were measured by diffusion-weighted MR imaging. Split renal function (glomerular filtration rate (GFR)) was determined by renal scintigraphy using 99m Tc-DTPA. The relationship between ADC values and split GFR was examined in 66 kidneys. The hydronephrotic kidneys were further classified into three groups (severe renal dysfunction, GFR 25 ml/min, n=28), and mean values for ADCs were calculated. Results: In hydronephrotic kidneys, there was a moderate positive correlation between ADC values and split GFR (R2=0.56). On the other hand, in non-hydronephrotic kidneys, poor correlation between ADC values and split GFR was observed (R2=0.08). The mean values for ADCs of the dysfunctioning hydronephrotic kidneys (severe renal dysfunction, 1.32x10 -3 ±0.18x10 -3 mm 2 /s; moderate renal dysfunction, 1.38x10 -3 ±0.10x10 -3 mm2/s) were significantly lower than that of the normal functioning hydronephrotic kidneys (1.63x10 -3 ±0.12±10 -3 mm 2 /s). Conclusion: These results indicated that measurement of ADC values by diffusion-weighted MR imaging has a potential value in the evaluation of the functional status of hydronephrotic kidneys

  13. Unified and Modular Modeling and Functional Verification Framework of Real-Time Image Signal Processors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In VLSI industry, image signal processing algorithms are developed and evaluated using software models before implementation of RTL and firmware. After the finalization of the algorithm, software models are used as a golden reference model for the image signal processor (ISP RTL and firmware development. In this paper, we are describing the unified and modular modeling framework of image signal processing algorithms used for different applications such as ISP algorithms development, reference for hardware (HW implementation, reference for firmware (FW implementation, and bit-true certification. The universal verification methodology- (UVM- based functional verification framework of image signal processors using software reference models is described. Further, IP-XACT based tools for automatic generation of functional verification environment files and model map files are described. The proposed framework is developed both with host interface and with core using virtual register interface (VRI approach. This modeling and functional verification framework is used in real-time image signal processing applications including cellphone, smart cameras, and image compression. The main motivation behind this work is to propose the best efficient, reusable, and automated framework for modeling and verification of image signal processor (ISP designs. The proposed framework shows better results and significant improvement is observed in product verification time, verification cost, and quality of the designs.

  14. Intravital imaging of cardiac function at the single-cell level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Aaron D; Vinegoni, Claudio; Sebas, Matt; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-08-05

    Knowledge of cardiomyocyte biology is limited by the lack of methods to interrogate single-cell physiology in vivo. Here we show that contracting myocytes can indeed be imaged with optical microscopy at high temporal and spatial resolution in the beating murine heart, allowing visualization of individual sarcomeres and measurement of the single cardiomyocyte contractile cycle. Collectively, this has been enabled by efficient tissue stabilization, a prospective real-time cardiac gating approach, an image processing algorithm for motion-artifact-free imaging throughout the cardiac cycle, and a fluorescent membrane staining protocol. Quantification of cardiomyocyte contractile function in vivo opens many possibilities for investigating myocardial disease and therapeutic intervention at the cellular level.

  15. The relationship between functional magnetic resonance imaging activation, diffusion tensor imaging, and training effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Danielle; Budson, Andrew E

    2017-04-01

    While the relationship between diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements and training effects is explored by Voelker et al. (this issue), a cursory discussion of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements categorizes increased activation with findings of greater white matter integrity. Evidence of the relationship between fMRI activation and white matter integrity is conflicting, as is the relationship between fMRI activation and training effects. An examination of the changes in fMRI activation in response to training is helpful, but the relationship between DTI and fMRI activation, particularly in the context of white matter changes, must be examined further before general conclusions can be drawn.

  16. Renal volume assessed by magnetic resonance imaging volumetry correlates with renal function in living kidney donors pre- and postdonation: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Daniel; Helck, Andreas; Rominger, Axel; Crispin, Alexander; Meiser, Bruno; Werner, Jens; Fischereder, Michael; Stangl, Manfred; Habicht, Antje

    2018-07-01

    Renal function of potential living kidney donors is routinely assessed with scintigraphy. Kidney anatomy is evaluated by imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We evaluated if a MRI-based renal volumetry is a good predictor of kidney function pre- and postdonation. We retrospectively analyzed the renal volume (RV) in a MRI of 100 living kidney donors. RV was correlated with the tubular excretion rate (TER) of MAG3-scintigraphy, a measured creatinine clearance (CrCl), and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) by Cockcroft-Gault (CG), CKD-EPI, and modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) formula pre- and postdonation during a follow-up of 3 years. RV correlated significantly with the TER (total: r = 0.6735, P volumetry might be an alternative technique for the evaluation of split renal function and prediction of renal function postdonation in living kidney donors. © 2018 Steunstichting ESOT.

  17. Requirements for effective functional breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, I.N.; Zawarzin, V.; Adler, L.P.; Pani, R.; DeVincentis, G.; Khalkhali, I.; Vargas, H.; Venegas, R.; Kim, S.C.; Bakale, G.; Levine, E.; Perrier, N.; Freimanis, R.I.; Lesko, N.M.; Newman, D.P.; Geisinger, K.R.; Berg, W.A.; Masood, S.

    2003-01-01

    Most nuclear medicine physicists were trained on devices aimed at functional neuroimaging. The clinical goals of brain-centered devices differ dramatically from the parameters needed to be useful in the breast clinic. We will discuss similarities and differences that impact on design considerations, and describe our latest generation of positron emission mammography and intraoperative products. - Source of physiologic contrast: Clinical neuroimaging depends on flow agents to detect the presence of breaks in the blood-brain barrier. Breast flow agents are nonspecific, and may miss preinvasive lesions. - Resolution: Brain cancers are generally diagnosed at late stages, so resolution is not so critical. Detecting early breast cancers, and specifying margins for surgery requires 3 mm spatial resolution or better. - Prevalence: Primary brain cancer is uncommon, and lesions mimicking brain cancer are rare. Primary breast cancer is common, and benign lesions are even more common, so specificity and biopsy capability are very important. - Anatomic references: Brain structure is standard, while breast structure is highly variable, requiring immobilization/compression for physiologic imaging and biopsy. - Surgery: Complete cancer resections for brain are very rare, but are possible for breast with appropriate imaging guidance, implying the need for rapid and reliable imaging. To summarize, the breast clinic needs a rapid and highly sensitive method of assessing breast physiology, compatible with biopsy and surgery. Positron emission mammography devices, in handheld and X-ray platform based configurations, are ideal for this mission

  18. The x-ray light valve: A potentially low-cost, digital radiographic imaging system-concept and implementation considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, Christie Ann; Koprinarov, Ivaylo; Germann, Stephen; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    New x-ray radiographic systems based on large-area flat-panel technology have revolutionized our capability to produce digital x-ray images. However, these imagers are extraordinarily expensive compared to the systems they are replacing. Hence, there is a need for a low-cost digital imaging system for general applications in radiology. A novel potentially low-cost radiographic imaging system based on established technologies is proposed--the X-Ray Light Valve (XLV). This is a potentially high-quality digital x-ray detector made of a photoconducting layer and a liquid-crystal cell, physically coupled in a sandwich structure. Upon exposure to x rays, charge is collected on the surface of the photoconductor. This causes a change in the optical properties of the liquid-crystal cell and a visible image is generated. Subsequently, it is digitized by a scanned optical imager. The image formation is based on controlled modulation of light from an external source. The operation and practical implementation of the XLV system are described. The potential performance of the complete system and issues related to sensitivity, spatial resolution, noise, and speed are discussed. The feasibility of clinical use of an XLV device based on amorphous selenium (a-Se) as the photoconductor and a reflective electrically controlled birefringence cell is analyzed. The results of our analysis indicate that the XLV can potentially be adapted to a wide variety of radiographic tasks

  19. Attentional and physiological processing of food images in functional dyspepsia patients: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In-Seon; Preissl, Hubert; Giel, Katrin; Schag, Kathrin; Enck, Paul

    2018-01-23

    The food-related behavior of functional dyspepsia has been attracting more interest of late. This pilot study aims to provide evidence of the physiological, emotional, and attentional aspects of food processing in functional dyspepsia patients. The study was performed in 15 functional dyspepsia patients and 17 healthy controls after a standard breakfast. We measured autonomic nervous system activity using skin conductance response and heart rate variability, emotional response using facial electromyography, and visual attention using eyetracking during the visual stimuli of food/non-food images. In comparison to healthy controls, functional dyspepsia patients showed a greater craving for food, a decreased intake of food, more dyspeptic symptoms, lower pleasantness rating of food images (particularly of high fat), decreased low frequency/high frequency ratio of heart rate variability, and suppressed total processing time of food images. There were no significant differences of skin conductance response and facial electromyography data between groups. The results suggest that high level cognitive functions rather than autonomic and emotional mechanisms are more liable to function differently in functional dyspepsia patients. Abnormal dietary behavior, reduced subjective rating of pleasantness and visual attention to food should be considered as important pathophysiological characteristics in functional dyspepsia.

  20. Electric Potential and Electric Field Imaging with Dynamic Applications: 2017 Research Award Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Ed

    2017-01-01

    The technology and methods for remote quantitative imaging of electrostatic potentials and electrostatic fields in and around objects and in free space is presented. Electric field imaging (EFI) technology may be applied to characterize intrinsic or existing electric potentials and electric fields, or an externally generated electrostatic field may be used for illuminating volumes to be inspected with EFI. The baseline sensor technology (e-Sensor) and its construction, optional electric field generation (quasi-static generator), and current e- Sensor enhancements (ephemeral e-Sensor) are discussed. Critical design elements of current linear and real-time two-dimensional (2D) measurement systems are highlighted, and the development of a three dimensional (3D) EFI system is presented. Demonstrations for structural, electronic, human, and memory applications are shown. Recent work demonstrates that phonons may be used to create and annihilate electric dipoles within structures. Phonon induced dipoles are ephemeral and their polarization, strength, and location may be quantitatively characterized by EFI providing a new subsurface Phonon-EFI imaging technology. Initial results from real-time imaging of combustion and ion flow, and their measurement complications, will be discussed. These new EFI capabilities are demonstrated to characterize electric charge distribution creating a new field of study embracing areas of interest including electrostatic discharge (ESD) mitigation, crime scene forensics, design and materials selection for advanced sensors, combustion science, on-orbit space potential, container inspection, remote characterization of electronic circuits and level of activation, dielectric morphology of structures, tether integrity, organic molecular memory, atmospheric science, and medical diagnostic and treatment efficacy applications such as cardiac polarization wave propagation and electromyography imaging.

  1. Neuropsychiatric dynamics: the study of mental illness using functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callicott, Joseph H.; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    1999-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is poised to make significant contributions to the study of neuropsychiatric illnesses. Whatever neural pathology attends such illnesses has proven subtle at best. By identifying predictable, regionally specific deficits in brain function, fMRI can suggest brain regions for detailed cellular analyses, provide valuable in vivo data regarding effective connectivity, provide a means to model the effects of various drug challenge paradigms, and characterize intermediate phenotypes in the search for the genes underlying mental illness. Nonetheless, as promising as fMRI appears to be in terms of its relative safety, repeatability, ability to generate individual brain maps and widespread availability, it is still subject to a number of unresolved conceptual conundrums inherited from earlier neuroimaging work. For example, functional neuroimaging has not generated any pathognomic findings in mental illness, has not established a clear link between neurophysiology and observable behavior, and has not resolved the potential confounds of medication. In this article, we will review the relevant historical background preceding fMRI, address methodological considerations in fMRI, and summarize recent fMRI findings in psychiatry. Finally, fMRI is being used to simplify the complex genetics of neuropsychiatric illness by generating quantitative and qualitative brain phenotypes

  2. Neuropsychiatric dynamics: the study of mental illness using functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callicott, Joseph H. E-mail: callicoj@intra.nimh.nih.gov; Weinberger, Daniel R

    1999-05-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is poised to make significant contributions to the study of neuropsychiatric illnesses. Whatever neural pathology attends such illnesses has proven subtle at best. By identifying predictable, regionally specific deficits in brain function, fMRI can suggest brain regions for detailed cellular analyses, provide valuable in vivo data regarding effective connectivity, provide a means to model the effects of various drug challenge paradigms, and characterize intermediate phenotypes in the search for the genes underlying mental illness. Nonetheless, as promising as fMRI appears to be in terms of its relative safety, repeatability, ability to generate individual brain maps and widespread availability, it is still subject to a number of unresolved conceptual conundrums inherited from earlier neuroimaging work. For example, functional neuroimaging has not generated any pathognomic findings in mental illness, has not established a clear link between neurophysiology and observable behavior, and has not resolved the potential confounds of medication. In this article, we will review the relevant historical background preceding fMRI, address methodological considerations in fMRI, and summarize recent fMRI findings in psychiatry. Finally, fMRI is being used to simplify the complex genetics of neuropsychiatric illness by generating quantitative and qualitative brain phenotypes.

  3. A new empirical potential energy function for Ar2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myatt, Philip T.; Dham, Ashok K.; Chandrasekhar, Pragna; McCourt, Frederick R. W.; Le Roy, Robert J.

    2018-06-01

    A critical re-analysis of all available spectroscopic and virial coefficient data for Ar2 has been used to determine an improved empirical analytic potential energy function that has been 'tuned' to optimise its agreement with viscosity, diffusion and thermal diffusion data, and whose short-range behaviour is in reasonably good agreement with the most recent ab initio calculations for this system. The recommended Morse/long-range potential function is smooth and differentiable at all distances, and incorporates both the correct theoretically predicted long-range behaviour and the correct limiting short-range functional behaviour. The resulting value of the well depth is ? cm-1 and the associated equilibrium distance is re = 3.766 (±0.002) Å, while the 40Ar s-wave scattering length is -714 Å.

  4. Utilizing Minkowski functionals for image analysis: a marching square algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantz, Hubert; Jacobs, Karin; Mecke, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Comparing noisy experimental image data with statistical models requires a quantitative analysis of grey-scale images beyond mean values and two-point correlations. A real-space image analysis technique is introduced for digitized grey-scale images, based on Minkowski functionals of thresholded patterns. A novel feature of this marching square algorithm is the use of weighted side lengths for pixels, so that boundary lengths are captured accurately. As examples to illustrate the technique we study surface topologies emerging during the dewetting process of thin films and analyse spinodal decomposition as well as turbulent patterns in chemical reaction–diffusion systems. The grey-scale value corresponds to the height of the film or to the concentration of chemicals, respectively. Comparison with analytic calculations in stochastic geometry models reveals a remarkable agreement of the examples with a Gaussian random field. Thus, a statistical test for non-Gaussian features in experimental data becomes possible with this image analysis technique—even for small image sizes. Implementations of the software used for the analysis are offered for download

  5. Studies on polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes as potential magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Guoping; Liu Maili; Li Liyun

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: A series of polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes containing pyridoxamine groups were studied as the potential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents for liver enhancement. Methods: These polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes were prepared and evaluated by relaxivity, acute toxicity studies and magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in rats. Results: These polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes have higher relaxation effectiveness than that of the clinically used gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and possess the low intravenous acute toxicities to Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice. Magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in rats indicated that they greatly enhance the contrast of magnetic resonance images and provide prolonged intravascular duration in the liver. Conclusion: These results indicated that the polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes containing pyridoxamine groups could be considered as the appropriate MRI contrast agents for liver enhancement

  6. Image mottle in abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ende, J F; Huda, W; Ros, P R; Litwiller, A L

    1999-04-01

    To investigate image mottle in conventional CT images of the abdomen as a function of radiographic technique factors and patient size. Water-filled phantoms simulating the abdomens of adult (32 cm in diameter) and pediatric (16 cm in diameter) patients were used to investigate image mottle in CT as a function of x-ray tube potential and mAs. CT images from 39 consecutive patients with noncontrast liver scans and 49 patients with iodine contrast scans were analyzed retrospectively. Measurements were made of the mean liver parenchyma Hounsfield unit value and the corresponding image mottle. For a given water phantom and x-ray tube potential, image mottle was proportional to the mAs-0.5. Increasing the phantom diameter from 16 cm (pediatric) to 32 cm increased the mottle by a factor of 2.4, and increasing the x-ray tube potential from 80 kVp to 140 kVp reduced the mottle by a factor of 2.5. All patients were scanned at 120 kVp, with no correlation between patient size and the x-ray tube mAs. The mean mottle level was 7.8 +/- 2.2 and 10.0 +/- 2.5 for the noncontrast and contrast studies, respectively. An increase in patient diameter of 3 cm would require approximately 65% more mAs to maintain the same level of image mottle. The mottle in abdominal CT images may be controlled by adjusting radiographic technique factors, which should be adjusted to take into account the size of the patient undergoing the examination.

