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Sample records for postulated bwr loss-of-coolant

  1. Experimental investigation of boiling-water nuclear-reactor parallel-channel effects during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlon, W.M.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1982-12-01

    This report describes an experimental study of the influence of parallel channel effects (PCE) on the distribution of emergency core spray cooling water in a Boiling Water Nuclear Reactor (BWR) following a postulated design basis loss of coolant accident (LCA). The experiments were conducted in a scaled test section in which the reactor coolant was simulated by Freon-114 at conditions similar to those postulated to occur in the reactor vessel shortly after a LOCA. A BWR/4 was simulated by a (PCE) test section which contained three parallel heated channels to simulate fuel assemblies; a core bypass channel, and a jet pump channel. The test section also inlcuded scaled regions to simulate the lower and upper plena, downcomer, and steam separation regions of a BWR. A series of nine transient experiments were conducted, in which the lower plenum vaporization rate and heater rod power were varied while the core spray flow rate was held constant to simulate that of a BWR/4. During these experiments the flow distribution and heat transfer phenomena were observed and measured

  2. Analysis of multidimensional and countercurrent effects in a BWR loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Dix, G.E.; Alamgir, M.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of parallel enclosed channels in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides opportunities for multiple flow regimes in cocurrent and countercurrent flow under loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. To address and understand these phenomena, an integrated experimental and analytical study has been conducted. The primary experimental facility was the steam sector test facility (SSFT), which simulated a full scale 30deg sector of a BWR/6 reactor vessel. Both steady-state separate effects tests an integral transients with vessel vlowdown and refill were performed. The presence of multidimensional and parallel-channel effects was found to be very beneficial to BWR LOCA performance. The best estimate TRAC-BWR computer code was extended as part of this study by incorporation of a phenomenological upper plenum mixing model. TRAC-BWR was applied to the analysis of these full scale experiments. Excellent predictions of phenomena and experimental trends were achieved. (orig.)

  3. Analysis of multi-dimensional and countercurrent effects in a BWR loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Dix, G.E.; Alamgir, M.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of parallel enclosed channels in a BWR provides opportunities for multiple flow regimes in co-current and countercurrent flow under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions. To address and understand these phenomena, an integrated experimental and analytical study has been conducted. The primary experimental facility was the Steam Sector Test Facility (SSTF) which simulated a full scale 30deg sector of a BWR/6 reactor vessel. Both steady-state separate effects tests and integral transients with vessel blowdown and refill were performed. The present of multi-dimensional and parallel channel effects was found to be very beneficial to BWR LOCA performance. The best estimate TRAC-BWR computer code was extended as part of this study by incorporation of a phenomenological upper plenum mixing model. TRAC-BWR was applied to the analysis of these full scale experiments. Excellent predictions of phenomena and experimental trends were achieved. (orig.)

  4. Analysis of the core reflooding of a PWR reactor under a loss-of-coolant postulated accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austregesilo Filho, H.

    1978-12-01

    The main purpose of this work is to analyse the termohydraulic behaviour of emergency cooling water, during reflooding of a PWR core submitted to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident, with the scope of giving the boundary conditions needed to verify fuel element and containment integrity. The analytical model presented was applied to the simulation of Angra I core reflooding phase, after a double-ended break between pressure vessel and discharge of one of the main coolant pumps. For this accident, with a discharge coefficient of C sub(D) = 0.4, the highest peak cladding temperature is expected. (author) [pt

  5. Laboratory simulation of rod-to-rod mechanical interactions during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents in a PWR involving cladding oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.; Haste, T.J.; Harrison, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    Creep deformation of Zircaloy cladding in postulated PWR loss-of-coolant accidents may lead to rod-to-rod mechanical interactions. Tests have been performed in the electrically heated FOURSQUARE rig at 750 0 C and 850 0 C in steam to investigate this effect. Conservatisms inherent in a simple 'square with rounded corners' coolant channel blockage model have been quantified; about 5-10% flow area may remain even at strains which in ideal circumstances would give total blockage. Reduction of average burst strains produced by an oxide layer (up to 13 μm) has been demonstrated, resulting from strain concentration at oxide cracks. (author)

  6. Complete BWR--EM LOCA analysis using the WRAP--EM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmeyer, R.R.; Gregory, M.V.; Buckner, M.R.

    1979-01-01

    The Water Reactor Analysis Package, Evaluation Model (WRAP--EM), provides a complete analysis of postulated loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA's) in light--water nuclear power reactors. The system is being developed at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) for use by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to interpret and evaluate reactor vendor, evaluation model (EM) analyses. The initial version of the WRAP--EM system for analysis of boiling water reactors (BWR's) is operational. To demonstrate the complete capability of the WRAP--BWR--EM system, a LOCA analysis has been performed for the Hope Creek Plant

  7. Review on research of small break loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bo Jinhai; Wang Fei

    1998-01-01

    The Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) and its research art-of -work are reviewed. A typical SBLOCA process in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and the influence of break size, break location and reactor coolant pump on the process are described. The existing papers are classified in two categories: experimental and numerical modeling, with the primary experimental apparatuses in the world listed and the research works on SBLOCA summarized

  8. Source term and behavioural parameters for a postulated HIFAR loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, F.G.

    1987-01-01

    The fraction of the fission product inventory which might be released into the atmosphere of the HIFAR reactor containment building (RCB) during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) has been evaluated as a function of time, for each classification of airborne radioactivity. This appraisal will be used as the source term for a computer program, which uses realistic attenuation of the fission product aerosol in a single compartment model with a defined leakrate to predict possible radioactive releases into the environment in a hypothetical bounding case reactor accident which is rather more severe in all major aspects than any single LOCA. Also given are the parameters governing the attenuation of the aerosol and vapours in the atmosphere of the RCB so that their behaviour may be accurately modelled. The source terms for several other types of accident involving the meltdown of fuel elements have also been considered but in less detail than the LOCA case. In some of the cases, the fission products are released directly to atmosphere, so there is no attenuation of the release by deposition within the RCB

  9. Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA): Study of CAREM Reactor Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Jose; Gimenez, Marcelo

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed the neutronic and thermohydraulic response of CAREM25 reactor and the safety systems involved in a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA).This parametric analysis considers several break diameters (1/2inch, 3/4inch, 1inch, 1.1/2inch and 2inches) in the vapor zone of the Reactor Pressure Vessel.For each accidental sequence, the successful operation of the following safety systems is modeled: Second Safety System (SSS), Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) and Safety Injection System (SIS). Availability of only one module is postulated for each system.On the other hand, the unsuccessful operation of all safety systems is postulated for each accidental sequence.In both cases the First Shutdown System (FSS) actuates, and the loss of Steam Generator secondary flow and Chemical and Control of Volume System (CCVS) unavailability are postulated.Maximum loss of coolant flow, reactor power and time for safety systems operation are analyzed, as well as its set point parameters.We verified that safety systems are dimensioned to satisfy the 48 hours cooling criteria

  10. Safeguarding of emergency core cooling in case of loss-of-coolant accidents with insulation material release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pointner, W.; Broecker, A.

    2012-01-01

    The report on safeguarding of emergency core cooling in case of loss-of-coolant accidents with insulation material release covers the following issues: assessment of the relevant status for PWR, evaluation of the national and international (USA, Canada, France) status, actualization of recommendations, transferability from PWR to BWR. Generic studies on the core cooling capability in case of insulation material release in BWR-type reactors were evaluated.

  11. ROSA-III/971, BWR Rig of Safety Assessment LOCA, Loss of Offsite Power Transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    1 - Description of test facility: ROSA-III is a 1/124 scaled down test facility with electrically heated core designed to study the response of engineered safety features to loss-of-coolant accidents in in commercial BWR. It consists of the following, fully instrumented subsystems: (a) the pressure vessel with a core simulating four half-length fuel assemblies and control rod; (b) steam line and feed water line, which are independent open loops; (c) coolant recirculation system, which consists of two loops provided with a recirculation pump and two jet pumps in each loop; (d) emergency cooling system, including HPCS, LPCS, LPCI, and ADS. 2 - Description of test: Run 971 simulated a BWR LOSS of off-site power transient. The core scram was assumed to occur at 6 seconds after the transient initiated by the turbine trip. HPCS failure was assumed. After ADS started, the upper half of the core was uncovered by steam. The core was re-flooded by LPCS alone

  12. Review of boiling water reactor small break loss of coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gururaj, P.M.; Dua, S.S.; Rao, A.S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the analytical and the experimental work performed by the General Electric Company to determine the performance of boiling water reactors (BWR) following postulated small break accidents (SBA). This review paper addresses the following issues: (1) the response of the BWR following small loss of inventory events; (2) methods of analysis and their justification; (3) necessity, if any, of operator action and the length of time available in which such action can be performed; and (4) operator interface following the SBA event. The results from these SBA studies for different BWR product lines show that even with the multiple system failures assumed, the BWR can successfully withstand an SBA. For a typical BWR/6, it takes the failure of 13 water delivery pumps to cause any significant core heatup. The only operator actions determined to be necessary are simple ones and ample time is available to the operator to perform these actions, if needed

  13. Fuel rod thermal analysis of the Angra-1 reactor during a postulated loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praes, J.G.L.

    1982-01-01

    A thermal analysis of a fuel element is performed, as subject to the most severe cooling conditions, such as those occurring during a postulated Loss of Coolant Accident in the Angra-I reactor. Our objective was to ascertain whether the cooling of the core is assured according to 10 CRF - 50. According to the stated purpose, sensitivity analyses are necessary, using the swelling and rupture models of the cladding, and at the same time, an updating of the FLECHT heat transfer correlations in the computing program used, which is TOODEE-2 e 1 Version(28), with the purpose of adequating it to the Angra-I core analysis. In addition, we did sensitivity studies on heat transfer coefficient calculations for the steam cooling model. From the results obtained we conclude that the maximum temperature values of the cladding and the oxidation rate due to the Z sub(r) H 2 O reaction were kept well below the maximum allowable limits. Thus, the cooling of the Angra-I core is assured for the assumed accident. (Author) [pt

  14. Fast measurements of the in-core coolant velocity in a BWR by neutron noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    A method to determine in-core coolant velocities from neutron noise within short time intervals has been developed. The accuracy of the method was determined by using a simulation set-up and by using signals of a twin self-powered neutron detector installed in the core of the Dodewaard BWR in the Netherlands. In-core coolant velocities can be estimated within 2.5 s with a standard deviation (due to statistics) less than 2.1%. The method is suitable for velocity monitoring as is shown by the application to a stepwise velocity change of the coolant in a model of a coolant channel of a BWR. The presented technique was applied to determine the variations of the coolant velocity in the Dodewaard core during normal operation and during pressure steps. Only minor variations of the coolant velocity were detected during normal reactor conditions. An increase of those variations with pressure lowering - indicating a lower thermal hydraulic stability - could be detected. A clear velocity response to pressure steps could be determined which was also reflected in the cross-spectrum of the velocity with the vessel pressure and with the in-core neutron flux. (author)

  15. Description of steam-condensation phenomena during the loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCauley, E.W.; Holman, G.S.; Aust, E.; Schwan, H.; Vollbrandt, J.; Fuerst, H.

    1980-01-01

    The development and verification of advanced computer models which describe the boiling water reactor (BWR) pressure suppression process for a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) require a clear description of basic steam condensation phenomena. The GKSS Research Center, in coordination with interested institutions of West Germany and the United States, is currently conducting a test program for such basic research on a multivent BWR-related pressure suppression system. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) acts as the principal US NRC liaison for this test program, with particular emphasis on development of GKSS data for confirmatory use regarding US Mark II nuclear power plants as well as to advanced code development. The multivent test facility, placed in operation in February 1979, is a three-pipe full-scale vent system modelling main features of both the West German KWU and United States G.E. Mk II BWR pressure suppression systems. The test facility and testing programs are described

  16. In-core failure of the instrumented BWR rod by locally induced high coolant temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki

    1985-12-01

    In the BWR type light water loop instrumented in HBWR, a current BWR type fuel rod pre-irradiated up to 5.6 MWd/kgU was power ramped to 50 kW/m. During the ramp, the diameter of the rod was expanded significantly at the bottom end. The behaviour was different from which caused by pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). In the post-irradiation examination, the rod was found to be failed. In this paper, the cause of the failure was studied and obtained the followings. (1) The significant expansion of the rod diameter was attributed to marked oxidation of cladding outer diameter, appeared in the direction of 0 0 -180 0 degree with a shape of nodular. (2) The cladding in the place was softened by high coolant temperature. Coolant pressure, 7MPa intruded the cladding into inside chamfer void at pellet interface. (3) At the place of the significant oxidation, an instrumented transformer was existed and the coolant flow area was very little. The reduction of the coolant flow was enhanced by the bending of the cladding which was caused in pre-irradiation stage. They are considered to be a principal cause of local closure of coolant flow and resultant high temperature in the place. (author)

  17. Flow rate control systems for coolants for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yoko; Kato, Naoyoshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase spontaneous recycling flow rate of coolants in BWR type reactors when the water level in the reactor decreases, by communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum. Constitution: An opening is provided to the back plate disposed at the lower end of a reactor core shroud for communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum, and an ON-OFF valve actuated by an operation rod is provided to the opening. When abnormal water level or pressure in the reactor is detected by a level metal or pressure meter, the operation rod is driven to open the ON-OFF valve, whereby coolants fed from a jet pump partially flows through the opening to increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants. This can increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants upon spontaneous recycling operation, thereby maintaining the reactor safety and the fuel soundness. (Moriyama, K.)

  18. Analysis of the behaviour of pressure and temperature of the containment of a PWR reactor, submitted to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, D.E. da; Arrieta, L.A.J.; Costa, J.R.; Camargo, C.; Santos, C.M. dos; Rochedo, E.R.R.

    1979-12-01

    The main purpose of this work is to analyse the pressure and temperature behaviour of the metalic containment of a PWR building, submitted to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) caused by a double-ended rupture in the main line of the primary circuit. The scope of the study was directed to verify the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) results for the integrity of the metalic containment of the Angra I power plant. The highest containment pressure peak for this unit is expected for a break in the suction line of one of the main pumps of the primary coolant. Using the same input data, our results are very similar to those presented in the FSAR which shows a reasonable equivalence between the two analytical models. Using as input data the results of a previous LOCA study at CNEN, which yields to more conservative boundary conditions than those presented by the FSAR, the pressure and temperature peak values determined by our model are quite larger than those presented by the cited Safety Report. (author) [pt

  19. Fuel gases generation in the primary contention during a coolant loss accident in a nuclear power plant with reactor type BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaices, M.; Salaices, E.; Ovando, R.; Esquivias, J.

    2011-11-01

    During an accident design base of coolant loos, the hydrogen gas can accumulate inside the primary contention as a result of several generation mechanisms among those that are: 1) the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding and the reactor coolant, 2) the metals corrosion for the solutions used in the emergency cooling and dew of the contention, and 3) the radio-decomposition of the cooling solutions of post-accident emergency. In this work the contribution of each generation mechanism to the hydrogen total in the primary contention is analyzed, considering typical inventories of zirconium, zinc, aluminum and fission products in balance cycle of a reactor type BWR. In the analysis the distribution model of fission products and hydrogen production proposed in the regulator guide 1.7, Rev. 2 of the US NRC was used. The results indicate that the mechanism that more contributes to the hydrogen generation at the end of a period of 24 hours of initiate the accident is the radio-decomposition of the cooling solutions of post-accident emergency continued by the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding with the reactor coolant, and lastly the aluminum and zinc oxidation present in the primary contention. However, the reaction metal-water involving the zirconium of the fuel cladding and the reactor coolant is the mechanism that more contributes to the hydrogen generation in the first moments after the accident. This study constitutes the first part of the general analysis of the generation, transport and control of fuel gases in the primary contention during a coolant loss accident in BWRs. (Author)

  20. Definition of loss-of-coolant accident radiation source. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-02-01

    Meaningful qualification testing of nuclear reactor components requires a knowledge of the radiation fields expected in a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The overall objective of this program is to define the LOCA source terms and compare these with the output of various simulators employed for radiation qualification testing. The basis for comparison will be the energy deposition in a model reactor component. The results of the calculations are presented and some interpretation of the results given. The energy release rates and spectra were validated by comparison with other calculations using different codes since experimental data appropriate to these calculations do not exist.

  1. Cladding embrittlement during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.; Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Daum, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-31

    The effect of fuel burnup on the embrittlement of various cladding alloys was examined with laboratory tests conducted under conditions relevant to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The cladding materials tested were Zircaloy-4, Zircaloy-2, ZIRLO, M5, and E110. Tests were performed with specimens sectioned from as-fabricated cladding, from prehydrided (surrogate for high-burnup) cladding, and from high-burnup fuel rods which had been irradiated in commercial reactors. The tests were designed to determine for each cladding material the ductile-to-brittle transition as a function of steam oxidation temperature, weight gain due to oxidation, hydrogen content, pre-transient cladding thickness, and pre-transient corrosion-layer thickness. For short, defueled cladding specimens oxidized at 1000-1200 C, ring compression tests were performed to determine post-quench ductility at {le} 135 C. The effect of breakaway oxidation on embrittlement was also examined for short specimens oxidized at 800-1000 C. Among other findings, embrittlement was found to be sensitive to fabrication processes--especially surface finish--but insensitive to alloy constituents for these dilute zirconium alloys used as cladding materials. It was also demonstrated that burnup effects on embrittlement are largely due to hydrogen that is absorbed in the cladding during normal operation. Some tests were also performed with longer, fueled-and-pressurized cladding segments subjected to LOCA-relevant heating and cooling rates. Recommendations are given for types of tests that would identify LOCA conditions under which embrittlement would occur.

  2. Component evaluation for intersystem loss-of-coolant accidents in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.

    1994-07-01

    Using the methodology outlined in NUREG/CR-5603 this report evaluates (on a probabilistic basis) design rules for components in ALWRs that could be subjected to intersystem loss-of-coolant accidents (ISLOCAs). The methodology is intended for piping elements, flange connections, on-line pumps and valves, and heat exchangers. The NRC has directed that the design rules be evaluated for BWR pressures of 7.04 MPa (1025 psig), PWR pressures of 15.4 MPa (2235 psig), and 177 degrees C (350 degrees F), and has established a goal of 90% probability that system rupture will not occur during an ISLOCA event. The results of the calculations in this report show that components designed for a pressure of 0.4 of the reactor coolant system operating pressure will satisfy the NRC survival goal in most cases. Specific recommendations for component strengths for BWR and PWR applications are made in the report. A peer review panel of nationally recognized experts was selected to review and critique the initial results of this program

  3. Assessment of value-impact associated with the elimination of postulated pipe ruptures from the design basis for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.

    1985-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is proposing to amend the regulations that currently require that the design basis for nuclear power plants include the postulation of dynamic effects from loss of coolant accidents up to and including the double-ended rupture of the largest pipe in the reactor coolant system. Proposed modifications would allow analyses to serve as a sufficient basis for excluding dynamic effects, including but not necessarily limited to pipe whip and jet impingement, associated with specific pipe ruptures. Only dynamic effects would be impacted; current design requirements for containment sizing and discharge capacity of emergency core cooling systems would remain unchanged. This report presents a detailed analysis of value-impact associated with the proposed amendment for PWR reactor coolant loop piping and for BWR recirculation loop piping. The effect of extending application of the proposed rule change to other piping systems is also assessed in a less quantitative manner

  4. Kinematics of two-phase mixture level motion in BWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.; Stritar, A.

    1985-01-01

    A model is presented for predicting two-phase mixture level elevations in BWR systems. The model accounts for the particular geometry and conditions in a BWR system during Small-Break Loss of Coolant Accidents. The model presented here is particularly suitable for efficient, high-speed simulations on small minicomputers. The model has been implemented and tested. Results are shown from BWR ATWS simulations

  5. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Ryoichi; Sato, Takashi; Osaki, Masahiko; Hirayama, Fumio; Watabe, Atsushi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively eliminate radioactive substances released upon loss of coolant accidents in BWR type reactors. Constitution: A high pressure gas jetting device having a plurality of small aperture nozzles is provided above a spray nozzle, that is, at the top of a dry well. The jetting device is connected to a vacuum breaker provided in a pressure suppression chamber. Upon loss of coolant accident, coolants are sprayed from the spray nozzle and air or nitrogen is jetted from the gas jetting device as well. Then, the gases in the dry well are disturbed, whereby radioactive iodine at high concentration liable to be accumulated in the dry well is forced downwardly, dissolved in the spray water and eliminated. (Ikeda, J.)

  6. Analysis of a postulated accident scenario involving loss of forced flow in a LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    A model to analyse a postulated accident scenario involving loss of forced flow in the reactor vessel of a LMFBR is used. Five phases of the accident are analysed: Natural Circulation, Subcooled Boiling, Nucleate Boiling, Core Dryout and Cladding melt. The heat conduction in the fuel cladding, coolant and lower and upper plenum are calculated by a lump-parameter model. Physical data of a prototype LMFBR reactor were used for the calculation. (author)

  7. Generic aging management programs for license renewal of BWR reactor coolant systems components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Liu, Y.Y.

    2002-01-01

    The paper reviews the existing generic aging management programs (AMPs) for the reactor coolant system (RCS) components in boiling water reactors (BWRs), including the reactor pressure vessel and internals, the reactor recirculation system, and the connected piping. These programs have been evaluated in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report, Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL), NUREG-1801, for their use in the license renewal process to manage several aging effects, including loss of material, crack initiation and growth, loss of fracture toughness, loss of preload, wall thinning, and cumulative fatigue damage. The program evaluation includes a review of ten attributes (scope of program, preventive actions, parameters monitored/inspected, detection of aging effects, monitoring and trending, acceptance criteria, corrective actions, confirmative process, administrative control, and operating experience) for their effectiveness in managing a specific aging effect in a given component(s). The generic programs are based on the ASME Section XI inservice inspection requirements; industry guidelines for inspection and evaluation of aging effects in BWR reactor vessel, internals, and recirculation piping; monitoring and control of BWR water chemistry; and operating experience as reported in the USNRC generic communications and industry reports. The review concludes that all generic AMPs are acceptable for managing aging effects in BWR RCS components during an extended period of operation and do not need further evaluation. However, the plant-specific programs for managing aging in certain RCS components during an extended period of operation do require further evaluation. For some plant-specific AMPs, the GALL report recommends an aging management activity to verify their effectiveness. An example of such an activity is a one-time inspection of Class 1 small-bore piping to ensure that service-induced weld cracking is not occurring in the piping. Several of

  8. Generic Aging Management Programs for License Renewal of BWR Reactor Coolant System Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Liu, Y.Y.

    2002-01-01

    The paper reviews the existing generic aging management programs (AMPs) for the reactor coolant system (RCS) components in boiling water reactors (BWRs), including the reactor pressure vessel and internals, the reactor recirculation system, and the connected piping. These programs have been evaluated in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) report, Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL), NUREG-1801, for their use in the license renewal process to manage several aging effects, including loss of material, crack initiation and growth, loss of fracture toughness, loss of preload, wall thinning, and cumulative fatigue damage. The program evaluation includes a review of ten attributes (scope of program, preventive actions, parameters monitored/inspected, detection of aging effects, monitoring and trending, acceptance criteria, corrective actions, confirmative process, administrative control, and operating experience) for their effectiveness in managing a specific aging effect in a given component(s). The generic programs are based on the ASME Section XI inservice inspection requirements; industry guidelines for inspection and evaluation of aging effects in BWR reactor vessel, internals, and recirculation piping; monitoring and control of BWR water chemistry; and operating experience as reported in the USNRC generic communications and industry reports. The review concludes that all generic AMPs are acceptable for managing aging effects in BWR RCS components during an extended period of operation and do not need further evaluation. However, the plant-specific programs for managing aging in certain RCS components during an extended period of operation do require further evaluation. For some plant-specific AMPs, the GALL report recommends an aging management activity to verify their effectiveness. An example of such an activity is a one-time inspection of Class 1 small-bore piping to ensure that service-induced weld cracking is not occurring in the piping. Several of

  9. Time-dependent coolant velocity measurements in an operating BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebbesmeyer, D.; Crowe, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A method to measure time-dependent fluid velocities in BWR-bundle elements by noise analysis of the incore-neutron-detector signals is shown. Two application examples of the new method are given. The time behaviour of the fluid velocity in the bundle element during a scheduled power excursion of the plant. The change of power was performed by changing the coolant flow through the core The apparent change of the fluid velocity due to thermal elongation of the helix-drive of the TIP-system. A simplified mathematical model was derived for this elongation to use as a reference to check the validity of the new method. (author)

  10. Simulation of a large break loss of coolant (LBLOCA), without actuation of the emergency injection systems (ECCS) for a BWR-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas V, J.; Mugica R, C. A.; Lopez M, R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper the analysis of scenario for the loss of coolant case was realized with break at the bottom of a recirculation loop of a BWR-5 with containment type Mark II and a thermal power of 2317 MWt considering that not have coolant injection. This in order to observe the speed of progression of the accident, the phenomenology of the scenario, the time to reach the limit pressure of containment venting and the amount of radionuclides released into the environment. This simulation was performed using the MELCOR code version 2.1. The scenario posits a break in one of the shear recirculation loops. The emergency core cooling system (ECCS) and the reactor core isolation cooling (Rcic) have not credit throughout the event, which allowed achieve greater severity on scenario. The venting of the primary containment was conducted via valve of 30 inches instead of the line of 24 inches of wet well, this in order to have a larger area of exhaust of fission products directly to the reactor building. The venting took place when the pressure in the primary containment reached the 4.5 kg/cm 2 and remained open for the rest of the scenario to maximize the amount released of radionuclides to the atmosphere. The safety relief valves were considered functional they do not present mechanical failure or limit their ability to release pressure due to the large number of performances in safety mode. The results of the analysis covers about 48 hours, time at which the accident evolution was observed; behavior of level, pressure in the vessel and the fuel temperature profile was analyzed. For progression of the scenario outside the vessel, the pressure and temperature of the primary containment, level and temperature of the suppression pool, the hydrogen accumulation in the container and the radionuclides mass released into the atmosphere were analyzed. (Author)

  11. Development of a BWR core burn-up calculation code COREBN-BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Yuichi; Okumura, Keisuke

    1992-05-01

    In order to evaluate core performances of BWR type reactors, the three dimensional core burnup calculation code COREBN-BWR and the fuel management code HIST-BWR have been developed. In analyses of BWR type reactors, thermal hydraulics calculations must be coupled with neutronics calculations to evaluate core performances, because steam void distribution changes according to the change of the power distribution. By installing new functions as follows to the three dimensional core burnup code COREBN2 developed in JAERI for PWR type reactor analyses, the code system becomes to be applicable to burnup analyses of BWR type reactors. (1) Macroscopic cross section calculation function taking into account of coolant void distribution. (2) Thermal hydraulics calculation function to evaluate core flow split, coolant void distribution and thermal margin. (3) Burnup calculation function under the Haling strategy. (4) Fuel management function to incorporate the thermal hydraulics information. This report consists of the general description, calculational models, input data requirements and their explanations, detailed information on usage and sample input. (author)

  12. Analysis of small break loss of coolant accident for Chinese CPR1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju Youl [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Cilier, Anthonie [North-West University, Mahikeng (South Africa); Poc, Li-chi Cliff [Micro-Simulation Technology, Montville (United States)

    2016-05-15

    This research analyses the small break loss of coolant accident (LOCA) on a Chinese CPR1000 type reactor. LOCA accident is used as benchmark for the PCTRAN/CPR1000 code by comparing the effects and results to the Manshaan FSAR accident analysis. LOCA is a design basis accident in which a guillotine break is postulated to occur in one of the cold legs of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Consequently, the primary system pressure would drop and almost all the reactor coolant would be discharged into the reactor containment. The drop in pressure would activate the reactor protection system and the reactor would trip. The simulation of a 3-inch small break loss of coolant accident using the PCTRAN/CPR1000 has revealed this code's effectiveness as well as weaknesses in specific simulation applications. The code has the ability to run at 16 times real time and produce very accurate results. The results are consistently producing the same trends as licensed codes used in Safety Assessment Reports. It is however able to produce these results in a fraction of the time and also provides a whole plant simulation coupling the various thermal, hydraulic, chemical and neutronic systems together with a plant specific control system.

  13. Environmental radiological consequences of a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, A.C.F.

    1981-01-01

    The elaboration of a calculation model to determine safety areas, named Exclusion Zone and Low Population Zone for nuclear power plants, is dealt with. These areas are determined from a radioactive doses calculation for the population living around the NPP after occurence of a postulated ' Maximum Credible Accident' (MCA). The MCA is defined as an accident with complete loss of primary coolant and consequent fusion of a substantial portion of the reactor core. In the calculations carried out, data from NPP Angra I were used and the assumptions made were conservative, to be compatible with licensing requirements. Under the most pessimistic assumption (no filters) the values of 410m and 1000m were obtained for the Exclusion Zone and Low Population Zone radii, respectivily. (Author) [pt

  14. Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) / Emergency Core Coolant System (ECCS Evaluation of Risk-Informed Margins Management Strategies for a Representative Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo Henriques [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) toolkit and methodology are proposed for investigating nuclear power plant core, fuels design and safety analysis, including postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis. This toolkit, under an integrated evaluation model framework, is name LOCA toolkit for the US (LOTUS). This demonstration includes coupled analysis of core design, fuel design, thermal hydraulics and systems analysis, using advanced risk analysis tools and methods to investigate a wide range of results.

  15. Analysis of an AP600 intermediate-size loss-of-coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyack, B.E.; Lime, J.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A postulated double-ended guillotine break of an AP600 direct-vessel-injection line has been analyzed. This event is characterized as an intermediate-break loss-of-coolant accident. Most of the insights regarding the response of the AP600 safety systems to the postulated accident are derived from calculations preformed with the TRAC-PF1/MOD2 code. However, complementary insights derived from a scaled experiment conducted in the ROSA facility, as well as insights based upon calculations by other codes, are also presented. Based upon the calculated and experimental results, the AP600 will not experience a core heat up and will reach a safe shutdown state using only safety-class equipment. Only the early part of the long-term cooling period initiated by In-containment Refueling Water Storage Tank injection was evaluated. Thus, the observation that the core is continuously cooled should be verified for the later phase of the long-term cooling period when sump injection and containment cooling processes are important.

  16. Evaluation of a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) due to a 160 cm2 break in a cold leg of Angra 2 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Carlos Vicente Goulart de; Palmieri, Elcio Tadeu; Aronne, Ivan Dionysio

    2002-01-01

    The development of a qualified full nodalization of Angra2 NPP for RELAP5/Mod 3.2.2 gamma, aiming at the evaluation of a comprehensive number of accidents and transients, thus providing suitable safety analysis support for licensing purposes, is being carried out within the framework of CNEN internal technical cooperation, involving some of its institutes (CDTN, IPEN and IEN) and the Reactors Coordination (CODRE). This work presents a simulation of a postulated Angra2 small cold leg break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA). A 160 cm 2 break is supposed to occur at one cold leg between the main coolant pump and the reactor vessel and is described in the Angra2 Final Safety Analysis Report, section 15.6.4.1.3.4. The simulation of several types of transients and accidents is necessary to verify the adequate performance of the modeled logic and systems. In general, the analysis of such and accident allows to demonstrate the safety Injection System performance and the reliable transition between the high pressure safety injection, the accumulator injection and the residual heat removal phases. Furthermore, it is assumed that some components are out of service due to fail or repair in order to make a conservative analysis. The results showed a compatible behavior of the molded systems and that the simulated Emergency Core Cooling System was able to provide sufficient cooling to avoid any damage to the core. (author)

  17. Investigation of decreasing reactor coolant inventory as a mechanism to reduce power during a BWR ATWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, C.E.; Chexal, V.K.; Layman, W.; Hentzen, R.D.; Gose, G.C.

    1985-01-01

    A best-estimate analysis was performed to evaluate the technique of intentionally reducing reactor coolant inventory in order to reduce power during a BWR ATWS event. The ATWS was initiated by closure of the main steam isolation valves. The analysis was performed with the RETRAN-02 computer code utilizing the one-dimensional kinetics option. The one-dimensional cross sections were developed using the SIMULATE-E and SIMTRAN-E computer codes. The MSIV closure transient provides some of the more severe conditions following a postulated failure to scram. In this transient, the only mechanism for removing energy from the vessel is through the safety relief valve system which results in a heating up of the suppression pool fluid. Consequently, the reactor power must be reduced so that the suppression pool temperature limits are not exceeded. Under the proposed emergency procedure guidelines for the ATWS event, the reactor vessel water level will be lowered to reduce system power. This analysis evaluated the dynamic response of the system as the water level was lowered to the top of active fuel evaluation. Correlating the system power and flow patterns to water level was of particular interest in the analysis. Under natural circulating conditions, the system flows, core power, and pressure responses are extremely tightly coupled and the analysis results proved to be very sensitive to the modeling of downcomer, upper plenum, and core regions

  18. Loss-of-coolant accident for large pipe breaks in light water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keusenhoff, J.

    1980-01-01

    The importance of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) and their control for nuclear reactor safety is explained. Showing the cooling circuits and emergency core cooling systems (ECCS) of both, PWR and BWR, the possible break spectrum and the general sequence of events is discussed. The governing physical phenomena for the different LOCA phases are pointed out in more detail. Special emphasis is taken on rules, regulations and failure criteria for licensing purposes. Analysis methods and codes for both, evaluation and best-estimate model are compared under deterministic and probabilistic approach, respectively. Some insight in present integral and separate effect tests demonstrates the interdependency of analysis and experiment. Results of LOCA analysis and experiments show the present state of the art. (orig.)

  19. Effects of a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident on a Mark I Boiling Water Reactor pressure-suppression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.; McCauley, E.W.

    1977-01-01

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a boiling-water-reactor (BWR) power plant has never occurred. However, because this type of accident could be particularly severe, it is used as a principal theoretical basis for design. A series of consistent, versatile, and accurate air-water tests that simulate LOCA conditions has been completed on a 1 / 5 -scale Mark I BWR pressure-suppression system. Results from these tests are used to quantify the vertical-loading function and to study the associated fluid dynamics phenomena. Detailed histories of vertical loads on the wetwell are shown. In particular, variation of hydrodynamic-generated vertical loads with changes in drywell-pressurization rate, downcomer submergence, and the vent-line loss coefficient are established. Initial drywell overpressure, which partially preclears the downcomers of water, substantially reduces the peak vertical loads. Scaling relationships, developed from dimensional analysis and verified by bench-top experiments, allow the 1 / 5 -scale results to be applied to a full-scale BWR power plant. This analysis leads to dimensionless groupings that are invariant. These groupings show that, if water is used as the working fluid, the magnitude of the forces in a scaled facility is reduced by the cube of the scale factor and occurs in a time reduced by the square root of the scale factor

  20. Core heat transfer analysis during a BWR LOCA simulation experiment at ROSA-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonomoto, T.; Koizumi, Y.; Tasaka, K.

    1987-01-01

    The ROSA-III test facility is a 1/424-th volumetrically scaled BWR/6 simulator with an electrically heated core to study the thermal-hydraulic response during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Heat transfer analyses for 5, 15, 50 and 200% break tests were conducted to understand the basic heat transfer behavior in the core under BWR LOCA conditions and to obtain a data base of post-critical heat flux (CHF) heat transfer coefficients and quench temperature. The results show that the convective heat transfer coefficient of dried-out rods at the core midplane during a steam cooling period is less than approximately 120 W/m 2 K. It is larger than existing data measured at lower pressures during a spray cooling period. Bottom-up quench temperatures are given by a simple equations: The sum of the saturation temperature and a constant of 262 K. Then the heat transfer model in the RELAP4/MOD6/U4/J3 code was revised using the present results. The rod surface temperature behavior in the 200% break test was calculated better by using the revised model although the model is very simple. (orig.)

  1. Multirods burst tests under loss-of-coolant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, S.; Uetsuka, H.; Furuta, T.

    1983-01-01

    In order to know the upper limit of coolant flow area restriction in a fuel assembly under loss-of-coolant accidents in LWRs, burst tests of fuel bundles were performed. Each bundle consisted of 49 rods(7x7 rods), and bursts were conducted in flowing steam. In some cases, 4 rods were replaced by control rods with guide tubes in a bundle. After the burst, the ballooning behavior of each rod and the degree of coolant flow area restriction in the bundle were measured. Ballooning behavior of rods and degree of coolant flow channel restriction in bundles with control rods were not different from those without control rods. The upper limit of coolant flow channel restriction under loss-of-coolant conditions was estimated to be about 80%. (author)

  2. THYDE-B1/MOD1: a computer code for analysis of small-break loss-of-coolant accident of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Ken; Akimoto, Masayuki

    1982-08-01

    THYDE-B1/MOD1 is a computer code to analyze thermo-hydraulic transients of the reactor cooling system of a BWR, mainly during a small-break loss-of-coolant accidnet (SB-LOCA) with a special emphasis on the behavior of pressure and mixture level in the pressure vessel. The coolant behavior is simulated with a volume-and-junction method based on assumptions of thermal equilibrium and homogeneous conditions for two-phase flow. A characteristic feature of this code is a three-region representation of the state of the coolant in a control volume, in which three regions, i.e., subcooled liquid, saturated mixture and saturated steam regions are allowed to exist. The regions are separated by moving boundaries, tracked by mass and energy balances for each region. The interior of the pressure vessel is represented by two volumes with three regions: one for inside of the shroud and the other for outside, while other portions of the system are treated with homogeneous model. This method, although it seems to be very simple, has been verified to be adequate for cases of BWR SB-LOCAs in which the hydraulic transient is relatively slow and the cooling of the core strongly depends on the mixture level behavior in the vessel. In order to simulate the system behavior, THYDE-B1 is provided with analytical models for reactor kinetics, heat generation and conduction in fuel rods and structures, heat transfer between coolant and solid surfaces, coolant injection systems, breaks and discharge systems, jet pumps, recirculation pumps, and so on. The verification of the code has been conducted. A good predictability of the code has been indicated through the comparison of calculated results with experimental data provided by ROSA-III small-break tests. This report presents the analytical models, solution method, and input data requirements of the THYDE-B1/MOD1 code. (author)

  3. Small break loss of coolant accident analysis of advanced PWR plant designs utilizing DVI line venturis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemper, Robert M.; Gagnon, Andre F.; McNamee, Kevin; Cheung, Augustine C.

    1995-01-01

    The Westinghouse Advanced Passive and evolutionary Pressurizer Water Reactors (i.e. AP600 and APWR) incorporate direct vessel injection (DVI) of emergency core coolant as a means of minimizing the potential spilling of emergency core cooling water during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). As a result, the most limiting small break LOCA (SBLOCA) event for these designs, with respect core inventory makeup capability, is a postulated double ended rupture of one of the DVI lines. This paper presents the results of a design optimization study that examines the installation of a venturi in the DVI line as a means of limiting the reactor coolant lost from the reactor vessel. The comparison results demonstrate that by incorporating a properly sized venturi in the DVI line, core uncovery concerns as a result of a DVI line break can be eliminated for both the AP600 and APWR plants. (author)

  4. Heat transfer and fluid flow aspects of fuel--coolant interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.

    1978-09-01

    A major portion of the safety analysis effort for the LMFBR is involved in assessing the consequences of a Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident (HCDA). The thermal interaction of the hot fuel and the sodium coolant during the HCDA is investigated in two areas. A postulated loss of flow transient may produce a two-phase fuel at high pressures. The thermal interaction phenomena between fuel and coolant as the fuel is ejected into the upper plenum are investigated. A postulated transient overpower accident may produce molten fuel being released into sodium coolant in the core region. An energetic coolant vapor explosion for these reactor materials does not seem likely. However, experiments using other materials (e.g., Freon/water, tin/water) have demonstrated the possibility of this phenomenon

  5. BWR fuel clad behaviour following LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, S.M.; Vyas, K.N.; Dinesh Babu, R.

    1996-01-01

    Flow and pressure through the fuel coolant channel reduce rapidly following a loss of coolant accident. Due to stored energy and decay heat, fuel and cladding temperatures rise rapidly. Increase in clad temperature causes deterioration of mechanical properties of clad material. This coupled with increase of pressure inside the cladding due to accumulation of fission gases and de-pressurization of coolant causes the cladding to balloon. This phenomenon is important as it can reduce or completely block the flow passages in a fuel assembly causing reduction of emergency coolant flow. Behaviour of a BWR clad is analyzed in a design basis LOCA. Fuel and clad temperatures following a LOCA are calculated. Fission gas release and pressure is estimated using well established models. An elasto-plastic analysis of clad tube is carried out to determine plastic strains and corresponding deformations using finite-element technique. Analysis of neighbouring pins gives an estimate of flow areas available for emergency coolant flow. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  6. BWR Refill-Reflood Program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, L.L.

    1983-09-01

    The BWR Refill-Reflood Program is part of the continuing Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) research in the United States which is jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Electric Power Research Institute, and the General Electric Company. The current program expanded the focus of this research to include full scale experimental evaluations of multidimensional and multichannel effects during system refill. The program has also made major contributions to the BWR version of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) which has been developed cooperatively with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for application to BWR transients. A summary description of the complete program is provided including the principal findings and main conclusions of the program. The results of the program have shown that multidimensional and parallel channel effects have the potential to significantly improve the system response over that observed in single channel tests

  7. Impact analysis of modifying the composition of the nuclear fuel of a BWR with beryllium oxide; Analisis del impacto de modificar la composicion del combustible nuclear de un BWR con oxido de berilio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo V, J. M.; Morales S, J. B., E-mail: euqrop@hotmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The beryllium oxide (Be O) presents excellent physical properties, especially its high thermal conductivity that contrasts clearly with that of the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) used at the present as fuel in a great number of nuclear plants. The present work models a nuclear reactor cooled by light water in boiling with two external recirculation loops (BWR/5) using the code for the transitory analysis and postulated accidents Trac-B F1, implementing a UO{sub 2} mixture and different fractions of Be O, with the objective of improving the thermal conductivity of the fuel. The numeric results and the realized analyses indicate that when adding a fraction in volume of 10% the central temperature decreases in 30.4% in stationary state, while during the large break loss of coolant accident the peak cladding temperature diminishes in 7%. Although the real interaction of the mixture has not been determined experimentally, the obtained results are promising. (Author)

  8. Comparisons of ROSA-III and FIST BWR loss of coolant accident simulation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, Kanji; Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Koizumi, Yasuo

    1985-10-01

    A common understanding and interpretation of BWR system response and the controlling phenomena in LOCA transients has been achieved through the evaluation and comparison of counterpart tests performed in the ROSA-III and FIST test facilities. These facilities, which are designed to simulate the thermal-hydraulic response of BWR systems, are operated respectively by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the General Electric Company. Comparison is made between three types of counterpart tests, each performed under similar tests conditions in the two facilities. They are large break, small break, and steamline break LOCA's. The system responses to these tests in each facility are quite similar. The sequence of events are similar, and the timing of these events are similar. Differences that do occur are due to minor differences in modeling objectives, facility scaling, and test conditions. Parallel channel flow interactions effects in the ROSA-III four channel (half length) core, although noticeable in the large break test, do not result in major differences with the single channel response in FIST. In the small break tests the timing of events is offset by the earlier ADS actuation in FIST. The steamline test responses are similar except there is no heatup in FIST, resulting from a different ECCS trip modeling. Overall comparisons between ROSA-III and FIST system responses in LOCA tests is very good. (author)

  9. CONTEMPT: computer program for predicting containment pressure-temperature response to a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsii, Y.H.

    1978-04-01

    The CONTEMPT code is used by Babcock and Wilcox for containment analysis following a postulated loss of coolant accident. An additional model is described which is used for the calculation of long term post reflood mass and energy releases to the containment that is used for the containment design basis LOCA calculations. These calculations maximize the rate of energy flow to the containment. The mass and energy data are given to the containment designer for use in calculating the containment building design pressure and temperature and in sizing containment heat removal equipment

  10. Impact analysis of modifying the composition of the nuclear fuel of a BWR with beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallardo V, J. M.; Morales S, J. B.

    2013-10-01

    The beryllium oxide (Be O) presents excellent physical properties, especially its high thermal conductivity that contrasts clearly with that of the uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) used at the present as fuel in a great number of nuclear plants. The present work models a nuclear reactor cooled by light water in boiling with two external recirculation loops (BWR/5) using the code for the transitory analysis and postulated accidents Trac-B F1, implementing a UO 2 mixture and different fractions of Be O, with the objective of improving the thermal conductivity of the fuel. The numeric results and the realized analyses indicate that when adding a fraction in volume of 10% the central temperature decreases in 30.4% in stationary state, while during the large break loss of coolant accident the peak cladding temperature diminishes in 7%. Although the real interaction of the mixture has not been determined experimentally, the obtained results are promising. (Author)

  11. Vent clearing during a simulated loss-of-coolant accident in a Mark I boiling-water reactor pressure-suppression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    In this test series, drywell pressurization rate, drywell overpressure, downcomer submergence, and overall vent system loss coefficient were varied to quantify the primary load sensitivities in the pressure suppression system. Extensive tests were conducted on a unique three-dimensional 1/5 scale model of the pressure suppression system a MARK-I BWR. They were focused on the initial or air cleaning phase of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident. As a result of the complete measurement system employed including multiple high speed cameras, the logical interrelationship between measured forces, measured pressures, and the hydrodynamic phenomena observed in high speed photographic pictures were established. The quantitative values from the 1/5 scale experiments can be applied to full scale plants using established scaling laws. (author)

  12. THALES, Thermohydraulic LOCA Analysis of BWR and PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABE, Kiyoharu

    1990-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: THALES, which stands for 'Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of Loss-of-coolant, Emergency core cooling and Severe core damage', is a computer code system for analyzing progression of core melt accident of light water reactors. The code was developed for Level 2 PSA (probabilistic safety assessment) and applicable to a wide range of postulated accident scenarios. Its outcomes are thermal hydraulic conditions in the reactor coolant system and the containment which are necessary for analyzing fission product release and transport behavior during the accident. The code system consists of following three member codes: (1) THALES-PM for accident progression in the primary and the secondary system of PWRs, (2) THALES-BM for accident progression in the reactor coolant system of BWRs, and (3) THALES-CV for accident progression in the containment of PWRs and BWRs. The THALES-PM and the THALES-BM codes carry out two categories of analysis. The first one is overall thermal-hydraulic analysis in the reactor coolant system. The reactor coolant system is divided into multi-volumes and each volume is further separated into a liquid region and a gas region by a movable mixture level. System pressure, mixture level in each volume, coolant temperature in each region, flow rate between volumes, etc. are calculated. The other one is core heatup and meltdown analysis. The reactor core is radially and axially divided into many nodes. Fuel and cladding temperature, cladding oxidation rate, hydrogen generation rate, core melt fraction, etc. are calculated. The THALES-CV code is for containment response analysis. It divides the containment into multiple compartments, each of which is further separated into a liquid region and a gas region by a movable mixture level. Containment pressure, mixture level in each compartment, coolant temperature in each region, flow rate between compartments, etc. are calculated. The code can treat coolant blowdown from the

  13. SSYST-1. A computer code system to analyse the fuel rod behaviour during a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulden, W.

    1977-08-01

    The modules of the SSYST program system allow the detailed analysis of an LWR fuel rod in the course of a postulated loss-of-coolant accident. They provide a tool for considering the interaction between the heat conduction in the fuel rod, heat transfer in the gap, fuel and cladding tube deformation, pressure in the coolant, as well as thermal and fluid dynamics in the cooling channel and for calculating the time and location of ballooning and rod failure, respectively. They can be used both to precalculate the behaviour of fuel rods during LWR accidents and in support of the design of experiments. Depending on the problem to be solved, the individual modules can be easily combined. (orig.) [de

  14. Fast instrumentation for loss of coolant accident (LOCA) experimental studies pertaining to nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkat Raj, V.; Sreenivas Rao, G.; Belokar, D.G.; Dolas, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    The loss of coolant accident (LOCA) which involves a breach in the pressure boundary of the primary coolant system (PCS) is one of the postulated accident conditions against which the safety of the reactor system is to be ensured. Mathematical models have been developed to analyse this kind of transients. However, because of the extremely complicated nature of the phenomena involved, it is necessary to validate the analytical models with appropriate experimental data. Many parameters are to be measured during the experiments, out of which temperature, pressure, void fraction and two-phase mass flow rate are the most important parameters. Since the phenomenon is very fast, special fast response instruments are required. This paper deals with the considerations that govern the selection of appropriate instruments and the development of suitable instruments for transient two-phase flow and void fraction measurements. The requirements of the associated fast data acquisition system are also discussed. (author). 4 figs

  15. Simulations of ex-vessel fuel coolant interactions in a Nordic BWR using MC3D code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakre, S.; Ma, W.

    2013-08-01

    Nordic Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) employ a drywell cavity flooding technique as a nuclear severe accident management strategy. In case of core melt accident where the reactor pressure vessel will fail and the melt will eject from the lower head and fall into a water pool, may be in the form of a continuous jet. It is assumed that the melt jet will fragment, quench and form a coolable debris bed into the water pool. The melt interaction with a water pool may cause an energetic steam explosion which creates a potential risk towards the integrity of containment, leading to fission products release into the atmosphere. The results of the APRI-7 project suggest that the significant damage to containment structures by steam explosion cannot be ruled according to the state-of-the-art knowledge about corresponding accident scenario. In the follow-up project APRI-8 (2012-2016) one of the goals of the KTH research is to resolve the steam explosion energetics (SEE) issue, developing a risk-oriented framework for quantifying conditional threats to containment integrity for a Nordic type BWR. The present study deals with the premixing and explosion phase calculations of a Nordic BWR dry cavity, using MC3D, a multiphase CFD code for fuel coolant interactions. The main goal of the study is the assessment of pressure buildup in the cavity and the impact loading on the side walls. The conditions for the calculations are used from the SERENA-II BWR case exercise. The other objective was to do the sensitivity analysis of the parameters in modeling of fuel coolant interactions, which can help to reduce uncertainty in assessment of steam explosion energetics. The results show that the amount of liquid melt droplets in the water (region of void<0.6) is maximum even before reaching the jet at the bottom. In the explosion phase, maximum pressure is attained at the bottom and the maximum impulse on the wall is at the bottom of the wall. The analysis is carried out using two different

  16. Simulations of ex-vessel fuel coolant interactions in a Nordic BWR using MC3D code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakre, S.; Ma, W. [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH. Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    Nordic Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) employ a drywell cavity flooding technique as a nuclear severe accident management strategy. In case of core melt accident where the reactor pressure vessel will fail and the melt will eject from the lower head and fall into a water pool, may be in the form of a continuous jet. It is assumed that the melt jet will fragment, quench and form a coolable debris bed into the water pool. The melt interaction with a water pool may cause an energetic steam explosion which creates a potential risk towards the integrity of containment, leading to fission products release into the atmosphere. The results of the APRI-7 project suggest that the significant damage to containment structures by steam explosion cannot be ruled according to the state-of-the-art knowledge about corresponding accident scenario. In the follow-up project APRI-8 (2012-2016) one of the goals of the KTH research is to resolve the steam explosion energetics (SEE) issue, developing a risk-oriented framework for quantifying conditional threats to containment integrity for a Nordic type BWR. The present study deals with the premixing and explosion phase calculations of a Nordic BWR dry cavity, using MC3D, a multiphase CFD code for fuel coolant interactions. The main goal of the study is the assessment of pressure buildup in the cavity and the impact loading on the side walls. The conditions for the calculations are used from the SERENA-II BWR case exercise. The other objective was to do the sensitivity analysis of the parameters in modeling of fuel coolant interactions, which can help to reduce uncertainty in assessment of steam explosion energetics. The results show that the amount of liquid melt droplets in the water (region of void<0.6) is maximum even before reaching the jet at the bottom. In the explosion phase, maximum pressure is attained at the bottom and the maximum impulse on the wall is at the bottom of the wall. The analysis is carried out using two different

  17. Loss-of-coolant accident analysis of the Savannah River new production reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloney, K.J.; Pryor, R.J.

    1990-11-01

    This document contains the loss-of-coolant accident analysis of the representative design for the Savannah River heavy water new production reactor. Included in this document are descriptions of the primary system, reactor vessel, and loss-of-coolant accident computer input models, the results of the cold leg and hot leg loss-of-coolant accident analyses, and the results of sensitivity calculations for the cold leg loss-of-coolant accident. 5 refs., 50 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Verification tests for GRAD, a computer program to predict nonuniform deformation and failure of Zr-2.5 wt percent Nb pressure tubes during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shewfelt, R.S.W.; Godin, D.P.

    1985-03-01

    During a postulated loss-of-coolant accident in a CANDU reactor, the temperature of the pressure tubes could rise sufficiently so that ballooning could occur. It is also likely that there would be a variation in temperature around the tube circumference, causing the deformation to be nonuniform. Since the deformation of the pressure tube controls how the core heat is transferred to the surrounding moderator, which is a large heat sink, a computer program, GRAD, has been developed to predict this nonuniform deformation. Numerous biaxial creep tests were done, where the temperature of internally pressurized sections of Zr-2.5 wt percent Nb pressure tubes were ramped to check the ability of GRAD to predict the resulting nonuniform deformation and possible tube failure. GRAD was successful in predicting the average transverse creep strain observed during the tests and the local transverse creep strain at the end of the tests. GRAD was also able to predict the failure time and average transverse creep strain at failure for all the specimens that failed

  19. Prediction of ROSA-III experiment Run 702

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Soda, Kunihisa; Kikuchi, Osamu.

