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Sample records for posterior interosseous nerve

  1. Ultrasonographic findings of posterior interosseous nerve syndrome

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    Kim, You Dong; Ha, Doo Hoe; Lee, Sang Min [Dept. of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ultrasonographic findings associated with posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) syndrome. Approval from the Institutional Review Board was obtained. A retrospective review of 908 patients' sonographic images of the upper extremity from January 2001 to October 2010 revealed 10 patients suspicious for a PIN abnormality (7 male and 3 female patients; mean age of 51.8±13.1 years; age range, 32 to 79 years). The ultrasonographic findings of PIN syndrome, including changes in the PIN and adjacent secondary changes, were evaluated. The anteroposterior diameter of the pathologic PIN was measured in eight patients and the anteroposterior diameter of the contralateral asymptomatic PIN was measured in six patients, all at the level immediately proximal to the proximal supinator border. The size of the pathologic nerves and contralateral asymptomatic nerves was compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Swelling of the PIN proximal to the supinator canal by compression at the arcade of Fröhse was observed in four cases. Swelling of the PIN distal to the supinator canal was observed in one case. Loss of the perineural fat plane in the supinator canal was observed in one case. Four soft tissue masses were noted. Secondary denervation atrophy of the supinator and extensor muscles was observed in two cases. The mean anteroposterior diameter of the pathologic nerves (n=8, 1.79±0.43 mm) was significantly larger than that of the contralateral asymptomatic nerves (n=6, 1.02±0.22 mm) (P=0.003). Ultrasonography provides high-resolution images of the PIN and helps to diagnose PIN syndrome through visualization of its various causes and adjacent secondary changes.

  2. Radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury

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    Bernardo Barcellos Terra

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Fractures of the radial head and radial neck correspond to 1.7-5.4% of all fractures and approximately 30% may present associated injuries. In the literature, there are few reports of radial head fracture with posterior interosseous nerve injury. This study aimed to report a case of radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury. CASE REPORT: A male patient, aged 42 years, sought medical care after falling from a skateboard. The patient related pain and limitation of movement in the right elbow and difficulty to extend the fingers of the right hand. During physical examination, thumb and fingers extension deficit was observed. The wrist extension showed a slight radial deviation. After imaging, it became evident that the patient had a fracture of the radial head that was classified as grade III in the Mason classification. The patient underwent fracture fixation; at the first postoperative day, thumb and fingers extension was observed. Although rare, posterior interosseous nerve branch injury may be associated with radial head fractures. In the present case, the authors believe that neuropraxia occurred as a result of the fracture hematoma and edema.

  3. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy as a complication of friction massage in tennis elbow.

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    Wu, Ya-Ying; Hsu, Wei-Chih; Wang, Han-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    Friction massage is a commonly used physical therapy that is usually safe and without complication. We report an unusual case of posterior interosseous nerve palsy that arose after friction massage. Electrophysiologic findings confirmed a focal neuropathy 4-6 cm distal to the lateral epicondyle. The neurologic symptoms resolved completely 2 mos after discontinuation of friction massage. This case experience broadens the spectrum of etiologies of posterior interosseous nerve palsy. Nerve conduction studies may be a useful adjunct to a thorough physical examination to confirm the diagnosis and is important to prognostic evaluation, if unexplained neurologic symptoms develop after certain physical therapy procedures. Further treatment includes avoiding compression and observation.

  4. Transposition of branches of radial nerve innervating supinator to posterior interosseous nerve for functional reconstruction of finger and thumb extension in 4 patients with middle and lower trunk root avulsion injuries of brachial plexus.

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    Wu, Xia; Cong, Xiao-Bing; Huang, Qi-Shun; Ai, Fang-Xin; Liu, Yu-Tian; Lu, Xiao-Cheng; Li, Jin; Weng, Yu-Xiong; Chen, Zhen-Bing

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the reconstruction of the thumb and finger extension function in patients with middle and lower trunk root avulsion injuries of the brachial plexus. From April 2010 to January 2015, we enrolled in this study 4 patients diagnosed with middle and lower trunk root avulsion injuries of the brachial plexus via imaging tests, electrophysiological examinations, and clinical confirmation. Muscular branches of the radial nerve, which innervate the supinator in the forearm, were transposed to the posterior interosseous nerve to reconstruct the thumb and finger extension function. Electrophysiological findings and muscle strength of the extensor pollicis longus and extensor digitorum communis, as well as the distance between the thumb tip and index finger tip, were monitored. All patients were followed up for 24 to 30 months, with an average of 27.5 months. Motor unit potentials (MUP) of the extensor digitorum communis appeared at an average of 3.8 months, while MUP of the extensor pollicis longus appeared at an average of 7 months. Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) appeared at an average of 9 months in the extensor digitorum communis, and 12 months in the extensor pollicis longus. Furthermore, the muscle strength of the extensor pollicis longus and extensor digitorum communis both reached grade III at 21 months. Lastly, the average distance between the thumb tip and index finger tip was 8.8 cm at 21 months. In conclusion, for patients with middle and lower trunk injuries of the brachial plexus, transposition of the muscular branches of the radial nerve innervating the supinator to the posterior interosseous nerve for the reconstruction of thumb and finger extension function is practicable and feasible.

  5. MR imaging findings of anterior interosseous nerve lesions

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    Dunn, Andrew J. [Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Salonen, David C. [University of Toronto, Toronto Western Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Anastakis, Dimitri J. [University of Toronto, Toronto Western Hospital, Division of Plastic Surgery, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-12-15

    To study and characterise the MR imaging findings of lesions of the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the forearm of ten patients referred to our institution with suspected AIN lesions were retrospectively studied. Five healthy volunteers with normal forearm MRI findings formed a control group. Two musculoskeletal radiologists assessed the forearm musculature for oedema in the distribution of the AIN, median, posterior interosseous and radial nerves on T2-weighted (T2W) fat-saturated sequences. T1-weighted (T1W) images were assessed and graded for the presence of muscle atrophy and fatty involution. Six patients had undergone surgical exploration; five of these had surgically confirmed AIN compression. Four patients had diagnoses other than AIN compression made on imaging features. Of the cases of proven AIN compression, oedema within the pronator quadratus (PQ) muscle was identified in all cases. PQ atrophy and fatty involution were seen in three (43%) surgically confirmed cases. Cases 2 and 3 also demonstrated oedema in the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP)1 and FDP2 muscles. These cases also showed oedema in the flexor-carpi radialis (FCR) and FDP3/FDP4 muscles, respectively. The four cases of non-AIN compression demonstrated muscle oedema patterns that were atypical for the AIN distribution. They included a rupture of the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon, brachial neuritis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and compression of the proximal median nerve. MRI is a useful investigation in the diagnostic workup of AIN syndrome. AIN syndrome is likely when there is diffuse oedema of AIN innervated muscles on T2W fat-saturated images. The most reliable sign of an AIN lesion is oedema within the PQ. Oedema in the flexor carpi radialis, FDP3 and FDP4, although not in the classical distribution of the AIN, does not preclude the diagnosis of AIN syndrome. (orig.)

  6. MR imaging findings of anterior interosseous nerve lesions

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    Dunn, Andrew J.; Salonen, David C.; Anastakis, Dimitri J.

    2007-01-01

    To study and characterise the MR imaging findings of lesions of the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the forearm of ten patients referred to our institution with suspected AIN lesions were retrospectively studied. Five healthy volunteers with normal forearm MRI findings formed a control group. Two musculoskeletal radiologists assessed the forearm musculature for oedema in the distribution of the AIN, median, posterior interosseous and radial nerves on T2-weighted (T2W) fat-saturated sequences. T1-weighted (T1W) images were assessed and graded for the presence of muscle atrophy and fatty involution. Six patients had undergone surgical exploration; five of these had surgically confirmed AIN compression. Four patients had diagnoses other than AIN compression made on imaging features. Of the cases of proven AIN compression, oedema within the pronator quadratus (PQ) muscle was identified in all cases. PQ atrophy and fatty involution were seen in three (43%) surgically confirmed cases. Cases 2 and 3 also demonstrated oedema in the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP)1 and FDP2 muscles. These cases also showed oedema in the flexor-carpi radialis (FCR) and FDP3/FDP4 muscles, respectively. The four cases of non-AIN compression demonstrated muscle oedema patterns that were atypical for the AIN distribution. They included a rupture of the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon, brachial neuritis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and compression of the proximal median nerve. MRI is a useful investigation in the diagnostic workup of AIN syndrome. AIN syndrome is likely when there is diffuse oedema of AIN innervated muscles on T2W fat-saturated images. The most reliable sign of an AIN lesion is oedema within the PQ. Oedema in the flexor carpi radialis, FDP3 and FDP4, although not in the classical distribution of the AIN, does not preclude the diagnosis of AIN syndrome. (orig.)

  7. Interosseous membrane window size for tibialis posterior tendon transfer-Geometrical and MRI analysis.

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    Wagner, Pablo; Ortiz, Cristian; Vela, Omar; Arias, Paul; Zanolli, Diego; Wagner, Emilio

    2016-09-01

    Tibialis posterior (TP) tendon transfer through the interosseous membrane is commonly performed in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In order to avoid entrapment of this tendon, no clear recommendation relative to the interosseous membrane (IOM) incision size has been made. Analyze the TP size at the transfer level and therefore determine the most adequate IOM window size to avoid muscle entrapment. Eleven lower extremity magnetic resonances were analyzed. TP muscle measurements were made in axial views, obtaining the medial-lateral and antero-posterior diameter at various distances from the medial malleolus tip. The distance from the posterior to anterior compartment was also measured. These measurements were applied to a mathematical model to predict the IOM window size necessary to allow an ample TP passage in an oblique direction. The average tendon diameter (confidence-interval) at 15cm proximal to the medial malleolus tip was 19.47mm (17.47-21.48). The deep posterior compartment to anterior compartment distance was 10.97mm (9.03-12.90). Using a mathematical model, the estimated IOM window size ranges from 4.2 to 4.9cm. The IOM window size is of utmost importance in trans-membrane TP transfers, given that if equal or smaller than the transposed tendon oblique diameter, a high entrapment risk exists. A membrane window of 5cm or 2.5 times the size of the tendon diameter should be performed in order to theoretically diminish this complication. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Anterior Interosseous Nerve Neuropraxia Secondary to Shoulder Arthroscopy and Open Subpectoral Long Head Biceps Tenodesis

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    Jeremiah T. Steed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthroscopic rotator cuff tendon repair is a common elective procedure performed by trained orthopaedic surgeons with a relatively low complication rate. Specifically, isolated neuropraxia of the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN is a very rare complication of shoulder arthroscopy. An analysis of peer-reviewed published literature revealed only three articles reporting a total of seven cases that describe this specific complication following standard shoulder arthroscopic procedures. This article reports on three patients diagnosed with AIN neuropraxia following routine shoulder arthroscopy done by a single surgeon within a three-year period. All three patients also underwent open biceps tenodesis immediately following completion of the arthroscopic procedures. The exact causal mechanism of AIN neuropraxia following shoulder arthroscopy with biceps tenodesis is not known. This case report reviews possible mechanisms with emphasis on specific factors that make a traction injury the most likely etiology in these cases. We critically analyze our operating room setup and patient positioning practices in light of the existing biomechanical and cadaveric research to propose changes to our standard practices that may help to reduce the incidence of this specific postoperative complication in patients undergoing elective shoulder arthroscopy with biceps tenodesis.

  9. Strain Distribution in the Anterior Inferior Tibiofibular Ligament, Posterior Inferior Tibiofibular Ligament, and Interosseous Membrane Using Digital Image Correlation.

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    Xu, Daorong; Wang, Yibei; Jiang, Chunyu; Fu, Maoqing; Li, Shiqi; Qian, Lei; Sun, Peidong; Ouyang, Jun

    2018-05-01

    Ligament repair and augmentation techniques can stabilize syndesmosis injuries. However, little is known about the mechanical behavior of syndesmotic ligaments. The aim of this study was to analyze full-field strain, strain trend under foot rotation, and subregional strain differences of the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL), posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (PITFL), and interosseous membrane (IOM). Eleven fresh-frozen lower limbs were dissected to expose the AITFL, PITFL, and IOM. The foot underwent rotation from 0° to 25° internal and 35° external, with 3 ankle positions (neutral, 15° dorsiflexion, and 25° plantarflexion) and a vertical load of 430 N. Ligament strain was recorded using digital image correlation. The mean strain on the AITFL with 35° external rotation was greater in the proximal portion compared with distal portion in the neutral position ( P = .009) and dorsiflexion ( P = .003). The mean strain in the tibial insertion and midsubstance near tibial insertion were greater when compared with other regions ( P = .018 and P = .009). The subregions of mean strain in the PITFL and IOM groups were not significantly different. The strain trend of AITFL, PITFL, and IOM showed common transformation, just when the foot was externally rotated. The findings of this study show that a significantly high strain was observed on the proximal part and the midsubstance near the Chaput tubercle of the AITFL when the ankle was externally rotated. All 3 ligaments resisted the torque in the syndesmosis by external rotation of the foot. This study allows for better understanding of the mechanical behavior of the syndesmosis ligaments, which could influence the repair technique and AITFL augmentation techniques.

  10. Effect of Electrothermal Treatment on Nerve Tissue Within the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex, Scapholunate, and Lunotriquetral Interosseous Ligaments.

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    Pirolo, Joseph M; Le, Wei; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of thermal treatment on neural tissue in the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL), and lunotriquetral interosseous ligament (LTIL). The intact TFCC, SLIL, and LTIL were harvested from cadaveric specimens and treated with a radiofrequency probe as would be performed intraoperatively. Slides were stained using a triple-stain technique for neurotrophin receptor p75, pan-neuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole for neural identification. Five TFCC, 5 SLIL, and 4 LTIL specimens were imaged with fluorescence microscopy. Imaging software was used to measure fluorescence signals and compare thermally treated areas with adjacent untreated areas. A paired t test was used to compare treated versus untreated areas. P < .05 was considered significant. For the TFCC, a mean of 94.9% ± 2.7% of PGP 9.5-positive neural tissue was ablated within a mean area of 11.7 ± 2.5 mm(2) (P = .02). For the SLIL treated from the radiocarpal surface, 97.4% ± 1.0% was ablated to a mean depth of 2.4 ± 0.3 mm from the surface and a mean horizontal spread of 3.4 ± 0.5 mm (P = .01). For the LTIL, 96.0% ± 1.5% was ablated to a mean depth of 1.7 ± 0.7 mm and a mean horizontal spread of 2.6 ± 1.0 mm (P = .02). Differences in the presence of neural tissue between treated areas and adjacent untreated areas were statistically significant for all specimens. Our study confirms elimination of neuronal markers after thermal treatment of the TFCC, SLIL, and LTIL in cadaveric specimens. This effect penetrates below the surface to innervated collagen tissue that is left structurally intact after treatment. Electrothermal treatment as commonly performed to treat symptomatic SLIL, LTIL, and TFCC tears eliminates neuronal tissue in treated areas and may function to relieve pain through a denervation effect. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by

  11. Anatomical relationship between the optic nerve and posterior paranasal sinuses on ostiomeatal unit CT

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    Cho, June Il; Kim, Hong In; Seol, Hae Young; Lee, Nam Joon; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Cha, In Ho

    1997-01-01

    To determine the anatomic variations that can lead to optic nerve damage during the sugical treatment of posterior paranasal sinus lesions two hundred optic nerves of 100 persons were examined using ostiomeatal unit CT(OMU CT). The anatomical features of this nerve and posterior paranasal sinuses were classified into four types:the optic nerve adjacent to the sphenoid sinus without indentation of the sinus wall (type 1);the optic nerve adjacent to the sphenoid sinus, causing indentation of the sinus wall (type 2);the optic nerve passing through the sphenoid sinus (type 3);and the optic nerve adjacent to the sphenoid sinus and posterior ethmoid sinus (type 4). Bony dehiscence around the optic nerve and pneumatization of the anterior clinoid process were also evaluated. The anatomical classification of the optic nerve and posterior paranasal sinuses was as follows:type 1, 1326(66%); type 2, 60(30%); type 3, 6(3%), and type 4, 2(1%). Bony dehiscence around the optic nerve had developed in 58 cases (29%) and pneumatization of the anterior clinoid process in 13(6.5%). These conditions were most common in type 3 optic nerve, and second most common in type 2. The 2 and 3 optic nerves, bony dehiscence around the optic nerve and pneumatization of the anterior clinoid process are the anatomic variations that can lead to optic nerve damage during the surgical treatment of posterior paranasal sinus lesions. To prevent optic nerve damage, these factors should be carefully evaluated by OMU CT

  12. Arterial relationships to the nerves and some rigid structures in the posterior cranial fossa.

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    Surchev, N

    2008-09-01

    The close relationships between the cranial nerves and the arterial vessels in the posterior cranial fossa are one of the predisposing factors for artery-nerve compression. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships of the vertebral and basilar arteries to some skull and dural structures and the nerves in the posterior cranial fossa. For this purpose, the skull bases and brains of 70 cadavers were studied. The topographic relationships of the vertebral and basilar arteries to the cranial nerves in the posterior cranial fossa were studied and the distances between the arteries and some osseous formations were measured. The most significant variations in arterial position were registered in the lower half of the basilar artery. Direct contact with an artery was established for the hypoglossal canal, jugular tubercle, and jugular foramen. The results reveal additional information about the relationships of the nerves and arteries to the skull and dural formations in the posterior cranial fossa. New quantitative information is given to illustrate them. The conditions for possible artery-nerve compression due to arterial dislocation are discussed and two groups (lines) of compression points are suggested. The medial line comprises of the brain stem points, usually the nerve root entry/exit zone. The lateral line includes the skull eminences, on which the nerves lie, or skull and dural foramina through which they exit the cranial cavity. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Posterior fossa gangliocytoma with facial nerve invasion: case report

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    Koerbel Andrei

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A 5 year-old boy with a cerebellar gangliocytoma with a peripheral right facial paresis and ataxia is presented. His MRI showed a heterogenous, diffuse lesion, isointense on T1 and hyperintense on T2-weigthed sequences, involving the right cerebellar hemisphere with direct extension into the right facial nerve. The present case is the first description of a gangliocytoma with direct facial nerve invasion, as demonstrated for the facial nerve paresis and supported by MRI and surgical inspection.

  14. Unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies associated with posterior fossa exploration surgery.

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    Khalil, Ayman; Clerkin, James; Mandiwanza, Tafadzwa; Green, Sandra; Javadpour, Mohsen

    2016-03-06

    Multiple cranial nerves palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment is a rare clinical presentation. This case report describes a young man who developed a unilateral abducens and bilateral facial nerve palsies following a posterior fossa exploration confined to an extradural compartment. There are different theories to explain this presentation, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. We propose that this patient cranial nerve palsies developed following cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, potentially as a consequence of rapid change in CSF dynamics. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016.

  15. The First Experience of Triple Nerve Transfer in Proximal Radial Nerve Palsy.

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    Emamhadi, Mohammadreza; Andalib, Sasan

    2018-01-01

    Injury to distal portion of posterior cord of brachial plexus leads to palsy of radial and axillary nerves. Symptoms are usually motor deficits of the deltoid muscle; triceps brachii muscle; and extensor muscles of the wrist, thumb, and fingers. Tendon transfers, nerve grafts, and nerve transfers are options for surgical treatment of proximal radial nerve palsy to restore some motor functions. Tendon transfer is painful, requires a long immobilization, and decreases donor muscle strength; nevertheless, nerve transfer produces promising outcomes. We present a patient with proximal radial nerve palsy following a blunt injury undergoing triple nerve transfer. The patient was involved in a motorcycle accident with complete palsy of the radial and axillary nerves. After 6 months, on admission, he showed spontaneous recovery of axillary nerve palsy, but radial nerve palsy remained. We performed triple nerve transfer, fascicle of ulnar nerve to long head of the triceps branch of radial nerve, flexor digitorum superficialis branch of median nerve to extensor carpi radialis brevis branch of radial nerve, and flexor carpi radialis branch of median nerve to posterior interosseous nerve, for restoration of elbow, wrist, and finger extensions, respectively. Our experience confirmed functional elbow, wrist, and finger extensions in the patient. Triple nerve transfer restores functions of the upper limb in patients with debilitating radial nerve palsy after blunt injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Chronic Localized Back Pain Due to Posterior Cutaneous Nerve Entrapment Syndrome (POCNES): A New Diagnosis.

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    Boelens, Oliver B; Maatman, Robert C; Scheltinga, Marc R; van Laarhoven, Kees; Roumen, Rudi M

    2017-03-01

    Most patients with chronic back pain suffer from degenerative thoracolumbovertebral disease. However, the following case illustrates that a localized peripheral nerve entrapment must be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic back pain. We report the case of a 26-year-old woman with continuous excruciating pain in the lower back area. Previous treatment for nephroptosis was to no avail. On physical examination the pain was present in a 2 x 2 cm area overlying the twelfth rib some 4 cm lateral to the spinal process. Somatosensory testing using swab and alcohol gauze demonstrated the presence of skin hypo- and dysesthesia over the painful area. Local pressure on this painful spot elicited an extreme pain response that did not irradiate towards the periphery. These findings were highly suggestive of a posterior version of the anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES), a condition leading to a severe localized neuropathic pain in anterior portions of the abdominal wall. She demonstrated a beneficial albeit temporary response after lidocaine infiltration as dictated by an established diagnostic and treatment protocol for ACNES. She subsequently underwent a local neurectomy of the involved superficial branch of the intercostal nerve. This limited operation had a favorable outcome resulting in a pain-free return to normal activities up to this very day (follow-up of 24 months).We propose to name this novel syndrome "posterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome" (POCNES). Each patient with chronic localized back pain should undergo simple somatosensory testing to detect the presence of overlying skin hypo- and dysesthesia possibly reflecting an entrapped posterior cutaneous nerve.Key words: Chronic pain, back pain, posterior cutaneous nerve entrapment, peripheral nerve entrapment, surgical treatment for pain, anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment.

  17. Surface Projection of Interosseous Foramen of the Leg: Cadaver Study

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    Eric Arguello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study was conducted to identify the surface projection of the interosseous foramen and associated structures of the proximal leg using the average clinician’s thumb width as a quick measurement to assist in differential diagnosis and treatment. Methods. Twelve cadavers (5 males and 7 females, age range = 51–91 years, and mean age = 76.9 were dissected for analysis. Location and size of interosseous foramen, location of anterior tibial artery, location of deep fibular nerve, and corresponding arterial branches were measured and converted into thumb widths. Results. Mean thumb width measured among the cadavers was 17.94±3.9 mm. The interosseous foramen measured was approximately 1 thumb width vertically (18.47±3.0 mm and 1/2 thumb width horizontally (7.32±2.1 mm and was located approximately 1 thumb width distally to the tibial tuberosity (20.81±6.8 mm and 2 thumb widths (37.47±4.7 mm lateral to the tibial ridge. The anterior tibial artery and deep fibular nerve converged approximately 4 thumb widths (74.31±14.8 mm inferior to the tibial tuberosity and 2 thumb widths (33.46±4.9 mm lateral to the tibial ridge. Conclusion. Clinicians may identify anatomical structures of the proximal leg with palpation using the thumb width for measurement.

  18. High-resolution MRI of cranial nerves in posterior fossa at 3.0 T.

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    Guo, Zi-Yi; Chen, Jing; Liang, Qi-Zhou; Liao, Hai-Yan; Cheng, Qiong-Yue; Fu, Shui-Xi; Chen, Cai-Xiang; Yu, Dan

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the influence of high-resolution imaging obtainable with the higher field strength of 3.0 T on the visualization of the brain nerves in the posterior fossa. In total, 20 nerves were investigated on MRI of 12 volunteers each and selected for comparison, respectively, with the FSE sequences with 5 mm and 2 mm section thicknesses and gradient recalled echo (GRE) sequences acquired with a 3.0-T scanner. The MR images were evaluated by three independent readers who rated image quality according to depiction of anatomic detail and contrast with use of a rating scale. In general, decrease of the slice thickness showed a significant increase in the detection of nerves as well as in the image quality characteristics. Comparing FSE and GRE imaging, the course of brain nerves and brainstem vessels was visualized best with use of the three-dimensional (3D) pulse sequence. The comparison revealed the clear advantage of a thin section. The increased resolution enabled immediate identification of all brainstem nerves. GRE sequence most distinctly and confidently depicted pertinent structures and enables 3D reconstruction to illustrate complex relations of the brainstem. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High-resolution MRI of cranial nerves in posterior fossa at 3.0 T

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-Yi Guo; Jing Chen; Qi-Zhou Liang; Hai-Yan Liao; Qiong-Yue Cheng; Shui-Xi Fu; Cai-Xiang Chen; Dan Yu

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the influence of high-resolution imaging obtainable with the higher field strength of3.0T on the visualization of the brain nerves in the posterior fossa.Methods:In total,20 nerves were investigated onMRI of12 volunteers each and selected for comparison, respectively, with theFSE sequences with5 mm and2 mm section thicknesses and gradient recalled echo(GRE) sequences acquired with a3.0-T scanner.TheMR images were evaluated by three independent readers who rated image quality according to depiction of anatomic detail and contrast with use of a rating scale.Results:In general, decrease of the slice thickness showed a significant increase in the detection of nerves as well as in the image quality characteristics. ComparingFSE andGRE imaging, the course of brain nerves and brainstem vessels was visualized best with use of the three-dimensional(3D) pulse sequence.Conclusions:The comparison revealed the clear advantage of a thin section.The increased resolution enabled immediate identification of all brainstem nerves.GRE sequence most distinctly and confidently depicted pertinent structures and enables3D reconstruction to illustrate complex relations of the brainstem.

  20. Retrospective comparison of three-dimensional imaging sequences in the visualization of posterior fossa cranial nerves.

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    Ors, Suna; Inci, Ercan; Turkay, Rustu; Kokurcan, Atilla; Hocaoglu, Elif

    2017-12-01

    To compare efficancy of three-dimentional SPACE (sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolutions) and CISS (constructive interference in steady state) sequences in the imaging of the cisternal segments of cranial nerves V-XII. Temporal MRI scans from 50 patients (F:M ratio, 27:23; mean age, 44.5±15.9 years) admitted to our hospital with vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had both CISS and SPACE sequences. Quantitative analysis of SPACE and CISS sequences was performed by measuring the ventricle-to-parenchyma contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Qualitative analysis of differences in visualization capability, image quality, and severity of artifacts was also conducted. A score ranging 'no artefact' to 'severe artefacts and unreadable' was used for the assessment of artifacts and from 'not visualized' to 'completely visualized' for the assesment of image quality, respectively. The distribution of variables was controlled by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Samples t-test and McNemar's test were used to determine statistical significance. Rates of visualization of posterior fossa cranial nerves in cases of complete visualization were as follows: nerve V (100% for both sequences), nerve VI (94% in SPACE, 86% in CISS sequences), nerves VII-VIII (100% for both sequences), IX-XI nerve complex (96%, 88%); nerve XII (58%, 46%) (p<0.05). SPACE sequences showed fewer artifacts than CISS sequences (p<0.002). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. "In Situ Vascular Nerve Graft" for Restoration of Intrinsic Hand Function: An Anatomical Study.

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    Mozaffarian, Kamran; Zemoodeh, Hamid Reza; Zarenezhad, Mohammad; Owji, Mohammad

    2018-06-01

    In combined high median and ulnar nerve injury, transfer of the posterior interosseous nerve branches to the motor branch of the ulnar nerve (MUN) is previously described in order to restore intrinsic hand function. In this operation a segment of sural nerve graft is required to close the gap between the donor and recipient nerves. However the thenar muscles are not innervated by this nerve transfer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the superficial radial nerve (SRN) can be used as an "in situ vascular nerve graft" to connect the donor nerves to the MUN and the motor branch of median nerve (MMN) at the same time in order to address all denervated intrinsic and thenar muscles. Twenty fresh male cadavers were dissected in order to evaluate the feasibility of this modification of technique. The size of nerve branches, the number of axons and the tension at repair site were evaluated. This nerve transfer was technically feasible in all specimens. There was no significant size mismatch between the donor and recipient nerves Conclusions: The possible advantages of this modification include innervation of both median and ulnar nerve innervated intrinsic muscles, preservation of vascularity of the nerve graft which might accelerate the nerve regeneration, avoidance of leg incision and therefore the possibility of performing surgery under regional instead of general anesthesia. Briefly, this novel technique is a viable option which can be used instead of conventional nerve graft in some brachial plexus or combined high median and ulnar nerve injuries when restoration of intrinsic hand function by transfer of posterior interosseous nerve branches is attempted.

  2. Recovery of Third Nerve Palsy after Endovascular Packing of Internal Carotid-Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavilio, N.; Pisani, R.; Rivano, C.; Testa, V.; Spaziante, R.; Rosa, M.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Endovascular packing of intracranial aneurysm with preservation of the parent vessel has become in many cases a valid alternative to surgical clipping. Regression of oculomotor disorders after clipping of internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (ICA-PCoA) aneurysms has been well assessed. This report focuses on the reversal of third nerve palsy after endovascular packing of ICA-PCoA aneurysms. To this end, clinical appearances, neuroradiological features, and endovascular interventional procedures of six treated patient are reported and discussed in the light of the very few previous case observations found in the literature. Results indicate that endovascular packing of ICA-PCoA aneurysms may produce effective recovery of correlated third nerve dysfunction. PMID:20667199

  3. Oculomotor nerve palsy by posterior communicating artery aneurysms: influence of surgical strategy on recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güresir, Erdem; Schuss, Patrick; Seifert, Volker; Vatter, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    Resolution of oculomotor nerve palsy (ONP) after clipping of posterior communicating artery (PCoA) aneurysms has been well documented. However, whether additional decompression of the oculomotor nerve via aneurysm sac dissection or resection is superior to pure aneurysm clipping is the subject of much debate. Therefore, the objective in the present investigation was to analyze the influence of surgical strategy--specifically, clipping with or without aneurysm dissection--on ONP resolution. Between June 1999 and December 2010, 18 consecutive patients with ruptured and unruptured PCoA aneurysms causing ONP were treated at the authors' institution. Oculomotor nerve palsy was evaluated on admission and at follow-up. The electronic database MEDLINE was searched for additional data in published studies of PCoA aneurysms causing ONP. Two reviewers independently extracted data. Overall, 8 studies from the literature review and 6 patients in the current series (121 PCoA aneurysms) met the study inclusion criteria. Ninety-four aneurysms were treated with simple aneurysm neck clipping and 27 with clipping plus aneurysm sac decompression. The surgical strategy, simple aneurysm neck clipping versus clipping plus oculomotor nerve decompression, had no effect on full ONP resolution on univariate (p = 0.5) and multivariate analyses. On multivariate analysis, patients with incomplete ONP at admission were more likely to have full resolution of the palsy than were those with complete ONP at admission (p = 0.03, OR = 4.2, 95% CI 1.1-16). Data in the present study indicated that ONP caused by PCoA aneurysms improves after clipping without and with oculomotor nerve decompression. The resolution of ONP is inversely associated with the initial severity of ONP.