  7. Characterizing EPR-mediated passive drug targeting using contrast-enhanced functional ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theek, Benjamin; Gremse, Felix; Kunjachan, Sijumon; Fokong, Stanley; Pola, Robert; Pechar, Michal; Deckers, Roel; Storm, Gert; Ehling, Josef; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2014-05-28

    The Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect is extensively used in drug delivery research. Taking into account that EPR is a highly variable phenomenon, we have here set out to evaluate if contrast-enhanced functional ultrasound (ceUS) imaging can be employed to characterize EPR-mediated passive drug targeting to tumors. Using standard fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and two different protocols for hybrid computed tomography-fluorescence molecular tomography (CT-FMT), the tumor accumulation of a ~10 nm-sized near-infrared-fluorophore-labeled polymeric drug carrier (pHPMA-Dy750) was evaluated in CT26 tumor-bearing mice. In the same set of animals, two different ceUS techniques (2D MIOT and 3D B-mode imaging) were employed to assess tumor vascularization. Subsequently, the degree of tumor vascularization was correlated with the degree of EPR-mediated drug targeting. Depending on the optical imaging protocol used, the tumor accumulation of the polymeric drug carrier ranged from 5 to 12% of the injected dose. The degree of tumor vascularization, determined using ceUS, varied from 4 to 11%. For both hybrid CT-FMT protocols, a good correlation between the degree of tumor vascularization and the degree of tumor accumulation was observed, within the case of reconstructed CT-FMT, correlation coefficients of ~0.8 and p-values of EPR, and potentially also to pre-select patients likely to respond to passively tumor-targeted nanomedicine treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A single-sided homogeneous Green's function representation for holographic imaging, inverse scattering, time-reversal acoustics and interferometric Green's function retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wapenaar, Kees; Thorbecke, Jan; van der Neut, Joost

    2016-04-01

    Green's theorem plays a fundamental role in a diverse range of wavefield imaging applications, such as holographic imaging, inverse scattering, time-reversal acoustics and interferometric Green's function retrieval. In many of those applications, the homogeneous Green's function (i.e. the Green's function of the wave equation without a singularity on the right-hand side) is represented by a closed boundary integral. In practical applications, sources and/or receivers are usually present only on an open surface, which implies that a significant part of the closed boundary integral is by necessity ignored. Here we derive a homogeneous Green's function representation for the common situation that sources and/or receivers are present on an open surface only. We modify the integrand in such a way that it vanishes on the part of the boundary where no sources and receivers are present. As a consequence, the remaining integral along the open surface is an accurate single-sided representation of the homogeneous Green's function. This single-sided representation accounts for all orders of multiple scattering. The new representation significantly improves the aforementioned wavefield imaging applications, particularly in situations where the first-order scattering approximation breaks down.

  9. Phase contribution of image potential on empty quantum well States in pb islands on the cu(111) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M C; Lin, C L; Su, W B; Lin, S P; Lu, S M; Lin, H Y; Chang, C S; Hsu, W K; Tsong, Tien T

    2009-05-15

    We use scanning tunneling spectroscopy to explore the quantum well states in the Pb islands grown on a Cu(111) surface. Our observation demonstrates that the empty quantum well states, whose energy levels lie beyond 1.2 eV above the Fermi level, are significantly affected by the image potential. As the quantum number increases, the energy separation between adjacent states is shrinking rather than widening, contrary to the prediction for a square potential well. By simply introducing a phase factor to reckon the effect of the image potential, the shrinking behavior of the energy separation can be reasonably explained with the phase accumulation model. The model also reveals that there exists a quantum regime above the Pb surface in which the image potential is vanished. Moreover, the quasi-image-potential state in the tunneling gap is quenched because of the existence of the quantum well states.

  10. Stereotactic imaging in functional neurosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirabayashi, Hidehiro

    2012-07-01

    Background: The birth of stereotactic functional neurosurgery in 1947 was to a great extent dependent on the development of ventriculography. The last decades have witnessed a renaissance of functional stereotactic neurosurgery in the treatment of patients with movement disorders. Initially, these procedures were largely based on the same imaging technique that had been used since the birth of this technique, and that is still used in some centers. The introduction of new imaging modalities such as Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provided new potentials, but also new challenges for accurate identification and visualisation of the targets in the basal ganglia and the thalamus with an urge to thoroughly evaluate and optimize the stereotactic targeting technique, as well as evaluate accurately in stereotactic space the location and extent of stereotactic Radiofrequency (RF) lesions and the position of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. Aims: To study the differences between CT and MRI regarding indirect atlas coordinates in thalamic and pallidal procedures and to evaluate and validate visualisation of the pallidum and the subthalamic nucleus in view of direct targeting irrespective of atlas-derived coordinates. Furthermore, to evaluate the contribution of RF parameters on the size of stereotactic lesions, as well as the impact of size and location on clinical outcome. Method: The coordinates in relation to the landmarks of the 3{sup rd} ventricle of the targets in the pallidum and ventrolateral thalamus were compared between CT and MRI in 34 patients. In another 48 patients direct visualization of the pallidum was evaluated and compared to indirect atlas based targeting. The possibility and versatility of visualizing the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) on short acquisition MRI were evaluated in a multicentre study, and the use of alternative landmarks in identification of the STN was demonstrated in another study. In 46 patients CT and

  11. Stereotactic imaging in functional neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    Background: The birth of stereotactic functional neurosurgery in 1947 was to a great extent dependent on the development of ventriculography. The last decades have witnessed a renaissance of functional stereotactic neurosurgery in the treatment of patients with movement disorders. Initially, these procedures were largely based on the same imaging technique that had been used since the birth of this technique, and that is still used in some centers. The introduction of new imaging modalities such as Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provided new potentials, but also new challenges for accurate identification and visualisation of the targets in the basal ganglia and the thalamus with an urge to thoroughly evaluate and optimize the stereotactic targeting technique, as well as evaluate accurately in stereotactic space the location and extent of stereotactic Radiofrequency (RF) lesions and the position of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. Aims: To study the differences between CT and MRI regarding indirect atlas coordinates in thalamic and pallidal procedures and to evaluate and validate visualisation of the pallidum and the subthalamic nucleus in view of direct targeting irrespective of atlas-derived coordinates. Furthermore, to evaluate the contribution of RF parameters on the size of stereotactic lesions, as well as the impact of size and location on clinical outcome. Method: The coordinates in relation to the landmarks of the 3 rd ventricle of the targets in the pallidum and ventrolateral thalamus were compared between CT and MRI in 34 patients. In another 48 patients direct visualization of the pallidum was evaluated and compared to indirect atlas based targeting. The possibility and versatility of visualizing the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) on short acquisition MRI were evaluated in a multicentre study, and the use of alternative landmarks in identification of the STN was demonstrated in another study. In 46 patients CT and MRI

  12. The role of hyperpolarized 129xenon in MR imaging of pulmonary function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebner, Lukas; Kammerman, Jeff; Driehuys, Bastiaan; Schiebler, Mark L.; Cadman, Robert V.; Fain, Sean B.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Recent advances in hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI are reviewed. • Xenon MRI allows for functional imaging of ventilation, diffusion, and gas exchange. • Xenon’s unique gas exchange imaging capabilities are highlighted. • Applications to obstructive and restrictive lung diseases are presented. • These advances are ready for translation to clinical applications. - Abstract: In the last two decades, functional imaging of the lungs using hyperpolarized noble gases has entered the clinical stage. Both helium ( 3 He) and xenon ( 129 Xe) gas have been thoroughly investigated for their ability to assess both the global and regional patterns of lung ventilation. With advances in polarizer technology and the current transition towards the widely available 129 Xe gas, this method is ready for translation to the clinic. Currently, hyperpolarized (HP) noble gas lung MRI is limited to selected academic institutions; yet, the promising results from initial clinical trials have drawn the attention of the pulmonary medicine community. HP 129 Xe MRI provides not only 3-dimensional ventilation imaging, but also unique capabilities for probing regional lung physiology. In this review article, we aim to (1) provide a brief overview of current ventilation MR imaging techniques, (2) emphasize the role of HP 129 Xe MRI within the array of different imaging strategies, (3) discuss the unique imaging possibilities with HP 129 Xe MRI, and (4) propose clinical applications.

  13. Automated radial basis function neural network based image classification system for diabetic retinopathy detection in retinal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, J.; Vijila, C. Kezi Selva; Hemanth, D. Jude

    2010-02-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a chronic eye disease for which early detection is highly essential to avoid any fatal results. Image processing of retinal images emerge as a feasible tool for this early diagnosis. Digital image processing techniques involve image classification which is a significant technique to detect the abnormality in the eye. Various automated classification systems have been developed in the recent years but most of them lack high classification accuracy. Artificial neural networks are the widely preferred artificial intelligence technique since it yields superior results in terms of classification accuracy. In this work, Radial Basis function (RBF) neural network based bi-level classification system is proposed to differentiate abnormal DR Images and normal retinal images. The results are analyzed in terms of classification accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. A comparative analysis is performed with the results of the probabilistic classifier namely Bayesian classifier to show the superior nature of neural classifier. Experimental results show promising results for the neural classifier in terms of the performance measures.

  14. MR imaging of the heart: functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croisille, P.; Revel, D.

    2000-01-01

    To date, most applications of cardiovascular MRI relate to the evaluation of major vessels rather than the heart itself. However, MRI plays a major role in the evaluation of specific types of cardiovascular pathology, namely intracardiac and paracardiac masses, pericardial disease, and congenital heart disease. In addition, because the visualization of cardiovascular anatomy with MR is non-invasive and permits three-dimensional analysis but also allows functional assessment of the cardiac pump, it is clear that MRI will have a growing and significant impact over the next years. We review some of the technical aspect of cardiac MRI and describe the current and potential clinical and investigative applications of this new methodology. (orig.)

  15. Two-extremum electrostatic potential of metal-lattice plasma and the work function of an electron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surma S.A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal-lattice plasma is treated as a neutral two-component two-phase system of 2D surface and 3D bulk. Free electron density and bulk chemical potential are used as intensive parameters of the system with the phase boundary position determined in the crystalline lattice. A semiempirical expression for the electron screened electrostatic potential is constructed using the lattice-plasma polarization concept. It comprises an image term and three repulsion/attraction terms of second and fourth orders. The novel curve has two extremes and agrees with certain theoretical forms of potential. A practical formula for the electron work function of metals and a simplified schema of electronic structure at the metal/vacuum interface are proposed. This yields 10.44 eV for the Fermi energy of free electron gas; -5.817 eV for the Fermi energy level; 4.509 eV for the average work function of bcc tungsten. Selected data are also given for fcc Cu and hcp Re. For harmonic frequencies ~ 10E16 per s of the self-excited metal-lattice plasma, energy gaps of 14.54 and 8.02 eV are found, which correspond to the bulk and surface plasmons, respectively. Further extension of this thermodynamics and metal-lattice theory based approach may contribute to a better understanding of theoretical models which are employed in chemical physics, catalysis and materials science of nanostructures.

  16. Imaging assessment of a portable hemodialysis device: detection of possible failure modes and monitoring of functional performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olorunsola, Olufoladare G; Kim, Steven H; Chang, Ryan; Kuo, Yuo-Chen; Hetts, Steven W; Heller, Alex; Kant, Rishi; Saeed, Maythem; Fissell, William H; Roy, Shuvo; Wilson, Mark W

    2014-03-27

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility and limitations of various imaging modalities in the noninvasive assessment of a novel compact hemodialyzer under development for renal replacement therapy, with specific aim towards monitoring its functional performance. The prototype is a 4×3×6 cm aluminum cartridge housing "blood" and "dialysate" flow paths arranged in parallel. A sheet of semipermeable silicon nanopore membranes forms the blood-dialysate interface, allowing passage of small molecules. Blood flow was simulated using a peristaltic pump to instill iodinated contrast through the blood compartment, while de-ionized water was instilled through the dialysate compartment at a matched rate in the countercurrent direction. Images were acquired under these flow conditions using multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), fluoroscopy, high-resolution quantitative computed tomography (HR-QCT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MDCT was used to monitor contrast diffusion efficiency by plotting contrast density as a function of position along the path of flow through the cartridge during steady state infusion at 1 and 20 mL/min. Both linear and exponential regressions were used to model contrast decay along the flow path. Both linear and exponential models of contrast decay appeared to be reasonable approximations, yielding similar results for contrast diffusion during a single pass through the cartridge. There was no measurable difference in contrast diffusion when comparing 1 mL/min and 20 mL/min flow rates. Fluoroscopy allowed a gross qualitative assessment of flow within the device, and revealed flow inhomogeneity within the corner of the cartridge opposite the blood inlet port. MRI and HR-QCT were both severely limited due to the paramagnetic properties and high atomic number of the target material, respectively. During testing, we encountered several causes of device malfunction, including leak formation, trapped gas, and contrast

  17. Imaging Action Potential in Single Mammalian Neurons by Tracking the Accompanying Sub-Nanometer Mechanical Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunze; Liu, Xian-Wei; Wang, Hui; Yu, Hui; Guan, Yan; Wang, Shaopeng; Tao, Nongjian

    2018-03-28

    Action potentials in neurons have been studied traditionally by intracellular electrophysiological recordings and more recently by the fluorescence detection methods. Here we describe a label-free optical imaging method that can measure mechanical motion in single cells with a sub-nanometer detection limit. Using the method, we have observed sub-nanometer mechanical motion accompanying the action potential in single mammalian neurons by averaging the repeated action potential spikes. The shape and width of the transient displacement are similar to those of the electrically recorded action potential, but the amplitude varies from neuron to neuron, and from one region of a neuron to another, ranging from 0.2-0.4 nm. The work indicates that action potentials may be studied noninvasively in single mammalian neurons by label-free imaging of the accompanying sub-nanometer mechanical motion.

  18. A Third-Generation Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction Technique: Phantom Study of Image Noise, Spatial Resolution, Lesion Detectability, and Dose Reduction Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, André; Solomon, Justin; Marin, Daniele; Nelson, Rendon C; Samei, Ehsan

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess image noise, spatial resolution, lesion detectability, and the dose reduction potential of a proprietary third-generation adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR-V) technique. A phantom representing five different body sizes (12-37 cm) and a contrast-detail phantom containing lesions of five low-contrast levels (5-20 HU) and three sizes (2-6 mm) were deployed. Both phantoms were scanned on a 256-MDCT scanner at six different radiation doses (1.25-10 mGy). Images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), ASIR-V with 50% blending with FBP (ASIR-V 50%), and ASIR-V without blending (ASIR-V 100%). In the first phantom, noise properties were assessed by noise power spectrum analysis. Spatial resolution properties were measured by use of task transfer functions for objects of different contrasts. Noise magnitude, noise texture, and resolution were compared between the three groups. In the second phantom, low-contrast detectability was assessed by nine human readers independently for each condition. The dose reduction potential of ASIR-V was estimated on the basis of a generalized linear statistical regression model. On average, image noise was reduced 37.3% with ASIR-V 50% and 71.5% with ASIR-V 100% compared with FBP. ASIR-V shifted the noise power spectrum toward lower frequencies compared with FBP. The spatial resolution of ASIR-V was equivalent or slightly superior to that of FBP, except for the low-contrast object, which had lower resolution. Lesion detection significantly increased with both ASIR-V levels (p = 0.001), with an estimated radiation dose reduction potential of 15% ± 5% (SD) for ASIR-V 50% and 31% ± 9% for ASIR-V 100%. ASIR-V reduced image noise and improved lesion detection compared with FBP and had potential for radiation dose reduction while preserving low-contrast detectability.

  19. Fundamentals of functional imaging I: current clinical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, A; Martín Noguerol, T; Mata, L Alcalá

    2018-05-01

    Imaging techniques can establish a structural, physiological, and molecular phenotype for cancer, which helps enable accurate diagnosis and personalized treatment. In recent years, various imaging techniques that make it possible to study the functional characteristics of tumors quantitatively and reproducibly have been introduced and have become established in routine clinical practice. Perfusion studies enable us to estimate the microcirculation as well as tumor angiogenesis and permeability using ultrafast dynamic acquisitions with ultrasound, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Diffusion-weighted sequences now form part of state-of-the-art MR imaging protocols to evaluate oncologic lesions in any anatomic location. Diffusion-weighted imaging provides information about the occupation of the extracellular and extravascular space and indirectly estimates the cellularity and apoptosis of tumors, having demonstrated its relation with biologic aggressiveness in various tumor lines and its usefulness in the evaluation of the early response to systemic and local targeted therapies. Another tool is hydrogen proton MR spectroscopy, which is used mainly in the study of the metabolic characteristics of brain tumors. However, the complexity of the technique and its lack of reproducibility have limited its clinical use in other anatomic areas, although much experience with the use of this technique in the assessment of prostate and breast cancers as well as liver lesions has also accumulated. This review analyzes the imaging techniques that make it possible to evaluate the physiological and molecular characteristics of cancer that have already been introduced into clinical practice, such as techniques that evaluate angiogenesis through dynamic acquisitions after the administration of contrast material, diffusion-weighted imaging, or hydrogen proton MR spectroscopy, as well as their principal applications in oncology. Copyright © 2018 SERAM. Publicado

  20. The Potential of Using Brain Images for Authentication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanglin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biometric recognition (also known as biometrics refers to the automated recognition of individuals based on their biological or behavioral traits. Examples of biometric traits include fingerprint, palmprint, iris, and face. The brain is the most important and complex organ in the human body. Can it be used as a biometric trait? In this study, we analyze the uniqueness of the brain and try to use the brain for identity authentication. The proposed brain-based verification system operates in two stages: gray matter extraction and gray matter matching. A modified brain segmentation algorithm is implemented for extracting gray matter from an input brain image. Then, an alignment-based matching algorithm is developed for brain matching. Experimental results on two data sets show that the proposed brain recognition system meets the high accuracy requirement of identity authentication. Though currently the acquisition of the brain is still time consuming and expensive, brain images are highly unique and have the potential possibility for authentication in view of pattern recognition.

  1. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of higher brain activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui He; Wang Yunjiu; Chen Runsheng; Tang Xiaowei.