    1978-11-01

    The purpose of the ROSA-III experiment with a scaled BWR test facility is to examine primary coolant thermalhydraulic behavior and performance during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident of BWR. The results provide information for verification and improvement of reactor safety analysis codes. Run 702 assumes a recirculation line double ended break at the pump suction with average core power and no ECCS. Prediction of the Run 702 experiment was made with computer code RELAP-4J. What determine the coolant behavior are mixture level in the downcomer and flowrates and flow directions at jet pump drive flow nozzle, jet pump suction and discharge. There is thus the need for these measurements to compare predicted results with experimental ones. The liquid level formation model also needs improvement. (author)

  20. Phenomena occuring in the reactor coolant system during severe core damage accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinauskas, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    The reactor coolant system (RCS) of a nuclear power plant consists of the reactor pressure vessel and the piping and associated components that are required for the continuous circulation of the coolant which is used to maintain thermal equilibrium throughout the system. This paper discusses, how in the event of an accident, the RCS also serves as one of several barriers to the escape of radiotoxic material into the biosphere. The physical and chemical processes occurring within the RCS during normal operation of the reactor are relatively uncomplicated and are reasonably well understood. When the flow of coolant is properly adjusted, the thermal energy resulting from nuclear fission (or, in the shutdown mode, from radioactive decay processes) and secondary inputs, such as pumps, are exactly balanced by thermal losses through the RCS boundaries and to the various heat sinks that are employed to effect the conversion of heat to electrical energy. Because all of the heat and mass fluxes remain sensibly constant with time, mathematical descriptions of the thermophysical processes are relatively straightforward, even for boiling water reactor (BWR) systems. Although the coolant in a BWR does undergo phase changes, the phase boundaries remain well-defined and time-invariant

  1. THYDE-B1/MOD2: a computer code for analysis of small-break loss-of-coolant accidents of boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hideo; Muramatsu, Ken; Kukita, Yutaka; Tasaka, Kanji

    1988-04-01

    THYDE-B1/MOD2 is a fast-running best estimate (BE) computer code to analyze thermal-hydraulic behaviors of the reactor cooling system of a boiling water reactor (BWR), mainly, during a small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) with a special emphasis on the behavior of pressure and mixture level in the pressure vessel. The coolant behavior is simulated with a volume-and-junction method based on assumptions of thermal equilibrium and homogeneous conditions for two-phase flow. A characteristic feature of this code is a three-region representation of the state of the coolant in a control volume, in which three regions consist of subcooled liquid, saturated mixture and saturated steam regions from the volume bottom. The regions are separated by two horizontal moving boundaries which are tracked by mass and energy balances for each region. With this three region node model, the interior of the pressure vessel can be represented by only two volumes: one for inside of the shroud and the other for outside, while other portions of the system are treated with homogeneous node model. This method, although it seems to be very simple, has been verified to be adequate for cases of BWR SBLOCAs in which the thermal-hydraulic behavior is relatively slow and gravity controlled. The code has been improved and modified from the last version of the code, THYDE-B1/MOD1, especially in the phase separation model which is used in the mixture level calculation in the three region node model. Then, a good predictability of the code has been indicated through the comparison of calculated results with various SBLOCA test data including ROSA-III of JAERI and FIST of the General Electric Co. This report presents the code modifications and input data requirements of the THYDE-B1/MOD2 code. (author)

  2. A summary of the assessment of fuel behaviour, fission product release and pressure tube integrity following a postulated large loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langman, V.J.; Weaver, K.R.

    1984-05-01

    The Ontario Hydro analyses of fuel and pressure tube temperatures, fuel behaviour, fission product release and pressure tube integrity for large break loss-of-coolant accidents in Bruce A or Pickering A have been critically reviewed. The determinations of maximum fuel temperatures and fission product release are very uncertain, and pressure tube integrity cannot be assured where low steam flows are predicted to persist for times on the order of minutes

  3. Probabilistic analyses of failure in reactor coolant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    LLNL is performing probabilistic reliability analyses of PWR and BWR reactor coolant piping for the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Specifically, LLNL is estimating the probability of a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) in the reactor coolant loop piping in PWR plants, and in the main stream, feedwater, and recirculation piping of BWR plants. In estimating the probability of DEGB, LLNL considers two causes of pipe break: pipe fracture due to the growth of cracks at welded joints (direct DEGB), and pipe rupture indirectly caused by the seismically-induced failure of critical supports or equipment (indirect DEGB)

  4. LOFT advanced densitometer for nuclear loss-of-coolant experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.O.; Lassahn, G.D.; Wood, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    A ''nuclear hardened'' gamma densitometer, a device which uses radiation attenuation to measure fluid density in the presence of a background radiation field, is described. Data from the nuclear hardened gamma densitometer are acquired by time sampling the coolant fluid piping and fluid attenuated source energy spectrum. The data are used to calculate transient coolant fluid cross sectional average density to analyze transient mass flow and other thermal-hydraulic characteristics during the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) loss-of-coolant experiments. The nuclear hardened gamma densitometer uses a pulse height analysis or energy discrimination, pulse counting technique which makes separation of the gamma radiation source signal from the reactor generated gamma radiation background noise signal possible by processing discrete pulses which retain their pulse amplitude information

  5. Coolant make-up device for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    In a coolant make-up device, an opening of a pressure equalizing pipeline in a pressure vessel is disposed in coolants above a reactor core and below a usual fluctuation range of a reactor vessel water level. Further, a float check valve is disposed to the pressure equalizing pipeline for preventing coolants in the pressure vessel flowing into the pipeline. If the water level in the pressure vessel is lowered than the setting position for the float check valve, the float drops by its own weight to open the opening of the pressure equalizing pipeline. Then, steams in the pressure vessel are flown into the pipeline, to equalize the pressure between a coolant storage tank and the pressure vessel of the reactor. Coolants in the coolant storage tank is injected to the pressure vessel by way of the water injection pipeline due to the difference of the pressure head between the water level in the coolants storage tank and the water level in the pressure vessel. If the coolants are lowered than the setting position for the float check value, the float check valve does not close unless the water level is recovered to the setting position for the float valve and, accordingly, the coolant make-up is continued. (N.H.)

  6. Analysis of loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldaschl, H.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors -Quantification of the influence of leak size, control assembly worth, boron concentration and initial power by a dynamic operations criterion. Neutronic and thermohydraulic behaviour of a pressurized water reactor during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is mainly influenced by -change of fuel temperature, -void in the primary coolant. They cause a local stabilization of power density, that means that also in the case of small leaks local void is the main stabilization effect. As a consequence the increase of fuel temperature remains very small even under extremely hypothetical assumptions: small leak, positive reactivity feedback (positive coolant temperature coefficient, negative density coefficient) at the beginning of the accident and all control assemblies getting stuck. Restrictions which have been valid up to now for permitted start-up conditions to fulfill inherent safety requirements can be lossened substantially by a dynamic operations criterion. Burnable poisons for compensation of reactivity theorefore can be omitted. (orig.)

  7. Coolant cleanup system for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Araki, Hidefumi.

    1993-01-01

    The cleanup system of the present invention removes impurity ions and floating materials accumulated in a reactor during evaporation of coolants in the nuclear reactor. That is, coolants pass pipelines from a pressure vessel using pressure difference between a high pressure in the pressure vessel and a low pressure at the upstream of a condensate filtration/desalting device of a condensate/feed water system as a driving source, during which cations and floating materials are removed in a high temperature filtration/desalting device and coolants flow into the condensate/feedwater system. Impurities containing anions are removed here by the condensates filtration/desalting device. Then, they return to the pressure vessel while pressurized and heated by a condensate pump, a feed water pump and a feed water heater. At least pumps, a heat exchanger for heating, a filtration/desalting device for removing anions and pipelines connecting them used exclusively for the coolant cleanup system are no more necessary. (I.S.)

  8. Coolant clean-up system in the primary coolant circuit for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Michio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the quality of coolants at a prescribed level by distillating coolants in the primary coolant circuit for a BWR type reactor to remove impurities therefrom, taking out the condensates from the top of the distillation column and extracting impurities in a concentrated state from the bottom. Constitution: Coolant water for cooling the core is recycled by a recycling pump by way of a recycling pipeway in a reactor. The coolants extracted from an extraction pipeway connected to the recycling pipeway are fed into a distillation column, where distillation is taken place. Impurities in the coolants, that is, in-core corrosion products, fission products generated in the reactor core, etc. are separated by the distillation, concentrated and solidified in the bottom of the distillation column. While on the other hand, condensates removed with the impurities, that is, coolants cleaned-up are recycled to the coolant water for cooling the reactor core. (Moriyama, K.)

  9. Effect of parameter variation of reactor coolant pump on loss of coolant accident consequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Gaojian; Huang Daishun; Gao Yingxian; He Xiaoqiang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the analyses were carried out on Ling'ao nuclear power station phase II to study the consequence of the loss of coolant accident when the homologous characteristic curves and free volumes of the reactor coolant pump changed. Two different pumps used in the analysis were 100D (employed on Ling'ao nuclear power station phase II) and ANDRITZ. The thermal characteristics in the large break LOCA accident were analyzed using CATHRE GB and CONPATE4, and the reactor coolant system hydraulics load during blow-clown phase of LOCA accident was analyzed using ATHIS and FORCET. The calculated results show that the homologous characteristic curves have great effect on the thermal characteristics of reactor core during the reflood phase of the large break LOCA accident. The maximum cladding surface temperatures are quite different when the pump's homologous characteristic curves change. On the other hand, the pump's free volume changing results in the variation of the LOCA rarefaction wave propagation, and therefore, the reactor coolant system hydraulic load in LOCA accident would be different. (authors)

  10. Staff discussion of fifteen technical issues listed in attachment to November 3, 1976 memorandum from Director, NRR to NRR staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-11-01

    Issues discussed include: treatment of non-safety grade equipment in evaluation of a postulated steamline break accidents, lack of independence of interlocks in ECCS valves, acceptability of swing bus design of BWR-4 plants, loss of offsite power subsequent to manual safety injection reset following a LOCA, postulated reactor coolant pump rotor seizures, single failures in reactivity control, passive failures following a LOCA, probabilistic assessment of reliability, frequency decay, grid stability, interpretation of GDC 19, load break switch, instrument trip setpoints, computer protection system, and overpressurization

  11. Utilization of DRUFAN 01/MOD 02 computer code for the depressurization phase analysis of a postulated loss of coolant accident in Angra 2/3 Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austregesilo Filho, H.; Figueiredo, P.J.M.

    1985-08-01

    The DRUFAN 01/Mod 2 developed by Gesellschaft fur Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbh to simulate thermohydraulic behavior of the primary circuit of PWR reactors, during the despressurization phase and initial refilling phase of loss of coolant accidents by great ruptures, is presented. The program simulates the system to be analysed by control volumes-concentrated parameters model - and it is based on numerical solution of conservation equations for mass of water, mass of vapor, quantities of motion and energy, and on the control volume homogeneity hypothesis. The possibilities of thermodynamic disequilibrium, determining mass transfer between liquid and vapor phases assuming that one saturated phase, are considered. The process of computer code implantation in the Honeywell Bull 64 DPS 7 system at CNEN, the modifications done into the program and the application to the despressurization phase analysis of a loss of coolant accident at Angra-2 and Angra-3 reactors are considered. (M.C.K.) [pt

  12. Core dynamics analysis for reactivity insertion and loss of coolant flow tests using the HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Takeda, Tetsuaki

    2007-01-01

    the loss of coolant flow test by tripping all gas circulators is also discussed. The reactor power decrease to decay heat level from the maximum reactor power of 30 MW due to the negative reactivity feedback effect of the core. Although the reactor power becomes critical again about five hours later, the peak power value is merely 2 MW. It was confirmed that by using the developed code, it is possible to not only analyze the reactor core dynamics but also simulate the core dynamics during the abnormal events postulated in the HTGR safety analysis. (author)

  13. BWR full integral simulation test (FIST) pretest predictions with TRACBO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.A.; Alamgir, M.

    1984-01-01

    The Full Integral Simulation Test program is a three pronged approach to the development of best-estimate analysis capability for BWR systems. An analytical method development program is underway to extend the BWR-TRAC computer code to model reactor kinetics and major interfacing systems, including balance-of-plant, to improve application modeling flexibility, and to reduce computer running time. An experimental program is underway in a new single bundle system test facility to extend the large break loss-of-coolant accident LOCA data base to small breaks and operational transients. And a method qualification program is underway to test TRACBO2 against experiments in the FIST facility. The recently completed Phase 1 period included a series of LOCA and power transient tests, and successful pretest analysis of the large and small break LOCA tests with TRACBO2. These comparisons demonstrate BWR-TRAC capability for small and large break analysis, and provide detailed understanding of the phenomena

  14. The 1994 loss of coolant incident at Pickering NGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlebois, P R; Clarke, T R; Goodman, R M; McEwan, W F [Ontario Hydro, Pickering, ON (Canada). Pickering Generating Station; Cuttler, J M [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    Fracture of the rubber diaphragm in a liquid relief valve initiated events leading to a loss of coolant in Unit 2, on December 10. The valve failed open, filling the bleed condenser. The reactor shut itself down. When pressure recovered, two spring-loaded safety relief valves opened and one of them chattered. The shock and pulsations cracked the inlet pipe to the chattering valve, and the subsequent loss of coolant triggered the emergency core cooling system. The incident was terminated by operator action. No abnormal radioactivity was released. The four reactor units of Pickering A remained shut down until the corrective actions were completed in April/May 1995. (author). 4 figs.

  15. Simulation of a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    An essential component of nuclear safety activities is the analysis of postulated accidents which are taken as a design basis for a facility. This analysis is usually carried out by using complex computer codes to simulate the behaviour of the plant and to calculate vital plant parameters, which are then compared with the design limits. Since these simulations cannot be verified at the plant itself, computer codes must be validated by comparing the results of calculations with experimental data obtained in test facilities. With this objective in mind, the Central Research Institute for Physics (CRIP) of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences designed and constructed the PMK-NVH (Paks Model Circuit) test facility, a scaled down model of the WWER-440 Paks nuclear power plant. Hungary with the aim of strengthening the international co-operation on nuclear safety, made the PMK-NVH facility available to the IAEA to conduct a standard problem exercise. In this exercise, experimental data from the simulation of a 7.4% break loss of coolant accident were compared with analytical predictions of the behaviour of the facility calculated with computer codes. This document presents a complete overview of the Standard Problem Exercise, including description of the facility, the experiment, the codes and models used by the participants and a detailed intercomparison of calculated and experimental results. It is recognized that code assessment is a long process which involves many inter-related steps, therefore, no general conclusion on optimum code or best model was reached. However, the exercise was recognized as an important contributor to code validation

  16. Large bundle BWR test CORA-18: Test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Sepold, L.; Schanz, G.; Schumacher, G.

    1998-04-01

    The CORA out-of-pile experiments are part of the international Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Program. They were performed to provide information on the damage progression of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel elements in Loss-of-coolant Accidents in the temperature range 1200 C to 2400 C. CORA-18 was the large BWR bundle test corresponding to the PWR test CORA-7. It should investigate if there exists an influence of the BWR bundle size on the fuel damage behaviour. Therefore, the standard-type BWR CORA bundle with 18 fuel rod simulators was replaced by a large bundle with two additional surrounding rows of 30 rods (48 rods total). Power input and steam flow were increased proportionally to the number of fuel rod simulators to give the same initial heat-up rate of about 1 K/s as in the smaller bundles. Emphasis was put on the initial phase of the damage progression. More information on the chemical composition of initial and intermediate interaction products and their relocation behaviour should be obtained. Therefore, power and steam input were terminated after the onset of the temperature escalation. (orig.) [de

  17. Assessment of Loss-of-Coolant Effect on Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won Young; Park, Joo Hwan; Kim, Bong Ghi

    2009-01-01

    A CANDU reactor is a heavy-water-moderated, natural uranium fuelled reactor with a pressure tube. The reactor contains a horizontal cylindrical vessel (calandria) and each pressure tube is isolated from the heavy-water moderator in a calandria. This allows the moderator system to be operated of a high-pressure and of a high-temperature coolant in pressure tube. This causes the pressurized liquid coolant in the channel to void and therefore give rise to a reactivity transient in the event of a break or fault in the coolant circuit. In particular, all CANDU reactors are well known to have a positive void reactivity coefficient and thus this phenomenon may lead to a positive feedback, which can cause a large power pulse. We assess the loss-of-coolant effect by coolant void reactivity versus fuel burnup, four factor parameters for fresh fuel and equilibrium fuel, reactivity change due to the change of coolant density and reactivity change in the case of half- and full-core coolant

  18. Responses to Small Break Loss of Coolant Accidents for SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Kyoo Hwan; Kim, Hee C.; Chang, Moon H.; Zee, Sung Q.; Kim, Si-Hwan; Lee, Un-Chul

    2004-01-01

    The SMART NSSS adopts the design characteristics of containing most of the primary circuit components, such as the reactor core, main coolant pumps (MCPs), steam generators (SGs), and N 2 gas pressurizer (PZR) in a single leak-tight Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) with a relatively large ratio of the primary coolant inventory to the core power compared to the conventional loop-type PWR. Due to these design characteristics, the SMART can fundamentally eliminate the possibility of Large Break Loss of Coolant Accidents (LBLOCAs), improve the natural circulation capability, and assure a sufficient time to mitigate the possibility of core uncover. Also, SMART adopts inherent safety improving features and passive engineered safety systems such as the substantially large negative moderator temperature coefficients, passive residual heat removal system, emergency core cooling system, and a steel-made leak-tight Safeguard Vessel (SV) housing the RPV. This paper presents the results of the safety analyses using a MARS/SMR code for the instantaneous guillotine ruptures of the major pipelines penetrating the RPV. The analysis results, employing conservative initial/boundary conditions and assumptions, show that the safety systems of the SMART basic design adequately remove the core decay heat without causing core uncover for all the cases of the Small Break Loss of Coolant Accidents (SBLOCAs). The sensitivity study results with variable SV conditions show that the reduced SV net free volume can shorten the time for reaching the thermal and mechanical equilibrium condition between the RPV and SV. Under these boundary conditions, the primary system inventory loss can be minimized and the core remains covered for a longer period of time without any makeup of the coolant. (authors)

  19. Core damage frequency prespectives for BWR 3/4 and Westinghouse 4-loop plants based on IPE results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingman, S.; Camp, S.; LaChance, J.; Mary Drouin

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the core damage frequency (CDF) insights gained by analyzing the results of the Individual Plant Examinations (IPES) for two groups of plants: boiling water reactor (BWR) 3/4 plants with Reactor Core Isolation Cooling systems, and Westinghouse 4-loop plants. Wide variability was observed for the plant CDFs and for the CDFs of the contributing accident classes. On average, transients-with loss of injection, station blackout sequences, and transients with loss of decay heat removal are important contributors for the BWR 3/4 plants, while transients, station blackout sequences, and loss-of-coolant accidents are important for the Westinghouse 4-loop plants. The key factors that contribute to the variability in the results are discussed. The results are often driven by plant-specific design and operational characteristics, but differences in modeling approaches are also important for some accident classes

  20. Genusa Bepu methodologies for the safety analysis of BWRs; Metodologias Bepu de Genusa para el analisis de seguridad de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, M.; Garcia, J.; Goodson, C.; Ibarra, L.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the BEPU methodologies developed by General Electric-Hitachi (GEH) for the evaluation of the BWR reactor safety analysis based on the TRACG best-estimate code. These methodologies are applicable to a wide range of events, operational transients (AOO), anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and instability events; to different BWR types operating commercially. General Electric (GE( designs and other vendors, including Generation III+ESBWR; to the new operation strategies, and to all types of BWR fuel. Their application achieves, among other benefits, a better understanding of the overall plant response and an improvement in margins to the operating limits; thus, the increase of flexibility in reactor operation and reduction in generation costs. (Author)

  1. Maximum thermal loading test of BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Yoshimura, Kunihiro; Nakamura, Satoshi; Ishizuka, Takao.

    1987-01-01

    Various proving tests on the reliability of nuclear power plants have been conducted at the Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center and at the Japan Power Plant Engineering and Inspection Corporation. The tests were initiated at the request of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). Toshiba undertook one of the proving tests on the reliability of nuclear fuel assembly; the maximum thermal loading test of BWR fuel assembly from the Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center. These tests are part of the proving tests mentioned above, and their purpose is to confirm the reliability of the thermal hydraulic engineering techniques. Toshiba has been engaged for the past nine years in the design, fabrication and testing of the equipment. For the project, a test model fuel assembly was used to measure the critical power of the BWR fuel assembly and the void and fluidity of the coolant. From the test results, it has been confirmed that the heat is transferred safely from the fuel assembly to the coolant in the BWR nuclear power plant. In addition, the propriety and reliability of the thermal hydraulic engineering techniques for the fuel assembly have been proved. (author)

  2. Evaluation of postulated LOF [loss-of-flow] events in PRISM and SAFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, B.C.; Van Tuyle, G.J.; Slovik, G.C.; Aronson, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    The PRISM and SAFR designs, as currently proposed by DOE, are designed for ''inherent'', as opposed to ''engineered'', safety. Brookhaven National Laboratory is supporting the initial NRC review of these advanced LMR concepts. A loss-of-flow (LOF) accident coupled with a failure of the reactor shutdown system is one of the major safety concerns in the advanced liquid metal reactor (LMR) evaluation effort. The analysis discussed here covers: (1) primary pipe break without pump trip, (2) primary coolant pump seizure, and (3) primary coolant pump coastdown. The analytical modelling and the calculated thermal and hydraulic behavior are described in detail

  3. Simulation of small break loss of coolant accident using relap 5/ MOD 2 computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megahed, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    An assessment of relap 5 / MOD 2/Cycle 36.05 best estimate computer code capabilities in predicting the thermohydraulic response of a PWR following a small break loss of coolant accident is presented. The experimental data base for the evaluation is the results of Test S-N H-3 performed in the semi scale MOD-2 c Test facility which modeled a 0.5% small break loss of coolant accident with an accompanying failure of the high pressure injection emergency core cooling system. A conclusion was reached that the code is capable of making small break loss of coolant accident calculations efficiently. However, some of the small break loss of coolant accident related phenomena were not properly predicted by the code, suggesting a need for code improvement.9 fig., 3 tab

  4. Studies of loss-of-coolant and loss-of-regulation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.T.

    1979-10-01

    Studies of a CANDU reactor during loss of coolant with delayed emergency core cooling showed that the moderator is an effective heat sink, and that in reactors with moderator dump the calandria sprays provide effective cooling. Fuel channel melting would not occur, and a coolable geometry will be maintained. Studies on film cooling and film stability on calandria tubes and on the analysis of flow reversal in vertical feeder tubes are also reported

  5. LWR primary coolant pipe rupture test rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitoshi, Shyoji

    1978-01-01

    The rupture test rig for primary coolant pipes is constructed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to verify the reliability of the primary coolant pipes for both PWRs and BWRs. The planned test items consisted of reaction force test, restraint test, whip test, jet test and continuous release test. A pressure vessel of about 4 m 3 volume, a circulating pump, a pressurizer, a heater, an air cooler and the related instrumentation and control system are included in this test rig. The coolant test condition is 160 kg/cm 2 g, 325 deg C for PWR test, and 70 kg/cm 2 g, saturated water and steam for BWR test, 100 ton of test load for the ruptured pipe bore of 8B Schedule 160, and 20 lit/min. discharge during 20 h for continuous release of coolant. The maximum pit internal pressure was estimated for various pipe diameters and time under the PWR and BWR conditions. The spark rupturing device was adopted for the rupture mechanics in this test rig. The computer PANAFACOM U-300 is used for the data processing. This test rig is expected to operate in 1978 effectively for the improvement of reliability of LWR primary coolant pipes. (Nakai, Y.)

  6. Analysis of loss of coolant accident and emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Kiyoharu; Kobayashi, Kenji; Hayata, Kunihisa; Tasaka, Kanji; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1977-01-01

    In this paper, the analysis for the performance evaluation of emergency core cooling system is described, which is the safety protection device to the loss of coolant accidents due to the break of primary cooling pipings of light water reactors. In the LOCA analysis for the performance evaluation of ECCS, it must be shown that a reactor core keeps the form which can be cooled with the ECCS in case of LOCA, and the overheat of the core can be prevented. Namely, the shattering of fuel cladding tubes is never to occur, and for the purpose, the maximum temperature of Zircaloy 2 or 4 cladding tubes must be limited to 1200 deg C, and the relative thickness of oxide film must be below 15%. The calculation for determining the temperature of cladding tubes in case of the LOCA in BWRs and PWRs is explained. First, the primary cooling system, the ECCS and the related installations of BWRs and PWRs are outlined. The code systems for LOCA/ECCS analysis are divid ed into several steps, such as blowdown process, reflooding process and heatup calculation. The examples of the sensitivity analysis of the codes are shown. The LOCA experiments carried out so far in Japan and foreign countries and the LOCA analysis of a BWR with RELAP-4J code are described. The guidance for the performance evaluation of ECCS was established in 1975 by the Reactor Safety Deliberation Committee in Japan, and the contents are quoted. (Kako, I.)

  7. Simulation of a large break loss of coolant (LBLOCA), without actuation of the emergency injection systems (ECCS) for a BWR-5; Simulacion de un escenario de perdida de refrigerante grande (LBLOCA), sin actuacion de los sistemas de inyeccion de emergencia (ECCS) para un reactor BWR-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas V, J.; Mugica R, C. A.; Lopez M, R., E-mail: jaime.cardenas@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper the analysis of scenario for the loss of coolant case was realized with break at the bottom of a recirculation loop of a BWR-5 with containment type Mark II and a thermal power of 2317 MWt considering that not have coolant injection. This in order to observe the speed of progression of the accident, the phenomenology of the scenario, the time to reach the limit pressure of containment venting and the amount of radionuclides released into the environment. This simulation was performed using the MELCOR code version 2.1. The scenario posits a break in one of the shear recirculation loops. The emergency core cooling system (ECCS) and the reactor core isolation cooling (Rcic) have not credit throughout the event, which allowed achieve greater severity on scenario. The venting of the primary containment was conducted via valve of 30 inches instead of the line of 24 inches of wet well, this in order to have a larger area of exhaust of fission products directly to the reactor building. The venting took place when the pressure in the primary containment reached the 4.5 kg/cm{sup 2} and remained open for the rest of the scenario to maximize the amount released of radionuclides to the atmosphere. The safety relief valves were considered functional they do not present mechanical failure or limit their ability to release pressure due to the large number of performances in safety mode. The results of the analysis covers about 48 hours, time at which the accident evolution was observed; behavior of level, pressure in the vessel and the fuel temperature profile was analyzed. For progression of the scenario outside the vessel, the pressure and temperature of the primary containment, level and temperature of the suppression pool, the hydrogen accumulation in the container and the radionuclides mass released into the atmosphere were analyzed. (Author)

  8. BWR core response to fluctuations in coolant flow and pressure, with implications on noise diagnosis and stability monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomstrand, J.H.; Andersson, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor dynamic tests, utilizing sinuosidal oscillations in pressure and recirculation flow, have been conducted in operating BWRs in Sweden and Finland. Test data recorded, as well as recordings of process noise, have been analyzed in terms of dynamic core properties. The results obtained show good qualitative agreement with model predictions of BWR core dynamics. Model studies can often support interpretation of dynamic information obtained from operating plants. Comparisons between model studies, dynamic tests and process noise may also provide improved understanding of test results and noise patterns; in this way it can be demonstrated that some neutron flux noise is caused by noise in coolant flow and steam flow. From reactor test data nd noise recordings, core stability parameters have been evaluated by a number of methods. These have been found to provide essentially the same results. The cores investigated were found to be very stable under normal operating conditions. In special operating points, outside the normal operating range, higher decay ratios may occur. The experience indicates that for BWR cores, operated at decay ratios above quarter damping, the stability parameters may be identified from the oscillatory behavior of the autocorrelation in the time domain of the neutron flux noise

  9. On the failure modes of alternative containment designs following postulated core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, C.K.; Knee, H.E.; Okrent, D.

    1977-01-01

    The containment response to a postulated core meltdown accident in a PWR ice condenser containment, a BWR Mark III containment and a BWR non-inerted Mark I containment has been examined to see if the WASH-1400 containment failure mode judgement for the Surry large, dry containment and the Peach Bottom Mark I inerted-containment are likely to be appropriate for these alternative containment plant designs. For the PWR, the representative accident chosen for the analysis is a large cold leg break accompanied by a loss of all electric power while the BWR respresentative event chosen is a recirculation line break without adequate core cooling function. Two containment event paths are studied for each of these two cases, depending on whether or not containment vapor suppression function is assumed to be available. Both the core and the containment pressure and temperature response to the accident events are computed for the four time intervals which characterize (a) blowdown of the pipe break, (b) core melt, (c) vessel melt-through, and (d) containment foundation penetration. The calculations are based on a best esimate of the most probable sequence, but certain phenomena and events were followed down multiple tracks. It appears that the non-inerted Mark I containment is not so vulnerable to overpressurization from hydrogen burning as the Mark III; however, acceptable temperatures may be exceeded. (Auth.)

  10. Rupture behaviour of nuclear fuel cladding during loss-of-coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suman, Siddharth [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Patna 801 103 (India); Khan, Mohd Kaleem, E-mail: mkkhan@iitp.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Patna 801 103 (India); Pathak, Manabendra [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Patna 801 103 (India); Singh, R.N.; Chakravartty, J.K. [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Modelling of nuclear fuel cladding during loss-of-coolant accident transient. • Phase transformation, corrosion, and creep combined to evaluate burst criterion. • Effect of oxygen concentration on burst stress and burst strain. • Effect of heating rate, internal pressure fluctuation, shear modulus incorporated. - Abstract: A burst criterion model accounting the simultaneous phenomena of corrosion, solute-strengthening effect of oxygen, oxygen concentration based non-isothermal phase transformation, and thermal creep has been developed to predict the rupture behaviour of zircaloy-4 nuclear fuel cladding during the loss-of-coolant accident transients. The present burst criterion model has been validated using experimental data obtained from single-rod transient burst tests performed in steam environment. The predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results. A detailed computational analysis has been performed to assess the role of different parameters in the rupture of zircaloy cladding during loss-of-coolant accidents. This model reveals that at low temperatures, lower heating rates produce higher burst strains as oxidation effect is nominal. For high temperatures, the lower heating rates produce less burst strains, whereas higher heating rates yield greater burst strains.

  11. TRAC-BD1: transient reactor analysis code for boiling-water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spore, J.W.; Weaver, W.L.; Shumway, R.W.; Giles, M.M.; Phillips, R.E.; Mohr, C.M.; Singer, G.L.; Aguilar, F.; Fischer, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) version of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to provide an advanced best-estimate predictive capability for the analysis of postulated accidents in BWRs. The TRAC-BD1 program provides the Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis capability for BWRs and for many BWR related thermal hydraulic experimental facilities. This code features a three-dimensional treatment of the BWR pressure vessel; a detailed model of a BWR fuel bundle including multirod, multibundle, radiation heat transfer, leakage path modeling capability, flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment, reflood tracking capability for both falling films and bottom flood quench fronts, and consistent treatment of the entire accident sequence. The BWR component models in TRAC-BD1 are described and comparisons with data presented. Application of the code to a BWR6 LOCA is also presented

  12. Optimal estimate of the coolant flow in the assemblies of a BWR of natural circulation in real time; Estimacion optima del flujo de refrigerante en los ensambles de un BWR de circulacion natural en tiempo real

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle H, J.; Morales S, J. B. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Division de Estudios de Posgrado, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Col. Progreso, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: julfi_jg@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The present work exposes the design and the implementation of an advanced controller that allows estimating the coolant flow in the fuel assemblies of a BWR reactor of natural circulation in real time. To be able to reduce the penalizations that are established in the calculations of the operation limits due to the magnitude of the uncertainties in the coolant flows of a natural circulation reactor, is the objective of this research. In this work the construction of the optimal controller that allows estimating the coolant flows in a fuel channels group of the reactor is shown, as well as the operation of this applied to a reduced order model that simulates the dynamics of a natural circulation reactor. The controller design required of an estimator of the valuation variables not directly of the plant and of the estimates use of the local distributions of the coolant flow. The controller construction of the estimator was based mathematically in the filter Kalman whose algorithm allows to be carried out an advanced control of the system. To prove the estimator operation was development a simplified model that reproduces the basic dynamics of the flowing coolant in the reactor, which works as observer of the system, this model is coupled by means of the estimator controller to a detail model of the plant. The results are presented by means of graphics of the interest variables and the estimate flow, and they are documented in the chart that is presented at the end of this article. (Author)

  13. Peaking cladding temperature and break equivalent size of intermediate break loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Bangqi

    2012-01-01

    The analysis results of intermediate break loss of coolant accident for the nuclear power plant of million kw level showed to be as following: (1) At the begin of life, the break occur simultaneity reactor shutdown with L(X)P. it's equivalent break size and peaking cladding temperature is respectively 20 cm and 849℃. (2) At the begin of life, the break occur simultaneity reactor shutdown without loop. the reactor coolant pumps will be stop after reactor shutdown 10 minutes, it's equivalent break size and peaking cladding temperature is respectively 10.5 cm and 921℃. (3) At the bur up of 31 GWd/t(EOC1). the break occur simultaneity reactor shutdown without loop, the reactor coolant pumps will be stop after reactor shutdown 20 minutes, it's equivalent break size and peaking cladding temperature is respectively 8 cm and 1145℃. The above analysis results showed that the peaking cladding temperature of intermediate break loss of coolant accident is not only related with the break equivalent size and core bur up, and is closely related with the stop time of coolant pumps because the coolant pumps would drive the coolant from safety system to produce the seal loop in break loop and affect the core coolant flow, results in the fuel cladding temperature increasing or damaging. Therefore, the break spectrum, burn up spectrum, the stop time of coolant pumps and operator action time will need to detail analysis and provide appropriate operating procedure, otherwise the peaking cladding temperature will exceed 1204℃ and threaten the safety of the reactor core when the intermediate break loss of coolant accident occur in some break equivalent size, burn up, stop pumps time and operator action not appropriate. The pressurizer pressure low signal simultaneity containment pressure higher signal were used as the operator manual close the signal of reactor coolant pumps after reactor shutdown of 20 minutes. have successful solved the operator intervention time from 10 minutes

  14. HTGR-GT primary coolant transient resulting from postulated turbine deblading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, G.J.; Deremer, R.K.

    1980-11-01

    The turbomachine is located within the primary coolant system of a nuclear closed cycle gas turbine plant (HTGR-GT). The deblading of the turbine can cause a rapid pressure equilibration transient that generates significant loads on other components in the system. Prediction of and design for this transient are important aspects of assuring the safety of the HTGR-GT. This paper describes the adaptation and use of the RATSAM program to analyze the rapid fluid transient throughout the primary coolant system during a spectrum of turbine deblading events. Included are discussions of (1) specific modifications and improvements to the basic RATSAM program, which is also briefly described; (2) typical results showing the expansion wave moving upstream from the debladed turbine through the primary coolant system; and (3) the effect on the transient results of different plenum volumes, flow resistances, times to deblade, and geometries that can choke the flow

  15. Simulation of small break loss of coolant accident in pressurized water reactor (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abass, N. M. N.

    2012-02-01

    A major safety concern in pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) design is the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA),in which a break in the primary coolant circuit leads to depressurization, boiling of the coolant, consequent reduced cooling of the reactor core, and , unless remedial measures are taken, overheating of the fuel rods. This concern has led to the development of several simulators for safety analysis. This study demonstrates how the passive and active safety systems in conventional and advanced PWR behave during the small break loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA). The consequences of SBOLOCA have been simulated using IAEA Generic pressurized Water Reactor Simulator (GPWRS) and personal Computer Transient analyzer (PCTRAN) . The results were presented and discussed. The study has confirmed the major safety advantage of passive plants versus conventional PWRs is that the passive safety systems provide long-term core cooling and decay heat removal without the need for operator actions and without reliance on active safety-related system. (Author)

  16. Speed control device for coolant recycling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageyama, Takao.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention intends to increase a margin relative of the oscillations of neutron fluxes when the temperature of feedwater is lowered in a compulsory recycling type BWR reactor. That is, when the operation point represented by a reactor thermal power and a reactor core inlet flow rate is in a state approximate to an oscillation limit of the reactor power, the device of the present invention controls the recycling pump speed in the increasing direction depending on the lowering range of the feedwater temperature from a stationary state. With such a constitution, even if the reactor power is in the operation region near the oscillation limit in the BWR type reactor and a feedwater heating loss is caused, the speed of the coolant recycling pump is increased by 10% at the maximum depending on the extent of the reduction of the feedwater temperature, so that the oscillation of the reactor power can be prevented from lasting for a long period of time even if a reactivity external disturbance should occur in the reactor. (I.S.)

  17. Control rod drive mechanism stator loss of coolant test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besel, L.; Ibatuan, R.

    1977-04-01

    This report documents the stator loss of coolant test conducted at HEDL on the lead unit Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) in February, 1977. The purpose of the test was to demonstrate scram capability of the CRDM with an uncooled stator and to obtain a time versus temperature curve of an uncooled stator under power. Brief descriptions of the test, hardware used, and results obtained are presented in the report. The test demonstrated that the CRDM could be successfully scrammed with no anomalies in both the two-phase and three-phase stator winding hold conditions after the respective equilibrium stator temperatures had been obtained with no stator coolant

  18. ESBWR long term containment response to loss of coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamgir, M. D.; Marquino, W.; Diaz-Quiroz, J.; Tucker, L.

    2010-01-01

    ESBWR is a 4500 MWt generation III+ natural circulation reactor with an array of robust passive safety systems to keep the reactor safe during postulated transients and accidents. With the submittal of the latest revision of the Design Control Document (DCD) to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ESBWR is nearing the completion of the US certification process. This paper focuses on the bounding licensing analysis of the long-term (30-day) response of the ESBWR containment to limiting Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) performed with the TRACG code. It is shown that using only passive systems available during the first 72 hours after the limiting Main Steam Line Break LOCA, the predicted peak containment pressure in the ESBWR containment remain well below the design limits with good margin. After 72 hours of LOCA initiation, PCCS Vent Fans (non-safety system) become available that remove non-condensable gases from, and further enhance the effectiveness of, PCCS heat exchangers to reduce the containment pressure and temperature to values substantially below the design limits. During the post- 72 hour period, the beneficial effects of the Vent Fan operation, combined with the available operator action to refill of PCCS pools, continue to maintain the containment pressure to about 30% below the design limit at 30 days after a limiting ESBWR LOCA. (authors)

  19. Reactor coolant pump shaft seal behavior during blackout conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mings, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has classified the problem of reactor coolant pump seal failures as an unresolved safety issue. This decision was made in large part due to experimental results obtained from a research program developed to study shaft seal performance during station blackout and reported in this paper. Testing and analysis indicated a potential for pump seal failure under postulated blackout conditions leading to a loss of primary coolant with a concomitant danger of core uncovery. The work to date has not answered all the concerns regarding shaft seal failure but it has helped scope the problem and focus future research needed to completely resolve this issue

  20. Corrosion resistance improvement of ferritic steels through hydrogen additions to the BWR coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.M.; Jewett, C.W.; Pickett, A.E.; Indig, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Motivated by the success of oxygen suppression for mitigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in weld sensitized austenitic materials used in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs), oxygen suppression, through hydrogen additions to the feedwater was investigated to determine its affect on the corrosion resistance of ferritic and martensitic BWR structural materials. The results of these investigations are presented in this paper, where particular emphasis is placed on the corrosion performance of BWR pressure vessel low alloy steels, carbon steel piping materials and martensitic pump materials. It is important to note that the corrosion resistance of these materials in the BWR environment is excellent. Consequently this investigation was also motivated to determine whether there were any detrimental effects of hydrogen additions, as well as to identify any additional margin in ferritic/martensitic materials corrosion performance

  1. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of nuclear reactor primary coolant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffell, B.F. Jr.; Macek, R.W.; Thompson, T.R.; Lippert, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    The ADINA computer code is utilized to perform mechanical response analysis of pressurized reactor primary coolant systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) loadings. Specifically, three plant analyses are performed utilizing the geometric and material nonlinear analysis capabilities of ADINA. Each reactor system finite element model represents the reactor vessel and internals, piping, major components, and component supports in a single coupled model. Material and geometric nonlinear capabilities of the beam and truss elements are employed in the formulation of each finite element model. Loadings applied to each plant for LOCA dynamic analysis include steady-state pressure, dead weight, strain energy release, transient piping hydraulic forces, and reactor vessel cavity pressurization. Representative results are presented with some suggestions for consideration in future ADINA code development

  2. Prediction of thermal hydraulic parameters in the loss of coolant accident by using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaziri, N.; Erfani, A.; Monsefi, M.; Hajabri, A.

    2008-01-01

    In a reactor accident like loss of coolant accident , one or more signals may not be monitored by control panel for some reasons such as interruptions and so on. Therefore a fast alternative method could guarantee the safe and reliable exploration of nuclear power planets. In this study, we used artificial neural network with Elman recurrent structure to predict six thermal hydraulic signals in a loss of coolant accident after upper plenum break. In the prediction procedure, a few previous samples are fed to the artificial neural network and the output value or next time step is estimated by the network output. The Elman recurrent network is trained with the data obtained from the benchmark simulation of loss of coolant accident in VVER. The results reveal that the predicted values follow the real trends well and artificial neural network can be used as a fast alternative prediction tool in loss of coolant accident

  3. Loss-of-coolant accident analyses of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, N.C.J.; Yoder, G.L.; Wendel, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    Currently in the conceptual design stage, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) will operate at a high heat flux, a high mass flux, an a high degree of coolant subcooling. Loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) analyses using RELAP5 have been performed as part of an early evaluation of ANSR safety issues. This paper discusses the RELAP5 ANSR conceptual design system model and preliminary LOCA simulation results. Some previous studies were conducted for the preconceptual design. 12 refs., 7 figs

  4. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) Phase II test results and TRAC-BWR model qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.A.; Alamgir, M.; Findlay, J.A.; Hwang, W.S.

    1985-10-01

    Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. There are nine tests in Phase II of the FIST program. They include the following LOCA tests: BWR/6 LPCI line break, BWR/6 intermediate size recirculation break, and a BWR/4 large break. Steady state natural circulation tests with feedwater makeup performed at high and low pressure, and at high pressure with HPCS makeup, are included. Simulation of a transient without rod insertion, and with controlled depressurization, was performed. Also included is a simulation of the Peach Bottom turbine trip test. The final two tests simulated a failure to maintain water level during a postulated accident. A FIST program objective is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two post-test predictions made with TRACB04 are compared with Phase II test data in this report. These are for the BWR/6 LPCI line break LOCA, and the Peach Bottom turbine trip test simulation

  5. Experiment data report for LOFT large-break loss-of-coolant experiment L2-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayless, P.D.; Divine, J.M.

    1982-08-01

    Selected pertinent and uninterpreted data from the third nuclear large break loss-of-coolant experiment (Experiment L2-5) conducted in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility are presented. The LOFT facility is a 50-MW(t) pressurized water reactor (PWR) system with instruments that measure and provide data on the system thermal-hydraulic and nuclear conditions. The operation of the LOFT system is typical of large [approx. 1000 MW(e)] commercial PWR operations. Experiment L2-5 simulated a double-ended offset shear of a cold leg in the primary coolant system. The primary coolant pumps were tripped within 1 s after the break initiation, simulating a loss of site power. Consistent with the loss of power, the starting of the high- and low-pressure injection systems was delayed. The peak fuel rod cladding temperature achieved was 1078 +- 13 K. The emergency core cooling system re-covered the core and quenched the cladding. No evidence of core damage was detected

  6. Cooling of safety rods in the Savannah River K Reactor during the gamma heating phase of a postulated loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; Unal, C.; Motley, F.E.; Rodriguez, S.B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper documents the heat-transfer analysis for the safety rod placed in a perforated guide tube during the gamma heating phase of a large-break loss of coolant accident in Savannah River K-reactor. The cooling mechanisms are natural convection to air and radiation to the surrounding structures. The limiting component is the guide tube. The guide tube is shown to remain coolable below its thermal limit for the anticipated reactor powers unless it is contacted by the hotter safety rod. Sample calculations are performed for various contact scenarios, and the results are reported within the paper. The results indicate that the most limiting contact scenario results when the safety rod heats up to its maximum temperature while remaining concentric in the guide tube and then contacts the guide tube. The worse contact location appears to be in line with the slugs-cladding contact and in between the rows of holes in the guide tube

  7. RELAP4/MOD5: a computer program for transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors and related systems. User's manual. Volume I. RELAP4/MOD5 description. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    RELAP4 is a computer program written in FORTRAN IV for the digital computer analysis of nuclear reactors and related systems. It is primarily applied in the study of system transient response to postulated perturbations such as coolant loop rupture, circulation pump failure, power excursions, etc. The program was written to be used for water-cooled (PWR and BWR) reactors and can be used for scale models such as LOFT and SEMISCALE. Additional versatility extends its usefulness to related applications, such as ice condenser and containment subcompartment analysis. Specific options are available for reflood (FLOOD) analysis and for the NRC Evaluation Model.

  8. Correlating activity incorporation with properties of oxide films formed on material samples exposed to BWR and PWR coolants in Finnish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojinov, M.; Kinnunen, P.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Sirkiae, P. [VTT Industrial Systems, Espoo (Finland); Buddas, T.; Halin, M.; Kvarnstroem, R.; Tompuri, K. [Fortum Power and Heat Oy, Loviisa Power Plant, Loviisa (Finland); Helin, M.; Muttilainen, E.; Reinvall, A. [Teollisuuden Voima Oy, Olkiluoto (Finland)

    2002-07-01

    The extent of activity incorporation on primary circuit surfaces in nuclear power plants is connected to the chemical composition of the coolant, to the corrosion behaviour of the material surfaces and to the structure and properties of oxide films formed on circuit surfaces due to corrosion. Possible changes in operational conditions may induce changes in the structure of the oxide films and thus in the rate of activity incorporation. To predict these changes, experimental correlations between water chemistry, oxide films and activity incorporation, as well as mechanistic understanding of the related phenomena need to be established. In order to do this, flow-through cells with material samples and facilities for high-temperature water chemistry monitoring have been installed at Olkiluoto unit 1 (BWR) and Loviisa unit 1 (PWR) in spring 2000. The cells are being used for two major purposes: To observe the changes in the structure and activity levels of oxide films formed on material samples exposed to the primary coolant. Correlating these observations with the abundant chemical and radiochemical data on coolant composition, dose rates etc. collected routinely by the plant, as well as with high-temperature water chemistry monitoring data such as the corrosion potentials of relevant material samples, the redox potential and the high-temperature conductivity of the primary coolant. We describe in this paper the scope of the work, give examples of the observations made and summarize the results on oxide films that have been obtained during one full fuel cycle at both plants. (authors)

  9. Investigation of break location effects on thermal-hydraulics during intermediate break loss-of-coolant accident experiments at ROSA-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Tasaka, Kanji

    1986-01-01

    The rig of safety assessment (ROSA)-III facility is a volumetrically scaled (1/424) boiling water reactor (BWR/6) system with an electrically heated core designed for integral loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) and emergency core cooling system (ECCS) tests. Break location effects on thermal-hydraulics during intermediate LOCAs were investigated by using four experiments at the ROSA-III, the 15 and 25 % main recirculation pump suction line break (MRPS-B) experiments, the 21 % single-ended jet pump drive line break (JPD-B) experiment and the 15 % main steam line break (MSL-B) experiment. Water injection from the high pressure core spray (HPCS) was not used in any of the experiments. Failure of ECCS actuation by the high containment pressure was also assumed in the tests. In the MRPS-B experiments, the discharge flow turned from low quality fluid to high quality fluid when the downcomer water level dropped to the main recirculation line outlet elevation, which suppressed coolant loss from the vessel and the core. In the JPD-B experiment, the jet pump drive nozzle was covered with low quality fluid and low quality fluid discharge continued even after the downcomer water level reached the jet pump suction elevation. Low quality fluid discharge ceased after the ADS actuation. It suggestes that the JPD-B LOCA has the possibility of causing larger and more severe core dryout and cladding temperature excursion than the MRPS-B LOCA. The MSL-B LOCA was characterized by mixture level swell in the downcomer and the core. The core mixture level swell resulted in the much later core dryout initiation than that in the MRPS-B LOCA, however, ECCS actuation was also delayed because of slow downcomer water level drop. (author)

  10. BWR fuel assembly bottom nozzle with one-way coolant flow valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor having a flow of coolant/moderator fluid therein, at least one fuel assembly installed in the fluid flow, the fuel assembly is described comprising in combination: a bundle of elongated fuel rods disposed in side-by-side relationship so as to form an array of spaced fuel rods; an outer tubular flow channel surrounding the fuel rods so as to direct the flow of coolant/moderator fluid along the fuel rods; bottom and top nozzles mounted at opposite ends of the flow channel and having an inlet and outlet respectively for allowing entry and exit of the flow of coolant/moderator fluid into and from the flow channel and along the fuel rods therein; and a coolant flow direction control device operatively disposed in the bottom nozzle so as to open the inlet thereof to the flow of coolant/moderator fluid in an inflow direction into the flow channel through the bottom nozzle inlet but close the inlet to the flow of coolant/moderator fluid from the flow channel through the bottom nozzle inlet upon reversal of coolant/moderator fluid flow from the inflow direction

  11. Safety assessment of the advanced CANDU reactor in postulated LOCA/LOECC events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazen Hezhi Fan; Zoran Bilanovic

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced CANDU Reactor TM (ACR TM ) retains the proven strengths and features of CANDU reactors, and incorporates innovative new features and state-of-the-art technology. In addition to the enhanced emergency core cooling system, the reserve water system is designed to be available to inject reserve water by gravity into the reactor inlet headers after a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). To assist in the ACR design and analysis of beyond the design basis events, simulations are needed to demonstrate the effectiveness of these two independent systems on core cooling, and to assess the consequences of the postulated accident coincident with the impairment of either of the two systems. The current paper is subject to an assessment of a postulated large LOCA coincident with loss of the emergency core cooling (LOECC) system. A postulated LOCA/LOECC has very low probability, in the range usually associated with severe core damage events. However, in the CANDU design, including ACR, the presence of moderator water surrounding the fuel channels acts as an effective heat sink, together with other safety features, to prevents severe core damage following a postulated LOCA/LOECC. Therefore, it is possible to analyse LOCA/LOECC using the same deterministic tools that are used for analysis of events with much higher frequencies, in the design basis event range. The assessment is conducted based on the current ACR-700 design. However, the analysis methodology, scope, computer tools, and the results in principle, are applicable to larger ACR designs. This assessment includes system (circuit), fuel channel, and fuel analyses. Some assessment results are needed in subsequent moderator analysis and containment analysis. In the assessment, several simulations were performed to analyse the full circuit and individual fuel channel transient behaviours, as well as the fission product release behaviour. The assessment has captured the key responses of the reactor heat

  12. Determining the boron concentration during long-term cooling of the reactor core after large loss of coolant accident; Dolocenje koncentracij bora pri dolgotrajnoem hladjenju sredice po veliki izlivni nezgodi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavko, B; Ravnki, M [Institut Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Yugoslavia)

    1988-07-01

    Critical boron concentration before and after postulated loss of coolant accident with long-term cooling recirculation was calculated for cycle 6 of Krsko NPP. The limiting boron concentration curve of containment sump was calculated for equilibrium conditions. The results were analysed and showed that the boron concentration in refueling water storage tank and in safety injection accumulators should be increased from 2000 to 2100 ppm in 6th cycle. In the consequence corresponding chapters of the NPP Krsko technical Specifications were changed as well. (author)

  13. Recycling systems for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Akio; Yamamoto, Fumiaki; Fukumoto, Ryuji.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To stabilize the coolant flowing characteristics and reactor core reactivity. Constitution: The recycling system in a BWR type reactor comprises a recycling pump disposed to the outside of a reactor pressure vessel, a ring header connected to the recycling pump through main pipe ways, and a plurality of pipes branched from and connected with the ring header and connected to a plurality of jet pumps within the pressure vessel. Then, by making the diameter for the pipeways of each of the branched pipes different from each other, the effective cross-sectional area is varied to thereby average the coolant flow rate supplied to each of the jet pumps. (Seki, T.)

  14. Assessment of the Prony's method for BWR stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier; Castillo-Duran, Rogelio; Palacios-Hernandez, Javier C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This paper describes a method to determine the degree of stability of a BWR. → Performance comparison between Prony's and common AR techniques is presented. → Benchmark data and actual BWR transient data are used for comparison. → DR and f results are presented and discussed. → The Prony's method is shown to be a robust technique for BWR stability. - Abstract: It is known that Boiling Water Reactors are susceptible to present power oscillations in regions of high power and low coolant flow, in the power-flow operational map. It is possible to fall in one of such instability regions during reactor startup, since both power and coolant flow are being increased but not proportionally. One other possibility for falling into those areas is the occurrence of a trip of recirculation pumps. Stability monitoring in such cases can be difficult, because the amount or quality of power signal data required for calculation of the stability key parameters may not be enough to provide reliable results in an adequate time range. In this work, the Prony's Method is presented as one complementary alternative to determine the degree of stability of a BWR, through time series data. This analysis method can provide information about decay ratio and oscillation frequency from power signals obtained during transient events. However, so far not many applications in Boiling Water Reactors operation have been reported and supported to establish the scope of using such analysis for actual transient events. This work presents first a comparison of decay ratio and frequency oscillation results obtained by Prony's method and those results obtained by the participants of the Forsmark 1 and 2 Boiling Water Reactor Stability Benchmark using diverse techniques. Then, a comparison of decay ratio and frequency oscillation results is performed for four real BWR transient event data, using Prony's method and two other techniques based on an autoregressive modeling. The four

  15. Fuel assembly stress and deflection analysis for loss-of-coolant accident and seismic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMars, R.V.; Steinke, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    Babcock and Wilcox has evaluated the capability of the fuel assemblies to withstand the effects of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) blowdown, the operational basis earthquake (OBE) and design basis earthquake (DBE), and the simultaneous occurrence of the DBE and LOCA. This method of analysis is applicable to all of B and W's nuclear steam system contracts that specify the skirt-supported pressure vessel. Loads during the saturated and subcooled phases of blowdown following a loss-of-coolant accident were calculated. The maximum loads on the fuel assemblies were found to be below allowable limits, and the maximum deflections of the fuel assemblies were found to be less than those that could prevent the insertion of control rods or the flow of coolant through the core. (U.S.)