  4. MRI-guided cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve for the treatment of neuropathy-mediated sitting pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Dharmdev H.; Thawait, Gaurav K.; Fritz, Jan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Del Grande, Filippo [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Servizio di Radiologia, Lugano, Ticino (Switzerland)

    2017-07-15

    Neuropathy of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve may manifest as pain and paresthesia in the skin over the inferior buttocks, posterior thigh, and popliteal region. Current treatment options include physical and oral pain therapy, perineural injections, and surgical neurectomy. Perineural steroid injections may provide short-term pain relief; however, to our knowledge, there is currently no minimally invasive denervation procedure for sustained pain relief that could serve as an alternative to surgical neurectomy. Percutaneous cryoablation of nerves is a minimally invasive technique that induces a sustained nerve conduction block through temporary freezing of the neural layers. It can result in long-lasting pain relief, but has not been described for the treatment of neuropathy-mediated PFCN pain. We report a technique of MR-guided cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve resulting in successful treatment of PFCN-mediated sitting pain. Cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve seems a promising, minimally invasive treatment option that deserves further investigation. (orig.)

  5. MRI-guided cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve for the treatment of neuropathy-mediated sitting pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Dharmdev H.; Thawait, Gaurav K.; Fritz, Jan; Del Grande, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathy of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve may manifest as pain and paresthesia in the skin over the inferior buttocks, posterior thigh, and popliteal region. Current treatment options include physical and oral pain therapy, perineural injections, and surgical neurectomy. Perineural steroid injections may provide short-term pain relief; however, to our knowledge, there is currently no minimally invasive denervation procedure for sustained pain relief that could serve as an alternative to surgical neurectomy. Percutaneous cryoablation of nerves is a minimally invasive technique that induces a sustained nerve conduction block through temporary freezing of the neural layers. It can result in long-lasting pain relief, but has not been described for the treatment of neuropathy-mediated PFCN pain. We report a technique of MR-guided cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve resulting in successful treatment of PFCN-mediated sitting pain. Cryoablation of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve seems a promising, minimally invasive treatment option that deserves further investigation. (orig.)

  6. Resolution of Oculomotor Nerve Palsy Secondary to Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms: Comparison of Clipping and Coiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, D Jay; Lovasik, Brendan P; McCracken, Courtney E; Caplan, Justin M; Turan, Nefize; Nogueira, Raul G; Cawley, C Michael; Dion, Jacques E; Tamargo, Rafael J; Barrow, Daniel L; Pradilla, Gustavo

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have attempted to determine the best treatment for oculomotor nerve palsy (ONP) secondary to posterior communicating artery (PCoA) aneurysms, but have been limited by small sample sizes and limited treatment. To analyze the treatment of ONP secondary to PCoA with both coiling and clipping in ruptured and unruptured aneurysms. Data from 2 large academic centers was retrospectively collected over 22 years, yielding a total of 93 patients with ONP secondary to PCoA aneurysms. These patients were combined with 321 patients from the literature review for large data analyses. Onset symptoms, recovery, and time to resolution were evaluated with respect to treatment and aneurysm rupture status. For all patients presenting with ONP (n = 414) 56.6% of those treated with microsurgical clipping made a full recovery vs 41.5% of those treated with endovascular coil embolization (P = .02). Of patients with a complete ONP (n = 229), full recovery occurred in 47.3% of those treated with clipping but in only 20% of those undergoing coiling (P = .01). For patients presenting with ruptured aneurysms (n = 130), full recovery occurred in 70.9% compared with 49.3% coiled patients (P = .01). Additionally, although patients with full ONP recovery had a median time to treatment of 4 days, those without full ONP recovery had a median time to treatment of 7 days (P = .01). Patients with ONP secondary to PCoA aneurysms treated with clipping showed higher rates of full ONP resolution than patients treated with coil embolization. Larger prospective studies are needed to determine the true potential of recovery associated with each treatment. EUH, Emory University HospitalIQR, interquartile rangeJHU, Johns Hopkins UniversitymRS, modified Rankin ScaleONP, oculomotor nerve palsyPCoA, posterior communicating arterySAH, subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  7. Inhibition of micturition reflex by activation of somatic afferents in posterior femoral cutaneous nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Changfeng; Shen, Bing; Mally, Abhijith D; Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Shouguo; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C

    2012-10-01

    This study determined if activation of somatic afferents in posterior femoral cutaneous nerve (PFCN) could modulate the micturition reflex recorded under isovolumetric conditions in α-chloralose anaesthetized cats. PFCN stimulation inhibited reflex bladder activity and significantly (P acid (AA). The optimal frequency for PFCN stimulation-induced bladder inhibition was between 3 and 10 Hz, and a minimal stimulation intensity of half of the threshold for inducing anal twitching was required. Bilateral pudendal nerve transection eliminated PFCN stimulation-induced anal twitching but did not change the stimulation-induced bladder inhibition, excluding the involvement of pudendal afferent or efferent axons in PFCN afferent inhibition.Mechanical or electrical stimulation on the skin surface in the PFCN dermatome also inhibited bladder activity. Prolonged (2 × 30 min) PFCN stimulation induced a post-stimulation inhibition that persists for at least 2 h. This study revealed a new cutaneous-bladder reflex activated by PFCN afferents. Although the mechanisms and physiological functions of this cutaneous-bladder reflex need to be further studied, our data raise the possibility that stimulation of PFCN afferents might be useful clinically for the treatment of overactive bladder symptoms.

  8. Surgical anatomy of the radial nerve at the elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, M; Telera, S; Tiengo, C; Stecco, C; Macchi, V; Porzionato, A; Vigato, E; Parenti, A; De Caro, R

    2009-02-01

    An anatomical study of the brachial portion of the radial nerve with surgical implications is proposed. Thirty specimens of arm from 20 fresh cadavers (11 male, 9 female) were used to examine the topographical relations of the radial nerve with reference to the following anatomical landmarks: acromion angle, medial and lateral epicondyles, point of division between the lateral and long heads of the triceps brachii, lateral intermuscular septum, site of division of the radial nerve into its superficial and posterior interosseous branches and entry and exit point of the posterior interosseous branch into the supinator muscle. The mean distances between the acromion angle and the medial and lateral levels of crossing the posterior aspect of the humerus were 109 (+/-11) and 157 (+/-11) mm, respectively. The mean length and calibre of the nerve in the groove were 59 (+/-4) and 6 (+/-1) mm, respectively. The division of the lateral and long heads of the triceps was found at a mean distance of 126 (+/-13) mm from the acromion angle. The mean distances between the lateral point of crossing the posterior aspect of the humerus and the medial and lateral epicondyles were 125 (+/-13) and 121 (+/-13) mm, respectively. The mean distance between the lateral point of crossing the posterior aspect of the humerus and the entry point in the lateral intermuscular septum (LIS) was 29 (+/-6) mm. The mean distances between the entry point of the nerve in the LIS and the medial and lateral epicondyles were 133 (+/-14) and 110 (+/-23) mm, respectively. Our study provides reliable and objective data of surgical anatomy of the radial nerve which should be always kept in mind by surgeons approaching to the surgery of the arm, in order to avoid iatrogenic injuries.

  9. Entrapment of the Martin-Gruber branch of median nerve in the forearm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Vinod Ranade

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of a dual neuro-vascular variation, which was observed in the right extremity of male cadaver. About an inch inferior to the elbow joint, three branches arose from the median nerve. These were the anterior interosseous branch, a Martin-Gruber branch (MGB and a muscular branch. The MGB coursed infero-medially to join with the ulnar nerve by running posterior to the ulnar artery. It was surprising to observe that the MGB passed between the ulnar artery and its venae comitantes. There was an acute angulation of the MGB here, suggesting entrapment at this site.

  10. Superior perioperative analgesia with combined femoral-obturator-sciatic nerve block in comparison with posterior lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block for ACL reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareka, Metaxia; Hantes, Michael; Arnaoutoglou, Eleni; Vretzakis, George

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled study is to compare and evaluate the intraoperative and post-operative outcome of PLPS nerve block and that of femoral, obturator and sciatic (FOS) nerve block as a method of anaesthesia, in performing ACL reconstruction. Patients referred for elective arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using hamstring autograft were divided in two groups. The first group received combined femoral-obturator-sciatic nerve block (FOS Group) under dual guidance, whereas the second group received posterior lumbar plexus block under neurostimulation and sciatic nerve block (PLPS Group) under dual guidance. The two groups were comparable in terms of age, sex, BMI and athletic activity. The time needed to perform the nerve blocks was significantly shorter for the FOS group (p block under dual guidance for arthroscopic ACL reconstructive surgery is a safe and tempting anaesthetic choice. The success rate of this technique is higher in comparison with PLPS and results in less peri- and post-operative pain with less opioid consumption. This study provides support for the use of peripheral nerve blocks as an exclusive method for ACL reconstructive surgery in an ambulatory setting with almost no complications. I.

  11. Hemodynamic and morphological characteristics of unruptured posterior communicating artery aneurysms with oculomotor nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Nan; Yu, Ying; Xu, Jinyu; Karmonik, Christof; Liu, Jianmin; Huang, Qinghai

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Unruptured posterior communicating artery (PCoA) aneurysms with oculomotor nerve palsy (ONP) have a very high risk of rupture. This study investigated the hemodynamic and morphological characteristics of intracranial aneurysms with high rupture risk by analyzing PCoA aneurysms with ONP. METHODS Fourteen unruptured PCoA aneurysms with ONP, 33 ruptured PCoA aneurysms, and 21 asymptomatic unruptured PCoA aneurysms were included in this study. The clinical, morphological, and hemodynamic characteristics were compared among the different groups. RESULTS The clinical characteristics did not differ among the 3 groups (p > 0.05), whereas the morphological and hemodynamic analyses showed that size, aspect ratio, size ratio, undulation index, nonsphericity index, ellipticity index, normalized wall shear stress (WSS), and percentage of low WSS area differed significantly (p PCoA aneurysms with ONP demonstrated a distinctive morphological-hemodynamic pattern that was significantly different compared with asymptomatic unruptured PCoA aneurysms and was similar to ruptured PCoA aneurysms. The larger size, more irregular shape, and lower WSS might be related to the high rupture risk of PCoA aneurysms.

  12. Major Peripheral Nerve Injuries After Elbow Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mihir J; Mithani, Suhail K; Lodha, Sameer J; Richard, Marc J; Leversedge, Fraser J; Ruch, David S

    2016-06-01

    To survey the American Society for Surgery of the Hand membership to determine the nature and distribution of nerve injuries treated after elbow arthroscopy. An online survey was sent to all members of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand under an institutional review board-approved protocol. Collected data included the number of nerve injuries observed over a 5-year period, the nature of treatment required for the injuries, and the outcomes observed after any intervention. Responses were anonymous, and results were securely compiled. We obtained 372 responses. A total of 222 nerve injuries were reported. The most injured nerves reported were ulnar, radial, and posterior interosseous (38%, 22%, and 19%, respectively). Nearly half of all patients with injuries required operative intervention, including nerve graft, tendon transfer, nerve repair, or nerve transfer. Of the patients who sustained major injuries, those requiring intervention, 77% had partial or no motor recovery. All minor injuries resolved completely. Our results suggest that major nerve injuries after elbow arthroscopy are not rare occurrences and the risk of these injuries is likely under-reported in the literature. Furthermore, patients should be counseled on this risk because most nerve injuries show only partial or no functional recovery. With the more widespread practice of elbow arthroscopy, understanding the nature and sequelae of significant complications is critically important in ensuring patient safety and improving outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Extensive molecular differences between anterior- and posterior-half-sclerotomes underlie somite polarity and spinal nerve segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keynes Roger J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polarization of somite-derived sclerotomes into anterior and posterior halves underlies vertebral morphogenesis and spinal nerve segmentation. To characterize the full extent of molecular differences that underlie this polarity, we have undertaken a systematic comparison of gene expression between the two sclerotome halves in the mouse embryo. Results Several hundred genes are differentially-expressed between the two sclerotome halves, showing that a marked degree of molecular heterogeneity underpins the development of somite polarity. Conclusion We have identified a set of genes that warrant further investigation as regulators of somite polarity and vertebral morphogenesis, as well as repellents of spinal axon growth. Moreover the results indicate that, unlike the posterior half-sclerotome, the central region of the anterior-half-sclerotome does not contribute bone and cartilage to the vertebral column, being associated instead with the development of the segmented spinal nerves.

  14. A posterior approach to cervical nerve root block and pulsed radiofrequency treatment for cervical radicular pain: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lizu; Li, Jie; Li, Disen; Yan, Dong; Yang, Jun; Wang, Daniel; Cheng, Jianguo

    2015-09-01

    Catastrophic complications have been reported for selective cervical nerve root block (SCNRB) or pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) via an anterolateral transforaminal approach. A posterior approach to these procedures under computed tomography guidance has been reported. Here, we report the clinical outcomes of 42 patients with chronic cervical radicular pain (CCRP) treated with a combination of SCNRB and PRF through a posterior approach under fluoroscopy guidance. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes of 42 consecutive patients with CCRP who received a combination of SCNRB and PRF through a posterior approach under fluoroscopy guidance. The thresholds of electrical stimulation and imaging of the nerve roots after contrast injection were used to evaluate the accuracy of needle placement. The numeric rating scale was used to measure the pain and numbness levels as primary clinical outcomes, which were evaluate in scheduled follow-up visits of up to 3 months. A total of 53 procedures were performed on 42 patients at the levels of C5-C8. All patients reported concordant paresthesia in response to electrical stimulation. The average sensory and motor thresholds of stimulation were 0.28 ± 0.14 and 0.36 ± 0.14 V, respectively. Injection of nonionic contrast resulted in excellent spread along the target nerve root in large majority of the procedures. The numeric rating scale scores for both pain and numbness improved significantly at 1 day, 1 week, and 1 and 3 months after the treatment. No serious adverse effects were observed in any of the patients. The posterior approach to combined SCNRB and PRF under fluoroscopy guidance appears to be safe and efficacious in the management of CCRP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Anterior Transfer of Tibialis Posterior through the Interosseous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative plaster of Paris cast for 6 weeks and ankle foot orthosis were used. We evaluated for correction and ability of the transferred tendon to actively dorsiflex at the ankle joint. Nineteen patients had good results 8 fair and 3 poor there was no neurovascular deficit. The purpose of this paper is to outline our outcome ...

  16. Neuropatía compresiva del nervio interoseo posterior a nivel del codo (síndrome de la arcada de frohse: ¿debe incluirse en el listado de enfermedades profesionales? Must the neuropathy compressive of posterior interoseal nerve at the elbow level (arcade of frohse syndrome: be included in the occupational diseases list?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Jesús Regal Ramos

    2010-09-01

    of this review isn't only to show that the compress affection of posterior interosseous nerve can be considered a occupational diseases, but, also, it should be included in the current ODL, among the "main activities able to induce radial nerve affection". Material and methods: To February 2010 it have been reviewed the following bibliographical database: Medline, Embase, Cochrane. Results: This bibliographical review allow us to conclude: SAF can have a occupational origin (fibrosis of short supinator is related with forearm repetitive pronosupinacion movements, and it is more prevalent in certain professions in which are made these kind of movements. SAF is the occupational origin neuropathy compress more frequent of radial nerve, and the most related with hand and forearm repetitive movements. The Arcade of Frohse is the most common radial compression place. Conclusions: Therefore, SAF can be considered a occupational diseases if it carries enough occupational risks factors, and it should be included in the ODL, by being the most frequent occupational origin compression of radial nerve.

  17. A randomised controlled trial of ultrasound-guided blockade of the saphenous nerve and the posterior branch of the obturator nerve for postoperative analgesia after day-case knee arthroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, B; Jensen, K; Lenz, K

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of blockade of the saphenous nerve and the posterior branch of the obturator nerve in addition to a standard analgesic regimen for patients discharged the same day after knee arthroscopy. The primary outcome was knee pain on flexion during...

  18. Transient long thoracic nerve injury during posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios I Tsirikos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the transient long thoracic nerve (LTN injury during instrumented posterior spinal arthrodesis for idiopathic scoliosis. The suspected mechanism of injury, postoperative course and final outcome is discussed. The LTN is susceptible to injury due to its long and relatively superficial course across the thoracic wall through direct trauma or tension. Radical mastectomies with resection of axillary lymph nodes, first rib resection to treat thoracic outlet syndrome and cardiac surgery can be complicated with LTN injury. LTN injury producing scapular winging has not been reported in association with spinal deformity surgery. We reviewed the medical notes and spinal radiographs of two adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal arthrodesis and developed LTN neuropraxia. Scoliosis surgery was uneventful and intraoperative spinal cord monitoring was stable throughout the procedure. Postoperative neurological examination was otherwise normal, but both patients developed winging of the scapula at 4 and 6 days after spinal arthrodesis, which did not affect shoulder function. Both patients made a good recovery and the scapular winging resolved spontaneously 8 and 11 months following surgery with no residual morbidity. We believe that this LTN was due to positioning of our patients with their head flexed, tilted and rotated toward the contralateral side while the arm was abducted and extended. The use of heavy retractors may have also applied compression or tension to the nerve in one of our patients contributing to the development of neuropraxia. This is an important consideration during spinal deformity surgery to prevent potentially permanent injury to the nerve, which can produce severe shoulder dysfunction and persistent pain.

  19. Reinnervation of bilateral posterior cricoarytenoid muscles using the left phrenic nerve in patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of reinnervation of the bilateral posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA muscles using the left phrenic nerve in patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis. METHODS: Forty-four patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis who underwent reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles using the left phrenic nerve were enrolled in this study. Videostroboscopy, perceptual evaluation, acoustic analysis, maximum phonation time, pulmonary function testing, and laryngeal electromyography were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Patients were followed-up for at least 1 year after surgery. RESULTS: Videostroboscopy showed that within 1 year after reinnervation, abductive movement could be observed in the left vocal folds of 87% of patients and the right vocal folds of 72% of patients. Abductive excursion on the left side was significantly larger than that on the right side (P 0.05. No patients developed immediate dyspnea after surgery, and the pulmonary function parameters recovered to normal reference value levels within 1 year. Postoperative laryngeal electromyography confirmed successful reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles. Eighty-seven percent of patients in this series were decannulated and did not show obvious dyspnea after physical activity. Those who were decannulated after subsequent arytenoidectomy were not included in calculating the success rate of decannulation. CONCLUSIONS: Reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles using the left phrenic nerve can restore inspiratory vocal fold abduction to a physiologically satisfactory extent while preserving phonatory function at the preoperative level without evident morbidity.

  20. Reinnervation of Bilateral Posterior Cricoarytenoid Muscles Using the Left Phrenic Nerve in Patients with Bilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongliang; Chen, Donghui; Zhu, Minhui; Wang, Wei; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Caiyun

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and safety of reinnervation of the bilateral posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscles using the left phrenic nerve in patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis. Methods Forty-four patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis who underwent reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles using the left phrenic nerve were enrolled in this study. Videostroboscopy, perceptual evaluation, acoustic analysis, maximum phonation time, pulmonary function testing, and laryngeal electromyography were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Patients were followed-up for at least 1 year after surgery. Results Videostroboscopy showed that within 1 year after reinnervation, abductive movement could be observed in the left vocal folds of 87% of patients and the right vocal folds of 72% of patients. Abductive excursion on the left side was significantly larger than that on the right side (P 0.05). No patients developed immediate dyspnea after surgery, and the pulmonary function parameters recovered to normal reference value levels within 1 year. Postoperative laryngeal electromyography confirmed successful reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles. Eighty-seven percent of patients in this series were decannulated and did not show obvious dyspnea after physical activity. Those who were decannulated after subsequent arytenoidectomy were not included in calculating the success rate of decannulation. Conclusions Reinnervation of the bilateral PCA muscles using the left phrenic nerve can restore inspiratory vocal fold abduction to a physiologically satisfactory extent while preserving phonatory function at the preoperative level without evident morbidity. PMID:24098581

  1. Clinical Outcomes following median to radial nerve transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Wilson Z.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In this study the authors evaluate the clinical outcomes in patients with radial nerve palsy who underwent nerve transfers utilizing redundant fascicles of median nerve (innervating the flexor digitorum superficialis and flexor carpi radialis muscles) to the posterior interosseous nerve and the nerve to the extensor carpi radialis brevis. Methods A retrospective review of the clinical records of 19 patients with radial nerve injuries who underwent nerve transfer procedures using the median nerve as a donor nerve were included. All patients were evaluated using the Medical Research Council (MRC) grading system. Results The mean age of patients was 41 years (range 17 – 78 years). All patients received at least 12 months of follow-up (20.3 ± 5.8 months). Surgery was performed at a mean of 5.7 ± 1.9 months post-injury. Post-operative functional evaluation was graded according to the following scale: grades MRC 0/5 - MRC 2/5 were considered poor outcomes, while MRC of 3/5 was a fair result, MRC grade 4/5 was a good result, and grade 4+/5 was considered an excellent outcome. Seventeen patients (89%) had a complete radial nerve palsy while two patients (11%) had intact wrist extension but no finger or thumb extension. Post-operatively all patients except one had good to excellent recovery of wrist extension. Twelve patients recovered good to excellent finger and thumb extension, two patients had fair recovery, five patients had a poor recovery. Conclusions The radial nerve is a commonly injured nerve, causing significant morbidity in affected patients. The median nerve provides a reliable source of donor nerve fascicles for radial nerve reinnervation. This transfer was first performed in 1999 and evolved over the subsequent decade. The important nuances of both surgical technique and motor re-education critical for to the success of this transfer have been identified and are discussed. PMID:21168979

  2. Third nerve palsy caused by compression of the posterior communicating artery aneurysm does not depend on the size of the aneurysm, but on the distance between the ICA and the anterior-posterior clinoid process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anan, Mitsuhiro; Nagai, Yasuyuki; Fudaba, Hirotaka; Kubo, Takeshi; Ishii, Keisuke; Murata, Kumi; Hisamitsu, Yoshinori; Kawano, Yoshihisa; Hori, Yuzo; Nagatomi, Hirofumi; Abe, Tatsuya; Fujiki, Minoru

    2014-08-01

    Third nerve palsy (TNP) caused by a posterior communicating artery (PCoA) aneurysm is a well-known symptom of the condition, but the characteristics of unruptured PCoA aneurysm-associated third nerve palsy have not been fully evaluated. The aim of this study was to analyze the anatomical features of PCoA aneurysms that caused TNP from the viewpoint of the relationship between the ICA and the skull base. Forty-eight unruptured PCoA aneurysms were treated surgically between January 2008 and September 2013. The characteristics of the aneurysms were evaluated. Thirteen of the 48 patients (27%) had a history of TNP. The distance between the ICA and the anterior-posterior clinoid process (ICA-APC distance) was significantly shorter in the TNP group (pPCoA aneurysms can cause third nerve palsy if the ICA runs close to the skull base. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Prospective clinical study comparing intraligamentary anesthesia and inferior alveolar nerve block for extraction of posterior mandibular teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämmerer, P W; Adubae, A; Buttchereit, I; Thiem, D G E; Daubländer, M; Frerich, B

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of intraligamentary anesthesia (ILA) with conventional inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) for extraction of mandibular posterior teeth. In a prospective clinical trial, a total of 301 mandibular posterior teeth were extracted in 266 patients. Randomization was conducted into those who received ILA (patients n = 98; teeth n = 105) and those who received IANB (patient n = 140; teeth n = 140). Twenty-eight patients were subjected to bilateral mandibular dental extractions and received both ILA und IANB (teeth n = 56 (ILA n = 28; IANB n = 28)). The primary objective was to evaluate the differences in pain during injection, in pain during tooth extraction (numeric rating scale (NRS)), and in anesthetic quality (complete/sufficient vs. insufficient/no effect). Differences in latency time, amount of anesthetic solution, need for second injection, and duration of local numbness as well as in the incidence of dry socket were assessed. ILA had significant lower pain of injection (p < 0.001), shorter latency time (p < 0.001), and shorter duration of local numbness (p < 0.001) and required lesser amount of local anesthetic solution (p < 0.001) together with a similar anesthetic quality (p = 0.082) compared to IANB. Concerning pain during extraction (p = 0.211), frequency of second injection (p = 0.197), and incidence of dry socket (p = 0.178), no significant differences were detected. ILA fulfills the requirements of a minimal invasive and patient-friendly local anesthetic technique. In accordance, it represents a safe and reliable alternative to IANB for extraction of mandibular posterior teeth. ILA can be recommended for routine dental extractions.

  4. Isolated abducens nerve palsy associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage: a localizing sign of ruptured posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Winkler, Ethan A; Lasker, George F; Yue, John K; Lawton, Michael T

    2018-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Compressive cranial nerve syndromes can be useful bedside clues to the diagnosis of an enlarging intracranial aneurysm and can also guide subsequent evaluation, as with an acute oculomotor nerve (cranial nerve [CN] III) palsy that is presumed to be a posterior communicating artery aneurysm and a surgical emergency until proven otherwise. The CN VI has a short cisternal segment from the pontomedullary sulcus to Dorello's canal, remote from most PICA aneurysms but in the hemodynamic pathway of a rupturing PICA aneurysm that projects toward Dorello's canal. The authors describe a cranial nerve syndrome for posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysms that associates subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and an isolated abducens nerve (CN VI) palsy. METHODS Clinical and radiological data from 106 surgical patients with PICA aneurysms (66 ruptured and 40 unruptured) were retrospectively reviewed. Data from a group of 174 patients with other aneurysmal SAH (aSAH) were analyzed in a similar manner to control for nonspecific effects of SAH. Univariate statistical analysis compared incidence and risk factors associated with CN VI palsy in subarachnoid hemorrhage. RESULTS Overall, 13 (4.6%) of 280 patients had CN VI palsy at presentation, and all of them had ruptured aneurysms (representing 13 [5.4%] of the 240 cases of ruptured aneurysms). CN VI palsies were observed in 12 patients with ruptured PICA aneurysms (12/66 [18.1%]) and 1 patient with other aSAH (1/174 [0.1%], p < 0.0001). PICA aneurysm location in ruptured aneurysms was an independent predictor for CN VI palsy on multivariate analysis (p = 0.001). PICA aneurysm size was not significantly different in patients with or without CN VI palsy (average size 4.4 mm and 5.2 mm, respectively). Within the PICA aneurysm cohort, modified Fisher grade (p = 0.011) and presence of a thick cisternal SAH (modified Fisher Grades 3 and 4) (p = 0.003) were predictors of CN VI palsy. In all patients with ruptured PICA

  5. Ptosis as partial oculomotor nerve palsy due to compression by infundibular dilatation of posterior communicating artery, visualized with three-dimensional computer graphics: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Yuta; Imai, Hideaki; Yoshino, Masanori; Kin, Taichi; Takasago, Megumi; Saito, Kuniaki; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2014-01-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy (ONP) due to internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (PcomA) aneurysm generally manifests as partial nerve palsy including pupillary dysfunction. In contrast, infundibular dilatation (ID) of the PcomA has no pathogenic significance, and mechanical compression of the cranial nerve is extremely rare. We describe a 60-year-old woman who presented with progressive ptosis due to mechanical compression of the oculomotor nerve by an ID of the PcomA. Three-dimensional computer graphics (3DCG) accurately visualized the mechanical compression by the ID, and her ptosis was improved after clipping of the ID. ID of the PcomA may cause ONP by mechanical compression and is treatable surgically. 3DCG are effective for the diagnosis and preoperative simulation.

  6. Forearm interosseous membrane imaging and anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Joseph C; Roach, Neil; Gaughan, John P; Kozin, Scott H

    2004-10-01

    To determine the regional thickness variation of the interosseous membrane (IOM) along the forearm and validate magnetic resonance imaging of the IOM with laser micrometry. Axial thickness measurements of 12 cadaver forearms were obtained using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at radial, central, and ulnar locations. The specimens were dissected, and IOM thickness measured using a laser micrometer. MRI and laser measurements of the main and oblique IOM bundles were compared. An axial thickness profile was plotted versus forearm length, and radial, central, and ulnar positions were compared. The main bundle thickness was 2.18+/-0.20 mm using laser micrometry, which was not significantly different from MRI measurements (1.86+/-0.25 mm, p=0.11, power = 0.84). The dorsal oblique bundle thickness was not significantly different between measurement methods (2.93+/-0.77 mm and 3.30+/-1.64 mm using laser micrometry and MRI respectively, p=0.75, power = 0.04). Both methods demonstrated a progressive increase in thickness proximally within the forearm. MRI measurements demonstrated a significantly greater thickness increase in the radial location compared to the central location (slope = 2.26 and 1.05, r(2)=0.31 and 0.12 respectively, p0.05). Our findings describe the varying IOM anatomy using MRI, and determined the location of the clinically important IOM fiber bundles. This study confirms the accuracy of MR imaging of the IOM by comparison with a laser micrometer, and demonstrates the thickness variation along the forearm. This information may be used to identify changes in IOM anatomy with both acute IOM injury and chronic fiber attenuation.

  7. Forearm interosseous membrane imaging and anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinley, Joseph C. [Temple University, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Roach, Neil [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Gaughan, John P. [Temple University, Department of Biostatistics, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kozin, Scott H. [Shriners Hospitals for Children, Pediatric Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery, Philadelphia (United States); Temple University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2004-10-01

    To determine the regional thickness variation of the interosseous membrane (IOM) along the forearm and validate magnetic resonance imaging of the IOM with laser micrometry. Axial thickness measurements of 12 cadaver forearms were obtained using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at radial, central, and ulnar locations. The specimens were dissected, and IOM thickness measured using a laser micrometer. MRI and laser measurements of the main and oblique IOM bundles were compared. An axial thickness profile was plotted versus forearm length, and radial, central, and ulnar positions were compared. The main bundle thickness was 2.18{+-}0.20 mm using laser micrometry, which was not significantly different from MRI measurements (1.86{+-}0.25 mm, p=0.11, power = 0.84). The dorsal oblique bundle thickness was not significantly different between measurement methods (2.93{+-}0.77 mm and 3.30{+-}1.64 mm using laser micrometry and MRI respectively, p=0.75, power = 0.04). Both methods demonstrated a progressive increase in thickness proximally within the forearm. MRI measurements demonstrated a significantly greater thickness increase in the radial location compared to the central location (slope = 2.26 and 1.05, r{sup 2}=0.31 and 0.12 respectively, p<0.05). The ulnar slope was not significantly different from zero (r{sup 2}=0.02, p>0.05). Our findings describe the varying IOM anatomy using MRI, and determined the location of the clinically important IOM fiber bundles. This study confirms the accuracy of MR imaging of the IOM by comparison with a laser micrometer, and demonstrates the thickness variation along the forearm. This information may be used to identify changes in IOM anatomy with both acute IOM injury and chronic fiber attenuation. (orig.)

  8. Forearm interosseous membrane imaging and anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinley, Joseph C.; Roach, Neil; Gaughan, John P.; Kozin, Scott H.