    1996-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance images (fMRIs) exhibit small differences in the magnetic resonance signal intensity in positions corresponding to focal areas of brain activation. These signal are caused by variation in the oxygenation state of the venous vasculature. Using this non-invasive and dynamic method, it is possible to localize functional brain activation, in vivo, in normal individuals, with an accuracy of millimeters and a temporal resolution of seconds. Though a series of technical difficulties remain, fMRI is increasingly becoming a key method for visualizing the working brain, and uncovering the topographical organization of the human brain, and understanding the relationship between brain and the mind

  2. Imaging Posture Veils Neural Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert T Thibault

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Whereas modern brain imaging often demands holding body positions incongruent with everyday life, posture governs both neural activity and cognitive performance. Humans commonly perform while upright; yet, many neuroimaging methodologies require participants to remain motionless and adhere to non-ecological comportments within a confined space. This inconsistency between ecological postures and imaging constraints undermines the transferability and generalizability of many a neuroimaging assay.Here we highlight the influence of posture on brain function and behavior. Specifically, we challenge the tacit assumption that brain processes and cognitive performance are comparable across a spectrum of positions. We provide an integrative synthesis regarding the increasingly prominent influence of imaging postures on autonomic function, mental capacity, sensory thresholds, and neural activity. Arguing that neuroimagers and cognitive scientists could benefit from considering the influence posture wields on both general functioning and brain activity, we examine existing imaging technologies and the potential of portable and versatile imaging devices (e.g., functional near infrared spectroscopy. Finally, we discuss ways that accounting for posture may help unveil the complex brain processes of everyday cognition.

  3. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwatban, Adnan Z.W.

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the author except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a transtympanic electrode implanted onto the surface of the cochlea. This approach would however, result in electromotive forces (EMFs) being induced by the time varying magnetic field, which would lead to current flow and heating, as well as deflection of the metallic electrode within the static magnetic field, and image distortion due to the magnetic susceptibility difference. A gold-plated tungsten electrode with a zero magnetic susceptibility was developed to avoid image distortion. Used with carbon leads and a carbon reference pad, it enabled safe, distortion-free fMRI studies of deaf subjects. The study revealed activation of the primary auditory cortex. This fMRI procedure can be used to demonstrate whether the auditory pathway is fully intact, and may provide a useful method for pre-operative assessment of candidates for cochlear implantation. Glucose is the energy source on which the function of the human brain is entirely dependent. Failure to

  4. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwatban, Adnan Z W

    2002-07-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the author except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a transtympanic electrode implanted onto the surface of the cochlea. This approach would however, result in electromotive forces (EMFs) being induced by the time varying magnetic field, which would lead to current flow and heating, as well as deflection of the metallic electrode within the static magnetic field, and image distortion due to the magnetic susceptibility difference. A gold-plated tungsten electrode with a zero magnetic susceptibility was developed to avoid image distortion. Used with carbon leads and a carbon reference pad, it enabled safe, distortion-free fMRI studies of deaf subjects. The study revealed activation of the primary auditory cortex. This fMRI procedure can be used to demonstrate whether the auditory pathway is fully intact, and may provide a useful method for pre-operative assessment of candidates for cochlear implantation. Glucose is the energy source on which the function of the human brain is entirely dependent. Failure to

  5. Microwave tomography for functional imaging of extremity soft tissues: feasibility assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, Serguei; Kellam, James; Althausen, Peter; Williams, Thomas; Abubakar, Aria; Bulyshev, Alexander; Sizov, Yuri

    2007-01-01

    It is important to assess the viability of extremity soft tissues, as this component is often the determinant of the final outcome of fracture treatment. Microwave tomography (MWT) and sensing might be able to provide a fast and mobile assessment of such properties. MWT imaging of extremities possesses a complicated, nonlinear, high dielectric contrast inverse problem of diffraction tomography. There is a high dielectric contrast between bone and soft tissue in the extremities. A contrast between soft tissue abnormalities is less pronounced when compared with the high bone-soft tissue contrast. The goal of this study was to assess the feasibility of MWT for functional imaging of extremity soft tissues, i.e. to detect a relatively small contrast within soft tissues in closer proximity to high contrast boney areas. Both experimental studies and computer simulation were performed. Experiments were conducted using live pigs with compromised blood flow and compartment syndrome within an extremity. A whole 2D tomographic imaging cycle at 1 GHz was computer simulated and images were reconstructed using the Newton, MR-CSI and modified Born methods. Results of experimental studies demonstrate that microwave technology is sensitive to changes in the soft tissue blood content and elevated compartment pressure. It was demonstrated that MWT is feasible for functional imaging of extremity soft tissues, circulatory-related changes, blood flow and elevated compartment pressure

  6. Folding pathways explored with artificial potential functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulutaş, B; Bozma, I; Haliloglu, T

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the generation of trajectories to a given protein conformation and presents a novel approach based on artificial potential functions—originally proposed for multi-robot navigation. The artificial potential function corresponds to a simplified energy model, but with the novelty that—motivated by work on robotic navigation—a nonlinear compositional scheme of constructing the energy model is adapted instead of an additive formulation. The artificial potential naturally gives rise to a dynamic system for the protein structure that ensures collision-free motion to an equilibrium point. In cases where the equilibrium point is the native conformation, the motion trajectory corresponds to the folding pathway. This framework is used to investigate folding in a variety of protein structures, and the results are compared with those of other approaches including experimental studies

  7. Effect of tube potential and image receptor on the detection of natural proximal caries in primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogur, Elif; Baksı, B Güniz; Orhan, Kaan; Paksoy, S Candan; Dogan, Salih; Erdal, Yılmaz S; Mert, Ali

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the detection of proximal caries in primary teeth at three different tube potentials using Ektaspeed films, storage phosphor plates (SPPs), and a charge-coupled device (CCD). Fifty-three extracted human primary molars with natural proximal caries were radiographed with three different imaging modalities--Digora Optime SPP system, RVGui CCD system, and Ektaspeed films--at 50-, 65-, and 70-kV tube potentials. Three observers scored the resultant images for the presence or absence of caries. The definitive diagnosis was determined by stereomicroscopic assessment. The diagnostic accuracy for each imaging modality was expressed as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (A(z)). Differences among the A(z) values were assessed using two-way ANOVA and t tests. Kappa was used to measure inter- and intra-observer agreement. Higher accuracy was found for SPPs compared to film and CCD images at all tube potentials. Accuracy was significantly different only at 50-kV tube setting in favor of SPPs (p tube potential for the diagnosis of proximal caries since further advantages include the elimination of chemical processing, image enhancement, and a better low-contrast detectability performance.

  8. High temporal resolution magnetic resonance imaging: development of a parallel three dimensional acquisition method for functional neuroimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabrait, C.

    2007-11-01

    Echo Planar Imaging is widely used to perform data acquisition in functional neuroimaging. This sequence allows the acquisition of a set of about 30 slices, covering the whole brain, at a spatial resolution ranging from 2 to 4 mm, and a temporal resolution ranging from 1 to 2 s. It is thus well adapted to the mapping of activated brain areas but does not allow precise study of the brain dynamics. Moreover, temporal interpolation is needed in order to correct for inter-slices delays and 2-dimensional acquisition is subject to vascular in flow artifacts. To improve the estimation of the hemodynamic response functions associated with activation, this thesis aimed at developing a 3-dimensional high temporal resolution acquisition method. To do so, Echo Volume Imaging was combined with reduced field-of-view acquisition and parallel imaging. Indeed, E.V.I. allows the acquisition of a whole volume in Fourier space following a single excitation, but it requires very long echo trains. Parallel imaging and field-of-view reduction are used to reduce the echo train durations by a factor of 4, which allows the acquisition of a 3-dimensional brain volume with limited susceptibility-induced distortions and signal losses, in 200 ms. All imaging parameters have been optimized in order to reduce echo train durations and to maximize S.N.R., so that cerebral activation can be detected with a high level of confidence. Robust detection of brain activation was demonstrated with both visual and auditory paradigms. High temporal resolution hemodynamic response functions could be estimated through selective averaging of the response to the different trials of the stimulation. To further improve S.N.R., the matrix inversions required in parallel reconstruction were regularized, and the impact of the level of regularization on activation detection was investigated. Eventually, potential applications of parallel E.V.I. such as the study of non-stationary effects in the B.O.L.D. response

  9. Usefulness of true FISP cine MR imaging in patients with poor cardiac function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, Toshiharu; Yamada, Naoaki; Motooka, Makoto; Enomoto, Naoyuki; Maeshima, Isamu; Matsuda, Kazuhide; Urayama, Shinichi; Ikeo, Miki [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    This study was done to assess the value of True FISP cine in patients with poor cardiac function. True FISP cine and FLASH cine imaging were performed on a 1.5 T machine. Both short axis and horizontal long axis imaging sections were used. The imaging sections used a Matrix (120 x 128), FOV (24 x 32 cm), and had a slice thickness of 8 mm. The imaging time for True FISP cine was 8 heart beats and 17 heart beats for FLASH cine. The contrast-to-noise ratio between the blood and myocardium (CNR) was measured at enddiastole and endsystole. The subjects in the study were 10 healty volunteers (average age 26.5{+-}3.2 years) and 12 patients with hypofunction (average age 53.9{+-}13.2 years). In the volunteers, the CNR of the short axis imaging was similar in both True FISP (24.6{+-}3.7) and FLASH (23.4{+-}5.9). In the patients with poor cardiac function however, the CNR of True FISP was larger than FLASH in both the short and long axis. In the short axis (22.7{+-}6.1 vs. 17.9{+-}5.3, P<0.01) and in the long axis (17.4{+-}4.3 vs. 9.3{+-}4.0, P<0.01). We conclude that True FISP cine has a higher contrast in a shorter imaging time than FLASH cine. True FISP cine is especially useful in patients with poor cardiac function. (author)

  10. Morphological and functional MR imaging of the pharyngotympanic tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krombach, G.A.; Nolte-Ernsting, C.; Schmitz-Rode, T.; Guenther, R.W.; Di Martino, E.; Westhofen, M.; Prescher, A.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a protocol for the anatomic depiction and functional testing of the auditory tube with the use of MR imaging. Methods: Eleven volunteers were included into this study. For the morphological assessment, the imaging protocol included axial and coronal T 2 -weighted turbo-spin echo sequences (T R /T E =3194/100 ms) and a T 1 -weighted gradient echo sequence (T R /T E =42/4.6 ms). For the functional test a dynamic turbo-gradient echo sequence (TFE) with spectral fat suppression (T R /T E =15/6,2 ms; 4 sec) was obtained using the single slice technique before and during the Valsalva manoeuvre. Results: With multi-slice sequences, the osseous part of the auditory tube, the tubal cartilage (middle and lateral lamina), the ciliated epithelium, Ostmann's adipose body and the levator and tensor veli palatini muscles were delineated in all cases. During the Valsalva test, opening of the auditory tube was demonstrated in 20 of the 22 investigated sides using the dynamic TFE single slice sequence. Conclusions: The introduced MRI protocol allow visualization of the opening of the auditory tube and provides detailed anatomical information of the nasopharynx. Comprehensive morphological and functional evaluation of the auditory tube becomes possible within a single examination. (orig.) [de

  11. Facile Synthesis of Gd-Functionalized Gold Nanoclusters as Potential MRI/CT Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Le

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Multi-modal imaging plays a key role in the earlier detection of disease. In this work, a facile bioinspired method was developed to synthesize Gd-functionalized gold nanoclusters (Gd-Au NCs. The Gd-Au NCs exhibit a uniform size, with an average size of 5.6 nm in dynamic light scattering (DLS, which is a bit bigger than gold clusters (3.74 nm, DLS, while the fluorescent properties of Gd-Au NCs are almost the same as that of Au NCs. Moreover, the Gd-Au NCs exhibit a high longitudinal relaxivity value (r1 of 22.111 s−1 per mM of Gd in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, which is six times higher than that of commercial Magnevist (A complex of gadolinium with a chelating agent, diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid, Gd-DTPA, r1 = 3.56 mM−1·s−1. Besides, as evaluated by nano single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and computed tomography (CT the Gd-Au NCs have a potential application as CT contrast agents because of the Au element. Finally, the Gd-Au NCs show little cytotoxicity, even when the Au concentration is up to 250 μM. Thus, the Gd-Au NCs can act as multi-modal imaging contrast agents.

  12. Functional MRI 2.0. {sup 23}Na and CEST imaging; Funktionelle MRT 2.0. {sup 23}Na- und CEST-Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haneder, S. [Uniklinik Koeln, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Koeln (Germany); Konstandin, S. [Universitaet Bremen, MR-Bildgebung und -Spektroskopie, Fachbereich 1 (Physik/Elektrotechnik), Bremen (Germany); Fraunhofer MEVIS, Institut fuer Bildgestuetzte Medizin, Bremen (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    In recent years the purely morphological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly flanked by so-called functional imaging methods, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), to obtain additional information about tissue or pathological processes. This review article presents two MR techniques that can detect physiological processes in the human body. In contrast to all other functional MR imaging techniques, which are based on hydrogen protons, the first technique presented (X-nuclei imaging) uses the spin of other nuclei for imaging and consequently allows a completely different insight into the human body. In this article X-nuclei imaging is focused on sodium ({sup 23}Na) MRI because it currently represents the main focus of research in this field due to the favorable MR properties of sodium. The second MR technique presented is the relatively novel chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging that can detect exchange processes between protons in metabolites and protons in free water. The first part of this article introduces the basic technical principles, problems, advantages and disadvantages of these two MR techniques, whereas the second part highlights the potential clinical applications. Examples illustrate several potential applications in neuroimaging (e. g. stroke and tumors), musculoskeletal imaging (e. g. osteoarthritis and degenerative processes) and abdominal imaging (e. g. kidneys and hypertension). Both techniques inherently contain an incredible potential for future imaging but are still on the threshold of clinical use and are currently under evaluation in many university centers. (orig.) [German] In den letzten Jahren wird die reine morphologische Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) zunehmend von sogenannten funktionellen Bildgebungsmethoden, wie der diffusionsgewichteten Bildgebung (''diffusion-weighted imaging'', DWI), flankiert, um zusaetzliche Informationen ueber Gewebe oder pathologische Prozesse zu

  13. Quantitative estimation of brain atrophy and function with PET and MRI two-dimensional projection images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Reiko; Uemura, Koji; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Toyama, Hinako; Ishii, Kenji; Senda, Michio

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to estimate the extent of atrophy and the decline in brain function objectively and quantitatively. Two-dimensional (2D) projection images of three-dimensional (3D) transaxial images of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were made by means of the Mollweide method which keeps the area of the brain surface. A correlation image was generated between 2D projection images of MRI and cerebral blood flow (CBF) or 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET images and the sulcus was extracted from the correlation image clustered by K-means method. Furthermore, the extent of atrophy was evaluated from the extracted sulcus on 2D-projection MRI and the cerebral cortical function such as blood flow or glucose metabolic rate was assessed in the cortex excluding sulcus on 2D-projection PET image, and then the relationship between the cerebral atrophy and function was evaluated. This method was applied to the two groups, the young and the aged normal subjects, and the relationship between the age and the rate of atrophy or the cerebral blood flow was investigated. This method was also applied to FDG-PET and MRI studies in the normal controls and in patients with corticobasal degeneration. The mean rate of atrophy in the aged group was found to be higher than that in the young. The mean value and the variance of the cerebral blood flow for the young are greater than those of the aged. The sulci were similarly extracted using either CBF or FDG PET images. The purposed method using 2-D projection images of MRI and PET is clinically useful for quantitative assessment of atrophic change and functional disorder of cerebral cortex. (author)

  14. New deconvolution method for microscopic images based on the continuous Gaussian radial basis function interpolation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaoxue; Chen, Hao

    2014-01-01

    A deconvolution method based on the Gaussian radial basis function (GRBF) interpolation is proposed. Both the original image and Gaussian point spread function are expressed as the same continuous GRBF model, thus image degradation is simplified as convolution of two continuous Gaussian functions, and image deconvolution is converted to calculate the weighted coefficients of two-dimensional control points. Compared with Wiener filter and Lucy-Richardson algorithm, the GRBF method has an obvious advantage in the quality of restored images. In order to overcome such a defect of long-time computing, the method of graphic processing unit multithreading or increasing space interval of control points is adopted, respectively, to speed up the implementation of GRBF method. The experiments show that based on the continuous GRBF model, the image deconvolution can be efficiently implemented by the method, which also has a considerable reference value for the study of three-dimensional microscopic image deconvolution.

  15. Study of functional brain imaging for bilingual language cognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Da

    2008-01-01

    Bilingual and multilingual brain studies of language recognition is an interdisciplinary subject which needs to identify different levels involved in the neural representation of languages, such as neuroanatomical, neurofunctional, biochemical, psychological and linguistic levels. Furthermore, specific factor's such as age, manner of acquisition and environmental factors seem to affect the neural representation. Functional brain imaging, such as PET, SPECT and functional MRI can explore the neurolinguistics representation of bilingualism in the brain in subjects, and elucidate the neuronal mechanisms of bilingual language processing. Functional imaging methods show differences in the pattern of cerebral activation associated with a second language compared with the subject's native language. It shows that verbal memory processing in two unrelated languages is mediated by a common neural system with some distinct cortical areas. The different patterns of activation differ according to the language used. It also could be ascribed either to age of acquisition or to proficiency level. And attained proficiency is more important than age of acquisition as a determinant of the cortical representation of the second language. The study used PET and SPECT shows that sign and spoken language seem to be localized in the same brain areas, and elicit similar regional cerebral blood flow patterns. But for sign language perception, the functional anatomy overlaps that of language processing contain both auditory and visual components. And the sign language is dependent on spatial information too. (authors)

  16. Functional brain activity changes after four weeks supplementation with a multi-vitamin/mineral combination: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial exploring functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials during working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J White

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the neurocognitive effects of four weeks daily supplementation with a multivitamin and mineral combination (MVM in healthy adults (aged 18-40 years. Using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, participants underwent assessments of brain activity using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI; n=32, 16 females and Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential recordings (SSVEP; n=39, 20 females during working memory and continuous performance tasks at baseline and following four weeks of active MVM treatment or placebo. There were several treatment-related effects suggestive of changes in functional brain activity associated with MVM administration. SSVEP data showed latency reductions across centro-parietal regions during the encoding period of a spatial working memory task following four weeks of active MVM treatment. Complementary results were observed with the fMRI data, in which a subset of those completing fMRI assessment after SSVEP assessment (n=16 demonstrated increased BOLD response during completion of the Rapid Visual Information Processing task (RVIP within regions of interest including bilateral parietal lobes. No treatment-related changes in fMRI data were observed in those who had not first undergone SSVEP assessment, suggesting these results may be most evident under conditions of fatigue. Performance on the working memory and continuous performance tasks did not significantly differ between treatment groups at follow-up. In addition, within the fatigued fMRI sample, increased RVIP BOLD response was correlated with the change in number of target detections as part of the RVIP task. This study provides preliminary evidence of changes in functional brain activity during working memory associated with four weeks of daily treatment with a multivitamin and mineral combination in healthy adults, using two distinct but complementary measures of functional brain activity.