  16. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrey Ioilev; Maskhud Samigulin; Vasily Ustinenko; Simon Lo; Adrian Tentner

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The goal of this project is to develop an advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computer code (CFD-BWR) that allows the detailed analysis of the two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel bundle under various operating conditions. This code will include more fundamental physical models than the current generation of sub-channel codes and advanced numerical algorithms for improved computational accuracy, robustness, and speed. It is highly desirable to understand the detailed two-phase flow phenomena inside a BWR fuel bundle. These phenomena include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for the analysis of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is still too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Recent progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), coupled with the rapidly increasing computational power of massively parallel computers, shows promising potential for the fine-mesh, detailed simulation of fuel assembly two-phase flow phenomena. However, the phenomenological models available in the commercial CFD programs are not as advanced as those currently being used in the sub-channel codes used in the nuclear industry. In particular, there are no models currently available which are able to reliably predict the nature of the flow regimes, and use the appropriate sub-models for those flow regimes. The CFD-BWR code is being developed as a customized module built on the foundation of the commercial CFD Code STAR-CD which provides general two-phase flow modeling capabilities. The paper describes the model development strategy which has been adopted by the development team for the

  17. Simulation of decreasing reactor power level with BWR simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwoto; Zuhair; Rivai, Abu Khalid

    2002-01-01

    Study on characteristic of BWR using Desktop PC Based Simulator Program was analysed. This simulator is more efficient and cheaper for analyzing of characteristic and dynamic respond than full scope simulator for decreasing power level of BW. Dynamic responses of BWR reactor was investigated during the power level reduction from 100% FP (Full Power) which is 3926 MWth to 0% FP with 25% steps and 1 % FP/sec rate. The overall results for core flow rate, reactor steam flow, feed-water flow and turbine-generator power show tendency proportional to reduction of reactor power. This results show that reactor power control in BWR could be done by control of re-circulation flow that alter the density of water used as coolant and moderator. Decreasing the re-circulation flow rate will decrease void density which has negative reactivity and also affect the position of control rods

  18. Trend of field data on pipe wall thinning for BWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakii, Junichi; Hiranuma, Naoki; Hidaka, Akitaka

    2009-01-01

    Strongly motivated by every stakeholder not to repeat Mihama Nuclear Power Station pipe rupture accident in August 2004, JSME Main Committee on Codes and Standards on Power Generation Facilities immediately launched a special task force to develop Rules on Pipe Wall Thinning Management for BWR, PWR and fossil Power Plants respectively. The authors describes the process of the development of Rules for BWR Power Plans from the view point of collections and analysis of fields data of pipe wall thinning. Through its activities, the authors confirmed the existing findings, like the effect of Oxygen injection, turbulence and dependence on coolant temperature, derived from series of laboratory-scaled experiments in FAC and coolant velocities effects in LDI. Further based upon the said proven findings with field data, they explain the adequacy of major concept of the rule such as separate treatment of FAC (Flow Accelerated Corrosion) and LDI (Liquid Droplet Impingement). (author)

  19. Loss of coolant analysis for CIRENE-LATINA heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiantore, B.; Dubbini, M.; Proto, G.

    1978-01-01

    CIRENE is a heavy-water moderated, boiling water cooled pressure tube reactor. Fuel is natural uranium. A variety of breaks in the primary coolant system have been postulated for the analysis of the CIRENE Latina Plant (now under construction) such as double-end break of inlet header, downcomer, steam line and inlet feeders. The basic tool for analysis is the TILT-N Code which has been purposely developed for simulating the nuclear, thermal and hydrodynamic behaviour of the CIRENE core and associated heat transport system. An extensive full-scale test programme has been carried out by CNEN and CISE which fully confirms the adequacy of the model. The main results of the analysis show that maximum temperatures are far from those leading to significant fuel damage and that adequate core cooling is provided over the whole transient. (author)

  20. Loss of coolant accident at boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez G, R.

    1975-01-01

    A revision is made with regard to the methods of thermohydraulic analysis which are used at present in order to determine the efficiency of the safety systems against loss of coolant at boiling water reactors. The object is to establish a program of work in the INEN so that the personnel in charge of the safety of the nuclear plants in Mexico, be able to make in a near future, independent valuations of the safety systems which mitigate the consequences of the above mentioned accident. (author)

  1. Deformation, oxidation and embrittlement of PWB fuel cladding in a loss-of-coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, P.D.; Hindle, E.D.; Mann, C.A.

    1986-09-01

    The scope of this report is limited to the oxidation, embrittlement and deformation of PWB fuel in a loss of coolant accident in which the emergency core coolant systems operate in accordance with the design, ie accidents within the design basis of the plant. A brief description is given of the thermal hydraulic events during large and small breaks of the primary circuit, followed by the correct functioning and remedial action of the emergency core cooling systems. The possible damage to the fuel cladding during these events is also described. The basic process of oxidation of zircaloy-4 fuel cladding by steam, and the reaction kinetics of the oxidation are reviewed in detail. Variables having a possible influence on the oxidation kinetics are also considered. The embrittlement of zircaloy-4 cladding by oxidation is also reviewed in detail. It is related to fracture during the thermal shock of rewetting or by the ambient impact forces as a result of post-accident fuel handling. Criteria based both on total oxidation and on the detailed distribution of oxygen through the oxidised cladding wall are considered. The published computer codes for the calculation of oxygen concentration are reviewed in terms of the model employed and the limitations apparent in these models when calculating oxygen distribution in cladding in the actual conditions of a loss of coolant accident. The factors controlling the deformation and rupture of cladding in a loss of coolant accident are reviewed in detail.

  2. Hydride precipitation, fracture and plasticity mechanisms in pure zirconium and Zircaloy-4 at temperatures typical for the postulated loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pshenichnikov, Anton; Stuckert, Juri; Walter, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • All δ-hydrides in Zr and Zircaloy-4 have basal or pyramidal types of habit planes. • Seven orientation relationships for δ-hydrides in Zr matrix were detected. • Decohesion fracture mechanism of hydrogenated Zr was investigated by fractography. - Abstract: The results of investigations of samples of zirconium and its alloy Zircaloy-4, hydrogenated at temperatures 900–1200 K (typical temperatures for loss-of-coolant accidents) are presented. The analyses, based on a range of complementary techniques (X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction) reveals the direct interrelation of internal structure transformation and hydride distribution with the degradation of mechanical properties. Formation of small-scale zirconium hydrides and their bulk distribution in zirconium and Zircaloy-4 were investigated. Fractographical analysis was performed on the ruptured samples tested in a tensile machine at room temperature. The already-known hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms based on hydride formation and hydrogen-enhanced decohesion and the applicability of them in the case of zirconium and its alloys is discussed.

  3. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after core degradation has occurred) of postulated BWR severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for additional assessment. The first is a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertains to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose is to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies have been performed during 1991 under the auspices of the Detailed Assessment of BWR In-Vessel Strategies Program. This paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies and the potential for their success. 33 refs., 9 figs

  4. BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines: 1993 Revision, Normal and hydrogen water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlberg, G.; Goddard, C.; Fitzpatrick, S.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of water chemistry control is to extend the operating life of the reactor and rector coolant system, balance-of-plant components, and turbines while simultaneously controlling costs to safeguard the continued economic viability of the nuclear power generation investment. To further this goal an industry committee of chemistry personnel prepared guidelines to identify the benefits, risks, and costs associated with water chemistry in BWRs and to provide a template for an optimized water chemistry program. This document replaces the BWR Normal Water Chemistry Guidelines - 1986 Revision and the BWR Hydrogen Water Chemistry Guidelines -- 1987 Revision. It expands on the previous guidelines documents by covering the economic implications of BWR water chemistry control

  5. The development of emergency core cooling systems in the PWR, BWR, and HWR Candu type of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mursid Djokolelono.

    1976-01-01

    Emergency core cooling systems in the PWR, BWR, and HWR-Candu type of nuclear power plant are reviewed. In PWR and BWR the emergency cooling can be catagorized as active high pressure, active low pressure, and a passive one. The PWR uses components of the shutdown cooling system: whereas the BWR uses components of pressure suppression contaiment. HWR Candu also uses the shutdown cooling system similar to the PWR except some details coming out from moderator coolant separation and expensive cost of heavy water. (author)

  6. BWR emergency procedure guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, J.S.; Karner, E.F.; Stratman, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter describes plans for dealing with reactor accidents developed by the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Owners' Group in response to post-Three Mile Island US NRC requirements. The devised Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGs), applicable to all BWRs, are symptom-based rather than event-based. According to the EPGs, the operator does not need to identify what event is occurring in the plant in order to decide what action to take, but need only observe the symptoms (values and trends of key control parameters) which exist and take appropriate action to control these symptoms. The original objective was to provide reactor operator guidance in responding to a small break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), but subsequent revisions have included other types of reactor accidents. Topics considered include the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) control guideline, the primary containment control guideline, the secondary containment control guideline, the radioactivity release control guideline, multiple failures vs. the design basis, safe limits vs. technical specifications, the technical status, licensing, and implementation. The EPGs are based upon maintaining both adequate core cooling and primary containment integrity

  7. Analysis of thermo-hydraulic behavior of coolant during discharge of pressurized high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Sobajima, Makoto; Sasaki, Shinobu; Onishi, Nobuaki; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1978-01-01

    The present report describes results of the analysis of the LOFT semiscale experiment No. 1011 using remodeled RELAP-3 code, performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to simulate a postulated loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor. It was clarified through the analysis that coolant behavior during blowdown was influenced variously by the system components in the primary loop, comparing with coolant discharge from a pressure vessel. Good agreement was obtained between experimental and analytical results when phase separation was assumed in upper plenum and downcomer, since experimental data indicated existence of liquid level in those parts. It was also found that the use of the Wilson's equation to calculate bubble rise velocity and the use of discharge coefficient as the function of fluid quality at break location to calculate discharge flow rate resulted in good agreement with experimental data. (auth.)

  8. Loss-of-coolant and loss-of-flow accident in the ITER-EDA first wall/blanket cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komen, E.M.J.; Koning, H.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the analysis of the transient thermal-hydraulic system behaviour inside the first wall/blanket cooling system and the resulting temperature response inside the first wall and blanket of the ITER-EDA (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - Engineering Design Activities) reactor design during a: - Loss-of-coolant accident caused by a reputure of the pump suction pipe; - loss-of-flow accident caused by a trip of the recirculation pump. (orig.).

  9. Loss-of-coolant and loss-of-flow accident in the ITER-EDA first wall/blanket cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komen, E.M.J.; Koning, H.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the analysis of the transient thermal-hydraulic system behaviour inside the first wall/blanket cooling system and the resulting temperature response inside the first wall and blanket of the ITER-EDA (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - Engineering Design Activities) reactor design during a: - Loss-of-coolant accident caused by a reputure of the pump suction pipe; - loss-of-flow accident caused by a trip of the recirculation pump. (orig.)

  10. Analysis of an Advanced Test Reactor Small-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident with an Engineered Safety Feature to Automatically Trip the Primary Coolant Pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polkinghorne, Steven T.; Davis, Cliff B.; McCracken, Richard T.

    2000-01-01

    A new engineered safety feature that automatically trips the primary coolant pumps following a low-pressure reactor scram was recently installed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The purpose of this engineered safety feature is to prevent the ATR's surge tank, which contains compressed air, from emptying during a small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA). If the surge tank were to empty, the air introduced into the primary coolant loop could potentially cause the performance of the primary and/or emergency coolant pumps to degrade, thereby reducing core thermal margins. Safety analysis performed with the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic code and the SINDA thermal analyzer shows that adequate thermal margins are maintained during an SBLOCA with the new engineered safety feature installed. The analysis also shows that the surge tank will not empty during an SBLOCA even if one of the primary coolant pumps fails to trip

  11. Definition of loss-of-coolant accident radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    Meaningful qualification testing of nuclear reactor components requires a knowledge of the radiation fields expected in a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The overall objective of this program is to define the LOCA source terms and compare these with the output of various simulators employed for radiation qualification testing. The basis for comparison will be the energy deposition in a model reactor component. The results of the calculations are presented and some interpretation of the results given. The energy release rates and spectra were validated by comparison with other calculations using different codes since experimental data appropriate to these calculations do not exist

  12. Simulation of a loss of coolant accident with hydroaccumulator injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    An essential component of nuclear safety activities is the analysis of postulated accidents which are taken as a design basis for a facility. This analysis is usually carried out by using complex computer codes to simulate the behaviour of the plant and to calculate vital plant parameters, which are then compared with the design limits. Since these simulations cannot be verified at the plant itself, computer codes must be validated by comparing the results of calculations with experimental data obtained in test facilities. The IAEA, having identified the need for experimental data due to the difficulties of building integral test facilities and the high costs of these experiments, has accepted the offer of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and organized two standard problem exercises. In these exercises, experimental data from the simulation of a 7.4% break loss of coolant accident was compared with analytical prediction of the behaviour of the facility calculated with computer codes. The second standard problem exercise involved a similar test, with the exception that in this case hydroaccumulator of the safety injection system were allowed to inject water in the system as anticipated in the design of the plant. This document presents a complete overview of the Second Standard Problem Exercise, including description of the facility, the experiment, the codes and models used by the participants and a detailed intercomparison of calculated and experimental results. It is recognized that code assessment is a long process which involves many inter-related steps, therefore, no general conclusion on optimum code or best model was reached. However, the exercise was recognized as an important contributor to code validation. 22 refs, figs and tabs

  13. Theoretical study on loss of coolant accident of a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwon-Yeong; Kim, Wan-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A theoretical model of siphon breaking phenomena was developed. • A general formula using Chisholm coefficient B was proposed. • The safety requirements regarding a loss of coolant accident of research reactors could be found out. - Abstract: Under the design conditions of a research reactor, the siphon phenomenon induced by pipe rupture can cause continuous efflux of water. In order to prevent water efflux, an additional facility is necessary. A siphon breaker is a type of safety facility that can resist the loss of coolant effectively. However, analysis of siphon breaking is complex since it comprises two-phase flow and there are many inputs to be considered. For this reason, we analyzed the experimental results to develop a theoretical model of siphon breaking phenomena. Developed model is based on fluid mechanics and Chisholm model. From Bernoulli’s equation, the velocity and quantity as well as undershooting height, water level, pressure, friction coefficient, and factors related to the two-phase flow could be calculated. The Chisholm model, which is able to analyze the two-phase flow, can predict the results in a manner similar to those obtained from a real-scale experiment, and a general formula using Chisholm coefficient B was proposed in this study. Also, we verified the theoretical model and concluded that it is possible to analyze the siphon breaking. Moreover, the design conditions that can satisfy the safety requirements regarding a loss of coolant accident of research reactors could be found out by using the theoretical model. In conclusion, we propose the theoretical model which can analyze the siphon breaking as real, and it is helpful not only to analyze but also to design the siphon breaker.

  14. CONTEMPT-LT/028: a computer program for predicting containment pressure-temperature response to a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargroves, D.W.; Metcalfe, L.J.; Wheat, L.L.; Niederauer, G.F.; Obenchain, C.F.

    1979-03-01

    CONTEMPT-LT is a digital computer program, written in FORTRAN IV, developed to describe the long-term behavior of water-cooled nuclear reactor containment systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. The program calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures, mass and energy inventories, heat structure temperature distributions, and energy exchange with adjacent compartments. The program is capable of describing the effects of leakage on containment response. Models are provided to describe fan cooler and cooling spray engineered safety systems. An annular fan model is also provided to model pressure control in the annular region of dual containment systems. Up to four compartments can be modeled with CONTEMPT-LT, and any compartment except the reactor system may have both a liquid pool region and an air--vapor atmosphere region above the pool. Each region is assumed to have a uniform temperature, but the temperatures of the two regions may be different

  15. Mark II containment 1/6-scale pressure suppression test program: data report no. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukita, Yutaka; Okazaki, Motoaki; Namatame, Ken; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1979-08-01

    This report documents experimental data from the first test phase of the Mark II Containment 1/6-Scale Pressure Suppression Test. The 1/6-Scale Test was initiated in December, 1976, to investigate the thermohydraulic responses of a BWR Mark II pressure suppression system to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), by means of scale model experiments. From January to June, 1977, a series of tests were performed for the Japanese BWR Owners' Group. These tests consisted of eight air-blowdown pool swell tests, three steam-blowdown pool swell tests, and twelve steam condensation tests. The dynamic responses of pressure and pool water level during the blowdown, pressure oscillation and chugging phenomena associated with unsteady condensation of steam were measured. (author)

  16. Tritium in liquid phase in a BWR-5 like Laguna Verde; Tritio en fase liquida en un BWR-5 como Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tijerina S, F.; Vargas A, A.; Cardenas J, J., E-mail: francisco.tijerina@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Subgerencia de Ingenieria, Carretera Veracruz-Medellin Km 7.5, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    In boiling water reactors (BWR), the tritium (H{sub 3}) takes place mainly as a result of ternary fissions in the nuclear reactors, of those which 75% are in gaseous form and 25% in liquid form. In the liquid phase, the tritium is transported to the pipes of the primary coolant toward condensed tanks or tanks of drainage excesses of radioactive equipment, located in external areas of a BWR, as well as to the processes of radioactive wastes to be able to be directed to the liquid effluents. For that reason, is necessary to know the possible routes of the transport and processes of the tritium in a BWR to control this radioisotope in the site of the event of leaks in equipment s and buried pipes, avoiding that emigrates toward underground flowing and an impact to the environment and to the people in general. (Author)

  17. Postulated accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, W.

    1980-01-01

    This lecture on 'Postulated Accidents' is the first of a series of lectures on the dynamic and transient behaviour of nuclear power plants, especially pressurized water reactors. The main points covered will be: Reactivity Accidents, Transients (Intact Loop) and Loss of Cooland Accidents (LOCA) including small leak. This lecture will discuss the accident analysis in general, the definition of the various operational phases, the accident classification, and, as an example, an accident sequence analysis on the basis of 'Postulated Accidents'. (orig./RW)

  18. The deformation, oxidation and embrittlement of PWB fuel cladding in a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, P.D.; Hindle, E.D.; Mann, C.A.

    1986-09-01

    The scope of this report is limited to the oxidation, embrittlement and deformation of PWB fuel in a loss of coolant accident in which the emergency core coolant systems operate in accordance with the design, ie accidents within the design basis of the plant. A brief description is given of the thermal hydraulic events during large and small breaks of the primary circuit, followed by the correct functioning and remedial action of the emergency core cooling systems. The possible damage to the fuel cladding during these events is also described. The basic process of oxidation of zircaloy-4 fuel cladding by steam, and the reaction kinetics of the oxidation are reviewed in detail. Variables having a possible influence on the oxidation kinetics are also considered. The embrittlement of zircaloy-4 cladding by oxidation is also reviewed in detail. It is related to fracture during the thermal shock of rewetting or by the ambient impact forces as a result of post-accident fuel handling. Criteria based both on total oxidation and on the detailed distribution of oxygen through the oxidised cladding wall are considered. The published computer codes for the calculation of oxygen concentration are reviewed in terms of the model employed and the limitations apparent in these models when calculating oxygen distribution in cladding in the actual conditions of a loss of coolant accident. The factors controlling the deformation and rupture of cladding in a loss of coolant accident are reviewed in detail. (author)

  19. Generic safety evaluation report regarding integrity of BWR scram system piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    Safety concerns associated with postulated pipe breaks in the boiling water reactor (BWR) scram system were identified during the staff's continuing investigation of the Browns Ferry Unit 3 control rod partial insertion failure on June 28, 1980. This report includes an evaluation of the licensing basis for the BWR scram discharge volume (SDV) piping and an assessment of the potential for the SDV piping to fail while in service. A discussion of the means available for mitigation an unlikely SDV system failure is provided. Generic recommendations are made to improve mitigation capability and ensure that system integrity is maintained in service

  20. Prediction of ROSA-III experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soda, Kunihisa

    1978-06-01

    ROSA-III experiment with the simulated BWR system is to investigate thermal hydraulic behavior as well as ECCS performance in a postulated loss-of-coolant accident. RUN 701 assumes average core power, high and low pressure core sprays and low pressure injection of ECCS. Prediction of experiment RUN 701 was made with computer code RELAP-4J. The results indicate the need for ROSA-III pump characteristics to be clarified and for liquid level formation model to be improved. Comparison of the prediction results with the experimental data should reveal the areas of modifications in calculation model. (auth.)

  1. Loss-of-Coolant and Loss-of-Flow Accidents in the SEAFP first wall/blanket cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komen, E.M.J.; Koning, H.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulic analysis of three Loss-of-Coolant Accidents (LOCAs) and three Loss-of-Flow Accidents (LOFAs) in the first wall/blanket cooling system of the SEAFP reactor design. The analyses deal with the transient thermal-hydraulic behaviour inside the cooling systems and the temperature development inside the nuclear components. As it appears, the temperature increase in the first wall Be-coating is limited to 30 K when an emergency plasma shutdown is initiated within 10 s following pump trip. (orig.)

  2. Loss-of-coolant and loss-of-flow accidents in the SEAFP first wall/blanket cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komen, E.M.J.; Koning, H.

    1994-07-01

    This paper presents the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulic analysis of three Loss-of-Coolant Accidents (LOCAs) and three Loss-of-Flow Accidents (LOFAs) in the first wall/blanket cooling system of the SEAFP reactor design. The analyses deal with the transient thermal-hydraulic behaviour inside the cooling systems and the temperature development inside the nuclear components. As it appears, the temperature increase in the first wall Be-coating is limited to 30 K when an emergency plasma shutdown is initiated within 10 s following pump trip. (orig.)

  3. Confinement barriers for loss of coolant accidents in the SEAFP reactor plant models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomquist, R.; Ebert, E.; Gay, J.M.; Mazille, F.; Natalizio, A.; Rolandsson, S.; Ross, W.E.; Shen, K.; Sjoeberg, A.

    1995-01-01

    Loss of coolant accidents may mobilise radioactivity and pressurise confinement barriers thereby making a release to the environment possible. The paper defines the radioactivity confinements and presents principal results from the underlying thermal-hydraulic analyses. (orig.)

  4. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly. Final CRADA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tentner, A.

    2009-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation capability for two-phase flows with heat transfer in complex geometries can considerably reduce the hardware development cycle, facilitate the optimization and reduce the costs of testing of various industrial facilities, such as nuclear power plants, steam generators, steam condensers, liquid cooling systems, heat exchangers, distillers, and boilers. Specifically, the phenomena occurring in a two-phase coolant flow in a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) fuel assembly include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for this purpose of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Advanced CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes provide a potential for detailed 3D simulations of coolant flow inside a fuel assembly, including flow around a spacer element using more fundamental physical models of flow regimes and phase interactions than sub-channel codes. Such models can extend the code applicability to a wider range of situations, which is highly important for increasing the efficiency and to prevent accidents.

  5. Assumptions used for evaluating the potential radiological consequences of a loss of coolant accident for boiling water reactors - June 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1974-01-01

    Section 50.34 of 10 CFR Part 50 requires that each applicant for a construction permit or operating license provide an analysis and evaluation of the design and performance of structures, systems, and components of the facility with the objective of assessing the risk to public health and safety resulting from operation of the facility. The design basis loss of coolant accident is one of the postulated accidents used to evaluate the adequacy of these structures, systems, and components with respect to the public health and safety. This guide gives acceptable assumptions that may be used in evaluating the radiological consequences of this accident for a pressurized water reactor. In some cases, unusual site characteristics, plant design features, or other factors may require different assumptions which will be considered on an individual case basis. The Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards has been consulted concerning this guide and has concurred in the regulatory position

  6. Radionuclide buildup in BWR [boiling water reactor] reactor coolant recirculation piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duce, S.W.; Marley, A.W.; Freeman, A.L.

    1989-12-01

    Since the spring of 1985, thermoluminescent dosimeter, dose rate, and gamma spectral data have been acquired on the contamination of boiling water reactor primary coolant recirculation systems as part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission funded study. Data have been gathered for twelve facilities by taking direct measurements and/or obtaining plant and vendor data. The project titled, ''Effectiveness and Safety Aspects of Selected Decontamination Processes'' (October 1983) initially reviewed the application of chemical decontamination processes on primary coolant recirculation system piping. Recontamination of the system following pipe replacement or chemical decontamination was studied as a second thrust of this program. During the course of this study, recontamination measurements were made at eight different commercial boiling water reactors. At four of the reactors the primary coolant recirculation system piping was chemically decontaminated. At the other four the piping was replaced. Vendor data were obtained from two boiling water reactors that had replaced the primary coolant recirculation system piping. Contamination measurements were made at two newly operating boiling water reactors. This report discusses the results of these measurements as they apply to contamination and recontamination of boiling water reactor recirculation piping. 16 refs., 29 figs., 9 tabs

  7. Generic evaluation of small break loss-of-coolant accident behavior in Babcock and Wilcox designed 177-FA operating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Slow system depressurization resulting from small break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) in the reactor coolant system have not, until recently, received detailed analytical study comparable to that devoted to large breaks. Following the TMI-2 accident, the staff had a series of meetings with Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) and the B and W licensees. The staff requested that B and W and the licensees: (1) systematically evaluate plant response for small break loss-of-coolant accidents; (2) address each of the concerns documented in the Michelson report; (3) validate the computer codes used against the TMI-2 accident; (4) extend the break spectrum analysis to very small breaks, giving special consideration to failure of pressurizer valves to close; (5) analyze degraded conditions where AFW is not available; (6) prepare design changes aimed at reducing the probability of loss-of-coolant accidents produced by the failure of a PORV to close; and (7) develop revised emergency procedures for small breaks. This report describes the review of the generic analyses performed by B and W based on the requests stated above

  8. Primary coolant system of BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, Hidefumi; Takahashi, Masanori; Aoki, Yasuko

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a water quality control system for preventing corrosion and for extending working life of structural materials of a BWR-type reactor. Namely, a sensor group 1 and a sensor group 2 are disposed at different positions such as in a feedwater system, a recycling system, main steam pipes, and a pressure vessel, respectively. Each sensor group can record and generate alarms independently. The sensor group 1 for usual monitoring is connected to a calculation device by way of a switch to confirm that the monitored values are within a proper range by the injection of a water quality moderating agent. The sensor group 2 is caused to stand alone or connected with the calculation device by way of a switch optionally. When abnormality should occur in the sensor group 1, the sensor group 2 determines the limit for the increase/decrease of controlling amount of the moderating agent at a portion where the conditions are changed to the most severe direction by using data base. The moderating agent is injected and controlled based on the controlling amount. The system of the present invention can optionally cope with a new sensor and determination for new water quality standards. Then the evaluation/control accuracy of the entire system can be improved while covering up the errors of each sensor. (I.S.)

  9. LOFT fuel module structural response during loss-of-coolant experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffell, B.F. Jr.; Selcho, H.S.

    1979-01-01

    The structural response of the reactor fuel modules installed in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility have been analyzed for subcooled blowdown loading conditions associated with loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCE). Three independent analyses using the WHAM, SHOCK, and SAP computer codes have been interfaced to calculate the transient mechanical behavior of the LOFT fuel. Test data from two LOCEs indicate the analysis method is conservative. Structural integrity of the fuel modules has been assessed by monitoring guide tube temperatures and control rod drop times during the LOCEs. The analysis and experimental test data indicate the fuel module structural integrity will be maintained for the duration of the LOFT experimental program

  10. Valuation of power oscillations in a BWR after control rod banks withdrawal events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A. L.; Pereira, C.; Da Silva, C. A. M.; Veloso, M. A. F.

    2009-01-01

    The out-of-phase mode of oscillation is a very challenging type of instability occurring in BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) and its study is relevant because of the safety implications related to the capability to promptly detect any such inadvertent occurrence by in-core neutron detectors, thus triggering the necessary countermeasures in terms of selected rod insertion or even reactor shutdown. In this work, control rod banks (CRB) withdrawal transient was considered to study the power instability occurring in a BWR. To simulate this transient, the control rod banks were continuously removed from the BWR core in different cases. The simulation resulted in a very large increase of power. To perform the instability simulations, the RELAP5/MOD3.3 thermal hydraulic system code was coupled with the PARCS/2.4 3D neutron kinetic code. Data from a real BWR, the Peach Bottom, have been used as reference conditions and reactor parameters. The trend of the mass flow rate, pressure, coolant temperature and the void fraction to four thermal hydraulic channels symmetrically located in the core with respect to the core centre, were taken. It appears that the velocity of the rod bank withdrawal is a very important aspect for reactor stability. The slowest CRB withdrawal (180 s) did not cause power perturbation while the fast removal (20 s) triggered a slow power oscillation that little by little amplified to reach levels of more 100% of the initial power after about 210 s. The investigation of the related thermo hydraulic parameters showed that the mass flow rate, the void fraction and also the coolant temperature began to oscillate at approximately the same time interval

  11. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 1 – Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, Kerry J., E-mail: howe@unm.edu [University of New Mexico, 210 University Blvd., Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Mitchell, Lana, E-mail: lmitchell@alionscience.com [University of New Mexico, 210 University Blvd., Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Kim, Seung-Jun, E-mail: skim@lanl.gov [University of New Mexico, 210 University Blvd., Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Blandford, Edward D., E-mail: edb@unm.edu [University of New Mexico, 210 University Blvd., Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Kee, Ernest J., E-mail: erniekee@gmail.com [South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company, P.O. Box 270, Wadsworth, TX 77483 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Trisodium phosphate (TSP) causes aluminum corrosion to cease after 24 h of exposure. • Chloride, iron, and copper have a minimal effect on the rate of aluminum corrosion when TSP is present. • Zinc can reduce the rate of aluminum corrosion when TSP is present. • Aluminum occasionally precipitates at concentrations lower than the calculated solubility for Al(OH){sub 3}. • Corrosion and solubility equations can be used to calculate the solids generated during a LOCA. - Abstract: Bench experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of aluminum from metallic aluminum surfaces under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident at a nuclear power generating facility. The experiments showed that TSP is capable of passivating the aluminum surface and preventing continued corrosion after about 24 h at the conditions tested. A correlation that describes the rate of corrosion including the passivation effect was developed from the bench experiments and validated with a separate set of experiments from a different test system. The saturation concentration of aluminum was shown to be well described by the solubility of amorphous aluminum hydroxide for the majority of cases, but instances have been observed when aluminum precipitates at concentrations lower than the calculated aluminum hydroxide solubility. Based on the experimental data and previous literature, an equation was developed to calculate the saturation concentration of aluminum as a function of pH and temperature under conditions representative of a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in a TSP-buffered pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment. The corrosion equation and precipitation equation can be used in concert with each other to calculate the quantity of solids that would form as a function of time during a LOCA if the temperature and pH profiles were known.

  12. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 1 – Aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, Kerry J.; Mitchell, Lana; Kim, Seung-Jun; Blandford, Edward D.; Kee, Ernest J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Trisodium phosphate (TSP) causes aluminum corrosion to cease after 24 h of exposure. • Chloride, iron, and copper have a minimal effect on the rate of aluminum corrosion when TSP is present. • Zinc can reduce the rate of aluminum corrosion when TSP is present. • Aluminum occasionally precipitates at concentrations lower than the calculated solubility for Al(OH) 3 . • Corrosion and solubility equations can be used to calculate the solids generated during a LOCA. - Abstract: Bench experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of aluminum from metallic aluminum surfaces under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident at a nuclear power generating facility. The experiments showed that TSP is capable of passivating the aluminum surface and preventing continued corrosion after about 24 h at the conditions tested. A correlation that describes the rate of corrosion including the passivation effect was developed from the bench experiments and validated with a separate set of experiments from a different test system. The saturation concentration of aluminum was shown to be well described by the solubility of amorphous aluminum hydroxide for the majority of cases, but instances have been observed when aluminum precipitates at concentrations lower than the calculated aluminum hydroxide solubility. Based on the experimental data and previous literature, an equation was developed to calculate the saturation concentration of aluminum as a function of pH and temperature under conditions representative of a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in a TSP-buffered pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment. The corrosion equation and precipitation equation can be used in concert with each other to calculate the quantity of solids that would form as a function of time during a LOCA if the temperature and pH profiles were known

  13. Simplified compact containment BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Tsutagawa, M.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2004-01-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to both energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's small power output of 300 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, internal upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The internal upper entry CRDs reduce the height of the reactor vessel (RPV) and consequently reduce the height of the primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), passive auto catalytic recombiner and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. The recombiner decreases hydrogen concentration in the PCV in the case of a severe accident. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. The feasibility of CCR safety system has been confirmed by LOCA

  14. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1994-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for the management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after-core degradation has occurred) of postulated boiling water reactor (BWR) severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities, and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for further assessment. The first was a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertained to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose was to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies were performed during 1991 and this paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies, and the potential for their success. ((orig.))

  15. Flex concept for US-A BWR extended loss of AC power events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K.; Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B.

    2015-09-01

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (US-A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (Stp 3 and 4) Combined License Application (Cola) and incorporates numerous design and technology enhancements for improved safety performance. Nuclear Innovation North America (NINA) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The Stp 3 and 4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola, and the final safety evaluation report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in 2015. Following the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, the US-A BWR was reviewed for Beyond Design Basis Event (BDBE) safety using industry and regulatory guidance for US NRC Order EA-12-049 Order Modifying Licenses with Regard to Requirements for Mitigation of Beyond Design Basis External Events (BDBEE). By virtue of the design approach, the US-A BWR is capable of providing an indefinite coping period for a station blackout. The use of installed systems with extended coping times is a significant advantage of the US-A BWR compared to most of the plants currently operating in the U.S. In addition, the Stp 3 and 4 design incorporates enhancements consistent with the current US industry Diverse and Flexible Coping Strategies (Flex) initiative. The final technical topic requiring review by the US NRC Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards was the Flex Integrated Plan submitted by NINA, and this review was successfully completed. This paper summarizes the progress of the US-A BWR in licensing the Flex Integrated Plan for the project, and describes the technology and features of the US-A BWR design that contribute to safety post-Fukushima. It also provides an informational comparison of the design capabilities of the US-A BWR for extreme external events, and relates these capabilities to re

  16. Flex concept for US-A BWR extended loss of AC power events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Thomas, S.; Mookhoek, B., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Nuclear Innovation North America, Lake Jackson, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (US-A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (Stp 3 and 4) Combined License Application (Cola) and incorporates numerous design and technology enhancements for improved safety performance. Nuclear Innovation North America (NINA) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. The Stp 3 and 4 project has finished the US NRC technical review of the Cola, and the final safety evaluation report (FSER) is scheduled to be issued by the US NRC in 2015. Following the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, the US-A BWR was reviewed for Beyond Design Basis Event (BDBE) safety using industry and regulatory guidance for US NRC Order EA-12-049 Order Modifying Licenses with Regard to Requirements for Mitigation of Beyond Design Basis External Events (BDBEE). By virtue of the design approach, the US-A BWR is capable of providing an indefinite coping period for a station blackout. The use of installed systems with extended coping times is a significant advantage of the US-A BWR compared to most of the plants currently operating in the U.S. In addition, the Stp 3 and 4 design incorporates enhancements consistent with the current US industry Diverse and Flexible Coping Strategies (Flex) initiative. The final technical topic requiring review by the US NRC Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards was the Flex Integrated Plan submitted by NINA, and this review was successfully completed. This paper summarizes the progress of the US-A BWR in licensing the Flex Integrated Plan for the project, and describes the technology and features of the US-A BWR design that contribute to safety post-Fukushima. It also provides an informational comparison of the design capabilities of the US-A BWR for extreme external events, and relates these capabilities to re

  17. Use of flow models to analyse loss of coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinet, Bernard

    1978-01-01

    This article summarises current work on developing the use of flow models to analyse loss-of-coolant accident in pressurized-water plants. This work is being done jointly, in the context of the LOCA Technical Committee, by the CEA, EDF and FRAMATOME. The construction of the flow model is very closely based on some theoretical studies of the two-fluid model. The laws of transfer at the interface and at the wall are tested experimentally. The representativity of the model then has to be checked in experiments involving several elementary physical phenomena [fr

  18. Modelling of tritium dispersion from postulated accidental release of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Abner Duarte

    2010-01-01

    This study has the aim to assess the impact of accidental release of tritium postulate from a nuclear power reactor through environmental modeling of aquatic resources. In order to do that it was used computational models of hydrodynamics and transport for the simulation of tritium dispersion caused by an accident in a CANDU reactor located in the ongoing Angra 3 site. This exercise was accomplished with the aid of a code system (SisBAHIA) developed in the Rio de Janeiro Federal University (COPPE/UFRJ). The CANDU reactor is one that uses heavy water (D 2 O) as moderator and coolant of the core. It was postulated, then, the LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) accident in the emergency cooling system of the nucleus (without fusion), where was lost 66 m 3 of soda almost instantaneously. This inventory contained 35 PBq and was released a load of 9.7 TBq/s in liquid form near the Itaorna beach, Angra dos Reis - RJ. The models mentioned above were applied in two scenarios (plant stopped and operating) and showed a tritium plume with specific activities larger than the reference level for seawater (1.1 MBq/m 3 ) during the first 14 days after the accident. The main difference between the scenario without and with seawater recirculation (pumping and discharge) is based on the enhancement of dilution of the highest concentrations in the last one. This dilution enhancement resulting in decreasing concentrations was observed only during the first two weeks, when they ranged from 1x10 9 to 5x10 5 Bq/m 3 close to the Itaorna beach spreading just to Sandri Island. After 180 days, the plume could not be detected anymore in the bay, because their activities would be lower than the minimum detectable value ( 3 ). (author)

  19. Description of steam condensation phenomena during the loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCauley, E.W.; Holman, G.S.; Aust, E.; Furst, H.; Schwan, H.; Vollbrandt, J.

    1981-01-01

    Study of results from the full scale multivent pressure suppression experiment conducted by the GKSS Laboratory has developed an improved understanding of the dynamic, oscillatory steam condensation events and related loading functions which occur during the hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident in a boiling water nuclear reactor. Due to the unique measurements systems which combines both cinematic and digital data, qualified correlation between the dynamic physical variables and the associated two-phase thermo-hydraulic phenomena has been obtained

  20. Iron crud supply device to reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Takao.

    1993-01-01

    In a device for supplying iron cruds into reactor coolants in a BWR type power plant, a system in which feed water containing iron cruds is supplied to the reactor coolants after once passing through an ion exchange resin is disposed. As a result, iron cruds having characteristics similar with those of naturally occurring iron cruds in the plant are obtained and they react with ionic radioactivity, to form composite oxides. Then, iron cruds having high performance of being secured to the surface of a fuel cladding tube can be supplied to the reactor coolants, thereby enabling to greatly reduce the density of reactor water ionic radioactivity. In its turn, dose rate on the surface of pipelines can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce operators' radiation exposure dose in the plant. Further, contamination of a condensate desalting device due to iron cruds can be prevented, and further, the density of the iron cruds supplied can easily be controlled. (N.H.)

  1. Tritium in liquid phase in a BWR-5 like Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tijerina S, F.; Vargas A, A.; Cardenas J, J.

    2011-11-01

    In boiling water reactors (BWR), the tritium (H 3 ) takes place mainly as a result of ternary fissions in the nuclear reactors, of those which 75% are in gaseous form and 25% in liquid form. In the liquid phase, the tritium is transported to the pipes of the primary coolant toward condensed tanks or tanks of drainage excesses of radioactive equipment, located in external areas of a BWR, as well as to the processes of radioactive wastes to be able to be directed to the liquid effluents. For that reason, is necessary to know the possible routes of the transport and processes of the tritium in a BWR to control this radioisotope in the site of the event of leaks in equipment s and buried pipes, avoiding that emigrates toward underground flowing and an impact to the environment and to the people in general. (Author)

  2. The impact of BWR MK I primary containment failure dynamics on secondary containment integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    During the past four years, the ORNL BWRSAT Program has developed a series of increasingly sophisticated BWR secondary containment models. These models have been applied in a variety of studies to evaluate the severe accident mitigation capability of BWR secondary containments. This paper describes the results of a recent ORNL study of the impact of BWR MK I primary containment failure dynamics on secondary containment integrity. A 26-cell MELCOR Browns Ferry secondary containment model is described and the predicted thermodynamic response of the secondary containment to a variety of postulated primary containment failure modes is presented. The effects of primary containment failure location, timing, and ultimate hole size on secondary containment response is investigated, and the potential impact of hydrogen deflagrations on secondary containment integrity is explored

  3. The condensation of steam on the external surfaces of the shells of HIFAR heavy water heat exchangers during a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, A.G.

    1987-03-01

    A study of steam condensation rates on the HIFAR heavy water heat exchangers was undertaken to predict thermohydraulic conditions in the HIFAR containment during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The process of surface condensation from a mixture of air and steam, and methods for calculating the rate of condensation, are briefly reviewed. Suitable experimental data are used to estimate coefficients of condensation heat transfer to cool surfaces in a reactor containment during a LOCA. The relevance of the available data to a LOCA in the HIFAR materials testing reactor is examined, and two sets of data are compared. The differences between air/H 2 O and air/D 2 O mixtures are discussed. Formulae are derived for the estimation of the coefficient of heat transfer from the heat exchanger shells to the cooling water, and a method of calculating the rate of condensation per unit area of surface is developed

  4. Zinc corrosion after loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors – Physicochemical effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryk, Holger, E-mail: h.kryk@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Hoffmann, Wolfgang [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Kästner, Wolfgang; Alt, Sören; Seeliger, André; Renger, Stefan [Hochschule Zittau/Görlitz, Institute of Process Technology, Process Automation and Measuring Technology, Theodor-Körner-Allee 16, D-02763 Zittau (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Physicochemical effects due to post-LOCA zinc corrosion in PWR were elucidated. • Decreasing solubility of corrosion products with increasing temperature was found. • Solid corrosion products may be deposited on hot surfaces and/or within hot-spots. • Corrosion products precipitating from coolant were identified as zinc borates. • Depending on coolant temperature, different types of zinc borate are formed. - Abstract: Within the framework of the reactor safety research, generic experimental investigations were carried out aiming at the physicochemical background of possible zinc corrosion product formation, which may occur inside the reactor pressure vessel during the sump circulation operation after loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors. The contact of the boric acid containing coolant with hot-dip galvanized steel containment internals causes corrosion of the corresponding materials resulting in dissolution of the zinc coat. A retrograde solubility of zinc corrosion products with increasing temperature was observed during batch experiments of zinc corrosion in boric acid containing coolants. Thus, the formation and deposition of solid corrosion products cannot be ruled out if the coolant containing dissolved zinc is heated up during its recirculation into hot regions within the emergency cooling circuit (e.g. hot-spots in the core). Corrosion experiments at a lab-scale test facility, which included formation of corrosion products at a single heated cladding tube, proved that dissolved zinc, formed at low temperatures in boric acid solution by zinc corrosion, turns into solid deposits of zinc borates when contacting heated zircaloy surfaces during the heating of the coolant. Moreover, the temperature of formation influences the chemical composition of the zinc borates and thus the deposition and mobilization behavior of the products.

  5. Zinc corrosion after loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors – Physicochemical effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryk, Holger; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Kästner, Wolfgang; Alt, Sören; Seeliger, André; Renger, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Physicochemical effects due to post-LOCA zinc corrosion in PWR were elucidated. • Decreasing solubility of corrosion products with increasing temperature was found. • Solid corrosion products may be deposited on hot surfaces and/or within hot-spots. • Corrosion products precipitating from coolant were identified as zinc borates. • Depending on coolant temperature, different types of zinc borate are formed. - Abstract: Within the framework of the reactor safety research, generic experimental investigations were carried out aiming at the physicochemical background of possible zinc corrosion product formation, which may occur inside the reactor pressure vessel during the sump circulation operation after loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors. The contact of the boric acid containing coolant with hot-dip galvanized steel containment internals causes corrosion of the corresponding materials resulting in dissolution of the zinc coat. A retrograde solubility of zinc corrosion products with increasing temperature was observed during batch experiments of zinc corrosion in boric acid containing coolants. Thus, the formation and deposition of solid corrosion products cannot be ruled out if the coolant containing dissolved zinc is heated up during its recirculation into hot regions within the emergency cooling circuit (e.g. hot-spots in the core). Corrosion experiments at a lab-scale test facility, which included formation of corrosion products at a single heated cladding tube, proved that dissolved zinc, formed at low temperatures in boric acid solution by zinc corrosion, turns into solid deposits of zinc borates when contacting heated zircaloy surfaces during the heating of the coolant. Moreover, the temperature of formation influences the chemical composition of the zinc borates and thus the deposition and mobilization behavior of the products

  6. Tools evaluation and development for loss of coolant accidents analysis in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maprelian, Eduardo; Cabral, Eduardo L.L.; Silva, Antonio T. e

    1999-01-01

    The loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) in pool type research reactors are normally considered as limiting in the licensing process. This paper verifies the viability of the computer code 3D-AIRLOCA to analyze LOCA in a pool type research reactor, and also develops two computer codes LOSS and TEMPLOCA. The computer code LOSS determines the time tom drawn the pool down to the level of the bottom of the core, and the computer code TEMPLOCA calculates the peak fuel element temperature during the transient. These two coders substitutes the 3D-AIRLOCA in the LOCA analysis for pool type research reactors. (author)

  7. Accident beyond the design basis management with the coolant loss at the NPP with WWER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalozubov, V.I.; Klyuchnikov, A.A.; Kolykhanov, V.N.

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of status and experience of development on modelling and accident beyond the design basis management, including the severe accidents, at the nuclear power plants is carried out. The methodical providing of manuals on the accident beyond the design basis management with the coolant loss on the basis of simulated critical system configurations providing the necessary safety function performance on reactor unit is proposed. The project of symptom-oriented manuals on accident beyond the design basis management with the coolant loss on the serial power unit with WWER-1000 on the basis of developed methodical providing and well known results of deepened safety analysis is presented.

  8. Identification of flow regimes and heat transfer modes in Angra-2 core during the simulation of the small break loss of coolant accident of 250 cm2 in the cold leg of primary loop using RELAP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Eduardo M.; Sabundjian, Gaiane

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify the flow regimes, the heat transfer modes, and the correlations used by RELAP5/MOD3.2. gamma code in Angra-2 during the Small-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) with a 250cm 2 of rupture area in the cold leg of primary loop. The Chapter 15 of the Final Safety Analysis Report of Angra-2 (FSAR-A2) reports this specific kind of accident. The results from this work demonstrated the several flow regimes and heat transfer modes that can be present in the core of Angra-2 during the postulated accident. The results obtained for Angra-2 nuclear reactor core during the postulated accident were satisfactory when compared with the FSAR-A2. Additionally, the results showed the correct actuation of the ECCS guaranteeing the integrity of the reactor core. (author)

  9. BWR 1 % main recirculation line break LOCA tests, RUNs 917 and 918, without HPCS at ROSA-III program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Okazaki, Motoaki; Anoda, Yoshinari; Kumamaru, Hiroshige; Nakamura, Hideo; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Koizumi, Yasuo; Tasaka, Kanji

    1988-07-01

    In a case of small break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) at a boiling water reactor (BWR) system, it is important to lower the system pressure to cool down the reactor system by using either the high pressure core spray (HPCS) or the automatic depressurization system (ADS). The report presents characteristic test results of RUNs 918 and 917, which were performed at the rig-of-safety assessment (ROSA)-III program simulating a 1 % break BWR LOCA with an assumption of HPCS failure, and clarifies effects of the ADS delay time on a small break LOCA. The ROSA-III test facility simulates principal components of a BWR/6 system with volumetric scaling factor of 1/424. It is experimentally concluded that the ADS delay time shorter than 4 minutes results in a similar PCT as that in a standard case, in which the PCT is observed after actuation of the low pressure core spray (LPCS). And the ADS delay time longer than 4 minutes results in higher PCT than in the standard case. In the latter, the PCT depends on the ADS time, a 220 K higher PCT, for example, in a case of 10 minutes ADS delay compared with the standard case. (author) 52 refs. 299 figs

  10. Reduction of radiation exposure in Japanese BWR Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morikawa, Yoshitake

    1995-01-01

    The reduction of occupational exposure to radiation during the annual inspection and maintenance outages of Japanese boiling water reactors (BWR) is one of the most important objectives for stable and reliable operation. It was shown that this radiation exposure is caused by radionuclides, such as Co-60, Co-58 and Mn-54 which are produced from the metal elements Co, Ni, and Fe present in the corrosion products of structural materials that had been irradiated by neutrons. Therefore, to reduce radiation sources and exposures in Japanese BWRs, attempts have been reinforced to remove corrosion products and activated corrosion products from the primary coolant system. This paper describes the progress of the application of these measures to Japanese BWRs. Most Japanese BWR-4 and BWR-5 type nuclear power plants started their commercial operations during the 1970s. With the elapse of time during operations, a problem came to the forefront, namely that occupational radiation exposure during plant outages gradually increased, which obstructed the smooth running of inspections and maintenance work. To overcome this problem, extensive studies to derive effective countermeasures for radiation exposure reduction were undertaken, based on the evaluation of the plants operation data

  11. Reduction of radiation exposure in Japanese BWR Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Yoshitake [ISOGO Nuclear Engineering Center, Yokohama (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    The reduction of occupational exposure to radiation during the annual inspection and maintenance outages of Japanese boiling water reactors (BWR) is one of the most important objectives for stable and reliable operation. It was shown that this radiation exposure is caused by radionuclides, such as Co-60, Co-58 and Mn-54 which are produced from the metal elements Co, Ni, and Fe present in the corrosion products of structural materials that had been irradiated by neutrons. Therefore, to reduce radiation sources and exposures in Japanese BWRs, attempts have been reinforced to remove corrosion products and activated corrosion products from the primary coolant system. This paper describes the progress of the application of these measures to Japanese BWRs. Most Japanese BWR-4 and BWR-5 type nuclear power plants started their commercial operations during the 1970s. With the elapse of time during operations, a problem came to the forefront, namely that occupational radiation exposure during plant outages gradually increased, which obstructed the smooth running of inspections and maintenance work. To overcome this problem, extensive studies to derive effective countermeasures for radiation exposure reduction were undertaken, based on the evaluation of the plants operation data.

  12. Reactor primary coolant system pipe rupture study. Progress report No. 33, January--June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    The pipe rupture study is designed to extend the understanding of failure-causing mechanisms and to provide improved capability for evaluating reactor piping systems to minimize the probability of failures. Following a detailed review to determine the effort most needed to improve nuclear system piping (Phase 1), analytical and experimental efforts (Phase 2) were started in 1965. This progress report summarizes the recent accomplishments of a broad program in (a) basic fatigue crack growth rate studies focused on LWR primary piping materials in a simulated BWR primary coolant environment, (b) at-reactor tests of the effect of primary coolant environment on the fatigue behavior of piping steels, (c) studies directed at quantifying weld sensitization in Type 304 stainless steel, (d) support studies to characterize the electrochemical potential behavior of a typical BWR primary water environment and (e) special tests related to simulation of fracture surfaces characteristic of IGSCC field failures

  13. Analysis of natural circulation BWR dynamics with stochastic and deterministic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanderHagen, T.H.; Van Dam, H.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Kleiss, E.B.J.; Nissen, W.H.M.; Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Reactor kinetic, thermal hydraulic and total plant stability of a natural convection cooled BWR was studied using noise analysis and by evaluation of process responses to control rod steps and to steamflow control valve steps. An estimate of the fuel thermal time constant and an impression of the recirculation flow response to power variations was obtained. A sophisticated noise analysis method resulted in more insight into the fluctuations of the coolant velocity

  14. Investigation of small break loss-of-coolant phenomena in a small scale nonnuclear test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzuol, J.M.; Fauble, T.J.; Harvego, E.A.