    2004-01-01

    To determine the regional thickness variation of the interosseous membrane (IOM) along the forearm and validate magnetic resonance imaging of the IOM with laser micrometry. Axial thickness measurements of 12 cadaver forearms were obtained using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at radial, central, and ulnar locations. The specimens were dissected, and IOM thickness measured using a laser micrometer. MRI and laser measurements of the main and oblique IOM bundles were compared. An axial thickness profile was plotted versus forearm length, and radial, central, and ulnar positions were compared. The main bundle thickness was 2.18±0.20 mm using laser micrometry, which was not significantly different from MRI measurements (1.86±0.25 mm, p=0.11, power = 0.84). The dorsal oblique bundle thickness was not significantly different between measurement methods (2.93±0.77 mm and 3.30±1.64 mm using laser micrometry and MRI respectively, p=0.75, power = 0.04). Both methods demonstrated a progressive increase in thickness proximally within the forearm. MRI measurements demonstrated a significantly greater thickness increase in the radial location compared to the central location (slope = 2.26 and 1.05, r 2 =0.31 and 0.12 respectively, p 2 =0.02, p>0.05). Our findings describe the varying IOM anatomy using MRI, and determined the location of the clinically important IOM fiber bundles. This study confirms the accuracy of MR imaging of the IOM by comparison with a laser micrometer, and demonstrates the thickness variation along the forearm. This information may be used to identify changes in IOM anatomy with both acute IOM injury and chronic fiber attenuation. (orig.)

  9. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the iatrogenic peripheral nerve injuries in upper extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabay, Nuri; Toros, Tulgar; Ademoglu, Yalcin; Ada, Sait

    2010-01-01

    The aim of our study is to assess the efficiency of the ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of peripheral nerve injury. This study includes nine patients (six radial, one median and two posterior interosseous (PIO) nerves) with peripheral nerve injury diagnosed by clinical and electrophysiological methods in the last 3 years. Preoperatively, an ultrasonographic examination was performed and correlated with physical exam and surgical findings. Five patients, who were diagnosed as peripheral nerve transection by US, underwent surgery. The ultrasonographic findings were concordant with the intraoperative findings. Axonal swelling alone was found in the remaining three patients, who were treated conservatively because of preserved nerve continuity without display of nerve compression. In one patient, we were unable to visualize the nerve due to obesity and soft tissue edema. High-resolution US provide morphological information about the exact location, intensity and extent of the nerve injuries, facilitating the preoperative diagnosis. Thus, US may be a useful method for planning optimal treatment strategy in especially iatrogenic nerve injuries.

  10. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the iatrogenic peripheral nerve injuries in upper extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karabay, Nuri [Department of Radiology, Hand and Microsurgery and Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EMOT) Hospital, 1418 Sok. No: 14 Kahramanlar, 35230 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: nurikarabay@gmail.com; Toros, Tulgar [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hand and Microsurgery and Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EMOT) Hospital, 1418 Sok. No: 14 Kahramanlar, 35230 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: tulgartoros@yahoo.com; Ademoglu, Yalcin [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hand and Microsurgery and Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EMOT) Hospital, 1418 Sok. No: 14 Kahramanlar, 35230 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: yalcinademoglu@yahoo.com; Ada, Sait [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hand and Microsurgery and Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EMOT) Hospital, 1418 Sok. No: 14 Kahramanlar, 35230 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: sait_ada@yahoo.com

    2010-02-15

    The aim of our study is to assess the efficiency of the ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of peripheral nerve injury. This study includes nine patients (six radial, one median and two posterior interosseous (PIO) nerves) with peripheral nerve injury diagnosed by clinical and electrophysiological methods in the last 3 years. Preoperatively, an ultrasonographic examination was performed and correlated with physical exam and surgical findings. Five patients, who were diagnosed as peripheral nerve transection by US, underwent surgery. The ultrasonographic findings were concordant with the intraoperative findings. Axonal swelling alone was found in the remaining three patients, who were treated conservatively because of preserved nerve continuity without display of nerve compression. In one patient, we were unable to visualize the nerve due to obesity and soft tissue edema. High-resolution US provide morphological information about the exact location, intensity and extent of the nerve injuries, facilitating the preoperative diagnosis. Thus, US may be a useful method for planning optimal treatment strategy in especially iatrogenic nerve injuries.

  11. MR imaging of the cisternal segment of the posterior group of cranial nerves: Neurovascular relationships and abnormal changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Changhu, E-mail: tigerlch@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Du Yinglin, E-mail: duyinglinzhuo@sohu.co [Shandong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Institute, 72, Jingshi Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Xu Jinfa, E-mail: xuke5598@icom.c [Liao Cheng City People' s Hospital, Dongchang Road, Liaocheng, Shandong (China); Wu Lebin, E-mail: Lebinwu518@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Liu Cheng, E-mail: cacab2a@126.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Wang Ximing, E-mail: wxming369@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Wang Haiyan, E-mail: whyott@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Yu Fuhua, E-mail: changhu1970@163.co [Weifang Medical College, 7166, West Road Baotong Weifang, Shandong (China)

    2010-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate the detailed anatomic features, neurovascular relationships of the cisternal segment of the posterior group of cranial nerves (PGCN: IX, X, XI, XII); to evaluate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in demonstrating the PGCN with disorders caused by abnormal compression related to artery or tumor. Methods: A total of 59 volunteers, 12 patients with abnormal symptom in the PGCN underwent three-dimensional (3D) Fourier transformation constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) MR imaging, and 22 of these volunteers and 12 patients also underwent MR angiography in which a time-of-flight (TOF) sequence was used to further distinguish the PGCN from the adjacent blood vessels. Anatomical features, neurovascular relationships of the PGCN in 59 volunteers and abnormal changes in 12 patients caused by neurovascular compression or tumor were observed from multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) images, cryomicrotome section and 3D-CISS MR imaging of cranial cadaver were used to testify the PGCN displayed in 59 volunteers. Results: 3D-CISS MR imaging depicted the proximal cisternal segment of the cranial nerves complex (CN IX, X, XI) at the oblique axial, sagittal planes in 100% (118/118), 99% (117/118) of 118 sides; CNXII in the oblique axial, sagittal planes in 90% (106/118), 91% (107/118) of 118 sides. At the sagittal planes, the CN IX, X, XI were found parallel to each other in the cisternal segment in 45.2% (53/117) of 117 sides, gathering into a bundle of nerves complex before entering the jugular foramen (JF) in 54.7% (64/117) of 117sides. VAs were blood vessels more often identified, they were found to be in contact with the PGCN in 28.0% (33/118) of 118 sides, and not in contact in 72.0% (85/118) of 118 sides. 3D-CISS MR imaging of volunteers revealed the similar result corresponding to cryomicrotome section and 3D-CISS MR imaging of cranial cadaver. Twelve patients with abnormal changes in the PGCN were all displayed well, among them 8 were

  12. MR imaging of the cisternal segment of the posterior group of cranial nerves: Neurovascular relationships and abnormal changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Changhu; Du Yinglin; Xu Jinfa; Wu Lebin; Liu Cheng; Wang Ximing; Wang Haiyan; Yu Fuhua

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the detailed anatomic features, neurovascular relationships of the cisternal segment of the posterior group of cranial nerves (PGCN: IX, X, XI, XII); to evaluate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in demonstrating the PGCN with disorders caused by abnormal compression related to artery or tumor. Methods: A total of 59 volunteers, 12 patients with abnormal symptom in the PGCN underwent three-dimensional (3D) Fourier transformation constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) MR imaging, and 22 of these volunteers and 12 patients also underwent MR angiography in which a time-of-flight (TOF) sequence was used to further distinguish the PGCN from the adjacent blood vessels. Anatomical features, neurovascular relationships of the PGCN in 59 volunteers and abnormal changes in 12 patients caused by neurovascular compression or tumor were observed from multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) images, cryomicrotome section and 3D-CISS MR imaging of cranial cadaver were used to testify the PGCN displayed in 59 volunteers. Results: 3D-CISS MR imaging depicted the proximal cisternal segment of the cranial nerves complex (CN IX, X, XI) at the oblique axial, sagittal planes in 100% (118/118), 99% (117/118) of 118 sides; CNXII in the oblique axial, sagittal planes in 90% (106/118), 91% (107/118) of 118 sides. At the sagittal planes, the CN IX, X, XI were found parallel to each other in the cisternal segment in 45.2% (53/117) of 117 sides, gathering into a bundle of nerves complex before entering the jugular foramen (JF) in 54.7% (64/117) of 117sides. VAs were blood vessels more often identified, they were found to be in contact with the PGCN in 28.0% (33/118) of 118 sides, and not in contact in 72.0% (85/118) of 118 sides. 3D-CISS MR imaging of volunteers revealed the similar result corresponding to cryomicrotome section and 3D-CISS MR imaging of cranial cadaver. Twelve patients with abnormal changes in the PGCN were all displayed well, among them 8 were

  13. Direct Coaptation of the Phrenic Nerve With the Posterior Division of the Lower Trunk to Restore Finger and Elbow Extension Function in Patients With Total Brachial Plexus Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-feng; Li, Peng-cheng; Xue, Yun-hao; Zou, Ji-yao; Li, Wen-jun; Li, Yucheng

    2016-02-01

    To overcome the mismatch in nerve sizes in phrenic nerve transfer to the radial nerve for elbow and finger extension reanimation for patients with total brachial plexus injuries (TBPI), a selective neurotization procedure was designed. To investigate the long-term results of phrenic nerve transfer to the posterior division of the lower trunk with direct coaptation in restoring elbow and finger extension after TBPI. Phrenic nerve was transferred to and directly coapted with the posterior division of the lower trunk in 27 patients with TBPI. Seven patients were <18 years old (adolescent group), and the remaining 20 patients ≥18 years (adult group). Postoperative mean follow-up period was 54 ± 9 months (range, 48-85 months). The motor function attained M3 or greater in 81.5% of patients for elbow extension and in 48% of patients for finger extension. The percentage of patients who regained M3 or greater muscle power of finger extension in the adolescent group and the adult group was 71.4%, and 40%, respectively. Meanwhile, 85.7% in the adolescent group and 80% in the adult group achieved M3 or greater muscle power of elbow extension. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups. The elbow extension and finger extension were synchronous contractions and did not become independent of respiratory effort. This procedure simultaneously and effectively restores the function of elbow and finger extension in patients after TBPI. However, the patients could not do elbow and finger extension separately.

  14. Transcutaneous stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve for treating refractory urge incontinence of idiopathic and neurogenic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles-Antuña, C; Pérez-Haro, M L; González-Ruiz de L, C; Quintás-Blanco, A; Tamargo-Diaz, E M; García-Rodríguez, J; San Martín-Blanco, A; Fernandez-Gomez, J M

    2017-09-01

    To assess the efficacy of treatment with transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation (TPTNS) in patients with urge urinary incontinence, of neurogenic or nonneurogenic origin, refractory to first-line therapeutic options. We included 65 patients with urge urinary incontinence refractory to medical treatment. A case history review, a urodynamic study and a somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) study were conducted before the TPTNS, studying the functional urological condition by means of a voiding diary. The treatment consisted of 10 weekly sessions of TPTNS lasting 30minutes. Some 57.7% of the patients showed abnormal tibial SEPs, and 42% showed abnormal pudendal SEPs. A statistically significant symptomatic improvement was observed in all clinical parameters after treatment with TPTNS, and 66% of the patients showed an overall improvement, regardless of sex, the presence of underlying neurological disorders, detrusor hyperactivity in the urodynamic study or SEP disorders. There were no adverse effects during the treatment. TPTNS is an effective and well tolerated treatment in patients with urge incontinence refractory to first-line therapies and should be offered early in the treatment strategy. New studies are needed to identify the optimal parameters of stimulation, the most effective treatment protocols and long-term efficacy, as well as its applicability to patients with a neurogenic substrate. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI for evaluation of peripheral nerve neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Katsuhiko; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Suzuki, Katsuji; Yamada, Mitsuko; Kojima, Motohiro.

    1995-01-01

    We carried out enhanced MRI for the carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, tarsal tunnel syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve palsy that is entrapment neuropathy. The affected nerve was enhanced in entrapment point. Carpal tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 41 of 52 cases (79%). Cubital tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 4 of 5 cases (80%). Tarsal tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 1 of 1 case. Anterior interosseous nerve palsy: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 3 of 4 cases (75%). The affected nerve was strongly enhanced by Gd-DTPA, indicating the blood-nerve barrier in the affected nerve to be broken and intraneural edema to be produced, e.i., the ability of Gd-DTPA to selectively contrast-enhance a pathologic focus within the peripheral nerve is perhaps its most important clinical applications. (author)

  16. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI for evaluation of peripheral nerve neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Katsuhiko [Aikoh Orthopaedic Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Kobayashi, Shigeru; Suzuki, Katsuji; Yamada, Mitsuko; Kojima, Motohiro

    1995-11-01

    We carried out enhanced MRI for the carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, tarsal tunnel syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve palsy that is entrapment neuropathy. The affected nerve was enhanced in entrapment point. Carpal tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 41 of 52 cases (79%). Cubital tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 4 of 5 cases (80%). Tarsal tunnel syndrome: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 1 of 1 case. Anterior interosseous nerve palsy: The enhancement of affected nerve was apparent in 3 of 4 cases (75%). The affected nerve was strongly enhanced by Gd-DTPA, indicating the blood-nerve barrier in the affected nerve to be broken and intraneural edema to be produced, e.i., the ability of Gd-DTPA to selectively contrast-enhance a pathologic focus within the peripheral nerve is perhaps its most important clinical applications. (author).

  17. Ultrasound assessment on selected peripheral nerve pathologies. Part I: Entrapment neuropathies of the upper limb – excluding carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US is one of the methods for imaging entrapment neuropathies, post-trau‑ matic changes to nerves, nerve tumors and postoperative complications to nerves. This type of examination is becoming more and more popular, not only for economic reasons, but also due to its value in making accurate diagnosis. It provides a very precise assess‑ ment of peripheral nerve trunk pathology – both in terms of morphology and localization. During examination there are several options available to the specialist: the making of a dynamic assessment, observation of pain radiation through the application of precise palpation and the comparison of resultant images with the contra lateral limb. Entrap‑ ment neuropathies of the upper limb are discussed in this study, with the omission of median nerve neuropathy at the level of the carpal canal, as extensive literature on this subject exists. The following pathologies are presented: pronator teres muscle syndrome, anterior interosseus nerve neuropathy, ulnar nerve groove syndrome and cubital tun‑ nel syndrome, Guyon’s canal syndrome, radial nerve neuropathy, posterior interosseous nerve neuropathy, Wartenberg’s disease, suprascapular nerve neuropathy and thoracic outlet syndrome. Peripheral nerve examination technique has been presented in previous articles presenting information about peripheral nerve anatomy [Journal of Ultrasonog‑ raphy 2012; 12 (49: 120–163 – Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part I: Sonohistology and general principles of examination, following the exam‑ ple of the median nerve; Part II: Peripheral nerves of the upper limb; Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb]. In this article potential compression sites of particular nerves are discussed, taking into account pathomechanisms of damage, including predisposing anatomical variants (accessory muscles. The parameters of ultrasound assessment have been established – echogenicity and

  18. Interosseous Ligament and Transverse Forearm Stability: A Biomechanical Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowski, Christina J; Darvish, Kurosh; Ilyas, Asif M; Jones, Christopher M

    2017-02-01

    The interosseous ligament (IOL) is known to be an important longitudinal stabilizer of the forearm. We hypothesize that it may also contribute to transverse stability, with pronosupination tensioning of the radius relative to the ulna. Therefore, when injured, we predict the interosseous space should widen in the transverse plane, enough to be appreciable on plain radiographs. A measurable difference in interosseous space, comparing an injured with an uninjured forearm, can potentially be of diagnostic and clinical value. Ten fresh-frozen cadaver arms (from 5 individuals) were radiographed in 6 different positions of forearm supination, first in an uninjured state and then with the IOL sectioned, both partially (central band only) and completely. The transverse interosseous distance was measured on radiographs using edge detection software and compared using analysis of variance and contrast analysis. The maximum range of pronosupination was also compared before and after injury, using a paired t test. Average maximum supination increased from 84° to 106°, and pronation from 69° to 84°, after the IOL was sectioned completely. Sectioning of the IOL led to a statistically significant increase in the interosseous distance, a minimum of 2 mm, in all but one forearm position. The IOL of the forearm plays an important role in providing transverse stability to the radius and ulna. When the IOL is sectioned, the forearm exhibits increased pronosupination range of motion. Radiographs of bilateral forearms taken in identical rotational position can reliably differentiate between an intact and torn IOL in cadavers. The IOL's stabilizing role during forearm rotation suggests a novel strategy for diagnosing forearm IOL injury using comparative radiographic measurements. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Radial nerve measurements in nonsymptomatic upper extremities of Filipinos: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Suarez, Consuelo B; Dones, Valentin C; Grimmer, Karen; Thoirs, Kerry; Milanese, Steven; Atlas, Alvin

    2015-10-01

    Despite reports on the association of radial nerve (RN) size and lateral epicondylalgia (LE), Filipino normative values on RN size in healthy elbows are not established. An association with upper extremity anthropometric measurements is likewise not reported. Musculoskeletal ultrasound measurements of the RN at the level of the lateral epicondyle (RN-LE), posterior interosseous nerve at the level of the radial head and supinator (PIN-RH and PIN-sup), and superficial RN (SRN) in the elbows of healthy Filipinos were made in Manila from January-September 2011. A total of 198 elbows of 99 healthy participants aged 43 years (range, 33-48 years) [median(IQR)] were investigated. Men have larger PIN-RH, PIN-sup, and SRN compared with women. Arm length was associated with PIN-RH, PIN-sup, and SRN (P values can now be used for comparison in elbows with LE. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Ultrasound of the elbow with emphasis on detailed assessment of ligaments, tendons, and nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Maeseneer, Michel; Brigido, Monica Kalume; Antic, Marijana; Lenchik, Leon; Milants, Annemieke; Vereecke, Evie; Jager, Tjeerd; Shahabpour, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    . Slightly more distally the ulnar nerve courses between the two heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris. An accessory muscle, the anconeus epitrochlearis can cover the ulnar nerve at the cubital tunnel, and is easily identified on ultrasound. The radial nerve divides in a superficial sensory branch and a deep motor branch. The motor branch, the posterior interosseous nerve, courses under the arcade of Frohse where it enters the supinator muscle. At the level of the dorsal wrist the posterior interosseous nerve is located at the deep aspect of the extensor tendons. The median nerve may be compressed at various sites, including the lacertus fibrosis, between the pronator teres heads, and the sublimis bridge. These compression sites can be identified with ultrasound

  1. Ultrasound of the elbow with emphasis on detailed assessment of ligaments, tendons, and nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Maeseneer, Michel, E-mail: Michel.demaeseneer@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Brigido, Monica Kalume, E-mail: Mbrigido@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Antic, Marijana, E-mail: Misscroa@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Lenchik, Leon, E-mail: Llenchik@wakehealth.edu [Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Milants, Annemieke, E-mail: Annemieke.Milants@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Vereecke, Evie, E-mail: Evie.Vereecke@kuleuven-kulak.be [Department of Anatomy, KULAK, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Campus Kortrijk, Kortrijk (Belgium); Jager, Tjeerd [Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium); Shahabpour, Maryam, E-mail: Maryam.Shahabpour@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-04-15

    . Slightly more distally the ulnar nerve courses between the two heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris. An accessory muscle, the anconeus epitrochlearis can cover the ulnar nerve at the cubital tunnel, and is easily identified on ultrasound. The radial nerve divides in a superficial sensory branch and a deep motor branch. The motor branch, the posterior interosseous nerve, courses under the arcade of Frohse where it enters the supinator muscle. At the level of the dorsal wrist the posterior interosseous nerve is located at the deep aspect of the extensor tendons. The median nerve may be compressed at various sites, including the lacertus fibrosis, between the pronator teres heads, and the sublimis bridge. These compression sites can be identified with ultrasound.

  2. High-resolution STIR for 3-T MRI of the posterior fossa: visualization of the lower cranial nerves and arteriovenous structures related to neurovascular compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiwatashi, Akio; Yoshiura, Takashi; Yamashita, Koji; Kamano, Hironori; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    Preoperative evaluation of small vessels without contrast material is sometimes difficult in patients with neurovascular compression disease. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate whether 3D STIR MRI could simultaneously depict the lower cranial nerves--fifth through twelfth--and the blood vessels in the posterior fossa. The posterior fossae of 47 adults (26 women, 21 men) without gross pathologic changes were imaged with 3D STIR and turbo spin-echo heavily T2-weighted MRI sequences and with contrast-enhanced turbo field-echo MR angiography (MRA). Visualization of the cranial nerves on STIR images was graded on a 4-point scale and compared with visualization on T2-weighted images. Visualization of the arteries on STIR images was evaluated according to the segments in each artery and compared with that on MRA images. Visualization of the veins on STIR images was also compared with that on MRA images. Statistical analysis was performed with the Mann-Whitney U test. There were no significant differences between STIR and T2-weighted images with respect to visualization of the cranial nerves (p > 0.05). Identified on STIR and MRA images were 94 superior cerebellar arteries, 81 anteroinferior cerebellar arteries, and 79 posteroinferior cerebellar arteries. All veins evaluated were seen on STIR and MRA images. There were no significant differences between STIR and MRA images with respect to visualization of arteries and veins (p > 0.05). High-resolution STIR is a feasible method for simultaneous evaluation of the lower cranial nerves and the vessels in the posterior fossa without the use of contrast material.

  3. Análise da camada de fibras nervosas pelo GDx em pacientes pseudofácicos com opacidades da cápsula posterior Analysis of the nerve fiber layer using GDx in pseudophakic patients with posterior capsular opacification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Azevedo Arraes

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar se a opacificação de cápsula posterior (OCP influenciaria na análise da camada de fibras nervosas pela polarimetria "scanning laser" (GDx. MÉTODOS: Trinta e sete pacientes pseudofácicos não glaucomatosos foram submetidos a análise da camada de fibras nervosas pelo GDx antes e após a realização de capsulotomia com Nd:YAG laser. RESULTADOS: Em cinco olhos, o GDx não conseguiu imagens aceitáveis pelos parâmetros de aquisição do aparelho. Em todos os outros, não foi observada diferença significante entre os valores médios das variáveis antes e após a realização da capsulotomia posterior. CONCLUSÃO: A presença de OCP em graus moderados e/ou quando há imagens aceitáveis em pacientes pseudofácicos não influencia o resultado da análise das imagens das fibras do nervo óptico pelo GDx. Apenas intensos graus de OCP que impeçam a obtenção de imagem analisável pelo aparelho inviabilizam o exame.PURPOSE: To evaluate if posterior capsule opacification (PCO would alter the analysis of nerve fiber layer using the scanning laser polarimetry (GDx. METHODS: Pseudophakic non-glaucomatosous eyes (37 patients underwent nerve fiber layer analysis using GDx before and after posterior capsulotomy with Nd:YAG Laser. RESULTS: In five eyes, GDx did not obtain acceptable images using the device's parameters of acquisition. In the others, mean variable values did not reach significant difference before and after posterior capsulotomy. CONCLUSION: Moderate degrees of PCO and/or acceptable images in pseudophakic patients do not alter the analysis of nerve fiber layer by GDx. Only intense degrees of PCO that hinder analyzable images make the examination impracticable.

  4. The prevalence of tenosynovitis of the interosseous tendons of the hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowbotham, Emma L. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Leeds (United Kingdom); Freeston, Jane E. [Department of Rheumatology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Emery, Paul [University of Leeds, Arthritis Research UK, Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, LTHT Leeds Institute of Rheumatic Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds (United Kingdom); Grainger, Andrew J. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Leeds (United Kingdom); Chapel Allerton Hospital, NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of tenosynovitis affecting the interosseous tendons of the hand in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population and to assess for association with metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis or ulnar drift. Forty-four patients with RA underwent hand MRI along with 20 normal controls. Coronal 3D T1 VIBE sequences pre- and post-contrast were performed and reconstructed. The presence of interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was recorded alongside MCP joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis and ulnar drift. Twenty-one (47.7 %) patients with RA showed interosseous tendon tenosynovitis. Fifty-two (14.8 %) interosseous tendons showed tenosynovitis amongst the RA patients. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more commonly seen in association with adjacent MCP joint synovitis (p < 0.001), but nine MCP joints (5.1 %) showed adjacent interosseous tenosynovitis in the absence of joint synovitis. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more frequently seen in fingers which also showed flexor tendon tenosynovitis (p < 0.001) and in patients with ulnar drift of the fingers (p = 0.01). Tenosynovitis of the hand interosseous tendons was found in 47.7 % of patients with RA. In the majority of cases this was adjacent to MCP joint synovitis; however, interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was also seen in isolation. (orig.)

  5. The prevalence of tenosynovitis of the interosseous tendons of the hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowbotham, Emma L.; Freeston, Jane E.; Emery, Paul; Grainger, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of tenosynovitis affecting the interosseous tendons of the hand in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population and to assess for association with metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis or ulnar drift. Forty-four patients with RA underwent hand MRI along with 20 normal controls. Coronal 3D T1 VIBE sequences pre- and post-contrast were performed and reconstructed. The presence of interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was recorded alongside MCP joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis and ulnar drift. Twenty-one (47.7 %) patients with RA showed interosseous tendon tenosynovitis. Fifty-two (14.8 %) interosseous tendons showed tenosynovitis amongst the RA patients. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more commonly seen in association with adjacent MCP joint synovitis (p < 0.001), but nine MCP joints (5.1 %) showed adjacent interosseous tenosynovitis in the absence of joint synovitis. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more frequently seen in fingers which also showed flexor tendon tenosynovitis (p < 0.001) and in patients with ulnar drift of the fingers (p = 0.01). Tenosynovitis of the hand interosseous tendons was found in 47.7 % of patients with RA. In the majority of cases this was adjacent to MCP joint synovitis; however, interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was also seen in isolation. (orig.)

  6. Effect of intraosseous injection versus inferior alveolar nerve block as primary pulpal anaesthesia of mandibular posterior teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhad, Alireza; Razavian, Hamid; Shafiee, Maryam

    2018-01-27

    This study sought to assess the success rate, effect on blood pressure, and pain of intraosseous injection (IO) and inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) for pulpal anaesthesia of mandibular posterior teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis as the primary anaesthetic technique. This randomized clinical trial (IRCT2013022712634N1) was conducted on 60 patients between 18 and 65 years suffering from symptomatic irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. Group one received IO while group two received IANB with 3% mepivacaine. After anaesthetic injection, success rate of pulpal anaesthesia was assessed by pulp testing in the two groups. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures of patients were compared before and after the anaesthetic injections. Level of pain during injection was scored using a visual analogue scale. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20, t-test and chi square test at p = .05 level of significance. Success rate of IO (56.7%) was significantly higher than that of IANB (23.3%) (p = .008). There was no significant difference in pain during anaesthetic injection (p = .304) or change in systolic (p = .80) and diastolic (p = .28) blood pressures following injection between the two techniques. IO had a higher success rate than IANB for pulpal anaesthesia of mandibular posterior teeth with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Neither technique provided profound pulpal anaesthesia.

  7. [Positional damage of the sciatic nerve during neurosurgical intervention into the posterior cranial fossa in the sitting position].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, A N; Lubnin, A Iu; Shimanskiĭ, V N; Kolycheva, M V; Ogurtsova, A A; Grigorian, A A

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a rare case of severe, but reversible bilateral damage to the sciatic nerve (compression neuropathy) in a patient with Blumenbach's clivus meningioma developing during 12-hour operation removing the tumor in the patient's sitting position on the operating table. The etiology and prevention of this complication are discussed.

  8. Clipping Versus Coiling in the Management of Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms with Third Nerve Palsy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaberel, Thomas; Borha, Alin; di Palma, Camille; Emery, Evelyne

    2016-03-01

    To compare surgical clipping with endovascular coiling in terms of recovery from oculomotor nerve palsy (ONP) in the management of posterior communicating artery (PCoA) aneurysms causing third nerve palsy. We conducted a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis. The meta-analysis included 11 relevant studies involving 384 patients with third nerve palsy caused by PCoA aneurysms at baseline, of whom 257 (67.0%) were treated by clipping and 127 were treated by coiling (33.0%). Pooled odds ratios of the impact of clipping or coiling on complete ONP recovery, lack of ONP recovery, and procedure-related death were calculated. The overall complete ONP recovery rate was 42.5% in the coiling group compared with 83.6% in the clipping group. The increase in complete ONP recovery in the clipping group corresponds to an overall pooled Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio of 4.44 (95% confidence interval = 1.66-11.84). Subgroup analysis revealed a clear benefit of clipping over coiling in patients with ruptured aneurysms, but not in patients with unruptured aneurysms. No procedure-related deaths were reported by any of the 11 studies. Surgical clipping of PCoA aneurysms causing third nerve palsy achieves better ONP recovery than endovascular coiling; this could be particularly true in the case of ruptured aneurysms. In view of the purely observational data, statements about this effect should be made with great caution. A randomized trial would better address the therapeutic dilemma, but pending the results of such a trial, we recommend treating PCoA aneurysms causing ONP with surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Use of a single bipolar electrode in the posterior arytenoid muscles for bilateral monitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerves in thyroid surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerle, Stephan; Sidler, D; Linder, Th; Mueller, W

    2008-12-01

    The aims were to assess the technical feasibility of using a single electrode in the posterior arytenoid muscles (PAM) for intraoperative monitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) in thyroid surgery, to validate the new method against the insertion of electrodes placed in the vocal cord muscle, and to report the results of the clinical application of the new concept. A total of 52 patients were enrolled. The handling and safety of RLN monitoring was tested by simultaneous registration of the EMG response from vocal fold electrodes and PAM electrodes. Acoustically and electromyographically we found nearly the same values for the arytenoid muscles as for the vocal folds, although the signals taken from the vocal folds were slightly stronger. PAM recording using a single bipolar electrode is technically feasible and as reliable compared to the standard vocal cord monitoring.

  10. Fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) MRI to investigate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within dural reflections of posterior fossa cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, David J; Scoffings, Daniel; Ajithkumar, Thankamma; Williams, Michael V; Jefferies, Sarah J

    2016-11-01

    There is no consensus approach to covering skull base meningeal reflections-and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) therein-of the posterior fossa cranial nerves (CNs VII-XII) when planning radiotherapy (RT) for medulloblastoma and ependymoma. We sought to determine whether MRI and specifically fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequences can answer this anatomical question and guide RT planning. 96 posterior fossa FIESTA sequences were reviewed. Following exclusions, measurements were made on the following scans for each foramen respectively (left, right); internal acoustic meatus (IAM) (86, 84), jugular foramen (JF) (83, 85) and hypoglossal canal (HC) (42, 45). A protocol describes measurement procedure. Two observers measured distances for five cases and agreement was assessed. One observer measured all the remaining cases. IAM and JF measurement interobserver variability was compared. Mean measurement difference between observers was -0.275 mm (standard deviation 0.557). IAM and JF measurements were normally distributed. Mean IAM distance was 12.2 mm [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.8-15.6]; JF was 7.3 mm (95% CI 4.0-10.6). The HC was difficult to visualize on many images and data followed a bimodal distribution. Dural reflections of posterior fossa CNs are well demonstrated by FIESTA MRI. Measuring CSF extension into these structures is feasible and robust; mean CSF extension into IAM and JF was measured. We plan further work to assess coverage of these structures with photon and proton RT plans. Advances in knowledge: We have described CSF extension beyond the internal table of the skull into the IAM, JF and HC. Oncologists planning RT for patients with medulloblastoma and ependymoma may use these data to guide contouring.