  17. 'Magnetic Resonance Motion Imaging' for functional diagnosis of the musculo-skeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, K.M.

    2002-06-01

    Purpose: radiological studies of joint and spine function are an important part of the diagnosis and therapy management for musculo-skeletal diseases affecting range-of-motion. The objective of this study was to investigate the integration and developement of the clinical application of currently available MR-tomographic techniques, which can be summarized as 'Magnetic Resonance Motion Imaging (MRMI)'. Material and methods: five healthy volunteers (three women and two men; mean age 21.8?4.4) and ten patients (eight women and two men; mean age 31.4?12.6) took part in the study. A total of 21 examinations with real-time motion-MRI were performed on selected peripheric joints (seven patellofemoral joints, six femorotibial joints, one cervical spine, two wrists, three ankles and two temporomandibular joints) with a 1.0T unit (Philips Intera T10) using T1-weighted gradient-echo and opposed-phase imaging sequences. For the examination of the patellofemoral joint, the femorotibial joint, the wrist and the tmj a dedicated positioning-device was used. Results were correlated with static MR-Images. Results: the quickly parcticable sequence of the examinations was not straining for the patients. The quality of imaging was only insignificantly lower as compared with static gradient-echo sequences. No artifacts were seen which could influence the evaluation. The visualisation of motions was very good. The quantification of the maximum extent of dysfunctions could be judged better with a higher sensitivity in real-time-mode than in static images. Conclusion: from the results of this study a three-step-plan for the radiodiagnostic procedure in cases of functional disorders of selected joints and the spine can be deduced, which uses static MR-imaging as first step. In case of unsolved questions MRMI is done (step 2). To obtain measurements, static MR-Images at different points of the motion range(kinematic MR-Imaging) should be done (step 3). This plan of 'motion-MRI' is well

  18. Motor and sensory function of the esophagus: revelations through ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Ravinder K

    2005-04-01

    Catheter based high frequency intraluminal ultrasound (HFIUS) imaging is a powerful tool to study esophageal sensory and motor function and dysfunction in vivo in humans. It has provided a number of important insights into the longitudinal muscle function of the esophagus. Based on the ultrasound images and intraluminal pressure recordings, it is clear that there is synchrony in the timing as well as the amplitude of contraction between the circular and the longitudinal muscle layers of the esophagus in normal subjects. On the other hand, in patients with spastic disorders of the esophagus, there is an asynchrony of contraction related to the timing and amplitude of contraction of the two muscle layers during peristalsis. Achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, and nutcracker esophagus (spastic motor disorders of the esophagus) are associated with hypertrophy of the circular as well as longitudinal muscle layers. A sustained contraction of the longitudinal muscle of the esophagus is temporally related to chest pain and heartburn and may very well be the cause of symptoms. Longitudinal muscle function of the esophagus can be studied in vivo in humans using dynamic ultrasound imaging. Longitudinal muscle dysfunction appears to be important in the motor and sensory disorders of the esophagus.

  19. Subjective matters: from image quality to image psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorovskaya, Elena A.; De Ridder, Huib

    2013-03-01

    From the advent of digital imaging through several decades of studies, the human vision research community systematically focused on perceived image quality and digital artifacts due to resolution, compression, gamma, dynamic range, capture and reproduction noise, blur, etc., to help overcome existing technological challenges and shortcomings. Technological advances made digital images and digital multimedia nearly flawless in quality, and ubiquitous and pervasive in usage, provide us with the exciting but at the same time demanding possibility to turn to the domain of human experience including higher psychological functions, such as cognition, emotion, awareness, social interaction, consciousness and Self. In this paper we will outline the evolution of human centered multidisciplinary studies related to imaging and propose steps and potential foci of future research.

  20. Proton magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of lung function and respiratory dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichinger, Monika; Tetzlaff, Ralf; Puderbach, Michael; Woodhouse, Neil; Kauczor, H.-U.

    2007-01-01

    Since many pulmonary diseases present with a variable regional involvement, modalities for assessment of regional lung function gained increasing attention over the last years. Together with lung perfusion and gas exchange, ventilation, as a result of the interaction of the respiratory pump and the lungs, is an indispensable component of lung function. So far, this complex mechanism is still mainly assessed indirectly and globally. A differentiation between the individual determining factors of ventilation would be crucial for precise diagnostics and adequate treatment. By dynamic imaging of the respiratory pump, the mechanical components of ventilation can be assessed regionally. Amongst imaging modalities applicable to this topic, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as a tool not relying on ionising radiation, is the most attractive. Recent advances in MRI technology have made it possible to assess diaphragmatic and chest wall motion, static and dynamic lung volumes, as well as regional lung function. Even though existing studies show large heterogeneity in design and applied methods, it becomes evident that MRI is capable to visualise pulmonary function as well as diaphragmatic and thoracic wall movement, providing new insights into lung physiology. Partly contradictory results and conclusions are most likely caused by technical limitations, limited number of studies and small sample size. Existing studies mainly evaluate possible imaging techniques and concentrate on normal physiology. The few studies in patients with lung cancer and emphysema already give a promising outlook for these techniques from which an increasing impact on improved and quantitative disease characterization as well as better patient management can be expected

  1. Molecular cardiovascular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefers, M.

    2007-01-01

    Although huge and long-lasting research efforts have been spent on the development of new diagnostic techniques investigating cardiovascular diseases, still fundamental challenges exist; the main challenge being the diagnosis of a suspected or known coronary artery disease or its consequences (myocardial infarction, heart failure etc.). Beside morphological techniques, functional imaging modalities are available in clinical diagnostic algorithms, whereas molecular cardiovascular imaging techniques are still under development. This review summarizes clinical-diagnostical challenges of modern cardiovascular medicine as well as the potential of new molecular imaging techniques to face these. (orig.)

  2. Stress and brain functional changes in patients with Crohn's disease: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, A; Ballotta, D; Righi, S; Moretti, M; Bertani, A; Scarcelli, A; Sartini, A; Ercolani, M; Nichelli, P; Campieri, M; Benuzzi, F

    2017-10-01

    In Crohn's disease (CD) patients, stress is believed to influence symptoms generation. Stress may act via central nervous system pathways to affect visceral sensitivity and motility thus exacerbating gastrointestinal symptoms. The neural substrate underpinning these mechanisms needs to be investigated in CD. We conducted an explorative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in order to investigate potential differences in the brain stress response in CD patients compared to controls. 17 CD patients and 17 healthy controls underwent a fMRI scan while performing a stressful task consisting in a Stroop color-word interference task designed to induce mental stress in the fMRI environment. Compared to controls, in CD patients the stress task elicited greater blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals in the midcingulate cortex (MCC). The MCC integrate "high" emotional processes with afferent sensory information ascending from the gut. In light of these integrative functions, the stress-evoked MCC hyperactivity in CD patients might represent a plausible neural substrate for the association between stress and symptomatic disease. The MCC dysfunction might be involved in mechanisms of central disinhibition of nociceptive inputs leading to amplify the visceral sensitivity. Finally, the stress-evoked MCC hyperactivity might affect the regulation of intestinal motility resulting in exacerbation of disease symptoms and the autonomic and neuroendocrine regulation of inflammation resulting in enhanced inflammatory activity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in neuroradiology; Funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie in der Neuroradiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essig, M.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Metzner, R.; Kaick, G. van [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Forschungsschwerpunkt Radiologische Diagnostik und Therapie

    2000-10-01

    The assessment of cerebral functions has long been the domain of positron-emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography. The use of rapid imaging sequences and contrast agents enables physiological and pathophysiological cerebral processes to be assessed and monitored by magnetic resonance imaging. Both T1- and T2*-weighted contrast-enhanced fast imaging sequences can be used to assess tissue perfusion, vascularity, and microcirculation by applying models developed in nuclear medicine. The diffusion of water molecules and hemodynamic aspects of the macrovasculature can also be monitored. Functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging enables the visualization of neuronal function and activity, and MR spectroscopy makes possible the metabolic mapping of lesions and surrounding tissue. The advantages of MR techniques includes their low invasiveness, multiplanar imaging ability, and lack of radiation. This contribution discusses the clinical use of functional MR imaging methods and their role in neuroradiological diseases. Measuring perfusion and diffusion allows detailed insight into the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia and is already being used routinely in acute ischemic stroke. Dynamic MR angiography enables the hemodynamic assessment of vascular malformations. In CNS neoplasms these imaging techniques can improve lesion characterization and the selecting, planning, and monitoring of therapy. Functional MR imaging techniques have also revolutionized the study of psychiatric illness; however, their clinical utility here is still limited. Initial results in patients with dementia and schizophrenia have provided insight into the pathophysiological changes of these diseases. (orig.) [German] Funktionelle Untersuchungen des Gehirns waren lange Zeit lediglich mit nuklearmedizinischen Methoden wie der Positronenemissionstomographie (PET) und der Single-Photonen-Emission-Computed-Tomography (SPECT) moeglich. Durch den Einsatz schneller

  4. Quantization function for attractive, singular potential tails; Die Quantisierungsfunktion fuer attraktive, singulaere Potentialschwaenze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raab, Patrick N.

    2010-02-04

    The interaction between atoms and molecules with each other are deep potential wells with attractive, singular tails. Bound state energies are determined by a quantization function according to a simple quantization rule. This function is dominantly determined by the singular potential tail for near-threshold states. General expressions for the low- and high-energy contributions of the singular potential tail to the quantization function, as well as the connection to the scattering length are presented in two and three dimensions. Precise analytical expressions for the quantization function are determined for the case of potential tails proportional to -1/r{sup 4} and -1/r{sup 6} for three dimensions. (orig.)

  5. Parameter Search Algorithms for Microwave Radar-Based Breast Imaging: Focal Quality Metrics as Fitness Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loughlin, Declan; Oliveira, Bárbara L; Elahi, Muhammad Adnan; Glavin, Martin; Jones, Edward; Popović, Milica; O'Halloran, Martin

    2017-12-06

    Inaccurate estimation of average dielectric properties can have a tangible impact on microwave radar-based breast images. Despite this, recent patient imaging studies have used a fixed estimate although this is known to vary from patient to patient. Parameter search algorithms are a promising technique for estimating the average dielectric properties from the reconstructed microwave images themselves without additional hardware. In this work, qualities of accurately reconstructed images are identified from point spread functions. As the qualities of accurately reconstructed microwave images are similar to the qualities of focused microscopic and photographic images, this work proposes the use of focal quality metrics for average dielectric property estimation. The robustness of the parameter search is evaluated using experimental dielectrically heterogeneous phantoms on the three-dimensional volumetric image. Based on a very broad initial estimate of the average dielectric properties, this paper shows how these metrics can be used as suitable fitness functions in parameter search algorithms to reconstruct clear and focused microwave radar images.

  6. Modulation transfer function cascade model for a sampled IR imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, L; Cardone, G

    1991-05-01

    The performance of the infrared scanning radiometer (IRSR) is strongly stressed in convective heat transfer applications where high spatial frequencies in the signal that describes the thermal image are present. The need to characterize more deeply the system spatial resolution has led to the formulation of a cascade model for the evaluation of the actual modulation transfer function of a sampled IR imaging system. The model can yield both the aliasing band and the averaged modulation response for a general sampling subsystem. For a line scan imaging system, which is the case of a typical IRSR, a rule of thumb that states whether the combined sampling-imaging system is either imaging-dependent or sampling-dependent is proposed. The model is tested by comparing it with other noncascade models as well as by ad hoc measurements performed on a commercial digitized IRSR.

  7. Functional imaging of semantic memory predicts postoperative episodic memory functions in chronic temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köylü, Bülent; Walser, Gerald; Ischebeck, Anja; Ortler, Martin; Benke, Thomas

    2008-08-05

    Medial temporal (MTL) structures have crucial functions in episodic (EM), but also in semantic memory (SM) processing. Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity within the MTL is increasingly used to predict post-surgical memory capacities. Based on the hypothesis that EM and SM memory functions are both hosted by the MTL the present study wanted to explore the relationship between SM related activations in the MTL as assessed before and the capacity of EM functions after surgery. Patients with chronic unilateral left (n=14) and right (n=12) temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) performed a standard word list learning test pre- and postoperatively, and a fMRI procedure before the operation using a semantic decision task. SM processing caused significant bilateral MTL activations in both patient groups. While right TLE patients showed asymmetry of fMRI activation with more activation in the left MTL, left TLE patients had almost equal activation in both MTL regions. Contrasting left TLE versus right TLE patients revealed greater activity within the right MTL, whereas no significant difference was observed for the reverse contrast. Greater effect size in the MTL region ipsilateral to the seizure focus was significantly and positively correlated with preoperative EM abilities. Greater effect size in the contralateral MTL was correlated with better postoperative verbal EM, especially in left TLE patients. These results suggest that functional imaging of SM tasks may be useful to predict postoperative verbal memory in TLE. They also advocate a common neuroanatomical basis for SM and EM processes in the MTL.

  8. Molecular Imaging With Optical, Magnetic Resonance, and Radioisotope Techniques: Potentials and Relative Limitations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Budinger, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The technology advances include photodiode arrays for optical methods high field magnets proposed to 12 Tesla for functional imaging and multinuclear spectroscopy 3D ultrasound and positron tomography...

  9. Evaluation of potential PET imaging probes for the orexin 2 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Changning; Wilson, Colin M.; Moseley, Christian K.; Carlin, Stephen M.; Hsu, Shirley; Arabasz, Grae; Schroeder, Frederick A.; Sander, Christin Y.; Hooker, Jacob M.

    2013-01-01

    A wide range of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, particularly those related to sleep, are associated with the abnormal function of orexin (OX) receptors. Several orexin receptor antagonists have been reported in recent years, but currently there are no imaging tools to probe the density and function of orexin receptors in vivo. To date there are no published data on the pharmacokinetics (PK) and accumulation of some lead orexin receptor antagonists. Evaluation of CNS pharmacokinetics in the pursuit of positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer development could be used to elucidate the association of orexin receptors with diseases and to facilitate the drug discovery and development. To this end, we designed and evaluated carbon-11 labeled compounds based on diazepane orexin receptor antagonists previously described. One of the synthesized compounds, [ 11 C]CW4, showed high brain uptake in rats and further evaluated in non-human primate (NHP) using PET-MR imaging. PET scans performed in a baboon showed appropriate early brain uptake for consideration as a radiotracer. However, [ 11 C]CW4 exhibited fast kinetics and high nonspecific binding, as determined after co-administration of [ 11 C]CW4 and unlabeled CW4. These properties indicate that [ 11 C]CW4 has excellent brain penetrance and could be used as a lead compound for developing new CNS-penetrant PET imaging probes of orexin receptors

  10. Restriction Spectrum Imaging As a Potential Measure of Cortical Neurite Density in Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Carper, Ruth A.; Treiber, Jeffrey M.; White, Nathan S.; Kohli, Jiwandeep S.; M?ller, Ralph-Axel

    2017-01-01

    Autism postmortem studies have shown various cytoarchitectural anomalies in cortical and limbic areas including increased cell packing density, laminar disorganization, and narrowed minicolumns. However, there is little evidence on dendritic and axonal organization in ASD. Recent imaging techniques have the potential for non-invasive, in vivo studies of small-scale structure in the human brain, including gray matter. Here, Restriction Spectrum Imaging (RSI), a multi-shell diffusion-weighted i...