    1980-01-01

    A small-scale nonnuclear integral test facility designed to simulate a pressurized water reactor (PWR) system was used to evaluate the effects of a small break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) on the system thermal-hydraulic response. The experiment approximated a 2.5% (11-cm diameter) communicative break in the cold leg of a PWR, and included initial conditions which were similar to conditions in a PWR operating at full power. The 2.5% break size ensured that the nominal break flow rate was greater than the high pressure injection system (HPIS) flow rate, thus providing the potential for a continuous system depressurization. The sequence of events was similar to that used in evaluation model analysis of small break loss-of-coolant accidents, and included simulated reactor scram and loss of offsite power. Comparisions of experimental data with computer code calculations are used to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of integral system calculations used to predict phenomena which can be important in the assessment of a small break LOCA in a PWR

  15. Thermalydraulic processes in the reactor coolant system of a BWR under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) incorporate many unique structural features that make their expected response under severe accident conditions very different from that predicted in the case of pressurized water reactor accident sequences. Automatic main steam isolation valve (MIV) closure as the vessel water level approaches the top of the core would cause reactor vessel isolation while automatic recirculation pump trip would limit the in-vessel flows to those characteristic of natural circulation (as disturbed by vessel relief valve actuation). This paper provides a discussion of the BWR control blade, channel box, core plate, control rod guide tube, and reactor vessel safety relief valve (SRV) configuration and the effects of these structural components upon thermal hydraulic processes within the reactor vessel under severe accident conditions. The dominant BWR severe accident sequences as determined by probabilistic risk assessment are described and the expected timing of events for the unmitigated short-term station blackout severe accident sequence at the Peach Bottom atomic power station is presented

  16. Hydrogen injection device in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Jun-ichi; Kubo, Koji.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the increasing ratio of main steam system dose rate due to N-16 activity due to excess hydrogen injection in the hydrogen injection operation of BWR type reactors. Constitution: There are provided a hydrogen injection mechanism for injecting hydrogen into primary coolants of a BWR type reactor, and a chemical injection device for injecting chemicals such as methanol, which makes nitrogen radioisotopes resulted in the reactor water upon hydrogen injection non-volatile, into the pressure vessel separately from hydrogen. Injected hydrogen and the chemicals are not reacted in the feedwater system, but the reaction proceeds due to the presence of radioactive rays after the injection into the pressure vessel. Then, hydrogen causes re-combination in the downcomer portion to reduce the dissolved oxygen concentration. Meanwhile, about 70 % of the chemicals is supplied by means of a jet pump directly to the reactor core, thereby converting the chemical form of N-16 in the reactor core more oxidative (non-volatile). (Kawakami, Y.)

  17. Requalification of the LOFT reactor following a loss of coolant experiment (Level I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    During a Loss of Coolant Experiment (LOCE), the LOFT reactor experiences an acceleration of 10 G's and fuel cladding temperature changes at a rate of 1100 0 K/sec. These unparalleled conditions present a unique startup problem to the LOFT program: How can the integrity of the fuel be confirmed so as to minimize operation if damage has occurred. The Level I Requalification Program is designed to accomplish this. It is a progressive series of tests, designed to detect damage at the earliest possible time, and thus preclude or minimize operation if damage exists. First, fuel specialists examine the LOCE data for possible damaging conditions and the results of primary coolant sample analysis for signs of failed fuel. Second, the requalification program proceeds to a series of mechanical and physics tests

  18. BWR 90 and BWR 90+: Two advanced BWR design generations from ABB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, S.; Ivung, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1999-01-01

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced light water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and total power generation costs have been low. When developing the BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to a reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher than that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Hence, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The review work was completed in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with an 'evolutionary' design called BWR 90+, which aims at developing the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is performed by ABB Atom

  19. MABEL-1. A code to analyse cladding deformation in a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowring, R.W.; Cooper, C.A.

    1978-06-01

    The MABEL-1 code has been written to investigate the deformation, of fuel pin cladding and its effects on fuel pin temperature transients during a loss-of-coolant accident. The code considers a single fuel pin with heated fuel concentric within the cladding. The fuel pin temperature distribution is evaluated using a one-dimensional conduction model with heat transfer to the coolant represented by an input set of heat transfer coefficients. The cladding deformation is calculated using the code CANSWEL, which assumes all strain to be elastic or creep and models the creep under a multi-axial stress system by a spring/dashpot combination undergoing alternate relaxation and elastic strain. (author)

  20. Reactor coolant pump seal response to loss of cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, T.; Metcalfe, R.; Burchett, P.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a test done to determine the performance of a reactor coolant pump seal for a water cooled nuclear reactor under loss of all cooling conditions. Under these conditions, seal faces can lose their liquid lubricating film and elastomers can rapidly degrade. Temperatures in the seal-cartridge tester reached 230 o C in three hours, at which time the tester was stopped and the temperature increased to 265 o C for a further five hours before cooling was restored. Seal leakage was 'normal' throughout the test. Parts sustained minor damage with no effect on seal integrity. Plant operators were shown to have ample margin beyond their 15 minute allowable reaction time. (author)

  1. Parallel channel effects under BWR LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.; Hatamiya, S.; Murase, M.

    1988-01-01

    Due to parallel channel effects, different flow patterns such as liquid down-flow and gas up-flow appear simultaneously in fuel bundles of a BWR core during postulated LOCAs. Applying the parallel channel effects to the fuel bundle, water drain tubes with a restricted bottom end have been developed in order to mitigate counter-current flow limiting and to increase the falling water flow rate at the upper tie plate. The upper tie plate with water drain tubes is an especially effective means of increasing the safety margin of a reactor with narrow gaps between fuel rods and high steam velocity at the upper tie plate. The characteristics of the water drain tubes have been experimentally investigated using a small-scaled steam-water system simulating a BWR core. Then, their effect on the fuel cladding temperature was evaluated using the LOCA analysis program SAFER. (orig.)

  2. General Electric Company analytical model for loss-of-coolant analysis in accordance with 10CFR50 appendix K, amendment No. 3: effect of steam environment on BWR core spray distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-04-01

    The core spray sparger designs of the BWR/2 through BWR/5 product lines were verified by means of full-scale mock-ups tested in air at various flow conditions. In 1974, an overseas technical partner of General Electric reported that a steam environment changed the individual core spray nozzle patterns when compared to patterns measured in air. This document describes preliminary findings of how a steam environment alters the core spray nozzle pattern, and the actions which General Electric is pursuing to quantify the steam effects

  3. An evaluation of debris mobility within a PWR reactor coolant system during the recirculation mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreychek, T.S.

    1987-01-01

    To provide for the long-term cooling of the nuclear core of a Pressurized Water Rector (PWR) following a hypothetical Loss-of-Coolant Accidnet (LOCA), water is drawn from the containment sump and pumped into the reactor coolant system (RCS). It has been postulated that debris from the containment, such as dirt, sand, and paint from containment walls and in-containment equipment, could be carried into the containment sump due to the action of the RCS coolant that escapes from the breach in the piping and then flows to the sump. Once in the sump, this debris could be pumped into the Safety Injection System (SIS) and ultimately the RCS itself, causing the performance of the SIS to be degraded. Of particular interest is the potential for core blockage that may occur due to debris transport into the core region by the recirculating flow. This paper presents a method of evaluating the potential for debris from the sump to form core blockages under recirculating flow conditions following a hypothetical LOCA for a PWR

  4. Atucha I nuclear power plant: Probabilistic safety study. Loss-of-coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    The plant response to the group of events 'large coolant loss' in order to evaluate the associated risk is analyzed. The event that covers all events of similar sequence due to its evolution features, being also the most demanded, is selected as starting event. The representative event is the 'guillotine type rupture of cold primary branch'. An annual occurrence frequency of 10/year is assumed for this event. The safety systems, when the event occurs, must assure the reactor shutdown and the core cooling, creating a heat sink to remove the decay heat. The annual frequency of core meltdown due to great loss of coolant is obtained multiplying the annual frequency of the starting event by the probability of failure of involved safety systems. By means of failure trees, the following is obtained: a) probability of failure to demand of the boron injection shutdown system = 4 x 10 -2 ; b) probability of failure to demand of the high pressure safety injection = 3 x 10 -3 ; c) probability of emergency cooling system failure = 4.4 x 10 -2 . Therefore, the three possible sequences of core meltdown have the following frequencies: λ 1 = 4 x 10 -6 /year λ 2 = 3 x 10 -7 /year λ 3 = 4.4 x 10 -6 /year. (Author)

  5. Probabilistic analysis of fuel pin behaviour during an eventual loss of coolant in PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    Brief description of the development of the coolant loss incident in a pressurized water reactor and analysis of its significance for the behaviour of the fuel rods. Description of a probalistic method for estimating the effects of the accident on the fuel rods and results obtained [fr

  6. BWR 90: The ABB advanced BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, S.; Ivung, B.; Pedersen, T.

    1999-01-01

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced fight water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and the total power generation costs have been low. In the development of BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to the reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher dim that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Thus, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The work is scheduled for completion in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with the 'evolutionary' design BWR 90+. The primary design goal is to develop the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is

  7. Application of passive auto catalytic recombiner (PAR) for BWR plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Murano, K.; Yamanari, S.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The passive auto-catalytic recombiner (PAR), which can recombine flammable gases such as hydrogen and oxygen with each other to avoid an explosion in case of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), installed in the primary containment vessel does not require a power supply or dynamic equipment, while the existing flammability gas control system (FCS) of most BWRs as an outer loop of the primary containment vessel needs them to make flammable gases circulate through blowers and heaters in the system. PAR offers a number of advantages over existing FCS, such as high reliability, low cost due to much smaller amount of materials needed, good maintainability, good operability in case of a LOCA, and smaller space for installation. An experimental study has been carried out for the purpose of solving the problems of applying PAR to Japanese BWR plants instead of existing FCS, in which we grasped the basic characteristics of PAR. (author)

  8. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1980-01-01

    This study deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the 13 N content in the containment atmosphere. 13 N is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process Hl+016/yields/ 13 N+ 4 He. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium 13 N concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m/sup -3/ and 7 kBq m/sup -3/ for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge(Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. 8 refs

  9. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1980-01-01

    This study deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the N13 content in the containment atmosphere. N13 is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process Hl+016/yields/Nl3+He4. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium N13 concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m/sup -3/ and 7 kBq m/sup -3/ for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge(Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. 8 refs

  10. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1979-08-01

    The present paper deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the N13 content in the containment atmosphere. N13 is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process H1+016 → N13+He4. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium N13 concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m -3 and 7 kBq m -3 for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge (Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. (Auth.)

  11. On-line prediction of BWR transients in support of plant operation and safety analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Lekach, S.V.; Mallen, A.N.

    1983-01-01

    A combination of advanced modeling techniques and modern, special-purpose peripheral minicomputer technology is presented which affords realistic predictions of plant transient and severe off-normal events in LWR power plants through on-line simulations at a speed ten times greater than actual process speeds. Results are shown for a BWR plant simulation. The mathematical models account for nonequilibrium, nonhomogeneous two-phase flow effects in the coolant, for acoustical effects in the steam line and for the dynamics of the recirculation loop and feed-water train. Point kinetics incorporate reactivity feedback for void fraction, for fuel temperature, and for coolant temperature. Control systems and trip logic are simulated for the nuclear steam supply system

  12. Identification of flow regimes and heat transfer modes in Angra-2 core during the simulation of the small break loss of coolant accident of 250 cm{sup 2} in the cold leg of primary loop using RELAP5 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Eduardo M.; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: borges.em@hotmail.com, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNE-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify the flow regimes, the heat transfer modes, and the correlations used by RELAP5/MOD3.2. gamma code in Angra-2 during the Small-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) with a 250cm{sup 2} of rupture area in the cold leg of primary loop. The Chapter 15 of the Final Safety Analysis Report of Angra-2 (FSAR-A2) reports this specific kind of accident. The results from this work demonstrated the several flow regimes and heat transfer modes that can be present in the core of Angra-2 during the postulated accident. The results obtained for Angra-2 nuclear reactor core during the postulated accident were satisfactory when compared with the FSAR-A2. Additionally, the results showed the correct actuation of the ECCS guaranteeing the integrity of the reactor core. (author)

  13. Analysis of a small break loss-of-coolant accident of pressurized water reactor by APROS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Falahi, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland); Haennine, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Porkholm, K. [IVO International, Ltd., Vantaa (Finland)

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the capability of APROS (Advanced PROcess Simulator) code to simulate the real plant thermal-hydraulic transient of a Small Break Loss-Of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) of Loss-Of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The LOFT is a scaled model of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). This work is a part of a larger validation of the APROS thermal-hydraulic models. The results of SBLOCA transient calculated by APROS showed a reasonable agreement with the measured data.

  14. Development and Assessment of CFD Models Including a Supplemental Program Code for Analyzing Buoyancy-Driven Flows Through BWR Fuel Assemblies in SFP Complete LOCA Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artnak, Edward Joseph, III

    This work seeks to illustrate the potential benefits afforded by implementing aspects of fluid dynamics, especially the latest computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling approach, through numerical experimentation and the traditional discipline of physical experimentation to improve the calibration of the severe reactor accident analysis code, MELCOR, in one of several spent fuel pool (SFP) complete loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) scenarios. While the scope of experimental work performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) extends well beyond that which is reasonably addressed by our allotted resources and computational time in accordance with initial project allocations to complete the report, these simulated case trials produced a significant array of supplementary high-fidelity solutions and hydraulic flow-field data in support of SNL research objectives. Results contained herein show FLUENT CFD model representations of a 9x9 BWR fuel assembly in conditions corresponding to a complete loss-of-coolant accident scenario. In addition to the CFD model developments, a MATLAB based controlvolume model was constructed to independently assess the 9x9 BWR fuel assembly under similar accident scenarios. The data produced from this work show that FLUENT CFD models are capable of resolving complex flow fields within a BWR fuel assembly in the realm of buoyancy-induced mass flow rates and that characteristic hydraulic parameters from such CFD simulations (or physical experiments) are reasonably employed in corresponding constitutive correlations for developing simplified numerical models of comparable solution accuracy.

  15. Comparison of gamma densitometer detectors used in loss of coolant studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipp, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Ionization chamber type gamma detectors are used in water-steam density measurements in loss of coolant studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Ionization chambers have replaced current-mode scintillation detectors to obtain stability and freedom from magnetic field interference. However, this change results in some loss of fast transient response. Results of studies comparing the transient response of ionization chamber detectors, plastic scintillation detectors, and sodium iodide (NaI) detectors to rapid changes in gamma intensity demonstrate that plastic scintillation detectors have the fastest response and most closely reproduce the transient; ionization chambers have an initial fast response followed by a slower response, which may produce errors in fast transient measurements; and NaI scintillation detectors have a moderately fast initial response followed by an extremely slow response, which produces errors in even slow transient measurements

  16. Advanced BWR core component designs and the implications for SFD analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    Prior to the DF-4 boiling water reactor (BWR) severe fuel damage (SFD) experiment conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories in 1986, no experimental data base existed for guidance in modeling core component behavior under postulated severe accident conditions in commercial BWRs. This paper will present the lessons learned from the DF-4 experiment (and subsequent German CORA BWR SFD tests) and the impact on core models in the current generation of SFD codes. The DF-4 and CORA BWR test assemblies were modeled on the core component designs circa 1985; that is, the 8 x 8 fuel assembly with two water rods and a cruciform control blade constructed of B 4 C-filled tubelets. Within the past ten years, the state-of-the-art with respect to BWR core component development has out-distanced the current SFD experimental data base and SFD code capabilities. For example, modern BWR control blade design includes hafnium at the tips and top of each control blade wing for longer blade operating lifetimes; also water rods have been replaced by larger water channels for better neutronics economy; and fuel assemblies now contain partial-length fuel rods, again for better neutronics economy. This paper will also discuss the implications of these advanced fuel assembly and core component designs on severe accident progression and on the current SFD code capabilities

  17. Technical support to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the boiling water reactor blowdown heat transfer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, R.E.

    1976-09-01

    Results are presented of studies conducted by Aerojet Nuclear Company (ANC) in FY 1975 to support the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the boiling water reactor blowdown heat transfer (BWR-BDHT) program. The support provided by ANC is that of an independent assessor of the program to ensure that the data obtained are adequate for verification of analytical models used for predicting reactor response to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident. The support included reviews of program plans, objectives, measurements, and actual data. Additional activity included analysis of experimental system performance and evaluation of the RELAP4 computer code as applied to the experiments

  18. BWR startup and shutdown activity transport control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, S.E., E-mail: sgarcia@epri.com [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, California (United States); Giannelli, J.F.; Jarvis, A.J., E-mail: jgiannelli@finetech.com, E-mail: ajarvis@finetech.com [Finetech, Inc., Parsippany, New Jersey (United States)

    2010-07-01

    This paper summarizes BWR industry experience on good practices for controlling the transport of corrosion product activity during shutdowns, particularly refueling outages, and for startup chemistry control to minimize IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracking). For shutdown, overall goals are to minimize adverse impacts of crud bursts and the time required to remove activated corrosion products from the reactor coolant during the shutdown process prior to refueling, and to assist plants in predicting and controlling radiation exposure during outages. For startup, the overall goals are to highlight conditions during early heatup and startup when sources of reactor coolant oxidants are high, when there is a greater likelihood for chemical excursions associated with refueling outage work activities, and when hydrogen injection is not available to mitigate IGSCC due to system design limitations. BWR water chemistry has changed significantly in recent years with the adoption of hydrogen water chemistry, zinc addition and noble metal chemical applications. These processes have, in some instances, resulted in significant activity increases during shutdown evolutions, which together with reduced time for cleanup because of shorter outages, has consequently increased outage radiation exposure. A review several recent outages shows that adverse effects from these conditions can be minimized, leading to the set of good practice recommendations for shutdown chemistry control. Most plants lose the majority of their hydrogen availability hours during early startup because feedwater hydrogen injection systems were not originally designed to inject hydrogen below 20% power. Hydrogen availability has improved through modifications to inject hydrogen at lower power levels, some near 5%. However, data indicate that IGSCC is accelerated during early startup, when dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide levels are high and reactor coolant temperatures are in the 300 to 400 {sup o}F

  19. Study of a loss of coolant accident of a PWR reactor through a Full Scope Simulator and computational code RELAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Alexandre de Souza

    2014-01-01

    The present paper proposes a study of a loss of coolant accident of a PWR reactor through a Full Scope Simulator and computational code RELAP. To this end, it considered a loss of coolant accident with 160 cm 2 breaking area in cold leg of 20 circuit of the reactor cooling system of nuclear power plant Angra 2, with the reactor operating in stationary condition, to 100% power. It considered that occurred at the same time the loss of External Power Supply and the availability of emergency cooling system was not full. The results obtained are quite relevant and with the possibility of being used in the planning of future activities, given that the construction of Angra 3 is underway and resembles the Angra 2. (author)

  20. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 4 – Integrated chemical effects testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Amir; LaBrier, Daniel [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States); Blandford, Edward, E-mail: edb@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States); Howe, Kerry [Department of Civil Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Integrated test explored the material release of a postulated large break LOCA. • Aluminum concentration was very low (<0.1 mg/L) throughout the test duration. • Zinc concentration was low (<1 mg/L) in TSP-buffered system. • Calcium release showed two distinguished release zones: prompt and meta-stable. • Copper and iron has no distinguishable concentration up to first 24 h of testing. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of an integrated chemical effects experiment executed under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) at the Vogtle nuclear power plant, operated by the Southern Nuclear Operating Company (SNOC). This test was conducted for closure of a series of bench scale experiments conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of aluminum (Howe et al., 2015) and zinc (Pease et al., 2015) from metallic surfaces, and calcium from NUKON fiberglass insulation (Olson et al., 2015) . The integrated test was performed in the Corrosion/Chemical Head Loss Experimental (CHLE) facility with representative amounts of zinc, aluminum, carbon steel, copper, NUKON fiberglass, and latent debris. The test was conducted using borated TSP-buffered solution under a post-LOCA prototypical temperature profile lasting for 30 days. The results presented in this article demonstrate trends for zinc, aluminum, and calcium release that are consistent with separate bench scale testing and previous integrated tests under TSP conditions. The release rate and maximum concentrations of the released materials were slightly different than the separate effect testing as a result of different experimental conditions (temperature, surface area-to-water volume ratio) and/or the presence of other metals and chemicals in the integrated test. Samples of metal coupons and fiberglass were selected for analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy

  1. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 4 – Integrated chemical effects testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Amir; LaBrier, Daniel; Blandford, Edward; Howe, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Integrated test explored the material release of a postulated large break LOCA. • Aluminum concentration was very low (<0.1 mg/L) throughout the test duration. • Zinc concentration was low (<1 mg/L) in TSP-buffered system. • Calcium release showed two distinguished release zones: prompt and meta-stable. • Copper and iron has no distinguishable concentration up to first 24 h of testing. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of an integrated chemical effects experiment executed under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) at the Vogtle nuclear power plant, operated by the Southern Nuclear Operating Company (SNOC). This test was conducted for closure of a series of bench scale experiments conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of aluminum (Howe et al., 2015) and zinc (Pease et al., 2015) from metallic surfaces, and calcium from NUKON fiberglass insulation (Olson et al., 2015) . The integrated test was performed in the Corrosion/Chemical Head Loss Experimental (CHLE) facility with representative amounts of zinc, aluminum, carbon steel, copper, NUKON fiberglass, and latent debris. The test was conducted using borated TSP-buffered solution under a post-LOCA prototypical temperature profile lasting for 30 days. The results presented in this article demonstrate trends for zinc, aluminum, and calcium release that are consistent with separate bench scale testing and previous integrated tests under TSP conditions. The release rate and maximum concentrations of the released materials were slightly different than the separate effect testing as a result of different experimental conditions (temperature, surface area-to-water volume ratio) and/or the presence of other metals and chemicals in the integrated test. Samples of metal coupons and fiberglass were selected for analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy

  2. LBB application in Swedish BWR design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornfeldt, H.; Bjoerk, K.O.; Ekstroem, P. [ABB Atom, Vaesteras (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    The protection against dynamic effects in connection with potential pipe breaks has been implemented in different ways in the development of BWR reactor designs. First-generation plant designs reflect code requirements in effect at that time which means that no piping restraint systems were designed and built into those plants. Modern designs have, in contrast, implemented full protection against damage in connection with postulated pipe breaks, as required in current codes and regulations. Moderns standards and current regulatory demands can be met for the older plants by backfitting pipe whip restraint hardware. This could lead to several practical difficulties as these installations were not anticipated in the original plant design and layout. Meeting the new demands by analysis would in this situation have great advantages. Application of leak-before-break criteria gives an alternative opportunity of meeting modem standards in reactor safety design. Analysis takes into account data specific to BWR primary system operation, actual pipe material properties, piping loads and leak detection capability. Special attention must be given to ensure that the data used reflects actual plant conditions.

  3. LBB application in Swedish BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornfeldt, H.; Bjoerk, K.O.; Ekstroem, P.

    1997-01-01

    The protection against dynamic effects in connection with potential pipe breaks has been implemented in different ways in the development of BWR reactor designs. First-generation plant designs reflect code requirements in effect at that time which means that no piping restraint systems were designed and built into those plants. Modern designs have, in contrast, implemented full protection against damage in connection with postulated pipe breaks, as required in current codes and regulations. Moderns standards and current regulatory demands can be met for the older plants by backfitting pipe whip restraint hardware. This could lead to several practical difficulties as these installations were not anticipated in the original plant design and layout. Meeting the new demands by analysis would in this situation have great advantages. Application of leak-before-break criteria gives an alternative opportunity of meeting modem standards in reactor safety design. Analysis takes into account data specific to BWR primary system operation, actual pipe material properties, piping loads and leak detection capability. Special attention must be given to ensure that the data used reflects actual plant conditions

  4. Long-term security of electrical and control engineering equipment in nuclear power stations to withstand a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.

    1996-01-01

    Electrical and control engineering equipment, which has to function even after many years of operation in the event of a fault in a saturated steam atmosphere of 160 C maximum, is essential in nuclear power stations in order to control a loss of coolant accident. The nuclear power station operators have, for this purpose, developed verification strategies for groups of components, by means of which it is ensured that the electrical and control engineering components are capable of dealing with a loss of coolant accident even at the end of their planned operating life. (orig.) [de

  5. On the transient pressure build-up in the full pressure safety shell of watercooled nuclear reactors after a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfeld, G.

    1979-08-01

    The thermo-and fluid-dynamic processes in a multichamber full pressure safety containment during a loss of coolant accident have been investigated. Comparison of the calculations carried out with the computer programs, in which ZOCO VI was used as being representative of similar programs, with the experimental results pointed out discrepancies in the determination of time dependent pressure, pressure difference and temperature curves. This led to the development of a new theoretical model and a program COFLOW which pays particular attention to the fluid dynamic processes in the initial phase of a loss of coolant accident. It can also be used to determine the maximum containment pressure towards the end of a loss of coolant accident. Comparison of the COFLOW results with experiments has shown that COFLOW provides a model and a procedure by which the physical processes in a multichamber full pressure safety containment can be simulated satisfactorily

  6. Effect of torus wall flexibility on hydro-structural interaction in BWR containment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.H.; McCauley, E.W.; Holman, G.S.

    1979-01-01

    The MARK I boiling water reactor (BWR) containment system is comprised of a light-bulb-shaped reactor compartment connected through vent pipes to a torus-shaped and partially water-filled pressure suppression chamber, or the wetwell. During either a normally occurring safety relief valve (SRV) discharge or a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), air or steam is forced into the wetwell water pool for condensation and results in hydrodynamically induced loads on the torus shell. An analytical program is described which employs the finite element method to investigate the influence of torus wall flexibility on hydrodynamically induced pressure and the resultant force on the torus shell surface. The shell flexibility is characterized by the diameter-to-thickness ratio which is varied from the perfectly rigid case to the nominal plant condition. The general conclusion reached is that torus wall flexibility decreases both the maximum pressure seen by the shell wall and the total vertical load resulted from the hydrodynamically induced pressure

  7. Influence of steam generator tube ruptures during semiscale loss-of-coolant experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzuol, J.M.; Larson, T.K.

    1978-01-01

    Tests which simulated rupture of steam generator tubes during loss-of-coolant experiments in a PWR type system have been conducted in the Semiscale Mod-1 system. Analysis of test data indicates that high rod cladding temperatures occured only for a band of tube ruptures (between 12 and 20 tubes) and that the peak cladding temperatures attained within this band were strongly dependent on the magnitude of the tube rupture flow rates. Maximum cladding temperature of about 1255 K was observed for tests which simulated tube ruptures within this narrow band. (author)

  8. Analysis of accidental loss of pool coolant due to leakage in a PWR SFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yapei; Tian, Wenxi; Su, Guanghui; Qiu, Suizheng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Accidental loss of pool coolant due to leakage in a PWR SFP was studied using MAAP5. • The effect of emergency ventilation on the accident progression was investigated. • The effect of emergency injection on the accident progression was discussed. - Abstract: A large loss of pool coolant/water accident may be caused by extreme accidents such as the pool wall or bottom floor punctures due to a large aircraft strike. The safety of SFP under this circumstance is very important. Large amounts of radioactive materials would be easily released into the environment if a severe accident happened in the SFP, because the spent fuel pool (SFP) in a PWR nuclear power station (NPS) is often located in the fuel handing building outside the reactor containment. To gain insight into the loss of pool coolant accident progression for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) SFP, a computational model was established by using the Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP5). Important factors such as Zr oxidation by air, air natural circulation and thermal radiation were considered for partial and complete drainage accidents without mitigation measures. The calculation indicated that even if the residual water level was in the active fuel region, there was a chance to effectively remove the decay heat through axial heat conduction (if the pool cooling system failed) or steam cooling (if the pool cooling system was working). For sensitivity study, the effects of emergency ventilation and water injection on the accident progression were analyzed. The analysis showed that for the current configuration of high-density storage racks, it was difficult to cool the spent fuels by air natural circulation. Enlarging the space between the adjacent assemblies was a way of increasing air natural circulation flow rate and maintaining the coolability of SFP. Water injection to the bottom of the SFP helped to recover water inventory, quenching the high temperature assemblies to prevent

  9. Assessment of the fracture toughness of irradiated stainless steel for BWR core shrouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.G.; Gamble, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    Data from previously performed experiments were collected and evaluated to determine the relationship between fracture toughness and neutron fluence for conditions representative of BWR core shrouds. This relationship together with EPFM (elastic-plastic fracture mechanics) analysis methods similar to those in Appendix K of Section XI of the ASME Code were used to compute margin against failure as a function of neutron fluence for postulated cracks in BWR core shrouds. The results indicate that EPFM analyses can be used for flaw evaluation of core shrouds at fluence levels less than 3.10 21 n/cm 2 (E > 1 MeV). At fluence levels equal to or greater than 3.10 21 n/cm 2 , LEFM (linear-elastic fracture mechanics) analyses should be used with K Ic = 55 MPa-(m) 0.5 . (authors)

  10. Loss of coolant analysis for the tower shielding reactor 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radcliff, T.D.; Williams, P.T.

    1990-06-01

    The operational limits of the Tower Shielding Reactor-2 (TSR-2) have been revised to account for placing the reactor in a beam shield, which reduces convection cooling during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A detailed heat transfer analysis was performed to set operating time limits which preclude fuel damage during a LOCA. Since a LOCA is survivable, the pressure boundary need not be safety related, minimizing seismic and inspection requirements. Measurements of reactor component emittance for this analysis revealed that aluminum oxidized in water may have emittance much higher than accepted values, allowing higher operating limits than were originally expected. These limits could be increased further with analytical or hardware improvements. 5 refs., 7 figs

  11. Observations of crud deposits, corrosion and erosion of BWR and PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairiot, H.

    1983-01-01

    The BWR experience is limited to one reactor but the PWR experience covers a wide range of successive generations of power plants (7 in total). The systems are described and their water chemistry briefly commented. Some R and D performed on the effects of the operating regimes (steady state and transients) are summarized. Observations made by pool-side inspections and postirradiation examinations of fuel are outlined concerning water chemistry effects (crud deposits and corrosion) and ''mechanical'' coolant-cladding interaction (chip deposits and baffle jetting). (author)

  12. Predicted Variations of Water Chemistry in the Primary Coolant Circuit of a Supercritical Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Wang, Mei-Ya; Liu, Hong-Ming; Lee, Min

    2012-09-01

    except for the core channel and the upper plenum. The [O 2 ] at the lower water rod was higher than that at the middle water rod due to the decomposition of H 2 O 2 . The lower plenum exhibited a high [O 2 ] simply because the [O 2 ] in the lower water rod region was higher. In the core channel region, the [H 2 O 2 ] slowly increased as the coolant moved upward, and it turned into a drastic increase as the coolant became supercritical. Although the [H 2 ] in all selected regions was higher than that in a commercial boiling water reactor (BWR), the [H 2 O 2 ] and [O 2 ] were even higher those in a BWR. In summary, it was predicted that the coolant environment in an SCWR could be highly oxidizing, and the structural components would therefore suffer from a more serious corrosion problem than those in a commercial BWR. (authors)

  13. Advanced Construction of Compact Containment BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Maruyama, T.; Mori, H.; Hoshino, K.; Hijioka, Y.; Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Hoshi, T.

    2006-01-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a mid/small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. Compact Containment BWR (CCR) is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, will provide attractiveness for the energy market in the world due to its flexibility in energy demands as well as in site conditions, its high potential in reducing investment risk and its safety feature facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's mid/small power output of 400 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). The high investment potential is expected from CCR's simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, top mounted upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified safety system with high pressure resistible primary containment vessel (PCV) concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps as well as needs for maintenance of such pumps. The top mounted upper entry CRDs enable the bottom located short core in RPV. The safety feature mainly consists of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), high pressure resistible PCV and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in case of design base accidents including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. CCR's specific self-standing steel high pressure resistible PCV is designed to contain minimum piping and valves inside with reactor pressure vessel (RPV), only 13 m in diameter and 24 m in height. This compact PCV makes it possible to

  14. Numerical simulation of the insulation material transport to a PWR core under loss of coolant accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Höhne, Thomas; Grahn, Alexander; Kliem, Sören; Rohde, Ulrich; Weiss, Frank-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Detailed results of a numerical simulation of the insulation material transport to a PWR core are shown. ► The spacer grid is modeled as a strainer which completely retains the insulation material carried by coolant. ► The CFD calculations showed that the fibers at the upper spacer grid plane are not uniformly distributed. ► Furthermore the pressure loss does not exceed a critical limit. ► The PWR core coolablity can be guaranteed all the time during the transient. -- Abstract: In 1992, strainers on the suction side of the ECCS pumps in Barsebäck NPP Unit 2 became partially clogged with mineral wool because after a safety valve opened the steam impinged on thermally insulated equipment and released mineral wool. This event pointed out that strainer clogging is an issue in the course of a loss-of-coolant accident. Modifications of the insulation material, the strainer area and mesh size were carried out in most of the German NPPs. Moreover, back flushing procedures to remove the mineral wool from the strainers and differential pressure measurements were implemented to assure the performance of emergency core cooling during the containment sump recirculation mode. Nevertheless, it cannot be completely ruled out, that a limited amount of small fractions of the insulation material is transported into the RPV. During a postulated cold leg LOCA with hot leg ECC injection, the fibers enter the upper plenum and can accumulate at the fuel element spacer grids, preferably at the uppermost grid level. This effect might affect the ECC flow into the core and could result in degradation of core cooling. It was the aim of the numerical simulations presented to study where and how many mineral wool fibers are deposited at the upper spacer grid. The 3D, time dependent, multi-phase flow problem was modeled applying the CFD code ANSYS CFX. The CFD calculation does not yet include steam production in the core and also does not include re-suspension of the

  15. Analysis of loss-of-coolant accident for a fast-spectrum lithium-cooled nuclear reactor for space-power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, G. E.; Petrik, E. J.; Kieffer, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    A two-dimensional, transient, heat-transfer analysis was made to determine the temperature response in the core of a conceptual space-power nuclear reactor following a total loss of reactor coolant. With loss of coolant from the reactor, the controlling mode of heat transfer is thermal radiation. In one of the schemes considered for removing decay heat from the core, it was assumed that the 4 pi shield which surrounds the core acts as a constant-temperature sink (temperature, 700 K) for absorption of thermal radiation from the core. Results based on this scheme of heat removal show that melting of fuel in the core is possible only when the emissivity of the heat-radiating surfaces in the core is less than about 0.40. In another scheme for removing the afterheat, the core centerline fuel pin was replaced by a redundant, constant temperature, coolant channel. Based on an emissivity of 0.20 for all material surfaces in the core, the calculated maximum fuel temperature for this scheme of heat removal was 2840 K, or about 90 K less than the melting temperature of the UN fuel.

  16. Single failure effects of reactor coolant system large bore hydraulic snubbers for Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, T.S.; Park, S.H.; Sung, K.K.; Kim, T.W.; Jheon, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    A potential snubber single failure is one of the safety significances identified in General Safety Issue 113 for Large Bore Hydraulic Snubber (LBHS) dynamic qualification. This paper investigates dynamic structural effects of single failures of the steam generator and reactor coolant pump snubbers in Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant by performing the time history dynamic analyses for the reactor coolant system under seismic and postulated pipe break events. The seismic input motions considered are the synthesized ground time histories conforming to SRP 3.7.1, and he postulated pipe break input loadings result from steam generator main seam line and feedwater line pipe breaks which govern pipe breaks remaining after applying LBB to the main coolant line and primary side ranch lines equal to and greater than 12 inch nominal pipe size

  17. Compact modular BWR (CM-BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fennern, Larry; Boardman, Charles; Carroll, Douglas G.; Hida, Takahiko

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary assessment has shown that a small 350 MWe BWR reactor can be placed within a close fitting steel containment vessel that is 7.1 meters inside diameter. This allows the technology and manufacturing capability currently used to fabricate large ABWR reactor vessels to be used to provide a factory fabricated containment vessel for a 350 MWe BWR. When a close fitted steel containment is combined with a passive closed loop isolation condenser system and a natural circulating reactor system that contains a large water inventory, primary system leaks cannot uncover the core. This eliminates many of the safety systems needed in response to a LOCA that are common to large, conventional plant designs including. Emergency Core Flooding, Automatic Depressurization System, Active Residual Heat Removal, Safety Related Auxiliary Cooling, Safety Related Diesel Generators, Hydrogen Re-Combiners, Ex-vessel Core Retention and Cooling. By fabricating the containment in a factory and eliminating most of the conventional safety systems, the construction schedule is shortened and the capital cost reduced to levels that would not otherwise be possible for a relatively small modular BWR. This makes the CM-BWR a candidate for applications where smaller incremental power additions are desired relative to a large ALWR or where the local infrastructure is not able to accommodate a conventional ALWR plant rated at 1350 MWe or more. This paper presents a preliminary design description of a Compact Modular BWR (CM-BWR) whose design features dramatically reduce the size and cost of the reactor building and associated safety systems. (author)

  18. Conservatism of loss-of-coolant accident licensing analysis compared to experimental results and best-estimate calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, F.; Friedmann, P.

    1986-01-01

    The paper compares results of loss-of-coolant accident licensing analysis with experimental results and results of best-estimate calculations. The large safety margins resulting from the more realistic best-estimate results are used to show the high conservatism inherent in the licensing process of pressurized water reactors. (orig.) [de

  19. Analysis of molten fuel behavior in coolant channel during severe accidents in KALIMER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, Soo Dong; Lee, Yong Bum; Hahn, Do Hee

    2004-11-01

    Preliminary safety analyses of the KALIMER-600 design have shown that the design has inherent safety characteristics and is capable of accommodating double fault initiators such as ATWS events without boiling coolant or melting fuel. For the future design of liquid metal reactor, however, the evaluation of the safety performance and the determination of containment requirements may require consideration of tripe-fault accident sequences of extremely low probability of occurrence that leads to fuel melting. For any postulated accident sequence which leads to core melting, in-vessel retention of the core debris will required as a design requirement for the future design of LMR. For sodium-cooled core designs with metallic fuel, one of the major phenomenological modeling uncertainties to be resolved is the potential for freezing and plugging of molten metallic fuel in above- and below-core structures and possibly in inter-subassembly spaces. In this study, scoping analyses were carried out to evaluate the penetration depths in the coolant channels by molten fuel mixture during the unprotected loss-of-flow accidents in the core of the KALIMER-600. It is assumed in the analyses that a solid fuel crust would start to form upon contact with the coolant channel structure temperature of which is below the fuel solidus. The analysis results predict that the coolant channels would be plugged by the freezing molten fuel in the inlet lower shield as well as in the outlet, fission-gas-plenum region for the KALIMER-600 design

  20. Metallurgical factors that contribute to cracking in BWR piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    During the fall of 1974 and early winter of 1975, cracks have been discovered in the 4 in. bypass lines of several Boiling Water Reactors (BWR's) in the United States. Further, similar cracks were discovered at two BWR's in Japan during the same period. More recently, cracks have been discovered in the core spray piping and in a furnace-sensitized ''safe end'' and adjacent ''dutchman'' at the Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 2. Although inspections at all other U.S. BWR's have not disclosed further instances of cracking in core spray piping, leaking cracks have been found in the core spray piping of two BWR's overseas. Metallurgical examinations of these cracks are not yet complete. The following observations have been made to date. All cracks (except those in the furnace-sensitized safe end and dutchman) occurred in seamless type 304 stainless steel piping or in elbows fabricated from such piping, in the outer heat affected zone of either field or shop welds, in lines isolated from the main primary coolant flow during full power operation, except for the not yet examined cracks in the Monticello bypass lines. The cracks are exclusively intergranular, and occur in metal that has been lightly sensitized by the welding process, with only intermittent grain boundary carbides. They developed in the areas of peak axial residual stresses from welding rather than in the most heavily sensitized areas. No fatigue striations have been found on the fracture surfaces. The evidence received to date strongly indicates that these cracks were caused by intergranular stress corrosion of weld-sensitized stainless steel by BWR water containing greater than 0.2 ppM oxygen. The possible role of fatigue or alternating stresses in this corrosion is not clear. Further, not all the cracks detected to date necessarily have occurred by the same mechanism

  1. MABEL-2: a code to analyse cladding deformation in a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowring, R.W.; Cooper, C.A.

    1982-04-01

    MABEL-2 has been developed to predict the extent of cladding deformation in PWR fuel rods during a loss of coolant accident. The user notes describe how to run MABEL. They include case preparation and input data, the job control language, a description of the output tables available, and aids to debugging. The input data and results for two sample cases are given. (U.K.)

  2. Small break LOCA [loss of coolant accident] mitigation for Bellefonte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayless, P.D.; Dobbe, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Several 5-cm (2-in.) diameter cold leg break loss coolant accidents for the Bellefonte nuclear plant were analyzed as part of the Severe Accident Sequence Analysis Program. The transients assumed various system failures, and included the S 2 D sequence. Operator actions to mitigate the S 2 D transient were also investigated. The transients were analyzed until either core damage began or long-term decay heat removal was established. The S 2 D sequence was analyzed into the core damage phase of the transient. The analyses showed that the flow from one high pressure injection pump was necessary and sufficient to prevent core damage in the absence of operator actions. Operator actions were also able to prevent core damage for the S 2 D sequence

  3. Radiological impact of a loss of coolant accident at Angra 2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, W.

    1992-01-01

    A loss of coolant accident is analyzed which comprises a double ended rupture of a main primary system line. The accident sequence is described and the main assumptions as to the activity release are presented. On the basis of site specific meteorological data, the atmospheric dispersion factors are calculated using the Gaussian plume diffusion model and the doses are then determined at the boundary of the low population zone. The resulting values for the effective dose equivalent are more than one order of magnitude below that due to the average background radiation received in one year. (author)

  4. Thermal hydraulic analysis of aggressive secondary cooldown in a small break loss of coolant accident with a total loss of high pressure safety injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seok Jung; Lim, Ho Gon; Yang, Joon Eon

    2003-01-01

    To support the development of a Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) model usable in Riskinformed Applications (RIA) for Korea Standard Nuclear power Plants (KSNP), we have performed a thermal hydraulic analysis of Aggressive Secondary Cooldown (ASC) in a 2-inch Small Break Loss Of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) with a total loss of High Pressure Safety Injection (HPSI). The present study focuses on the estimation of the success criteria of ASC, and the enhanced understanding of the detailed thermal hydraulic behavior and phenomena. The results have shown that the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) pressure can be reduced to the Low Pressure Safety Injection (LPSI) operation conditions without core damage. It was also shown that more relaxed success criteria compared to those in the previous PSA models of KSNP could be used in the new PSA model. However, it was found that the results could be affected by various parameters related with ASC operation, i.e., reference temperature for the calculation of the cooldown rate and its control method

  5. Behaviour of a pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plant during loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, E.; Carl, H.; Kubis, K.

    1979-01-01

    Starting from the foundation of the design basis accident in a PWR-type nuclear power plant - Loss of Coolant Accident -the actual status of the processes to be expected in the reactor are described. Operating behaviour of the heat removal system and efficiency of the safety systems are evaluated. Final considerations are concerned with the overall behaviour of the plant under such conditions. Probable failures, shut down times and possibilities of repair are estimated. (author)

  6. Research on loss of coolant accident of pressurized-water reactor based on PSO algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jie; Guo Lifeng; Peng Qiao

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the diagnosis performance of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), based on Back Propagation (BP) algorithm study, a fault diagnosis network is established based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm in this paper. The PSO algorithm is used to train the weights and the thresholds of neural network, which can conquer part convergence problem of BP algorithm. The test results show that the diagnosis network has higher accuracy of LOCA. (authors)

  7. Fracture assessment of a main reactor coolant pump in a BWR with encountered defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brickstad, B [Swedish Plant Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1988-12-31

    This document presents a case-study fracture assessment in BWR type reactor components. A cast stainless steel presenting defects due to thermal is studied. The stress analysis performed by aid of a finite element technique shows that a Leak Before Break situation could be expected. Nevertheless, it may be concluded that the cross section of the pump where the defect area was located can withstand very deep cracks before the risk of failure becomes unacceptable. (TEC).

  8. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications.

  9. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications

  10. Thermohydraulic behavior in a primary cooling system during a loss-of-coolant accident of a light-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamune, Hiroji; Shiba, Masayoshi; Adachi, Hiromichi; Suzuki, Norio; Okubo, Kaoru

    1975-12-01

    With ROSA-I (Rig of Safety Assessment - I), 61 runs of the LWR blowdown experiment have been carried out under the conditions: model reactor type, BWR and PWR; reactor core, none, no-heating and heating; rupture position, upper and lower pressure vessel nozzle; initial discharge pressure, 40, 70 and 100 kg/cm 2 G; and rupture diameter, 25, 50, 70, 100 and 125 mm. The purpose was to obtain the data of thermal and hydrodynamic behavior in the reactor pressure vessel during a blowdown, including in-vessel pressure, coolant temperature, discharge flow rate, model fuel rod surface temperature and shock wave. Analysis was also made with the codes RELAP-2 and -3 developed by NRTS of the United States, to verify the calculation model used. In addition, the results of calculation with the shockwave analysis code DEPCO developed in JAERI were compared with those by experiment. The experimental facility ROSA-I and the results obtained with it and also the analyses made in this connection, are described in detail. (auth.)

  11. BWR zinc addition Sourcebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.; Jarvis, Alfred J.

    2014-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) have been injecting zinc into the primary coolant via the reactor feedwater system for over 25 years for the purpose of controlling primary system radiation fields. The BWR zinc injection process has evolved since the initial application at the Hope Creek Nuclear Station in 1986. Key transitions were from the original natural zinc oxide (NZO) to depleted zinc oxide (DZO), and from active zinc injection of a powdered zinc oxide slurry (pumped systems) to passive injection systems (zinc pellet beds). Zinc addition has continued through various chemistry regimes changes, from normal water chemistry (NWC) to hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) and HWC with noble metals (NobleChem™) for mitigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of reactor internals and primary system piping. While past reports published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) document specific industry experience related to these topics, the Zinc Sourcebook was prepared to consolidate all of the experience gained over the past 25 years. The Zinc Sourcebook will benefit experienced BWR Chemistry, Operations, Radiation Protection and Engineering personnel as well as new people entering the nuclear power industry. While all North American BWRs implement feedwater zinc injection, a number of other BWRs do not inject zinc. This Sourcebook will also be a valuable resource to plants considering the benefits of zinc addition process implementation, and to gain insights on industry experience related to zinc process control and best practices. This paper presents some of the highlights from the Sourcebook. (author)

  12. Zircaloy-steam reaction under a simulated loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Satoru; Furuta, Teruo; Hashimoto, Masao

    1975-07-01

    Under a simulated loss-of-coolant condition, the reaction between zircaloy and steam and the embrittlement of the zircaloy oxidized by this reaction have been studied. The parabolic rate constant, ksub(p), in the zircaloy-steam reaction is represented as ksub(p)=3.24x10 6 exp(-40500/RT) (mg 2 /cm 4 . sec) Ring compression test was made on the steam-reacted zircaloy tubes, and following results were obtained: Embrittlement of the steam-reacted zircaloy tube increases with oxidation at each oxidation temperature. For a given quantity of the oxidation, the incursion of α-phase into β-phase is more remarkable in the specimens reacted at low temperatures than those at high temperatures. The embrittlement, however, is larger in the specimens oxidized at high temperatures than those at low temperatures. (auth.)

  13. Pressure behavior in nuclear reactor containment following a loss of coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khattab, M; Ibrahim, N A; Bedrose, C D [Reactors department, nuclear research center, atomic energy authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    The scenarios of pressure variation following a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) inside the containment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) have been investigated. Critical mass flow rushing out from high pressure leg through pipe break is used to calculate the rate of coolant. The energy added to the containment atmosphere is determined to specify the rate of growth of pressure and temperature. The seniors of small, medium and large LOCA at 2%, 15%, and 25% flow released are investigated. Safety water spray system is initiated as the pressure reaches the containment design safety limit at about 3 bar to depressurise and to cooldown the system and thereby to reduce the concentration of radioactivity release in the containment atmosphere. The pressure response before and after operation of safety spray system is predicted in each size of LOCA using a typical design of westinghouse PWR system. The heat removal from the containment environment is rejected into the sump by drop-wise condensation mechanism. The effect of initial droplets diameters injected from the nozzles of the spray system is investigated. The results show that the droplet diameter of 3 mm gives best performance. 6 figs.

  14. Pressure behavior in nuclear reactor containment following a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, M.; Ibrahim, N.A.; Bedrose, C.D.

    1995-01-01

    The scenarios of pressure variation following a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) inside the containment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) have been investigated. Critical mass flow rushing out from high pressure leg through pipe break is used to calculate the rate of coolant. The energy added to the containment atmosphere is determined to specify the rate of growth of pressure and temperature. The seniors of small, medium and large LOCA at 2%, 15%, and 25% flow released are investigated. Safety water spray system is initiated as the pressure reaches the containment design safety limit at about 3 bar to depressurise and to cooldown the system and thereby to reduce the concentration of radioactivity release in the containment atmosphere. The pressure response before and after operation of safety spray system is predicted in each size of LOCA using a typical design of westinghouse PWR system. The heat removal from the containment environment is rejected into the sump by drop-wise condensation mechanism. The effect of initial droplets diameters injected from the nozzles of the spray system is investigated. The results show that the droplet diameter of 3 mm gives best performance. 6 figs

  15. Oxidation of SiC cladding under Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.; Yue, C.; Arnold, R. P.; McKrell, T. J.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental assessment of Silicon Carbide (SiC) cladding oxidation rate in steam under conditions representative of Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) in light water reactors (LWRs) was conducted. SiC oxidation tests were performed with monolithic alpha phase tubular samples in a vertical quartz tube at a steam temperature of 1140 deg. C and steam velocity range of 1 to 10 m/sec, at atmospheric pressure. Linear weight loss of SiC samples due to boundary layer controlled reaction of silica scale (SiO 2 volatilization) was experimentally observed. The weight loss rate increased with increasing steam flow rate. Over the range of test conditions, SiC oxidation rates were shown to be about 3 orders of magnitude lower than the oxidation rates of zircaloy 4. A SiC volatilization correlation for developing laminar flow in a vertical channel is formulated. (authors)

  16. Analysis of the loss of coolant accident for LEU cores of Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, L.A.; Bokhari, I.H.; Raza, S.H.

    1993-12-01

    Response of LEU cores for PARR-1 to a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) has been studied. It has been assumed that pool water drains out to double ended rupture of primary coolant pipe or complete shearing of an experimental beam tube. Results show that for an operating power level of 10 MW, both the first high power and equilibrium cores would enter into melting conditions if the pool drain time is less than 22 h and 11 h respectively. However, an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) capable of spraying the core at flow rate of 8.3 m/sup 3/h, for the above mentioned duration, would keep the peak core temperature much below the critical value. Maximum operating power levels below which melting would not occur have been assessed to 3.4 MW and 4.8 MW, respectively, for the first high power and equilibrium cores. (author) 5 figs

  17. Cobalt-60 simulation of LOCA [loss of coolant accident] radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckalew, W.H.

    1989-07-01

    The consequences of simulating nuclear reactor loss of coolant accident (LOCA) radiation effects with Cobalt-60 gamma ray irradiators have been investigated. Based on radiation induced damage in polymer base materials, it was demonstrated that electron/photon induced radiation damage could be related on the basis of average absorbed radiation dose. This result was used to estimate the relative effectiveness of the mixed beta/gamma LOCA and Cobalt-60 radiation environments to damage both bare and jacketed polymer base electrical insulation materials. From the results obtained, it is concluded that present simulation techniques are a conservative method for simulating LOCA radiation effects and that the practices have probably substantially overstressed both bare and jacketed materials during qualification testing. 9 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  18. Condensing heat transfer following a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krotiuk, W.J.; Rubin, M.B.