  11. Communication between radial nerve and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R R Marathe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial nerve is usually a branch of the posterior cord of the brachial plexus. It innervates triceps, anconeous, brachialis, brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus muscles and gives the posterior cutaneous nerve of the arm, lower lateral cutaneous nerve of arm, posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm; without exhibiting any communication with the medial cutaneous nerve of forearm or any other nerve. We report communication between the radial nerve and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm on the left side in a 58-year-old male cadaver. The right sided structures were found to be normal. Neurosurgeons should keep such variations in mind while performing the surgeries of axilla and upper arm.

  12. Anatomy and biomechanics of the forearm interosseous membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Leela D; Werner, Frederick W; McGrattan, Michael L; Zwerling, Sierra R; Harley, Brian J

    2015-06-01

    To examine the anatomy and function of the forearm interosseous membrane by exploring the anatomical insertions of the central band (CB) on the radius and the ulna and by quantifying the length of the intact ligament and replacement grafts located at the original CB attachment sites and alternative locations. Eight fresh cadaver forearms were supinated and pronated and the wrist was extended and flexed while the motion between the distal radius and ulna were recorded. The length of the CB was computed for the intact CB as well for several alternative graft orientations and positions. The maximum length of the CB did not significantly change among different wrist motions. However, with the wrist in a static neutral position, the CB length was significantly shorter in forearm supination than in neutral. During active forearm rotation when CB replacement grafts were positioned distal or proximal to the original CB site, yet still parallel to it, each had a similar trend to be longer in neutral than in supination. If a graft was more transversely oriented, the computed CB length would be 1.6 mm shorter in supination than in neutral. These results support tensioning a CB graft with the forearm in supination if the goal is to maximize graft tension and to maintain the native 22° angle for a CB graft between the radius and ulna. The results also suggest that the CB graft can probably be located slightly distal or slightly proximal to its original attachment sites. Reconstruction of the interosseous membrane has been hampered by a lack of understanding of its length changes with forearm or wrist motion. These results provide a starting point in helping clinicians understand how to more precisely reconstruct this ligament in an anatomical manner. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Does the presence of the nerve root sedimentation sign on MRI correlate with the operative level in patients undergoing posterior lumbar decompression for lumbar stenosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Akil; Yoo, Andrew; Bendo, John A

    2013-08-01

    Recent research describes the use of a nerve root sedimentation sign to diagnose lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). The lack of sedimentation of the nerve roots (positive sedimentation sign) to the dorsal part of the dural sac is the characteristic feature of this new radiological parameter. To demonstrate how the nerve root sedimentation sign compares with other more traditional radiological parameters in patients who have been operated for LSS. A retrospective chart and image review. Preoperative magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were reviewed from 71 consecutive operative patients who presented with LSS and received spinal decompression surgery from 2006 to 2010. Preoperative T2-weighted MRIs were reviewed for each patient. One hundred thirty-four vertebral levels from L1 to L5 were measured for: sedimentation sign, cross-sectional area (CSA) and anterior/posterior (A/P) diameter of the dural sac, thickness of the ligamentum flavum, and Fujiwara grade of facet hypertrophy. Radiological measurements were made using Surgimap 1.1.2.169 software (Nemaris, Inc., New York, NY, USA). Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS 17.0 statistical software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Significance was demonstrated using unpaired t tests and chi-squared tests. Study funding was departmental. There were no study-specific conflicts of interest-associated biases. A positive sedimentation sign was determined in 120 operated levels (89.5%), whereas 14 levels (10.5%) had no sign (negative sedimentation sign). The mean CSA and A/P diameter were 140.62 mm(2) (standard deviation [SD]=53) and 11.76 mm (SD=3), respectively, for the no-sign group; the mean CSA and A/P diameter were 81.87 mm(2) (SD=35) and 8.76 mm (SD=2.2), respectively, for the sedimentation sign group (p<.001). We found that 60% of levels with Fujiwara Grade A facet hypertrophy did not have a sedimentation sign, whereas 86.3% of levels with Grade B, 93.2% of levels with Grade C, and 100.0% of levels with Grade D

  14. The prevalence of tenosynovitis of the interosseous tendons of the hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rowbotham, EL; Freeston, JE; Emery, P; Grainger, AJ

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of tenosynovitis affecting the interosseous tendons of the hand in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population and to assess for association with metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis or ulnar drift. METHODS: Forty-four patients with RA underwent hand MRI along with 20 normal controls. Coronal 3D T1 VIBE sequences pre- and post-contrast were performed and reconstructed. The presence of interosseous tendon t...

  15. Anesthetic Efficacy of 4 % Articaine During Extraction of the Mandibular Posterior Teeth by Using Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block and Buccal Infiltration Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kholey, Khalid E

    2017-03-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of 4 % articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine (A100) in infiltration and inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) anesthetic techniques for the pain control during extraction of the mandibular posterior teeth. This prospective randomized single-blind clinical trial included 100 patients needing extraction of at least two mandibular molars. Patients received either infiltration in the buccal vestibule opposite to the first molar supplemented with lingual infiltration or standard IANB with A100. For assessment of depth of anesthesia obtained by the two anaethetic techniques, presence or absence of pain during the extraction were rated using the visual analog scale. Fifty patients received infiltration anesthesia and fifty patients were anesthetized by IANB. The success rate of pain-free extraction after buccal infiltration was 94 %, whereas by using IANB with the same anesthetic it was 92 %. No statistical differences were detected in the success rates between the two anesthetic techniques ( P  = 0.15). Buccal Infiltration can be considered a good option during extraction of the mandibular molar and premolar teeth of course, with supplemental lingual anesthesia.

  16. Forearm interosseous membrane trauma: MRI diagnostic criteria and injury patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinley, Joseph C. [Stanford University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Roach, Neil [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hopgood, Brendon C. [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Limmer, Karl [Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kozin, Scott H. [Shriners Hospital for Children, Temple University and Pediatric Hand and Upper Extremity Surgeon, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2006-05-15

    Define criteria for interosseous membrane (IOM) injury diagnosis using MRI, and characterize patterns of IOM disruption following forearm trauma. Our hypothesis is that most IOM injuries occur along the ulnar insertion, and MRI should be obtained following forearm trauma to assess IOM competency. Sixteen cadaver forearms were subjected to longitudinal impact trauma. Prior to and following injury, MR images were examined by a board-certified musculoskeletal radiologist using pre-defined criteria for determining IOM integrity. Each specimen was dissected and the viability/pattern of injury examined. The MRI and dissection results were compared using a double-blinded methodology. Eight of the 16 specimens demonstrated IOM trauma. Seven specimens demonstrated complete IOM disruption from the ulnar insertion, and one revealed a mid-substance tear with intact origin and insertion. The dorsal oblique bundle was disrupted in four specimens. MRI analysis identified IOM injury in seven of the eight forearms. The injury location was correctly identified in six specimens when compared to dissection observations. MRI determination of IOM injury demonstrated a positive predictive value of 100%, a negative predictive value of 89%, a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 100%. (orig.)

  17. Forearm interosseous membrane trauma: MRI diagnostic criteria and injury patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinley, Joseph C.; Roach, Neil; Hopgood, Brendon C.; Limmer, Karl; Kozin, Scott H.

    2006-01-01

    Define criteria for interosseous membrane (IOM) injury diagnosis using MRI, and characterize patterns of IOM disruption following forearm trauma. Our hypothesis is that most IOM injuries occur along the ulnar insertion, and MRI should be obtained following forearm trauma to assess IOM competency. Sixteen cadaver forearms were subjected to longitudinal impact trauma. Prior to and following injury, MR images were examined by a board-certified musculoskeletal radiologist using pre-defined criteria for determining IOM integrity. Each specimen was dissected and the viability/pattern of injury examined. The MRI and dissection results were compared using a double-blinded methodology. Eight of the 16 specimens demonstrated IOM trauma. Seven specimens demonstrated complete IOM disruption from the ulnar insertion, and one revealed a mid-substance tear with intact origin and insertion. The dorsal oblique bundle was disrupted in four specimens. MRI analysis identified IOM injury in seven of the eight forearms. The injury location was correctly identified in six specimens when compared to dissection observations. MRI determination of IOM injury demonstrated a positive predictive value of 100%, a negative predictive value of 89%, a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 100%. (orig.)

  18. Surgical Anatomy of the Radial Nerve at the Elbow and in the Forearm: Anatomical Basis for Intraplexus Nerve Transfer to Reconstruct Thumb and Finger Extension in C7 - T1 Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Dong, Zhen; Zhang, Chun-Lin; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2016-11-01

    Background  C7 - T1 palsy results in complete loss of finger motion and poses a surgical challenge. This study investigated the anatomy of the radial nerve in the elbow and forearm and the feasibility of intraplexus nerve transfer to restore thumb and finger extension. Methods  The radial nerves were dissected in 28 formalin-fixed upper extremities. Branching pattern, length, diameter, and number of myelinated fibers were recorded. Results  Commonly, the branching pattern (from proximal to distal) was to the brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus, superficial sensory proximal to the lateral epicondyle, extensor carpi radialis brevis, supinator, extensor digitorum communis, extensor digiti minimi, extensor carpi ulnaris, abductor pollicis longus, extensor pollicis brevis, extensor pollicis longus, and extensor indicis distal to the lateral epicondyle. Conclusions  Branches to the brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus, and supinator can be transferred to the posterior interosseous nerve to restore hand movement in patients with C7 - T1 brachial plexus palsies; the supinator branch is probably the best choice in this regard. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Clinical value and indication for the dissection of lymph nodes posterior to the right recurrent laryngeal nerve in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ding-Cun; Xu, Xiao-Cheng; Ding, Jin-Wang; Zhang, Yu; Peng, You; Pan, Gang; Zhang, Wo

    2017-10-03

    Lymph nodes posterior to the right recurrent laryngeal nerve (LN-prRLN) are common sites of nodal recurrence after the resection of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). However, the indication for LN-prRLN dissection remains debatable. We therefore studied the relationships between LN-prRLN metastasis and the clinicopathological characteristics in 306 patients with right or bilateral PTC who underwent LN-prRLN dissection. We found that LN-prRLN metastasis occurred in 16.67% of PTC and was associated with a number of the clinicopathological features. The receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that the areas under the ROC curves for the prediction of LN-prRLN metastasis by the risk factors age right tumor size > 0.85 cm, lymph node (right cervical central VI-1) number > 1.5, metastatic lymph node (right cervical central VI-1) size > 0.45 cm, and lymph node number in the right cervical lateral compartment > 0.5 were 0.601, 0.815, 0.813, 0.725, and 0.743, respectively. In conclusion, the risk factors for LN-prRLN metastasis in patients suffering right thyroid lobe or bilateral PTC include age ≤ 35.5 years, right tumor size ≥ 0.85 cm, capsular invasion, metastatic lymph node (right cervical central VI-1) number ≥ 2, metastatic lymph node (right cervical central VI-1) size ≥ 0.45 cm, and metastatic lymph node number in the right cervical lateral compartment ≥ 1. In patients whose risk factors can be identified pre-operatively or intraoperatively, the dissection of LN-pr-RLN should be considered during right cervical central compartment dissection.

  20. Posterior cricoarytenoid muscle electrophysiologic changes are predictive of vocal cord paralysis with recurrent laryngeal nerve compressive injury in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puram, Sidharth V; Chow, Harold; Wu, Che-Wei; Heaton, James T; Kamani, Dipti; Gorti, Gautham; Chiang, Feng Yu; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Barczynski, Marcin; Schneider, Rick; Dralle, Henning; Lorenz, Kerstin; Randolph, Gregory W

    2016-12-01

    Injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) is a dreaded complication of endocrine surgery. Intraoperative neural monitoring (IONM) has been increasingly utilized to assess the functional status of the RLN. Although the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle (PCA) is innervated by the RLN as the abductor of the larynx, PCA electromyography (EMG) is infrequently recorded during IONM and PCA activity after RLN compressive injury remains poorly characterized. Single-subject prospective animal study. We employed a canine model to identify postcricoid EMG correlates of postoperative vocal cord paralysis (VCP). Postcricoid electrode recordings were obtained before and after compressive RLN injury associated with VCP. Normative postcricoid recordings revealed mean amplitude of 1288 microvolt (μV) and latency of 8.2 millisecond (ms) with maximum (1 milliamp [mA]) vagal stimulation, and mean amplitude of 1807 μV and latency of 3.5 ms with maximum (1 mA) RLN stimulation. Following injury that was associated with VCP, there was 62.1% decrement in postcricoid EMG amplitude with maximum vagal stimulation and 80% decrement with maximum RLN stimulation. Threshold stimulation of the vagus increased by 23%, and there was a corresponding 42% decrease in amplitude. For RLN stimulation, latency increased by 17.3% following injury, whereas threshold stimulation increased by 61% with 35.5% decrement in EMG amplitude. Thus, if RLN amplitude decreases by ≥ 80%, with absolute amplitude of ≤ 300 μV or less and latency increase of ≥ 10%, RLN injury is likely associated with VCP. Our results predict postoperative VCP based on postcricoid electromyographic IONM and may guide surgical decision making. NA Laryngoscope, 126:2744-2751, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Bloqueio do plexo braquial pela via posterior com uso de neuroestimulador e ropivacaína a 0,5% Bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior con el uso de neuroestimulador y ropivacaína a 0,5% Posterior brachial plexus block with nerve stimulator and 0.5% ropivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Beato

    2005-08-01

    ícula y húmero proximal. El objetivo de este estudio fue mostrar los resultados observados en pacientes sometidos a bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior con el uso del neuroestimulador y ropivacaína a 0,5%. MÉTODO: Veintidós pacientes con edad entre 17 y 76 años, estado físico ASA I y II, sometidos a cirugías ortopédicas envolviendo el hombro, clavícula y húmero proximal fueron anestesiados con bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía posterior utilizando neuroestimulador desde 1 mA. Lograda la contracción deseada, la corriente fue disminuida para 0,5 MA y, permaneciendo la respuesta contráctil, fueron inyectados 40 mL de ropivacaína a 0,5%. Fueron evaluados los siguientes parámetros: latencia, analgesia, duración de la cirugía, duración de la analgesia y del bloqueo motor, complicaciones y efectos colaterales. RESULTADOS: El bloqueo fue efectivo en 20 de los 22 pacientes; la latencia media fue de 15,52 min; la duración media de la cirugía fue de 1,61 hora. La media de duración de la analgesia fue de 15,85 horas y del bloqueo motor 11,16 horas. No fueron observados señales y síntomas clínicos de toxicidad del anestésico local y ningún paciente presentó efectos adversos del bloqueo. CONCLUSIONES: En las condiciones de este estudio el bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior con el uso del neuroestimulador y ropivacaína a 0,5% demostró que es una técnica efectiva, confortable para el paciente y de fácil realización.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: There are several approaches to the brachial plexus depending on the experience of the anesthesiologist and the site of the surgery. Posterior brachial plexus block may be an alternative for shoulder, clavicle and proximal humerus surgery. This study aims at presenting the results of patients submitted to posterior brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine and the aid of nerve stimulator. METHODS: Participated in this study 22 patients aged 17 to 76 years, physical status ASA I and II

  2. Role of motor-evoked potential monitoring in conjunction with temporary clipping of spinal nerve roots in posterior thoracic spine tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleraky, Mohammed A; Setzer, Matthias; Papanastassiou, Ioannis D; Baaj, Ali A; Tran, Nam D; Katsares, Kiesha M; Vrionis, Frank D

    2010-05-01

    The vascular supply of the thoracic spinal cord depends on the thoracolumbar segmental arteries. Because of the small size and ventral course of these arteries in relation to the dorsal root ganglion and ventral root, they cannot be reliably identified during surgery by anatomic or morphologic criteria. Sacrificing them will most likely result in paraplegia. The goal of this study was to evaluate a novel method of intraoperative testing of a nerve root's contribution to the blood supply of the thoracic spinal cord. This is a clinical retrospective study of 49 patients diagnosed with thoracic spine tumors. Temporary nerve root clipping combined with motor-evoked potential (MEP) and somatosensory-evoked potential (SSEP) monitoring was performed; additionally, postoperative clinical evaluation was done and reported in all cases. All cases were monitored by SSEP and MEPs. The nerve root to be sacrificed was temporarily clipped using standard aneurysm clips, and SSEP/MEP were assessed before and after clipping. Four nerve roots were sacrificed in four cases, three nerve roots in eight cases, and two nerve roots in 22 cases. Nerve roots were sacrificed bilaterally in 12 cases. Most patients (47/49) had no changes in MEP/SSEP and had no neurological deficit postoperatively. One case of a spinal sarcoma demonstrated changes in MEP after temporary clipping of the left T11 nerve root. The nerve was not sacrificed, and the patient was neurologically intact after surgery. In another case of a sarcoma, MEPs changed in the lower limbs after ligation of left T9 nerve root. It was felt that it was a global event because of anesthesia. Postoperatively, the patient had complete paraplegia but recovered almost completely after 6 months. Temporary nerve root clipping combined with MEP and SSEP monitoring may enhance the impact of neuromonitoring in the intraoperative management of patients with thoracic spine tumors and favorably influence neurological outcome. Copyright 2010 Elsevier

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cranial nerves in the posterior fossa: a comparative study of t2-weighted spin-echo sequences at 1.5 and 3.0 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, F; Müller, M; Bruhn, H

    2008-04-01

    High-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3.0 Tesla (T) is rapidly gaining clinical acceptance. Whether doubling of the field strength of 1.5T and the subsequent increase in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) leads to a significant improvement of image quality is not automatically given. To evaluate the depiction of fine anatomic detail in the posterior fossa, focusing on brain nerves, on T2-weighted imaging, and to define the potential advantage of imaging at 3.0T versus 1.5T. In total, 10 brainstem nerve pairs of 12 volunteers were identified on T2-weighted MR images of 2- and 5-mm section thickness acquired at 1.5T and 3.0T. The MR images were compared for each subject at both field strengths by three independent readers who rated image quality according to depiction of anatomic detail and contrast by using a rating scale. In general, MR images at 3.0T were considered more conspicuous and less noisy than images at 1.5T. The SNR value measured was almost doubled. With respect to structural identification and contrast according to the rating scale, observer scores were significantly improved both for standard imaging with 5-mm sections and high-resolution imaging with 2-mm sections at 3.0T. Direct comparison revealed a significant increase for evaluated image quality criteria and the number of nerves detected. The comparison revealed a clear advantage in favor of T2-weighted MRI at 3.0T vs. 1.5T in depicting the roots and course of brain nerves in the posterior fossa.

  4. Anterior interosseous nerve syndrome diagnosis and intraoperative findings: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Aljawder

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Clinical suspicion should arise in the presence of isolated paralysis of the AIN-supplied muscles. MRI and electrodiagnostic studies will confirm the diagnosis and identify the etiology. The optimal treatment of AIN syndrome has not been established. We recommend surgical intervention in confirmed AIN syndrome from compression neuropathy, refractive to conservative therapy.

  5. Spondylolisthesis and Posterior Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niggemann, P.; Beyer, H.K.; Frey, H.; Grosskurth, D.; Simons, P.; Kuchta, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with a spondylolisthesis of L5 on S1 due to spondylolysis at the level L5/S1. The vertebral slip was fixed and no anterior instability was found. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an upright MRI scanner, posterior instability at the level of the spondylolytic defect of L5 was demonstrated. A structure, probably the hypertrophic ligament flava, arising from the spondylolytic defect was displaced toward the L5 nerve root, and a bilateral contact of the displaced structure with the L5 nerve root was shown in extension of the spine. To our knowledge, this is the first case described of posterior instability in patients with spondylolisthesis. The clinical implications of posterior instability are unknown; however, it is thought that this disorder is common and that it can only be diagnosed using upright MRI

  6. Spondylolisthesis and Posterior Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niggemann, P.; Beyer, H.K.; Frey, H.; Grosskurth, D. (Privatpraxis fuer Upright MRT, Koeln (Germany)); Simons, P.; Kuchta, J. (Media Park Klinik, Koeln (Germany))

    2009-04-15

    We present the case of a patient with a spondylolisthesis of L5 on S1 due to spondylolysis at the level L5/S1. The vertebral slip was fixed and no anterior instability was found. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an upright MRI scanner, posterior instability at the level of the spondylolytic defect of L5 was demonstrated. A structure, probably the hypertrophic ligament flava, arising from the spondylolytic defect was displaced toward the L5 nerve root, and a bilateral contact of the displaced structure with the L5 nerve root was shown in extension of the spine. To our knowledge, this is the first case described of posterior instability in patients with spondylolisthesis. The clinical implications of posterior instability are unknown; however, it is thought that this disorder is common and that it can only be diagnosed using upright MRI.

  7. The role of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the forearm interosseous membrane. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Martin, Juan; Pretell-Mazzini, Juan

    2011-01-01

    The interosseous membrane of the forearm is an important structure to consider in cases of elbow and forearm trauma; it can be injured after elbow or forearm fractures, leading to longitudinal forearm instability. Diagnosis of interosseous membrane injuries is challenging, and failure in diagnosis may result in poor clinical outcomes and complications. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have shown to be valuable methods for the evaluation of this important structure. Both techniques have advantages and limitations, and its use should be adapted to each specific clinical scenario. This article presents an up-to-date literature review regarding the use of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the forearm interosseous membrane evaluation. (orig.)

  8. The role of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the forearm interosseous membrane. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Martin, Juan [Infanta Leonor University Hospital, Trauma and Orthopaedics, Shoulder and Elbow Unit, Madrid (Spain); Pretell-Mazzini, Juan [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Pediatric Orthopaedic Fellow, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2011-12-15

    The interosseous membrane of the forearm is an important structure to consider in cases of elbow and forearm trauma; it can be injured after elbow or forearm fractures, leading to longitudinal forearm instability. Diagnosis of interosseous membrane injuries is challenging, and failure in diagnosis may result in poor clinical outcomes and complications. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have shown to be valuable methods for the evaluation of this important structure. Both techniques have advantages and limitations, and its use should be adapted to each specific clinical scenario. This article presents an up-to-date literature review regarding the use of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the forearm interosseous membrane evaluation. (orig.)

  9. Acute calcific tendonitis of dorsal interosseous muscles of the hand: uncommon site of a frequent disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Schneider

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute calcific tendinopathy is one of the manifestations of hydroxyapatite crystal deposition disease. While it is more frequent in the shoulder, it has been described in virtually all areas of the body, but rarely in the muscles of the hand. Its etiopathogenesis is not yet fully understood and despite being a fairly frequent condition, it is commonly misdiagnosed. The onset of the disease is usually acute and resolves spontaneously. Acute calcific tendinitis of the interosseous tendons of the hand is an uncommon site of a frequent condition. The clinical presentation is similar to other entities, thus errors in diagnosis frequently occur, resulting in over-treatment or unnecessary tests. We describe a case of acute calcific tendinitis of the interosseous muscles of the hand with a brief review of the current literature with emphasis on diagnostic imaging methods.

  10. Fetal development of deep back muscles in the human thoracic region with a focus on transversospinalis muscles and the medial branch of the spinal nerve posterior ramus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuo; Koizumi, Masahiro; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Wang, Bao Jian; Murakami, Gen; Cho, Baik Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Fetal development of human deep back muscles has not yet been fully described, possibly because of the difficulty in identifying muscle bundle directions in horizontal sections. Here, we prepared near-frontal sections along the thoracic back skin (eight fetuses) as well as horizontal sections (six fetuses) from 14 mid-term fetuses at 9–15 weeks of gestation. In the deep side of the trapezius and rhomboideus muscles, the CD34-positive thoracolumbar fascia was evident even at 9 weeks. Desmin-reactivity was strong and homogeneous in the superficial muscle fibers in contrast to the spotty expression in the deep fibers. Thus, in back muscles, formation of the myotendinous junction may start from the superficial muscles and advance to the deep muscles. The fact that developing intramuscular tendons were desmin-negative suggested little possibility of a secondary change from the muscle fibers to tendons. We found no prospective spinalis muscle or its tendinous connections with other muscles. Instead, abundant CD68-positive macrophages along the spinous process at 15 weeks suggested a change in muscle attachment, an event that may result in a later formation of the spinalis muscle. S100-positive intramuscular nerves exhibited downward courses from the multifidus longus muscle in the original segment to the rotatores brevis muscles in the inferiorly adjacent level. The medial cutaneous nerve had already reached the thoracolumbar fascia at 9 weeks, but by 15 weeks the nerve could not penetrate the trapezius muscle. Finally, we propose a folded myotomal model of the primitive transversospinalis muscle that seems to explain a fact that the roofing tile-like configuration of nerve twigs in the semispinalis muscle is reversed in the multifidus and rotatores muscles. PMID:21954879

  11. A Way to Avoid Muscular Fibrosis in the First Dorsal Interosseous Muscle after Acupuncture Injection Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiu Ming Wong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibrosis of skeletal muscle following acupuncture is an iatrogenic disorder. The present case illustrates a patient with a unilateral fibrotic formation on a thumb muscle after acupuncture injection therapy with red sage. The patient in the present case was a counter-terrorism police officer with right-handedness; he noted a palpable nodule three months after injection therapy at his left first dorsal interosseous in which the acupuncture point LI4 (He Gu is located. He also found a reduction in the strength of his left pinch grip that noticeably affected his left handgun marksmanship. However, being ambidextrous in single-hand pistol shooting is an essential requirement for counter-terrorism police officers. Based on the patient’s medical history and claims, no underlying disease or trauma was found to be associated with his current complaint. During physical examination, a fibrotic formation in his left first dorsal interosseous muscle was visualized by using diagnostic ultrasound; also, as confirmed with dynamometry, the strength of his left pinch grip was significantly lower than that of the right counterpart. Because acupuncture injection therapy has three components, antiseptic practices, the mechanical action of syringe insertion, and the pharmacological effect of the sterile herb extract, any one of the components may have contributed to the present adverse event. The first dorsal interosseous muscle is small in dimension and rather vascular; thus, it is not an ideal site for intramuscular injection. When a clinician needs to treat a patient by performing acupuncture at the LI4 acupoint and injecting a herbal extract simultaneously, the clinician should only mechanically stimulate the LI4 acupoint while injecting the herbal medicine into the LI14 (Bi Noe acupoint on the same meridian, the LI14 acupoint being located in the distal portion of the deltoid muscle and being fairly close to the universally agreed upon site on the upper arm

  12. Nerve Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Nerve Blocks A nerve block is an injection to ... the limitations of Nerve Block? What is a Nerve Block? A nerve block is an anesthetic and/ ...

  13. Vascularized nerve grafts for lower extremity nerve reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Kostopoulos, Vasileios K

    2010-02-01

    Vascularized nerve grafts (VNG) were introduced in 1976 but since then, there have been no reports of their usage in lower extremity reconstruction systematically. The factors influencing outcomes as well as a comparison with conventional nerve grafts will be presented.Since 1981, 14 lower extremity nerve injuries in 12 patients have been reconstructed with VNG. Common peroneal nerve was injured in 12 and posterior tibial nerve in 5 patients. The level of the injury was at the knee or thigh. Twelve sural nerves were used as VNG with or without concomitant vascularized posterior calf fascia.All patients regained improved sensibility and adequate posterior tibial nerve function. For common peroneal nerve reconstructions, all patients with denervation time less than 6 months regained muscle strength of grade at least 4, even when long grafts were used for defects of 20 cm or more. Late cases, yielded inadequate muscle function even with the use of VNG.Denervation time of 6 months or less was critical for reconstruction with vascularized nerve graft. Not only the results were statistically significant compared with late cases, but also all early operated patients achieved excellent results. VNG are strongly recommended in traction avulsion injuries of the lower extremity with lengthy nerve damage.

  14. The superiority of 3D-CISS sequence in displaying the cisternal segment of posterior nerves and their pathological changes%3D-CISS MRI序列对脑池段后组脑神经及其病变显示的优势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁长虎; 柳澄; 李坤成; 武乐斌; 庞琦; 乌大尉; 王海燕; 于富华

    2009-01-01

    目的 通过脑池段后组脑神经3D-CISS序列与3D-TSE序列成像质量的比较,评估3D-CISS序列对脑池段后组脑神经及其病变显示的作用.方法 对45例正常体检者和12例患有各种后组脑神经异常症状的病人进行3D-CISS序列、3D-TSE序列扫描,对后组腑神经成像进行评分.结果 舌咽、迷走、副神经及舌下神经在3D-CISS、3D-TSE序列的显示率依次为:100%、57.1%;100%、52.3%;100%、41.1%;91.0%、59.3%.应用3D-CISS序列:对8例血管性神经痛病人显示了责任血管压迫点,对3例后组脑神经微小肿瘤进行了显示,对1例蛛网膜囊肿病人显示了压迫点.结论 对于被脑脊液围绕的后组脑神经显示成像,3D-CISS序列是较好的选择.%Objective To evaluate the efficacy of 3D-CISS on image quality of posterior nerves surrounded by CSF when compared with that of 3D-TSE. Method A total of 45 volunteers and 12 patients with abnormality of posterior cranial nerves were examined using 3D-CISS and 3D-TSE sequences respectively. The image quality were graded for glossopharyngeal nerve、vagus nerve、accessory nerve、 hypoglossal nerves (CN Ⅸ、Ⅹ、Ⅺ、Ⅻ) and their related arteries. Results The identification rates for cisternal segment of posterior nerves were as follows: glossopharyngeal nerve (100% in 3D-CISS and 57.1% in 31)-TSE)、vagus nerve(100% in 3D-CISS and 52.3% in 3I)-TSE)、accessory nerve(100% in 3D-CISS and 41.1% in 3D-TSE)、hypoglossal nerves(91.0% in 3D-CISS and 59.3% in 3D-TSE);12 patients with pathological changes in posterior nerves were all displayed well, among them 8 were pressed by artery, 1 by arachnoid cyst,3 caused by tumors. Conclusions 3D-CISS sequence is preferable when imaging posterior cranial nerves surrounded by CSF.