  11. MRI-Derived Cellularity Index as a Potential Noninvasive Imaging Biomarker of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    patients has revealed atypical gelatinous necrosis. We have coined this abnormality bevacizumab-related imaging abnormality (BRIA) and have observed that...neurologic disorders . Radiology 1986;161: 401–7. 25. Merboldt K-D, HanickeW, Frahm J. Self-diffusion NMR imaging using stimulated echoes. J Magn Reson...sensitivity and functional characterization 8 Left peripheral mid gland 3–5 o’clock Bulges the capsule, no gross extraprostatic extension Motion and

  12. Diversity of radioprobes targeted to tumor angiogenesis on molecular functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xia; Zhang Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Molecular functional imaging could visualize, characterize, and measure the bio- logical processes including tumor angiogenesis at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems. The molecular probes labeled by a variety of radionuclide used in the field of the nuclear medicine play pivotal roles in molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis. However, the regulatory role of different probes in tumor angiogenesis has not been systematically illustrated. The current status of tumor angiogenesis imaging with radiolabeled probes of peptide, monoclonal antibody as well as its fragment, especially nanoparticle-based probes to gain insights into the robust tumor angiogenesis development were summarized. It was recognized that only the probes such as nanoparticle-based probes, which truly target the tumor vasculature rather than tumor cells because of poor extravasation, are really tumor angiogenesis imaging agent. The research of molecular probe targeted to angiogenesis would meet its flourish just after the outstanding improvements in the in vivo stability and biocompatibility, tumor-targeting efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of tumor angiogenesis imaging probes are made. Translation to clinical applications will also be critical for the maximize benefits of these novel agents. The future of tumor angiogenesis imaging lies in liable imaging probes and multiple imaging modalities, imaging of protein-protein interactions, and quantitative molecular imaging. (authors)

  13. Application of gastric emptying imaging in the therapy of functional dyspepsia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Qingxiang; Shi Jin; Rong Rong; Wang Hongbing

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the application of gastric emptying imaging in the therapy of functional dyspepsia (FD) of Spleen deficiency and qi stagnation. Methods: 78 cases of patients with FD were divide into Chinese herbal medicine group (40 cases treated with Chinese herbal medicine of Decoction of invigorating spleen) and Western medicine group (38 cases treated with regulating qi and Domperidone). The gastric emptying imagings were carried out before and after treatment. Results: The gastric emptying imaging results showed that both traditional Chinese Medicine and Western medicine treatments had good curative effects (P<0.01), and the traditional Chinese Medicine was better than that of Wester medicine (P<0.05). Conclusion: Gastric emptying imaging is very useful in observation curative effect of FD treatment. (authors)

  14. Development of {sup 68}Ga-labelled DTPA galactosyl human serum albumin for liver function imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubner, Roland [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Medizinische Universitaet Innsbruck, Universitaetsklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Innsbruck (Austria); Vera, David R.; Farshchi-Heydari, Salman [University of California, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, and the UCSD Molecular Imaging Program, San Diego, CA (United States); Helbok, Anna; Rangger, Christine; Putzer, Daniel; Virgolini, Irene J. [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-08-15

    The hepatic asialoglycoprotein receptor is responsible for degradation of desialylated glycoproteins through receptor-mediated endocytosis. It has been shown that imaging of the receptor density using [{sup 99m}Tc]diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) galactosyl human serum albumin ([{sup 99m}Tc]GSA) allows non-invasive determination of functional hepatocellular mass. Here we present the synthesis and evaluation of [{sup 68}Ga]GSA for the potential use with positron emission tomography (PET). Labelling of GSA with {sup 68}Ga was carried out using a fractionated elution protocol. For quality control thin-layer chromatography (TLC), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) techniques were evaluated. Stability of [{sup 68}Ga]GSA was studied in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human serum. For in vivo evaluation [{sup 68}Ga]GSA distribution in Lewis rats was compared with [{sup 99m}Tc]GSA by using a dual isotope protocol. PET and planar imaging studies were performed using the same scaled molar dose of [{sup 68}Ga]GSA and [{sup 99m}Tc]GSA. Time-activity curves (TAC) for heart and liver were generated and corresponding parameters calculated (t50, t90). [{sup 68}Ga]GSA can be produced with high radiochemical purity. The best TLC methods for determining potential free {sup 68}Ga include 0.1 M sodium citrate as eluent. None of the TLC methods tested were able to determine potential colloids. This can be achieved by SEC. HPLC confirmed high radiochemical purity (>98 %). Stability after 120 min incubation at 37 C was high in PBS (>95 % intact tracer) and low in human serum ({proportional_to}27 % intact tracer). Biodistribution studies simultaneously injecting both tracers showed comparable liver uptake, whereas activity concentration in blood was higher for [{sup 68}Ga]GSA compared to [{sup 99m}Tc]GSA. The [{sup 99m}Tc]GSA TACs exhibited a small degree of hepatic metabolism compared to the [{sup 68}Ga]GSA curves. The mean

  15. Structural and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cerebellum: Considerations for Assessing Cerebellar Ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deistung, Andreas; Stefanescu, Maria R; Ernst, Thomas M; Schlamann, Marc; Ladd, Mark E; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Timmann, Dagmar

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is of high interest for diagnosing and understanding degenerative ataxias. Here, we present state-of-the-art MRI methods to characterize structural alterations of the cerebellum and introduce initial experiments to show abnormalities in the cerebellar nuclei. Clinically, T1-weighted MR images are used to assess atrophy of the cerebellar cortex, the brainstem, and the spinal cord, whereas T2-weighted and PD-weighted images are typically employed to depict potential white matter lesions that may be associated with certain types of ataxias. More recently, attention has also focused on the characterization of the cerebellar nuclei, which are discernible on spatially highly resolved iron-sensitive MR images due to their relatively high iron content, including T2 (*)-weighted images, susceptibility-weighted images (SWI), effective transverse relaxation rate (R2 (*)) maps, and quantitative susceptibility maps (QSM). Among these iron-sensitive techniques, QSM reveals the best contrast between cerebellar nuclei and their surroundings. In particular, the gyrification of the dentate nuclei is prominently depicted, even at the clinically widely available field strength of 3 T. The linear relationship between magnetic susceptibility and local iron content allows for determination of iron deposition in cerebellar nuclei non-invasively. The increased signal-to-noise ratio of ultrahigh-field MRI (B0 ≥ 7 T) and advances in spatial normalization methods enable functional MRI (fMRI) at the level of the cerebellar cortex and cerebellar nuclei. Data from initial fMRI studies are presented in three common forms of hereditary ataxias (Friedreich's ataxia, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3, and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6). Characteristic changes in the fMRI signal are discussed in the light of histopathological data and current knowledge of the underlying physiology of the fMRI signal in the cerebellum.

  16. Free-radical probes for functional in vivo EPR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, S.; Krishna, M. C.

    2007-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is one of the recent functional imaging modalities that can provide valuable in vivo physiological information on its own merit and aids as a complimentary imaging technique to MRI and PET of tissues especially with respect to in vivo pO II (oxygen partial pressure), redox status and pharmacology. EPR imaging mainly deals with the measurement of distribution and in vivo dynamics and redox changes using special nontoxic paramagnetic spin probes that can be infused into the object of investigation. These spin probes should be characterized by simple EPR spectra, preferably with narrow EPR lines. The line width should be reversibly sensitive to the concentration of in vivo pO II with a linear dependence. Several non-toxic paramagnetic probes, some particulate and insoluble and others water-soluble and infusible (by intravenous or intramuscular injection) have been developed which can be effectively used to quantitatively assess tissue redox status, and tumor hypoxia. Quantitative assessment of the redox status of tissue in vivo is important in investigating oxidative stress, and that of tissue pO II is very important in radiation oncology. Other areas in which EPR imaging and oxymetry may help are in the investigation of tumorangiogenesis, wound healing, oxygenation of tumor tissue by the ingestion of oxygen-rich gases, etc. The correct choice of the spin probe will depend on the modality of measurement (whether by CW or time-domain EPR imaging) and the particular physiology interrogated. Examples of the available spin probes and some EPR imaging applications employing them are presented.

  17. Increasing the applicability of density functional theory. IV. Consequences of ionization-potential improved exchange-correlation potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Prakash; Bartlett, Rodney J

    2014-05-14

    This paper's objective is to create a "consistent" mean-field based Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT) meaning the functional should not only provide good total energy properties, but also the corresponding KS eigenvalues should be accurate approximations to the vertical ionization potentials (VIPs) of the molecule, as the latter condition attests to the viability of the exchange-correlation potential (VXC). None of the prominently used DFT approaches show these properties: the optimized effective potential VXC based ab initio dft does. A local, range-separated hybrid potential cam-QTP-00 is introduced as the basis for a "consistent" KS DFT approach. The computed VIPs as the negative of KS eigenvalue have a mean absolute error of 0.8 eV for an extensive set of molecule's electron ionizations, including the core. Barrier heights, equilibrium geometries, and magnetic properties obtained from the potential are in good agreement with experiment. A similar accuracy with less computational efforts can be achieved by using a non-variational global hybrid variant of the QTP-00 approach.

  18. Alcohol Preferences and Event-Related Potentials to Alcohol Images in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurin, Kyle; Ceballos, Natalie A; Graham, Reiko

    2017-11-01

    Research on attentional biases to alcohol images has used heterogeneous sets of stimuli (e.g., an isolated beer can or a group of people drinking). However, alcoholic beverage preferences play an important part in determining an individual's alcohol use pattern and may influence attentional biases, especially for inexperienced drinkers. The current study examined whether alcoholic beverage preferences affect event-related potential (ERP) indices of cue reactivity to different types of alcohol images (e.g., beer, wine, and distilled spirits) in heavy episodic drinkers. ERPs were recorded in 14 heavy episodic drinkers (7 male) who completed a Go/No-Go task using preferred and nonpreferred alcohol images with nonalcoholic beverage images as controls. Larger N2 amplitudes for preferred alcohol images were observed relative to control images and to nonpreferred alcohol images, indicating increased attentional capture by preferred beverages. P3 amplitudes and latencies were not sensitive to preferences, but latencies were delayed and amplitudes were enhanced on No-Go trials (i.e., trials requiring response inhibition). These results suggest that alcoholic beverage preference is a factor influencing alcohol cue reactivity in heavy-episodic-drinking college students. This information has methodological significance and may also be applied to improve treatment and prevention programs that focus on attentional bias modification and inhibitory control training.

  19. Hierarchy of model Kohn–Sham potentials for orbital-dependent functionals: A practical alternative to the optimized effective potential method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohut, Sviataslau V.; Staroverov, Viktor N.; Ryabinkin, Ilya G.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method for constructing a hierarchy of model potentials approximating the functional derivative of a given orbital-dependent exchange-correlation functional with respect to electron density. Each model is derived by assuming a particular relationship between the self-consistent solutions of Kohn–Sham (KS) and generalized Kohn–Sham (GKS) equations for the same functional. In the KS scheme, the functional is differentiated with respect to density, in the GKS scheme—with respect to orbitals. The lowest-level approximation is the orbital-averaged effective potential (OAEP) built with the GKS orbitals. The second-level approximation, termed the orbital-consistent effective potential (OCEP), is based on the assumption that the KS and GKS orbitals are the same. It has the form of the OAEP plus a correction term. The highest-level approximation is the density-consistent effective potential (DCEP), derived under the assumption that the KS and GKS electron densities are equal. The analytic expression for a DCEP is the OCEP formula augmented with kinetic-energy-density-dependent terms. In the case of exact-exchange functional, the OAEP is the Slater potential, the OCEP is roughly equivalent to the localized Hartree–Fock approximation and related models, and the DCEP is practically indistinguishable from the true optimized effective potential for exact exchange. All three levels of the proposed hierarchy require solutions of the GKS equations as input and have the same affordable computational cost

  20. Powerful functional imaging of respiratory nuclear medicine. Is CT imaging alone really sufficient for diagnosis and pathophysiologic assessment of lung diseases?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Ventilation (V)-perfusion (Q) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides important information of functional impairment in various lung diseases, and often sensitively detects CT-undetectable lesions. V·Q SPECT also provides objective and quantitative assessment of severity of lung functional impairment. Functional-morphological correlation on V·Q SPECT-CT fusion images further facilitates these advantages of V·Q SPECT. This article describes clinical feasibility of V·Q SPECT in functional assessment and diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hypertension, interstitial lung diseases, and lung right-to-left shunt diseases. This article hopefully provides sufficient responses to the crucial query of ''Is CT imaging alone really sufficient for diagnosis and pathophysiological assessment of various lung diseases?'' (author)

  1. Dental imaging using laminar optical tomography and micro CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Feixiao; Ozturk, Mehmet S.; Intes, Xavier; Kotha, Shiva

    2014-02-01

    Dental lesions located in the pulp are quite difficult to identify based on anatomical contrast, and, hence, to diagnose using traditional imaging methods such as dental CT. However, such lesions could lead to functional and/or molecular optical contrast. Herein, we report on the preliminary investigation of using Laminar Optical Tomography (LOT) to image the pulp and root canals in teeth. LOT is a non-contact, high resolution, molecular and functional mesoscopic optical imaging modality. To investigate the potential of LOT for dental imaging, we injected an optical dye into ex vivo teeth samples and imaged them using LOT and micro-CT simultaneously. A rigid image registration between the LOT and micro-CT reconstruction was obtained, validating the potential of LOT to image molecular optical contrast deep in the teeth with accuracy, non-invasively. We demonstrate that LOT can retrieve the 3D bio-distribution of molecular probes at depths up to 2mm with a resolution of several hundred microns in teeth.

  2. Single cell electroporation for longitudinal imaging of synaptic structure and function in the adult mouse neocortex in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane ePages

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal imaging studies of neuronal structures in vivo have revealed rich dynamics in dendritic spines and axonal boutons. Spines and boutons are considered to be proxies for synapses. This implies that synapses display similar dynamics. However, spines and boutons do not always bear synapses, some may contain more than one, and dendritic shaft synapses have no clear structural proxies. In addition, synaptic strength is not always accurately revealed by just the size of these structures. Structural and functional dynamics of synapses could be studied more reliably using fluorescent synaptic proteins as markers for size and function. These proteins are often large and possibly interfere with circuit development, which renders them less suitable for conventional transfection or transgenesis methods such as viral vectors, in utero electroporation and germline transgenesis. Single cell electroporation has been shown to be a potential alternative for transfection of recombinant fluorescent proteins in adult cortical neurons. Here we provide proof of principle for the use of single cell electroporation to express and subsequently image fluorescently tagged synaptic proteins over days to weeks in vivo.

  3. Usefulness of true FISP cine MR imaging in patients with poor cardiac function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Toshiharu; Yamada, Naoaki; Motooka, Makoto; Enomoto, Naoyuki; Maeshima, Isamu; Matsuda, Kazuhide; Urayama, Shinichi; Ikeo, Miki

    2002-01-01

    This study was done to assess the value of True FISP cine in patients with poor cardiac function. True FISP cine and FLASH cine imaging were performed on a 1.5 T machine. Both short axis and horizontal long axis imaging sections were used. The imaging sections used a Matrix (120 x 128), FOV (24 x 32 cm), and had a slice thickness of 8 mm. The imaging time for True FISP cine was 8 heart beats and 17 heart beats for FLASH cine. The contrast-to-noise ratio between the blood and myocardium (CNR) was measured at enddiastole and endsystole. The subjects in the study were 10 healty volunteers (average age 26.5±3.2 years) and 12 patients with hypofunction (average age 53.9±13.2 years). In the volunteers, the CNR of the short axis imaging was similar in both True FISP (24.6±3.7) and FLASH (23.4±5.9). In the patients with poor cardiac function however, the CNR of True FISP was larger than FLASH in both the short and long axis. In the short axis (22.7±6.1 vs. 17.9±5.3, P<0.01) and in the long axis (17.4±4.3 vs. 9.3±4.0, P<0.01). We conclude that True FISP cine has a higher contrast in a shorter imaging time than FLASH cine. True FISP cine is especially useful in patients with poor cardiac function. (author)

  4. Functional Imaging of Autonomic Regulation: Methods and Key Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system processing of autonomic function involves a network of regions throughout the brain which can be visualized and measured with neuroimaging techniques, notably functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. The development of fMRI procedures has both confirmed and extended earlier findings from animal models, and human stroke and lesion studies. Assessments with fMRI can elucidate interactions between different central sites in regulating normal autonomic patterning, and demonstrate how disturbed systems can interact to produce aberrant regulation during autonomic challenges. Understanding autonomic dysfunction in various illnesses reveals mechanisms that potentially lead to interventions in the impairments. The objectives here are to: 1 describe the fMRI neuroimaging methodology for assessment of autonomic neural control, 2 outline the widespread, lateralized distribution of function in autonomic sites in the normal brain which includes structures from the neocortex through the medulla and cerebellum, 3 illustrate the importance of the time course of neural changes when coordinating responses, and how those patterns are impacted in conditions of sleep-disordered breathing, and 4 highlight opportunities for future research studies with emerging methodologies. Methodological considerations specific to autonomic testing include timing of challenges relative to the underlying fMRI signal, spatial resolution sufficient to identify autonomic brainstem nuclei, blood pressure and blood oxygenation influences on the fMRI signal, and the sustained timing, often measured in minutes of challenge periods and recovery. Key findings include the lateralized nature of autonomic organization, which is reminiscent of asymmetric motor, sensory and language pathways. Testing brain function during autonomic challenges demonstrate closely-integrated timing of responses in connected brain areas during autonomic challenges, and the involvement with

  5. Imaging vascular function for early stage clinical trials using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M.O.; Orton, M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Morgan, B. [Univ. of Leicester, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology, Leicester (United Kingdom); Tofts, P.S. [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Univ. of Sussex, Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Sussex (United Kingdom); Buckley, D.L. [University of Leeds, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); Huang, W. [Oregon Health and Science Univ., Advanced Imaging Research Centre, Portland, OR (United States); Horsfield, M.A. [Medical Physics Section, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Dept. of Cardiovascular Sciences, Leicester (United Kingdom); Chenevert, T.L. [Univ. of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, D.J. [Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jackson, A. [Univ. of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Withington, Manchester, M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Lomas, D. [Univ. of Cambridge, Dept. of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Whitcher, B. [Unit 2 Greenways Business Park, Mango Solutions, Chippenham (United Kingdom); Clarke, L. [Cancer Imaging Program, Imaging Technology Development Branch, Rockville, MD (United States); Plummer, R. [Univ. of Newcastle Upon Tyne, The Medical School, Medical Oncology, Northern Inst. for Cancer Research, Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Judson, I. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jones, R. [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Alonzi, R. [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood (United Kingdom); Brunner, T. [Gray Inst. for Radiation, Oncology and Biology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Koh, D.M. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Diagnostic Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2012-07-15

    Many therapeutic approaches to cancer affect the tumour vasculature, either indirectly or as a direct target. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important means of investigating this action, both pre-clinically and in early stage clinical trials. For such trials, it is essential that the measurement process (i.e. image acquisition and analysis) can be performed effectively and with consistency among contributing centres. As the technique continues to develop in order to provide potential improvements in sensitivity and physiological relevance, there is considerable scope for between-centre variation in techniques. A workshop was convened by the Imaging Committee of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres (ECMC) to review the current status of DCE-MRI and to provide recommendations on how the technique can best be used for early stage trials. This review and the consequent recommendations are summarised here. (orig.)