    1978-01-01

    A new method for calculating the steam mass condensation energy removal rates on cold surfaces in contact with an air-steam mixture has been developed. This method is based on the principles of mass diffusion of steam from an area of high concentration to the condensing surface, which is an area of low steam concentration. This new method of calculating mass condensation has been programmed into the CONTEMPT-LT Mod 26 computer code, which calculates the pressure and temperature transients inside a light water reactor containment following a loss-of-coolant accident. The condensing heat transfer coefficient predicted by the mass diffusion method is compared to existing semi-empirical correlations and to the experimental results of the Carolinas Virginia Tube Reactor Containment natural decay test. Closer agreement with test results is shown in the calculation of containment pressure, temperature, and heat sink surface temperature using the mass diffusion condensation method than when using any existing semi-empirical correlation

  19. Development of the BWR Dry Core Initial and Boundary Conditions for the SNL XR2 Experiments; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Boiling Water Reactor Experimental Analysis and Model Development for Severe Accidents (BEAMD) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are: (1) the development of a sound quantitative understanding of boiling water reactor (BWR) core melt progression; this includes control blade and channel box effects, metallic melt relocation and possible blockage formation under severe accident conditions, and (2) provision of BWR melt progression modeling capabilities in SCDAP/RELAP5 (consistent with the BWR experimental data base). This requires the assessment of current modeling of BWR core melt progression against the expanding BWR data base. Emphasis is placed upon data from the BWR tests in the German CORA test facility and from the ex-reactor experiments[Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation in BWRs, as well as upon in-reactor data from the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) DF-4 BWR test (conducted in 1986 at SNL). The BEAMD Program is a derivative of the BWR Severe Accident Technology Programs at ORNL. The ORNL BWR programs have studied postulated severe accidents in BWRs and have developed a set of models specific to boiling water reactor response under severe accident conditions. These models, in an experiment-specific format, have been successfully applied to both pretest and posttest analyses of the DF-4 experiment, and the BWR severe fuel damage (SFD) experiments performed in the CORA facility at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany, resulting in excellent agreement between model prediction and experiment. The ORNL BWR models have provided for more precise predictions of the conditions in the BWR experiments than were previously available. This has provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena for which the experiments are performed. The experiment-specific models, as used in the ORNL DF-4 and CORA BWR experimental analyses, also provide a basis

  20. A direct comparison of MELCOR 1.8.3 and MAAP4 results for several PWR ampersand BWR accident sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, M.T.; Ashbaugh, S.G.; Cole, R.K.; Bergeron, K.D.; Nagashima, K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of calculations of severe accident progression for several postulated accident sequences for representative Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) nuclear power plants performed with the MELCOR 1.8.3 and the MAAP4 computer codes. The PWR system examined in this study is a 1100 MWe system similar in design to a Westinghouse 3-loop plant with a large dry containment; the BWR is a 1100 MWe system similar in design to General Electric BWR/4 with a Mark I containment. A total of nine accident sequences were studied with both codes. Results of these calculations are compared to identify major differences in the timing of key events in the calculated accident progression or other important aspects of severe accident behavior, and to identify specific sources of the observed differences

  1. Requirements of coolants in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abass, O. A. M.

    2014-11-01

    This study discussed the purposes and types of coolants in nuclear reactors to generate electricity. The major systems and components associated with nuclear reactors are cooling system. There are two major cooling systems utilized to convert the heat generated in the fuel into electrical power. The primary system transfers the heat from the fuel to the steam generator, where the secondary system begins. The steam formed in the steam generator is transferred by the secondary system to the main turbine generator, where it s converted into electricity after passing through the low pressure turbine. There are various coolants used in nuclear reactors-light water, heavy water and liquid metal. The two major types of water-cooled reactors are pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR) but pressurized water reactors are more in the world. Also discusses this study the reactors and impact of the major nuclear accidents, in the April 1986 disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine was the product operators, and in the March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan was the product of earthquake of magnitude 9.0, the accidents caused the largest uncontrolled radioactive release into the environment.(Author)

  2. HANARO secondary coolant management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seon Duk.

    1998-02-01

    In this report, the basic theory for management of water quality, environmental factors influencing to the coolant, chemicals and its usage for quality control of coolant are mentioned, and water balance including the loss rate by evaporation (34.3 m 3 /hr), discharge rate (12.665 m 3 /hr), concentration ratio and feed rate (54.1 m 3 /hr) are calculated at 20 MW operation. Also, the analysis data of HANSU Limited for HANARO secondary coolant (feed water and circulating coolant) - turbidity, pH, conductivity, M-alkalinity, Ca-hardness, chloride ion, total iron ion, phosphoric ion and conversion rate are reviewed. It is confirmed that the feed water has good quality and the circulating coolant has been maintained within the control specification in general, but some items exceeded the control specification occasionally. Therefore it is judged that more regular discharge of coolant is needed. (author). 6 refs., 17 tabs., 18 figs

  3. Development status of compact containment BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Mori, H.; Sekiguchi, K.; Kuroki, M.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2005-01-01

    time in case of design base accidents including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. Module fabrication and construction method is promising technology from the points of construction duration shortening and construction cost reduction. Various modules such as PCV module and electrical equipment room module are applied to CCR construction. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR) has possibilities of attaining both economical and safe small reactor by simplified system and compact PCV and module construction technologies. (authors)

  4. Characteristics of axial splits in failed BWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysell, G.; Grigoriev, V.

    2000-01-01

    Secondary cladding defects in BWR fuel sometimes have the shape of long axial cracks or ''splits''. Due to the large open UO 2 surfaces exposed to the water, fission product and UO 2 release to the coolant can reach excessive levels leading to forced shut downs to remove the failed fuel rods. A number of such fuel rods have been examined in Studsvik over the last 10 years. The paper describes observations from the PIE of long cracks and discusses the driving force of the cracks. Details such as starting cracks, macroscopic and microscopic fracture surface appearance, cross sections of cracks, hydride precipitates, location and degree of plastic deformation are given. (author)

  5. Quantifying reactor safety margins: Application of code scaling, applicability, and uncertainty evaluation methodology to a large-break, loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyack, B.; Duffey, R.; Wilson, G.; Griffith, P.; Lellouche, G.; Levy, S.; Rohatgi, U.; Wulff, W.; Zuber, N.

    1989-12-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued a revised rule for loss-of-coolant accident/emergency core cooling system (ECCS) analysis of light water reactors to allow the use of best-estimate computer codes in safety analysis as an option. A key feature of this option requires the licensee to quantify the uncertainty of the calculations and include that uncertainty when comparing the calculated results with acceptance limits provided in 10 CFR Part 50. To support the revised ECCS rule and illustrate its application, the NRC and its contractors and consultants have developed and demonstrated an uncertainty evaluation methodology called code scaling, applicability, and uncertainty (CSAU). The CSAU methodology and an example application described in this report demonstrate that uncertainties in complex phenomena can be quantified. The methodology is structured, traceable, and practical, as is needed in the regulatory arena. The methodology is systematic and comprehensive as it addresses and integrates the scenario, experiments, code, and plant to resolve questions concerned with: (a) code capability to scale-up processes from test facility to full-scale nuclear power plants; (b) code applicability to safety studies of a postulated accident scenario in a specified nuclear power plant; and (c) quantifying uncertainties of calculated results. 127 refs., 55 figs., 40 tabs

  6. The noise analysis and the BWR operation map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazquez, J.; Ballestrin, J.

    1996-01-01

    An analytical expression for the Decay Ratio is obtained: DR = exp(-bW / P 1/2 ). The physics behind is also explained. It applies to a commercial BWR Operation Map, on the vicinity of the power instability. This functional form seems fitting to the structure of the Operation map. The power P and the coolant flow are measured straightforward; the Decay Ratio is obtained by neutron noise analysis techniques. The parameter b, depending on the void reactivity coefficient, is then calculated on line during the Reactor Operation. New DR value is now predicted for each new displacement on the Map, so unexpected instability events are more likely avoided. (authors)

  7. Experimental investigations of pressure and temperature loads on a containment after a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanzleiter, T.

    1975-10-01

    The phenomena occuring within a containment during a LOCA are currently investigated through experiments with a modelcontainment at Battelle-Institut Frankfurt on behalf of the Bundesministerium fuer Forschung und Technologie, Bonn. The experimental results are to be compared with the results of model calculations in order to improve the calculational methods. An experimental facility was built, consisting of a primary coolant circuit and a special model-containment. The model-containment, built in conventional reinforced concrete, has a diameter of 12 m, a height of 12.5 m, a capacity of 580 m 3 and is designed for an internal pressure of 6 bar. The interior is divided by concrete walls and removable partitions into several compartments, which are interconnected through openings with adjustable cross section. By exchanging the removable partitions it is possible to modify the interior of the containment and to simulate different containment shapes. For the first experiment a PWR-configuration with nine compartments has been istalled. The model scale of the compartment volumes and the overflow areas are about 1:64 compared to the 1,200-MW-PWR-plant Biblis A. Later investigations will also include BWR-experiments and experiments leading to an extremely high load on special containment structures. (orig.) [de

  8. Thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic in a BWR; Estabilidad termohidraulica acoplada a la neutronica en un BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleros M, G.; Zapata Y, M.; Gomez H, R.A.; Mendez M, A. [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica de Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 42.5, Mpio. Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico); Castlllo D, R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5, La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: gcm9acpp@cfe.gob.mx

    2006-07-01

    In a BWR type reactor the phenomenon of the nuclear fission is presented, in which are liberated in stochastic form neutrons, originating that the population of the same ones varies in statistic form around a mean value. This variation will cause that when the neutron flow impacts on the neutron detectors, its are had as a result neutron flow signals with fluctuations around an average value. In this article it is shown that it conforms it lapses the time, this variations in the neutron flow (and therefore, in the flow signal due only to the fission), they presented oscillations inside a stable range, which won't be divergent. Considering that the BWR is characterized because boiling phenomena are presented, which affect the moderation of the neutrons, additional variations will be had in the signal coming from the neutron detectors, with relationship to the fission itself, which will be influenced by the feedback of the moderator's reactivity and of the temperature of the fuel pellet. Also, as the BWR it has coupled control systems to maintain the coolant level one and of the thermal power of the reactor, for each control action it was affected the neutron population. This means that the reactor could end up straying of a stable state condition. By it previously described, the study of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic is complex. In this work it is shown the phenomenology, the mathematical models and the theoretical behavior associated to the stability of the BWR type reactor; the variables that affect it are identified, the models that reproduce the behavior of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic, the way to maintain stable the reactor and the instrumentation that can settle to detect and to suppress uncertainties is described. In particular, is make reference to the evolution of the methods to maintain the stability of the reactor and the detection system and suppression of uncertainties implemented in the

  9. Methyl Iodide Decomposition at BWR Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, Mike; Bell, Merl

    2012-09-01

    Based on favourable results from short-term testing of methanol addition to an operating BWR plant, AREVA has performed numerous studies in support of necessary Engineering and Plant Safety Evaluations prior to extended injection of methanol. The current paper presents data from a study intended to provide further understanding of the decomposition of methyl iodide as it affects the assessment of methyl iodide formation with the application of methanol at BWR Plants. This paper describes the results of the decomposition testing under UV-C light at laboratory conditions and its effect on the subject methyl iodide production evaluation. The study as to the formation and decomposition of methyl iodide as it is effected by methanol addition is one phase of a larger AREVA effort to provide a generic plant Safety Evaluation prior to long-term methanol injection to an operating BWR. Other testing phases have investigated the compatibility of methanol with fuel construction materials, plant structural materials, plant consumable materials (i.e. elastomers and coatings), and ion exchange resins. Methyl iodide is known to be very unstable, typically preserved with copper metal or other stabilizing materials when produced and stored. It is even more unstable when exposed to light, heat, radiation, and water. Additionally, it is known that methyl iodide will decompose radiolytically, and that this effect may be simulated using ultra-violet radiation (UV-C) [2]. In the tests described in this paper, the use of a UV-C light source provides activation energy for the formation of methyl iodide. Thus is similar to the effect expected from Cherenkov radiation present in a reactor core after shutdown. Based on the testing described in this paper, it is concluded that injection of methanol at concentrations below 2.5 ppm in BWR applications to mitigate IGSCC of internals is inconsequential to the accident conditions postulated in the FSAR as they are related to methyl iodide formation

  10. Compendium of ECCS [Emergency Core Cooling Systems] research for realistic LOCA [loss-of-coolant accidents] analysis: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    In the United States, Emergency Core Cooling Systems (ECCS) are required for light water reactors (LWRs) to provide cooling of the reactor core in the event of a break or leak in the reactor piping or an inadvertent opening of a valve. These accidents are called loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA), and they range from small leaks up to a postulated full break of the largest pipe in the reactor cooling system. Federal government regulations provide that LOCA analysis be performed to show that the ECCS will maintain fuel rod cladding temperatures, cladding oxidation, and hydrogen production within certain limits. The NRC and others have completed a large body of research which investigated fuel rod behavior and LOCA/ECCS performance. It is now possible to make a realistic estimate of the ECCS performance during a LOCA and to quantify the uncertainty of this calculation. The purpose of this report is to summarize this research and to serve as a general reference for the extensive research effort that has been performed. The report: (1) summarizes the understanding of LOCA phenomena in 1974; (2) reviews experimental and analytical programs developed to address the phenomena; (3) describes the best-estimate computer codes developed by the NRC; (4) discusses the salient technical aspects of the physical phenomena and our current understanding of them; (5) discusses probabilistic risk assessment results and perspectives, and (6) evaluates the impact of research results on the ECCS regulations. 736 refs., 412 figs., 66 tabs

  11. Performance behavior of the passive containment cooling system of a natural circulation BWR during postulated accident condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Nayak, A.K.; Jain, Vikas; Vijayan, P.K.; Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    Passive systems are playing prominent role in the development of innovative nuclear reactor systems due to their simplicity, enhanced safety, reliability and economy. These systems are being considered for normal operation as well as accidental conditions of reactor following a postulated accident scenario to preclude the scenarios arising out of failure of active systems as well as to minimize the operator intervention. Indian innovative reactor AHWR being designed for thorium utilization employs various passive safety concepts. As containment is the ultimate barrier to the release of radioactivity, passive concepts are being employed in BWRs for minimize peak containment pressure in the containment during a postulated accident condition like LOCA. The concept of passive containment cooling system (PCCS) in the AHWR comprises of inclined tube heat exchangers located underneath an elevated pool that removes the heat from the steam-air atmosphere of containment following a LOCA by natural circulation of water inside the tubes. The steam condenses on the external surface of tubes of PCCS in addition to the wall of the containment which in turn depressurizes the containment. This paper deals with the performance assessment of PCCS of AHWR during a postulated design basis LOCA by using the best estimate code RELAP5/Mod3.2. (author)

  12. Interfacing systems loss of coolant accident (ISLOCA) pressure capacity methodology and Davis-Besse results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesley, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    A loss of coolant accident resulting from the overpressurization by reactor coolant fluid of a system designed for low-pressure, low-temperature service has been identified as a potential contributor to nuclear power plant risk. In this paper, the methodology developed to assess the probability of failure as a function of internal pressure is presented, and sample results developed for the controlling failure modes and locations of four fluid systems at the Davis-Besse Plant are shown. Included in this evaluation are the tanks, heat exchangers, filters, pumps, valves, and flanged connections for each system. The variability in the probability of failure is included, and the estimated leak rates or leak areas are given for the controlling modes of failure. For this evaluation, all failures are based on quasistatic pressures since the probability of dynamic effects resulting from such causes as water hammer have been initially judged to be negligible for the Davis-Besse plant ISLOCA

  13. Deformation of PWR cladding following a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.; Mann, C.A.

    1979-07-01

    A review is presented of recent experiments to investigate the deformation behaviour of Zircaloy cladding in simulated loss-of-coolant accidents. The behaviour of Zircaloy cladding is shown to be controlled by a complex interaction of metallurgical and heat transfer variables, with the latter having a major influence. There is a significant increase in both diametral strain and the axial extent of deformation in multi-rod compared with single-rod tests. The extent to which this will occur in nuclear-heated tests is not yet known; however, it is expected that the 'smearing' of the gamma-radiation portion of decay heat in such tests will tend to reduce circumferential temperature variations. Opposing this is the influence of the colder control rods in an assembly. The resolution of this dichotomy will require a series of in-reactor multi-rod tests and attendant code development. (author)

  14. Validation and application of the system code ATHLET-CD for BWR severe accident analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Marcello, Valentino, E-mail: valentino.marcello@kit.edu; Imke, Uwe; Sanchez, Victor

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • We present the application of the system code ATHLET-CD code for BWR safety analyses. • Validation of core in-vessel models is performed based on KIT CORA experiments. • A SB-LOCA scenario is simulated on a generic German BWR plant up to vessel failure. • Different core reflooding possibilities are investigated to mitigate the accident consequences. • ATHLET-CD modelling features reflect the current state of the art of severe accident codes. - Abstract: This paper is aimed at the validation and application of the system code ATHLET-CD for the simulation of severe accident phenomena in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). The corresponding models for core degradation behaviour e.g., oxidation, melting and relocation of core structural components are validated against experimental data available from the CORA-16 and -17 bundle tests. Model weaknesses are discussed along with needs for further code improvements. With the validated ATHLET-CD code, calculations are performed to assess the code capabilities for the prediction of in-vessel late phase core behaviour and reflooding of damaged fuel rods. For this purpose, a small break LOCA scenario for a generic German BWR with postulated multiple failures of the safety systems was selected. In the analysis, accident management measures represented by cold water injection into the damaged reactor core are addressed to investigate the efficacy in avoiding or delaying the failure of the reactor pressure vessel. Results show that ATHLET-CD is applicable to the description of BWR plant behaviour with reliable physical models and numerical methods adopted for the description of key in-vessel phenomena.

  15. Analysis of LOFT loss-of-coolant experiments L2-2, L2-3, and L3-0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach, L.P.; Linebarger, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    A summary of results from Loss-of-Coolant Experiments (LOCE) L2-2, L2-3, and L3-0, conducted in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility, and conclusions from posttest analyses of the experimental data are presented. LOCEs L2-2 and L2-3 were nuclear large break experiments and were dominated by a core-wide fuel rod cladding rewet, which limited the maximum fuel temperature. Analytical models only conservatively predicted the measured fuel rod temperatures and will require improvements to provide best estimate predictions in this area. Analysis of a large commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) indicates that the cladding rewet observed in LOFT is also likely to occur in a large PWR, and that, therefore, safety analysis calculations of large loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) are more conservative than previously thought. LOCE L3-0 was an isothermal small break (top of pressurizer) experiment and illustrated that the pressurizer fills after the primary system fluid saturates someplace other than the pressurizer itself, that the indicated pressurizer level is higher than the actual level, and that additional model development and assessment work is necessary in order to predict small LOCAs as accurately as large LOCAs

  16. Influence of steam generator tube ruptures during semiscale loss-of-coolant experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzuol, J.M.; Larson, T.K.

    1978-01-01

    Examination of the U-tubes in the steam generators of some large commercial pressurized water reactors (PWR) has revealed the existence of leakage and in some cases structural weakening of the tubes. This structural weakening enhances the possibility of tubes rupturing during a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Considerable interest has been shown in the analysis of tube ruptures concurrent with a hypothesized LOCA since the presence of tube ruptures has the potential to influence the system thermal-hydraulic response and could foreseeably result in a more severe core thermal behavior than might otherwise occur. To experimentally investigate the influence of steam generator tube ruptures on the thermal-hydraulic response of PWR type system, a series of experiments was conducted in the Semiscale Mod-1 system by EG and G Idaho, Inc., for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy. The primary objective of the experiments was to obtain data which could be used to evaluate the influence of the simulated tube ruptures on the system and core thermal-hydraulic response for a range of tube ruptures that was expected to provide the potential for high cladding temperatures in the Semiscale facility. The experiments were conducted assuming a variety in the number of tubes ruptured during large break loss-of-coolant conditions. The number of experiments conducted permitted determination of the range of tube ruptures for which high peak cladding temperatures could result in the Semiscale Mod-1 system. The paper contains a description of the Semiscale Mod-1 system and a discussion of the steam generator tube rupture tests conducted. The experimental results from the test series and the thermal-hydraulic phenomena found to influence the core thermal response during the experiments are discussed

  17. Alternative protections for loss of coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estevez, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    One way to mitigate a small loss of coolant accident (LOCA) is by depressurizing the primary system, in order to turn the accident into a sequence where water is fed to a low pressure system. It can be achieved by two different ways: by incorporating a valve system (ADS - Automatic Depressurization System) to the design, which helps to diminish the pressure, obtaining a bigger LOCA, or by extracting heat from the system. Our analysis is centered in integrated reactors. The first characterization performed was on CAREM reactor. The idea was then to observe its behavior with LOCAs for different thermal power relations, water volume and rupture area. A simple depressurization model is presented, which enables us to find the parameter relationships which characterize this process, from which some particular cases will arise. ADS implementation is then analyzed, giving the criteria for the triggering time. A study on its reliability and the probability of a spurious opening is made, taking into account independent and dependent failures. An analysis on heat extraction as alternative for depressurizing is also made. Finally, the different reasons to choose between ADS or heat extraction as alternative are given, and the meaning of the parameters found are discussed. An alternative to classify LOCAs, instead of the traditional classification, by fracture size, is suggested. (author)

  18. Consequences in the pumps operation during a large loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.A. dos; Sabundjian, G.

    1991-08-01

    The event of living on or turning off the operation of the Reactor Cooling Pumps - RCPs, in the case of a Loss of Coolant Accident - LOCA, has been a reason of a lot of studies after the Three Mile Island 2 accident. Thus, it was investigated a large break LOCA in the cold leg of Angra 1, with the RELAP4/MOD5 Code during the blowdown. The attained results indicated that the best performance of the core was in the case where the RCPs had been turned off in the beginning of the transient, when compared with different operation conditions of the RCPs. (author)

  19. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 2 – Zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, David; LaBrier, Daniel; Ali, Amir; Blandford, Edward D.; Howe, Kerry J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Zinc release is limited to less than 1 mg/L in TSP-buffered solution under a variety of conditions (pH, temperature, zinc source). • Zinc release in high-temperature non-TSP-buffered environment is approximately 25 mg/L. • Long-term zinc release is controlled by passivation (without TSP) and zinc solubility (with TSP). • Precipitation and solubility of zinc phosphate limit the release of zinc. - Abstract: Bench experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of zinc from metallic zinc-bearing surfaces under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) at a nuclear power generating facility. The experiments showed that in non-buffered (acidic) environments, measurable quantities of zinc are released from zinc-bearing surfaces. Precipitation and solubility of phosphate-based corrosion products, such as zinc phosphate, limit the release of zinc from zinc-bearing surfaces. These experiments have found that under a variety of conditions, including variations of temperature, pH, and across different zinc-bearing surfaces, the release of zinc into solution is limited to <1 mg/L when phosphate is present. When phosphate is not present, zinc release is instead bounded by a markedly higher saturation limit which is a strong function of the solution temperature.

  20. Leak rate analysis of the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boardman, T.; Jeanmougin, N.; Lofaro, R.; Prevost, J.

    1985-07-01

    An independent analysis was performed by ETEC to determine what the seal leakage rates would be for the Westinghouse Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) during a postulated station blackout resulting from loss of ac electric power. The object of the study was to determine leakage rates for the following conditions: Case 1: All three seals function. Case 2: No. 1 seal fails open while Nos. 2 and 3 seals function. Case 3: All three seals fail open. The ETEC analysis confirmed Westinghouse calculations on RCP seal performance for the conditions investigated. The leak rates predicted by ETEC were slightly lower than those predicted by Westinghouse for each of the three cases as summarized below. Case 1: ETEC predicted 19.6 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 21.1 gpm. Case 2: ETEC predicted 64.7 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 75.6 gpm. Case 3: ETEC predicted 422 gpm, Westinghouse predicted 480 gpm. 3 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs

  1. Thermal analyses for the spend fuel pool of Taiwan BWR plants during the loss of cooling accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, B-Y.; Yeh, C-L.; Wei, W-C.; Chen, Y-S., E-mail: onepicemine@iner.gov.tw, E-mail: clinyeh@iner.gov.tw, E-mail: hn150456@iner.gov.tw, E-mail: yschen@iner.gov.tw [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-01

    After the Fukushima nuclear accident, the safety of the spent fuel pool has become an important concern. In this study, thermal analysis of the spent fuel pool under a loss of cooling accident is performed. The BWR spent fuel pools in Taiwan are investigated, including the Chinshan, Kuosheng, and Lungmen plants. The transient pool temperature and level behaviors are calculated based on lumped energy balance. After the pool level drops below the top of the fuel, the peak cladding temperature is predicted by the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis. The influence to the cladding temperature of the uniform and checkboard fuel loading patterns is also investigated. (author)

  2. Babcock and Wilcox revisions to CONTEMPT, computer program for predicting containment pressure-temperature response to a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsii, Y.H.

    1975-01-01

    The CONTEMPT computer program predicts the pressure-temperature response of a single-volume reactor building to a loss-of-coolant accident. The analytical model used for the program is described. CONTEMPT assumes that the loss-of-coolant accident can be separated into two phases; the primary system blowdown and reactor building pressurization. The results of the blowdown analysis serve as the boundary conditions and are input to the CONTEMPT program. Thus, the containment model is only concerned with the pressure and temperature in the reactor building and the temperature distribution through the reactor building structures. The program also calculates building leakage and the effects of engineered safety features such as reactor building sprays, decay heat coolers, sump coolers, etc. 11 references. (U.S.)

  3. Analyses of Decrease in Reactor Coolant Flow Rate in SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Rae; Bae, Kyoo Hwan; Choi, Suhn

    2011-01-01

    SMART is a small integral reactor, which is under development at KAERI to get the standard design approval by the end of 2011. SMART works like a pressurized light-water reactor in principle though it is more compact than large commercial reactors. SMART houses major components such as steam generators, a pressurizer, and reactor coolant pumps inside the reactor pressure vessel. Due to its compact design, SMART adopts a canned-motor type reactor coolant pump which has much smaller rotational inertia than the ones used in commercial reactors. As a consequence, the reactor coolant pump has very short coastdown time and reactor coolant flow rate decreases more severely compared to commercial reactors. The transients initiated by reduction of reactor coolant flow rate have been analyzed to ensure that SMART can be safely shutdown on such transients. The design basis events in this category are complete loss of flow, single pump locked rotor with loss of offsite power, and single pump shaft break with loss of offsite power

  4. Prediction of loop seal formation and clearing during small break loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Suk Ho; Kim, Hho Jung

    1992-01-01

    Behavior of loop seal formation and clearing during small break loss of coolant accident is investigated using the RELAP5/MOD2 and /MOD3 codes with the test of SB-CL-18 of the LSTF(Large Scale Test Facility). The present study examines the thermal-hydraulic mechanisms responsible for early core uncovery includeing the manometric effect due to an asymmetric coolant holdup in the steam generator upflow and downflow side. The analysis with the RELAP5/ MOD2 demonstrates the main phenomena occuring in the depressurization transient including the loop seal formation and clearing with sufficient accuracy. Nevertheless, several differences regarding the evolution of phenomena and their timing have been pointed out in the base calculations. The RELAP5/MOD3 predicts overall phenomena, particularly the steam generator liquid holdup better than the RELAP5/MOD2. The nodalization study in the components of the steam generator U-tubes and the cross-over legs with the RELAP5/MOD3 results in good prediction of the loop seal clearing phenomena and their timing. (Author)

  5. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor passive safety system response to postulated events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M. C.; Wright, R. F.

    2012-01-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor. This paper is part of a series of four describing the design and safety features of the Westinghouse SMR. This paper focuses in particular upon the passive safety features and the safety system response of the Westinghouse SMR. The Westinghouse SMR design incorporates many features to minimize the effects of, and in some cases eliminates the possibility of postulated accidents. The small size of the reactor and the low power density limits the potential consequences of an accident relative to a large plant. The integral design eliminates large loop piping, which significantly reduces the flow area of postulated loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs). The Westinghouse SMR containment is a high-pressure, compact design that normally operates at a partial vacuum. This facilitates heat removal from the containment during LOCA events. The containment is submerged in water which also aides the heat removal and provides an additional radionuclide filter. The Westinghouse SMR safety system design is passive, is based largely on the passive safety systems used in the AP1000 R reactor, and provides mitigation of all design basis accidents without the need for AC electrical power for a period of seven days. Frequent faults, such as reactivity insertion events and loss of power events, are protected by first shutting down the nuclear reaction by inserting control rods, then providing cold, borated water through a passive, buoyancy-driven flow. Decay heat removal is provided using a layered approach that includes the passive removal of heat by the steam drum and independent passive heat removal system that transfers heat from the primary system to the environment. Less frequent faults such as loss of coolant accidents are mitigated by passive injection of a large quantity of water that is readily available inside containment. An automatic depressurization system is used to

  6. Final report, BWR drywell debris transport Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.E.; Boyack, B.E.; Leonard, M.T.; Williams, K.A.; Wolf, L.T.

    1997-09-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a Regulatory Bulletin and accompanying Regulatory Guide (1.82, Rev. 2) which requires licensees of boiling water reactors to develop a specific plan of action (including hardware backfits, if necessary) to preclude the possibility of early emergency core cooling system strainer blockage following a postulated loss-of-coolant-accident. The postulated mechanism for strainer blockage is destruction of piping insulation in the vicinity of the break and subsequent transport of fragmented insulation to the wetwell. In the absence of more definitive information, the Regulatory Guide recommends that licensees assume a drywell debris transport fraction of 1.0. Accordingly, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission initiated research focused toward developing a technical basis to provide insights useful to regulatory oversight of licensee submittals associated with resolution of the postulated strainer blockage issue. Part of this program was directed towards experimental and analytical research leading to a more realistic specification of the debris transport through the drywell to the wetwell. To help focus this development into a cost effective effort, a panel, with broad based knowledge and experience, was formed to address the relative importance of the various phenomena that can be expected in plant response to postulated accidents that may produce strainer blockage. The resulting phenomena identification and ranking tables reported herein were used to help guide research. The phenomena occurring in boiling water reactors drywells was the specific focus of the panel, although supporting experimental data and calculations of debris transport fractions were considered

  7. Predicted HIFAR fuel element temperatures for postulated loss-of-coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, W.J.

    1987-04-01

    A two-dimensional theoretical heat transfer model of a HIFAR Mark IV/Va fuel element has been developed and validated by comparing predicted thermal performances with experimental temperature responses obtained from irradiated fuel elements during simulated accident conditions. Full details of the model's development and its verification have been reported elsewhere. In this report, the model has been further used to ascertain acceptable limits of fuel element decay power for the start of two specific LOCAs which have been identified by the Regulatory Bureau of the AAEC. For a single fuel element which is positioned within a fuel load/unload flask and is not subjected to any forced convective air cooling, the model indicates that fission product decay powers must not exceed 1.86 kW if fuel surface temperatures are not to exceed 450 deg C. In the case of a HIFAR core LOCA in which the complete inventory of heavy water is lost, it is calculated that the maximum fission product decay power of a central element must not exceed 1.1 kW if fuel surface temperatures are not to exceed 450 deg C anywhere in the core

  8. Feedwater control system in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanji, Jun-ichi; Oomori, Takashi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the water level control performance in BWR type reactor by regulating the water level set to the reactor depending on the rate of change in the recycling amount of coolant to thereby control the fluctuations in the water level resulted in the reactor within an aimed range even upon significant fluctuations in the recycling flow rate. Constitution: The recycling flow rate of coolant in the reactor is detected and the rate of its change with time is computed to form a rate of change signal. The rate of change signal is inputted to a reactor level setter to amend the actual reactor water level demand signal and regulate the water level set to the reactor water depending on the rate of change in the recycling flow rate. Such a regulation method for the set water level enables to control the water level fluctuation resulted in the reactor within the aimed range even upon the significant fluctuation in the recycling flow rate and improve the water level control performance of the reactor, whereby the operationability for the reactor is improved to enhance the operation rate. (Moriyama, K.)

  9. BWR and PWR chemistry operating experience and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzzetti, K.; Garcia, S.; Lynch, N.; Reid, R.

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that proper control of water chemistry plays a critical role in ensuring the safe and reliable operation of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce general and localized corrosion of reactor coolant system, steam cycle equipment, and fuel cladding materials; ensure continued integrity of cycle components; and reduce radiation fields. Once a particular nuclear plant component has been installed or plant system constructed, proper water chemistry provides a global tool to mitigate materials degradation problems, thereby reducing the need for costly repairs or replacements. Recognizing the importance of proper chemistry control and the value in understanding the relationship between chemistry guidance and actual operating experience, EPRI continues to collect, monitor, and evaluate operating data from BWRs and PWRs around the world. More than 900 cycles of valuable BWR and PWR operating chemistry data has been collected, including online, startup and shutdown chemistry data over more than 10 years (> 20 years for BWRs). This paper will provide an overview of current trends in BWR and PWR chemistry, focusing on plants in the U.S.. Important chemistry parameters will be highlighted and discussed in the context of the EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines requirements (i.e., those parameters considered to be of key importance as related to the major goals identified in the EPRI Guidelines: materials integrity; fuel integrity; and minimizing plant radiation fields). Perspectives will be provided in light of recent industry initiatives and changes in the EPRI BWR and PWR Water Chemistry Guidelines. (author)

  10. Analysis of fuel behaviour after loss-of-coolant accident with the TESPA-code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keusenhoff, J.

    1981-01-01

    After a loss-of-coolant accident fuel rods go through a phase of high temperature and differential pressure before quenching and initiation of long term cooling. For licensing purpose the highest cladding temperature and the coolability of the core is of interest. The highest temperature is evaluated by a hot channel calculation with conservative assumptions. It gives little information about the status of the entire core. Therefore more detailed information is necessary. TESPA is a fast running code, which uses best-estimate assumptions, considers statistical uncertainties in the input parameters and calculates clad ballooning and rupture. The code is a usefull tool for calculation of channel blockage and cladding rupture

  11. Validation of advanced NSSS simulator model for loss-of-coolant accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, S.P.; Chang, S.K.; Huang, H.C. [Nuclear Training Branch, Northeast Utilities, Waterford, CT (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The replacement of the NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) model on the Millstone 2 full-scope simulator has significantly increased its fidelity to simulate adverse conditions in the RCS. The new simulator NSSS model is a real-time derivative of the Nuclear Plant Analyzer by ABB. The thermal-hydraulic model is a five-equation, non-homogeneous model for water, steam, and non-condensible gases. The neutronic model is a three-dimensional nodal diffusion model. In order to certify the new NSSS model for operator training, an extensive validation effort has been performed by benchmarking the model performance against RELAP5/MOD2. This paper presents the validation results for the cases of small-and large-break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA). Detailed comparisons in the phenomena of reflux-condensation, phase separation, and two-phase natural circulation are discussed.

  12. Contempt-LT: a computer program for predicting containment pressure-temperature response to a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheat, L.L.; Wagner, R.J.; Niederauer, G.F.; Obenchain, C.F.

    1975-06-01

    CONTEMPT-LT is a digital computer program, written in FORTRAN IV, developed to describe the long-term behavior of water-cooled nuclear reactor containment systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. The program calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures, mass and energy inventories, heat structure temperature distributions, and energy exchange with adjacent compartments. The program is capable of describing the effects of leakage on containment response. Models are provided to describe fan cooler and cooling spray engineered safety systems. Up to four compartments can be modeled with CONTEMPT-LT, and any compartment except the reactor system may have both a liquid pool region and an air-vapor atmosphere region above the pool. Each region is assumed to have a uniform temperature, but the temperatures of the two regions may be different. CONTEMPT-LT can be used to model all current boiling water reactor pressure suppression systems, including containments with either vertical or horizontal vent systems. CONTEMPT-LT can also be used to model pressurized water reactor dry containments, subatmospheric containments, and dual volume containments with an annulus region, and can be used to describe containment responses in experimental containment systems. The program user defines which compartments are used, specifies input mass and energy additions, defines heat structure and leakage systems, and describes the time advancement and output control. CONTEMPT-LT source decks are available in double precision extended-binary-coded-decimal-interchange-code (EBCDIC) versions. Sample problems have been run on the IBM360/75 computer. (U.S.)

  13. Fission product transport and behavior during two postulated loss of flow transients in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.P.; Carboneau, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    This document discusses fission product behavior during two postulated loss-of-flow accidents (leading to high- and low-pressure core degradation, respectively) in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). These transients are designated ATR Transient LCPI5 (high-pressure) and LPP9 (low-pressure). Normally, transients of this nature would be easily mitigated using existing safety systems and procedures. In these analyses, failure of these safety systems was assumed so that core degradation and fission product release could be analyzed. A probabilistic risk assessment indicated that the probability of occurrence for these two transients is of the order of 10 -5 and 10 -7 per reactor year for LCP15 and LPP9, respectively

  14. Emergency recirculation pump driving mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morooka, Shin-ichi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To sufficiently secure the coolant flow rate in a reactor core and restrict the temperature on the surface of fuel elements to low degree when the coolant is lost in a BWR type reactor. Constitution: In order to secure sufficient coolant flow rate in a reactor core and to sufficiently cool the reactor core when the coolant is lost in a BWR type reactor, it is tripped upon loss of power supply simultaneously when an accident occurs, a recycling pump at the side of normal reactor where its rotating speed is decelerated in accordance with its inertia is restarted by the pressure water stored in a tank out of the reactor to increase the coolant flow rate in the reactor core so as to sufficiently cool the reactor core. (Aizawa, K.)

  15. Loss of coolant acident analyses on Osiris research reactor using the RELAP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Humberto Vitor; Costa, Antonella Lombardi; Lima, Claubia Pereira Bezerra; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora Fortini

    2011-01-01

    RELAP5/MOD 3.3 code is widely used for thermal hydraulic studies of commercial nuclear power plants. However, several current investigations have shown that RELAP5 code can also be applied for thermal hydraulic analysis of nuclear research systems with good predictions. In this paper, a nodalization of the core and the most important components of the primary cooling system of the OSIRIS reactor developed for RELAP5 thermal hydraulic code are presented as well as results of steady state and transient simulations. OSIRIS has thermal power of 70 MW and it is an open pool type research reactor moderated and cooled by water. The OSIRIS reactor characteristics have been used as a base for the development of a model for the Multipurpose Brazilian Reactor (RMB). The aim of the present work is to investigate the behavior of the core during a loss of coolant accident and the possible damage of the fuel elements due an inadequate heat removal. Although the core coolant reached the saturation point due the large break, the fuel element conditions were out of the damage zone. (author)

  16. Long-term recovery of pressurized water reactors following a large break loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, C.D.; Callow, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    The USNRC recently identified a possible safety concern for PWR's. Following the reflood phase of a large break loss-of-coolant accident, long-term cooling of the reactor core may not be ensured. Specifically, the concern is that, for a pump discharge cold leg break, the loop seals in the reactor coolant pump suction piping will refill with liquid and the post-reflood steam production may depress the liquid levels in the downflow sides of the loop seals. A loop seal depression would cause a corresponding depression of the core liquid levels and possibly a fuel rod heatup in the upper core region. This paper is intended as an introduction of the safety issue that: 1) describes the important aspects of the problem, 2) provides an initial analysis of the consequences, and 3) discusses ongoing work in this area. Because the elevation of the loop seals is near the mid-core elevation in plants of WE design, the concern is greatest for those plants. There is less concern for most plants of CE design, and likely no concern for plants of BW design. This issue was addressed by employing both steady-state and transient systems analysis approaches. Two approaches were used because of uncertainties regarding actual reactor coolant system behavior during the post-reflood period. The steady-state approach involved the development and application of a simple computer program to investigate reactor coolant system behavior assuming quiescent post-reflood conditions. The transient systems approach involved investigating this behavior using the RELAP5/MOD2 computer code and a comprehensive RELAP5 model of a WE PWR. The steady-state analysis indicated only a moderate fuel rod heatup is possible. The transient systems analysis indicated boiling and condensation-induced flow oscillations are sufficient to prevent fuel rod heatup. Analysis uncertainties are discussed. (orig./HP)

  17. Advances in BWR water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.; Jarvis, Mary L.

    2012-09-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) water chemistry control with examples of plant experiences at U.S. designed BWRs. Water chemistry advances provide some of the most effective methods for mitigating materials degradation, reducing fuel performance concerns and lowering radiation fields. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of materials remains a high priority and improved techniques that have been demonstrated in BWRs will be reviewed, specifically hydrogen injection combined with noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) and the newer on-line noble metal application process (OLNC). Hydrogen injection performance, an important part of SCC mitigation, will also be reviewed for the BWR fleet, highlighting system improvements that have enabled earlier injection of hydrogen including the potential for hydrogen injection during plant startup. Water chemistry has been significantly improved by the application of pre-filtration and optimized use of ion exchange resins in the CP (condensate polishing) and reactor water cleanup (RWCU) systems. EPRI has monitored and supported water treatment improvements to meet water chemistry goals as outlined in the EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines, particularly those for SCC mitigation of reactor internals and piping, minimization of fuel risk due to corrosion and crud deposits and chemistry control for radiation field reduction. In recent years, a significant reduction has occurred in feedwater corrosion product input, particularly iron. A large percentage of plants are now reporting <0.1 ppb feedwater iron. The impacts to plant operation and chemistry of lower feedwater iron will be explored. Depleted zinc addition is widely practiced across the fleet and the enhanced focus on radiation reduction continues to emphasize the importance of controlling radiation source term. In addition, shutdown chemistry control is necessary to avoid excessive release of activated corrosion products from fuel

  18. Problems of two-phase flows in water cooled and moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syu, Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Heat exchange in two-phase flows of coolant in loss of coolant accidents in PWR and BWR reactors has been investigated. Three main stages of accident history are considered: blowdown, reflooding using emergency core cooling system and rewetting. Factors, determining the rate of coolant leakage and the rate of temperature increase in fuel cladding during blowdown, processes of vapour during reflooding and liquid priming by vapour during rewetting, are discussed

  19. Analysis of Loss-of-Coolant Accidents in the NIST Research Reactor - Early Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Joo S.; Diamond, David

    2016-12-06

    A study of the fuel temperature during the early phase of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in the NIST research reactor (NBSR) was completed. Previous studies had been reported in the preliminary safety analysis report for the conversion of the NBSR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched (LEU) fuel. Those studies had focused on the most vulnerable LOCA situation, namely, a double-ended guillotine break in the time period after reactor trip when water is drained from either the coolant channels inside the fuel elements or the region outside the fuel elements. The current study fills in a gap in the analysis which is the early phase of the event when there may still be water present but the reactor is at power or immediately after reactor trip and pumps have tripped. The calculations were done, for both the current HEU-fueled core and the proposed LEU core, with the TRACE thermal-hydraulic systems code. Several break locations and different break sizes were considered. In all cases the increase in the clad (or fuel meat) temperature was relatively small so that a large margin to the temperature threshold for blistering (the Safety Limit for the NBSR) remained.

  20. PCTRAN enhancement for large break loss of coolant accident concurrent with loss of offsite power in VVER-1000 simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadad, Kamal; Esmaeili-Sanjavanmareh, Mansour [Shiraz Univ., Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2017-05-15

    PCTRAN capability to simulate a large break loss of coolant accident concurrent with the loss of offsite power in Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant is enhanced and investigated. Following the correction of the accident scenario for Bushehr nuclear power plant in PCTRAN, simulation results are compared with the final safety assessment report of that plant. As a result, the primary loop thermal hydraulics parameters including pressure, total flow rates, leakage flow rates and reactor power are in a good agreement with the reference data. Hot and cold leg temperature variations have the same trends as reference data but have a maximum of 80 C disagreement at the transient initiation. The reason for this disagreement is explained and its adjustment is discussed. Improvements of PCTRAN simulator are mainly due to enhancing user control for atmospheric steam dump valve, containment pressure and emergency core cooling systems which are thoroughly described in this paper.

  1. A study of thermal stratification in the cold legs during the subcooled blowdown phase of a loss of coolant accident in the OSU APEX thermal hydraulic testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachs, D. M.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal stratification, which has been linked to the occurrence of pressurized thermal shock (PTS), is observed to occur during the early stages of simulated loss of coolant accidents (LOCAS) in the Oregon State University Advanced Plant Experiment (OSU APEX) Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility. The OSU APEX Test Facility is a scaled model of the Westinghouse AP600 nuclear power plant. Analysis of the OSU APEX facility data has allowed the determination of an onset criteria for thermal stratification and has provided support for the postulated mechanisms leading to thermal stratification. CFX 4.1, a computational fluid dynamics code, was used to generate a model of the cold legs and the downcomer that described the phenomena occurring within them. Some mixing phenomena were predicted that lead to non-uniformity between the two cold legs attached to the steam generator on the side of the facility containing the Passive Residual Heat Removal (PRHR) injection system. The stratification was found to be two phase and unlikely to be a factor in PTS

  2. A novel technology for fouling mitigation and dose reduction in BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Varela, Juan

    2014-01-01

    In a boiling water reactor (BWR), a jet pump provides an internal circulation path for the core coolant flow and consists of four main sections: the nozzle section, inlet mixer section (throat barrel), flare and diffuser. A high velocity coolant flow moves through the nozzles and discharges into the inlet mixer, and over time, oxide particulates (cruds) build up on the inside 304 stainless steel (SS) surfaces of the nozzles and the inlet mixer forming a layer of crud fouling. Cruds are typically removed from the surfaces of BWR components during regularly scheduled shutdowns of the reactor that is highly costly. Thus, a cost-effective is being developed to mitigate the crud fouling and the accumulation of radioactive species by using a colloid-based process. A colloid-based process can be applied to components in service, and does not require extensive equipment and extreme processing parameters as compared to other deposition processes and is not limited by geometric constraints as is the CVD process. Several parameters, such as concentration of TiO 2 nanoparticle, deposition/post-annealing temperature, and hydrodynamic flow condition, etc., for developing the optimum TiO 2 coating process have been examined to identify the most critical condition that can be applicable at plants. Preliminary results showed that the post-annealing treatment of coating is essential for improving the adherence and coherence of colloidal TiO 2 nanoparticles to the substrate. In addition, the presence of oxide on the coating surface is detrimental to the coating durability and thus pre-existing oxide surfaces require to be cleaned before coating. (author)

  3. Coolant radiolysis studies in the high temperature, fuelled U-2 loop in the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliot, A.J.; Stuart, C.R.

    2008-06-01

    An understanding of the radiolysis-induced chemistry in the coolant water of nuclear reactors is an important key to the understanding of materials integrity issues in reactor coolant systems. Significant materials and chemistry issues have emerged in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) and CANDU reactors that have required a detailed understanding of the radiation chemistry of the coolant. For each reactor type, specific computer radiolysis models have been developed to gain insight into radiolysis processes and to make chemistry control adjustments to address the particular issue. In this respect, modelling the radiolysis chemistry has been successful enough to allow progress to be made. This report contains a description of the water radiolysis tests performed in the U-2 loop, NRU reactor in 1995, which measured the CHC under different physical conditions of the loop such as temperature, reactor power and steam quality. (author)

  4. Investigation of a hydrogen mitigation system during large break loss-of-coolant accident for a two-loop pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehjourian, Mehdi; Rahgoshay, Mohmmad; Jahanfamia, Gholamreza [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sayareh, Reza [Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Kerman Graduate University of Technology, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shirani, Amir Saied [Faculty of Engineering, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Hydrogen release during severe accidents poses a serious threat to containment integrity. Mitigating procedures are necessary to prevent global or local explosions, especially in large steel shell containments. The management of hydrogen safety and prevention of over-pressurization could be implemented through a hydrogen reduction system and spray system. During the course of the hypothetical large break loss-of-coolant accident in a nuclear power plant, hydrogen is generated by a reaction between steam and the fuel-cladding inside the reactor pressure vessel and also core concrete interaction after ejection of melt into the cavity. The MELCOR 1.8.6 was used to assess core degradation and containment behavior during the large break loss-of-coolant accident without the actuation of the safety injection system except for accumulators in Beznau nuclear power plant. Also, hydrogen distribution in containment and performance of hydrogen reduction system were investigated.

  5. An investigation of core liquid level depression in small break loss-of-coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, R.R.; Watkins, J.C.; Motley, F.E.; Stumpf, H.; Chen, Y.S.

    1991-08-01

    Core liquid level depression can result in partial core dryout and heatup early in a small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) transient. Such behavior occurs when steam, trapped in the upper regions of the reactor primary system (between the loop seal and the core inventory), moves coolant out of the core region and uncovers the rod upper elevations. The net result is core liquid level depression. Core liquid level depression and subsequent core heatups are investigated using subscale data from the ROSA-IV Program's 1/48-scale Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) and the 1/1705-scale Semiscale facility. Both facilities are Westinghouse-type, four-loop, pressurized water reactor simulators. The depression phenomena and factors which influence the minimum core level are described and illustrated using examples from the data. Analyses of the subject experiments, conducted using the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 (Version 12.7) thermal-hydraulic code, are also described and summarized. Finally, the response of a typical Westinghouse four-loop plant (RESAR-3S) was calculated to qualitatively study coal liquid level depression in a full-scale system. 31 refs., 37 figs., 6 tabs

  6. Application of damage function analysis to reactor coolant circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, D.D.

    2002-01-01

    The application of deterministic models for simulating stress corrosion cracking phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor primary coolant circuits is described. The first generation code, DAMAGE-PREDICTOR, has been used to model the radiolysis of the coolant, to estimate the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), and to calculate the crack growth rate (CGR) at fixed state points during reactor operation in about a dozen plants worldwide. This code has been validated in ''double-blind'' comparisons between the calculated and measured hydrogen concentration, oxygen concentration, and ECP in the recirculation system of the Leibstadt BWR in Switzerland, as well as through less formal comparisons with data from other plants. Second generation codes have now been developed, including REMAIN for simulating BWRs with internal coolant pumps and the ALERT series for modeling reactors with external pumps. One of this series, ALERT, yields the integrated damage function (IDF), which is the crack length versus time, on a component-by-component basis for a specified future operating scenario. This code therefore allows one to explore proposed future operating protocols, with the objective of identifying those that are most cost-effective and which minimizes the risk of failure of components in the coolant circuit by stress corrosion cracking. The application of this code is illustrated by exploring the benefits of partial hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) for an actual reactor, in which hydrogen is added to the feedwater over only limited periods during operation. The simulations show that the benefits, in terms of reduction in the IDFs for various components, are sensitive to when HWC was initiated in the plant life and to the length of time over which it is applied. (author)

  7. Application of damage function analysis to reactor coolant circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, D.D. [Center for Electrochemical Science and Technology, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The application of deterministic models for simulating stress corrosion cracking phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor primary coolant circuits is described. The first generation code, DAMAGE-PREDICTOR, has been used to model the radiolysis of the coolant, to estimate the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), and to calculate the crack growth rate (CGR) at fixed state points during reactor operation in about a dozen plants worldwide. This code has been validated in ''double-blind'' comparisons between the calculated and measured hydrogen concentration, oxygen concentration, and ECP in the recirculation system of the Leibstadt BWR in Switzerland, as well as through less formal comparisons with data from other plants. Second generation codes have now been developed, including REMAIN for simulating BWRs with internal coolant pumps and the ALERT series for modeling reactors with external pumps. One of this series, ALERT, yields the integrated damage function (IDF), which is the crack length versus time, on a component-by-component basis for a specified future operating scenario. This code therefore allows one to explore proposed future operating protocols, with the objective of identifying those that are most cost-effective and which minimizes the risk of failure of components in the coolant circuit by stress corrosion cracking. The application of this code is illustrated by exploring the benefits of partial hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) for an actual reactor, in which hydrogen is added to the feedwater over only limited periods during operation. The simulations show that the benefits, in terms of reduction in the IDFs for various components, are sensitive to when HWC was initiated in the plant life and to the length of time over which it is applied. (author)

  8. BWR Mark III containment analyses using a GOTHIC 8.0 3D model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, Gonzalo; Serrano, César; Lopez-Alonso, Emma; Molina, M del Carmen; Calvo, Daniel; García, Javier; Queral, César; Zuriaga, J. Vicente; González, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The development of a 3D GOTHIC code model of BWR Mark-III containment is described. • Suppression pool modelling based on the POOLEX STB-20 and STB-16 experimental tests. • LOCA and SBO transient simulated to verify the behaviour of the 3D GOTHIC model. • Comparison between the 3D GOTHIC model and MAAP4.07 model is conducted. • Accurate reproduction of pre severe accident conditions with the 3D GOTHIC model. - Abstract: The purpose of this study is to establish a detailed three-dimensional model of Cofrentes NPP BWR/6 Mark III containment building using the containment code GOTHIC 8.0. This paper presents the model construction, the phenomenology tests conducted and the selected transient for the model evaluation. In order to study the proper settings for the model in the suppression pool, two experiments conducted with the experimental installation POOLEX have been simulated, allowing to obtain a proper behaviour of the model under different suppression pool phenomenology. In the transient analyses, a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and a Station Blackout (SBO) transient have been performed. The main results of the simulations of those transients were qualitative compared with the results obtained from simulations with MAAP 4.07 Cofrentes NPP model, used by the plant for simulating severe accidents. From this comparison, a verification of the model in terms of pressurization, asymmetric discharges and high pressure release were obtained. The completeness of this model has proved to adequately simulate the thermal hydraulic phenomena which occur in the containment during accidental sequences

  9. Modeling of the dispersion of tritium from postulated accidental releases from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Andre Silva de; Simoes Filho, Francisco Fernando Lamego; Lapa, Celso Marcelo Franklin; Alvim, Antonio Carlos Marques; Soares, Abner Duarte

    2013-01-01

    This study has the aim to assess the impact of accidental release of tritium postulate from a nuclear power reactor through environmental modeling of aquatic resources. In order to do that it was used computational models of hydrodynamics and transport for the simulation of tritium dispersion caused by an accident in a CANDU reactor located in the ongoing Angra 3 site. It was postulated, then, the LOCA - Loss of Coolant Accident -, accident in the emergency cooling system of the nucleus ( without fusion), where was lost 66m 3 of soda almost instantaneously. This inventory contained 35 PBq and was released a load of 9.7 TBq/s in liquid form near the Itaorna beach, Angra dos Reis - RJ. The models mentioned above were applied in two scenarios ( plant stopped or operating) and showed a tritium plume with specific activities larger than the reference level for seawater (1.1MBq/m 3 ), during the first 14 days after the accident. The main difference between the scenario without and with seawater recirculation (pumping and discharge) is based on the enhancement of dilution of the highest concentrations in the last one. This dilution enhancement resulting in decreasing concentrations was observed only during the first two weeks, when they ranged from 1x10 9 to 5x10 5 Bq/m 3 close to the Itaorna beach spreading just to Sandri Island. After 180 days, the plume could not be detected anymore in the bay, because their activities would be lower than the minimum detectable value ( 3 ). (author)

  10. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Ryuji; Yamanari, Shozo.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent contamination of reactor water by suppression pool water upon isolation of a BWR type reactor. Constitution: In a cooling system upon reactor separation and a high pressure core spray system of a BWR type reactor, a controller comprises an AND circuit which outputs a valve switching signal upon input of a low level signal for condensate storage tank water and a high level signal for a suppression pool water level. This can prevent the injection of suppression pool water into the reactor in the event other than loss of coolant accident. The valve is switched only when the suppression pool water level signal takes a high level and loss of coolant accident signal is present, and the water of the suppression water is pumped into the reactor. In the case, other than the loss of coolant accident, the valve is not switched even when a high level signal for the suppression pool water level is detected. (Horiuchi, T.)