  15. Prevention of upper limb symptoms and signs of nerve afflictions in computer operators: The effect of intervention by stretching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomsen Gert

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a previous study of computer operators we have demonstrated the relation of upper limb pain to individual and patterns of neurological findings (reduced function of muscles, sensory deviations from normal and mechanical allodynia of nerve trunks. The identified patterns were in accordance with neural afflictions at three specific locations (brachial plexus at chord level, posterior interosseous and median nerve on elbow level. We have introduced an intervention program aiming to mobilize nerves at these locations and tested its efficacy. Methods 125 and 59, respectively, computer operators in two divisions of an engineering consultancy company were invited to answer a questionnaire on upper limb symptoms and to undergo a blinded neurological examination. Participants in one division were subsequently instructed to participate in an upper limb stretching course at least three times during workdays in a six month period. Subjects from the other division served as controls. At the end of the intervention both groups were invited to a second identical evaluation by questionnaire and physical examination. Symptoms and findings were studied in the right upper limb. Perceived changes of pain were recorded and individual and patterns of physical findings assessed for both groups at baseline and at follow-up. In subjects with no or minimal preceding pain we additionally studied the relation of incident pain to the summarized findings for parameters contained in the definition of nerve affliction at the three locations. Results Summarized pain was significantly reduced in the intervention group but unchanged in controls. After the intervention, fewer neurological abnormalities in accordance with nerve affliction were recorded for the whole material but no conclusion could be drawn regarding the relation to the intervention of this reduction. Incident pain correlated to findings in accordance with the three locations of nerve

  16. The strain – Counter strain technique in the management of anterior interosseous nerve syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Goyal, MSc (Applied Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available متلازمة العصب بين العظمي الأمامي؛ هي الاعتلال العصبي للعصب المتوسط القريب على مستوى الساعد. يمكن أن تحدث نقاط الزناد في المقصورات الأمامية للساعد ضغطا للعصب بين العظمي الأمامي، وهذا بدوره يسبب ضعف العضلات. يعرض التقرير حالة سيدة عمرها ٣٧ عاما، اشتكت من شعور غير طبيعي عند مسك القلم أثناء الكتابة. وأظهر الفحص السريري (الملاحظة٬ والملامسة٬ وقوة القبضة ضعفا في قوة القبضة٬ ونقاط الزناد النشطة في منتصف الجانب الأمامي من الساعد وإيجابية علامة الدائرة. بدأ علاجها بالتدليك بالتبريد٬ والتحريك العصبي٬ والتحفيز العصبي الكهربائي عبر الجلد٬ وتقنية الضغط الإجهادي المعاكس أربع مرات أسبوعيا لأسبوعين. وجدت المريضة تحسنا في قوة القبضة، تم قياسه بمقياس القبضة الهيدروليكي الأساسي٬ كما وجدت تحسنا في نقاط الزناد غير النشطة باللمس٬ وتحسن خط اليد. يكشف تقرير هذه الحالة فاعلية تقنية الضغط الإجهادي المعاكس في الاعتلال العصبي الانحباسي كإضافة هامة للعلاج التحفظي. كما أظهرت تقنية الضغط الإجهادي المعاكس تحسنا في قوة العضلات.

  17. Age-related differences in twitch properties and muscle activation of the first dorsal interosseous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonathan D; Herda, Trent J; Trevino, Michael A; Sterczala, Adam J; Ciccone, Anthony B; Nicoll, Justin X

    2017-06-01

    To examine twitch force potentiation and twitch contraction duration, as well as electromyographic amplitude (EMG RMS ) and motor unit mean firing rates (MFR) at targeted forces between young and old individuals in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI). Ultrasonography was used to assess muscle quality. Twenty-two young (YG) (age=22.6±2.7years) and 14 older (OD) (age=62.1±4.7years) individuals completed conditioning contractions at 10% and 50% maximal voluntary contraction, (MVC) during which EMG RMS and MFRs were assessed. Evoked twitches preceded and followed the conditioning contractions. Ultrasound images were taken to quantify muscle quality (cross-sectional area [CSA] and echo intensity [EI]). No differences were found between young and old for CSA, pre-conditioning contraction twitch force, or MFRs (P>0.05). However, OD individuals exhibited greater EI and contraction duration (PMFRs. Ultrasonography suggested age-related changes in muscle structure contributed to altered contractile properties in the OD. Greater muscle activation requirements can have negative implications on fatigue resistance at low to moderate intensities in older individuals. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pinched Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Pinched Nerve Information Page Pinched Nerve Information Page What research is being done? Within the NINDS research programs, pinched nerves are addressed primarily through studies associated with pain ...

  19. Intraoperative Physical Examination for Diagnosis of Interosseous Ligament Rupture-Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachooei, Amir Reza; Rivlin, Michael; Wu, Fei; Faghfouri, Aram; Eberlin, Kyle R; Ring, David

    2015-09-01

    To study the intraobserver and interobserver reliability of the diagnosis of interosseous ligament (IOL) rupture in a cadaver model. On 12 fresh frozen cadavers, radial heads were cut using an identical incision and osteotomy. After randomization, the soft tissues of the limbs were divided into 4 groups: both IOL and triangular fibrocartilage (TFCC) intact; IOL disruption but TFCC intact; both IOL and TFCC divided; and IOL intact but TFCC divided. All incisions had identical suturing. After standard instruction and demonstration of radius pull-push and radius lateral pull tests, 10 physician evaluators with different levels of experience examined the cadaver limbs in a standardized way (elbow at 90° with the forearm held in both supination and pronation) and were asked to classify them into one of the 4 groups. Next, the same examiners were asked to re-examine the limbs after randomly changing the order of examination. The interobserver reliability of agreement for the diagnosis of IOL injury (groups 2 and 3) was fair in both rounds of examination and the intraobserver reliability was moderate. The intra- and interobserver reliabilities of agreement for the 4 groups of injuries among the examiners were fair in both rounds of examination. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive, and negative predictive values were all around 70%. The likelihood of a positive test corresponding with the presence of IOL rupture (positive likelihood ratio) was 2.2. The likelihood of a negative test correctly diagnosing an intact IOL was 0.40. In cadavers, intraoperative tests had fair reliability and 70% accuracy for the diagnosis of IOL rupture using the push-pull and lateral pull maneuvers. The level of experience did not have any effect on the correct diagnosis of intact versus disrupted IOL. Although not common, some failure of surgeries for traumatic elbow fracture-dislocations is because of failure in timely diagnosis of IOL disruption. Copyright © 2015 American

  20. Changes in motor unit behavior following isometric fatigue of the first dorsal interosseous muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymer, William Z.; Lowery, Madeleine M.; Suresh, Nina L.

    2015-01-01

    The neuromuscular strategies employed to compensate for fatigue-induced muscle force deficits are not clearly understood. This study utilizes surface electromyography (sEMG) together with recordings of a population of individual motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) to investigate potential compensatory alterations in motor unit (MU) behavior immediately following a sustained fatiguing contraction and after a recovery period. EMG activity was recorded during abduction of the first dorsal interosseous in 12 subjects at 20% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), before and directly after a 30% MVC fatiguing contraction to task failure, with additional 20% MVC contractions following a 10-min rest. The amplitude, duration and mean firing rate (MFR) of MUAPs extracted with a sEMG decomposition system were analyzed, together with sEMG root-mean-square (RMS) amplitude and median frequency (MPF). MUAP duration and amplitude increased immediately postfatigue and were correlated with changes to sEMG MPF and RMS, respectively. After 10 min, MUAP duration and sEMG MPF recovered to prefatigue values but MUAP amplitude and sEMG RMS remained elevated. MU MFR and recruitment thresholds decreased postfatigue and recovered following rest. The increase in MUAP and sEMG amplitude likely reflects recruitment of larger MUs, while recruitment compression is an additional compensatory strategy directly postfatigue. Recovery of MU MFR in parallel with MUAP duration suggests a possible role for metabolically sensitive afferents in MFR depression postfatigue. This study provides insight into fatigue-induced neuromuscular changes by examining the properties of a large population of concurrently recorded single MUs and outlines possible compensatory strategies involving alterations in MU recruitment and MFR. PMID:25761952

  1. Intraoperative EMG monitoring for protection of the posterior cranial nerves nucleus%术中肌电监测对累及第四脑室底面肿瘤切除中后组脑神经核团的保护研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    漆松涛; 刘文; 张喜安; 方陆雄; 潘军; 杨开军

    2009-01-01

    Objective In order to protect the posterior cranial nerves nucleus,the intraoperative EMG monintoring was used during the surgical resection of brain tumors related to the forth ventrical floor.Method 23 brain tumors were surgically removed in our hospital from February 2007 to April 2008, which including 8 case of medulloblastoms, 7 enpendymomas, 3 brain stem gliomas.All the tumors were microsurgical removed and intraoperative EMG monitoring was applied during the operation. The dates of the posterior cranial nerves function,the surgical procedure and EMG monitor changes were analyzed in order to find their relationship.Results 17 tumors were totally removed and 6 subtotally removed.The patients posterior cranial nerves function were protected well in 6 cases, 13 cases of slight dysfunction and 4 cases of moderate dysfunction.There was no serious damage in our group.The myoelectricity induced by the posterior cranial nerve nucleus stimulation could be recorded successfully under normal anesthesia condition.Conclusion The intraoperative EMG monitoring could avoid posterior cranial nerves nucleus damage and provide objective judgment for resection strategy of tumors related to the forth ventrical floor.%目的 探讨术中肌电监测在累及第四脑室底面肿瘤切除术中,后组脑神经核团的保护作用.方法 2007年2月至2008年4月治疗23例累及第四脑室底面的肿瘤,其中巨大髓母细胞瘤8例,室管膜瘤7例,脑干起源外生性胶质瘤3例,脑干背侧血管网状细胞瘤2例,脑干海绵状血管瘤3例.全部患者通过显微手术切除肿瘤,术中全程监测后组脑神经肌电活动.对患者术后脑神经功能状态、手术过程和监测情况分析.结果 肿瘤全切除17例,次全切除6例,无后组脑神经功能障碍6例,轻度后组腩神经损伤13例,中度后组腩神经损伤4例,无严重损伤者.术中全部患者在正常麻醉和肌松药状态下,可以稳定引出各种刺激诱发的后组脑神

  2. Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm in a 20 Year Old Boy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Result: A clinical diagnosis of left third and fourth cranial nerve palsies from intracranial space-occupying lesion was made. Computed tomography and computed tomography angiography confirmed left posterior communicating artery aneurysm. Conclusion: Any degree of pupillary involvement in third nerve palsy, whether ...

  3. Anatomical and biomechanical study on the interosseous membrane of the cadaveric forearm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YI Xian-hong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: To study the anatomical and biomechanical features of the interosseous membrane (IOM of the cadaveric forearm. Methods: Ten radius-IOM-ulna structures were har- vested from fresh-frozen cadavers to measure the length, width and thickness of the tendinous portion of IOM. Then, the tendinous portion was isolated along with the ulnar and radial ends to which the tendon attached after measurement. The proximal portion of the radius and the distal portion of the ulna were embedded and fixed in the dental base acrylic resin powder. The embedded specimen was clamped and fixed by the MTS 858 test machine using a 10 000 N load cell for the entire tensile test. IOM was stretched at a speed of 50 mm/min until it was ruptured. The load-displacement curve was depicted with a computer and the maximum load and stiffness were recorded at the same time. Results: The IOM of the forearm was composed of three portions: central tendinous tissue, membranous tis- sue and dorsal affiliated oblique cord. IOM was stretched at a neutral position, and flexed at pronation and supination positions. The tendinous portion of IOM was lacerated in 6 specimens when the point of the maximum load reached to 1 021.50 N± 250.13 N, the stiffness to 138.24 N/m±24.29 N/m, and the length of stretch to 9.77 mm±1.77 mm. Fracture occurred at the fixed end of the ulna before laceration of the tendinous portion in 4 specimens when the maximum load was 744.40 N±109.85 N, the stiffness was 151.17 N/m±30.68 N/m, and the length of the stretch was 6.51 mm±0.51 mm. Conclusions: The IOM of the forearm is a structure having ligamentous characteristics between the radius and the ulna. It is very important for maintenance of the longitu- dinal stability of the forearm. The anatomical and biome- chanical data can be used as an objective criterion for evalu- ating the reconstructive method of IOM of the forearm. Key words: Forearm; Anatomy; Biomechanics

  4. A novel method of lengthening the accessory nerve for direct coaptation during nerve repair and nerve transfer procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Maldonado, Andrés A; Stoves, Yolanda; Fries, Fabian N; Li, Rong; Loukas, Marios; Oskouian, Rod J; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The accessory nerve is frequently repaired or used for nerve transfer. The length of accessory nerve available is often insufficient or marginal (under tension) for allowing direct coaptation during nerve repair or nerve transfer (neurotization), necessitating an interpositional graft. An attractive maneuver would facilitate lengthening of the accessory nerve for direct coaptation. The aim of the present study was to identify an anatomical method for such lengthening. METHODS In 20 adult cadavers, the C-2 or C-3 connections to the accessory nerve were identified medial to the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle and the anatomy of the accessory nerve/cervical nerve fibers within the SCM was documented. The cervical nerve connections were cut. Lengths of the accessory nerve were measured. Samples of the cut C-2 and C-3 nerves were examined using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS The anatomy and adjacent neural connections within the SCM are complicated. However, after the accessory nerve was "detethered" from within the SCM and following transection, the additional length of the accessory nerve increased from a mean of 6 cm to a mean of 10.5 cm (increase of 4.5 cm) after cutting the C-2 connections, and from a mean of 6 cm to a mean length of 9 cm (increase of 3.5 cm) after cutting the C-3 connections. The additional length of accessory nerve even allowed direct repair of an infraclavicular target (i.e., the proximal musculocutaneous nerve). The cervical nerve connections were shown not to contain motor fibers. CONCLUSIONS An additional length of the accessory nerve made available in the posterior cervical triangle can facilitate direct repair or neurotization procedures, thus eliminating the need for an interpositional nerve graft, decreasing the time/distance for regeneration and potentially improving clinical outcomes.

  5. Is it necessary to use the entire root as a donor when transferring contralateral C7 nerve to repair median nerve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kai-Ming; Lao, Jie; Guan, Wen-Jie; Hu, Jing-Jing

    2018-01-01

    If a partial contralateral C 7 nerve is transferred to a recipient injured nerve, results are not satisfactory. However, if an entire contralateral C 7 nerve is used to repair two nerves, both recipient nerves show good recovery. These findings seem contradictory, as the above two methods use the same donor nerve, only the cutting method of the contralateral C 7 nerve is different. To verify whether this can actually result in different repair effects, we divided rats with right total brachial plexus injury into three groups. In the entire root group, the entire contralateral C 7 root was transected and transferred to the median nerve of the affected limb. In the posterior division group, only the posterior division of the contralateral C 7 root was transected and transferred to the median nerve. In the entire root + posterior division group, the entire contralateral C 7 root was transected but only the posterior division was transferred to the median nerve. After neurectomy, the median nerve was repaired on the affected side in the three groups. At 8, 12, and 16 weeks postoperatively, electrophysiological examination showed that maximum amplitude, latency, muscle tetanic contraction force, and muscle fiber cross-sectional area of the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle were significantly better in the entire root and entire root + posterior division groups than in the posterior division group. No significant difference was found between the entire root and entire root + posterior division groups. Counts of myelinated axons in the median nerve were greater in the entire root group than in the entire root + posterior division group, which were greater than the posterior division group. We conclude that for the same recipient nerve, harvesting of the entire contralateral C 7 root achieved significantly better recovery than partial harvesting, even if only part of the entire root was used for transfer. This result indicates that the entire root should be used as a

  6. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  7. Association of lunate morphology, sex, and lunotriquetral interosseous ligament injury with radiologic measurement of the capitate-triquetrum joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgese, Marissa; Boutin, Robert D.; Chaudhari, Abhijit J. [University of California - Davis, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bayne, Christopher O.; Szabo, Robert M. [University of California - Davis, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2017-12-15

    Radiologic presentation of carpal instability at the radial side of the carpus, e.g. scapholunate diastasis following scapholunate interosseous ligament injury, has been studied extensively. By comparison, presentation at the ulnar-sided carpus has not. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of lunate morphology, sex, and lunotriquetral interosseous ligament (LTIL) status on the radiologic measurement of the capitate-triquetrum joint (C-T distance). Further, we sought to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of C-T distance for assessing LTIL injuries. We retrospectively identified 223 wrists with wrist radiographs and MR arthrograms with contrast injection. Data collected included sex, lunate morphology and LTIL status from MR arthrography, and C-T distance from radiography. The effects of lunate morphology, sex, and LTIL injury status on C-T distance were evaluated using generalized linear models. Diagnostic performance of C-T distance was assessed by the area under receiver-operator characteristic curve (AUROC). Lunate morphology, sex, and LTIL injury status all had significant effects on C-T distance; wrists with type II lunates, men, and wrists with LTIL injuries had greater C-T distances than wrists with type I lunates, women, and wrists without LTIL injuries, respectively (p < 0.01). The diagnostic value of the C-T distance for identifying patients with full-thickness LTIL tears was sufficient for women with type I (AUROC = 0.67) and type II lunates (0.60) and good for men with type I (0.72) and type II lunates (0.77). The demonstrated influence of LTIL status on C-T distance supports the use of C-T distance as a tool in assessing for full-thickness LTIL tears. (orig.)

  8. Association of lunate morphology, sex, and lunotriquetral interosseous ligament injury with radiologic measurement of the capitate-triquetrum joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgese, Marissa; Boutin, Robert D.; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Bayne, Christopher O.; Szabo, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    Radiologic presentation of carpal instability at the radial side of the carpus, e.g. scapholunate diastasis following scapholunate interosseous ligament injury, has been studied extensively. By comparison, presentation at the ulnar-sided carpus has not. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of lunate morphology, sex, and lunotriquetral interosseous ligament (LTIL) status on the radiologic measurement of the capitate-triquetrum joint (C-T distance). Further, we sought to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of C-T distance for assessing LTIL injuries. We retrospectively identified 223 wrists with wrist radiographs and MR arthrograms with contrast injection. Data collected included sex, lunate morphology and LTIL status from MR arthrography, and C-T distance from radiography. The effects of lunate morphology, sex, and LTIL injury status on C-T distance were evaluated using generalized linear models. Diagnostic performance of C-T distance was assessed by the area under receiver-operator characteristic curve (AUROC). Lunate morphology, sex, and LTIL injury status all had significant effects on C-T distance; wrists with type II lunates, men, and wrists with LTIL injuries had greater C-T distances than wrists with type I lunates, women, and wrists without LTIL injuries, respectively (p < 0.01). The diagnostic value of the C-T distance for identifying patients with full-thickness LTIL tears was sufficient for women with type I (AUROC = 0.67) and type II lunates (0.60) and good for men with type I (0.72) and type II lunates (0.77). The demonstrated influence of LTIL status on C-T distance supports the use of C-T distance as a tool in assessing for full-thickness LTIL tears. (orig.)

  9. Mental nerve paresthesia secondary to initiation of endodontic therapy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Andrabi, Syed Mukhtar-Un-Nisar; Alam, Sharique; Zia, Afaf; Khan, Masood Hasan; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Whenever endodontic therapy is performed on mandibular posterior teeth, damage to the inferior alveolar nerve or any of its branches is possible. Acute periapical infection in mandibular posterior teeth may also sometimes disturb the normal functioning of the inferior alveolar nerve. The most common clinical manifestation of these insults is the paresthesia of the inferior alveolar nerve or mental nerve paresthesia. Paresthesia usually manifests as burning, prickling, tingling, numbness, itch...

  10. Variant palmaris profundus enclosed by an unusual loop of the median nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHOU, HSIU-CHU; JENG, HELLEN; KO, TSUI-LING; PAI, MAN-HUI; CHANG, CHIU-YUN; WU, CHING-HSIANG

    2001-01-01

    According to the usual description in most anatomy texts, the median nerve in the forearm passes between the 2 heads of pronator teres. It continues distally between flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus almost to the retinaculum. Muscular branches leave the nerve near the elbow and supply all superficial muscles of the anterior part of the forearm except flexor carpi ulnaris. Many variations of the median nerve in the forearm have been reported (Urban & Krosman, 1992). The palmaris profundus is also a rare anomaly of the forearm (Dyreby & Engber, 1982). It originates from the radial side of the common flexor tendon in the proximal forearm and inserts into the undersurface of the palmar aponeurosis. The origin of palmaris profundus may be close to the median nerve and its branches, and may be involved in compressive neuropathy of the anterior interosseous nerve. Its tendon crossing through the carpal canal has been implicated in the carpal tunnel syndrome (reviewed by Lahey & Aulicino, 1986). In some cases, palmaris profundus was found enclosed in a common fascial sheath with the median nerve (Stark, 1992; Sahinoglu et al. 1994). To indicate its close association with the median nerve, the palmaris profundus was also named ‘musculus comitans nervi mediani’ (Sahinoglu et al. 1994). This article reports an unusual loop of the median nerve encircling an anomalous palmaris profundus in the forearm, which, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously described. PMID:11693311

  11. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the ulnar nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  12. Radial nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - radial nerve; Radial nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the radial nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  13. Intraoperative Hypoglossal Nerve Mapping During Carotid Endarterectomy: Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Atsuhiro; Saga, Isako; Ishikawa, Mami

    2018-05-01

    Hypoglossal nerve deficit is a possible complication caused by carotid endarterectomy (CEA). The accidental injury of the hypoglossal nerve during surgery is one of the major reasons for permanent hypoglossal nerve palsy. In this study, we investigated the usefulness of intraoperative mapping of the hypoglossal nerve to identify this nerve during CEA. Five consecutive patients who underwent CEA for the treatment of symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis were studied. A hand-held probe was used to detect the hypoglossal nerve in the operative field, and the tongue motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded. The tongue MEPs were obtained in all the patients. The invisible hypoglossal nerve was successfully identified without any difficulty when the internal carotid artery was exposed. Intraoperative mapping was particularly useful for identifying the hypoglossal nerve when the hypoglossal nerve passed beneath the posterior belly of the digastric muscle. In 1 of 2 cases, MEP was also elicited when the ansa cervicalis was stimulated, although the resulting amplitude was much smaller than that obtained by direct stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve. Postoperatively, none of the patients presented with hypoglossal nerve palsy. Intraoperative hypoglossal nerve mapping enabled us to locate the invisible hypoglossal nerve during the exposure of the internal carotid artery accurately without retracting the posterior belly of the digastric muscle and other tissues in the vicinity of the internal carotid artery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Iodine-125 radiation of posterior uveal melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, S.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-eight cases of posterior choroidal melanoma were treated with iodine-125 in gold eye plaques. Eleven cases were located within 3.0 mm of the optic nerve (group A), nine were within 3.0 mm of the fovea (group B), and eight were within 3.0 mm of the optic nerve and fovea (group C). The mean follow-up of group A was 46.3 months; group B, 25.5 months; and group C, 42.7 months. Complications included macular edema, cataract and tumor growth. Visual acuity remained within two lines of that tested preoperatively for 4 of 11 patients in group A, 4 of 9 in group B, and 5 of 8 in group C. These results with iodine-125 suggest it as an appropriate treatment for patients with choroidal melanoma located near optic nerve and/or macula

  15. Iodine-125 radiation of posterior uveal melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, S.

    1987-12-01

    Twenty-eight cases of posterior choroidal melanoma were treated with iodine-125 in gold eye plaques. Eleven cases were located within 3.0 mm of the optic nerve (group A), nine were within 3.0 mm of the fovea (group B), and eight were within 3.0 mm of the optic nerve and fovea (group C). The mean follow-up of group A was 46.3 months; group B, 25.5 months; and group C, 42.7 months. Complications included macular edema, cataract and tumor growth. Visual acuity remained within two lines of that tested preoperatively for 4 of 11 patients in group A, 4 of 9 in group B, and 5 of 8 in group C. These results with iodine-125 suggest it as an appropriate treatment for patients with choroidal melanoma located near optic nerve and/or macula.

  16. Examination of muscle composition and motor unit behavior of the first dorsal interosseous of normal and overweight children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonathan D; Sterczala, Adam J; Trevino, Michael A; Herda, Trent J

    2018-05-01

    We examined differences between normal weight (NW) and overweight (OW) children aged 8-10 yr in strength, muscle composition, and motor unit (MU) behavior of the first dorsal interosseous. Ultrasonography was used to determine muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), subcutaneous fat (sFAT), and echo intensity (EI). MU behavior was assessed during isometric muscle actions at 20% and 50% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) by analyzing electromyography amplitude (EMG RMS ) and relationships between mean firing rates (MFR), recruitment thresholds (RT), and MU action potential amplitudes (MUAP size ) and durations (MUAP time ). The OW group had significantly greater EI than the NW group ( P = 0.002; NW, 47.99 ± 6.01 AU; OW, 58.90 ± 10.63 AU, where AU is arbitrary units) with no differences between groups for CSA ( P = 0.688) or MVC force ( P = 0.790). MUAP size was larger for NW than OW in relation to RT ( P = 0.002) and for MUs expressing similar MFRs ( P = 0.011). There were no significant differences ( P = 0.279-0.969) between groups for slopes or y-intercepts from the MFR vs. RT relationships. MUAP time was larger in OW ( P = 0.015) and EMG RMS was attenuated in OW compared with NW ( P = 0.034); however, there were no significant correlations ( P = 0.133-0.164, r = 0.270-0.291) between sFAT and EMG RMS . In a muscle that does not support body mass, the OW children had smaller MUAP size as well as greater EI, although anatomical CSA was similar. This contradicts previous studies examining larger limb muscles. Despite evidence of smaller MUs, the OW children had similar isometric strength compared with NW children. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Ultrasound data and motor unit action potential sizes suggest that overweight children have poorer muscle composition and smaller motor units in the first dorsal interosseous than normal weight children. Evidence is presented that suggests differences in action potential size cannot be explained

  17. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in entrapment and compressive neuropathy - what, where, and how to see the peripheral nerves on the musculoskeletal magnetic resonance image: Part 2. Upper extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sungjun [Yonsei University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Hanyang University, Kuri Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Kuri City, Kyunggi-do (Korea); Choi, Jin-Young; Huh, Yong-Min; Song, Ho-Taek; Lee, Sung-Ah [Yonsei University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Seung Min [Yonsei University, Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Suh, Jin-Suck [Yonsei University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University, Research Institute of Radiological Science, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2007-02-15

    The diagnosis of nerve entrapment and compressive neuropathy has been traditionally based on the clinical and electrodiagnostic examinations. As a result of improvements in the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging modality, it plays not only a fundamental role in the detection of space-occupying lesions, but also a compensatory role in clinically and electrodiagnostically inconclusive cases. Although ultrasound has undergone further development in the past decades and shows high resolution capabilities, it has inherent limitations due to its operator dependency. We review the course of normal peripheral nerves, as well as various clinical demonstrations and pathological features of compressed and entrapped nerves in the upper extremities on MR imaging, according to the nerves involved. The common sites of nerve entrapment of the upper extremity are as follows: the brachial plexus of the thoracic outlet; axillary nerve of the quadrilateral space; radial nerve of the radial tunnel; ulnar nerve of the cubital tunnel and Guyon's canal; median nerve of the pronator syndrome, anterior interosseous nerve syndrome, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Although MR imaging can depict the peripheral nerves in the extremities effectively, radiologists should be familiar with nerve pathways, common sites of nerve compression, and common space-occupying lesions resulting in nerve compression in MR imaging. (orig.)

  18. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in entrapment and compressive neuropathy - what, where, and how to see the peripheral nerves on the musculoskeletal magnetic resonance image: Part 2. Upper extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sungjun; Choi, Jin-Young; Huh, Yong-Min; Song, Ho-Taek; Lee, Sung-Ah; Kim, Seung Min; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of nerve entrapment and compressive neuropathy has been traditionally based on the clinical and electrodiagnostic examinations. As a result of improvements in the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging modality, it plays not only a fundamental role in the detection of space-occupying lesions, but also a compensatory role in clinically and electrodiagnostically inconclusive cases. Although ultrasound has undergone further development in the past decades and shows high resolution capabilities, it has inherent limitations due to its operator dependency. We review the course of normal peripheral nerves, as well as various clinical demonstrations and pathological features of compressed and entrapped nerves in the upper extremities on MR imaging, according to the nerves involved. The common sites of nerve entrapment of the upper extremity are as follows: the brachial plexus of the thoracic outlet; axillary nerve of the quadrilateral space; radial nerve of the radial tunnel; ulnar nerve of the cubital tunnel and Guyon's canal; median nerve of the pronator syndrome, anterior interosseous nerve syndrome, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Although MR imaging can depict the peripheral nerves in the extremities effectively, radiologists should be familiar with nerve pathways, common sites of nerve compression, and common space-occupying lesions resulting in nerve compression in MR imaging. (orig.)

  19. Ossification of the Interosseous Membrane of the Leg in a Football Player: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Postacchini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We report a case of ossification of the interosseous membrane (OIM of the leg in a football player who had no history of severe local traumas. A review of the literature of the OIM of the leg in athletes was also carried out. Case Report. A 38-year-old Caucasian male patient complained of pain on lateral aspect of the leg when playing football. Pain progressively worsened until he had to stop the sporting activity. Radiographs, and then CT and MRI, showed OIM in the middle third of the left leg. MRI showed inflammation of tibia periosteum and bone adjacent to the ossification, which was then excised. Two months after surgery the patient returned to play football. Conclusion. A thorough analysis of the literature revealed three types of OIM of the leg in athletes. Type I usually occurs after a syndesmosis ankle sprain, Type II appears to result from a tibia fracture, and Type III, of which only one fully recorded case has been published, is probably caused, as in our patient, by repetitive minor traumas to the leg. Awareness of the existence of Type III OIM can avoid erroneous diagnoses leading to useless investigations and treatments.

  20. Arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Philipp; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Foreman, Paul; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-11-01

    The arterial supply to the upper cranial nerves is derived from a complex network of branches derived from the anterior and posterior cerebral circulations. We performed a comprehensive literature review of the arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves with an emphasis on clinical considerations. Arteries coursing in close proximity to the cranial nerves regularly give rise to small vessels that supply the nerve. Knowledge of the arteries supplying the cranial nerves is of particular importance during surgical approaches to the skull base. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Levels of Bifurcation of the Sciatic Nerve among Ugandans at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The sciatic nerve is derived from the lumbo-sacral plexus, It is the thickest nerve in the whole body, it exits the gluteal region through the lower part of the greater sciatic foramen, it is the main innervator of the posterior thigh, the leg and foot, it usually ends halfway down the back of the thigh by dividing into the ...

  2. Spinal accessory nerve schwannomas masquerading as a fourth ventricular lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Sundar Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign lesions that arise from the nerve sheath of cranial nerves. The most common schwannomas arise from the 8 th cranial nerve (the vestibulo-cochlear nerve followed by trigeminal and facial nerves and then from glossopharyngeal, vagus, and spinal accessory nerves. Schwannomas involving the oculomotor, trochlear, abducens and hypoglossal nerves are very rare. We report a very unusual spinal accessory nerve schwannoma which occupied the fourth ventricle and extended inferiorly to the upper cervical canal. The radiological features have been detailed. The diagnostic dilemma was due to its midline posterior location mimicking a fourth ventricular lesion like medulloblastoma and ependymoma. Total excision is the ideal treatment for these tumors. A brief review of literature with tabulations of the variants has been listed.

  3. Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy After Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Christopher P; Clark, Aaron J; Kanter, Adam S; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Multi-institutional retrospective study. The goal of the current study is to quantify the incidence of 2 extremely rare complications of cervical spine surgery; hypoglossal and glossopharyngeal nerve palsies. A total of 8887 patients who underwent cervical spine surgery from 2005 to 2011 were included in the study from 21 institutions. No glossopharyngeal nerve injuries were reported. One hypoglossal nerve injury was reported after a C3-7 laminectomy (0.01%). This deficit resolved with conservative management. The rate by institution ranged from 0% to 1.28%. Although not directly injured by the surgical procedure, the transient nerve injury might have been related to patient positioning as has been described previously in the literature. Hypoglossal nerve injury during cervical spine surgery is an extremely rare complication. Institutional rates may vary. Care should be taken during posterior cervical surgery to avoid hyperflexion of the neck and endotracheal tube malposition.