  6. Imaging of primary and metastatic colorectal carcinoma with monoclonal antibody 791T/36 and the therapeutic potential of antibody-drug conjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimm, M.V.; Armitage, N.C.; Ballantyne, K.; Baldwin, R.W.; Perkins, A.C.; Durrant, L.G.; Garnett, M.C.; Hardcastle, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody 791T/36, prepared against a tumor-associated 72,000 dalton glycoprotein, reacted with cells from primary and metastatic colorectal carcinomas. I-131 or In-111-labelled antibody localized in xenografts of colorectal carcinomas established from in vitro clonogenic populations. Clinically, with I-131-labelled antibody, 8/11 colonic tumors imaged positively. Imaging was negative in four patients with benign colon disease. 5/11 rectal tumors were positively imaged, but excreted I-131 in the bladder obscured tumors in several studies. In-111-labelled antibody gave superior images and positively imaged primary and metastatic sites in 13/14 patients. Prospectively in the detection of recurrent disease, I-131 or In-111-antibody detected 29/33 separate sites in 24 patients. Seven negative patients remain disease free. There were 3 false positives; overall sensitivity was 88%, with 70% specificity. Specific localization of radiolabel was confirmed immunochemically and by counting radioactivity in resected specimens. Antibody conjugates with methotrexate, vindesine and daunomycin retained drug activity and antibody function, including xenograft localization and conjugates were therapeutically effective against xenografts. 791T/36 antibody has potential for immunodetection of primary and recurrent colorectal carcinoma and for targeting of therapeutic agents

  7. An compression algorithm for medical images and a display with the decoding function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Nakagawa, Yukihiro; Shiohara, Morito; Yoshida, Masumi

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes and efficient image compression method for medical images, a high-speed display with the decoding function. In our method, an input image is divided into blocks, and either of Discrete Cosine Transform coding (DCT) or Block Truncation Coding (BTC) is adaptively applied on each block to improve image quality. The display, we developed, receives the compressed data from the host computer and reconstruct images of good quality at high speed using four decoding microprocessors on which our algorithm is implemented in pipeline. By the experiments, our method and display were verified to be effective. (author)

  8. One-step fabrication of PEGylated fluorescent nanodiamonds through the thiol-ene click reaction and their potential for biological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongye; Liu, Meiying; Tuo, Xun; Chen, Junyu; Mao, Liucheng; Wen, Yuanqing; Tian, Jianwen; Zhou, Naigen; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2018-05-01

    Over the past years, fluorescent carbon nanoparticles have got growing interest for biological imaging. Fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are novel fluorescent carbon nanoparticles with multitudinous useful properties, including remarkable fluorescence properties, extremely low toxicity and high refractive index. However, facile preparation of FNDs with designable properties and functions from non-fluorescent detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) has demonstrated to be challengeable. In this work, we reported for the first time that preparation of Polyethylene glycol (PEG) functionalized FNDs through a one-step thiol-ene click reaction using thiol containing PEG (PEG-SH) as the coating agent. Based on the characterization results, we demonstrated that PEG-SH could be efficiently introduced on DNDs to obtain FNDs through the thiol-ene click chemistry. The resultant FND-PEG composites showed high water dispersibility, strong fluorescence and low cytotoxicity. Moreover, FND-PEG composites could be internalized by cells and displayed good cell dyeing performance. All of these features implied that FND-PEG composites are of great potential for biological imaging. Taken together, a facile one-step strategy based on the one-step thiol-ene click reaction has been developed for efficient preparation of FND-PEG composites from non-fluorescent DNDs. The strategy should be also useful for fabrication of many other functional FNDs via using different thiol containing compounds for the universality of thiol-ene click reaction.

  9. Functional and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation after single-tendon rotator cuff reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, H B; Gelineck, J; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate tendon integrity after surgical repair of single-tendon rotator cuff lesions. In 31 patients, 31 single-tendon repairs were evaluated. Thirty-one patients were available for clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at follow-up. A standard...... series of MR images was obtained for each. The results of functional assessment were scored according to the system of Constant. According to MRI evaluation, 21 (68%) patients had an intact or thinned rotator cuff and 10 (32%) had recurrence of a full-thickness cuff defect at follow-up. Patients...... with an intact or thinned rotator cuff had a median Constant score of 75.5 points; patients with a full-thickness cuff defect had a median score of 62 points. There was no correlation between tendon integrity on postoperative MR images and functional outcome. Patients with intact or thinned cuffs did not have...

  10. Evaluation of coronary artery disease by functional imaging from equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zuoxiang

    1992-01-01

    Functional imagings were performed in 10 normals, 9 subjects with Non coronary Artery disease (NCAD), 33 CAD patients with documented MI (CAD-WMI) and 20 without MI (CAD-NMI). The sensitivity of LVGEF, LVREF and phase analysis at rest for detecting CAD-WMI was 66.7%, 78.8%, 93.9% respectively. LVGEF, LVREF during exercise for assessing CAD-NMI had the sensitivity of 90%, 80%, respectively, while specificity 90%. Early LVEF decrease, > 10% LVEF decrease and abnormal response at > 7 sectors during exercise were observed in 2 patients with 3 vessel. In conclusion, functional imaging were very useful for detecting CAD and evaluating its extent

  11. Target localization on standard axial images in computed tomography (CT) stereotaxis for functional neurosurgery - a technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, A.-A.

    1986-01-01

    A simple technique for marking functional neurosurgery target on computed tomography (CT) axial image is described. This permits the use of standard axial image for computed tomography (CT) stereotaxis in functional neurosurgery. (Author)

  12. Functional imaging of decision conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochon, Jean-Baptiste; Riis, Jason; Sanfey, Alan G; Nystrom, Leigh E; Cohen, Jonathan D

    2008-03-26

    Decision conflict occurs when people feel uncertain as to which option to choose from a set of similarly attractive (or unattractive) options, with many studies demonstrating that this conflict can lead to suboptimal decision making. In this article, we investigate the neurobiological underpinnings of decision conflict, in particular, the involvement of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Previous studies have implicated the ACC in conflict monitoring during perceptual tasks, but there is considerable controversy as to whether the ACC actually indexes conflict related to choice, or merely conflict related to selection of competing motor responses. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we dissociate the decision and response phases of a decision task, and show that the ACC does indeed index conflict at the decision stage. Furthermore, we show that it does so for a complex decision task, one that requires the integration of beliefs and preferences and not just perceptual judgments.

  13. Medical Imaging and the Human Brain: Being Warped is Not Always a Bad Thing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, James C. II

    2005-01-01

    The capacity to look inside the living human brain and image its function has been present since the early 1980s. There are some clinicians who use functional brain imaging for diagnostic or prognostic purposes, but much of the work done still relates to research evaluation of brain function. There is a striking dichotomy in the use of functional brain imaging between these two fields. Clinical evaluation of a brain PET or SPECT scan is subjective; that is, a Nuclear Medicine physician examines the brain image, and states whether the brain image looks normal or abnormal. On the other hand, modern research evaluation of functional brain images is almost always objective. Brain images are processed and analyzed with advanced software tools, and a mathematical result that relates to regional changes in brain activity is provided. The potential for this research methodology to provide a more accurate and reliable answer to clinical questions about brain function and pathology are immense, but there are still obstacles to overcome. Foremost in this regard is the use of a standardized normal control database for comparison of patient scan data. The tools and methods used in objective analysis of functional imaging data, as well as potential clinical applications will be the focus of my presentation

  14. Quality parameters analysis of optical imaging systems with enhanced focal depth using the Wigner distribution function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalvidea; Colautti; Sicre

    2000-05-01

    An analysis of the Strehl ratio and the optical transfer function as imaging quality parameters of optical elements with enhanced focal length is carried out by employing the Wigner distribution function. To this end, we use four different pupil functions: a full circular aperture, a hyper-Gaussian aperture, a quartic phase plate, and a logarithmic phase mask. A comparison is performed between the quality parameters and test images formed by these pupil functions at different defocus distances.

  15. Imaging in hearing using radiotracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berding Georg

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiotracers offer unique options for brain imaging of functional and molecular processes related to hearing. Such imaging can be applied in a broad spectrum of situations from preclinical research to clinical patient care. Functional imaging to assess activation in brain regions and networks involved in auditory processing uses markers of blood flow or energy-metabolism in well-defined conditions with and without auditory stimulation. Molecular markers can be used in hearing research for example to study changes in inhibitory neurotransmission systems related to hearing loss. For imaging either positron emission tomography (PET or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT are employed. Data analysis can encompasses voxel-wise statistical analysis of activation and calculation of quantitative parameters like receptor binding-potentials based on bio-kinetic modeling. Functional imaging has been frequently used in the context of auditory implantation. Before implantation it aims to assess intactness of the central auditory pathway and prognosis. After implantation it is used to improve understanding of the outcome with respect to auditory function and finally speech understanding, e.g. by measuring correlates of central auditory processing and neuroplasticity.

  16. Registration of deformed multimodality medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshfeghi, M.; Naidich, D.

    1989-01-01

    The registration and combination of images from different modalities have several potential applications, such as functional and anatomic studies, 3D radiation treatment planning, surgical planning, and retrospective studies. Image registration algorithms should correct for any local deformations caused by respiration, heart beat, imaging device distortions, and so forth. This paper reports on an elastic matching technique for registering deformed multimodality images. Correspondences between contours in the two images are used to stretch the deformed image toward its goal image. This process is repeated a number of times, with decreasing image stiffness. As the iterations continue, the stretched image better approximates its goal image

  17. AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF QUANTITATIVE IMAGE DATA USING ISOMORPHIC FUNCTIONAL MIXED MODELS, WITH APPLICATION TO PROTEOMICS DATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jeffrey S; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Herrick, Richard C; Sanna, Pietro; Gutstein, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Image data are increasingly encountered and are of growing importance in many areas of science. Much of these data are quantitative image data, which are characterized by intensities that represent some measurement of interest in the scanned images. The data typically consist of multiple images on the same domain and the goal of the research is to combine the quantitative information across images to make inference about populations or interventions. In this paper, we present a unified analysis framework for the analysis of quantitative image data using a Bayesian functional mixed model approach. This framework is flexible enough to handle complex, irregular images with many local features, and can model the simultaneous effects of multiple factors on the image intensities and account for the correlation between images induced by the design. We introduce a general isomorphic modeling approach to fitting the functional mixed model, of which the wavelet-based functional mixed model is one special case. With suitable modeling choices, this approach leads to efficient calculations and can result in flexible modeling and adaptive smoothing of the salient features in the data. The proposed method has the following advantages: it can be run automatically, it produces inferential plots indicating which regions of the image are associated with each factor, it simultaneously considers the practical and statistical significance of findings, and it controls the false discovery rate. Although the method we present is general and can be applied to quantitative image data from any application, in this paper we focus on image-based proteomic data. We apply our method to an animal study investigating the effects of opiate addiction on the brain proteome. Our image-based functional mixed model approach finds results that are missed with conventional spot-based analysis approaches. In particular, we find that the significant regions of the image identified by the proposed method

  18. Fetal functional imaging portrays heterogeneous development of emerging human brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras eJakab

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The functional connectivity architecture of the adult human brain enables complex cognitive processes, and exhibits a remarkably complex structure shared across individuals. We are only beginning to understand its heterogeneous structure, ranging from a strongly hierarchical organization in sensorimotor areas to widely distributed networks in areas such as the parieto-frontal cortex. Our study relied on the functional magnetic resonance imaging data of 32 fetuses with no detectable morphological abnormalities. After adapting functional magnetic resonance acquisition, motion correction and nuisance signal reduction procedures of resting-state functional data analysis to fetuses, we extracted neural activity information for major cortical and subcortical structures. Resting fMRI networks were observed for increasing regional functional connectivity from 21st – 38th gestational weeks (GW with a network-based statistical inference approach. The overall connectivity network, short range and interhemispheric connections showed sigmoid expansion curve peaking at the 26-29. GW. In contrast, long-range connections exhibited linear increase with no periods of peaking development. Region-specific increase of functional signal synchrony followed a sequence of occipital (peak: 24.8 GW, temporal (peak: 26 GW, frontal (peak: 26.4 GW and parietal expansion (peak: 27.5 GW. We successfully adapted functional neuroimaging and image post-processing approaches to correlate macroscopical scale activations in the fetal brain with gestational age. This in vivo study reflects the fact that the mid-fetal period hosts events that cause the architecture of the brain circuitry to mature, which presumably manifests in increasing strength of intra- and interhemispheric functional macroconnectivity.

  19. Fetal functional imaging portrays heterogeneous development of emerging human brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, András; Schwartz, Ernst; Kasprian, Gregor; Gruber, Gerlinde M; Prayer, Daniela; Schöpf, Veronika; Langs, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The functional connectivity architecture of the adult human brain enables complex cognitive processes, and exhibits a remarkably complex structure shared across individuals. We are only beginning to understand its heterogeneous structure, ranging from a strongly hierarchical organization in sensorimotor areas to widely distributed networks in areas such as the parieto-frontal cortex. Our study relied on the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data of 32 fetuses with no detectable morphological abnormalities. After adapting functional magnetic resonance acquisition, motion correction, and nuisance signal reduction procedures of resting-state functional data analysis to fetuses, we extracted neural activity information for major cortical and subcortical structures. Resting fMRI networks were observed for increasing regional functional connectivity from 21st to 38th gestational weeks (GWs) with a network-based statistical inference approach. The overall connectivity network, short range, and interhemispheric connections showed sigmoid expansion curve peaking at the 26-29 GW. In contrast, long-range connections exhibited linear increase with no periods of peaking development. Region-specific increase of functional signal synchrony followed a sequence of occipital (peak: 24.8 GW), temporal (peak: 26 GW), frontal (peak: 26.4 GW), and parietal expansion (peak: 27.5 GW). We successfully adapted functional neuroimaging and image post-processing approaches to correlate macroscopical scale activations in the fetal brain with gestational age. This in vivo study reflects the fact that the mid-fetal period hosts events that cause the architecture of the brain circuitry to mature, which presumably manifests in increasing strength of intra- and interhemispheric functional macro connectivity.

  20. Imaging the square of the correlated two-electron wave function of a hydrogen molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitz, M; Bello, R Y; Metz, D; Lower, J; Trinter, F; Schober, C; Keiling, M; Lenz, U; Pitzer, M; Mertens, K; Martins, M; Viefhaus, J; Klumpp, S; Weber, T; Schmidt, L Ph H; Williams, J B; Schöffler, M S; Serov, V V; Kheifets, A S; Argenti, L; Palacios, A; Martín, F; Jahnke, T; Dörner, R

    2017-12-22

    The toolbox for imaging molecules is well-equipped today. Some techniques visualize the geometrical structure, others the electron density or electron orbitals. Molecules are many-body systems for which the correlation between the constituents is decisive and the spatial and the momentum distribution of one electron depends on those of the other electrons and the nuclei. Such correlations have escaped direct observation by imaging techniques so far. Here, we implement an imaging scheme which visualizes correlations between electrons by coincident detection of the reaction fragments after high energy photofragmentation. With this technique, we examine the H 2 two-electron wave function in which electron-electron correlation beyond the mean-field level is prominent. We visualize the dependence of the wave function on the internuclear distance. High energy photoelectrons are shown to be a powerful tool for molecular imaging. Our study paves the way for future time resolved correlation imaging at FELs and laser based X-ray sources.

  1. Dual-well potential field function for articulated manipulator trajectory planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Badawy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A new attractive potential field function is proposed in this paper for manipulator trajectory planning. Existing attractive potential field constructs a global minimum through which maneuvering objects move down the gradient of the potential field toward this global minimum. The proposed method constructs a potential field with two minima. The purpose of these two minima is to create a dual attraction between links rather than affecting each link by the preceding one through kinematic constraints.

  2. Syntheses of Radioiodinated Pyrimidine-2,4,6-Triones as Potential Agents for Non-Invasive Imaging of Matrix Metalloproteinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Jörg Breyholz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulated expression or activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs is observed in many kinds of live-threatening diseases. Therefore, MMP imaging for example with radiolabelled MMP inhibitors (MMPIs potentially represents a valuable tool for clinical diagnostics using non-invasive single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT or positron emission tomography (PET imaging. This work includes the organic chemical syntheses and in vitro evaluation of five iodinated barbiturate based MMPIs and the selection of derivative 9 for radiosyntheses of isotopologues [123I]9 potentially useful for MMP SPECT imaging and [124I]9 for MMP PET imaging.

  3. Generating functionals for quantum field theories with random potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Mudit; Vanchurin, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    We consider generating functionals for computing correlators in quantum field theories with random potentials. Examples of such theories include cosmological systems in context of the string theory landscape (e.g. cosmic inflation) or condensed matter systems with quenched disorder (e.g. spin glass). We use the so-called replica trick to define two different generating functionals for calculating correlators of the quantum fields averaged over a given distribution of random potentials. The first generating functional is appropriate for calculating averaged (in-out) amplitudes and involves a single replica of fields, but the replica limit is taken to an (unphysical) negative one number of fields outside of the path integral. When the number of replicas is doubled the generating functional can also be used for calculating averaged probabilities (squared amplitudes) using the in-in construction. The second generating functional involves an infinite number of replicas, but can be used for calculating both in-out and in-in correlators and the replica limits are taken to only a zero number of fields. We discuss the formalism in details for a single real scalar field, but the generalization to more fields or to different types of fields is straightforward. We work out three examples: one where the mass of scalar field is treated as a random variable and two where the functional form of interactions is random, one described by a Gaussian random field and the other by a Euclidean action in the field configuration space.