  11. Reactor coolant and associated systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Safety Guide outlines the design requirements for the reactor coolant and associated systems (RCAS) and the features required in order to achieve their safety functions. It covers design considerations for various reactor types and encompasses the safety aspects of the functions of the RCAS both during normal operation and following postulated initiating events, and to some extent also for decommissioning

  12. Post-test analysis of ROSA-III experiment RUNs 705 and 706

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Soda, Kunihisa; Kikuchi, Osamu; Tasaka, Kanji; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1980-07-01

    The purpose of ROSA-III experiment with a scaled BWR Test facility is to examine primary coolant thermal-hydraulic behavior and performance of ECCS during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident of BWR. The results provide the information for verification and improvement of reactor safety analysis codes. RUNs 705 and 706 assumed a 200% double-ended break at the recirculation pump suction. RUN 705 was an isothermal blowdown test without initial power and initial core flow. In RUN 706 for an average core power and no ECCS, the main steam line and feed water line were isolated immediately on the break. Post-test analysis of RUNs 705 and 706 was made with computer code RELAP4J. The agreement in system pressure between calculation and experiment was satisfactory. However, the calculated heater rod surface temperature were significantly higher than the experimental ones. The calculated axial temperature profile was different in tendency from the experimental one. The calculated mixture level behavior in the core was different from the liquid void distribution observed in experiment. The rapid rise of fuel rod surface temperature was caused by the reduction of heat transfer coefficient attributed to the increase of quality. The need was indicated for improvement of analytical model of void distribution in the core, and also to performe a characteristic test of recirculation line under reverse flow and to examine the core inlet flow rate experimentally and analytically. (author)

  13. Transient two-phase performance of LOFT reactor coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.H.; Modro, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    Performance characteristics of Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor coolant pumps under transient two-phase flow conditions were obtained based on the analysis of two large and small break loss-of-coolant experiments conducted at the LOFT facility. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of the transient two-phase flow effects on the LOFT reactor coolant pump performance during the first quadrant operation. The measured pump characteristics are presented as functions of pump void fraction which was determined based on the measured density. The calculated pump characteristics such as pump head, torque (or hydraulic torque), and efficiency are also determined as functions of pump void fractions. The importance of accurate modeling of the reactor coolant pump performance under two-phase conditions is addressed. The analytical pump model, currently used in most reactor analysis codes to predict transient two-phase pump behavior, is assessed

  14. Touch-sensitive colour graphics enhance monitoring of loss-of-coolant accident tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snedden, M.D.; Mead, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    A stand-alone computer-based system with an intelligent colour termimal is described for monitoring parameters during loss-of-coolant accident tests. Colour graphic displays and touch-sensitive control have been combined for effective operator interaction. Data collected by the host MODCOMP II minicomputer are dynamically updated on colour pictures generated by the terminal. Experimenters select system functions by touching simulated switches on a transparent touch-sensitive overlay, mounted directly over the face of the colour screen, eliminating the need for a keyboard. Switch labels and colours are changed on the screen by the terminal software as different functions are selected. Interaction is self-prompting and can be learned quickly. System operation for a complete set of 20 tests has demonstrated the convenience of interactive touchsensitive colour graphics

  15. Pressure behaviour in a nuclear reactor containment following a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KHattab, M.S.; Ibrahim, N.A.; Bedrose, S.D.

    1994-01-01

    The scenarios of pressure variation following a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) inside the containment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) have been investigated. Critical mass flow rushing out from high pressure leg through pipe break, is used to calculate the rate of coolant. The energy added to the containment atmosphere is determined to specify the rate of growth of pressure and temperature. The scenarios of small, medium and large LOCA at 2%, 15% and 25% flow released are investigated. Safety water spray system is initiated as the pressure reaches the containment design safety limit at about 3 bar to depressurise and to cooldown the system and thereby to reduce the concentration of radioactivity release in the containment atmosphere. The pressure response before and after operation of safety spray system is predicted in each size of LOCA using a typical design of westinghouse PWR system. The results of large LOCA showed good agreement with westinghouse calculations of the same design. The heat removal from the containment environment is rejected into the sump by drop-wise condensation mechanism. The effect of initial droplets diameters injected from the nozzles of the spray system is investigated. The results show that the droplet diameter of 3 mm gives best performance. 6 figs., 1 tab

  16. Modelling of the tritium dispersion from postulated accidental release of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Abner Duarte; Simoes Filho, Francisco Fernando Lamego; Cunha, Tatiana Santos da; Aguiar, Andre Silva de; Lapa, Celso Marcelo Franklin

    2011-01-01

    This study has the aim to assess the impact of accidental release of tritium postulate from a nuclear power reactor through environmental modeling of aquatic resources. In order to do that it was used computational models to simulation of tritium dispersion caused by an accident in a Candu reactor located in the ongoing Angra 3 site. The Candu reactor is one that uses heavy water (D 2 O) as moderator and coolant of the core. It was postulated, then, the LOCA accident (without fusion), where was lost 66 m3 of soda almost instantaneously. This inventory contained 35 P Bq and was released a load of 9.7 TBq/s in liquid form near the Itaorna beach, Angra dos Reis - RJ. The models mentioned above were applied in two scenarios (plant stopped or operating) and showed a tritium plume with specific activities larger than the reference level for seawater (1.1 MBq/m 3 ) during the first 14 days after the accident. (author)

  17. LWR fuel performance during anticipated transients with scram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinson, Z.R.; McCardell, R.K.; MacDonanl, P.E.; Rowland, T.C.; Tokar, M.

    1983-01-01

    Operational transients occur occasionally in light water reactors when minor malfunctions of certain system components affect the reactor core. Potential effects of such malfunctions include a loss of the secondary heat sink, an increase in system pressure, and, in boiling water reactors, void collapse and a brief increase in reactor power. The most severe postulated Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) anticipated transient is characterized by a power peak of up to 495% rated power for about 1 second (according to a recent General Electric Co., generic analysis). The results of a series of fuel behaviour tests in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are presented in this paper. Four progressively higher and broader power transients at a constant coolant flow rate were performed. The first transient simulated a BWR-5 turbine trip without steam bypass with fuel rods operating at BWR-6 core average rod powers. The second transient simulated a generator load rejection without steam bypass with fuel rods operating at above core average powers. The last two transients were performed at higher powers than safety analysis predicts to be possible in commercial reactors to be defined failure threshold margins. The test rods did not fail and were not damaged during any of the four transients. (author)

  18. Consequences in a long time of the forced loss of coolant in a pool type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The fuel and pool water temperatures are calculated as a function of time using unidimensional models of heat conduction and momentum conservation, to simulate the natural convection flow of the coolant. The reactor building pressure due to the pool water evaporation is calculated using a homogeneous model with thermal equilibrium. The heat loss from the three main components of the building volume (liquid water, air, and steam) to solid surfaces such as the building walls are taking into account. (Author) [pt

  19. Rapid depressurization event analysis in BWR/6 using RELAP5 and contain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueftueoglu, A.K.; Feltus, M.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Noncondensable gases may become dissolved in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) water level instrumentation during normal operations. Any dissolved noncondensable gases inside these water columns may come out of solution during rapid depressurization events, and displace water from the reference leg piping resulting in a false high level. These water level errors may cause a delay or failure in actuation, or premature shutdown of the Emergency Core Cooling System. (ECCS). If a rapid depressurization causes an erroneously high water level, preventing automatic ECCS actuation, it becomes important to determine if there would be other adequate indications for operator response and other signals for automatic actuation such as high drywell pressure. It is also important to determine the effect of the level signal on ECCS operation after it is being actuated. The objective of this study is to determine the detailed coupled containment/NSSS response during this rapid depressurization events in BWR/6. The selected scenarios involve: (a) inadvertent opening of all ADS valves, (b) design basis (DB) large break loss of coolant accident (LOCA), and (c) main steam line break (MSLB). The transient behaviors are evaluated in terms of: (a) vessel pressure and collapsed water level response, (b) specific transient boundary conditions, (e.g., scram, MSIV closure timing, feedwater flow, and break blowdown rates), (c) ECCS initiation timing, (d) impact of operator actions, (e) whether indications besides low-low water level were available. The results of the analysis had shown that there would be signals to actuate ECCS other than low reactor level, such as high drywell pressure, low vessel pressure, high suppression pool temperature, and that the plant operators would have significant indications to actuate ECCS.

  20. Investigation of loss of coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors using the ''Dynamic Best-Estimate Safety Analysis'' (DYBESA) method for considering of uncertainties in TRACE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sporn, Michael; Hurtado, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Loss of coolant accident must take uncertainties with potentially strong effects on the accident sequence prediction into account. For example, uncertainties in computational model input parameters resulting from varying geometry and material data due to manufacturing tolerances or unavailable measurements should be considered. The uncertainties of physical models used by the software program are also significant. In this paper, use of the ''Dynamic Best-Estimate Safety Analysis'' (DYBESA) method to quantify the uncertainties in the TRACE thermal-hydraulic program is demonstrated. For demonstration purposes loss of coolant accidents with breaks of various types and sizes in a DN 700 reactor coolant pipe are used as an example Application.

  1. Simulation of the SPE-4 small-break loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebull, P.; Hassan, Y.A.

    1993-01-01

    A small-break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA) conducted at the PMK-2 integral test facility was analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3. 1. The experiment simulated a 7.4% break in the cold leg of a VVER-440/213-type nuclear power plant as part of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Fourth Standard Problem Exercise (SPE-4). The VVER design differs from pressurized water reactors (PWRS) of western origin, primarily in its use of horizontal steam generators, hot- and cold-leg loop seals, and safety injection tanks. Because of these differences, it will exhibit somewhat different transient behavior than most PWRS. The PMK-2 test facility, located at the KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute (AEKI), is a scale model of the Paks nuclear power plant in Hungary with scaling factors of 1:2070 in power and volume and 1:1 in elevation. Primarily used to study SBLOCAs and natural circulation behavior of VVER reactors, it has been used in three previous SPEs

  2. Loss-of-coolant accident mitigation for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, N.C.J.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A RELAP5 Advanced Neutron Source Reactor system model has been developed for the conceptual design safety analysis. Three major regions modeled are the core, the heat exchanger loops, and letdown/pressurizing system. The model has been used to examine design alternatives for mitigation of loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) transients. The safety margins to the flow excursion limit and critical heat flux are presented. The results show that the core can survive an instantaneous double-ended guillotine of the core outlet piping break (610 mm-diameter) provided a cavitating venturi is employed. RELAP5 calculations were also used to determine the effects of using a non-instantaneous break opening times. Both break opening time and break formation characteristics were included in these parametric calculations. Accumulator optimization studies were also performed which suggest that an optimum accumulator bubble size exists which improves system performance under some break scenarios

  3. The possibility and the effects of a steam explosion in the BWR lower head on recriticality of a BWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.

    2002-12-01

    The report describes an analysis considering a BWR postulated severe accident scenario during which the late vessel automatic depressurization brings the water below the level of the bottom core plate. The subsequent lack of ECCS leads to core heat up during which the control rods melt and the melt deposits on the core plate. At that point of time in the scenario, the core fuel bundles are still intact and the Zircaloy clad oxidation is about to start. The objective of the study is to provide the conditions of reflood into the hot core due to the level swell or a slug delivered from the lower head as the control rod melt drops into the water. These conditions are employed in the neutronic analysis with the RECRIT code to determine if the core recriticality may be achieved. (au)

  4. Thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calleros M, G.; Zapata Y, M.; Gomez H, R.A.; Mendez M, A.; Castlllo D, R.

    2006-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor the phenomenon of the nuclear fission is presented, in which are liberated in stochastic form neutrons, originating that the population of the same ones varies in statistic form around a mean value. This variation will cause that when the neutron flow impacts on the neutron detectors, its are had as a result neutron flow signals with fluctuations around an average value. In this article it is shown that it conforms it lapses the time, this variations in the neutron flow (and therefore, in the flow signal due only to the fission), they presented oscillations inside a stable range, which won't be divergent. Considering that the BWR is characterized because boiling phenomena are presented, which affect the moderation of the neutrons, additional variations will be had in the signal coming from the neutron detectors, with relationship to the fission itself, which will be influenced by the feedback of the moderator's reactivity and of the temperature of the fuel pellet. Also, as the BWR it has coupled control systems to maintain the coolant level one and of the thermal power of the reactor, for each control action it was affected the neutron population. This means that the reactor could end up straying of a stable state condition. By it previously described, the study of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic is complex. In this work it is shown the phenomenology, the mathematical models and the theoretical behavior associated to the stability of the BWR type reactor; the variables that affect it are identified, the models that reproduce the behavior of the thermohydraulic stability coupled to the neutronic, the way to maintain stable the reactor and the instrumentation that can settle to detect and to suppress uncertainties is described. In particular, is make reference to the evolution of the methods to maintain the stability of the reactor and the detection system and suppression of uncertainties implemented in the Laguna Verde

  5. BWR stability: analysis of cladding temperature for high amplitude oscillations - 146

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, P.; Wehle, F.

    2010-01-01

    Power oscillations associated with density waves in boiling water reactors (BWRs) have been studied widely. Industrial research in this area is active since the invention of the first BWR. Stability measurements have been performed in various plants during commissioning phase but especially the magnitude and divergent nature of the oscillations during the LaSalle Unit 2 nuclear power plant event on March 9, 1988, renewed concern about the state of knowledge on BWR instabilities and possible consequences to fuel rod integrity. The objective of this paper is to present a simplified stability tool, applicable for stability analysis in the non-linear regime, which extends to high amplitude oscillations where inlet reverse flow occurs. In case of high amplitude oscillations a cyclical dryout and rewetting process at the fuel rod may take place, which leads in turn to rapid changes of the heat transfer from the fuel rod to the coolant. The application of this stability tool allows for a conservative determination of the fuel rod cladding temperature in case of high amplitude oscillations during the dryout / re-wet phase. Moreover, it reveals in good agreement to experimental findings the stabilizing effect of the reverse bundle inlet flow, which might be obtained for large oscillation amplitudes. (authors)

  6. Babcock and Wilcox revisions to CONTEMPT, computer program for predicting containment pressure-temperature response to a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsii, Y.H.

    1976-06-01

    The CONTEMPT computer program predicts the pressure-temperature response of a single-volume reactor building to a loss-of-coolant accident. The report describes the analytical model used for the program. CONTEMPT assumes that the loss-of-coolant accident can be separated into two phases; the primary system blowdown and reactor building pressurization. The results of the blowdown analysis serve as the boundary conditions and are input to the CONTEMPT program. Thus, the containment model is only concerned with the pressure and temperature in the reactor building and the temperature distribution through the reactor building structures. The user is required to input the description of the discharge of coolant, the boiling of residual water by reactor decay heat, the superheating of steam passing through the core, and metal-water reactions. The reactor building is separated into liquid and vapor regions. Each region is in thermal equilibrium itself, but the two may not be in thermal equilibrium; the liquid and gaseous regions may have different temperatures. The reactor building is represented as consisting of several heat-conducting structures whose thermal behavior can be described by the one-dimensional multi-region heat conduction equation. The program also calculates building leakage and the effects of engineered safety features such as reactor building sprays, decay heat coolers, sump coolers, etc

  7. Scenarios simulation of severe accident type small loss of coolant (Loca), with the code MELCOR version 2.1 for the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas V, J.; Mugica R, C. A.; Godinez S, V.

    2013-10-01

    In this work was carried out the analysis of two scenarios of the accident type with loss of coolant in a recirculation loop for a break with smaller ares to 0.1 ft 2 (4.6 cm 2 ), which is classified according to their size like small Loca. The first simulated scenario was a small Loca without action of the emergency coolant injection systems, and the second was a small Loca with only the available system LPCS. This design base accident was taken into account for its relevance with regard to the damage to the core and the hydrogen generation. Was also observed and analyzed the response of the action of the ECCS that depend of the loss of coolant reason and this in turn depends of the size and type of the pipe break. The specified scenarios were simulated by means of the use of MELCOR model for the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde that has the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias. (Author)

  8. RELAP5/MOD2. 5 analysis of the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) for a loss of power and coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, Jae.

    1990-05-01

    A set of postulated accidents were evaluated for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A loss of power accident (LOPA) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) were analyzed. This work was performed in response to a DOE review that wanted to update the understanding of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the HFBR during these transients. These calculations were used to determine the margins to fuel damage at the 60 MW power level. The LOPA assumes all the backup power systems fail (although this event is highly unlikely). The reactor scrams, the depressurization valve opens, and the pumps coast down. The HFBR has down flow through the core during normal operation. To avoid fuel damage, the core normally goes through an extended period of forced down flow after a scram before natural circulation is allowed. During a LOPA, the core will go into flow reversal once the buoyancy forces are larger than the friction forces produced during the pump coast down. The flow will stagnate, reverse direction, and establish a buoyancy driven (natural circulation) flow around the core. Fuel damage would probably occur if the critical heat flux (CHF) limit is reached during the flow reversal event. The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code, with an option for heavy water, was used to model the HFBR and perform the LOPA calculation. The code was used to predict the time when the buoyancy forces overcome the friction forces and produce upward directed flow in the core. The Monde CHF correlation and experimental data taken for the HFBR during the design verification phase in 1963 were used to determine the fuel damage margin. 20 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. RELAP5/MOD2.5 analysis of the HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor] for a loss of power and coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, Jae.

    1990-05-01

    A set of postulated accidents were evaluated for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A loss of power accident (LOPA) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) were analyzed. This work was performed in response to a DOE review that wanted to update the understanding of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the HFBR during these transients. These calculations were used to determine the margins to fuel damage at the 60 MW power level. The LOPA assumes all the backup power systems fail (although this event is highly unlikely). The reactor scrams, the depressurization valve opens, and the pumps coast down. The HFBR has down flow through the core during normal operation. To avoid fuel damage, the core normally goes through an extended period of forced down flow after a scram before natural circulation is allowed. During a LOPA, the core will go into flow reversal once the buoyancy forces are larger than the friction forces produced during the pump coast down. The flow will stagnate, reverse direction, and establish a buoyancy driven (natural circulation) flow around the core. Fuel damage would probably occur if the critical heat flux (CHF) limit is reached during the flow reversal event. The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code, with an option for heavy water, was used to model the HFBR and perform the LOPA calculation. The code was used to predict the time when the buoyancy forces overcome the friction forces and produce upward directed flow in the core. The Monde CHF correlation and experimental data taken for the HFBR during the design verification phase in 1963 were used to determine the fuel damage margin. 20 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs

  10. Reducing BWR O and M costs through on-line performance monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonas, T.; Gross, R.; Logback, F.; Josyula, R.

    1995-01-01

    Competition in the electric power industry has placed significant emphasis on reducing operating and maintenance (O and M) costs at nuclear facilities. Therefore, on-line performance monitoring to locate power losses for boiling water reactor (BWR) plants is creating tremendous interest. In addition, the ability to automate activities such as data collection, analysis, and reporting increases the efficiency of plant engineers and gives them more time to concentrate on solving plant efficiency problems. This capability is now available with a unique software product called GEBOPS. GE Nuclear Energy, in conjunction with Joint Venture partner Black and Veatch, has undertaken development of the General Electric/Black and Veatch On-line Performance System (GEBOPS), an on-line performance monitoring system for BWR plants. The experience and expertise of GE Nuclear Energy with BWR plants, coupled with the proven on-line monitoring software development experience and capability of Black and Veatch, provide the foundation for a unique product which addresses the needs of today's BWR plants

  11. The electrochemistry of IGSCC mitigation in BWR coolant circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.D.

    2002-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the electrochemical mitigation of IGSCC in water-cooled reactor heat transport circuit structural materials. Electrochemical control and mitigation is possible, because of the existence of a critical potential for IGSCC and by the feasibility of modifying the environment to displace the corrosion potential (ECP) to a value that is more negative than the critical value. However, even in cases where the ECP cannot be displaced sufficiently in the negative direction to become more negative than the critical potential, considerable advantage is accrued, because of the roughly exponential dependence of crack growth rate on potential. The most important parameters in affecting electrochemical control over the ECP and crack growth rate are the kinetic parameters (exchange current densities and Tafel constants) for the redox reactions involving the principal radiolysis products of water (O 2 , H 2 , H 2 O 2 ), external solution composition (concentrations of O 2 , H 2 O 2 , and H 2 ), flow velocity, and the conductivity of the bulk environment. The kinetic parameters for the redox reactions essentially determine the charge transfer impedance of the steel surface, which is shown to be one of the key parameters in affecting the magnitude of the coupling current and hence the crack growth rate. The exchange current densities, in particular, are amenable to control by catalysis or inhibition, with the result that surface modification techniques are highly effective in controlling and mitigating IGSCC in reactor coolant circuit materials. (authors)

  12. Application of tearing modulus stability concepts to nuclear piping. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotter, K.H.; Chang, H.Y.; Zahoor, A.

    1982-02-01

    The recently developed tearing modulus stability concept was successfully applied to several boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) piping systems. Circumferentially oriented through-the-thickness cracks were postulated at numerous locations in each system. For each location, the simplified tearing stability methods developed in USNRC Report NUREG/CR-0838 were used to determine crack stability. The J-T diagram was used to present the results of the computations. The piping systems considered included Type 304 stainless steel as well as A106 carbon steel materials. These systems were analyzed using the piping analysis computer code MINK.

  13. Zinc corrosion after loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors – Thermo- and fluid-dynamic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeliger, André, E-mail: a.seeliger@hszg.de [Hochschule Zittau/Görlitz, Institute of Process Technology, Process Automation and Measuring Technology, Theodor-Körner-Allee 16, D-02763 Zittau (Germany); Alt, Sören; Kästner, Wolfgang; Renger, Stefan [Hochschule Zittau/Görlitz, Institute of Process Technology, Process Automation and Measuring Technology, Theodor-Körner-Allee 16, D-02763 Zittau (Germany); Kryk, Holger; Harm, Ulrich [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Borated coolant supports corrosion at zinc-coated installations in PWR after LOCA. • Dissolved zinc is injected into core by ECCS during sump recirculation phase. • Corrosion products can reach and settle at further downstream components. • Corrosion products can cause head losses at spacers and influence decay heat removal. • Preventive procedures were tested at semi-technical scale facilities. - Abstract: Within the framework of the German reactor safety research, generic experimental investigations were carried out aiming at thermal-hydraulic consequences of physicochemical mechanisms, caused by dissolution of zinc in boric acid during corrosion processes at hot-dip galvanized surfaces of containment internals at lower coolant temperatures and the subsequent precipitation of solid zinc borates in PWR core regions of higher temperature. This constellation can occur during sump recirculation operation of ECCS after LOCA. Hot-dip galvanized compounds, which are installed inside a PWR containment, may act as zinc sources. Getting in contact with boric acid coolant, zinc at their surfaces is released into coolant in form of ions due to corrosion processes. As a long-term behavior resp. over a time period of several days, metal layers of zinc and zinc alloys can dissolve extensively. First fundamental studies at laboratory scale were done at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR). Their experimental results were picked up for the definition of boundary conditions for experiments at semi-technical scale at the Hochschule Zittau/Görlitz (HSZG). Electrical heating rods with zircaloy cladding tubes have been used as fuel rod simulators. As near-plant core components, a 3 × 3 configuration of heating rods (HRC) and a shortened, partially heatable PWR fuel assembly dummy were applied into cooling circuits. The HRC module includes segments of spacers for a suitable representation of a heating channel geometry. Formations of different solid

  14. Application of TRAC-BD1/MOD1 to a BWR/4 feedwater control failure ATWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouhani, S.Z.; Giles, M.M.; Mohr, C.M. Jr.; Weaver, W.L. III.

    1984-01-01

    This paper begins with a short description of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code for Boiling Water Reactors (TRAC-BWR), briefly mentioning some of its main features such as specific BWR models and input structure. Next, an input model of a BWR/4 is described, and, the assumptions used in performing an analysis of the loss of a feedwater controller without scram are listed. The important features of the calculated trends in flows, pressure, reactivity, and power are shown graphically and commented in the text. A comparison of some of the main predicted trends with the calculated results from a similar study by General Electric is also presented

  15. Minimizing secondary coolant blowdown in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y. C.; Woo, J. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Cho, Y. G.; Lim, N. Y.

    2000-01-01

    There is about 80m 3 /h loss of the secondary cooling water by evaporation, windage and blowdown during the operation of HANARO, 30MW research reactor. The evaporation and the windage is necessary loss to maintain the performance of cooling tower, but the blowdown is artificial lose to get rid of the foreign material and to maintain the quality of the secondary cooling water. Therefore, minimizing the blowdown loss was studied. It was confirmed, through the relation of the number of cycle and the loss rate of secondary coolant, that the number of cycle is saturated to 12 without blowdown because of the windage loss. When the secondary coolant is treated by high Ca-hardness treatment program (the number of cycle > 10) to maintain the number of cycle around 12 without blowdown, only the turbidity exceeds the limit. By adding filtering system it was confirmed, through the relation of turbidity and filtering rate of secondary cooling water, that the turbidity is reduced below the limit (5 deg.) by 2% of filtering rate without blowdown. And it was verified, through the performance test of back-flow filtering unit, that this unit gets rid of foreign material up to 95% of the back-flow and that the water can be reused as coolant. Therefore, the secondary cooling water can be treated by the high Ca-hardness program and filter system without blowdown

  16. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Kazutoshi.

    1991-01-01

    A region increased with the hydrophilic property at the surface is formed in the downstream portion of a cladding tube. Then, the surface of the region is made coarse. With such a constitution, coolants form three streams generally divided into a bubble stream, a slab stream and an annular stream along the cladding tube from the upstream to the downstream during operation of a BWR type reactor, and if BWR power is increased, the annular stream is enlarged. In this region, since oolant membranes for covering the surface of the region improved with its hydrophile property are easily formed by downcoming coolants, and the thickness of the coolant membrane is increased remarkably, the surface of the cladding tube can be cooled certainly and efficiently. Further, since there is no definit downwarding water stream in the annular portion, frictional pressure loss of the BWR is not increased by incresing the hydrophilic property. (T.M.)

  17. Fission product source from Ignalina NPP in case of loss-of-coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubonavicius, E.; Rimkevicius, S.

    2001-01-01

    The release of radioactive materials to the environment is of special importance in the case of any accident at Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). The integrated analysis of thermal-hydraulic parameters behavior and radioactive fission products (FP) transport and deposition in the compartments play an important role in the evaluation of FP release to the environment and determines the irradiation dozes of personnel and public. In this report the transport and the deposition of radioactive material in the Ignalina NPP unit 1 compartments as well as the FP source term to the environment in the case of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents are discussed. The calculation models for the evaluation of FP transport and deposition as well as the results of performed calculations of several accidents at Ignalina NPP are presented. (author)

  18. Application of noise analysis to stability determination of a natural circulation cooled BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Dam, H. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Nissen, W.H.M.; Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were performed on the Dodewaard natural circulation cooled BWR at different conditions. The absolute stability was determined by measuring system responses to control rod and steam flow valve steps. Changes in core stability were studied using the signal of an average power range monitor (APRM) in time domain (auto-correlation function and impulse response) and in frequency domain (power spectral density and peaking factor), the outlet void fraction and variations of the incore coolant velocity. It is shown that the reactor is very stable and that cooling by natural circulation improves load following. Stability monitoring can be performed by all mentioned methods but using APRM signals in frequency domain is preferred.

  19. Analysis of containment pressure and temperature changes following loss of coolant accident (LOCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Thai; Kieu Ngoc Dung

    2015-01-01

    This paper present a preliminary thermal-hydraulics analysis of AP1000 containment following loss of coolant accident events such as double-end cold line break (DECLB) or main steam line break (MSLB) using MELCOR code. A break of this type will produce a rapid depressurization of the reactor pressure vessel (primary system) and release initially high pressure water into the containment followed by a much smaller release of highly superheated steam. The high pressure liquid water will flash and rapidly pressurize the containment building. The performance of passive containment cooling system for steam removal by condensation on large steel containment structure is a major contributing process, controlling the pressure and temperature maximum reached during the accident event. The results are analyzed, discussed and compared with the similar work done by Sandia National Laboratories. (author)

  20. Analytical and experimental assessment of TVS-2006 fuel assembly thermal-mechanical shape deformation at temperature modeling of a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanasiev, A.; Semishkin, V.; Makarov, V.; Matvienko, I.; Puzanov, D.

    2015-01-01

    Full or partial core drying-out takes place in loss-of-coolant accidents, which leads to worsening of heat removal from the fuel rods. Depending on the accident scenario the fuel rod cladding temperature can be in a wide range from 350 to 1200°C. It is worth mentioning, that the length of the process can considerably affect the fuel rod cladding loadcarrying capacity and the FA structure as a whole, and in the long run it defines the radiation consequences of the accident and the possibility of postaccident core disassembly at low cost. Most experiments staged of late were devoted to a study of FA behaviour in the temperature range 800-900°C of α→β phase transition that is characterized by a sharp increase in the rate of zirconium alloy creep which leads to fuel rod cladding ballooning and loss of their tightness within a short period of time. The 600-700°C temperature range turned out to be less investigated whereas this is the range where the change of zirconium alloy mechanical properties is also observed but only with the retention of α-phase. The tests of a full-scale FA dummy with the skeleton of guide tubes and spacer grids connected by friction forces, carried out at the testing facility of JSC OKB “GIDROPRESS”, were devoted to a study of FA behaviour in this temperature range. The model was heated up with hot air to 650°C for 6 hours. The tests ended with fuel rod cladding ballooning due to gauge pressure and shape deformation. No loss of fuel rod cladding integrity was observed. Therefore, a conclusion can be made that a long-time core holdup at the parameters implemented at the test facility is permitted and the deformations of the FA structure do not lead to the damage that could considerably complicate the core disassembly. The test results were used for the verification of the calculational model of FA TVS-2006 structure with a welded skeleton by ANSYS code. On the basis of the verified calculational model a calculational model was

  1. Reactor elements properties response during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.E.; Rahman, F.A.

    1985-01-01

    Four computer algorithms have been introduced to solve for the reactor different materials response subjected to LOCA conditions, they were developed with the intent of producing a simple, accurate and efficient prediction schemes. A general overview of the solution procedures design and working of each of four algorithms are presented, followed by short description of the nature of solution and calculated results. These algorithms are: 1. ZIRCP to give the cladding material properties response under normal and transient conditions. 2. FCGAPP to give the fuel- cladding gas-gap conductivity. 3. NFUEIP to solve the temperature dependent of nuclear fuel properties during normal and transient conditions. 4. TSDATP has been developed to solve for the thermodynamic and transport properties of water and steam over a large range of temperature and pressure. 14 fig

  2. Loss of flow incident - Simulation and measurements in the MPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doval, A.; Hesham Abdou

    1999-01-01

    As part of the Probabilistic Safety Analysis of the Multi Purpose Reactor, MPR, the list of Postulated Initiating Events was analyzed and one of these PIEs corresponds to the Loss of Coolant Flow. It is well known that during the operation life of a research reactor a LOFA could eventually occur and, once this event takes place, in time detection and automatic actions, thanks to the engineering safety features of the system, will mitigate the incident evolution. The postulated event corresponds to a loss of flow due to a total loss of power supply. The goal of the present work is to provide a general description and the engineering safety features of the MPR, as well as describe the sequence of scenarios during a LOFA. Temporal evolution of main parameters is presented, also. During Stage A of the Commissioning Program measurements of the core cooling system pump coast-down were performed in order to validate previous simulation results, as well as, flap valves opening time. In this way it was verified that engineering safety features worked properly. On Stage B of the Commissioning Program the upward natural convection flow was verified and results comparison against analytical calculation, showed that the reactor core was cooled within the adopted design goals. (author)

  3. Identification of Loss-of-Coolant Accidents in LWRs by Inverse Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cholewa, Wojciech; Frid, Wiktor; Bednarski, Marcin

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a novel diagnostic method based on inverse models that could be applied to identification of transients and accidents in nuclear power plants. In particular, it is shown that such models could be successfully applied to identification of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). This is demonstrated for LOCA scenarios for a boiling water reactor. Two classes of inverse models are discussed: local models valid only in a selected neighborhood of an unknown element in the data set, representing a state of a considered object, and global models, in the form of partially unilateral models, valid over the whole learning data set. An interesting and useful property of local inverse models is that they can be considered as example-based models, i.e., models that are spanned on particular sets of pattern data. It is concluded that the optimal diagnostic method should combine the advantages of both models, i.e., the high quality of results obtained from a local inverse model and the information about the confidence interval for the expected output provided by a partially unilateral model

  4. Final results of the XR2-1 BWR metallic melt relocation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauntt, R.O.; Humphries, L.L.

    1997-08-01

    This report documents the final results of the XR2-1 boiling water reactor (BWR) metallic melt relocation experiment, conducted at Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The objective of this experiment was to investigate the material relocation processes and relocation pathways in a dry BWR core following a severe nuclear reactor accident such as an unrecovered station blackout accident. The imposed test conditions (initial thermal state and the melt generation rates) simulated the conditions for the postulated accident scenario and the prototypic design of the lower core test section (in composition and in geometry) ensured that thermal masses and physical flow barriers were modeled adequately. The experiment has shown that, under dry core conditions, the metallic core materials that melt and drain from the upper core regions can drain from the core region entirely without formation of robust coherent blockages in the lower core. Temporary blockages that suspended pools of molten metal later melted, allowing the metals to continue draining downward. The test facility and instrumentation are described in detail. The test progression and results are presented and compared to MERIS code analyses. 6 refs., 55 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Development of alternative materials for BWR fuel springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uruma, Y.; Osato, T.; Yamazaki, K.

    2002-01-01

    Major sources of radioactivity introduced into reactor water of BWR were estimated fuel crud and in-core materials (especially, fuel springs). Fuel springs are used for fixation of fuel cladding tubes with spacer grid. Those are small parts (total length is only within 25 mm) and so many numbers are loaded simultaneously and then total surfaces area are calculated up to about 200 m 2 . Fuel springs are located under high radiation field and high oxidative environment. Conventional fuel spring is made of alloy-X750 which is one of nickel-based alloy and is reported to show relatively higher corrosion release rate. 58 Co and 60 Co will be released directly into reactor water from intensely radio-activated fuel springs surface and increase radioactivity concentrations in primary coolant. Corrosion release control from fuel springs is an important technical item and a development of alternative material instead of alloy-X750 for fuel spring is a key subject to achieve ultra low man-rem exposure BWR plant. In present work, alloy-X718 which started usage for PWR fuel springs and stainless steel type 316L which has many mechanical property data are picked up for alternative materials and compared their corrosion behaviors with conventional material. Corrosion experiment was conducted under vapor-water two phases flow which is simulated fuel cladding surface boiling condition. After exposure, corrosion film formed under corrosion test was analyzed in detail and corrosion film amount and corrosion release amount are estimated among three materials. (authors)

  6. The electrochemistry of IGSCC mitigation in BWR coolant circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, D.D. [Center for Electrochemical Science and Technology, The Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    A brief review is presented of the electrochemical mitigation of IGSCC in water-cooled reactor heat transport circuit structural materials. Electrochemical control and mitigation is possible, because of the existence of a critical potential for IGSCC and by the feasibility of modifying the environment to displace the corrosion potential (ECP) to a value that is more negative than the critical value. However, even in cases where the ECP cannot be displaced sufficiently in the negative direction to become more negative than the critical potential, considerable advantage is accrued, because of the roughly exponential dependence of crack growth rate on potential. The most important parameters in affecting electrochemical control over the ECP and crack growth rate are the kinetic parameters (exchange current densities and Tafel constants) for the redox reactions involving the principal radiolysis products of water (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), external solution composition (concentrations of O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}), flow velocity, and the conductivity of the bulk environment. The kinetic parameters for the redox reactions essentially determine the charge transfer impedance of the steel surface, which is shown to be one of the key parameters in affecting the magnitude of the coupling current and hence the crack growth rate. The exchange current densities, in particular, are amenable to control by catalysis or inhibition, with the result that surface modification techniques are highly effective in controlling and mitigating IGSCC in reactor coolant circuit materials. (authors)

  7. Enhancing the moderator effectiveness as a heat sink during loss-of-coolant accidents in CANDU-PHW reactors using glass-peened surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitheanandan, T.; Tiede, R.W.; Sanderson, D.B.; Fong, R.W.L.; Coleman, C.E.

    1998-08-01

    The horizontal fuel channel concept is a distinguishing feature of the CANDU-PHW reactor. Each fuel channel consists of a Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube and a Zircaloy-2 calandria tube, separated by a gas filled annulus. The calandria tube is surrounded by heavy-water moderator that also provides a backup heat sink for the reactor core. This heat sink (about 10 mm away from the hot pressure tube) ensures adequate cooling of fuel in the unlikely event of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). One of the ways of enhancing the use of the moderator as a heat sink is to improve the heat-transfer characteristics between the calandria tube and the moderator. This enhancement can be achieved through surface modifications to the calandria tube which have been shown to increase the tube's critical heat flux (CHF) value. An increase in CHIF could be used to reduce moderator subcooling requirements for CANDU fuel channels or increase the margin to dryout. A series of experiments was conducted to assess the benefits provided by glass-peening the outside surface of calandria tubes for postulated LOCA conditions. In particular, the ability to increase the tube's CHF, and thereby reduce moderator subcooling requirements was assessed. Results from the experiments confirm that glass-peening the outer surface of a tube increases its CHF value in pool boiling. This increase in CHF could be used to reduce moderator subcooling requirements for CANDU fuel channels by at least 5 degrees C. (author)

  8. Effect of zinc injection on BWR fuel cladding corrosion. Pt. 1. Study on an accelerated corrosion condition to evaluate corrosion resistance of zircaloy-2 fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka; Kanbe, Hiromu; Furuya, Masahiro

    2002-01-01

    Japanese BWR utilities have a plan to apply zinc injection to the primary coolant in order to reduce radioactivity accumulation on the structure. Prior to applying the zinc injection to BWR plants, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of zinc injection on corrosion resistance of fuel cladding. The objective of this report was to examine the accelerated corrosion condition for evaluation of BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance under non-irradiated conditions, as the first step of a zinc injection evaluation study. A heat transfer corrosion test facility, in which a two phase flow condition could be achieved, was designed and constructed. The effects of heat flux, void fraction and solution temperature on BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance were quantitatively investigated. The main findings were as follows. (1) In situ measurements using high speed camera and a void sensor together with one dimensional two phase flow analysis results showed that a two phase flow simulated BWR core condition can be obtained in the corrosion test facility. (2) The heat transfer corrosion test results showed that the thickness of the zirconium oxide layer increased with increasing solution temperature and was independent of heat flux and void fraction. The corrosion accelerating factor was about 2.5 times in the case of a temperature increase from 288degC to 350degC. (author)

  9. Parametric study of the potential for BWR ECCS strainer blockage due to LOCA generated debris. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zigler, G.; Brideau, J.; Rao, D.V.; Shaffer, C.; Souto, F.; Thomas, W.

    1995-10-01

    This report documents a plant-specific study for a BWR/4 with a Mark I containment that evaluated the potential for LOCA generated debris and the probability of losing long term recirculation capability due ECCS pump suction strainer blockage. The major elements of this study were: (1) acquisition of detailed piping layouts and installed insulation details for a reference BWR; (2) analysis of plant specific piping weld failure probabilities to estimate the LOCA frequency; (3) development of an insulation and other debris generation and drywell transport models for the reference BWR; (4) modeling of debris transport in the suppression pool; (5) development of strainer blockage head loss models for estimating loss of NPSH margin; (6) estimation of core damage frequency attributable to loss of ECCS recirculation capability following a LOCA. Elements 2 through 5 were combined into a computer code, BLOCKAGE 2.3. A point estimate of overall DEGB pipe break frequency (per Rx-year) of 1.59E-04 was calculated for the reference plant, with a corresponding overall ECCS loss of NPSH frequency (per Rx-year) of 1.58E-04. The calculated point estimate of core damage frequency (per Rx-year) due to blockage related accident sequences for the reference BWR ranged from 4.2E-06 to 2.5E-05. The results of this study show that unacceptable strainer blockage and loss of NPSH margin can occur within the first few minutes after ECCS pumps achieve maximum flows when the ECCS strainers are exposed to LOCA generated fibrous debris in the presence of particulates (sludge, paint chips, concrete dust). Generic or unconditional extrapolation of these reference plant calculated results should not be undertaken

  10. Development of a deformation and failure model for Zircaloy at high temperatures for light water reactor loss-of-coolant-accident investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raff, S.

    1982-11-01

    To describe Zircaloy-4 deformation and failure behaviour at high temperatures (600 to 1400 0 C), the phenomenological model NORA was developed and verified against numerous experimental results. The model can be applied to the calculation of fuel rod cladding deformation during small and large break loss-of-coolant-accidents. (orig./RW) [de

  11. Analysis of effects of pellet-cladding bonding on trapping of the released fission gases in high burnup KKL BWR fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brankov, Vladimir [Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour at the Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), Route Cantonale, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Khvostov, Grigori; Mikityuk, Konstantin [Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour at the Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Pautz, Andreas [Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour at the Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), Route Cantonale, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Restani, Renato; Abolhassani, Sousan [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials at the Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Ledergerber, Guido [Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt, 5325 Leibstadt (Switzerland); Wiesenack, Wolfgang [Institutt for Energiteknikk - OECD Halden Reactor Project, Os Allé 5, 1777 Halden (Norway)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Explanation for the scatter in measured fission gas release in high-BU BWR fuel rods. • Partial fuel-clad bond layer formation in high-BU BWR fuel. • Hypothesis for fission gas trapping facilitated by the pellet-cladding bond layer. • Correlation between burnup asymmetry and the quantity of trapped fission gas. • Implications of the trapped FG in LOCA transient. - Abstract: The first part of the paper presents results of a numerical analysis of the fuel behavior during base irradiation in the Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt Boiling Water Reactor (KKL BWR) using EPRI’s FALCON code coupled to GRSW-A – an advanced model for fuel swelling and fission gas release. Post-irradiation examinations conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institute’s (PSI) hot laboratory gave evidence of a distinct circumferential non-uniformity of local burnup at pellet surfaces. For several fuel samples, intact pellet-cladding bonding areas on the high burnup sides of the pellets at high burnup above ∼70 MWd/kgU were observed. It is hypothesized that a part of the fission gases, which are expected to be released by those areas, can be trapped and do not reach the rod plenum. In this paper, a simple approach to modeling of fission gas trapping is employed which reveals a potential correlation between the position of the rod within the fuel assembly (and therefore the degree of circumferential burnup non-uniformity) and the degree of fission gas trapping. A model is suggested to correlate the amount of locally trapped gas with the integral of the local contact pressure and the degree of circumferential burnup non-uniformity. The model is calibrated with available measurements of FGR from rod puncturing at the level of the plenums. In future work, the hypothesis about the axial distribution of trapped fission gas will be extrapolated to the Loss-Of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis as an attempt to explain the fission gas release observed in some samples fabricated from

  12. Frontier between medium and large break loss of coolant accidents of pressurized water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taewan

    2017-10-01

    In order to provide the probabilistic safety assessment with more realistic condition to calculate the frequency of the initiating event, a study on the frontier between medium-break and large-break loss-of-coolant-accidents has been performed by using best-estimate thermal hydraulic code, TRACE. A methodology based on the combination of the essential safety features and system parameter has been applied to the Zion nuclear power plant to evaluate the validity of the frontier utilized for the probabilistic safety assessment. The peak cladding temperature has been chosen as a relevant system parameter that represents the system behavior during the transient. The results showed that the frontier should be extended from 6 in. to 10 in. based on the required safety functions and system response.

  13. Filtering device for primary coolant circuits in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Fumio; Yamamoto, Tetsuo.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a filtering device with a large filtering area and requiring less space. Constitution: A condensate inlet for introducing condensates to be filtered of primary coolant circuits, a filtrate exit, a backwash water exit and a bent tube are disposed to a container, and a plurality of hollow thread membrane modules are suspended in the container. The condensates are caused to flow through the condensate inlet, filtered through the hollow thread membrane and then discharged from the filtrate exit. When the filtering treatment is proceeded to some extent, since solid contents captured in the hollow thread membranes are accumulated, a differential pressure is produced between the condensate inlet and the filtrate exit. When the differential pressure reaches a predetermined value, the backwash is conducted to discharge the liquid cleaning wastes through the backwash exit. The bent tube disposed to the container body is used for water and air draining. The hollow thread membranes are formed with porous resin such as of polyethylene. (Kawakami, Y.)

  14. Generic evaluation of feedwater transients and small break loss-of-coolant accidents in combustion engineering designed operating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of a generic evaluation of feedwater transients, small break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs), and other TMI-2-related events in the Combustion Engineering (CE)-designed operating plants and to establish or confirm the bases for their continued operation. The results of this evaluation are presented in this report in the form of a set of findings and recommendations in each of the principal review areas

  15. Analysis of the loss of coolant accident due to the faiture in the open position of two pressurizer relief valves, for Angra-1 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, C.F.

    1981-06-01

    A study of the modeling techniques adequate for simulating the loss of coolant accident caused by stuck open pressurizer relief valves, using the RELAP4-MOD5 code, is performed and the model developed is applied to the analysis of this kind of accident for the Central Nuclear Almirante Alvaro Alberto Unit (Angra 1). The thermal hydraulic behavior of the reactor cooling system, when subjected to a loss of main feedwater followed by the failure in the open position of two pressurizer relief valves, is determined. The relief valves are assumed to fail in the totally open position, delivering the maximum massflow through the discharge line. The RELAP4-MOD5 code is shown to be adequate for this kind of analysis, and the detailed prediction of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the Reactor Coolant System is thus possible. The eficiency of the emergency core cooling system of Angra 1 is demonstrated, the fuel elements remaining covered by the coolant during all the accident, and the peak clad temperatures are kept within design limites, ensuring the integrity of the core. (Author) [pt

  16. Experimental investigation of void distribution in suppression pool over the duration of a loss of coolant accident using steam–water two-phase mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassame, Somboon; Griffiths, Matthew; Yang, Jun; Ju, Peng; Sharma, Subash; Hibiki, Takashi; Ishii, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Experiments were conducted to study void fraction distribution in SP during blowdown. • 3 Experimental phases, namely, an initial and a quasi-steady phase, chugging were observed. • The maximum void penetration depth was experienced during the initial phase. • The quasi-steady phase provided less void penetration depth with oscillations. • The chugging phase was experienced at the end of experimental phase. - Abstract: Studies are underway to determine if a large amount gas discharged through the downcomer pipes in the pressure suppression chamber during the blowdown of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) can potentially be entrained into the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) suction piping of BWR. This may result in degraded ECCS pumps performance which could affect the ability to maintain or recover the water inventory level in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) during a LOCA. Therefore, it is very important to understand the void behavior in the pressure suppression chamber during the blowdown period of a LOCA. To address this issue, a set of experiments is conducted using the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly for ESBWR applications (PUMA-E) facility. The geometry of the test apparatus is determined based on the basic geometrical scaling analysis from a prototypical BWR containment (MARK I) with a consideration of downcomer size, downcomer water submergence depth and Suppression Pool (SP) water level. Several instruments are installed in the test facility to measure the required experimental data such as the steam mass flow rate, void fraction, pressure and temperature. In the experiments, sequential flows of air, steam–air mixture and pure steam-each with the various flow rate conditions are injected from the Drywell (DW) through a downcomer pipe in the SP. Eight tests with two different downcomer sizes, various initial gas volumetric fluxes at the downcomer, and two different initial non-condensable gas

  17. Water chemistry experiences in a Japanese BWR during preoperational test period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, K.; Maeda, K.; Nakamura, M.

    1994-01-01

    The interest in organic impurities intrusion into the BWR's coolant has been increased in recent years. Organic impurities can be measured as total organic carbons (TOC) by using commercial TOC measuring instruments. The corrosive impurities such as sulfates and chlorides, produced by decomposition of the TOC, will enhance the crack growth rate of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the reactor cooling system. During the preoperational test period, the reactor water quality changed remarkably by TOC intrusion. The TOC intrusion was monitored by measuring main steam conductivity. It is appeared that the main steam conductivity measurement is one of the effective and reliable techniques to detect the TOC intrusion into the reactor. (authors). 4 figs., 5 refs

  18. Interfacing systems LOCAs [Loss of Coolant Accidents] at boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Tsong-Lun; Fitzpatrick, R.; Stoyanov, S.

    1987-01-01

    The work presented in this paper was performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) effort towards the resolution of Generic Issue 105 ''Interfacing System Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCAs) at Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs).'' For BWRs, intersystem LOCA have typically either not been considered in probabilistic risk analyses, or if considered, were judged to contribute little to the risk estimates because of their perceived low frequency of occurrence. However, recent operating experience indicates that the pressure isolation valves (PIVs) in BWRs may not adequately protect against overpressurization of low pressure systems. The objective of this paper is to present the results of a study which analyzed interfacing system LOCA at several BWRs. The BWRs were selected to best represent a spectrum of BWRs in service using industry operating event experience and plant-specific information/configurations. The results presented here include some possible changes in test requirements/practices as well as an evaluation of their reduction potential in terms of core damage frequency

  19. GARLIC-B. A digital code for real-time calculation of the transient behaviour of nodal and global core and plant parameters of BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ercan, Y.; Hoeld, A.; Lupas, O.

    1982-04-01

    A program description of the code GARLIC-B is given. The code is based on a nonlinear transient model for BWR nuclear power plants which consist of a 3D-core, a top plenum, steam removal and feed water systems and a downcomer with main coolant recirculation pumps. The core is subdivided into a number of superboxes and flow channels with different coolant mass flow rates. Subcooled boiling within these channels has an important reactivity feed back effect and has to be taken also into account. The code computes the local and global core and plant transient situation as dependent on both the inherent core dynamics and external control actions, i.e., disturbances such as motions of control rod banks, changes of mass flow rates of coolant, feed water and steam outlet. The case of a pressure-controlled reactor operation is also considered. (orig./GL) [de

  20. Development of advanced BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyota, Masatoshi

    1982-01-01

    The Japanese technology and domestic production of BWR type nuclear power plants have been established through the experiences in the construction and operation of BWRs in addition to the technical agreement with the General Electric Co. In early days, the plants experienced some trouble such as stress corrosion cracking and some inconvenience in the operation and maintenance. The government, electric power companies and BWR manufacturers have endeavored to standardize and improve the design of LWRs for the purpose of improving the safety, reliability and the rate of operation and reducing the radiation exposure dose of plant workers. The first and second stages of the standardization and improvement of LWRs have been completed. Five manufacturers of BWRs in the world have continued the conceptual design of a new version of BWR power plants. It was concluded that this is the most desirable version of BWR nuclear power stations, but the technical and economic evaluation must be made before the commercial application. Six electric power companies and three manufacturers of BWRs in Japan set up the organization to develop the technology in cooperation. The internal pump system, the new control rod drive mechanism and others are the main features. (Kako, I.)

  1. Computer programmes of the Power Research Institute for the analysis of processes in the primary coolant circuit and in the containment of a WWER plant in a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misak, J.

    1976-01-01

    A brief description is given of computer programmes for the analysis of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) in WWER type reactors. The LENKA programme is intended for the thermal and hydraulic analysis of the consequences of such accidents in the primary coolant circuit. The SICHTA programme is intended for the detailed calculation of the time dependence of the axial and radial distribution of heat in fuel rods from steady-state to the flooding of the core. CHEMLOC is intended for the analysis of the heat history of the core and the extent of chemical reactions in LOCA when the emergency core cooling system is not operating. The TRACO I is intended for the analysis of the initial stage of the transient process in a full-pressure containment after LOCA (the computation of the time and spatial dependences of pressures and temperatures). TRACO III is intended for the computation of the long-term time dependence of pressure and temperature in the full-pressure containment after LOCA. (B.S.)

  2. Insights into location dependent loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) frequency assessment for GSI-191 risk-informed applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, K.N., E-mail: KarlFleming@comcast.net [KNF Consulting LLC, Spokane, WA (United States); Lydell, B.O.Y. [SIGMA-PHASE INC., Vail, AZ (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Role of operating experience in loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) frequency assessment. • Plant-to-plant variability in calculated LOCA frequency. • Frequency of double-ended-guillotine-break (DEGB). • Uncertainties in LOCA frequencies. • Risk management insights. - Abstract: As a tribute to the published work by S.H. Bush, S. Beliczey and H. Schulz, this paper assesses the progress with methods and techniques for quantifying the reliability of piping systems in commercial nuclear power plants on the basis of failure rate estimates derived from field experience data in combination with insights and results from probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses and expert elicitation exercises. This status assessment is made from a technical perspective obtained through development of location-specific loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) frequencies for input to risk-informed resolution of the generic safety issue (GSI) 191. The methods and techniques on which these GSI-191 applications are based build on a body of work developed by the authors during a period spanning more than two decades. The insights that are presented and discussed in this paper cover today’s knowledge base concerning how to utilize a risk-informed approach to the assessment of piping reliability in the context of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in general and the resolution of GSI-191 in particular. Specifically the paper addresses the extent to which LOCA frequencies vary from location to location within a reactor coolant system pressure boundary (RCPB) for a given plant as well as vary from plant to plant, and the reasons for these variabilities. Furthermore, the paper provides the authors’ perspectives on interpretations and applications of information extracted from an expert elicitation process to obtain LOCA frequencies as documented in NUREG-1829 and how to apply this information to GSI-191. Finally, this paper documents technical insights relative to mitigation of

  3. Insights into location dependent loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) frequency assessment for GSI-191 risk-informed applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, K.N.; Lydell, B.O.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Role of operating experience in loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) frequency assessment. • Plant-to-plant variability in calculated LOCA frequency. • Frequency of double-ended-guillotine-break (DEGB). • Uncertainties in LOCA frequencies. • Risk management insights. - Abstract: As a tribute to the published work by S.H. Bush, S. Beliczey and H. Schulz, this paper assesses the progress with methods and techniques for quantifying the reliability of piping systems in commercial nuclear power plants on the basis of failure rate estimates derived from field experience data in combination with insights and results from probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses and expert elicitation exercises. This status assessment is made from a technical perspective obtained through development of location-specific loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) frequencies for input to risk-informed resolution of the generic safety issue (GSI) 191. The methods and techniques on which these GSI-191 applications are based build on a body of work developed by the authors during a period spanning more than two decades. The insights that are presented and discussed in this paper cover today’s knowledge base concerning how to utilize a risk-informed approach to the assessment of piping reliability in the context of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in general and the resolution of GSI-191 in particular. Specifically the paper addresses the extent to which LOCA frequencies vary from location to location within a reactor coolant system pressure boundary (RCPB) for a given plant as well as vary from plant to plant, and the reasons for these variabilities. Furthermore, the paper provides the authors’ perspectives on interpretations and applications of information extracted from an expert elicitation process to obtain LOCA frequencies as documented in NUREG-1829 and how to apply this information to GSI-191. Finally, this paper documents technical insights relative to mitigation of

  4. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning reference light water reactors following postulated accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.