  4. Posterior fossa epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushner, M.J.; Luken, M.G. III

    1983-01-01

    CT demonstrated posterior fossa epidural hematoma in three patients with head trauma in whom this diagnosis was not clinically apparent. No patient was in stupor or coma and no patient experienced a lucid interval. Only one patient had signs referable to the posterior fossa. Two patients had occipital skull fracture disclosed by plain radiographs. CT revealed a unilateral biconvex hematoma in two cases, and a bilateral hematoma with supratentorial extension in the third. All patients underwent suboccipital craniectomy and recovered. Therapeutic success in these cases was facilitated by early CT and the rapid disclosure of the unsuspected posterior fossa lesions. CT showing contiguous hematoma below and above the tentorium cerebelli after posterior head trauma is highly suggestive of epidural hematoma arising from the posterior fossa. (orig.)

  5. "Pollical palmar interosseous muscle" (musculus adductor pollicis accessorius): attachments, innervation, variations, phylogeny, and implications for human evolution and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Hellegouarch, Gaelle; Aziz, M Ashraf; Ferrero, Eva M; Kern, Michael; Francis, Nadia; Diogo, Rui

    2013-03-01

    Most atlases and textbooks dealing with human anatomy do not refer to the "pollical palmar interosseous" (PPI) muscle of Henle. In order to undertake a fresh and detailed study of this muscle and to thus better understand human comparative anatomy and evolution, we: 1) analyze the frequency of the PPI in a large sample of human hands; 2) describe the attachments, innervation and varieties of the PPI in these hands; 3) compare the data obtained with the information available in the literature; and 4) discuss the phylogenetic origin of the PPI and the implications of our observations and comparisons for medicine and for the understanding of human evolutionary history. Within the 72 hands dissected by us, the PPI is present in 67 hands (93%), commonly having a single muscular branch, originating from the medial side of the base of metacarpal I only, inserting onto the medial side of the base of the pollical proximal phalanx and/or surrounding structures (e.g., ulnar sesamoid bone, wing tendon of extensor apparatus), and passing at least partially, and usually mainly, medial to the princeps pollicis artery. A careful study of the human PPI, as well as a detailed comparison with other mammals, strongly suggest that the muscle is evolutionarily derived from the adductor pollicis, and namely from its oblique head. Therefore, we propose that PPI should be designated by the name musculus adductor pollicis accessorius, which indicates that the muscle is most likely a de novo structure derived from the adductor pollicis. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. 3DCRT for posterior fossa: Sparing of surrounding organs at risk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azza Helal

    2013-06-25

    Jun 25, 2013 ... including non-posterior fossa brain, pituitary, cochlea, eyes, optic nerves, optic chiasm, ... grams; Rt.C, right cochlea; Lt. C, left cochlea; Non P.F, non posterior ... child's cognitive function and quality of life.6 Although the.

  7. Morphology of Donor and Recipient Nerves Utilised in Nerve Transfers to Restore Upper Limb Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Messina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Loss of hand function after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI impacts heavily on independence. Multiple nerve transfer surgery has been applied successfully after cervical SCI to restore critical arm and hand functions, and the outcome depends on nerve integrity. Nerve integrity is assessed indirectly using muscle strength testing and intramuscular electromyography, but these measures cannot show the manifestation that SCI has on the peripheral nerves. We directly assessed the morphology of nerves biopsied at the time of surgery, from three patients within 18 months post injury. Our objective was to document their morphologic features. Donor nerves included teres minor, posterior axillary, brachialis, extensor carpi radialis brevis and supinator. Recipient nerves included triceps, posterior interosseus (PIN and anterior interosseus nerves (AIN. They were fixed in glutaraldehyde, processed and embedded in Araldite Epon for light microscopy. Eighty percent of nerves showed abnormalities. Most common were myelin thickening and folding, demyelination, inflammation and a reduction of large myelinated axon density. Others were a thickened perineurium, oedematous endoneurium and Renaut bodies. Significantly, very thinly myelinated axons and groups of unmyelinated axons were observed indicating regenerative efforts. Abnormalities exist in both donor and recipient nerves and they differ in appearance and aetiology. The abnormalities observed may be preventable or reversible.

  8. Reconstruction of the abdominal vagus nerve using sural nerve grafts in canine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingbo; Wang, Jun; Luo, Fen; Wang, Zhiming; Wang, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Recently, vagus nerve preservation or reconstruction of vagus has received increasing attention. The present study aimed to investigate the feasibility of reconstructing the severed vagal trunk using an autologous sural nerve graft. Ten adult Beagle dogs were randomly assigned to two groups of five, the nerve grafting group (TG) and the vagal resection group (VG). The gastric secretion and emptying functions in both groups were assessed using Hollander insulin and acetaminophen tests before surgery and three months after surgery. All dogs underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia. In TG group, latency and conduction velocity of the action potential in a vagal trunk were measured, and then nerves of 4 cm long were cut from the abdominal anterior and posterior vagal trunks. Two segments of autologous sural nerve were collected for performing end-to-end anastomoses with the cut ends of vagal trunk (8-0 nylon suture, 3 sutures for each anastomosis). Dogs in VG group only underwent partial resections of the anterior and posterior vagal trunks. Laparotomy was performed in dogs of TG group, and latency and conduction velocity of the action potential in their vagal trunks were measured. The grafted nerve segment was removed, and stained with anti-neurofilament protein and toluidine blue. Latency of the action potential in the vagal trunk was longer after surgery than before surgery in TG group, while the conduction velocity was lower after surgery. The gastric secretion and emptying functions were weaker after surgery in dogs of both groups, but in TG group they were significantly better than in VG group. Anti-neurofilament protein staining and toluidine blue staining showed there were nerve fibers crossing the anastomosis of the vagus and sural nerves in dogs of TG group. Reconstruction of the vagus nerve using the sural nerve is technically feasible.

  9. Reconstruction of the abdominal vagus nerve using sural nerve grafts in canine models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, vagus nerve preservation or reconstruction of vagus has received increasing attention. The present study aimed to investigate the feasibility of reconstructing the severed vagal trunk using an autologous sural nerve graft. METHODS: Ten adult Beagle dogs were randomly assigned to two groups of five, the nerve grafting group (TG and the vagal resection group (VG. The gastric secretion and emptying functions in both groups were assessed using Hollander insulin and acetaminophen tests before surgery and three months after surgery. All dogs underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia. In TG group, latency and conduction velocity of the action potential in a vagal trunk were measured, and then nerves of 4 cm long were cut from the abdominal anterior and posterior vagal trunks. Two segments of autologous sural nerve were collected for performing end-to-end anastomoses with the cut ends of vagal trunk (8-0 nylon suture, 3 sutures for each anastomosis. Dogs in VG group only underwent partial resections of the anterior and posterior vagal trunks. Laparotomy was performed in dogs of TG group, and latency and conduction velocity of the action potential in their vagal trunks were measured. The grafted nerve segment was removed, and stained with anti-neurofilament protein and toluidine blue. RESULTS: Latency of the action potential in the vagal trunk was longer after surgery than before surgery in TG group, while the conduction velocity was lower after surgery. The gastric secretion and emptying functions were weaker after surgery in dogs of both groups, but in TG group they were significantly better than in VG group. Anti-neurofilament protein staining and toluidine blue staining showed there were nerve fibers crossing the anastomosis of the vagus and sural nerves in dogs of TG group. CONCLUSION: Reconstruction of the vagus nerve using the sural nerve is technically feasible.

  10. Low Median Nerve Palsy as Initial Manifestation of Churg-Strauss Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Hak; Koh, Young Do; Noh, Jung Ho; Gong, Hyun Sik; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2017-06-01

    Anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) syndrome is typically characterized by forearm pain and partial or complete dysfunction of the AIN-innervated muscles. Although the exact etiology and pathophysiology of the disorder remain unclear, AIN syndrome is increasingly thought to be an inflammatory condition of the nerve rather than a compressive neuropathy because the symptoms often resolve spontaneously following prolonged observation. However, peripheral neuropathy can be 1 of the first symptoms of systemic vasculitis that needs early systemic immunotherapy to prevent extensive nerve damage. Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS; eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis) is 1 type of primary systemic vasculitis that frequently damages the peripheral nervous system. CSS-associated neuropathy usually involves nerves of the lower limb, and few studies have reported on the involvement of the upper limb alone. We report on a rare case of low median nerve palsy as the initial manifestation of CSS. The patient recovered well with early steroid treatment for primary systemic vasculitis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Posterior capsule opacification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormstone, I Michael; Wang, Lixin; Liu, Christopher S C

    2009-02-01

    Posterior Capsule Opacification (PCO) is the most common complication of cataract surgery. At present the only means of treating cataract is by surgical intervention, and this initially restores high visual quality. Unfortunately, PCO develops in a significant proportion of patients to such an extent that a secondary loss of vision occurs. A modern cataract operation generates a capsular bag, which comprises a proportion of the anterior and the entire posterior capsule. The bag remains in situ, partitions the aqueous and vitreous humours, and in the majority of cases, houses an intraocular lens. The production of a capsular bag following surgery permits a free passage of light along the visual axis through the transparent intraocular lens and thin acellular posterior capsule. However, on the remaining anterior capsule, lens epithelial cells stubbornly reside despite enduring the rigours of surgical trauma. This resilient group of cells then begin to re-colonise the denuded regions of the anterior capsule, encroach onto the intraocular lens surface, occupy regions of the outer anterior capsule and most importantly of all begin to colonise the previously cell-free posterior capsule. Cells continue to divide, begin to cover the posterior capsule and can ultimately encroach on the visual axis resulting in changes to the matrix and cell organization that can give rise to light scatter. This review will describe the biological mechanisms driving PCO progression and discuss the influence of IOL design, surgical techniques and putative drug therapies in regulating the rate and severity of PCO.

  12. Optic Nerve Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    The optic nerve is a bundle of more than 1 million nerve fibers that carry visual messages. You have one connecting ... retina) to your brain. Damage to an optic nerve can cause vision loss. The type of vision ...

  13. Optic Nerve Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Optic Nerve Imaging email Send this article to a friend ... measurements of nerve fiber damage (or loss). The Nerve Fiber Analyzer (GDx) uses laser light to measure ...

  14. Femoral nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The femoral nerve is located in the leg and supplies the muscles that assist help straighten the leg. It supplies sensation ... leg. One risk of damage to the femoral nerve is pelvic fracture. Symptoms of femoral nerve damage ...

  15. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ulnar nerve originates from the brachial plexus and travels down arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near the surface of the body where ...

  16. Phrenic nerve neurotization utilizing the spinal accessory nerve: technical note with potential application in patients with high cervical quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Pearson, Blake; Loukas, Marios; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Oakes, W Jerry

    2008-11-01

    High cervical quadriplegia is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Artificial respiration in these patients carries significant long-term risks such as infection, atelectasis, and respiratory failure. As phrenic nerve pacing has been proven to free many of these patients from ventilatory dependency, we hypothesized that neurotization of the phrenic nerve with the spinal accessory nerve (SAN) may offer one potential alternative to phrenic nerve stimulation via pacing and may be more efficacious and longer lasting without the complications of an implantable device. Ten cadavers (20 sides) underwent exposure of the cervical phrenic nerve and the SAN in the posterior cervical triangle. The SAN was split into anterior and posterior halves and the anterior half transposed to the ipsilateral phrenic nerve as it crossed the anterior scalene muscle. The mean distance between the cervical phrenic nerve and the SAN in the posterior cervical triangle was 2.5 cm proximally, 4 cm at a midpoint, and 6 cm distally. The range for these measurements was 2 to 4 cm, 3.5 to 5 cm, and 4 to 8.5 cm, respectively. The mean excess length of SAN available after transposition to the more anteromedially placed phrenic nerve was 5 cm (range 4 to 6.5 cm). The mean diameter of these regional parts of the spinal accessory and phrenic nerves was 2 and 2.5 mm, respectively. No statistically significant difference was found for measurements between sides. To our knowledge, using the SAN for neurotization to the phrenic nerve for potential use in patients with spinal cord injury has not been previously explored. Following clinical trials, these data may provide a mechanism for self stimulation of the diaphragm and obviate phrenic nerve pacing in patients with high cervical quadriplegia. Our study found that such a maneuver is technically feasible in the cadaver.

  17. Posterior pelvic exenteration and retrograde total hysterectomy in patients with locally advanced ovarian cancer: Clinical and functional outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Berretta

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Our study confirmed that pelvic posterior exenteration associated with retrograde radical hysterectomy represents the safest radical surgical approach to advanced ovarian cancer, which permits preservation of the pelvic autonomic nerve plexus and, therefore, bladder and colorectal functions.

  18. Posterior Urethral Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve J. Hodges

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common cause of lower urinary tract obstruction in male infants is posterior urethral valves. Although the incidence has remained stable, the neonatal mortality for this disorder has improved due to early diagnosis and intensive neonatal care, thanks in part to the widespread use of prenatal ultrasound evaluations. In fact, the most common reason for the diagnosis of posterior urethral valves presently is the evaluation of infants for prenatal hydronephrosis. Since these children are often diagnosed early, the urethral obstruction can be alleviated rapidly through catheter insertion and eventual surgery, and their metabolic derangements can be normalized without delay, avoiding preventable infant mortality. Of the children that survive, however, early diagnosis has not had much effect on their long-term prognosis, as 30% still develop renal insufficiency before adolescence. A better understanding of the exact cause of the congenital obstruction of the male posterior urethra, prevention of postnatal bladder and renal injury, and the development of safe methods to treat urethral obstruction prenatally (and thereby avoiding the bladder and renal damage due to obstructive uropathy are the goals for the care of children with posterior urethral valves[1].

  19. [Dynamics of lagophthalmos depending on facial nerve repair and its intraoperative monitoring in neurosurgical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnikova, T V; Serova, N K; Shimansky, V N

    2014-01-01

    Over 200 patients with acoustic neuromas and over 100 patients with posterior cranial fossa meningiomas are annually operated on at the N.N. Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute. Intraoperative monitoring of the facial nerve function is used in most patients with tumors of the posterior cranial fossa to identify the facial nerve in the surgical wound. If the anatomical integrity of the facial nerve in the cranial cavity cannot be retained, facial nerve repair is performed to restore the facial muscle function. Intraoperative electrical stimulation of the facial nerve has a great prognostic significance to evaluate the dynamics of lagophthalmos in the late postoperative period and to select the proper method for lagophthalmos correction. When the facial nerve was reinnervated by the descending branch or trunk of the hypoglossal nerve, sufficient eyelid closure was observed only in 3 patients out of 17.

  20. Musculocutaneous nerve substituting for the distal part of radial nerve: A case report and its embryological basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Yogesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present case, we have reported a unilateral variation of the radial and musculocutaneous nerves on the left side in a 64-year-old male cadaver. The radial nerve supplied all the heads of the triceps brachii muscle and gave cutaneous branches such as lower lateral cutaneous nerve of the arm and posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm. The radial nerve ended without continuing further. The musculocutaneous nerve supplied the brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscles. The musculocutaneous nerve divided terminally into two branches, superficial and deep. The deep branch of musculocutaneous nerve corresponded to usual deep branch of the radial nerve while the superficial branch of musculocutaneous nerve corresponded to usual superficial branch of the radial nerve. The dissection was continued to expose the entire brachial plexus from its origin and it was found to be normal. The structures on the right upper limb were found to be normal. Surgeons should keep such variations in mind while performing the surgeries of the upper limb.

  1. Posterior microphthalmos pigmentary retinopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehere, Niranjan; Jalali, Subhadra; Deshmukh, Himanshu; Kannabiran, Chitra

    2011-04-01

    Posterior Microphthalmos Pigmentary Retinopathy Syndrome (PMPRS). Posterior microphthalmos (PM) is a relatively infrequent type of microphthalmos where posterior segment is predominantly affected with normal anterior segment measurements. Herein, we report two siblings with posterior microphthalmos retinopathy syndrome with postulated autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A 13-year-old child had PM and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and his 7-year-old sister had PM, RP, and foveoschisis. The genetics of this syndrome and variable phenotype is discussed. Importance of being aware of posterior microphthalmos and its posterior segment associations is highlighted.

  2. Optic Nerve Hemangioblastoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Zywicke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangioblastomas are World Health Organization (WHO grade I tumors of uncertain histologic origin. These central nervous system tumors are most often found in the posterior fossa, brainstem, and spinal cord. There are fewer than 20 reported cases of optic nerve hemangioblastomas in the literature. We present a patient with visual decline found to have a mass arising from within the posterior orbital canal that grossly involved the optic nerve sheath. Neuropathologic evaluation showed hemangioblastoma. Although not a common tumor in this location, consideration of hemangioblastoma in the differential diagnosis is important as they can have a more aggressive course than other tumors of this region and have a detrimental effect on visual prognosis.

  3. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es una parálisis ...

  4. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy (PRES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moron E, Fanny E; Diaz Marchan, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    The Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) is a clinical Syndrome composed of cephalea, alteration in vision and convulsions, usually observed in patients with sudden elevation of arterial pressure. The imagenologic evidence shows reversible vasogenic brain edema without stroke. Its location is predominantly posterior; it affects the cortex and the subcortical white matter of the occipital, parietal and temporal lobes. The treatment with antihypertensive drugs and the removing of immunosupressor medication are generally associated with complete neurological recovery; this is reflected also in the images which return to their basal condition. The untreated hypertension, on the other side, can result in a progressive defect of the autoregulation system of the central nervous system with cerebral hemorrhage, irreversible brain stroke, coma and death

  5. Robotic posterior retroperitoneal adrenalectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoh, Alexis Kofi; Yigitbas, Hakan; Berber, Eren

    2015-09-01

    Since its initial description by Mercan et al. laparoscopic posterior retroperitoneal (PR) adrenalectomy has served as an alternaltive to the transabdominal (TL) approach for the treatment of adrenal pathologies. Robotic adrenal surgery has been reported to improve surgeon ergonomics and facilitate dissection. In patients with bilateral adrenal masses, PR adrenalectomy may be the approach of choice. We herein describe the technique, discuss its limitations and present a critical review of the current literature. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Normal computed tomographic anatomy of the cisterns and cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manelfe, C.; Bonafe, A.

    1980-01-01

    This study, based on the normal CT anatomy of the cisterns investigated with Metrizamide, aims at attempting to find out with accuracy which plane of section is the most suitable for the investigation of each group of cisterns (posterior fossa, mesencephalon, suprasellar). Moreover we felt it necessary to include our study the normal appearance of the cranial nerves as their normal CT anatymy - optic nerves expected - is not well known yet. (orig./AJ) [de

  7. A clear map of the lower cranial nerves at the superior carotid triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Daniel D; Garcia-Gonzalez, Ulises; Agrawal, Abhishek; Tavares, Paulo L M S; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2010-07-01

    The lower cranial nerves must be identified to avoid iatrogenic injury during skull base and high cervical approaches. Prompt recognition of these structures using basic landmarks could reduce surgical time and morbidity. The anterior triangle of the neck was dissected in 30 cadaveric head sides. The most superficial segments of the glossopharyngeal, vagus and its superior laryngeal nerves, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves were exposed and designated into smaller anatomic triangles. The midpoint of each nerve segment inside the triangles was correlated to the angle of the mandible (AM), mastoid tip (MT), and bifurcation of the common carotid artery. A triangle bounded by the styloglossus muscle, external carotid artery, and facial artery housed the glossopharyngeal nerve. This nerve segment was 0.06 ± 0.71 cm posterior to the AM and 2.50 ± 0.59 cm inferior to the MT. The vagus nerve ran inside the carotid sheath posterior to internal carotid artery and common carotid artery bifurcation in 48.3% of specimens. A triangle formed by the posterior belly of digastric muscle, sternocleidomastoid muscle, and internal jugular vein housed the accessory nerve, 1.90 ± 0.60 cm posterior to the AM and 2.30 ± 0.57 cm inferior to the MT. A triangle outlined by the posterior belly of digastric muscle, internal jugular vein, and common facial vein housed the hypoglossal nerve, which was 0.82 ± 0.84 cm posterior to the AM and 3.64 ± 0.70 cm inferior to the MT. Comprehensible landmarks can be defined to help expose the lower cranial nerves to avoid injury to this complex region. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Finite Element Modeling of the Posterior Eye in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feola, Andrew; Raykin, Julia; Mulugeta, Lealem; Gleason, Rudolph; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity experienced during spaceflight affects astronauts in various ways, including weakened muscles and loss of bone density. Recently, visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome has become a major concern for space missions lasting longer than 30 days. Astronauts suffering from VIIP syndrome have changes in ocular anatomical and visual impairment that persist after returning to earth. It is hypothesized that a cephalad fluid shift in microgravity may increase the intracranial pressure (ICP), which leads to an altered biomechanical environment of the posterior globe and optic nerve sheath (ONS).Currently, there is a lack of knowledge of how elevated ICP may lead to vision impairment and connective tissue changes in VIIP. Our goal was to develop a finite element model to simulate the acute effects of elevated ICP on the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath. We used a finite element (FE) analysis approach to understand the response of the lamina cribrosa and optic nerve to the elevations in ICP thought to occur in microgravity and to identify which tissue components have the greatest impact on strain experienced by optic nerve head tissues.

  9. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Ja; Yu, Won Jong; Ahn, Kook Jin; Jung, So Lyung; Lee, Yeon Soo; Kim, Ji Chang; Kang, Si Won; Song, Chang Joon; Song, Soon-Young; Koo, Ja Hong; Kim, Man Deuk

    2001-01-01

    To review reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. We reviewed 22 patients (M:F=3:19; age, 17-46 years) with the characteristic clinical and imaging features of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. All underwent brain MRI, and in three cases both CT and MRI were performed. In one, MRA was obtained, and in eleven, follow-up MR images were obtained. We evaluated the causes of this syndrome, its clinical manifestations, and MR findings including the locations of lesions, the presence or absence of contrast enhancement, and the changes seen at follow-up MRI. Of the 22 patients, 13 had eclampsia (six during pregnancy and seven during puerperium). Four were receiving immunosuppressive therapy (three, cyclosporine ; one, FK 506). Four suffered renal failure and one had complicated migraine. The clinical manifestations included headache (n=12), visual disturbance (n=13), seizure (n=15), focal neurologic sign (n=3), and altered mental status (n=2). Fifteen patients had hypertension and the others normotension. MRI revealed that lesions were bilateral (n=20) or unilateral (n=2). In all patients the lesion was found in the cortical and subcortical areas of the parieto-occipital lobes ; other locations were the basal ganglia (n=9), posterior temporal lobe (n=8), frontal lobe (n=5), cerebellum (n=5), pons (n=2), and thalamus (n=1). All lesions were of high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and of iso to low intensity on T1-weighted images. One was combined with acute hematoma in the left basal ganglia. In eight of 11 patients who underwent postcontrast T1-weighted MRI, there was no definite enhancement ; in one, enhancement was mild, and in tow, patchy. CT studies showed low attenuation, and MRA revealed mild vasospasm. The symptoms of all patients improved. Follow-up MRI in nine of 11 patients depicted complete resolution of the lesions ; in two, small infarctions remained but the extent of the lesions had decreased. Reversible posterior

  10. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ja; Yu, Won Jong; Ahn, Kook Jin; Jung, So Lyung; Lee, Yeon Soo; Kim, Ji Chang; Kang, Si Won [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chang Joon [Chungnam National Univ. School of Medicine, Cheonju (Korea, Republic of); Song, Soon-Young; Koo, Ja Hong [Kwandong Univ. College of Medicine, Myungji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Man Deuk [College of Medicine Pochon CHA Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    To review reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. We reviewed 22 patients (M:F=3:19; age, 17-46 years) with the characteristic clinical and imaging features of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. All underwent brain MRI, and in three cases both CT and MRI were performed. In one, MRA was obtained, and in eleven, follow-up MR images were obtained. We evaluated the causes of this syndrome, its clinical manifestations, and MR findings including the locations of lesions, the presence or absence of contrast enhancement, and the changes seen at follow-up MRI. Of the 22 patients, 13 had eclampsia (six during pregnancy and seven during puerperium). Four were receiving immunosuppressive therapy (three, cyclosporine ; one, FK 506). Four suffered renal failure and one had complicated migraine. The clinical manifestations included headache (n=12), visual disturbance (n=13), seizure (n=15), focal neurologic sign (n=3), and altered mental status (n=2). Fifteen patients had hypertension and the others normotension. MRI revealed that lesions were bilateral (n=20) or unilateral (n=2). In all patients the lesion was found in the cortical and subcortical areas of the parieto-occipital lobes ; other locations were the basal ganglia (n=9), posterior temporal lobe (n=8), frontal lobe (n=5), cerebellum (n=5), pons (n=2), and thalamus (n=1). All lesions were of high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and of iso to low intensity on T1-weighted images. One was combined with acute hematoma in the left basal ganglia. In eight of 11 patients who underwent postcontrast T1-weighted MRI, there was no definite enhancement ; in one, enhancement was mild, and in tow, patchy. CT studies showed low attenuation, and MRA revealed mild vasospasm. The symptoms of all patients improved. Follow-up MRI in nine of 11 patients depicted complete resolution of the lesions ; in two, small infarctions remained but the extent of the lesions had decreased. Reversible posterior

  11. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Gelman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty.

  12. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  13. Lumbar posterior marginal intra-osseous cartilaginous node

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laredo, J.D.; Bard, M.; Chretien, J.; Kahn, M.F.

    1986-03-01

    This report concerns 12 patients, eight young adults and four adolescents, presenting with lumbar or sciatic pain. This was associated with an unusual defect of the inferior and posterior edges of the vertebral bodies of L4 or L5, together with a small bony ridge protruding into the spinal canal. We found 11 similar cases in the literature, all involving adolescents except for one young adult. It has been considered to be the result of a fracture of the posterior ring apophysis in association with a herniated disc. In our cases, in the absence of any known previous trauma, the radiological features and surgical results and the similarity and frequent association with typical lesions of Scheuermann disease, all suggest a posterior marginal cartilaginous node. The inferior lumbar location and frequent association with herniated disc and sciatic nerve root compression in young patients are discussed.

  14. Lumbar posterior marginal intra-osseous cartilaginous node

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laredo, J.D.; Bard, M.; Chretien, J.; Kahn, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    This report concerns 12 patients, eight young adults and four adolescents, presenting with lumbar or sciatic pain. This was associated with an unusual defect of the inferior and posterior edges of the vertebral bodies of L4 or L5, together with a small bony ridge protruding into the spinal canal. We found 11 similar cases in the literature, all involving adolescents except for one young adult. It has been considered to be the result of a fracture of the posterior ring apophysis in association with a herniated disc. In our cases, in the absence of any known previous trauma, the radiological features and surgical results and the similarity and frequent association with typical lesions of Scheuermann disease, all suggest a posterior marginal cartilaginous node. The inferior lumbar location and frequent association with herniated disc and sciatic nerve root compression in young patients are discussed. (orig.)

  15. CT anatomy of right phrenic nerve and pulmonary ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkmen, Y.M.; Kazam, E.; Auh, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the right phrenic nerve and the right pulmonary ligament was studied in eight cadavers and 100 computed tomographic (CT) examinations. The pulmonary ligament originates below the inferior pulmonary vein and is constantly posterior to the inferior vena cava. The lower end of the right phrenic nerve, on the other hand, descends over the lateral surface of the inferior vena cava, accompanied by the right cardiophrenic artery. The nerve spreads over the diaphragm within a thick parietal pleural fold, wrapped in a fatty tissue, and this should not be confused with pulmonary ligament on CT

  16. The intracranial facial nerve as seen through different surgical windows: an extensive anatomosurgical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Antonio; Evins, Alexander I; Visca, Anna; Stieg, Phillip E

    2013-06-01

    The facial nerve has a short intracranial course but crosses critical and frequently accessed surgical structures during cranial base surgery. When performing approaches to complex intracranial regions, it is essential to understand the nerve's conventional and topographic anatomy from different surgical perspectives as well as its relationship with surrounding structures. To describe the entire intracranial course of the facial nerve as observed via different neurosurgical approaches and to provide an analytical evaluation of the degree of nerve exposure achieved with each approach. Anterior petrosectomies (middle fossa, extended middle fossa), posterior petrosectomies (translabyrinthine, retrolabyrinthine, transcochlear), a retrosigmoid, a far lateral, and anterior transfacial (extended maxillectomy, mandibular swing) approaches were performed on 10 adult cadaveric heads (20 sides). The degree of facial nerve exposure achieved per segment for each approach was assessed and graded independently by 3 surgeons. The anterior petrosal approaches offered good visualization of the nerve in the cerebellopontine angle and intracanalicular portion superiorly, whereas the posterior petrosectomies provided more direct visualization without the need for cerebellar retraction. The far lateral approach exposed part of the posterior and the entire inferior quadrants, whereas the retrosigmoid approach exposed parts of the superior and inferior quadrants and the entire posterior quadrant. Anterior and anteroinferior exposure of the facial nerve was achieved via the transfacial approaches. The surgical route used must rely on the size, nature, and general location of the lesion, as well as on the capability of the particular approach to better expose the appropriate segment of the facial nerve.

  17. The vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoudiba, F; Toulgoat, F; Sarrazin, J-L

    2013-10-01

    The vestibulocochlear nerve (8th cranial nerve) is a sensory nerve. It is made up of two nerves, the cochlear, which transmits sound and the vestibular which controls balance. It is an intracranial nerve which runs from the sensory receptors in the internal ear to the brain stem nuclei and finally to the auditory areas: the post-central gyrus and superior temporal auditory cortex. The most common lesions responsible for damage to VIII are vestibular Schwannomas. This report reviews the anatomy and various investigations of the nerve. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. [Motor nerves of the face. Surgical and radiologic anatomy of facial paralysis and their surgical repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacher, C; Cyna-Gorse, F

    2015-10-01

    Motor innervation of the face depends on the facial nerve for the mobility of the face, on the mandibular nerve, third branch of the trigeminal nerve, which gives the motor innervation of the masticator muscles, and the hypoglossal nerve for the tongue. In case of facial paralysis, the most common palliative surgical techniques are the lengthening temporalis myoplasty (the temporal is innervated by the mandibular nerve) and the hypoglossal-facial anastomosis. The aim of this work is to describe the surgical anatomy of these three nerves and the radiologic anatomy of the facial nerve inside the temporal bone. Then the facial nerve penetrates inside the parotid gland giving a plexus. Four branches of the facial nerve leave the parotid gland: they are called temporal, zygomatic, buccal and marginal which give innervation to the cutaneous muscles of the face. Mandibular nerve gives three branches to the temporal muscles: the anterior, intermediate and posterior deep temporal nerves which penetrate inside the deep aspect of the temporal muscle in front of the infratemporal line. The hypoglossal nerve is only the motor nerve to the tongue. The ansa cervicalis, which is coming from the superficial cervical plexus and joins the hypoglossal nerve in the submandibular area is giving the motor innervation to subhyoid muscles and to the geniohyoid muscle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Photodocumentation of the Development of Type I Posterior Glottic Stenosis after Intubation Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Scott Howard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral vocal fold immobility may result from bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis or physiologic insults to the airway such as glottic scars. The progression of mucosal injury to granulation tissue, and then posterior glottis stenosis, is an accepted theory but has not been photodocumented. This paper presents serial images from common postintubation injury to less common posterior glottic stenosis with interarytenoid synechia.