  4. Whole-body imaging of whole-organ, subresolution, basic functional unit (BFU) perfusion characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yue; Ritman, Erik L.

    2008-08-01

    A BFU is an organ's smallest assembly of diverse cells that functions like the organ, such as the liver's hepatic lobules. There are approximately 107 BFUs in a human organ. These 100-200 μm structures are perfused by capillaries fed by a terminal arteriole (15μm diameter). BFU sizes, function and number per organ vary with disease, either by loss of BFUs and/or their decrease in function. The BFU is the upper limit of a spherical assembly of cells, immersed in a suitably nutrient medium, which can survive without its own blood supply. However, each BFU has its own blood supply to support the extra energy and/or solutes needed for providing its physiological function (e.g., contraction or secretion). A BFU function is best evaluated by its micro-perfusion, which can be readily evaluated with whole-body CT. Resolution of individual BFUs within in-situ organs, using clinical imaging devices, would require high radiation doses and/or the intolerably long scan-durations needed for suitable signal-to-noise image-data. However, it is possible to obtain a statistical description of the BFU number, size and function from wholebody CT by way of a model. In this study we demonstrate this capability by using the distribution of myocardial terminal arteriolar perfusion territories by way of a nested, multiple, regions-of-interest analysis of the heart wall imaged during transient opacification of its blood supply.

  5. A MAP-based image interpolation method via Viterbi decoding of Markov chains of interpolation functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedadi, Farhang; Shirani, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    A new method of image resolution up-conversion (image interpolation) based on maximum a posteriori sequence estimation is proposed. Instead of making a hard decision about the value of each missing pixel, we estimate the missing pixels in groups. At each missing pixel of the high resolution (HR) image, we consider an ensemble of candidate interpolation methods (interpolation functions). The interpolation functions are interpreted as states of a Markov model. In other words, the proposed method undergoes state transitions from one missing pixel position to the next. Accordingly, the interpolation problem is translated to the problem of estimating the optimal sequence of interpolation functions corresponding to the sequence of missing HR pixel positions. We derive a parameter-free probabilistic model for this to-be-estimated sequence of interpolation functions. Then, we solve the estimation problem using a trellis representation and the Viterbi algorithm. Using directional interpolation functions and sequence estimation techniques, we classify the new algorithm as an adaptive directional interpolation using soft-decision estimation techniques. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm yields images with higher or comparable peak signal-to-noise ratios compared with some benchmark interpolation methods in the literature while being efficient in terms of implementation and complexity considerations.

  6. Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis as Potential Functional Starter Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Cvrtila

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify and characterise potential autochthonous functional starter cultures in homemade horsemeat sausage. The dominant microflora in the samples of horsemeat sausage were lactic acid bacteria (LAB, followed by micrococci. Among the LAB, Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum were the dominant species, and since the first is not common in fermented sausages, we characterised it as a potential functional starter culture. Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis produced a significant amount of lactic acid, displayed good growth capability at 12, 18 and 22 °C, growth in the presence of 5 % NaCl, good viability after lyophilisation and in simulated gastric and small intestinal juice, antimicrobial activity against test pathogens, and good adhesive properties in vitro.

  7. Evaluation of renal function with dynamic Gd-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging after shock wave lithotripsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Hirokazu; Shiokawa, Hidefumi; Kurokawa, Jun; Murata, Koichiro; Mashimo, Setsuo; Koshiba, Ken.

    1992-01-01

    It has already been reported that MR imaging is a superior imaging technique to detect minute anatomical changes in the kidney after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). However, the morphological abnormalities found by MR imaging do not necessarily mean deterioration of the renal function. The purpose of this study is to assess the morphological changes in the kidney and changes in renal function after ESWL treatment by dynamic MR imaging. A total of 16 patients underwent axial MR imaging before and after ESWL. Dynamic MR was also performed on 11 patients of them within 24 hours after ESWL, and both before and after ESWL in the remaining 5 patients. Eight kidneys showed morphological abnormalities on T1-weighted images, and 4 of them showed loss of corticomedullary demarcation. Furthermore, the first MR imaging after injection of Gd-DTPA revealed focal areas of decreased signal intensity in only 2 of these 4 patients who showed loss of corticomedullary demarcation on previous MR images. However, the second MR imaging 6 months after ESWL showed no abnormality in either of them. The percent contrast of signal intensity increase to fat signal intensity was one minute after Gd-DTPA injection compared before and after ESWL in 5 of the 16 patients. The values before and after ESWL revealed no statistically significant difference, and no patient showed any remarkable decrease of signal intensity after ESWL. These results suggest that loss of corticomedullary demarcation after ESWL does not necessarily reflect damage to the renal function and that the shock-wave exposure causes no premanent damage to the renal function but only temporary impairment. (author)

  8. Evaluation of renal function with dynamic Gd-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging after shock wave lithotripsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, Hirokazu; Shiokawa, Hidefumi; Kurokawa, Jun; Murata, Koichiro (Kitasato Inst., Saitama (Japan). Medical Center Hospital); Mashimo, Setsuo; Koshiba, Ken

    1992-03-01

    It has already been reported that MR imaging is a superior imaging technique to detect minute anatomical changes in the kidney after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). However, the morphological abnormalities found by MR imaging do not necessarily mean deterioration of the renal function. The purpose of this study is to assess the morphological changes in the kidney and changes in renal function after ESWL treatment by dynamic MR imaging. A total of 16 patients underwent axial MR imaging before and after ESWL. Dynamic MR was also performed on 11 patients of them within 24 hours after ESWL, and both before and after ESWL in the remaining 5 patients. Eight kidneys showed morphological abnormalities on T1-weighted images, and 4 of them showed loss of corticomedullary demarcation. Furthermore, the first MR imaging after injection of Gd-DTPA revealed focal areas of decreased signal intensity in only 2 of these 4 patients who showed loss of corticomedullary demarcation on previous MR images. However, the second MR imaging 6 months after ESWL showed no abnormality in either of them. The percent contrast of signal intensity increase to fat signal intensity was one minute after Gd-DTPA injection compared before and after ESWL in 5 of the 16 patients. The values before and after ESWL revealed no statistically significant difference, and no patient showed any remarkable decrease of signal intensity after ESWL. These results suggest that loss of corticomedullary demarcation after ESWL does not necessarily reflect damage to the renal function and that the shock-wave exposure causes no premanent damage to the renal function but only temporary impairment. (author).

  9. Dendrimer-stabilized bismuth sulfide nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and potential computed tomography imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi; Peng, Chen; Guo, Rui; Zheng, Linfeng; Qin, Jinbao; Zhou, Benqing; Shen, Mingwu; Lu, Xinwu; Zhang, Guixiang; Shi, Xiangyang

    2013-06-07

    We report here a general approach to synthesizing dendrimer-stabilized bismuth sulfide nanoparticles (Bi2S3 DSNPs) for potential computed tomography (CT) imaging applications. In this study, ethylenediamine core glycidol hydroxyl-terminated generation 4 poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (G4.NGlyOH) were used as stabilizers to first complex the Bi(III) ions, followed by reaction with hydrogen sulfide to generate Bi2S3 DSNPs. By varying the molar ratio of Bi atom to dendrimer, stable Bi2S3 DSNPs with an average size range of 5.2-5.7 nm were formed. The formed Bi2S3 DSNPs were characterized via different techniques. X-ray absorption coefficient measurements show that the attenuation of Bi2S3 DSNPs is much higher than that of iodine-based CT contrast agent at the same molar concentration of the active element (Bi versus iodine). 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell viability assay and hemolysis assay reveal that the formed Bi2S3 DSNPs are noncytotoxic and have a negligible hemolysis effect in the studied concentration range. Furthermore, we show that cells incubated with the Bi2S3 DSNPs are able to be imaged using CT, a prominent enhancement at the point of rabbit injected subcutaneously with the Bi2S3 DSNPs is able to be visualized via CT scanning, and the mouse's pulmonary vein can be visualized via CT after intravenous injection of the Bi2S3 DSNPs. With the good biocompatibility, enhanced X-ray attenuation property, and tunable dendrimer chemistry, the designed Bi2S3 DSNPs should be able to be further functionalized, allowing them to be used as a highly efficient contrast agent for CT imaging of different biological systems.

  10. IMAGING OF BRAIN FUNCTION BASED ON THE ANALYSIS OF FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY - IMAGING ANALYSIS OF BRAIN FUNCTION BY FMRI AFTER ACUPUNCTURE AT LR3 IN HEALTHY INDIVIDUALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Yuying; Lan, Yujun; Qu, Xiaodong; Lin, Kelin; Zhang, Jiping; Qu, Shanshan; Wang, Yanjie; Tang, Chunzhi; Huang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This Study observed the relevant brain areas activated by acupuncture at the Taichong acupoint (LR3) and analyzed the functional connectivity among brain areas using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore the acupoint specificity of the Taichong acupoint. A total of 45 healthy subjects were randomly divided into the Taichong (LR3) group, sham acupuncture group and sham acupoint group. Subjects received resting state fMRI before acupuncture, after true (sham) acupuncture in each group. Analysis of changes in connectivity among the brain areas was performed using the brain functional connectivity method. The right cerebrum temporal lobe was selected as the seed point to analyze the functional connectivity. It had a functional connectivity with right cerebrum superior frontal gyrus, limbic lobe cingulate gyrus and left cerebrum inferior temporal gyrus (BA 37), inferior parietal lobule compared by before vs. after acupuncture at LR3, and right cerebrum sub-lobar insula and left cerebrum middle frontal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus compared by true vs. sham acupuncture at LR3, and right cerebrum occipital lobe cuneus, occipital lobe sub-gyral, parietal lobe precuneus and left cerebellum anterior lobe culmen by acupuncture at LR3 vs. sham acupoint. Acupuncture at LR3 mainly specifically activated the brain functional network that participates in visual function, associative function, and emotion cognition, which are similar to the features on LR3 in tradition Chinese medicine. These brain areas constituted a neural network structure with specific functions that had specific reference values for the interpretation of the acupoint specificity of the Taichong acupoint.

  11. Potential Mechanisms and Functions of Intermittent Neural Synchronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungwoo Ahn

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neural synchronization is believed to play an important role in different brain functions. Synchrony in cortical and subcortical circuits is frequently variable in time and not perfect. Few long intervals of desynchronized dynamics may be functionally different from many short desynchronized intervals although the average synchrony may be the same. Recent analysis of imperfect synchrony in different neural systems reported one common feature: neural oscillations may go out of synchrony frequently, but primarily for a short time interval. This study explores potential mechanisms and functional advantages of this short desynchronizations dynamics using computational neuroscience techniques. We show that short desynchronizations are exhibited in coupled neurons if their delayed rectifier potassium current has relatively large values of the voltage-dependent activation time-constant. The delayed activation of potassium current is associated with generation of quickly-rising action potential. This “spikiness” is a very general property of neurons. This may explain why very different neural systems exhibit short desynchronization dynamics. We also show how the distribution of desynchronization durations may be independent of the synchronization strength. Finally, we show that short desynchronization dynamics requires weaker synaptic input to reach a pre-set synchrony level. Thus, this dynamics allows for efficient regulation of synchrony and may promote efficient formation of synchronous neural assemblies.

  12. WE-AB-202-04: Statistical Evaluation of Lung Function Using 4DCT Ventilation Imaging: Proton Therapy VS IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Q; Zhang, M; Chen, T; Yue, N; Zou, J [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Variation in function of different lung regions has been ignored so far for conventional lung cancer treatment planning, which may lead to higher risk of radiation induced lung disease. 4DCT based lung ventilation imaging provides a novel yet convenient approach for lung functional imaging as 4DCT is taken as routine for lung cancer treatment. Our work aims to evaluate the impact of accounting for spatial heterogeneity in lung function using 4DCT based lung ventilation imaging for proton and IMRT plans. Methods: Six patients with advanced stage lung cancer of various tumor locations were retrospectively evaluated for the study. Proton and IMRT plans were designed following identical planning objective and constrains for each patient. Ventilation images were calculated from patients’ 4DCT using deformable image registration implemented by Velocity AI software based on Jacobian-metrics. Lung was delineated into two function level regions based on ventilation (low and high functional area). High functional region was defined as lung ventilation greater than 30%. Dose distribution and statistics in different lung function area was calculated for patients. Results: Variation in dosimetric statistics of different function lung region was observed between proton and IMRT plans. In all proton plans, high function lung regions receive lower maximum dose (100.2%–108.9%), compared with IMRT plans (106.4%–119.7%). Interestingly, three out of six proton plans gave higher mean dose by up to 2.2% than IMRT to high function lung region. Lower mean dose (lower by up to 14.1%) and maximum dose (lower by up to 9%) were observed in low function lung for proton plans. Conclusion: A systematic approach was developed to generate function lung ventilation imaging and use it to evaluate plans. This method hold great promise in function analysis of lung during planning. We are currently studying more subjects to evaluate this tool.

  13. Supervised Classification High-Resolution Remote-Sensing Image Based on Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Membership Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Because of the degradation of classification accuracy that is caused by the uncertainty of pixel class and classification decisions of high-resolution remote-sensing images, we proposed a supervised classification method that is based on an interval type-2 fuzzy membership function for high-resolution remote-sensing images. We analyze the data features of a high-resolution remote-sensing image and construct a type-1 membership function model in a homogenous region by supervised sampling in order to characterize the uncertainty of the pixel class. On the basis of the fuzzy membership function model in the homogeneous region and in accordance with the 3σ criterion of normal distribution, we proposed a method for modeling three types of interval type-2 membership functions and analyze the different types of functions to improve the uncertainty of pixel class expressed by the type-1 fuzzy membership function and to enhance the accuracy of classification decision. According to the principle that importance will increase with a decrease in the distance between the original, upper, and lower fuzzy membership of the training data and the corresponding frequency value in the histogram, we use the weighted average sum of three types of fuzzy membership as the new fuzzy membership of the pixel to be classified and then integrated into the neighborhood pixel relations, constructing a classification decision model. We use the proposed method to classify real high-resolution remote-sensing images and synthetic images. Additionally, we qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the test results. The results show that a higher classification accuracy can be achieved with the proposed algorithm.

  14. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of autism spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichter, Gabriel S.

    2012-01-01

    This review presents an overview of functional magnetic resonance imaging findings in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), Although there is considerable heterogeneity with respect to results across studies, common themes have emerged, including: (i) hypoactivation in nodes of the “social brain” during social processing tasks, including regions within the prefrontal cortex, the posterior superior temporal sulcus, the amygdala, and the fusiform gyrus; (ii) aberrant frontostriatal activation during cognitive control tasks relevant to restricted and repetitive behaviors and interests, including regions within the dorsal prefrontal cortex and the basal ganglia; (iii) differential lateralization and activation of language processing and production regions during communication tasks; (iv) anomalous mesolimbic responses to social and nonsocial rewards; (v) task-based long-range functional hypoconnectivity and short-range hyper-connectivity; and (vi) decreased anterior-posterior functional connectivity during resting states. These findings provide mechanistic accounts of ASD pathophysiology and suggest directions for future research aimed at elucidating etiologic models and developing rationally derived and targeted treatments. PMID:23226956

  15. Toward a functional neuroanatomy of dysthymia: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Arun V; Smith, Andra; Cameron, Colin; Bhatla, Raj; Cameron, Ian; Georgescu, Tania M; Hogan, Matthew J

    2009-12-01

    Dysthymia is a common mood disorder. Recent studies have confirmed the neurobiological and treatment response overlap of dysthymia with major depression. There are no previous published studies of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in dysthymia. fMRI was used to compare neural processing of 17 unmedicated dysthymic patients with 17 age, sex, and education-matched control subjects in a mood induction paradigm using the International Affective Pictures System (IAPS). Using a random effects analysis to compare the groups, the results revealed that the dysthymic patients had significantly reduced activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex compared to controls. The dysthymic patients exhibited increased activation in the amygdala, anterior cingulate and insula compared to controls and these differences were more evident when processing negative than positive images. This study included both early and late subtypes of dysthymia, and participants were only imaged at one time point, which may limit the generalizability of the results. The findings suggest the involvement of the prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, amygdala, and insula in the neural circuitry underlying dysthymia. It is suggested that altered activation in some of these neural regions may be a common substrate for depressive disorders in general while others may relate specifically to symptom characteristics and the chronic course of dysthymia. These findings are particularly striking given the history of this deceptively mild disorder which is still confused by some with character pathology.

  16. Assessment of renal function with 99Tcm-DTPA renal dynamic imaging in neonatal hydronephrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Lixin; Guo Zongyuan; Wu Rongde; Yu Qihai; Liu Zhanfeng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the renal function in neonatal hydronephrosis with 99 Tc m -DTPA renal imaging. Methods: Eighteen unilateral hydronephrotic kidneys and 12 normal kidneys were studied by 99 Tc m -DTPA renal dynamic imaging , and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) quantitative analysis was also performed. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (SCr) and hemoglobin (Hb) were determined simultaneously and the correlations between GFR and each of these parameters were analyzed. Results: Positive correlation was discovered between GFR and Hb in neonates with moderate or severe hydronephrosis (r=0.414, 0.667, P 0.05). The renal function was decreased significantly in moderate and severe neonatal hydronephrosis (P 99 Tc m -DTPA renal dynamic imaging GFR is an ideal marker for estimating renal function in neonatal hydronephrosis; SCr could be a marker for renal damage especially in moderate and severe neonatal hydronephrosis; BUN could not be a marker for evaluating renal function in neonatal hydronephrosis. Neonates with hydronephrosis should be referred for surgical procedures as soon as possible in the early stage

  17. A density functional theory-based chemical potential equalisation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A chemical potential equalisation scheme is proposed for the calculation of these quantities and hence the dipole polarizability within the framework of density functional theory based linear response theory. The resulting polarizability is expressed in terms of the contributions from individual atoms in the molecule. A few ...