    1990-12-01

    The estimated costs for post-accident cleanup at the reference BWR (developed previously in NUREG/CR-2601, Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Reference Light Water Reactors Following Postulated Accidents) are updated to January 1989 dollars in this report. A simple formula for escalating post-accident cleanup costs is also presented. Accident cleanup following the most severe accident described in NUREG/CR-2601 (i.e., the Scenario 3 accident) is estimated to cost from $1.22 to 1.44 billion, in 1989 dollars, for assumed escalation rates of 4% or 8% in the years following 1989. The time to accomplish cleanup remained unchanged from the 8.3 years originally estimated. No reanalysis of current information on the technical aspects of TMI-2 cleanup has been performed. Only the cost of inflation has been evaluated since the original PNL analysis was completed. 32 refs., 12 tabs

  5. Estimation of break location and size for loss of coolant accidents using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Man Gyun; Shin, Sun Ho; Jung, Dong Won; Kim, Soong Pyung; Jeong, Ji Hwan; Lee, Byung Chul

    2004-01-01

    In this work, a probabilistic neural network (PNN) that has been applied well to the classification problems is used in order to identify the break locations of loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) such as hot-leg, cold-leg and steam generator tubes. Also, a fuzzy neural network (FNN) is designed to estimate the break size. The inputs to PNN and FNN are time-integrated values obtained by integrating measurement signals during a short time interval after reactor scram. An automatic structure constructor for the fuzzy neural network automatically selects the input variables from the time-integrated values of many measured signals, and optimizes the number of rules and its related parameters. It is verified that the proposed algorithm identifies very well the break locations of LOCAs and also, estimate their break size accurately

  6. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of loss-of-coolant accident in the JMTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Fumio; Oyamada, Rokuro

    1985-02-01

    The reevaluation of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) was required through the process of a safety review for the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) core conversion from the high-enriched uranium fuel (Enrichment : 93%) to the medium-enriched uranium fuel (Enrichment : 45%). The following were concluded by thermal-hydraulic analysis of a LOCA caused by a double-ended pipe break in the JMTR primary cooling system. (1) The fuel in the core does not burn-out as long as it is covered with water. (2) A larger siphon break valve (larger than phi60mm) should be installed instead of the present one (phi25mm) on the primary cooling system in order to prevent the core from being uncovered with water in case of a LOCA caused by a double-ended pipe break. The present siphon break valve was installed to keep the core covered with water in case of a LOCA caused by a small pipe rupture. In this analysis, the Siphon Breaker Analysis Code (SBAC) was written in order to analyse the size of the siphon break valve and its accuracy was confirmed to be within 5% through a verification experiment. (author)

  7. Water quality control device and water quality control method for reactor primary coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Yoichi; Ibe, Eishi; Watanabe, Atsushi.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is suitable for preventing defects due to corrosion of structural materials in a primary coolant system of a BWR type reactor. Namely, a concentration measuring means measures the concentration of oxidative ingredients contained in a reactor water. A reducing electrode is disposed along a reactor water flow channel in the primary coolant system and reduces the oxidative ingredients. A reducing counter electrode is disposed along the reactor water flow channel in the primary coolant system, and electrically connected to the reducing electrode. The reactor structural materials are used as a reference electrode providing a reference potential to the reducing electrode and the reducing counter electrode. A potential control means controls the potential of the reducing electrode relative to the reference potential based on the signals from the concentration measuring means. A stable reference potential in a region where an effective oxygen concentration is stable can be obtained irrespective of the change of operation conditions by using the reactor structural materials disposed to a boiling region in the reactor core as a reference electrode. As a result, the water quality can be controlled at high accuracy. (I.S.)

  8. Preliminary phenomena identification and ranking tables for simplified boiling water reactor Loss-of-Coolant Accident scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, P.G.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, J.H.; Slovik, G.C.

    1998-04-01

    For three potential Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenarios in the General Electric Simplified Boiling Water Reactors (SBWR) a set of Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRT) is presented. The selected LOCA scenarios are typical for the class of small and large breaks generally considered in Safety Analysis Reports. The method used to develop the PIRTs is described. Following is a discussion of the transient scenarios, the PIRTs are presented and discussed in detailed and in summarized form. A procedure for future validation of the PIRTs, to enhance their value, is outlined. 26 refs., 25 figs., 44 tabs

  9. Modeling of the water gap in BWR fuel elements using SCALE/TRITON; Modellierung des Wasserspalts bei SWR-BE mit SCALE/TRITON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tittelbach, S.; Chernykh, M. [WTI Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    The authors show that an adequate modeling of the water gap in BWR fuel element models using the code TRITON requires an explicit consideration of the Dancoff factors. The analysis of three modeling options reveals that considering the moderating effects of the water gap coolant for the peripheral fuel elements the resulting deviations of the U-235 and Pu-239 concentrations are significantly reduced. The increased temporal calculation efforts are justified with respect to the burnup credits for criticality safety analyses.

  10. Analysis of independent failure assumptions on postulated secondary high energy line ruptures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollingsworth, S.D.

    1977-01-01

    Postulated ruptures of the main steam piping in pressurized water reactors result in large amounts of steam being removed from the secondary system. Since the energy removal rate could be many times that of nominal design power, there may be a rapid cooldown of the primary coolant system and a positive addition of reactivity to the reactor core. The Westinghouse protection system design concept incorporates features that trip the reactor, isolate the main steamlines and provide for automatic alternate shutdown capability in the form of boric acid solution injection into the primary coolant system. At the most limiting time in life (end of life) the reactivity calculated to be inserted by the cooldown is sufficient to overcome the shutdown margin predicted to be available from control rods with the most reactive rod in the fully withdrawn position. Because the boron injected into the core may be delayed due to system responses, there is potential that the reactor core could return critical and return to power. The extremely adverse radial power distributions caused by the fully withdrawn control rod causes localized high power densities that could lead to reduced heat transfer capability (DNB). Because of the large amount of stored energy in the reactor coolant system at full power, the cooldown and subsequent return to power is more severe when calculated from a shutdown, hot zero power condition. It is shown that the protection system design has large margins to protect against adverse core effects following a steamline rupture

  11. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Gruber, Eugene E.; Shack, William J.

    2010-01-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC. The

  12. One Hair Postulate for Hawking Radiation as Tunneling Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Hui; Sun Chang-Pu; Cai Qing-Yu; Liu Xu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    For Hawking radiation, treated as a tunneling process, the no-hair theorem of black hole together with the law of energy conservation is utilized to postulate that the tunneling rate only depends on the external qualities (e.g., the mass for the Schwarzschild black hole) and the energy of the radiated particle. This postulate is justified by the WKB approximation for calculating the tunneling probability. Based on this postulate, a general formula for the tunneling probability is derived without referring to the concrete form of black hole metric. This formula implies an intrinsic correlation between the successive processes of the black hole radiation of two or more particles. It also suggests a kind of entropy conservation and thus resolves the puzzle of black hole information loss in some sense. (general)

  13. Experimental investigations of pressure and temperature loads on a containment after a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanzleiter, T.F.

    1976-01-01

    For the design of an LWR containment one of the important conditions to be considered is the rapid rise of internal pressure and temperature caused by a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) of the primary cooling system. The phenomena occurring within a containment during a LOCA are currently investigated through experiments with a model containment. The experimental results are compared with the results of model calculations to improve the calculational methods. An experimental facility was built, consisting of a primary coolant circuit and a special model containment. The model containment, built in conventional reinforced concrete, has a diameter of 12 m, a height of 12.5 m, a capacity of 580 m 3 and is designed for an internal pressure of 6 bar. The interior is divided by concrete walls and removable partitions into several compartments, which are interconnected through openings with adjustable cross sections. By exchanging the removable partitions it is possible to modify the interior of the containment and to simulate different containment shapes. For the first experiments a PWR configuration with nine compartments has been installed. The model scales of the compartment volumes and the overflow areas are about 1 : 64 compared to the 1200 MW PWR plant Biblis A. (Auth.)

  14. LOFA [loss of flow accident] and LOCA [loss of coolant accident] in the TIBER-II engineering test reactor: Appendix A-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Attaya, H.M.; Corradini, M.L.; Lomperski, S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary analysis of LOFA (loss of flow accident) and LOCA (loss of coolant accident) in the TIBER-II engineering test reactor breeding shield. TIBER-II is a compact reactor with a major radius of 3 m and thus requires a thin, high efficiency shield on the inboard side. The use of tungsten in the inboard shield implies a rather high rate of afterheat upon plasma shutdown, which must be dissipated in a controlled manner to avoid the possibility of radioactivity release or threatening the investment. Because the shield is cooled with an aqueous solution, LOFA does not pose a problem as long as natural convection can be established. LOCA, however, has more serious consequences, particularly on the inboard side. Circulation of air by natural convection is proposed as a means for dissipating the inboard shield decay heat. The safety and environmental implications of such a scheme are evaluated. It is shown that the inboard shield temperature never exceeds 510 0 C following LOCA posing no hazard to reactor personnel and not threatening the investment. 7 refs., 6 figs

  15. Reactor hydrodynamics during the reflood phase of a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    The thermohydraulics of a nuclear reactor during the reflood phase of a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident can be represented by moving control volume methodology in which six control volumes are used to represent the downcomer, lower plenum, and reactor core. The one-dimensional, homogeneous, equilibrium constitutive equations for two-phase steam/water flow are solved in each control volume and connecting junctions. One of the three core control volumes represents the quench region; it changes size and position based on the axial location of the clad quench temperature and the condensed liquid level in the flow channel. The lengths of the remaining two core control volumes are determined by the position of the quench region. Simulation of actual reflood experiments demonstrates that the methodology predicts reflood-like flow oscillations and reproduces the correct trends in experimental data. The moving control volume methodology has proven itself as a valid concept for reflood hydrodynamics, but further development of the existing EFLOD code is required for simulation of actual reflood experiments

  16. A study of the large break loss-of-coolant accident in the Angra-1 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    The simulation of the Angra-I nuclear power plant under the condition of large break loss of coolant accident is presented, the thermal-hydraulic analysis of the primary circuit during each phase of the acident and thermal analysis of the hottest fuel rod curing reflooding are shown. Computer codes RELAP4/MOD5 (options EM and FLOOD) and TOODEE 2 are used to perform these computations. Fuel rod peak temperatures reached during the simulation are below the permissible levels. However, during the reflooding phase; the maximum oxidation of the cladding exceeds the limit of 0.17 times the original cladding thickness. (Author) [pt

  17. Simulation of Thermal Stratification in BWR Suppression Pools with One Dimensional Modeling Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The suppression pool in a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides the major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as a loss-of-coolant accident and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (available net positive suction head) and therefore the performance of the Emergency Core Cooling System and Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System pumps that draw cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use zero dimensional (0-D) lumped parameter models to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool; therefore, they have large uncertainties in the prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods can be used to analyze realistic 3-D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, resulting in a long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code (Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by one-dimensional (1-D) transient partial differential equations and substructures (such as free or wall jets) are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to multi-dimensional CFD modeling. One heat-up experiment performed at the Finland POOLEX facility, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, is used for

  18. Coolant voiding analysis following SGTR for an HLMC reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.T.; Spencer, B.W.; Sienicki, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Concepts are under development at Argonne National Laboratory for a small, modular, proliferation-resistant nuclear power steam supply system. Of primary interest here is the simplified system design, featuring steam generators that are directly immersed in the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant of the primary system. To support the safety case for this design approach, model development and analysis of transient coolant voiding during a postulated guillotine-type steam generator tube rupture event has been carried out. For the current design, the blowdown will occur from the steam generator shell into the ruptured 12.7-mm-inside-diameter tube through which the LBE coolant passes. The steam will expand biaxially in the tube, with a portion of the flow vented upward to eventually expand into the cover-gas region, while the balance of the flow is vented downward as a jet into the surrounding downward-flowing LBE. Coolant freezing is not an issue in this case because of high feedwater temperature in relation to the freezing point of the LBE. The specific objectives of the current work are to (a) determine the penetration behavior of the steam jet into the lower cold-leg region, (b) characterize the resultant void behavior in terms of coherent bubble versus breakup into a size distribution of small bubbles, and (c) characterize the motion of the bubbles with regard to rise to the cover-gas region (via the liner-to-coolant vessel gap) versus downward transport with the flowing LBE and subsequent upflow through the core to the cover-gas region

  19. Primary coolant circuits in FBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutani, Masushiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the requirement of a pump for the forcive circulation of primary coolants and avoid the manufacturing difficulty of equipments. Constitution: In primary coolant circuits of an LMFBR type reactor having a recycling path forming a closed loop between a reactor core and a heat exchanger, coolants recycled through the recycling path are made of a magnetic fluid comprising liquid sodium incorporated with fine magnetic powder, and an electromagnet is disposed to the downstream of the heat exchanger. In the above-mentioned structure, since the magnetic fluid as the primary coolants losses its magnetic property when heated in the reactor core but recovers the property at a lower temperature after the completion of the heat exchange, the magnetic fluid can forcively be flown through the recycling path under the effect of the electromagnet disposed to the down stream of the heat exchanger to thereby forcively recycle the primary coolants. (Kawakami, Y.)

  20. A review of Zircaloy fuel cladding behavior in a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbacher, F.J.; Leistikow, S.

    1985-09-01

    The paper reviews the state-of-the-art experimental work performed in several countries with respect to the acceptance criteria established for emergency core cooling (ECC) in a loss-of-coolant accident (LOGA) of light water reactors (LWRs). It covers in detail oxidation, embrittlement, plastic deformation and coolability of deformed rod bundles. The main test results are discussed on the basis of research work performed at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center (KfK) within the framework of the Nuclear Safety Project (PNS) and reference is made to test data obtained in other countries. The conclusion reached in the paper is that the major mechanisms and consequences of oxidation, deformation and emergency core cooling are sufficiently investigated in order to provide a reliable data base for safety assessments and licensing of LWRs. All test data prove that the ECC-criteria are conservative and that the coolability of an LWR and the public safety can be maintained in a LOCA. (orig.) [de

  1. Evaluation of effective coolant flow rate in advanced design of the small scale VHTR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumizawa, Motoo; Suzuki, Kunihiko; Murakami, Tomoyuki.

    1988-02-01

    This report describes the evaluation of effective coolant flow rate in the advanced design of the small scale VHTR core. The analytical design study was carried out after the 2nd stage of detailed design in order to reduce the cost of construction. The summary of the analytical results are as follows: (1) Crossflow loss coefficient of flange type fuel block having 0.1 mm of sealing gap is about 100 times higher than that of dowel type block adopted in the 2nd stage of detailed design. (2) In case that coolant channel outer diameter is 52 mm and hydraulic diameter is 6 mm, the effective coolant flow rates using flange and dowel type fuel blocks are 80 % and 70 % respectively. Because the crossflow loss coefficients of dowel type are lower than that of flange type. (3) The effective coolant flow rate, when crossflow loss coefficients are distributed along with the axial direction, agrees well with that using mean value of crossflow loss coefficient i.e. 5 x 10 11 m -4 . (author)

  2. Panorama of the BWR reactors - Evolution of the concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, C.; Uhrig, E. [AREVA NP GmbH, Safety Engineering Department - PEPS-G (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Nowadays, a fleet of more than 50 boiling water reactors (BWR) are in operation in the world. This article gives a short overview on the developments of nuclear power plants of the BWR type, with a focus on the European builds. It describes the technical bases from the early designs in the fifties, sketches the innovations of the sixties and seventies in the types BWR 69 and 72 (Baulinie 69 and 72) and gives an outlook of a possible next generation BWR. A promising approach in recent BWR developments is the the combination of passive safety systems with established design basis

  3. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Safety Issue 105: Interfacing system loss-of-coolant accident in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    An interfacing systems loss of coolant accident (ISLOCA) involves failure or improper operation of pressure isolation valves (PIVs) that compose the boundary between the reactor coolant system and low-pressure rated systems. Some ISLOCAs can bypass containment and result in direct release of fission products to the environment. A cost/benefit evaluation, using three PWR analyses, calculated the benefit of two potential modifications to the plants. Alternative 1 is improved plant operations to optimize the operator's performance and reduce human error probabilities. Alternative 2 adds pressure sensing devices, cabling, and instrumentation between two PIVs to provide operators with continuous monitoring of the first PIV. These two alternatives were evaluated for the base case plants (Case 1) and for each plant, assuming the plants had a particular auxiliary building design in which severe flooding would be a problem if an ISLOCA occurred. The auxiliary building design (Case 2) was selected from a survey that revealed a number of designs with features that provided less than optimal resistance to ECCS equipment loss caused by a ISLOCA-induced environment. The results were judged not to provide sufficient basis for generic requirements. It was concluded that the most viable course of action to resolve Generic Issue 105 is licensee participation in individual plant examinations (IPEs)

  4. Angra 2 small break LOCA flow regime identification through RELAP5 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Marcelo da Silva; Sabundjian, Gaiane; Belchior Junior, Antonio; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de; Torres, Walmir Maximo; Conti, Thadeu das Neves; Macedo, Luiz Alberto; Umbehaun, Pedro Ernesto; Mesquita, Roberto Navarro de; Masotti, Paulo Henrique Ferraz, E-mail: msrocha@ipen.br, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br, E-mail: abelchior@ipen.br, E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br, E-mail: wmtorres@ipen.br, E-mail: tnconti@ipen.br, E-mail: lamacedo@ipen.br, E-mail: umbehaun@ipen.br, E-mail: s, E-mail: rnavarro@ipen.br, E-mail: pmasotti@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the flow regimes in the core of Angra 2 nuclear reactor with RELAP5/MOD3.2.gamma code (RELAP5, 2001). The postulated accident is the loss of coolant through a small break in the primary circuit (SBLOCA), which is described in Chapter 15 of the Final Safety Analysis Report of Angra 2 - FSAR (ETN, 2006). As the primary circuit pressure decreases due to the loss of coolant, several alternating two phase flow regimes are established in the primary circuit. This paper analyses the coolant two-phase flow behavior in the nuclear reactor core during the postulated accident. (author)

  5. Modelling of tritium dispersion from postulated accidental release of nuclear power plants; Modelagem da dispersao de tritio a partir de liberacoes acidentais postuladas de centrais nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Abner Duarte

    2010-07-01

    This study has the aim to assess the impact of accidental release of tritium postulate from a nuclear power reactor through environmental modeling of aquatic resources. In order to do that it was used computational models of hydrodynamics and transport for the simulation of tritium dispersion caused by an accident in a CANDU reactor located in the ongoing Angra 3 site. This exercise was accomplished with the aid of a code system (SisBAHIA) developed in the Rio de Janeiro Federal University (COPPE/UFRJ). The CANDU reactor is one that uses heavy water (D{sub 2}O) as moderator and coolant of the core. It was postulated, then, the LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) accident in the emergency cooling system of the nucleus (without fusion), where was lost 66 m{sup 3} of soda almost instantaneously. This inventory contained 35 PBq and was released a load of 9.7 TBq/s in liquid form near the Itaorna beach, Angra dos Reis - RJ. The models mentioned above were applied in two scenarios (plant stopped and operating) and showed a tritium plume with specific activities larger than the reference level for seawater (1.1 MBq/m{sup 3} ) during the first 14 days after the accident. The main difference between the scenario without and with seawater recirculation (pumping and discharge) is based on the enhancement of dilution of the highest concentrations in the last one. This dilution enhancement resulting in decreasing concentrations was observed only during the first two weeks, when they ranged from 1x10{sup 9} to 5x10{sup 5} Bq/m{sup 3} close to the Itaorna beach spreading just to Sandri Island. After 180 days, the plume could not be detected anymore in the bay, because their activities would be lower than the minimum detectable value (< 11 kBq/m{sup 3}). (author)

  6. Break spectrum analyses for small break loss of coolant accidents in a RESAR-3S Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, C.D.; Kullberg, C.M.

    1986-03-01

    A series of thermal-hydraulic analyses were performed to investigate phenomena occurring during small break loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) sequences in a RESAR-3S pressurized water reactor. The analysis included simulations of plant behavior using the TRAC-PF1 and RELAP5/MOD2 computer codes. Series of calculations were performed using both codes for different break sizes. The analyses presented here also served an audit function in that the results shown here were used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as an independent confirmation of similar analyses performed by Westinghouse Electric Company using another computer code. 10 refs., 62 figs., 14 tabs

  7. The BWR Stability Issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to supply general information about Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) stability. The main concerned topics are: phenomenological aspects, experimental database, modelling features and capabilities, numerical models, three-dimensional modelling, BWR system performance during stability, stability monitoring and licensing aspects.

  8. Analysis of postulated unscrammed loss of flow in SAFR using SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovik, G.C.; Van Tuyle, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is providing technical assistance to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in reviewing two advanced liquid-metal reactor (LMR) designs in order to address the licensability of these innovative concepts. The designs, PRISM and SAFR are being proposed by General Electric Company and Rockwell International (RI), respectively. Brookhaven National Laboratory has utilized the super system code (SSC) to independently evaluate the LMR reactor system response during several postulated unscrammed events. This paper describes the SAFR reactor responses to a beyond-design base event where forced cooling is lost. A similar transient analysis has already been reported for PRISM

  9. Scaling criteria and an assessment of Semiscale Mod-3 scaling for small-break loss-of-coolant transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, T.K.; Anderson, J.L.; Shimeck, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Various methods of scaling fluid thermal-hydraulic test facilities and their relative merits and disadvantages are examined in light of nuclear reactor safety considerations. Particular emphasis is placed on examination of the scaling of the Semiscale Mod-3 system and determination of thermal-hydraulic phenomena thought to be important during a small break loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water nuclear reactor. The influence of geometric and dynamic scaling concerns in the Mod-3 system on small break behavior are addressed from an engineering viewpoint and corrective measures contemplated or required to make results from Semiscale tests more meaningful relative to expected PWR response are discussed

  10. BWR Radiation Assessment and Control Program: assessment and control of BWR radiation fields. Volume 1. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstine, L.D.

    1983-05-01

    This report covers work on the BWR Radiation Assessment and Control (BRAC) Program from 1978 to 1982. The major activities during this report period were assessment of the radiation-level trends in BWRs, evaluation of the effects of forward-pumped heater drains on BWR water quality, installation and operation of a corrosion-product deposition loop in an operating BWR, and analyzation of fuel-deposit samples from two BWRs. Radiation fields were found to be controlled by cobalt-60 and to vary from as low as 50 mr/hr to as high as 800 mr/hr on the recirculation-system piping. Detailed information on BWR corrosion films and system deposits is presented in the report. Additionally, the results of an oxygen-injection experiment and recontamination monitoring studies are provided

  11. Conceptual design loss-of-coolant accident analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, N.C.J.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A RELAP5 system model for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor has been developed for performing conceptual safety analysis report calculations. To better represent thermal-hydraulic behavior of the core, three specific changes in the RELAP5 computer code were implemented: a turbulent forced-convection heat transfer correlation, a critical heat flux (CHF) correlation, and an interfacial drag correlation. The model consists of the core region, the heat exchanger loop region, and the pressurizing/letdown system region. Results for three loss-of-coolant accident analyses are presented: (1) an instantaneous double-ended guillotine (DEG) core outlet break with a cavitating venturi installed downstream of the core, (b) a core pressure boundary tube outer wall rupture, and (c) a DEG core inlet break with a finite break-formation time. The results show that the core can survive without exceeding the flow excursion of CHF thermal limits at a 95% probability level if the proper mitigation options are provided

  12. Analysis of forces on core structures during a loss-of-coolant accident. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griggs, D.P.; Vilim, R.B.; Wang, C.H.; Meyer, J.E.

    1980-08-01

    There are several design requirements related to the emergency core cooling which would follow a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). One of these requirements is that the core must retain a coolable geometry throughout the accident. A possible cause of core damage leading to an uncoolable geometry is the action of forces on the core and associated support structures during the very early (blowdown) stage of the LOCA. An equally unsatisfactory design result would occur if calculated deformations and failures were so extensive that the geometry used for calculating the next stages of the LOCA (refill and reflood) could not be known reasonably well. Subsidiary questions involve damage preventing the operation of control assemblies and loss of integrity of other needed safety systems. A reliable method of calculating these forces is therefore an important part of LOCA analysis. These concerns provided the motivation for the study. The general objective of the study was to review the state-of-the-art in LOCA force determination. Specific objectives were: (1) determine state-of-the-art by reviewing current (and projected near future) techniques for LOCA force determination, and (2) consider each of the major assumptions involved in force determination and make a qualitative assessment of their validity

  13. Thermal hydraulic analysis of aggressive secondary cooldown in a small break loss of coolant accident with a total loss of high pressure safety injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seok Jung; Lim, Ho Gon; Yang, Joon Eon

    2003-03-01

    Recently, Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) has being applied to various fields as a basic technique of Risk-Informed Applications (RIA). The present study focuses on detailed thermal hydraulic analyses for major accident sequences and success criteria to support a development of PSA model using RIA for Korea Standard Nuclear Power plant (KSNP). The primary purpose of the present study in this year is to evaluate the success cri-teria of Aggressive Secondary Cooldown (ASC) in a Small Size Loss Of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) without HPSI and to enhance the understanding of related thermal hydraulic behavior and phenomena. An effort was made to evaluate the system success criteria and a mission time for the recovery action by an operator to prevent the core damage for that accident scenario. The accident scenario for KSNP was a 2 inch coldleg break LOCA with a total loss of High Pressure Safety Injection (HPSI) and 1/2 Low Pressure Safety Injection (LPSI) available and perform-ing ASC limited by 55.6 .deg. C/hr (100 .deg. F/hr) cooldown rate at 15 minute after reactor trip. It successively reached the LPSI condition for about 1.5hr after starting the ASC operation with the Peak Cladding Temperature (PCT) of the hottest rod below the core damage criteria of 1204.4 .deg. C (2200 .deg. F). Sensitivity studies were performed for (1) cool-ant average temperature parameters, (2) ASC operation control method, (3) operation start time, (4) 1 inch break size. The present analysis identified thermal hydraulic phenomena and parameters affecting on the behavior, which consist of coolant break flow and inventory, parameters governing secondary heat removal, ASC operation control method, and its reference temperature parameters. In the present study, more relaxed success criteria than the previous PSA for KSNP could be generated under an assumption that an operator should maintain the ade-quate ASC operation. However, it is necessary to evaluate the uncertainties arisen from the

  14. Loss of Coolant Accident Simulation for the Top-Slot break at Cold Leg Focusing on the Loop Seal Reformation under Long Term Cooling with the ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Rok; Park, Yu Sun; Bae, Byoung Uhn; Choi, Nam Hyun; Kang, Kyoung Ho; Choi, Ki Yong [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In the present paper, loss of coolant accident for the top-slot break at cold leg was simulated with the ATLAS, which is a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for evolutionary pressurized water reactors (PWRs) of an advanced power reactor of 1400 MWe (APR1400). The simulation was focused on the loop seal reformation under long term cooling condition. During a certain class of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a PWR like an advanced power reactor of 1400 MWe (APR1400), the steam volume in the reactor vessel upper plenum and/or upper head may continue expanding until steam blows liquid out of the intermediate leg (U-shaped pump suction cold leg), called loop seal clearing (LSC), opening a path for the steam to be relieved from the break. Prediction of the LSC phenomena is difficult because they are varies for many parameters, which are break location, type, size, etc. This LSC is the major factor that affects the coolant inventory in the small break LOCA (SBLOCA) or intermediate break LOCA (IBLOCA). There is an issue about the loop seal reformation that liquid refills intermediate leg and blocks the steam path after LSC. During the SBLOCA or IBLOCA, the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) is operated. For long term of the top slot small or intermediate break at cold leg, the primary steam condensation by SG heat transfer or SIP, SIT water flooding (reverse flow to loop seal) make loop seal reformation possibly. The primary pressure increase at the top core region due to the steam release blockage by loop seal reformation. And then core level decreases and partial core uncover may occur. The loss of coolant accident for the top-slot break at cold leg was simulated with the ATLAS. The loop seal clearing and loop seal reformation were occurred repeatedly.

  15. Full-scale mark II CRT program facility description report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namatame, Ken; Kukita, Yutaka; Ito, Hideo; Yamamoto, Nobuo; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1980-03-01

    Started in fiscal year 1977, the Full-Scale Mark II CRT (Containment Response Test) Program is proceeding for the period of five years. The primary objective of the CRT Program is to provide a data base for evaluation of the pressure suppression pool hydrodynamic loads associated with a postulated loss-of-coolant accident in the BWR Mark II containment system. The test facility was designed and constructed from fiscal year 1977 to 1978, and completed in March 1979. It is 1/18 in volume and has a wetwell which is a full-scale replica of one 20 0 -sector of that of a reference Mark II. This report describes design concepts, dimensions and constructions of the test facility, as well as specifications, locations and installation schemes of the measuring equipments. Results of soil structure inspection, vacuum breaker test and shaker test of the containment shell are given in the appendices. (author)

  16. SCORPIO-BWR: status and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porsmyr, Jan; Bodal, Terje; Beere, William H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: During the years from 2000 to 2003 a joint project has been performed by IFE, Halden and TEPCO Systems Corporation, Japan, to develop a core monitoring system for BWRs based on the their existing core monitoring system TiARA and the SCORPIO framework. It has been emphasised to develop a reliable, flexible, adaptable and user-friendly system, which is easy to maintain. Therefore, a rather general framework (SCORPIO Framework) has been used which facilitates easy software modifications as well as adding/ replacing physics modules. The software modules is integrated in the SCORPIO framework using the Software Bus as the communication tool and with the Picasso UIMS tool for MMI. The SCORPIO-BWR version is developed on a Windows-PC platform. The SCORPIO-BWR version provides all functions, which are necessary for all analyses and operations performed on a BWR plant and comprises functions for on-line core monitoring, predictive analysis and core management with interfaces to plant instrumentation and physics codes. Functions for system initialisation and maintenance are also included. A SCORPIO-BWR version adapted for ABWR was installed in TEPSYS facilities in Tokyo in January 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. The ABWR version of the system is now in the verification and validation phase. In the period from April 2003 until March 2004 a project for realizing an offline-version of SCORPIO-BWR system, which supports the offline tasks of BWR in-core fuel management for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors, was developed. The offline-version of the SCORPIO-BWR system for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors was installed at TEPSYS in March 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. Plans for the next version of this system is to study the possibility of adapting SCORPIO-BWR to work with 'mobile technology'. This means that it should be possible to access and display information from the SCORPIO-BWR system on a

  17. SCORPIO-BWR: status and future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porsmyr, Jan; Bodal, Terje; Beere, William H. (and others)

    2004-07-01

    Full text: During the years from 2000 to 2003 a joint project has been performed by IFE, Halden and TEPCO Systems Corporation, Japan, to develop a core monitoring system for BWRs based on the their existing core monitoring system TiARA and the SCORPIO framework. It has been emphasised to develop a reliable, flexible, adaptable and user-friendly system, which is easy to maintain. Therefore, a rather general framework (SCORPIO Framework) has been used which facilitates easy software modifications as well as adding/ replacing physics modules. The software modules is integrated in the SCORPIO framework using the Software Bus as the communication tool and with the Picasso UIMS tool for MMI. The SCORPIO-BWR version is developed on a Windows-PC platform. The SCORPIO-BWR version provides all functions, which are necessary for all analyses and operations performed on a BWR plant and comprises functions for on-line core monitoring, predictive analysis and core management with interfaces to plant instrumentation and physics codes. Functions for system initialisation and maintenance are also included. A SCORPIO-BWR version adapted for ABWR was installed in TEPSYS facilities in Tokyo in January 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. The ABWR version of the system is now in the verification and validation phase. In the period from April 2003 until March 2004 a project for realizing an offline-version of SCORPIO-BWR system, which supports the offline tasks of BWR in-core fuel management for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors, was developed. The offline-version of the SCORPIO-BWR system for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors was installed at TEPSYS in March 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. Plans for the next version of this system is to study the possibility of adapting SCORPIO-BWR to work with 'mobile technology'. This means that it should be possible to access and display information from the SCORPIO-BWR

  18. Analysis of Consequences in the Loss-of-Coolant Accident in Wendelstein 7-X Experimental Nuclear Fusion Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uspuras, E., E-mail: algis@mail.lei.lt [Laboratory of Nuclear Installations Safety, Lithuanian Energy Institute, Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: Fusion is the energy production technology, which could potentially solve problems with growing energy demand of population in the future. Starting 2007, Lithuanian energy institute (LEI) is a member of European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) organization. LEI is cooperating with Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP, Germany) in the frames of EFDA project by performing safety analysis of fusion device W7-X. Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is an experimental stellarator facility currently being built in Greifswald, Germany, which shall demonstrate that in the future energy could be produced in such type of fusion reactors. The W7-X facility divertor cooling system consists of two coolant circuits: the main cooling circuit and the so-called 'baking' circuit. Before plasma operation, the divertor and other invessel components must be heated up in order to 'clean' the surfaces by thermal desorption and the subsequent pumping out of the released volatile molecules. The rupture of pipe, providing water for the divertor targets during the 'baking' regime is one of the critical failure events, since primary and secondary steam production leads to a rapid increase of the inner pressure in the plasma (vacuum) vessel. Such initiating event could lead to the loss of vacuum condition up to overpressure of the plasma vessel, damage of in-vessel components and bellows of the ports. In this paper the safety analysis of 40 mm inner diameter coolant pipe rupture in cooling circuit and discharge of steam-water mixture through the leak into plasma vessel during the W7-X no-plasma 'baking' operation mode is presented. For the analysis the model of W7-X cooling system (pumps, valves, pipes, hydro-accumulators, and heat exchangers) and plasma vessel was developed by employing system thermal-hydraulic state-of-the-art RELAP5 Mod 3.3 code. This paper demonstrated, that the developed RELAP5 model allows to analyze the processes in divertor cooling system and plasma vessel

  19. Study on severe accident induced by large break loss of coolant accident for pressureized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Longfei; Zhang Dafa; Wang Shaoming

    2007-01-01

    Using the best estimate computer code SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.2 and taking US Westinghouse corporation Surry nuclear power plant as the reference object, a typical three-loop pressurized water reactor severe accident calculation model was established and 25 cm large break loss of coolant accident (LBLOCA) in cold and hot leg of primary loop induced core melt accident was analyzed. The calculated results show that core melt progression is fast and most of the core material melt and relocated to the lower plenum. The lower head of reactor pressure vessel failed at an early time and the cold leg break is more severe than the hot leg break in primary loop during LBLOCA. (authors)

  20. Consequences of tritium release to water pathways from postulated accidents in a DOE production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Kula, K.R.; Olson, R.L.; Hamby, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    A full-scale PRA of a DOE production reactor has been completed that considers full release of tritium as part of the severe accident source term. Two classes of postulated reactor accidents, a loss-of-moderator pumping accident and a loss-of-coolant accident, are used to bound the expected dose consequence from liquid pathway release. Population doses from the radiological release associated with the two accidents are compared for aqueous discharge and atmospheric release modes. The expectation values of the distribution of possible values for the societal effective dose equivalent to the general public, given a tritium release to the atmosphere, is 2.8 person-Sv/PBq (9.9 x 10 -3 person-rem/Ci). The general public drinking water dose to downstream water consumers is 6.5 x 10 -2 person-Sv/Pbq (2.4 x 10 -4 person-rem/Ci) for aqueous releases to the surface streams eventually reaching the Savannah River. Negligible doses are calculated for freshwater fish and saltwater invertebrate consumption, irrigation, and recreational use of the river, given that an aqueous release is assumed to occur. Relative to the balance of fission products released in a hypothetical severe accident, the tritium-related dose is small. This study suggests that application of regional models (1610 km radius) will indicate larger dose consequences from short-term tritium release to the atmosphere than from comparable tritium source terms to water pathways. However, the water pathways assessment is clearly site-specific, and the overall aqueous dose will be dependent on downstream receptor populations and uses of the river

  1. Loss of coolant accident mitigation for liquid metal cooled space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgevich, Vladimir; Best, Frederick; Erdman, Carl

    1989-01-01

    A loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in a liquid metal-cooled space reactor system has been considered as a possible accident scenario. Development of new concepts that will prevent core damage by LOCA caused elevated temperatures is the primary motivation of this work. Decay heat generated by the fission products in the reactor core following shutdown is sufficiently high to melt the fuel unless energy can be removed from the pins at a sufficiently rapid rate. There are two major reasons that prevent utilization of traditional emergency cooling methods. One is the absence of gravity and the other is the vacuum condition outside the reactor vessel. A concept that overcomes both problems is the Saturated Wick Evaporation Method (SWEM). This method involves placing wicking structures at specific locations in the core to act as energy sinks. One of its properties is the isothermal behaviour of the liquid in the wick. The absorption of energy by the surface at the isothermal temperature will direct the energy into an evaporation process and not in sensible heat addition. The use of this concept enables establishment of isothermal positions within the core. A computer code that evaluates the temperature distribution of the core has been developed and the results show that this design will prevent fuel meltdown. (author)

  2. Test results of a jet impingement from a 4 inch pipe under BWR LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isozaki, Toshikuni; Yano, Toshikazu; Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Kato, Rokuro; Kurihara, Ryoichi; Ueda, Shuzo; Miyazono, Shohachiro

    1982-09-01

    Hypothetical instantaneous pipe rupture is now considered to be one of the design basis accidents during the operation of the light water reactor. If a pipe rupture accidnet occurs, the pipe will start moving with the sudden discharge of internal fluid. So, the various apparatus such as pipe whip restraints and jet deflectors are being installed near the postulated break location to protect the nuclear power plants against the effect of postulated pipe rupture. Pipe whipping test and jet discharge test are now being conducted at the Division of Reactor Safety of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. This report describes the test results of the jet discharge from a 4 inch pipe under BWR LOCA condition. In front of the pipe exit the target disk of 1000 mm in diameter was installed. The distance between the pipe exit and the target was 500 mm. 13 pressure transducers and 13 thermocouples were mounted on the target disk to measure the pressure and temperature increase due to jet impingement on the target. (author)

  3. Conceptual design of the integral test loop (I): Reactor coolant system and secondary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chul Hwa; Lee, Seong Je; Kwon, Tae Soon; Moon, Sang Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of the primary coolant system and the secondary system of the Integral Test Loop (ITL) which simulates overall thermal hydraulic phenomena of the primary system of a nuclear power plant during postulated accidents or transients. The design basis for the primary coolant system and secondary system is as follows ; Reference plant: Korean Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP), Height ratio : 1/1, Volume ratio : 1/200, Power scale : Max. 15% of the scaled nominal power, Temperature, Pressure : Real plant conditions. The primary coolant system includes a reactor vessel, which contains a core simulator, a steam generator, a reactor coolant pump simulator, a pressurizer and piping, which consists of two hot legs, four cold legs and four intermediate legs. The secondary system consists of s steam discharge system, a feedwater supply system and a steam condensing system. This conceptual design report describes general configuration of the reference plant, and major function and operation of each system of the plant. Also described is the design philosophy of each component and system of the ITL, and specified are the design criteria and technical specifications of each component and system of the ITL in the report. 17 refs., 43 figs., 51 tabs. (Author)

  4. High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report describes the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) work conducted for completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Level 3 milestone THM.CFD.P13.03: High Fidelity BWR Fuel Simulation. High fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) was conducted to investigate the applicability and robustness performance of BWR closures. As a preliminary study, a CFD model with simplified Ferrule spacer grid geometry of NUPEC BWR Full-size Fine-mesh Bundle Test (BFBT) benchmark has been implemented. Performance of multiphase segregated solver with baseline boiling closures has been evaluated. Although the mean values of void fraction and exit quality of CFD result for BFBT case 4101-61 agreed with experimental data, the local void distribution was not predicted accurately. The mesh quality was one of the critical factors to obtain converged result. The stability and robustness of the simulation was mainly affected by the mesh quality, combination of BWR closure models. In addition, the CFD modeling of fully-detailed spacer grid geometry with mixing vane is necessary for improving the accuracy of CFD simulation.

  5. Assessment of RELAP/MOD2 using large break loss-of-coolant experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, L.; Liao, L.Y.; Liang, K.S.; Wang, S.F.; Chen, Y.B.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 using LOFT L2-5 and Semiscale S-06-3 tests are performed to provide information of the code capability and its limitation in analyzing large break LOCA of a nuclear power plant. Experiments L2-5 and S-06-3 are conducted to simulate a hypothetical LOCA which results from a 200% double-ended offset shear break in the cold-leg of a typical pressurized water reactor by utilizing scaling facilities of the LOFT and Semiscale Mod-1 systems, respectively. The RELAP5/MOD2 calculations for both tests begin with break initiation and subsequent blowdown, continue through lower plenum refill, core reflood, and terminate with corewide quench. Major phenomena of both large break loss-of-coolant tests are well predicted by RELAP5/MOD2. The results indicate that the break flow and system pressure are reasonably calculated. The cladding temperature response during blowdown period, which is the major importance to a large break LOCA, calculated by RELAP5/MOD2 shows good agreement with the test data

  6. BWR core melt progression phenomena: Experimental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the BWR Core Melt in Progression Phenomena Program, experimental results concerning severe fuel damage and core melt progression in BWR core geometry are used to evaluate existing models of the governing phenomena. These include control blade eutectic liquefaction and the subsequent relocation and attack on the channel box structure; oxidation heating and hydrogen generation; Zircaloy melting and relocation; and the continuing oxidation of zirconium with metallic blockage formation. Integral data have been obtained from the BWR DF-4 experiment in the ACRR and from BWR tests in the German CORA exreactor fuel-damage test facility. Additional integral data will be obtained from new CORA BWR test, the full-length FLHT-6 BWR test in the NRU test reactor, and the new program of exreactor experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation. an essential part of this activity is interpretation and use of the results of the BWR tests. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed experiment-specific models for analysis of the BWR experiments; to date, these models have permitted far more precise analyses of the conditions in these experiments than has previously been available. These analyses have provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena that the experiments are intended to investigate. The results of posttest analyses of BWR experiments are discussed and significant findings from these analyses are explained. The ORNL control blade/canister models with materials interaction, relocation and blockage models are currently being implemented in SCDAP/RELAP5 as an optional structural component

  7. New cooling system of the FRG-1 two barrier system of the primary coolant cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knop, W.; Schreiner, P.

    2003-01-01

    The GKSS research center operates the swimming pool reactor FRG-1 with a thermal power of 5 MW as national neutron source for neutron scattering experiments and sample irradiation as well. Before changing the primary coolant cycle consisted of the reactor core and the closed piping including pumps, heat exchanger and delay tank. The closed cooling circuit was located underneath the reactor pool, in the so-called radioactive cellar. This piping system served secondary coolant system. Due to the location of the primary coolant cycle below the operation pool a postulated 2-F line break and simultaneous failure of the pool slide gate valve could lead to a falling dry of the total reactor core. the new primary coolant system was built in the beginning 2002 in a partitioned cell all within the radioactive cellar, so that the reactor core remains with water with the assumed incident. Due to the new two barrier-inclusion of the primary circuit only the melting of two fuel plates (from total 252 fuel plates) has to be taken into account. This measure and the core compactness in 2000 with a neutron flux gain of a factor of 2 makes the FRG-1 ready for the next 15 years of reactor operation. (author)

  8. Specificities of reactor coolant pumps units with lead and lead-bismuth coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beznosov, A.V.; Anotonenkov, M.A.; Bokov, P.A.; Baranova, V.S.; Kustov, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis results of impact of lead and lead-bismuth coolants specific properties on the coolants flow features in flow channels of the main and auxiliary circulating pumps are presented. Impossibility of cavitation initiation in flow channels of vane pumps pumping lead and lead-bismuth coolants was demonstrated. The experimental research results of discontinuity of heavy liquid metal coolant column were presented and conditions of gas cavitation initiation in coolant flow were discussed. Invalidity of traditional calculation methods of water and sodium coolants circulation pumps calculations for lead and lead-bismuth coolants circulation pumps was substantiated [ru

  9. BWR water chemistry guidelines and PWR primary water chemistry guidelines in Japan – Purpose and technical background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka, E-mail: kawamuh@criepi.denken.or.jp [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Hirano, Hideo [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Katsumura, Yousuke [University of Tokyo (Japan); Uchida, Shunsuke [Tohoku University (Japan); Mizuno, Takayuki [Mie University (Japan); Kitajima, Hideaki; Tsuzuki, Yasuo [Japan Nuclear Safety Institute (Japan); Terachi, Takumi [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc. (Japan); Nagase, Makoto; Usui, Naoshi [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan); Takagi, Junichi; Urata, Hidehiro [Toshiba Corporation (Japan); Shoda, Yasuhiko; Nishimura, Takao [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, Ltd. (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Framework of BWR/PWR water chemistry Guidelines in Japan are presented. • Guideline necessity, definitions, philosophy and technical background are mentioned. • Some guideline settings for control parameters and recommendations are explaines. • Chemistry strategy is also mentioned. - Abstract: After 40 years of light water reactor (LWR) operations in Japan, the sustainable development of water chemistry technologies has aimed to ensure the highest coolant system component integrity and fuel reliability performance for maintaining LWRs in the world; additionally, it aimed to achieve an excellent dose rate reduction. Although reasonable control and diagnostic parameters are utilized by each boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) owner, it is recognized that specific values are not shared among everyone involved. To ensure the reliability of BWR and PWR operation and maintenance, relevant members of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) decided to establish guidelines for water chemistry. The Japanese BWR and PWR water chemistry guidelines provide strategies to improve material and fuel reliability performance as well as to reduce dosing rates. The guidelines also provide reasonable “control values”, “diagnostic values” and “action levels” for multiple parameters, and they stipulate responses when these levels are exceeded. Specifically, “conditioning parameters” are adopted in the Japanese PWR primary water chemistry guidelines. Good practices for operational conditions are also discussed with reference to long-term experience. This paper presents the purpose, technical background and framework of the preliminary water chemistry guidelines for Japanese BWRs and PWRs. It is expected that the guidelines will be helpful as an introduction to achieve safety and reliability during operations.

  10. TRACG: Twenty years of collaboration between ENUSA and GE-HITACHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haces, J.; Trueba, M.; Garcia, J.; Barrera, J.

    2011-01-01

    TRACG is the GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy (GEH) proprietary version of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code. It is a best-estimate code for analysis of boiling eater reactors (BWR). Enusa has extensively contributed to the development of TRACG, applying this code to different scenarios and BWR plants: loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), anticipated operational occurrences (AOO), instability events licensing of GNF fuel for Nordic plants, anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) reactivity insertion accidents (RIA), validation of the simulator for the Advanced BWR (ABWR) plant, the licensing of the TRACG based U. s. Nuclear Regulatory commission (NRC)-approved AOO and LOCA licensing methodologies, and in the licensing of the passively safe generation III+ Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR).

  11. An assessment of structural response of condensation pool columns in a BWR/MARK II containment to loads resulting from steam explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, W.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to estimate the amount of molten core debris participating in a postulated propagating large-scale steam explosion that could threaten the integrity of the condensation pool columns in a BWR/MARK II containment. This objective was achieved by examination of the structural response of the columns to shock wave loadings and comparison, on the shock wave energy basis, of a propagating steam explosion to a detonation of TNT. In this connection the fraction of the steam explosion energy which appears in the form of a pressure shock wave was estimated. (orig.)

  12. MABEL-2D: a code to analyse cladding deformation in a loss-of-coolant accident. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowring, R.W.

    1985-08-01

    The MABEL series of codes is being developed at Harwell to predict the extent of cladding deformation (ballooning) in pressurized water reactor fuel rods during a loss of coolant accident. MABEL - 2D is an updated version of MABEL - 2C. These are user notes for MABEL - 2D (which is described in a separate report AEEW - R1979). They describe the input data specification; the use of the restart facility; debug printing and quick-running sample problems. The input data are divided into rod data, thermal hydraulic data and creep data. There is an input data flow chart. The main appendix gives the detailed input data specification. (U.K.)

  13. The behaviour of CAGR moderator and sleeve graphites radiolytically oxidised to high weight loss in inhibited coolant gas compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schofield, P.; Fitzgerald, B.; Ketchen, J.

    1987-01-01

    Gilsocarbon graphites were irradiated to high weight losses in three different CO 2 based coolants. The experimental data is tested against a model which interprets the gas phase chemistry and pore geometry and allows weight loss and gas flow properties to be calculated. The observed changes of oxidation rate with dose were successfully predicted from the model. An empirical relationship was also derived which was shown to fit data for moderator, sleeve and special pore structure graphites. Changes in graphite permeability and diffusivity were predicted by the model, and also by other simplified, more approximate methods. The model based upon the measured transport pore spectrum was shown to be the best with other methods proving adequate to moderate doses. (author)

  14. Device for preventing coolant outflow in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Mochizuki, Keiichi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To prevent outflow of coolant from a reactor vessel even in an occurrence of leaking trouble at a low position in a primary cooling system or the like in the reactor vessel. Structure: An inlet at the foremost end of a coolant inlet pipe inserted into a reactor vessel is arranged at a level lower than a core, and a check valve is positioned at a level higher than the core in a rising portion of the inlet. In normal condition, the check valve is pushed up by discharge pressure of a main circulating pump and remains closed, and hence, producing no flow loss of coolant, sodium. However, when a trouble such as rupture occurs at the lower position in the primary cooling system, the attractive force for allowing the coolant to back-flow outside the reactor vessel and the load force of the coolant within the reactor vessel cause the check valve to actuate, as a consequence of which a liquid level of the coolant downwardly moves to the position of the check valve to intake the cover gases into a gas intake, thereby cutting off a flow passage of the coolant to stop outflow thereof. (Kamimura, M.)

  15. Axial distribution of deformation in the cladding of pressurized water reactor fuel rods in a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, K.M.; Mann, C.A.; Hindle, E.D.

    1979-01-01

    In the event of a loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor, the cladding of the fuel rods would undergo a temperature excursion while being subject to tensile hoop stress. The deformation behavior of 470-mm lengths of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding has been studied experimentally; under a range of stress levels in the high-alpha range of zirconium (600 to 850 0 C), diametral strains of up to 70% were observed over the greater part of their length. A negative-feedback mechanism is suggested, based on the reduction of secondary creep rate following cooling by enhanced heat loss at swelling areas. An approximate analysis based on this mechanism was found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. A computer modeling code is being developed to predict cladding deformation under realistic conditions

  16. Axial distribution of deformation in the cladding of pressurized water reactor fuel rods in a loss-of-coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K.M.; Mann, C.A.; Hindle, E.D.

    1979-12-01

    In the event of a loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor, the cladding of the fuel rods would undergo a temperature excursion while being subject to tensile hoop stress. The deformation behavior of 470-mm lengths of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding has been studied experimentally; under a range of stress levels in the high-alpha range of zirconium (600 to 850/sup 0/C), diametral strains of up to 70% were observed over the greater part of their length. A negative-feedback mechanism is suggested, based on the reduction of secondary creep rate following cooling by enhanced heat loss at swelling areas. An approximate analysis based on this mechanism was found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. A computer modeling code is being developed to predict cladding deformation under realistic conditions.

  17. Multidimensional analysis of fluid flow in the loft cold leg blowdown pipe during a loss-of-coolant experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmie, P.N.; Hofmann, K.R.