  20. Posterior glenoid rim deficiency in recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weishaupt, D.; Zanetti, M.; Hodler, J.; Nyffeler, R.W.; Gerber, C.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To assess the shape of the posterior glenoid rim in patients with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability.Design and patients. CT examinations of 15 shoulders with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability were reviewed in masked fashion with regard to abnormalities of the glenoid shape, specifically of its posterior rim. The glenoid version was also assessed. The findings were compared with the findings in 15 shoulders with recurrent anterior shoulder instability and 15 shoulders without instability. For all patients, surgical correlation was available.Results. Fourteen of the 15 (93%) shoulders with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability had a deficiency of the posteroinferior glenoid rim. In patients with recurrent anterior instability or stable shoulders such deficiencies were less common (60% and 73%, respectively). The craniocaudal length of the deficiencies was largest in patients with posterior instability. When a posteroinferior deficiency with a craniocaudal length of 12 mm or more was defined as abnormal, sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability were 86.7% and 83.3%, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in glenoid version between shoulders with posterior instability and stable shoulders (P=0.01).Conclusion. Recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability should be considered in patients with a bony deficiency of the posteroinferior glenoid rim with a craniocaudal length of more than 12 mm. (orig.)

  1. Anterior transposition of the radial nerve--a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakkanti, Madhusudhan R; Roberts, Craig S; Murphy, Joshua; Acland, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    The radial nerve is at risk during the posterior plating of the humerus. The purpose of this anatomic study was to assess the extent of radial nerve dissection required for anterior transposition through the fracture site (transfracture anterior transposition). A cadaver study was conducted approaching the humerus by a posterior midline incision. The extent of dissection of the nerve necessary for plate fixation of the humerus fracture was measured. An osteotomy was created to model a humeral shaft fracture at the spiral groove (OTA classification 12-A2, 12-A3). The radial nerve was then transposed anterior to the humeral shaft through the fracture site. The additional dissection of the radial nerve and the extent of release of soft tissue from the humerus shaft to achieve the transposition were measured. Plating required a dissection of the radial nerve 1.78 cm proximal and 2.13 cm distal to the spiral groove. Transfracture anterior transposition of the radial nerve required an average dissection of 2.24 cm proximal and 2.68 cm distal to the spiral groove. The lateral intermuscular septum had to be released for 2.21 cm on the distal fragment to maintain laxity of the transposed nerve. Transfracture anterior transposition of the radial nerve before plating is feasible with dissection proximal and distal to the spiral groove and elevation of the lateral intermuscular septum. Potential clinical advantages of this technique include enhanced fracture site visualization, application of broader plates, and protection of the radial nerve during the internal fixation.

  2. Radial nerve dysfunction (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The radial nerve travels down the arm and supplies movement to the triceps muscle at the back of the upper arm. ... the wrist and hand. The usual causes of nerve dysfunction are direct trauma, prolonged pressure on the ...

  3. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many ... viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ...

  4. Nerve conduction velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see ...

  5. Distal median nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... later on. Inflammation of the tendons ( tendonitis ) or joints ( arthritis ) can also put pressure on the nerve. ... how fast electrical signals move through a nerve Neuromuscular ultrasound to view problems with the muscles and ...

  6. MR imaging of the cranial nerves and the intracranial vessels using 3D-SPGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, Takaaki; Sato, Nami; Yamaguchi, Koichi; Sugai, Yukio; Ogushi, Masatoshi; Kubota, Hisashi

    1992-01-01

    MR angiography (MRA) has developed rapidly, but it is still insufficient to demonstrate the detail of the intracranial vascular anatomy. We found that original images of MRA render more information than MRA images about not only intracranial vessels but also cranial nerves. We have tried to demonstrate cranial nerves and intracranial vessels on 26 patients and evaluated using real time reformation of original images of MRA. MR images were obtained by SPGR (3DFT) after injection of Gd-DTPA. The optic nerve, the oculomotor nerve, the trigeminal nerve, the facial nerve and the vestibulocochlear nerve were visualized clearly on almost patients and detectabilities of these nerves were 100%, 98%, 100%, 94% and 100%, respectively. The abducent nerve was also detectable in 76%. The trochlear nerve, which could not be observed by any modality, was detected at prepontine cistern in 10%. Arteries around brain stem such as the superior cerebellar artery (SCA), the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and the posterior communicating artery (PcomA) were clearly visible, and branching of these arteries and anatomical detail were completely coincide with angiogram on 12 patients. The basal vein of Rosenthal and the petrosal vein were confirmed in 100% and their anastomose were demonstrated obviously. We concluded that this method was extremely useful to observe cranial nerves and intracranial small vessels. (author)

  7. Irreducible Traumatic Posterior Shoulder Dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Collier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 22-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department complaining of right shoulder pain after a motocross accident. He was traveling at approximately 10 mph around a turn when he lost control and was thrown over the handlebars, landing directly on his right shoulder. On arrival, he was holding his arm in adduction and internal rotation. An area of swelling was noted over his anterior shoulder. He was unable to abduct his shoulder. No humeral gapping was noted. He had normal neuro-vascular status distal to the injury. Significant findings: Radiographs demonstrated posterior displacement of the humeral head on the “Y” view (see white arrow and widening of the glenohumeral joint space on anterior-posterior view (see red arrow. The findings were consistent with posterior dislocation and a Hill-Sachs type deformity. Sedation was performed and reduction was attempted using external rotation, traction counter-traction. An immediate “pop” was felt during the procedure. Post-procedure radiographs revealed a persistent posterior subluxation with interlocking at posterior glenoid. CT revealed posterior dislocation with acute depressed impaction deformity medial to the biceps groove with the humeral head perched on the posterior glenoid, interlocked at reverse Hill-Sachs deformity (see blue arrow. Discussion: Posterior shoulder dislocations are rare and represent only 2% of all shoulder dislocations. Posterior shoulder dislocations are missed on initial diagnosis in more than 60% of cases.1 Posterior shoulder dislocations result from axial loading of the adducted and internally rotated shoulder, violent muscle contractions (resulting from seizures or electrocution, a direct posterior force applied to the anterior shoulder.1 Physical findings include decreased anterior prominence of the humeral head, increased palpable posterior prominence of the humeral head below the acromion, increased palpable prominence of the

  8. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Henrique de Gobbi Porto

    Full Text Available Abstract Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal and ventral (occipito-temporal pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction, complete Balint's syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right . Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD.

  9. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Fábio Henrique de Gobbi; Machado, Gislaine Cristina Lopes; Morillo, Lilian Schafirovits; Brucki, Sonia Maria Dozzi

    2010-01-01

    Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD) is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal) and ventral (occipito-temporal) pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction), complete Balint’s syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right. Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD. PMID:29213665

  10. Acetabular paralabral cyst causing compression of the sciatic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caoimhe Byrne, MB BCh BAO

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Acetabular paralabral cysts are common. They vary in their clinical presentation and may be asymptomatic or cause pain and restriction at the hip joint. In rare instances they may cause symptoms by compressing local neurovascular structures. We report a case of symptomatic compression of the sciatic nerve by a posteriorly displaced acetabular paralabral cyst.

  11. Schwannoma of the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve : A Rare Entity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heer, Linda M; Teding van Berkhout, F; Priesterbach, Loudy; Buijsrogge, Marc P

    Neurogenic tumors are the most common posterior mediastinal tumors in adults. Schwannomas originating from the recurrent laryngeal nerve are rare. The present study describes a 46-year-old man with a tumor in the left superior mediastinum. Because of the narrow relationship with the aorta and the

  12. Optic Nerve Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  13. Diagnostic nerve ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeumer, T.; Grimm, A.; Schelle, T.

    2017-01-01

    For the diagnostics of nerve lesions an imaging method is necessary to visualize peripheral nerves and their surrounding structures for an etiological classification. Clinical neurological and electrophysiological investigations provide functional information about nerve lesions. The information provided by a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination is inadequate for peripheral nerve diagnostics; however, MRI neurography is suitable but on the other hand a resource and time-consuming method. Using ultrasonography for peripheral nerve diagnostics. With ultrasonography reliable diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies and traumatic nerve lesions are possible. The use of ultrasonography for neuropathies shows that a differentiation between different forms is possible. Nerve ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool. In addition to the clinical examination and clinical electrophysiology, structural information can be obtained, which results in a clear improvement in the diagnostics. Ultrasonography has become an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in neurophysiological departments. Nerve ultrasonography is recommended for the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in addition to clinical and electrophysiological investigations. It should be used in the clinical work-up of entrapment neuropathies, traumatic nerve lesions and spacy-occupying lesions of nerves. (orig.) [de

  14. Endoscopic Management of Posterior Epistaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, J.; Kanotra, Sohit Paul; Kanotra, Sonika

    2011-01-01

    The traditional method of management of posterior epistaxis has been with anteroposterior nasal packing. Apart from the high failure rate of 26–50% reported in various series, nasal packing is associated with marked discomfort and several complications. In order to avoid nasal packing, we started doing endoscopic cauterization in cases of posterior epistaxis. A total of 23 patients with posterior epistaxis were subjected to nasal endoscopy with the intent to stop bleeding by cauterization of ...

  15. Intraoperative cranial nerve monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, C Michel

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of intraoperative monitoring is to preserve function and prevent injury to the nervous system at a time when clinical examination is not possible. Cranial nerves are delicate structures and are susceptible to damage by mechanical trauma or ischemia during intracranial and extracranial surgery. A number of reliable electrodiagnostic techniques, including nerve conduction studies, electromyography, and the recording of evoked potentials have been adapted to the study of cranial nerve function during surgery. A growing body of evidence supports the utility of intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerve nerves during selected surgical procedures.

  16. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    The oxygen tension of the optic nerve is regulated by the intraocular pressure and systemic blood pressure, the resistance in the blood vessels and oxygen consumption of the tissue. The oxygen tension is autoregulated and moderate changes in intraocular pressure or blood pressure do not affect...... the optic nerve oxygen tension. If the intraocular pressure is increased above 40 mmHg or the ocular perfusion pressure decreased below 50 mmHg the autoregulation is overwhelmed and the optic nerve becomes hypoxic. A disturbance in oxidative metabolism in the cytochromes of the optic nerve can be seen...... at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...

  17. Diaphragm-Sparing Nerve Blocks for Shoulder Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, De Q H; Elgueta, Maria Francisca; Aliste, Julian; Finlayson, Roderick J

    Shoulder surgery can result in significant postoperative pain. Interscalene brachial plexus blocks (ISBs) constitute the current criterion standard for analgesia but may be contraindicated in patients with pulmonary pathology due to the inherent risk of phrenic nerve block and symptomatic hemidiaphragmatic paralysis. Although ultrasound-guided ISB with small volumes (5 mL), dilute local anesthetic (LA) concentrations, and LA injection 4 mm lateral to the brachial plexus have been shown to reduce the risk of phrenic nerve block, no single intervention can decrease its incidence below 20%. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular blocks with LA injection posterolateral to the brachial plexus may anesthetize the shoulder without incidental diaphragmatic dysfunction, but further confirmatory trials are required. Ultrasound-guided C7 root blocks also seem to offer an attractive, diaphragm-sparing alternative to ISB. However, additional large-scale studies are needed to confirm their efficacy and to quantify the risk of periforaminal vascular breach. Combined axillary-suprascapular nerve blocks may provide adequate postoperative analgesia for minor shoulder surgery but do not compare favorably to ISB for major surgical procedures. One intriguing solution lies in the combined use of infraclavicular brachial plexus blocks and suprascapular nerve blocks. Theoretically, the infraclavicular approach targets the posterior and lateral cords, thus anesthetizing the axillary nerve (which supplies the anterior and posterior shoulder joint), as well as the subscapular and lateral pectoral nerves (both of which supply the anterior shoulder joint), whereas the suprascapular nerve block anesthetizes the posterior shoulder. Future randomized trials are required to validate the efficacy of combined infraclavicular-suprascapular blocks for shoulder surgery.

  18. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra; Casselman, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  19. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  20. Overlapping sphincteroplasty and posterior repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Andrea K; Myers, Erinn M; Lippmann, Quinn K; Matthews, Catherine A

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of how to anatomically reconstruct extensive posterior-compartment defects is variable among gynecologists. The objective of this video is to demonstrate an effective technique of overlapping sphincteroplasty and posterior repair. In this video, a scripted storyboard was constructed that outlines the key surgical steps of a comprehensive posterior compartment repair: (1) surgical incision that permits access to posterior compartment and perineal body, (2) dissection of the rectovaginal space up to the level of the cervix, (3) plication of the rectovaginal muscularis, (4) repair of internal and external anal sphincters, and (5) reconstruction of the perineal body. Using a combination of graphic illustrations and live video footage, tips on repair are highlighted. The goals at the end of repair are to: (1) have improved vaginal caliber, (2) increase rectal tone along the entire posterior vaginal wall, (3) have the posterior vaginal wall at a perpendicular plane to the perineal body, (4) reform the hymenal ring, and (5) not have an overly elongated perineal body. This video provides a step-by-step guide on how to perform an overlapping sphincteroplasty and posterior repair.

  1. Classification of posterior vitreous detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakehashi, Akihiro; Takezawa, Mikiko; Akiba, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosing a posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) is important for predicting the prognosis and determining the indication for vitreoretinal surgery in many vitreoretinal diseases. This article presents both classifications of a PVD by slit-lamp biomicroscopy and of a shallow PVD by optical coherence tomography (OCT). By biomicroscopy, the vitreous condition is determined based on the presence or absence of a PVD. The PVD then is classified as either a complete posterior vitreous detachment (C-PVD) or a partial posterior vitreous detachment (P-PVD). A C-PVD is further divided into a C-PVD with collapse and a C-PVD without collapse, while a P-PVD is divided into a P-PVD with shrinkage of the posterior hyaloid membrane (P-PVD with shrinkage) and a P-PVD without shrinkage of the posterior hyaloid membrane (P-PVD without shrinkage). A P-PVD without shrinkage has a subtype characterized by vitreous gel attachment through the premacular hole in a posterior hyaloid membrane to the macula (P-PVD without shrinkage [M]). By OCT, a shallow PVD is classified as the absence of a shallow PVD or as a shallow PVD. A shallow PVD is then subclassified as a shallow PVD without shrinkage of the posterior vitreous cortex, a shallow PVD with shrinkage of the posterior vitreous cortex, and a peripheral shallow PVD. A shallow PVD without shrinkage of the posterior vitreous cortex has two subtypes: an age-related shallow PVD and a perifoveal PVD associated with a macular hole. PMID:24376338

  2. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoshima, Kazumitsu; Nishiura, Iwao; Koyama, Tsunemaro

    1986-01-01

    Several kinds of the lumbosacral nerve root anomalies have already been recognized, and the conjoined nerve roots is the most common among them. It does not make symptoms by itself, but if there is a causation of neural entrapment, for example, disc herniation, lateral recessus stenosis, spondylolisthesis, etc., so called ''biradicular syndrome'' should occur. Anomalies of the lumbosacral nerve roots, if not properly recognized, may lead to injury of these nerves during operation of the lumbar spine. Recently, the chance of finding these anomalous roots has been increased more and more with the use of metrizamide myelography and metrizamide CT, because of the improvement of the opacification of nerve roots. We describe the findings of the anomalous roots as revealed by these two methods. They demonstrate two nerve roots running parallel and the asymmetrical wide root sleeve. Under such circumstances, it is important to distinguish the anomalous roots from the normal ventral and dorsal roots. (author)

  3. Anatomical relations of anterior and posterior ankle arthroscopy portals: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Xavier Martin; Méndez López, José Manuel; Monzo Planella, Mariano; Bravo, Alex; Rodrigues-Pinto, Ricardo

    2015-04-01

    Ankle arthroscopy is an increasingly used technique. Knowledge of the anatomical structures in relation to its portals is paramount to avoid complications. Twenty cadaveric ankles were analysed to assess the distance between relevant neurovascular structures to the anteromedial, anterolateral, posteromedial, and posterolateral arthroscopy portals. The intermediate dorsal branch of the superficial peroneal nerve was the closest structure to any of the portals (4.8 mm from the anterolateral portal), followed by the posterior tibial nerve (7.3 mm from the posteromedial portal). All structures analysed but one (posterior tibial artery) were, at least in one specimen, portals. This study provides information on the anatomical relations of ankle arthroscopy portals and relevant neurovascular structures, confirming previous studies identifying the superficial peroneal nerve as the structure at highest risk of injury, but also highlighting some important variations. Techniques to minimise the injury to these structures are discussed.

  4. Primary Posterior Mediastinum Hydatid Cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.; Eid, A. F.; Sheikh, M. Y.; Yiannakou, N.

    2014-01-01

    Primary posterior mediastinal hydatid cyst is a serious health problem for the Mediterranean countries. We diagnosed a case of a 46-year-old female with a primary posterior mediastinum hydatid cyst on CT and MRI. It was provisionally identified as either a hydatid cyst or bronchogenic cyst or neuroenteric cyst. CT guided aspiration with 18 gauge needle confirmed as hydatid sand. This is very rare in this population but it should be kept in mind when one is looking at any cyst in the posterior mediastinum. (author)

  5. Clinical significance of vagus nerve variation in radiofrequency ablation of thyroid nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Eun Ju; Baek, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Jae Kyun

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the types and incidence of vagus nerve variations and to assess factors related to the vulnerability of vagus nerves during the radiofrequency (RF) ablation of thyroid nodules. Bilateral vagus nerves of 304 consecutive patients who underwent ultrasound of the neck were assessed. Two radiologists evaluated vagus nerve type (types 1-4; lateral/anterior/medial/posterior), the shortest distance between the thyroid gland and vagus nerve, and thyroid contour. Vagus nerve vulnerability was defined as a vagus nerve located within 2 mm of the thyroid gland through the ex vivo experiments, and factors associated with vulnerability were assessed. We were unable to find one vagus nerve. Of the 607 vagus nerves, 467 (76.9%) were type 1, 128 (21.1%) were type 2, 10 (1.6%) were type 3, and 2 (0.3%) were type 4, with 81 (13.3%) being vulnerable. Univariate analysis showed that sex, location, thyroid contour and type were significantly associated with vagus nerve vulnerability. Multivariate analysis showed that bulging contour caused by thyroid nodules (P = 0.001), vagus nerve types 2/4 (P < 0.001) and type 3 (P < 0.001) were independent predictors. The operator should pay attention to anatomical variations and the resulting vagus nerve injury during RF ablation of bulging thyroid nodules. (orig.)

  6. [Facial nerve neurinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowski, Jacek; Bartoszewicz, Robert; Morawski, Krzysztof; Jamróz, Barbara; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of diagnostic, surgical technique, treatment results facial nerve neurinomas and its comparison with literature was the main purpose of this study. Seven cases of patients (2005-2011) with facial nerve schwannomas were included to retrospective analysis in the Department of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Warsaw. All patients were assessed with history of the disease, physical examination, hearing tests, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging, electronystagmography. Cases were observed in the direction of potential complications and recurrences. Neurinoma of the facial nerve occurred in the vertical segment (n=2), facial nerve geniculum (n=1) and the internal auditory canal (n=4). The symptoms observed in patients were analyzed: facial nerve paresis (n=3), hearing loss (n=2), dizziness (n=1). Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography allowed to confirm the presence of the tumor and to assess its staging. Schwannoma of the facial nerve has been surgically removed using the middle fossa approach (n=5) and by antromastoidectomy (n=2). Anatomical continuity of the facial nerve was achieved in 3 cases. In the twelve months after surgery, facial nerve paresis was rated at level II-III° HB. There was no recurrence of the tumor in radiological observation. Facial nerve neurinoma is a rare tumor. Currently surgical techniques allow in most cases, the radical removing of the lesion and reconstruction of the VII nerve function. The rate of recurrence is low. A tumor of the facial nerve should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nerve VII paresis. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrasound imaging accurately identifies the intercostobrachial nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed K. Thallaj

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To test the hypothesis that identification and blockade of the intercostobrachial nerve (ICBN can be achieved under ultrasound (US guidance using a small volume of local anesthetic. Methods: Twenty-eight adult male volunteers were examined at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from November 2012 to September 2013. Intercostobrachial nerve blockade was performed using one ml of 2% lidocaine under US guidance. A sensory map of the blocked area was developed relative to the medial aspect of the humeral head. Results: The ICBN appears as a hyper-echoic structure. The nerve diameter was 2.3±0.28 mm, and the depth was 9±0.28 mm. The measurements of the sensory-blocked area relative to the medial aspect of the humeral head were as follows: 6.3±1.6 cm anteriorly; 6.2±2.9 cm posteriorly; 9.4±2.9 cm proximally; and 9.2±4.4 cm distally. Intercostobrachial nerve blockade using one ml of local anesthetic was successful in all cases. Conclusion: The present study described the sonographic anatomical details of the ICBN and its sensory distribution to successfully perform selective US-guided ICBN blockade.

  8. Chronic elbow dislocation: a rare complication of tennis elbow surgery. Successful treatment by open reduction and external fixator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degreef, I; De Smet, L

    2007-06-01

    A case is presented of chronic dislocation of the elbow after tennis elbow surgery combined with posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) release. An open reduction with repair of the collateral ligaments was performed. Postoperative rehabilitation involved the use of an articulated external fixator and there was a successful outcome. Possible causes of the dislocation are discussed.

  9. Radial tunnel syndrome. Findings and treatment in 17 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Alberto Breglia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Backround Radial tunnel syndrome is a condition secondary to the intermittent entrapment of the posterior interosseous nerve between superficial and deep mass of short supinator adjacent structures, such as vessels and fascias. The purpose of this study was to identify the anatomical structures that produce the eventual compression, to establish and communicate the differences in the subjective pain perception before and after the release of the posterior interosseous nerve in the radial tunnel. Method Between 2009 and 2014, 17 patients underwent surgical treatment by posterior interosseous nerve release. We used the approach between the first external radial and brachioradialis. Patients were assessed by visual analogue scale for pain intensity before surgery and at week 6, and according to the Roles and Maudsley functional criteria. Results The causes of posterior interosseous nerve compression were fibrous band of short supinator (arcade of Frohse (7 cases, recurrent vessels (4 cases, compression by the mass of the superficial portion of the short supinator muscle (2 cases and secondary compression by extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon (4 cases. Results were excellent (4 patients, good (10 patients and fair (3 patients. Patients treated through the Labor Risk Insurance had worse outcomes than those who were not covered by this system. Conclusions Radial tunnel syndrome is a condition that must be taken into account when there is refractory lateral epicondylalgia. This disease has a marked effect in patients with labor conflict, which may bias the outcome of treatment.

  10. Posterior fossa meningioma (surgical experiences)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wael M. Moussa

    2012-08-27

    Aug 27, 2012 ... of the CNS, representing about a third of brain tumors. They arise from the ... subtypes based on cell structure.1–4 In 1979, the World Health. Organization .... anterior or posterior to the internal auditory meatus), petrocli-.

  11. A Novel Rodent Model of Posterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Brown, Dale P.; Duan, Yuanli; Kong, Wei; Watson, Brant D.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To develop a reliable, reproducible rat model of posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) and study the cellular responses in the optic nerve and retina. Methods Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy was induced in adult rats by photochemically induced ischemia. Retinal and optic nerve vasculature was examined by fluorescein isothiocyanate–dextran extravasation. Tissue sectioning and immunohistochemistry were used to investigate the pathologic changes. Retinal ganglion cell survival at different times after PION induction, with or without neurotrophic application, was quantified by fluorogold retrograde labeling. Results Optic nerve injury was confirmed after PION induction, including local vascular leakage, optic nerve edema, and cavernous degeneration. Immunostaining data revealed microglial activation and focal loss of astrocytes, with adjacent astrocytic hypertrophy. Up to 23%, 50%, and 70% retinal ganglion cell loss was observed at 1 week, 2 weeks, and 3 weeks, respectively, after injury compared with a sham control group. Experimental treatment by brain-derived neurotrophic factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor remarkably prevented retinal ganglion cell loss in PION rats. At 3 weeks after injury, more than 40% of retinal ganglion cells were saved by the application of neurotrophic factors. Conclusions Rat PION created by photochemically induced ischemia is a reproducible and reliable animal model for mimicking the key features of human PION. Clinical Relevance The correspondence between the features of this rat PION model to those of human PION makes it an ideal model to study the pathophysiologic course of the disease, most of which remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, it provides an optimal model for testing therapeutic approaches for optic neuropathies. PMID:23544206

  12. Variations of posterior vitreous detachment

    OpenAIRE

    Kakehashi, A.; Kado, M.; Akiba, J.; Hirokawa, H.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To identify variations in posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) and establish a clinical classification system for PVD.
METHODS—400 consecutive eyes were examined using biomicroscopy and vitreous photography and classified the PVD variations—complete PVD with collapse, complete PVD without collapse, partial PVD with thickened posterior vitreous cortex (TPVC), or partial PVD without TPVC.
RESULTS—In each PVD type, the most frequently seen ocular pathologies were as follows: in complete PVD ...

  13. Anatomical study of phrenic nerve course in relation to neck dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Tomohiro; Usami, Akinobu; Kishi, Asuka; Kon, Hideki; Takada, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    The present study sought to clarify the course of the phrenic nerve and its correlation with anatomical landmarks in the neck region. We examined 17 cadavers (30 sides). In each, the phrenic nerves was dissected from the lateral side of the neck, and its position within the triangle formed by the mastoid process and sternal and acromial ends of the clavicle was determined. The point where the phrenic nerve arises in the posterior triangle was found to be similar to the point where the cutaneous blanches of the cervical plexus emerge at the middle of the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. In the supraclavian triangle, the phrenic nerve crosses the anterior border of the anterior scalene muscle near Erb's point where the superficial point is 2-3 cm superior from the clavicle and posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The phrenic nerve arises in the posterior triangle near the nerve point, then descends to the anterior surface of the anterior scalene muscle in the supraclavian triangle. It is necessary to be aware of the supraclavian triangle below Erb's point during neck dissection procedures.

  14. [Evaluation of iatrogenic accessory nerve injury in forensic medical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, E; Irányi, J

    1996-04-14

    The authors give a survey of the clinical and medical-legal characteristics of the accessory nerve injury. In the past two decades the conception of the successfulness of the surgical treatment of the accessory nerve injury became prevailing. About the medical-legal aspects of the iatrogenic injury of the nerve reported in connection of the reconstructive surgery chiefly also departments of neurosurgery, orthopedics and traumatology. In the case of the authors a 70 year old patient suffered 10 years ago a iatrogenic accessory nerve injury. The mild trapezius palsy recovered spontaneously practically with cosmetic disadvantage. In connection with the development of extreme dorso-lumbal scoliosis associated with torsion the trapezius atrophy worsened. Physical therapy was partly successful. But the patient became unfit for manual work. Their observations sustain the data of authors who established that in the case of accessory nerve injury not only the surgical but also conservative treatment is usually successful. In opposite to certain data of the literature the authors establish that the iatrogenic injuries of the accessory nerve may lead to significant lifelong disability. The diagnosis is not always made in time with consequent delay in repair. This may be regarded as an unfavorable issue during medical-legal discussions. The authors recommend in interest to prevent nerve injury in the posterior triangle of the neck to perform operation in special department.

  15. Isolated optic nerve pseudotumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patankar, T.; Prasad, S.; Krishnan, A.; Laxminarayan, R.

    2000-01-01

    Isolated optic nerve involvement by the idiopathic inflammatory process is a rare finding and very few reports are available. Here a case of an isolated optic nerve inflammatory pseudotumour presenting with gradually progressive unilateral loss of vision is described. It showed dramatic response to a trial of steroids and its differential diagnoses are discussed. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. Axillary nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes in sensation or movement No history of injury to the area No signs of nerve damage These medicines reduce swelling and pressure on the nerve. They may be injected directly into the area or taken by mouth. Other medicines include: Over-the-counter pain ...

  17. Tibial nerve (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nerve is commonly injured by fractures or other injury to the back of the knee or the lower leg. It may be affected by systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus. The nerve can also be damaged by pressure from a tumor, abscess, or bleeding into the ...

  18. Assessment of Optic Nerve Impairment in Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica by MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiye Chen

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI has been used for the evaluation of the white matter integrity. In this study, we evaluated optic nerve impairment in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO using DTI.Optic nerve DTI were performed on 28 NMO patients and 38 normal controls. Fractional anisotropy (FA values were measured in the anterior, middle, and posterior parts of the intraorbital optic nerve segment. For the posterior intraorbital optic nerve, FA values of BI (0.20±0.07, MI (0.24±0.16, and NA (0.25±0.14 decreased significantly compared with that of NC (0.43±0.07 (P<0.05, and ROC analysis demonstrated that the area under the curve (AUC measurements for BI vs. NC, MI vs. NC, NA vs. NC, and NMO (including BI, MI, and NA vs. NC were 0.99, 0.93, 0.88, and 0.96, respectively. The corresponding diagnostic sensitivities of ROC analysis were 100%, 80%, 80%, and 91%; and the specificities were 93%, 97%, 91%, and 93%.Decreased FA value in the intraorbital optic nerve, especially in the posterior part of the nerve, was demonstrated as a characteristic MR feature for NMO-related optic nerve impairment.

  19. Evaluation of nerve transfer options for treating total brachial plexus avulsion injury: A retrospective study of 73 participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kai-Ming; Hu, Jing-Jing; Lao, Jie; Zhao, Xin

    2018-03-01

    Despite recent great progress in diagnosis and microsurgical repair, the prognosis in total brachial plexus-avulsion injury remains unfavorable. Insufficient number of donors and unreasonable use of donor nerves might be key factors. To identify an optimal treatment strategy for this condition, we conducted a retrospective review. Seventy-three patients with total brachial plexus avulsion injury were followed up for an average of 7.3 years. Our analysis demonstrated no significant difference in elbow-flexion recovery between phrenic nerve-transfer (25 cases), phrenic nerve-graft (19 cases), intercostal nerve (17 cases), or contralateral C 7 -transfer (12 cases) groups. Restoration of shoulder function was attempted through anterior accessory nerve (27 cases), posterior accessory nerve (10 cases), intercostal nerve (5 cases), or accessory + intercostal nerve transfer (31 cases). Accessory nerve + intercostal nerve transfer was the most effective method. A significantly greater amount of elbow extension was observed in patients with intercostal nerve transfer (25 cases) than in those with contralateral C 7 transfer (10 cases). Recovery of median nerve function was noticeably better for those who received entire contralateral C 7 transfer (33 cases) than for those who received partial contralateral C 7 transfer (40 cases). Wrist and finger extension were reconstructed by intercostal nerve transfer (31 cases). Overall, the recommended surgical treatment for total brachial plexus-avulsion injury is phrenic nerve transfer for elbow flexion, accessory nerve + intercostal nerve transfer for shoulder function, intercostal nerves transfer for elbow extension, entire contralateral C 7 transfer for median nerve function, and intercostal nerve transfer for finger extension. The trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: NCT03166033).