  18. TCA Cycle and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Are Necessary for Diverse Biological Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Reyes, Inmaculada; Diebold, Lauren P; Kong, Hyewon; Schieber, Michael; Huang, He; Hensley, Christopher T; Mehta, Manan M; Wang, Tianyuan; Santos, Janine H; Woychik, Richard; Dufour, Eric; Spelbrink, Johannes N; Weinberg, Samuel E; Zhao, Yingming; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2016-01-21

    Mitochondrial metabolism is necessary for the maintenance of oxidative TCA cycle function and mitochondrial membrane potential. Previous attempts to decipher whether mitochondria are necessary for biological outcomes have been hampered by genetic and pharmacologic methods that simultaneously disrupt multiple functions linked to mitochondrial metabolism. Here, we report that inducible depletion of mitochondrial DNA (ρ(ο) cells) diminished respiration, oxidative TCA cycle function, and the mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in diminished cell proliferation, hypoxic activation of HIF-1, and specific histone acetylation marks. Genetic reconstitution only of the oxidative TCA cycle function specifically in these inducible ρ(ο) cells restored metabolites, resulting in re-establishment of histone acetylation. In contrast, genetic reconstitution of the mitochondrial membrane potential restored ROS, which were necessary for hypoxic activation of HIF-1 and cell proliferation. These results indicate that distinct mitochondrial functions associated with respiration are necessary for cell proliferation, epigenetics, and HIF-1 activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional image guided radiation therapy planning in volumetric modulated arc therapy for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiko Doi, MD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Significant reductions in fV5, fV10, fMLD, V5, and MLD were achieved with the functional image guided VMAT plan without negative effects on other factors. LAA-based functional image guided radiation therapy planning in VMAT is a feasible method to spare the functional lung in patients with MPM.

  20. The method of images and Green's function for spherical domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutkin, Eugene; Newton, Paul K

    2004-01-01

    Motivated by problems in electrostatics and vortex dynamics, we develop two general methods for constructing Green's function for simply connected domains on the surface of the unit sphere. We prove a Riemann mapping theorem showing that such domains can be conformally mapped to the upper hemisphere. We then categorize all domains on the sphere for which Green's function can be constructed by an extension of the classical method of images. We illustrate our methods by several examples, such as the upper hemisphere, geodesic triangles, and latitudinal rectangles. We describe the point vortex motion in these domains, which is governed by a Hamiltonian determined by the Dirichlet Green's function

  1. Using Functional or Structural Magnetic Resonance Images and Personal Characteristic Data to Identify ADHD and Autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Ghiassian

    Full Text Available A clinical tool that can diagnose psychiatric illness using functional or structural magnetic resonance (MR brain images has the potential to greatly assist physicians and improve treatment efficacy. Working toward the goal of automated diagnosis, we propose an approach for automated classification of ADHD and autism based on histogram of oriented gradients (HOG features extracted from MR brain images, as well as personal characteristic data features. We describe a learning algorithm that can produce effective classifiers for ADHD and autism when run on two large public datasets. The algorithm is able to distinguish ADHD from control with hold-out accuracy of 69.6% (over baseline 55.0% using personal characteristics and structural brain scan features when trained on the ADHD-200 dataset (769 participants in training set, 171 in test set. It is able to distinguish autism from control with hold-out accuracy of 65.0% (over baseline 51.6% using functional images with personal characteristic data when trained on the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE dataset (889 participants in training set, 222 in test set. These results outperform all previously presented methods on both datasets. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a single automated learning process that can produce classifiers for distinguishing patients vs. controls from brain imaging data with above-chance accuracy on large datasets for two different psychiatric illnesses (ADHD and autism. Working toward clinical applications requires robustness against real-world conditions, including the substantial variability that often exists among data collected at different institutions. It is therefore important that our algorithm was successful with the large ADHD-200 and ABIDE datasets, which include data from hundreds of participants collected at multiple institutions. While the resulting classifiers are not yet clinically relevant, this work shows that there is a signal in

  2. Potential Measurement Errors Due to Image Enlargement in Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uji, Akihito; Murakami, Tomoaki; Muraoka, Yuki; Hosoda, Yoshikatsu; Yoshitake, Shin; Dodo, Yoko; Arichika, Shigeta; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-01-01

    The effect of interpolation and super-resolution (SR) algorithms on quantitative and qualitative assessments of enlarged optical coherence tomography (OCT) images was investigated in this report. Spectral-domain OCT images from 30 eyes in 30 consecutive patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) and 20 healthy eyes in 20 consecutive volunteers were analyzed. Original image (OR) resolution was reduced by a factor of four. Images were then magnified by a factor of four with and without application of one of the following algorithms: bilinear (BL), bicubic (BC), Lanczos3 (LA), and SR. Differences in peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, photoreceptor layer status, and parallelism (reflects the complexity of photoreceptor layer alterations) were analyzed in each image type. The order of PSNRs from highest to lowest was SR > LA > BC > BL > non-processed enlarged images (NONE). The PSNR was statistically different in all groups. The NONE, BC, and LA images resulted in significantly thicker RNFL measurements than the OR image. In eyes with DME, the photoreceptor layer, which was hardly identifiable in NONE images, became detectable with algorithm application. However, OCT photoreceptor parameters were still assessed as more undetectable than in OR images. Parallelism was not statistically different in OR and NONE images, but other image groups had significantly higher parallelism than OR images. Our results indicated that interpolation and SR algorithms increased OCT image resolution. However, qualitative and quantitative assessments were influenced by algorithm use. Additionally, each algorithm affected the assessments differently. PMID:26024236

  3. Synaptic neurochemistry: Potential targets for the development of new tracer imaging methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Radiotracer techniques for measuring biochemical and pharmacologic processes unique to the synapse and to chemically defined neuronal populations are now under investigation. These methods make use of neuronal biochemical specializations determined by invasive animal experiments and confirmed by human biopsy and autopsy. Early investigators focused on determination of neurotransmitter receptors. More recently, attention has turned to evaluation of presynaptic markers such as steps in neurotransmitter synthesis, storage and degradation, and to the potential evaluation of new postsynaptic markers, including chemical second-messenger activities and receptor-grated ion channel distributions. In this review, synaptic neurochemistry is presented with attention to potential radiotracer imaging methods. Strategies for selecting and applying neuropharmacologic methods to disorders of the human brain are outlined. The methodological requirements of new radiotracer imaging techniques are summarized according to their desired application. Finally, distinctions between in vitro and in vivo measurements of these processes are outlined, along with strategies for detecting such differences

  4. Image processing of airborne geophysical data: a potential exploration tool for atomic minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanti Kumar, C.; Bhairam, C.L.; Kak, S.N.; Achar, K.K.

    1993-01-01

    Data sets obtained from airborne gamma-ray spectrometric (AGRS) and aeromagnetic (AM) surveys, after necessary correction, are usually presented as profiles or as contour maps for interpretation in mineral exploration and geological analysis. Currently, imaging of the geophysical data sets have been extensively used as they have many advantages in their usage compared to conventional techniques. For the application of image processing techniques to the AGRS and AM data, software programs were customized for converting the digital data compatible to the satellite image processing system (SIPS). The geophysical data has been imaged and rectified to a poly conic projection, using cubic convolution resampling technique. While imaging, the radioelemental concentration values are rescaled to 256 grey levels. Software for the statistical information of radioelements and printing of coloured paper image have also been developed. Some of the image processing techniques used include, generation of colour composite images for preparing radioelemental (eU,eTh, and K) images and radioelemental colour composite images (K,eTh, eU) enabling display of a combined radioelemental distribution. Aeromagnetic data on the other hand are displayed in grey tone, pseudo-colours, and shaded relief images. Many other image enhancement techniques used for improving the display for further interpretation comprise, band ratioing, band combinations, filtering, look up table manipulation, and other similar functions. Advanced image processing techniques such as the principal component analysis (PCA) for understanding the geochemical and geological phenomena and the hue saturation and intensity (HSI) transformation for integration of radioelemental data with its corresponding satellite images facilitated display of radioelemental images draped over the satellite image. Statistics of radioelement and inter-elemental relationship has been obtained. The paper deals with the methodology adopted in the

  5. Use of images in Social Studies and Science lessons: Teaching through visual semiotic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Haas Prieto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Learners access the school curriculum through meanings created among a variety of semiotic modes (diagrams, photographs, drawings, writing, etc., this learning enables them to join a worldview as they do in each curricular discipline. From a pedagogical and semiotic gaze to classroom interaction, we focus on the use of images in teaching, in relation to their potential to create meaning in social studies and science lessons. This article is part of Fondecyt 1130684 and systematizes methodological tools from Social Semiotics and multimodality used to explore the semiotic potential of a set images used by teachers of elementary and secondary in a public school. From an audiovisual corpus of lessons of a complete curricular unit, we analyze Social Studies and Science videos from the two subjects in 3rd, 6th grade of elementary and 1st grade of secondary school. Through a Multimodal Discourse Analysis using the concepts of ideational or representational metafunction and the categories of Visual Grammar Design, we show examples of situated images anylisis. The results show how the meaning in the image is modified when teachers use them in face to face interaction. This analysis should help teachers to select and deploy images in terms of improving the learning process and teaching materials they prepare for students.

  6. Interactive definition of transfer functions in volume rendering based on image markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teistler, Michael; Nowinski, Wieslaw L.; Breiman, Richard S.; Liong, Sauw Ming; Ho, Liang Yoong; Shahab, Atif

    2007-01-01

    Objectives A user interface for transfer function (TF) definition in volume rendering (VR) was developed that allows the user to intuitively assign color and opacity to the original image intensities. This software may surpass solutions currently deployed in clinical practice by simplifying the use of TFs beyond predefined settings that are not always applicable. Materials and methods The TF definition is usually a cumbersome task that requires the user to manipulate graphical representations of the TF (e.g. trapezoids). A new method that allows the user to place markers at points of interest directly on CT and MRI images or orthogonal reformations was developed based on two-dimensional region growing and a few user-definable marker-related parameters. For each user defined image marker, a segment of the transfer function is computed. The resulting TF can also be applied to the slice image views. Results were judged subjectively. Results Each individualized TF can be defined interactively in a few simple steps. For every user interaction, immediate visual feedback is given. Clinicians who tested the application appreciated being able to directly work on familiar slice images to generate the desired 3D views. Conclusion Interactive TF definition can increase the actual utility of VR, help to understand the role of the TF with its variations, and increase the acceptance of VR as a clinical tool. (orig.)

  7. Functional Assay of Cancer Cell Invasion Potential Based on Mechanotransduction of Focused Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. Weitz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells undergo a number of biophysical changes as they transform from an indolent to an aggressive state. These changes, which include altered mechanical and electrical properties, can reveal important diagnostic information about disease status. Here, we introduce a high-throughput, functional technique for assessing cancer cell invasion potential, which works by probing for the mechanically excitable phenotype exhibited by invasive cancer cells. Cells are labeled with fluorescent calcium dye and imaged during stimulation with low-intensity focused ultrasound, a non-contact mechanical stimulus. We show that cells located at the focus of the stimulus exhibit calcium elevation for invasive prostate (PC-3 and DU-145 and bladder (T24/83 cancer cell lines, but not for non-invasive cell lines (BPH-1, PNT1A, and RT112/84. In invasive cells, ultrasound stimulation initiates a calcium wave that propagates from the cells at the transducer focus to other cells, over distances greater than 1 mm. We demonstrate that this wave is mediated by extracellular signaling molecules and can be abolished through inhibition of transient receptor potential channels and inositol trisphosphate receptors, implicating these proteins in the mechanotransduction process. If validated clinically, our technology could provide a means to assess tumor invasion potential in cytology specimens, which is not currently possible. It may therefore have applications in diseases such as bladder cancer, where cytologic diagnosis of tumor invasion could improve clinical decision-making.

  8. Structural-functional lung imaging using a combined CT-EIT and a Discrete Cosine Transformation reconstruction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schullcke, Benjamin; Gong, Bo; Krueger-Ziolek, Sabine; Soleimani, Manuchehr; Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich; Moeller, Knut

    2016-05-16

    Lung EIT is a functional imaging method that utilizes electrical currents to reconstruct images of conductivity changes inside the thorax. This technique is radiation free and applicable at the bedside, but lacks of spatial resolution compared to morphological imaging methods such as X-ray computed tomography (CT). In this article we describe an approach for EIT image reconstruction using morphologic information obtained from other structural imaging modalities. This leads to recon- structed images of lung ventilation that can easily be superimposed with structural CT or MRI images, which facilitates image interpretation. The approach is based on a Discrete Cosine Transformation (DCT) of an image of the considered transversal thorax slice. The use of DCT enables reduction of the dimensionality of the reconstruction and ensures that only conductivity changes of the lungs are reconstructed and displayed. The DCT based approach is well suited to fuse morphological image information with functional lung imaging at low computational costs. Results on simulated data indicate that this approach preserves the morphological structures of the lungs and avoids blurring of the solution. Images from patient measurements reveal the capabilities of the method and demonstrate benefits in possible applications.

  9. Towards factor analysis exploration applied to positron emission tomography functional imaging for breast cancer characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekik, W.; Ketata, I.; Sellami, L.; Ben slima, M.; Ben Hamida, A.; Chtourou, K.; Ruan, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the factor analysis when applied to a dynamic sequence of medical images obtained using nuclear imaging modality, Positron Emission Tomography (PET). This latter modality allows obtaining information on physiological phenomena, through the examination of radiotracer evolution during time. Factor analysis of dynamic medical images sequence (FADMIS) estimates the underlying fundamental spatial distributions by factor images and the associated so-called fundamental functions (describing the signal variations) by factors. This method is based on an orthogonal analysis followed by an oblique analysis. The results of the FADMIS are physiological curves showing the evolution during time of radiotracer within homogeneous tissues distributions. This functional analysis of dynamic nuclear medical images is considered to be very efficient for cancer diagnostics. In fact, it could be applied for cancer characterization, vascularization as well as possible evaluation of response to therapy.

  10. The Two-Dimensional Gabor Function Adapted to Natural Image Statistics: A Model of Simple-Cell Receptive Fields and Sparse Structure in Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loxley, P N

    2017-10-01

    The two-dimensional Gabor function is adapted to natural image statistics, leading to a tractable probabilistic generative model that can be used to model simple cell receptive field profiles, or generate basis functions for sparse coding applications. Learning is found to be most pronounced in three Gabor function parameters representing the size and spatial frequency of the two-dimensional Gabor function and characterized by a nonuniform probability distribution with heavy tails. All three parameters are found to be strongly correlated, resulting in a basis of multiscale Gabor functions with similar aspect ratios and size-dependent spatial frequencies. A key finding is that the distribution of receptive-field sizes is scale invariant over a wide range of values, so there is no characteristic receptive field size selected by natural image statistics. The Gabor function aspect ratio is found to be approximately conserved by the learning rules and is therefore not well determined by natural image statistics. This allows for three distinct solutions: a basis of Gabor functions with sharp orientation resolution at the expense of spatial-frequency resolution, a basis of Gabor functions with sharp spatial-frequency resolution at the expense of orientation resolution, or a basis with unit aspect ratio. Arbitrary mixtures of all three cases are also possible. Two parameters controlling the shape of the marginal distributions in a probabilistic generative model fully account for all three solutions. The best-performing probabilistic generative model for sparse coding applications is found to be a gaussian copula with Pareto marginal probability density functions.

  11. Construction of integrable model Kohn-Sham potentials by analysis of the structure of functional derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaiduk, Alex P.; Staroverov, Viktor N.

    2011-01-01

    A directly approximated exchange-correlation potential should, by construction, be a functional derivative of some density functional in order to avoid unphysical results. Using generalized gradient approximations (GGAs) as an example, we show that functional derivatives of explicit density functionals have a very rigid inner structure, the knowledge of which allows one to build the entire functional derivative from a small part. Based on this analysis, we develop a method for direct construction of integrable Kohn-Sham potentials. As an illustration, we transform the model potential of van Leeuwen and Baerends (which is not a functional derivative) into a semilocal exchange potential that has a parent GGA, yields accurate energies, and is free from the artifacts inherent in existing semilocal potential approximations.

  12. Elastic-plastic potential functionals for rates and increments of stress and strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feijoo, R.A.; Zouain, N.

    1990-03-01

    In this work attention is focused in the derivation of variational formulations of the constutive relationship in the form of conjugate potential functionals from which stress and strain rates are derived as elements of the corresponding sub-differential sets. The main result obtained is a pair of potential functionals. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  13. Cardiac and pericardial tumors: A potential application of positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathala, Ahmed; Abouzied, Mohei; AlSugair, Abdul-Aziz

    2017-07-26

    Cardiac and pericardial masses may be neoplastic, benign and malignant, non-neoplastic such as thrombus or simple pericardial cysts, or normal variants cardiac structure can also be a diagnostic challenge. Currently, there are several imaging modalities for diagnosis of cardiac masses; each technique has its inherent advantages and disadvantages. Echocardiography, is typically the initial test utilizes in such cases, Echocardiography is considered the test of choice for evaluation and detection of cardiac mass, it is widely available, portable, with no ionizing radiation and provides comprehensive evaluation of cardiac function and valves, however, echocardiography is not very helpful in many cases such as evaluation of extracardiac extension of mass, poor tissue characterization, and it is non diagnostic in some cases. Cross sectional imaging with cardiac computed tomography provides a three dimensional data set with excellent spatial resolution but utilizes ionizing radiation, intravenous iodinated contrast and relatively limited functional evaluation of the heart. Cardiac magnetic resonance