    1979-03-01

    A computer analysis of fluid flow in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) cold leg blowdown pipe during a loss-of-coolant experiment (LOCE) was performed using the computer program K-FIX/MOD1. The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the capability of K-FIX/MOD1 to calculate theoretical fluid quantity distributions in the blowdown pipe during a LOCE for possible application to the analysis of LOFT experimental data, the determination of mass flow, or the development of data reduction models. A rectangular section of a portion of the LOFT blowdown pipe containing measurement Station BL-1 was modeled using time-dependent boundary conditions. Fluid quantities were calculated during a simulation of the first 26 s of LOFT LOCE L1-4. Sensitivity studies were made to determine changes in void fractions and velocities resulting from specific changes in the inflow boundary conditions used for this simulation

  18. Analysis of BWR/Mark III drywell failure during degraded core accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    The potential for a hydrogen detonation due to the accumulation of a large amount of hydrogen in the drywell region of a BWR Mark III containment is analyzed. Loss of integrity of the drywell wall causes a complete bypass of the suppression pool and leads to pressurization of the containment building. However, the predicted peak containment pressure does not exceed the estimates of containment failure pressure

  19. Quarterly technical progress report on water reactor safety programs sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, April--June 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-08-01

    Results from the previously conducted Semiscale Mod-1 ECC injection test series were analyzed. Testing in the LOFT counterpart test series was essentially completed, and the steam generator tube rupture test series was begun. Two tests in the alternate ECC injection test series were conducted which included injection of emergency core coolant into the upper plenum through use of the low pressure injection system. The Loss-of-Fluid Test Program successfully completed nonnuclear Loss-of-Coolant Experiment L1-4. A nuclear test, GC 2-3, in the Power Burst Facility Reactor was performed to evaluate the power oscillation method of determining gap conductance and to determine the effects of initial gap size, fill gas composition, and fuel density on the thermal performance of a light water reactor fuel rod. Additional test results were obtained relative to the behavior of irradiated fuel rods during a fast power increase and during a high power film boiling transient. Fuel model development and verification activities continued for the steady state and transient Fuel Rod Analysis Program, FRAP-S and FRAP-T. A computer code known as RELAP4/MOD7 is being developed to provide best-estimate modeling for reflood during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A prediction of the fourth test in the boiling water reactor (BWR) Blowdown/Emergency Core Cooling Program was completed and an uncertainty analysis was completed of experimental steady state stable film boiling data for water flowing vertically upward in round tubes. A new multinational cooperative program to study the behavior of entrained liquid in the upper plenum and cross flow in the core during the reflood phase of a pressurized water reactor LOCA was defined.

  20. Verification of computer code for calculation of coolant radiolysis in the VVER reactor core with regard for boiling in its upper part

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, O.P.; Kabakchi, S.A. [OKB Gidropress, Podolsk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    Code Bora for WWER coolant radiolysis calculation considering single jets boiling in the reactor core top part is developed on the basis of computer codes MOPABA-H2 (radiolysis of aqueous solutions) and SteamRad (radiolysis of vapor). Physico-chemical processes taking place in boiling core coolant are complex and diversified. Still, for the solution of certain problems their simulation can be simplified. The approach of reasonable simplification was used for development of code Bora: mathematical model assumed is purposed for simulation of phenomena only in the area of interest; the number of simulated chemical reactions and particles shall be reasonably minimum; complexity of interphase mass transfer calculation procedure shall be adequate to actually available accuracy of modeling. The analysis of new experimental initial yields of water radiolysis products data and kinetic parameters of elementary chemical reactions with their participation has been carried out. Some changes have been introduced in the mechanism of liquid water and aqueous solutions of ammonia radiolysis have been significantly revised on the basis of this analysis. Examples of the calculations provided for code Bora verification are presented. Despite of very simple simulation of interphase mass transfer, Bora allows to obtain average chemical composition of two-phase coolant at BWR core outlet with the accuracy sufficient for engineering calculations. The report also presents the results of two-phase coolant chemical composition test calculation for reactor core top part coolant boiling in pressurized water reactor. (author)

  1. Development of Methodology for Spent Fuel Pool Severe Accident Analysis Using MELCOR Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won-Tae; Shin, Jae-Uk [RETech. Co. LTD., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Kwang-Il [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The general reason why SFP severe accident analysis has to be considered is that there is a potential great risk due to the huge number of fuel assemblies and no containment in a SFP building. In most cases, the SFP building is vulnerable to external damage or attack. In contrary, low decay heat of fuel assemblies may make the accident processes slow compared to the accident in reactor core because of a great deal of water. In short, its severity of consequence cannot exclude the consideration of SFP risk management. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has performed the consequence studies of postulated spent fuel pool accident. The Fukushima-Daiichi accident has accelerated the needs for the consequence studies of postulated spent fuel pool accidents, causing the nuclear industry and regulatory bodies to reexamine several assumptions concerning beyond-design basis events such as a station blackout. The tsunami brought about the loss of coolant accident, leading to the explosion of hydrogen in the SFP building. Analyses of SFP accident processes in the case of a loss of coolant with no heat removal have studied. Few studies however have focused on a long term process of SFP severe accident under no mitigation action such as a water makeup to SFP. USNRC and OECD have co-worked to examine the behavior of PWR fuel assemblies under severe accident conditions in a spent fuel rack. In support of the investigation, several new features of MELCOR model have been added to simulate both BWR fuel assembly and PWR 17 x 17 assembly in a spent fuel pool rack undergoing severe accident conditions. The purpose of the study in this paper is to develop a methodology of the long-term analysis for the plant level SFP severe accident by using the new-featured MELCOR program in the OPR-1000 Nuclear Power Plant. The study is to investigate the ability of MELCOR in predicting an entire process of SFP severe accident phenomena including the molten corium and concrete reaction. The

  2. Nonlinear dynamic response analysis in piping system for a loss of coolant accident in primary loop of pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiwen; He Feng; Hao Pengfei; Wang Xuefang

    2000-01-01

    Based on the elaborate force and moment analysis with characteristics method and control-volume integrating method for the piping system of primary loop under pressurized water reactor' loss of coolant accident (LOCA) conditions, the nonlinear dynamic response of this system is calculated by the updated Lagrangian formulation (ADINA code). The piping system and virtual underpinning are specially processed, the move displacement of the broken pipe with time is accurately acquired, which is very important and useful for the design of piping system and virtual underpinning

  3. Method of estimating thermal power distribution of core of BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimizu, Koichi

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To accurately and rapidly predict the thermal power of the core of a BWR they reactor at load follow-up operating time. Method: A parameter value corrected from a correction coefficient deciding unit and a xenon density distribution value predicted and calculated from a xenon density distributor are inputted to a thermal power distribution predicting devise, the status amount such as coolant flow rate or the like predetermined at this and next high power operating times is substituted for physical model to predict and calculate the thermal power distribution. The status amount of a nuclear reactor at the time of operating in previous high power corresponding to the next high power operation to be predicted is read from the status amount of the reactor stored in time series manner is a reactor core status memory, and the physical model used in the prediction and calculation of the thermal power distribution at the time of next high power operation is corrected. (Sikiya, K.)

  4. Fundamentals of boiling water reactor (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzola, S.

    1982-01-01

    These lectures on fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are a synthesis of known and established concepts. These lectures are intended to be a comprehensive (even though descriptive in nature) presentation, which would give the basis for a fair understanding of power operation, fuel cycle and safety aspects of the boiling water reactor. The fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are oriented to design and operation. In the first lecture general description of BWR is presented, with emphasis on the reactor physics aspects. A survey of methods applied in fuel and core design and operation is presented in the second lecture in order to indicate the main features of the calculational tools. The third and fourth lectures are devoted to review of BWR design bases, reactivity requirements, reactivity and power control, fuel loading patterns. Moreover, operating limits are reviewed, as the actual limits during power operation and constraints for reactor physics analyses (design and operation). The basic elements of core management are also presented. The constraints on control rod movements during the achieving of criticality and low power operation are illustrated in the fifth lecture. Some considerations on plant transient analyses are also presented in the fifth lecture, in order to show the impact between core and fuel performance and plant/system performance. The last (sixth) lecture is devoted to the open vessel testing during the startup of a commercial BWR. A control rod calibration is also illustrated. (author)

  5. Vent clearing during a simulated loss-of-coolant accident in Mark I boiling-water-reactor pressure-suppression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    The response of the pressure-suspension containment system of Mark I boiling-water reactors to a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is being studied. This response is a design basis for light-water nuclear reactors. Part of the study is being carried out on a 1 / 5 -scale experimental facility that models the pressure-suppression containment system of the Peach Bottom 2 nuclear power plant. The test series reported here focused on the initial or air-clearing phase of a hypothetical LOCA. Measured forces, measured pressures, and the hydrodynamic phenomena (observed with high-speed cameras) show a logical interrelationship

  6. Comparison of the Aerospace Systems Test Reactor loss-of-coolant test data with predictions of the 3D-AIRLOCA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warinner, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper compares the predictions of the revised 3D-AIRLOCA computer code to those data available from the Aerospace Systems Test Reactor's (ASTR's) loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) tests run in 1964. The theoretical and experimental hot-spot temperature responses compare remarkably well. In the thirteen cases studied, the irradiation powers varied from 0.4 to 8.87 MW; the irradiation times were 300, 1540, 1800, and 10 4 s. The degrees of agreement between the data and predictions provide an experimental validation of the 3D-AIRLOCA code

  7. Comparison of the aerospace systems test reactor loss-of-coolant test data with predictions of the 3D-AIRLOCA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warinner, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper compares the predictions of the revised 3D-AIRLOCA computer code to those data available from the Aerospace Systems Test Reactor's (ASTR's) loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) tests run in 1964. The theoretical and experimental hot-spot temperature responses compare remarkably well. In the thirteen cases studied, the irradiation powers varied from 0.4 to 8.87 MW; the irradiation times were 300, 1540, 1800, and 10 4 s. The degrees of agreement between the data and predictions provide an experimental validation of the 3D-AIRLOCA code. (author)

  8. 76 FR 68512 - Carolina Power & Light Company; H. B. Robinson Steam Electric Plant, Unit 2; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... postulated loss-of-coolant accident. Therefore, both of these regulations either state or assume that either... report BAW- 10227(P)(A), Revision1 addressed all of the important aspects of M5 with respect to ECCS... with respect to the loss-of- coolant accident (LOCA) applications. Appendix K, paragraph I.A.5, of 10...

  9. Analysis of unmitigated large break loss of coolant accidents using MELCOR code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescarini, M.; Mascari, F.; Mostacci, D.; De Rosa, F.; Lombardo, C.; Giannetti, F.

    2017-11-01

    In the framework of severe accident research activity developed by ENEA, a MELCOR nodalization of a generic Pressurized Water Reactor of 900 MWe has been developed. The aim of this paper is to present the analysis of MELCOR code calculations concerning two independent unmitigated large break loss of coolant accident transients, occurring in the cited type of reactor. In particular, the analysis and comparison between the transients initiated by an unmitigated double-ended cold leg rupture and an unmitigated double-ended hot leg rupture in the loop 1 of the primary cooling system is presented herein. This activity has been performed focusing specifically on the in-vessel phenomenology that characterizes this kind of accidents. The analysis of the thermal-hydraulic transient phenomena and the core degradation phenomena is therefore here presented. The analysis of the calculated data shows the capability of the code to reproduce the phenomena typical of these transients and permits their phenomenological study. A first sequence of main events is here presented and shows that the cold leg break transient results faster than the hot leg break transient because of the position of the break. Further analyses are in progress to quantitatively assess the results of the code nodalization for accident management strategy definition and fission product source term evaluation.

  10. Thermal mixing characteritics during a postulated PTS event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jae Won; Bang, Young Seok; Seul, Kwang Won; Kim, Hho Jung

    1998-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the characteristics of thermal fluid mixing during a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) under two-phase flow condition using RELAP5 code. The RELAP5 code has been widely used in estimating global system thermal-hydraulic behaviors. However, the RELAP5 is not fully verified for the prediction of thermal mixing phenomena due to its limitation to the multi-dimensional behavior. Therefore, supplementary analysis is required, which can address the performance and limitation of the current RELAP5 code in predicting the thermal mixing. Another objective of this study is to compare the applicable empirical correlation (Theofanous') and the calculation of simple mixing code (REMIX) with one predicted by RELAP5. By those comparisons the capability on PTS thermal mixing of the current RELAP5 can be evaluated. In this study, thermal mixing behavior is analyzed for the task of the international comparative assessment study on PTS (PTS-ICAS) which was proposed by OECD-NEA. Through some preliminary calculations using RELAP5, the boundary conditions relevant to the problem constraints are appropriately specified with some artificial assumptions. As a calculation results, system pressure, downcomer water level, wall heat transfer coefficient, etc., are predicted as suitable for given problem constraints. From the predicted thermal hydraulic behavior, it is shown that the thermal stratification begins to start around 200 seconds after high pressure safety injection. At 400 seconds, the maximum difference in azimuthal temperature distribution at the downcomer due to thermal mixing is predicted about 150 K. Based on the comparison of the current RELAP5 prediction with the Theofanous' correlation and the REMIX calculation, it is found that thermal stratification characteristics predicted by RELAP5 is agreed in qualitative manner to the empirical correlation

  11. Analysis of risk reduction methods for interfacing system LOCAs [loss-of-coolant accidents] at PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoki, G.; Kohut, P.; Fitzpatrick, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) predicted that Interfacing System Loss-of-Coolant Accidents (ISL) events were significant contributors to risk even though they were calculated to be relatively low frequency events. However, there are substantial uncertainties involved in determining the probability and consequences of the ISL sequences. For example, the assumed valve failure modes, common cause contributions and the location of the break/leak are all uncertain and can significantly influence the predicted risk from ISL events. In order to provide more realistic estimates for the core damage frequencies (CDFs) and a reduction in the magnitude of the uncertainties, a reexamination of ISL scenarios at PWRs has been performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory. The objective of this study was to investigate the vulnerability of pressurized water reactor designs to ISLs and identify any improvements that could significantly reduce the frequency/risk of these events

  12. Primary coolant recycling device for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanbe, Mitsuru; Tokiwai, Moriyasu

    1998-01-01

    A primary coolants (liquid sodium) recycling device comprises a plurality of recycling pumps. The recycling pumps are operated while using, as a power source, electric power generated by a thermoelectric power generation system by utilizing heat stored in the coolants. The thermoelectric power generation system comprises a thermo-electric conversion module, heat collecting heat pipes as a high temperature side heat conduction means and heat dissipating pipes as a low temperature side heat conduction means. The heat of coolants is transferred to the surface of the high temperature side of each thermo-electric conversion elements of the thermal power generation system by the heat collecting heat pipes. The heat on the low temperature side of each of the thermo-electric conversion elements is removed by the heat dissipating pipes. Accordingly, temperature difference is caused between both surfaces of the thermo-electric conversion elements. Even upon loss of a main power source due to stoppage of electricity, electric power is generated by utilizing heat of coolants, so that the recycling pumps circulate coolants to cool a reactor core continuously. (I.N.)

  13. Coolant clean up system in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Fumio; Iwami, Hiroshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the amount of main steams and improve the plant heat efficiency by the use of condensated water as coolants for not-regenerative heat exchangers in a coolant clean up system of a nuclear reactor. Constitution: In a coolant clean up system of a nuclear reactor, a portion of condensates is transferred to the shell of a non-regenerative heat exchanger by way of a condensate pump for non-regenerative heat exchanger through a branched pipeway provided to the outlet of a condensate desalter for using the condensates as the coolants for the shell of the heat exchanger and the condensates are then returned to the inlet of a feedwater heater after the heat exchange. The branched flow rate of the condensates is controlled by the flow rate control valve mounted in the pipeway. Condensates passed through the heat exchanger and the condensates not passed through the heat exchanger are mixed and heated in a heater and then fed to the nuclear reactor. In a case where no feedwater is necessary to the nuclear reactor such as upon shutdown of the reactor, the condensates are returned by way of feedwater bypass pipeway to the condensator. By the use of the condensates as the coolants for the heat exchanger, the main steam loss can be decreased and the thermal load for the auxiliary coolant facility can be reduced. (Kawakami, Y.)

  14. Effect of spacer grid mixing vanes on coolant outlet temperature distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raemae, Tommi; Lahtinen, Tuukka; Brandt, Tellervo; Toppila, Timo [Fortum Power and Heat, Fortum (Finland). Nuclear Competence Center

    2012-08-15

    In Loviisa VVER-440-type NPP the coolant outlet temperature of the hot subchannel is constantly monitored during the operation. According to the authority requirement the maximum subchannel outlet temperature must not exceed the saturation temperature. Coolant temperature distribution inside the fuel assembly is affected by the efficiency of the coolant mixing. In order to enhance the coolant mixing the fuel manufacturer is introducing the additional mixing vanes on the fuel bundle spacer grids. In the paper the effect of the different mixing vane modifications is studied with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Goal of the modelling is to find vane modifications with which sufficient mixing is reached with acceptable increase in the spacer grid pressure loss. The results of the studies are discussed in the paper. (orig.)

  15. Transient behaviour of main coolant pump in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delja, A.

    1986-01-01

    A basic concept of PWR reactor coolant pump thermo-hydraulic modelling in transient and accident operational condition is presented. The reactor coolant pump is a component of the nuclear steam supply system which forces the coolant through the reactor and steam generator, maintaining design heat transfer condition. The pump operating conditions have strong influence on the flow and thermal behaviour of NSSS, both in the stationary and nonstationary conditions. A mathematical model of the reactor coolant pump is formed by using dimensionless homologous relations in the four-quadrant regimes: normal pump, turbine, dissipation and reversed flow. Since in some operational regimes flow of mixture, liquid and steam may occur, the model has additional correction members for two-phase homologous relations. Modular concept has been used in developing computer program. The verification is performed on the simulation loss of offsite power transient and obtained results are presented. (author)

  16. Boiling water system of nuclear power plants (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martias Nurdin

    1975-01-01

    About 85% of the world electric generators are light water reactors. It shows that LWR is technologically and economically competitive with other generators. The Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is one of the two systems in the LWR group. The techniques of BWR operation in several countries, especially low and moderate power BWR, are presented. The discussion is made in relation with the interconnection problems of electric installation in developing countries, including Indonesia, where the total electric energy installation is low. The high reliability and great flexibility of the operation of a boiling water reactor for a sufficiently long period are also presented. Component standardization for BWR system is discussed to get a better technological and economical performance for further development. (author)

  17. Synergistic failure of BWR internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A. G.; Chang, T.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) core shrouds and other reactor internals important to safety are experiencing intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has followed the problem, and as part of its investigations, contracted with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to conduct a risk assessment. The overall project objective is to assess the potential consequences and risks associated with the failure of IGSCC-susceptible BWR vessel internals, with specific consideration given to potential cascading and common mode effects. An initial phase has been completed in which background material was gathered and evaluated, and potential accident sequences were identified. A second phase is underway to perform a simplified, quantitative probabilistic risk assessment on a representative high-power BWR/4. Results of the initial study conducted on the jet pumps show that any cascading failures would not result in a significant increase in the core damage frequency. The methodology is currently being extended to other major reactor internals components

  18. Analysis of a main steam isolation value closure anticipated transient without scram in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, T.J.; Pan, C.; Chen, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) could be a major accident sequence with possible core melt and containment damage in a boiling water reactor (BWR). The behavior of a BWR/6 during a main steam isolation valve closure ATWS is investigated using the best-estimate computer program, RETRAN-02. The effects of both makeup coolant and boron injection on the reactor behavior are studied. It is found that the BWR/6 behaves similarly to the BWR/2 and BWR/4. Without boron injection and makeup coolant, the reactor loses its coolant inventory very quickly and the reactor power drops rapidly to ∼ 16% of rated power due to negative void reactivity. With coolant makeup from the high-pressure core spray and the reactor core isolation cooling systems, the rector reaches a quasi-steady-state condition after an initially rapidly changing transient. The dome pressure, downcomer water level, and core power oscillate around a mean value; the average core power is ∼ 15%, which is approximately equal to the power needed to heat and evaporate the subcooled makeup coolant. Lower boron concentrations in the core tend to complicate reactor behavior due to the combination of two competing phenomena: the negative boron reactivity and the positive reactivity caused by a void collapse

  19. A contribution to a theory of two-phase flow with phase change and addition of heat in a coolant channel of a LWR-fuel element during a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaballah, I.

    1978-09-01

    A contribution to a theory of two-phase flow with phase change and addition of heat in a coolant channel of a LWR-fuel element during a loss-of-coolant accident. A theory was developed for the calculation of a dispersed two phase flow with heat addition in a channel with general area change. The theory was used to study different thermodynamic and gasdynamic processes, which may occur during the emergency cooling after a LOCA of a pressurized water reactor. The basic equations were formulated and solved numerically. The heat transfer mechanism was examined. Calculations have indicated that the radiative heat flux component is small compared to the convective component. A drop size spectrum was used in the calculations. Its effect on the heat transfer was investigated. It was found that the calculation with a mean drop diameter gives good results. Significant thermal non-equilibrium has been evaluated. The effect of different operating parameters on the degree of thermal non-equilibrium was studied. The flow and heat transfer in a channel with cross-sectional area change were calculated. It was shown that the channel deformation affects the state properties and the heat transfer along the channel very strongly. (orig.) 891 GL [de

  20. Utilization of the RELAP4/MOD5/SAS code version in loss of coolant accident in the Angra 1 nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabundjian, G.; Freitas, R.L.

    1991-09-01

    A new version of computer code RELAP4/MOD5 was developed to improve the output. The new version, called RELAP4/MOD5/SAS, prints the main variables in graphical form. In order to check the program, a 36 - volume simulation of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident for Angra - I was performed and the results compared to those of a existing 44 - volume simulation showed a satisfactory agreement with a substantial reduction in computing time. (author)

  1. NPP Krsko containment environmental conditions during postulated accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozaric, M.; Cavlina, N.; Spalj, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents NPP Krsko containment pressure and temperature increase during Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and Main Steam Line Break (MSLB). Containment environmental condition calculation was performed by CONTEMPT4/MOD4 computer code. Design accident calculations were performed by RELAP4/MOD6 and RELAP5/MOD1 computer codes. Calculational abilities and application methodology of these codes are presented. The CONTEMPT code is described in more detail. The containment pressure and temperature time distribution are presented as well. (author)

  2. Experimental investigation of material chemical effects on emergency core cooling pump suction filter performance after loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Woon; Park, Byung Gi; Kim, Chang Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Integral tests of head loss through an emergency core cooling filter screen are conducted, simulating reactor building environmental conditions for 30 days after a loss of coolant accident. A test rig with five individual loops each of whose chamber is established to test chemical product formation and measure the head loss through a sample filter. The screen area at each chamber and the amounts of reactor building materials are scaled down according to specific plant condition. A series of tests have been performed to investigate the effects of calcium-silicate, reactor building spray, existence of calcium-silicate with tri-sodium phosphate (TSP), and composition of materials. The results showed that head loss across the chemical bed with even a small amount of calcium-silicate insulation instantaneously increased as soon as TSP was added to the test solution. Also, the head loss across the filter screen is strongly affected by spray duration and the head loss increase is rapid at the early stage, because of high dissolution and precipitation of aluminum and zinc. After passivation of aluminum and zinc by corrosion, the head loss increase is much slowed down and is mainly induced by materials such as calcium, silicon, and magnesium leached from NUKON TM and concrete. Furthermore, it is newly found that the spay buffer agent, tri-sodium phosphate, to form protective coating on the aluminum surface and reduce aluminum leaching is not effective for a large amount of aluminum and a long spray.

  3. A neutronic assessment of the new Spherical Cermets Fuel concept for the BWR-PB reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benchrif, A.; Chetaine, A.; Amsil, H.; Bounakhla, M.

    2010-01-01

    The tri-structural-isotopic (TRISO) fuel directly cooled by boiling light water is used in the boiling water reactor with pebble-bed coated particles (BWR-PB). At the lower coolant temperature, the TRISO fuel particles demonstrate an unacceptable irradiation swelling in the silicon carbide coating layer during a fuel cycle. So, the objectives of this paper, on the one hand is to evaluate some neutronic parameters of a new fuel concept, Spherical Cermets Fuel (SCF), for a BWR-PB reactor. On the other hand, to assess the fact of SCF fuel concept on the fuel assembly lifetime and the burn-up characteristic. All the parameters as well as Infinite Multiplication Factor, Spectrum Index, Instantaneous Conversion Ratio and Neutron Energy Spectrum was calculated then compared for the TRISO and the SCF fuel concept. It can be seen from the assessment of fuel assembly burn-up characteristics that the normalised neutron spectra of all the assembly's parts pointed out a thermal spectrum for the SCF fuel assembly's parts than the TRISO one. The SCF fuel element increase the assembly life time about 6.1 EFPY corresponding 8000 MWd/t. So, the fuel assembly can be operated for a reasonably long period without outside refuelling. The difference in the assembly lifetime might leads to SCF fuel concept adopted, because the geometry and concept of TRISO fuel particles are wholly different to SCF ones. (author)

  4. Novel modular natural circulation BWR design and safety evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Mamoru; Shi, Shanbin; Yang, Won Sik; Wu, Zeyun; Rassame, Somboon; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Introduction of BWR-type natural circulation small modular reactor preliminary design (NMR-50). • Design of long fuel cycle length for the NMR-50. • Design of double passive safety systems for the NMR-50. • RELAP5 analyses of design basis accidents for the NMR-50. - Abstract: The Purdue NMR (Novel Modular Reactor) represents a BWR-type small modular reactor with a significantly reduced reactor pressure vessel (RPV) height. Specifically, it has one third the height of a conventional BWR RPV with an electrical output of 50 MWe. The preliminary design of the NMR-50 including reactor, fuel cycle, and safety systems is described and discussed. The improved neutronics design of the NMR-50 extends the fuel cycle length up to 10 years. The NMR-50 is designed with double passive engineering safety system, which is intended to withstand a prolonged station black out with loss of ultimate heat sink accident such as experienced at Fukushima. In order to evaluate the safety features of the NMR-50, two representative design basis accidents, i.e. main steam line break (MSLB) and bottom drain line break (BDLB), are simulated by using the best-estimate thermal–hydraulic code RELAP5. The RPV water inventory, containment pressure, and the performance of engineering safety systems are investigated for about 33 h after the initiation of the accidents

  5. Identification of the reduced order models of a BWR reactor; Identificacion de modelos de orden reducido de un reactor BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez S, A. [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: augusto@correo.unam.mx

    2004-07-01

    The present work has as objective to analyze the relative stability of a BWR type reactor. It is analyzed that so adaptive it turns out to identify the parameters of a model of reduced order so that this it reproduces a condition of given uncertainty. This will take of a real fact happened in the La Salle plant under certain operation conditions of power and flow of coolant. The parametric identification is carried out by means of an algorithm of recursive least square and an Output Error model (Output Error), measuring the output power of the reactor when the instability is present, and considering that it is produced by a change in the reactivity of the system in the same way that a sign of type step. Also it is carried out an analytic comparison of the relative stability, analyzing two types of answers: the original answer of the uncertainty of the reactor vs. the obtained response identifying the parameters of the model of reduced order, reaching the conclusion that it is very viable to adapt a model of reduced order to study the stability of a reactor, under the only condition to consider that the dynamics of the reactivity is of step type. (Author)

  6. Sensitivity analysis on the zirconium ignition in a postulated SFP loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sanggil; Lee, Jaeyoung; Kim, Sun-ki; Chun, Tae-hyun; Bang, Je-geon

    2016-01-01

    From both SFP complete LOCA experiments, it was observed that zirconium alloy cladding temperature was abruptly increased at a certain point and the cladding was almost fully oxidized. To capture this phenomenon, the concept of air oxidation breakaway model was adopted in MELCOR code. This paper examines this air oxidation breakaway model by comparing the SFP project test data and MELCOR code calculation results by using this model. The air oxidation model parameters are slightly altered to see their sensitivities on the occurrence of the zirconium ignition. Through such sensitivity analysis, limitations of the air oxidation breakaway model are revealed in comparison to the actual zirconium ignition phenomenon during air ingress scenarios. In addition, ways to overcome the identified limitations of the air oxidation model are recommended to estimate better the zirconium ignition phenomenon in SFP sequences. In this paper, the zirconium ignition phenomenon was reviewed and the model to capture this phenomenon was investigated. The model is the air oxidation breakaway model in MELCOR code, and its sensitivity of the model parameters on the time to ignition was studied. From the sensitivity analysis, the slight change of model parameters induce the large variation of the time to ignition. The model itself includes its weakness to fully represent both the air oxidation breakaway phenomenon and the followed zirconium ignition behavior. Furthermore, this model considers no effect of N2 on the cladding degradation and its promoted exothermic heat release

  7. Sensitivity analysis on the zirconium ignition in a postulated SFP loss of coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sanggil; Lee, Jaeyoung [Handong Global Univ., Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun-ki; Chun, Tae-hyun; Bang, Je-geon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    From both SFP complete LOCA experiments, it was observed that zirconium alloy cladding temperature was abruptly increased at a certain point and the cladding was almost fully oxidized. To capture this phenomenon, the concept of air oxidation breakaway model was adopted in MELCOR code. This paper examines this air oxidation breakaway model by comparing the SFP project test data and MELCOR code calculation results by using this model. The air oxidation model parameters are slightly altered to see their sensitivities on the occurrence of the zirconium ignition. Through such sensitivity analysis, limitations of the air oxidation breakaway model are revealed in comparison to the actual zirconium ignition phenomenon during air ingress scenarios. In addition, ways to overcome the identified limitations of the air oxidation model are recommended to estimate better the zirconium ignition phenomenon in SFP sequences. In this paper, the zirconium ignition phenomenon was reviewed and the model to capture this phenomenon was investigated. The model is the air oxidation breakaway model in MELCOR code, and its sensitivity of the model parameters on the time to ignition was studied. From the sensitivity analysis, the slight change of model parameters induce the large variation of the time to ignition. The model itself includes its weakness to fully represent both the air oxidation breakaway phenomenon and the followed zirconium ignition behavior. Furthermore, this model considers no effect of N2 on the cladding degradation and its promoted exothermic heat release.

  8. Reactor Coolant Pump seal issues and their applicability to new reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruger, C.J.; Higgins, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCPs) of various types are used to circulate the primary coolant through the reactor in most reactor designs. RCPs generally contain mechanical seals to limit the leakage of pressurized reactor coolant along the pump drive shaft into the containment. The relatively large number of RCP seal and seal auxiliary system failures experienced at US operating plants during the 1970's and early 1980's raised concerns from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) that gross failures may lead to reactor core uncovery and subsequent core damage. Some seal failure events resulted in a loss of primary coolant to the containment at flow rates greater than the normal makeup capacity of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plants. This is an example of RCP seal failures resulting in a small Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). This paper discusses observed and potential causes of RCP seal failure and the recommendations for limiting the likelihood of a seal induced small LOCA. Issues arising out of the research supporting these recommendations and subsequent public comments by the utility industry on them, serve as lessons learned, which are applicable to the design of new reactor plants

  9. Reactor coolant pump seal issues and their applicability to new reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruger, C.J.; Higgins, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCPs) of various types are used to circulate the primary coolant through the reactor in most reactor designs. RCPs generally contain mechanical seals to limit the leakage of pressurized reactor coolant along the pump drive shaft into the containment. The relatively large number of RCP seal and seal auxiliary system failures experienced at U.S. operating plants during the 1970's and early 1980's raised concerns from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) that gross failures may lead to reactor core uncovery and subsequent core damage. Some seal failure events resulted in a loss of primary coolant to the containment at flow rates greater than the normal makeup capacity of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plants. This is an example of RCP seal failures resulting in a small Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). This paper discusses observed and potential causes of RCP seal failure and the recommendations for limiting the likelihood of a seal induced small LOCA. Issues arising out of the research supporting these recommendations and subsequent public comments by the utility industry on them, serve as lessons learned, which are applicable to the design of new reactor plants

  10. Application of reliability techniques to prioritize BWR [boiling water reactor] recirculation loop welds for in-service inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, G.S.

    1989-12-01

    In January 1988 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Generic Letter 88-01 together with NUREG-0313, Revision 2, ''Technical Report on Material Selection and Processing Guidelines for BWR Coolant Pressure Boundary Piping,'' to implement NRC long-range plans for addressing the problem of stress corrosion cracking in boiling water reactor piping. NUREG-0313 presents guidelines for categorizing BWR pipe welds according to their SCC condition (e.g., presence of known cracks, implementation of measures for mitigating SCC) as well as recommended inspection schedules (e.g., percentage of welds inspected, inspection frequency) for each weld category. NUREG-0313 does not, however, specify individual welds to be inspected. To address this issue, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed two recommended inspection samples for welds in a typical BWR recirculation loop. Using a probabilistic fracture mechanics model, LLNL prioritized loop welds on the basis of estimated leak probabilities. The results of this evaluation indicate that riser welds and bypass welds should be given priority attention over other welds. Larger-diameter welds as a group can be considered of secondary importance compared to riser and bypass welds. A ''blind'' comparison between the probability-based inspection samples and data from actual field inspections indicated that the probabilistic analysis generally captured the welds which the field inspections identified as warranting repair or replacement. Discrepancies between the field data and the analytic results can likely be attributed to simplifying assumptions made in the analysis. The overall agreement between analysis and field experience suggests that reliability techniques -- when combined with historical experience -- represent a sound technical basis on which to define meaningful weld inspection programs. 13 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Computer code HYDRO-ACE for analyzing thermo-hydraulic phenomena in the BWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Kiyoharu; Naito, Yoshitaka

    1979-10-01

    A computer code HYDRO-ACE has been developed for analyzing thermo-hydraulic phenomena in the BWR core under forced or natural circulation of cooling water. The code is composed of two main calculation routines for single channels such as riser, separator, and downcommer and multiple channels such as the reactor core with a heated zone. Functionally the code is divided into many subroutines to be connected straightforwardly, and so that the user can choose a given course freely by simply arranging the subroutines. In the program, void fraction is calculated by Maurer's method, two-phase frictional pressure drop by Maltinelli-Nelson's, and critical heat flux ratio by Hench-Levy's. The coolant flow distributions in the JPDR-II core calculated by the code are in good agreement with those measured. (author)

  12. Consideration of severe accident issues for the General Electric BWR standard plant: Chapter 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtzclaw, K.W.

    1983-01-01

    In early 1982, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) proposed a policy to address severe accident rulemaking on future plants by utilizing standard plant licensing documentation. GE provided appendices to the licensing documentation of its standard plant design, GESSAR II, which address severe accidents for the GE BWR/6 Mark III 238 nuclear island design. The GE submittals discuss the features of the design that prevent severe accidents from leading to core damage or that mitigate the effects of severe accidents should core damage occur. The quantification of the accident prevention and mitigation features, including those incorporated in the design since the accident at Three Mile Island (TMI), is provided by means of a comprehensive probabilistic risk assessment, which provides an analysis of the probability and consequences of postulated severe accidents

  13. Phenomena identification and ranking tables for Westinghouse AP600 small break loss-of-coolant accident, main steam line break, and steam generator tube rupture scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.E.; Fletcher, C.D.; Davis, C.B.

    1997-06-01

    This report revision incorporates new experimental evidence regarding AP600 behavior during small break loss-of-coolant accidents. This report documents the results of Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) efforts for the Westinghouse AP600 reactor. The purpose of this PIRT is to identify important phenomena so that they may be addressed in both the experimental programs and the RELAP5/MOD3 systems analysis computer code. In Revision of this report, the responses of AP600 during small break loss-of-coolant accident, main steam line break, and steam generator tube rupture accident scenarios were evaluated by a committee of thermal-hydraulic experts. Committee membership included Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory staff and recognized thermal-hydraulic experts from outside of the laboratory. Each of the accident scenarios was subdivided into separate, sequential periods or phases. Within each phase, the plant behavior is controlled by, at most, a few thermal-hydraulic processes. The committee identified the phenomena influencing those processes, and ranked ampersand influences as being of high, medium, low, or insignificant importance. The primary product of this effort is a series of tables, one for each phase of each accident scenario, describing the thermal-hydraulic phenomena judged by the committee to be important, and the relative ranking of that importance. The rationales for the phenomena selected and their rankings are provided. This document issue incorporates an update of the small break loss-of-coolant accident portion of the report. This revision is the result of the release of experimental evidence from AP600-related integral test facilities (ROSA/AP600, OSU, and SPES) and thermal-hydraulic expert review. The activities associated with this update were performed during the period from June 1995 through November 1996. 8 refs., 26 figs., 42 tabs

  14. Phenomena identification and ranking tables for Westinghouse AP600 small break loss-of-coolant accident, main steam line break, and steam generator tube rupture scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, G.E.; Fletcher, C.D.; Davis, C.B. [and others

    1997-06-01

    This report revision incorporates new experimental evidence regarding AP600 behavior during small break loss-of-coolant accidents. This report documents the results of Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) efforts for the Westinghouse AP600 reactor. The purpose of this PIRT is to identify important phenomena so that they may be addressed in both the experimental programs and the RELAP5/MOD3 systems analysis computer code. In Revision of this report, the responses of AP600 during small break loss-of-coolant accident, main steam line break, and steam generator tube rupture accident scenarios were evaluated by a committee of thermal-hydraulic experts. Committee membership included Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory staff and recognized thermal-hydraulic experts from outside of the laboratory. Each of the accident scenarios was subdivided into separate, sequential periods or phases. Within each phase, the plant behavior is controlled by, at most, a few thermal-hydraulic processes. The committee identified the phenomena influencing those processes, and ranked & influences as being of high, medium, low, or insignificant importance. The primary product of this effort is a series of tables, one for each phase of each accident scenario, describing the thermal-hydraulic phenomena judged by the committee to be important, and the relative ranking of that importance. The rationales for the phenomena selected and their rankings are provided. This document issue incorporates an update of the small break loss-of-coolant accident portion of the report. This revision is the result of the release of experimental evidence from AP600-related integral test facilities (ROSA/AP600, OSU, and SPES) and thermal-hydraulic expert review. The activities associated with this update were performed during the period from June 1995 through November 1996. 8 refs., 26 figs., 42 tabs.

  15. Rational interpretation of the postulates in plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohua Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is mainly focussed on revisited of the two well-known postulates of plasticity, i.e., the Drucker and the Il’iushin postulate, and it describes their rational interpretation within the framework of irreversible thermodynamics and using exterior calculus. It shows that the Il’iushin and the Drucker postulate is the integral form and local form of the irreversible thermodynamics of plastic deformation, respectively. The Drucker and Il’iushin postulate is equivalent for both soft and hardening materials.

  16. Best-estimate analysis development for BWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, W.A.; Alamgir, M.; Kalra, S.P.; Beckner, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) Program is a three pronged approach to the development of best-estimate analysis capability for BWR systems. An experimental program in the FIST BWR system simulator facility extends the LOCA data base and adds operational transients data. An analytical method development program with the BWR-TRAC computer program extends the modeling of BWR specific components and major interfacing systems, and improves numerical techniques to reduce computer running time. A method qualification program tests TRAC-B against experiments run in the FIST facility and extends the results to reactor system applications. With the completion and integration of these three activities, the objective of a best-estimate analysis capability has been achieved. (author)

  17. Experiments for simulating a great leak in the primary coolant circuit of a PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebig, E.

    1977-01-01

    A loss of coolant accident is to be simulated on a high pressure test rig. The accident is initiated by an externally induced rupture of a pair of rupture-disks installed in a coolant ejection device. Several problems of simulating leaks in the primary coolant circuit of PWR type reactors are dealt with. The selection of appropriate rupture-disks for such experiments is described

  18. BWR AXIAL PROFILE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular axial profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding axial profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR axial profiles is provided in Attachment I

  19. Containment integrity of SEP plants under combined loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, T.; Nelson, T.A.; Chen, P.Y.; Persinko, D.; Grimes, C.

    1984-06-01

    Because the containment structure is the last barrier against the release of radioactivity, an assessment was undertaken to identify the design weaknesses and estimate the margins of safety for the SEP containments under the postulated, combined loading conditions of a safe shutdown earthquake (SSE) and a design basis accident (DBA). The design basis accident is either a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) or a main steam line break (MSLB). The containment designs analyzed consisted of three inverted light-bulb shaped drywells used in boiling water reactor (BWR) systems, and three steel-lined concrete containments and a spherical steel shell used in pressurized water reactor (PWR) systems. These designs cover a majority of the containment types used in domestic operating plants. The results indicate that five of the seven designs are adequate even under current design standards. For the remaining two designs, the possible design weaknesses identified were buckling of the spherical steel shell and over-stress in both the radial and tangential directions in one of the concrete containments near its base

  20. Assumptions used for evaluating the potential radiological consequences of a less of coolant accident for pressurized water reactors - June 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1974-01-01

    Section 50.34 of 10 CFR Part 50 requires that each applicant for a construction permit or operating license provide an analysis and evaluation of the design and performance of structures, systems, and components of the facility with the objective of assessing the risk to public health and safety resulting from operation of the facility. The design basis loss of coolant accident is one of the postulated accidents used to evaluate the adequacy of these structures, systems, and components with respect to the public health and safety. This guide gives acceptable assumptions that may be used in evaluating the radiological consequences of this accident for a pressurized water reactor. In some cases, unusual site characteristics, plant design features, or other factors may require different assumptions which will be considered on an individual case basis. The Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards has been consulted concerning this guide and has concurred in the regulatory position

  1. A comparative neutronic analysis of KALIMER breeder core using Na or Pb-Bi coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, J. W.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, Y. I.

    2000-01-01

    A comparative neutronic study has been conducted on KALIMER breeder core according to the replacement of sodium coolant by Pb-Bi coolant. Since the atomic weight of Pb and Bi is about 9 times heavier than that of Na, the energy loss by neutron colliding with Pb-Bi nucleus will be very small. Therefore, the reactor with Pb-Bi coolant will have a harder neutron spectrum than that with Na coolant. Consequently, the breeding ratio and burnup reactivity swing is expected to be enhanced. In addition, when Pb-Bi coolant is voided, a negative coolant void coefficient can be obtained by the net effects of smaller spectrum hardening and large neutron leakage. As a result, the breeding ratio was increased from 1.18 to 1.23 and burnup reactivity swing was reduced from 631 pcm to 150 pcm. When the coolant in the whole region of active core is voided, the coolant void coefficient was found to be -539 and -264 pcm at BOEC and EOEC, respectively. In the local voided case, the smaller coolant void coefficient was obtained than that of Na coolant. Accordingly, the use of Pb-Bi coolant in KALIMER gives an advantage of higher breeding ratio, smaller burnup reactivity swing and negative coolant void coefficient without any significant degradation of nuclear performance

  2. Technical findings related to Generic Issue 23: Reactor coolant pump seal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruger, C.J.; Luckas, W.J. Jr.

    1989-03-01

    Reactor coolant pumps contain mechanical seals to limit the leakage of pressurized coolant from the reactor coolant system to the containment. These seals have the potential to leak, and a few have degraded and even failed resulting in a small break loss of coolant accident (LOCA). As a result, ''Reactor Coolant Pump Seal Failure,'' Generic Issue 23 was established. This report summarizes the findings of a technical investigation generated as part of the program to resolve this issue. These technical findings address the various fact-finding issue tasks developed for the action plan associated with the generic issue, namely background information on seal failure, evaluation of seal cooling, and mechanical- and maintenance-induced failure mechanisms. 46 refs., 15 figs., 14 tabs

  3. Analyzing the loss of coolant accident in PWR nuclear reactors with elevation change in cold leg by RELAP5/MOD3.2 system code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheshtpaz, H.; Alison, C.

    2006-01-01

    As, the Russian designed VVER-1000 reactor of the Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant by taking into account the change from German technology to that of Russian technology, and with the design of elevation change in the cold legs has been developed; therefore safety assessment of these systems for loss of coolant accident in elevation change in the cold legs and comparison results for non change elevation in the cold legs for a typical reactor (normal design of nuclear reactors) is the main important factor to be considered for the safe operation. In this article, the main objective is the simulation of the loss of coolant accident scenario by the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code in two different cases; first, the elevation change in the cold legs, and the second, non change in it. After comparing and analyzing these two code calculations the results have been generalized for a new design feature of Bushehr reactor. The design and simulation of the elevation change in the cold legs process with RELAP5/MOD3.2 code for PWR reactor is performed for the first time in the country, where it is introducing several important results in this respect

  4. Conception of a model for the description of the rewetting phase of reactor fuel pins following a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinderer, B.; Schuetzle, R.

    1976-10-01

    The aim of the present paper has been the development of a model describing rewetting of fuel rods in the reflood phase after a loss of coolant accident of a reactor. Because a suitable solution to the problem could not be found an appropriate model has been implemented into an IKE computer program for transient, two-dimensional heat conductance for a cylindrical rod. Developing this model experimental results of up-to-date literature were used. Remarkable is that very small meshes are necessary around the rewetting front to calculate the rewetting velocity which is strongly dependent on the quench temperature. (orig.) [de

  5. CNE (central nuclear en Embalse): probabilistic safety study. Loss-of-coolant accidents. Analysis through events sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layral, S.I.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform for the Embalse nuclear power plant, a probabilistic evaluation of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) to identify the risks associated with them and to determine their acceptability in accordance with norms. This study includes all ruptures in the primary system that produce the automatic activation of 'emergency core cooling system'. Three starting events were selected for the probabilistic evaluation: 100% rupture of an input collector; 5% rupture of an input collector; 1.2% rupture of an input collector. At this stage the evaluation is focussed on the identification and quantization of the main failure sequences that follow a LOCA and lead to an uncontrolled reactor state or 'core meltdown'. The most important contribution to the core meltdown due to LOCA is the failure of supplies that are required for the emergency core cooling system. (Author)

  6. GPE-BWR and the containment venting and filtering issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, J.; Santiago, J. de

    1988-01-01

    The Spanish Boiling Water Reactor Owner's Group (GPE-BWR) is formed by three utilities, owning four units: Santa Maria de Garona (46 MWe, BWR3, Mark I containment), Cofrentes (975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) and Valdecaballeros (2x975 MWe, BWR6, Mark III containment) - all of the reactors having been supplied by General Electric. One of the GPE-BWR's several committees is the Safety and Licensing Committee, which follows up the evolution of severe accident topics and particularly the containment venting and filtering issue. In September 1987, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), the Spanish Regulatory Body, asked the GPE-BWR to define its position on the installation of a containment venting system. The GPE-BWR created a Working Group which presented a Report on Containment Venting to the CSN in January 1987 gathered from: the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); some US utilities; and several European countries, especially France, Germany and Sweden. CSN's review of the containment venting Report and the Action Plan proposed by the GPE-BWR finished in April 1988. The conclusion of the Report and the proposed Action Plan take into account the US NRC's identified open items on severe accidents and the R and D programs scheduled to close these items

  7. Failure probability of PWR reactor coolant loop piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, T.; Woo, H.H.; Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.

    1984-02-01

    This paper describes the results of assessments performed on the PWR coolant loop piping of Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering plants. For direct double-ended guillotine break (DEGB), consideration was given to crack existence probability, initial crack size distribution, hydrostatic proof test, preservice inspection, leak detection probability, crack growth characteristics, and failure criteria based on the net section stress failure and tearing modulus stability concept. For indirect DEGB, fragilities of major component supports were estimated. The system level fragility was then calculated based on the Boolean expression involving these fragilities. Indirect DEGB due to seismic effects was calculated by convolving the system level fragility and the seismic hazard curve. The results indicate that the probability of occurrence of both direct and indirect DEGB is extremely small, thus, postulation of DEGB in design should be eliminated and replaced by more realistic criteria

  8. Revisiting the analysis of passive plasma shutdown during an ex-vessel loss of coolant accident in ITER blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivas, J.C.; Dies, J.; Fajarnés, X.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We have repeated the safety analysis for the hypothesis of passive plasma shutdown for beryllium evaporation during an ex-vessel LOCA of ITER first wall, with AINA code. • We have performed a sensitivity analysis over some key parameters that represents uncertainties in physics and engineering, to identify cliff edge effects. • The obtained results for the 500 MW inductive scenario, with an ex-vessel LOCA affecting a third of first wall surface are similar to those of previous studies and point to the possibility of a passive plasma shutdown during this safety case, before a serious damage is inflicted to the ITER wall. • The sensitivity analysis revealed a new scenario potentially damaging for the first wall if we increase fusion power and time delay for impurity transport, and decrease fraction of affected first wall area and initial beryllium fraction in plasma. • After studying the 700 MW inductive scenario, with an ex-vessel LOCA affecting 10% of first wall surface, with 0.5% of Be in plasma and a time delay twice the energy confinement time, it was found that affected area of first wall would melt before a passive plasma shutdown occurs. - Abstract: In this contribution, the analysis of passive safety during an ex-vessel loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in the first wall/shield blanket of ITER has been studied with AINA safety code. In the past, this case has been studied using robust safety arguments, based on simple 0D models for plasma balance equations and 1D models for wall heat transfer. The conclusion was that, after first wall heating up due to the loss of all coolant, the beryllium evaporation in the wall surface would induce a growing impurity flux into core plasma that finally would end in a passive shut down of the discharge. The analysis of plasma-wall transients in this work is based in results from AINA code simulations. AINA (Analyses of IN vessel Accidents) code is a safety code developed at Fusion Energy Engineering

  9. RETRAN analysis of inter-system LOCA within the primary coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangadharan, A.; Pratt, G.F.

    1992-01-01

    One example of an inter-system loss of coolant accident is the failure of the tubing within the primary coolant pump (PCP) thermal barrier heat exchanger. Such a failure would result in the entry of primary coolant into the component cooling water (CCW) system. The primary coolant flowrate through the break would rapidly pressurize the CCW system when the relief valves are too small. The piping in the CCW system at Palisades has a low pressure rating. Failures in this system outside the containment boundary could lead to primary coolant release to the atmosphere. RETRAN-02 was used to perform a simulation of the break in the PCP integral heat exchanger. The model included a detailed nodalization of the Byron-Jackson primary coolant pump internals leading up to the CCW system relief valves. Preliminary studies show the need for increased relief capacity in the CCW system. A case was run using a larger relief valve. Critical flow in the system upstream of the relief valves maintains the pressures in those volumes above the CCW design pressure. The pressures downstream from the relief valves and outside containment will be at or below the design pressure. This paper presents the results of the transient analysis

  10. Aging, Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA), and high potential testing of damaged cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigil, R.A.; Jacobus, M.J.

    1994-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the effects of high potential testing of cables and to assess the survivability of aged and damaged cables under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions. High potential testing at 240 Vdc/mil on undamaged cables suggested that no damage was incurred on the selected virgin cables. During aging and LOCA testing, Okonite ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) cables with a bonded jacket experienced unexpected failures. The failures appear to be primarily related to the level of thermal aging and the presence of a bonded jacket that ages more rapidly than the insulation. For Brand Rex crosslinked polyolefin (XLPO) cables, the results suggest that 7 mils of insulation remaining should give the cables a high probability of surviving accident exposure following aging. The voltage necessary to detect when 7 mils of insulation remain on unaged Brand Rex cables is approximately 35 kVdc. This voltage level would almost certainly be unacceptable to a utility for use as a damage assessment tool. However, additional tests indicated that a 35 kvdc voltage application would not damage virgin Brand Rex cables when tested in water. Although two damaged Rockbestos silicone rubber cables also failed during the accident test, no correlation between failures and level of damage was apparent

  11. Thermal hydraulic analysis of aggressive secondary cooldown in small break loss of coolant accident with total loss of high pressure safety injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, S. J.; Im, H. K.; Yang, J. U.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) has being applied to various fields as a basic technique of Risk-Informed Applications (RIA). To use RIA, the present study focuses on the detailed thermal hydraulic analyses for major accident sequences and success criteria to support a development of PSA model for Korea Standard Nuclear Power plant (KSNP). The primary purpose of the present study is to evaluate the success criteria of Aggressive Secondary Cooldown (ASC) in Small Break Loss Of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) with total loss of High Pressure Safety Injection (HPSI) and to enhance the understanding of related thermal hydraulic behavior and phenomena. The accident scenario was 2 inch coldleg break LOCA without HPSI, with 1/2 Low Pressure Safety Injection (LPSI), and performing ASC limited by 55.6 .deg. C /hr (100 .deg. F/hr) cooldown rate at 15 minute after reactor trip, which successively reaches the LPSI condition for about 1.5hr after starting ASC operation with the Peak Cladding Temperature (PCT) of the hottest rod below the core damage criteria 1204.4 .deg. C (2200 .deg. F). In the present study, more relaxed success criteria than the previous PSA for KSNP could be generated under an assumption that operator should maintain the adequate ASC operation. However, it is necessary to evaluate uncertainties arisen from the related parameters of the ASC operation

  12. Behaviour of the reactivity for BWR fuel cells; Comportamiento de la reactividad para celdas de combustible BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Alonso, G.; Delfin, A.; Vargas, S. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Del Valle G, E., E-mail: galonso@inin.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    In this work the behaviour of the reactivity of a fuel assembly type BWR was studied, the objective is to obtain some expressions that consider the average enrichment of U-235 and the gadolinium concentration like a function of the fuel cells burnt. Also, the applicability of the lineal reactivity model was analyzed for fuel cells type BWR. The analysis was carried out with the CASMO-4 code. (Author)

  13. Technical report on material selection and processing guidelines for BWR [boiling water reactor] coolant pressure boundary piping: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazelton, W.S.; Koo, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    This report provides the technical bases for the NRC staff's revised recommended methods to control the intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of BWR piping. For piping that does not fully comply with the material selection, testing, and processing guideline combinations of this document, varying degrees of augmented inservice inspection are recommended. This revision also includes guidance and NRC staff recommendations (not requirements) regarding crack evaluation and weld overlay repair methods for long-term operation or for continuing interim operation of plants until a more permanent solution is implemented

  14. Hypothetical accident scenario analyses for a 250-MW(t) modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, R.M.; Ball, S.J.; Cleveland, J.C.

    1985-11-01

    This paper describes calculations performed to characterize the inherent safety of a 250-MW(t), 100-MW(e), pebble bed modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design with vertical in-line arrangement (i.e., upflow core with steam generators directly above the core). A variety of postulated accident sequences involving combinations of loss of forced primary coolant (helium) circulation, loss of primary coolant pressurization, and loss of heat sink were studied and were discussed

  15. Passive BWR integral LOCA testing at the Karlstein test facility INKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, Robert [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Wagner, Thomas [AREVA GmbH, Karlstein am Main (Germany); Leyer, Stephan [TH University of Applied Sciences, Deggendorf (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    KERENA is an innovative AREVA GmbH boiling water reactor (BWR)