  20. Evaluation of nerve transfer options for treating total brachial plexus avulsion injury: a retrospective study of 73 participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kai-ming; Hu, Jing-jing; Lao, Jie; Zhao, Xin

    2018-01-01

    Despite recent great progress in diagnosis and microsurgical repair, the prognosis in total brachial plexus-avulsion injury remains unfavorable. Insufficient number of donors and unreasonable use of donor nerves might be key factors. To identify an optimal treatment strategy for this condition, we conducted a retrospective review. Seventy-three patients with total brachial plexus avulsion injury were followed up for an average of 7.3 years. Our analysis demonstrated no significant difference in elbow-flexion recovery between phrenic nerve-transfer (25 cases), phrenic nerve-graft (19 cases), intercostal nerve (17 cases), or contralateral C7-transfer (12 cases) groups. Restoration of shoulder function was attempted through anterior accessory nerve (27 cases), posterior accessory nerve (10 cases), intercostal nerve (5 cases), or accessory + intercostal nerve transfer (31 cases). Accessory nerve + intercostal nerve transfer was the most effective method. A significantly greater amount of elbow extension was observed in patients with intercostal nerve transfer (25 cases) than in those with contralateral C7 transfer (10 cases). Recovery of median nerve function was noticeably better for those who received entire contralateral C7 transfer (33 cases) than for those who received partial contralateral C7 transfer (40 cases). Wrist and finger extension were reconstructed by intercostal nerve transfer (31 cases). Overall, the recommended surgical treatment for total brachial plexus-avulsion injury is phrenic nerve transfer for elbow flexion, accessory nerve + intercostal nerve transfer for shoulder function, intercostal nerves transfer for elbow extension, entire contralateral C7 transfer for median nerve function, and intercostal nerve transfer for finger extension. The trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: NCT03166033). PMID:29623932

  1. Microgravity-Driven Optic Nerve/Sheath Biomechanics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, A.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a concern for long-duration space flight. Current thinking suggests that the ocular changes observed in VIIP syndrome are related to cephalad fluid shifts resulting in altered fluid pressures [1]. In particular, we hypothesize that increased intracranial pressure (ICP) drives connective tissue remodeling of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS). We describe here finite element (FE) modeling designed to understand how altered pressures, particularly altered ICP, affect the tissues of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS) in VIIP. METHODS: Additional description of the modeling methodology is provided in the companion IWS abstract by Feola et al. In brief, a geometric model of the posterior eye and optic nerve, including the ONS, was created and the effects of fluid pressures on tissue deformations were simulated. We considered three ICP scenarios: an elevated ICP assumed to occur in chronic microgravity, and ICP in the upright and supine positions on earth. Within each scenario we used Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) to consider a range of ICPs, ONH tissue mechanical properties, intraocular pressures (IOPs) and mean arterial pressures (MAPs). The outcome measures were biomechanical strains in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve and retina; here we focus on peak values of these strains, since elevated strain alters cell phenotype and induce tissue remodeling. In 3D, the strain field can be decomposed into three orthogonal components, denoted as first, second and third principal strains. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: For baseline material properties, increasing ICP from 0 to 20 mmHg significantly changed strains within the posterior eye and ONS (Fig. 1), indicating that elevated ICP affects ocular tissue biomechanics. Notably, strains in the lamina cribrosa and retina became less extreme as ICP increased; however, within the optic nerve, the occurrence of such extreme strains greatly increased as

  2. Anatomic and pathologic features of third cranial nerve disorders according to magnetic resonance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, Y.; Torres, J.; Ramos, M.; Caniego, J.L.; Manzanares, R.; Fresno, L.F.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this report is to demonstrate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in the diagnosis of disorders involving the third cranial nerves. We have selected MR studies corresponding to patients with an anomaly affecting the third cranial nerves, whether alone or in combination with other cranial nerves. In order to better study the pathology of these cranial nerves, we considered four different segments of the nerves: mesencephalic, cisternal, cavernous and orbital. We present the MR features of the anatomy of the third cranial nerves and the most representative lesions affecting the different intracranial segments: infraction, multiple sclerosis, glioma and cavernoma in the mesencephalon; posterior communicating artery aneurysm, neuritis, neurinomas and meningioma in the cisternal segment; aneurysm of the internal carotid artery, cavernous carotid fistula, metastasis and meningioma in the cavernous sinus and Tolosa-Hunt syndrome in the orbital apex. (Author) 11 refs

  3. Endoscopic management of posterior epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, J; Kanotra, Sohit Paul; Kanotra, Sonika

    2011-04-01

    The traditional method of management of posterior epistaxis has been with anteroposterior nasal packing. Apart from the high failure rate of 26-50% reported in various series, nasal packing is associated with marked discomfort and several complications. In order to avoid nasal packing, we started doing endoscopic cauterization in cases of posterior epistaxis. A total of 23 patients with posterior epistaxis were subjected to nasal endoscopy with the intent to stop bleeding by cauterization of the bleeding vessel. Of these, in four cases unsuspected diagnosis was made. Of the remaining 19, in three patients, the bleeding point could not be localized accurately and these patients were managed by anteroposterior packing. The rest of the 16 patients were managed by endoscopic cauterization. In four patients, there was recurrence of bleeding within 24 h. In one of these, cauterization controlled the bleeding while in the rest nasal packing had to be resorted to. Thus, of the 23 patients of posterior epistaxis subjected to nasal endoscopy, we could avoid nasal packing in 17 (74%). To conclude, endoscopic nasal cauterization is recommended as the first line to treatment in all cases of posterior epistaxis. This will not only prevent the uncomfortable and potentially dangerous nasal packing but also help in finding the underlying pathology.

  4. Neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring of the vestibulocochlear nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Mirela V

    2011-12-01

    Neurosurgical procedures involving the skull base and structures within can pose a significant risk of damage to the brain stem and cranial nerves. This can have life-threatening consequences and/or result in devastating neurologic deficits. Over the past decade, intraoperative neurophysiology has significantly evolved and currently offers a great tool for live monitoring of the integrity of nervous structures. Thus, dysfunction can be identified early and prompt modification of the surgical management or operating conditions, leads to avoidance of permanent structural damage.Along these lines, the vestibulocochlear nerve (CN VIII) and, to a greater extent, the auditory pathways as they pass through the brain stem are especially at risk during cerebelopontine angle (CPA), posterior/middle fossa, or brain stem surgery. CN VIII can be damaged by several mechanisms, from vascular compromise to mechanical injury by stretch, compression, dissection, and heat injury. Additionally, cochlea itself can be significantly damaged during temporal bone drilling, by noise, mechanical destruction, or infarction, and because of rupture, occlusion, or vasospasm of the internal auditory artery.CN VIII monitoring can be successfully achieved by live recording of the function of one of its parts, the cochlear or auditory nerve (AN), using the brain stem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs), electrocochleography (ECochG), and compound nerve action potentials (CNAPs) of the cochlear nerve.This is a review of these techniques, their principle, applications, methodology, interpretation of the evoked responses, and their change from baseline, within the context of surgical and anesthesia environments, and finally the appropriate management of these changes.

  5. End-to-side neurotization with the phrenic nerve in restoring the function of toe extension: an experimental study in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaotian; Chen, Chao; Yang, Jianyun; Yu, Cong

    2018-06-01

    The phrenic nerve being transferred to the posterior division of the lower trunk with end-to-end neurorrhaphy is reported to be effective in restoring the function of digit extension in literature. However, the phrenic nerve is extremely important in respiration. We designed an animal experiment to discover whether the phrenic nerve being transferred to the posterior division of the lower trunk with end-to-side neurotization was feasible and provided the theoretical basis. A sum of 36 Sprague-Dawley rats was randomly assigned to one of two groups. In Group A, the phrenic nerve was transferred to the posterior division of the lower trunk with end-to-side neurotization. In Group B, the posterior division of the lower trunk was directly sutured. The results of behavioral assessment, electrophysiology, histology and nerve fiber count and muscle weight at 12 weeks postoperatively were recorded. In Group A, none of the rats experienced tachypnea. The motion of slight toe extension was observed. The results of electrophysiology, histology and nerve fiber count and muscle weight in Group A were not as well as those of Group B, but gradually improved with time. The phrenic nerve being transferred to the posterior division of lower trunk with end-to-side neurotization can partially restore the function of toe extension in a rat model. Whether the function of digit extension can be restored by the phrenic nerve with end-to-side neurotization in humans still needs more practice in clinic.

  6. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozic, D; Nagulic, M; Ostojic, J

    2006-01-01

    We present the short-term follow-up magnetic resonance (MR) studies and 1H-MR spectroscopy in a child with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve associated with other less aggressive cranial nerve schwannomas. The tumor revealed perineural extension and diffuse nerve...

  7. Bilateral posterior tarsal tunnel syndrome caused by accessory flexor digitorum longus; case report and surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Hebbel, A; Elgueta, J; Villa, A; Mery, P; Filippi, J

    To present a case report of bilateral posterior tarsal tunnel syndrome (PTTS) caused by an accessory flexor digitorum longus (AFDL), including the surgical technique and a review of the literature. Twenty-nine year old male diagnosed with bilateral PTTS, refractory to conservative management, with 53 points on the preoperative AOFAS score. MR of both ankles showed an AFDL within the tarsal tunnel, in close relationship to the posterior tibial nerve. Bilateral tarsal tunnel decompression and AFDL resection was performed. There were no post-operative complications. At 6 months after surgery, the patient had no pain and had 87 points on the AOFAS score. The PTTS is an entrapment neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve or one of its terminal branches. A rare cause is the presence of an AFDL, and its resection is associated with good clinical results. Careful scar tissue resection and neurolysis is recommended. Knowing the normal pathway and anatomical variability of the posterior tibial nerve and its branches is essential to avoid iatrogenic injury. In our case report, MR and intraoperative findings identified a bilateral FDLA in close relationship to the common flexor digitorum, an unusual finding, with few reports in current literature. Careful tarsal tunnel decompression and AFDL resection in our patient with bilateral symptomatic PTTS has good clinical results and no complications, particularly when diagnosed and treated early. Copyright © 2015 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Intramuscular Distribution of the Abducens Nerve in the Lateral Rectus Muscle for the Management of Strabismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun Jin; Lee, Shin-Hyo; Shin, Kang-Jae; Koh, Ki-Seok; Song, Wu-Chul

    2018-06-01

    To elucidate the intramuscular distribution and branching patterns of the abducens nerve in the lateral rectus (LR) muscle so as to provide anatomical confirmation of the presence of compartmentalization, including for use in clinical applications such as botulinum toxin injections. Thirty whole-mount human cadaver specimens were dissected and then Sihler's stain was applied. The basic dimensions of the LR and its intramuscular nerve distribution were investigated. The distances from the muscle insertion to the point at which the abducens nerve enters the LR and to the terminal nerve plexus were also measured. The LR was 46.0 mm long. The abducens nerve enters the muscle on the posterior one-third of the LR and then typically divides into a few branches (average of 1.8). This supports a segregated abducens nerve selectively innervating compartments of the LR. The intramuscular nerve distribution showed a Y-shaped ramification with root-like arborization. The intramuscular nerve course finished around the middle of the LR (24.8 mm posterior to the insertion point) to form the terminal nerve plexus. This region should be considered the optimal target site for botulinum toxin injections. We have also identified the presence of an overlapping zone and communicating nerve branches between the neighboring LR compartments. Sihler's staining is a useful technique for visualizing the entire nerve network of the LR. Improving the knowledge of the nerve distribution patterns is important not only for researchers but also clinicians to understand the functions of the LR and the diverse pathophysiology of strabismus.

  9. Epidural hematomas of posterior fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Danilo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Posterior fossa epidural hematomas represent 7-14% of all traumatic intracranial epidural hematomas. They are most frequently encountered posttraumatic mass lesions in the posterior fossa. The aim of this study was to identify clinical features that could lead to the early diagnosis of posterior fossa epidural hematoma. Methods. Between 1980 and 2002, 28 patients with epidural hematoma of the posterior fossa were operated on at the Institute for Neurosurgery, Belgrade. Clinical course neuroradiological investigations, and the results of surgical treatment of the patients with posterior fossa epidural hematomas were analyzed retrospectively. Results. Almost two thirds of patients were younger than 16 years of age. In 20 cases injury was caused by a fall, in 6 cases by a traffic accident, and in 2 by the assault. Clinical course was subacute or chronic in two thirds of the patients. On the admission Glasgow Coma Scale was 7 or less in 9 injured, 8-14 in 14 injured, and 15 in 5 injured patients. Linear fracture of the occipital bone was radiographically evident in 19 patients, but was intraoperatively encountered in all the patients except for a 4-year old child. In 25 patients the diagnosis was established by computer assisted tomography (CAT and in 3 by vertebral angiography. All the patients were operated on via suboccipital craniotomy. Four injured patients who were preoperatively comatose were with lethal outcome. Postoperatively, 24 patients were with sufficient neurologic recovery. Conclusion. Posterior fossa epidural hematoma should be suspected in cases of occipital injury, consciousness disturbances, and occipital bone fracture. In such cases urgent CAT-scan is recommended. Early recognition early diagnosis, and prompt treatment are crucial for good neurological recovery after surgery.

  10. A comparison of optic nerve dosimetry in craniospinal radiotherapy planned and treated with conventional and intensity modulated techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rene, Nicholas J.; Brodeur, Marylene; Parker, William; Roberge, David; Freeman, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Some CNS tumours present leptomeningeal dissemination. Craniospinal radiotherapy is complex and recurrences may occur at sites of target volume underdosage. IMRT, being highly conformal to the target, could theoretically underdose the optic nerves if they are not specifically targeted leading to optic nerve recurrences. We analyzed optic nerve dosimetry when they are not specifically targeted. Materials and methods: We designed 3D-conformal and tomotherapy plans for our last five patients treated to the craniospinal axis, not including the optic nerves in the target volume. We analyzed the dose delivered to the optic nerves, to the anterior and posterior half of the optic nerves, and to a theoretical optic nerve-PTV. Results: The dose delivered to the optic nerves was similar for both plans in all patients (V95% close to 100%) except one in whom tomotherapy considerably underdosed the anterior optic nerves. The dose to the optic nerve-PTV was lower with tomotherapy in all patients. Conclusion: Despite not intentionally targeting the optic nerves, the dose to the optic nerves with IMRT was similar to 3D-conformal plans in most cases but left no margin for setup error. In individual cases the anterior half of the optic nerves could be significantly underdosed.

  11. Unsuccessful outcomes after posterior urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Oliver; Fisch, Margit

    2015-03-01

    Posterior urethroplasty is the most common strategy for the treatment of post-traumatic urethral injuries. Especially in younger patients, post-traumatic injuries are a common reason for urethral strictures caused by road traffic accidents, with pelvic fracture or direct trauma to the perineum. In many cases early endoscopic realignment is the first attempt to restore the junction between proximal and distal urethra, but in some cases primary realignment is not possible or not enough to treat the urethral injury. In these cases suprapubic cystostomy alone and delayed repair by stricture excision and posterior urethroplasty is an alternative procedure to minimise the risk of stricture recurrence.

  12. Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0047 TITLE: Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ahmet Höke...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0047 Nanofiber nerve guide for peripheral nerve repair and regeneration 5b. GRANT NUMBER...goal of this collaborative research project was to develop next generation engineered nerve guide conduits (NGCs) with aligned nanofibers and

  13. Mental nerve paresthesia secondary to initiation of endodontic therapy: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Sharique; Zia, Afaf; Khan, Masood Hasan; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Whenever endodontic therapy is performed on mandibular posterior teeth, damage to the inferior alveolar nerve or any of its branches is possible. Acute periapical infection in mandibular posterior teeth may also sometimes disturb the normal functioning of the inferior alveolar nerve. The most common clinical manifestation of these insults is the paresthesia of the inferior alveolar nerve or mental nerve paresthesia. Paresthesia usually manifests as burning, prickling, tingling, numbness, itching or any deviation from normal sensation. Altered sensation and pain in the involved areas may interfere with speaking, eating, drinking, shaving, tooth brushing and other events of social interaction which will have a disturbing impact on the patient. Paresthesia can be short term, long term or even permanent. The duration of the paresthesia depends upon the extent of the nerve damage or persistence of the etiology. Permanent paresthesia is the result of nerve trunk laceration or actual total nerve damage. Paresthesia must be treated as soon as diagnosed to have better treatment outcomes. The present paper describes a case of mental nerve paresthesia arising after the start of the endodontic therapy in left mandibular first molar which was managed successfully by conservative treatment. PMID:25110646

  14. Time-related changes in firing rates are influenced by recruitment threshold and twitch force potentiation in the first dorsal interosseous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonathan D; Herda, Trent J; Trevino, Michael A; Sterczala, Adam J; Ciccone, Anthony B

    2017-08-01

    What is the central question of this study? The influences of motor unit recruitment threshold and twitch force potentiation on the changes in firing rates during steady-force muscular contractions are not well understood. What is the main finding and its importance? The behaviour of motor units during steady force was influenced by recruitment threshold, such that firing rates decreased for lower-threshold motor units but increased for higher-threshold motor units. In addition, individuals with greater changes in firing rates possessed greater twitch force potentiation. There are contradictory reports regarding changes in motor unit firing rates during steady-force contractions. Inconsistencies are likely to be the result of previous studies disregarding motor unit recruitment thresholds and not examining firing rates on a subject-by-subject basis. It is hypothesized that firing rates are manipulated by twitch force potentiation during contractions. Therefore, in this study we examined time-related changes in firing rates at steady force in relationship to motor unit recruitment threshold in the first dorsal interosseous and the influence of twitch force potentiation on such changes in young versus aged individuals. Subjects performed a 12 s steady-force contraction at 50% maximal voluntary contraction, with evoked twitches before and after the contraction to quantify potentiation. Firing rates, in relationship to recruitment thresholds, were determined at the beginning, middle and end of the steady force. There were no firing rate changes for aged individuals. For the young, firing rates decreased slightly for lower-threshold motor units but increased for higher-threshold motor units. Twitch force potentiation was greater for young than aged subjects, and changes in firing rates were correlated with twitch force potentiation. Thus, individuals with greater increases in firing rates of higher-threshold motor units and decreases in lower-threshold motor units

  15. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get ... you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. ...

  16. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  17. Tumors of peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Michael; Lutz, Amelie M.

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation between malignant and benign tumors of peripheral nerves in the early stages is challenging; however, due to the unfavorable prognosis of malignant tumors early identification is required. To show the possibilities for detection, differential diagnosis and clinical management of peripheral nerve tumors by imaging appearance in magnetic resonance (MR) neurography. Review of current literature available in PubMed and MEDLINE, supplemented by the authors' own observations in clinical practice. Although not pathognomonic, several imaging features have been reported for a differentiation between distinct peripheral nerve tumors. The use of MR neurography enables detection and initial differential diagnosis in tumors of peripheral nerves. Furthermore, it plays an important role in clinical follow-up, targeted biopsy and surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  18. Intermuscular aponeuroses between the flexor muscles of the forearm and their relationships with the ulnar nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Hyung-Sun; Liu, Hong-Fu; Kim, Jun-Ho; Kwak, Dai-Soon; Chung, In-Hyuk; Kim, In-Beom

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the morphological characteristics of the intermuscular aponeurosis between the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS; IMAS), and that between the FCU and flexor digitorum profundus (FDP; IMAP), and their topographic relationships with the ulnar nerve. Fifty limbs of 38 adult cadavers were studied. The IMAS extended along the deep surface of the FCU adjoining the FDS, having the appearance of a ladder, giving off "steps" that decreased in width from superficial to deep around the middle of the forearm. Its proximal part divided into two bands connected by a thin membrane, and was attached to the medial epicondyle and the tubercle (the most medial prominent part of the coronoid process of the ulna), respectively. The IMAP extended deep between the FCU and FDP from the antebrachial fascia, and its distal end was located on the posterior border of the FCU. The IMAP became broader toward its proximal part, and its proximal end was attached anterior and posterior to the tubercle and the olecranon, respectively. The ulnar nerve passed posterior to the medial epicondyle and then medial to the tubercle, and was crossed by the deep border of the IMAS at 58.3 ± 14.1 mm below the medial epicondyle. The deep border of the IMAS and aberrant tendinous structure passing across the ulnar nerve, or the parts of the IMAS and IMAP passing posterior to the ulnar nerve are potential causes of ulnar nerve compression.

  19. Anatomical study of the motor branches of the median nerve to the forearm and guidelines for selective neurectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parot, Catalina; Leclercq, Caroline

    2016-07-01

    The median nerve is responsible for the motor innervation of most of the muscles usually involved in upper limb spasticity. Selective neurectomy is one of the treatments utilized to reduce spasticity. The purpose of this study was to describe the variations of the motor branches of the median nerve in the forearm and draw recommendations for an appropriate planning of selective neurectomy. The median nerve was dissected in the forearm of 20 fresh cadaver upper limbs. Measurements included number, origin, division, and entry point of each motor branch into the muscles. One branch for the pronator teres was the most common pattern. In 9/20 cases, it arose as a common trunk with other branches. A single trunk innervated the flexor carpi radialis with a common origin with other branches in 17/20 cases. Two, three or four branches innervated the flexor digitorum superficialis, the first one frequently through a common trunk with other branches. They were very difficult to identify unless insertions of pronator teres and flexor digitorum superficialis were detached. The flexor digitorum profundus received one to five branches and flexor pollicis longus one to two branches from the anterior interosseous nerve. There is no regular pattern of the motor branches of the median nerve in the forearm. Our findings differ in many points from the classical literature. Because of the frequency of common trunks for different muscles, we recommend the use of peroperative electrical stimulation. Selective neurotomy of flexor digitorum superficialis is technically difficult, because the entry point of some of their terminal branches occurs just below the arch and deep to the muscle belly.

  20. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide.......To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  1. Prevention of posterior capsular opacification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nibourg, Lisanne M; Gelens, Edith; Kuijer, Roelof; Hooymans, Johanna Mm; van Kooten, Theo G; Koopmans, Steven A

    Posterior capsular opacification (PCO) is a common complication of cataract surgery. The development of PCO is due to a combination of the processes of proliferation, migration, and transdifferentiation of residual lens epithelial cells (LECs) on the lens capsule. In the past decades, various forms

  2. The ectopic posterior pituitary gland

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-04

    Nov 4, 2013 ... crinology with short stature, delayed bone age and biochemical features suggestive of hypo pituitarism. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated a flattened anterior pituitary gland within the sella, associated with absence of the infundibular stalk and an ectopic posterior pituitary gland (Fig.

  3. [Posterior ceramic bonded partial restorations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    Posterior ceramic bonded partial restorations are conservative and esthetic approaches for compromised teeth. Overlays constitute a less invasive alternative for tooth tissues than crown preparations. With inlays and onlays they are also indicated in case of full arch or quadrant rehabilitations including several teeth. This article screens indications and realization of this type of restorations.

  4. Complete Spinal Accessory Nerve Palsy From Carrying Climbing Gear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Jess M; Warme, Winston J

    2015-09-01

    We report an unusual case of spinal accessory nerve palsy sustained while transporting climbing gear. Spinal accessory nerve injury is commonly a result of iatrogenic surgical trauma during lymph node excision. This particular nerve is less frequently injured by blunt trauma. The case reported here results from compression of the spinal accessory nerve for a sustained period-that is, carrying a load over the shoulder using a single nylon rope for 2.5 hours. This highlights the importance of using proper load-carrying equipment to distribute weight over a greater surface area to avoid nerve compression in the posterior triangle of the neck. The signs and symptoms of spinal accessory nerve palsy and its etiology are discussed. This report is particularly relevant to individuals involved in mountaineering and rock climbing but can be extended to anyone carrying a load with a strap over one shoulder and across the body. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A reminder about the trigeminocardiac reflex in surgeries at the posterior third of the falx cerebri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Takano

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR is defined as a reproducible hypotension and bradycardia coinciding with the manipulation around the trigeminal nerve. Here, we report a case of sudden bradycardia with falcine manipulation. As the falx cerebri is innervated by the nervus tentorii, which is a recurrent branch of the ophthalmic nerve, the observed asystole is highly possible to be caused by TCR. Anesthesiologists and neurosurgeons should be fully aware of the anatomical innervation of the falx cerebri and that the posterior third of the falx cerebri is one of the highest risk structures for TCR induction for safe operation around this region.

  6. Direct Posterior Bipolar Cervical Facet Radiofrequency Rhizotomy: A Simpler and Safer Approach to Denervate the Facet Capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palea, Ovidiu; Andar, Haroon M; Lugo, Ramon; Granville, Michelle; Jacobson, Robert E

    2018-03-14

    Radiofrequency cervical rhizotomy has been shown to be effective for the relief of chronic neck pain, whether it be due to soft tissue injury, cervical spondylosis, or post-cervical spine surgery. The target and technique have traditionally been taught using an oblique approach to the anterior lateral capsule of the cervical facet joint. The goal is to position the electrode at the proximal location of the recurrent branch after it leaves the exiting nerve root and loops back to the cervical facet joint. The standard oblique approach to the recurrent nerve requires the testing of both motor and sensory components to verify the correct position and ensure safety so as to not damage the slightly more anterior nerve root. Bilateral lesions require the repositioning of the patient's neck. Poorly positioned electrodes can also pass anteriorly and contact the nerve root or vertebral artery. The direct posterior approach presented allows electrode positioning over a broader expanse of the facet joint without risk to the nerve root or vertebral artery. Over a four-year period, direct posterior radiofrequency ablation was performed under fluoroscopic guidance at multiple levels without neuro-stimulation testing with zero procedural neurologic events even as high as the C2 spinal segment. The direct posterior approach allows either unipolar or bipolar lesioning at multiple levels. Making a radiofrequency lesion along the larger posterior area of the facet capsule is as effective as the traditional target point closer to the nerve root but technically easier, allowing bilateral access and safety. The article will review the anatomy and innervation of the cervical facet joint and capsule, showing the diffuse nerve supply extending into the capsule of the facet joint that is more extensive than the recurrent medial sensory branches that have been the focus of radiofrequency lesioning.

  7. The Posterior Transpetrosal Approach in a Case of Large Retrochiasmatic Craniopharyngioma: Operative Video and Technical Nuances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, Moujahed; Watanabe, Kentaro; Loit, Marie-Pier; Hanakita, Shunya; Froelich, Sébastien

    2018-02-01

    Objectives  To discuss the use of the posterior petrosal approach for the resection of a retrochiasmatic craniopharyngioma. Design  Operative video. Results  In this case video, the authors discuss the surgical management of a large craniopharyngioma, presenting with mass effect on the third ventricle and optic apparatus. A first surgical stage, through an endoscopic endonasal transtubercular approach, allowed satisfactory decompression of the optic chiasma and nerves in preparation for adjuvant therapy. However, accelerated growth of the tumor, with renewed visual deficits and mass effect on the hypothalamus and third ventricle, warranted a supplementary resection. A posterior transpetrosal 1 2 (also called "retrolabyrinthine transtentorial") was performed to obtain a better exposure of the tumor and the surrounding anatomy (floor and walls of the third ventricle, perforating vessels, optic nerves, etc.) 3 . Nuances of technique and surgical pearls related to the posterior transpetrosal are discussed and illustrated in this operative video, including the posterior mobilization of the transverse-sigmoid sinuses junction, preservation of the venous anatomy during the tentorial incision, identification and preservation of the floor of the third ventricle during tumor resection, and a careful multilayer closure. Conclusion  Retrochiasmatic craniopharyngiomas are difficult to reach tumors that often require skull base approaches, either endoscopic endonasal or transcranial. The posterior transpetrosal approach is an important part of the surgical armamentarium to safely resect these complex tumors. The link to the video can be found at: https://youtu.be/2MyGLJ_v1kI .

  8. α-Synuclein pathology in the cranial and spinal nerves in Lewy body disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Keiko; Mori, Fumiaki; Tanji, Kunikazu; Miki, Yasuo; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Yamada, Masahito; Wakabayashi, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation of phosphorylated α-synuclein in neurons and glial cells is a histological hallmark of Lewy body disease (LBD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). Recently, filamentous aggregations of phosphorylated α-synuclein have been reported in the cytoplasm of Schwann cells, but not in axons, in the peripheral nervous system in MSA, mainly in the cranial and spinal nerve roots. Here we conducted an immunohistochemical investigation of the cranial and spinal nerves and dorsal root ganglia of patients with LBD. Lewy axons were found in the oculomotor, trigeminal and glossopharyngeal-vagus nerves, but not in the hypoglossal nerve. The glossopharyngeal-vagus nerves were most frequently affected, with involvement in all of 20 subjects. In the spinal nerve roots, Lewy axons were found in all of the cases examined. Lewy axons in the anterior nerves were more frequent and numerous in the thoracic and sacral segments than in the cervical and lumbar segments. On the other hand, axonal lesions in the posterior spinal nerve roots appeared to increase along a cervical-to-sacral gradient. Although Schwann cell cytoplasmic inclusions were found in the spinal nerves, they were only minimal. In the dorsal root ganglia, axonal lesions were seldom evident. These findings indicate that α-synuclein pathology in the peripheral nerves is axonal-predominant in LBD, whereas it is restricted to glial cells in MSA. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  9. Posterior circulation aneurysms: A 10-year institutional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Aneurysms are uncommon and challenging to manage. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was designed to report 53 patients who are treated from June 2002 to June 2011. Results: The mean age at presentation was 46.34 ± 13.67 years (males, 26. Clinical features included subarachnoid hemorrhage (median Hunt and Hess Grade II, n = 42, cranial nerve palsies (9, hydrocephalus (5, and incidentally diagnosed (5. Locations included superior cerebellar artery (3, posterior cerebral artery (2, basilar trunk (4, vertebral (8, anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA (5, posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA (13, vertebrobasilar junction (6, and basilar top (13. Management included both endovascular intervention (26 and surgery (19, and both (2. Five patients presented as poor grade and underwent only extraventricular drain placement while one patient had thrombosed aneurysm and was managed conservatively. Mortality was 26.4% (n = 14 and morbidity included vasospasm (10, meningitis (2, pseudomeningocele (2, pneumonitis (2, and myocardial infarction (1. Conclusion: Posterior circulation aneurysms are highly challenging. They require the multimodality approach, and decision regarding surgery or embolization has to be individualized.

  10. Anatomical approach for surgery of the male posterior urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalpiaz, Orietta; Mitterberger, Michael; Kerschbaumer, Andrea; Pinggera, Germar M; Bartsch, Georg; Strasser, Hannes

    2008-11-01

    To investigate, in a morphological study, the anatomy of the male rhabdosphincter and the relation between the membranous urethra, the rhabdosphincter and the neurovascular bundles (NVBs) to provide the anatomical basis for surgical approach of the posterior urethra as successful outcomes in urethral reconstructive surgery still remain a challenging issue. In all, 11 complete pelves and four tissue blocks of prostate, rectum, membranous urethra and the rhabdosphincter were studied. Besides anatomical preparations, the posterior urethra and their relationship were studied by means of serial histological sections. In the histological cross-sections, the rhabdosphincter forms an omega-shaped loop around the anterior and lateral aspects of the membranous urethra. Ventrally and laterally, it is separated from the membranous urethra by a delicate sheath of connective tissue. Through a midline approach displacing the nerves and vessels laterally, injuries to the NVBs can be avoided. With meticulous dissection of the delicate ventral connective tissue sheath between the ventral wall of the membranous urethra and the rhabdosphincter, the two structures can be separated without damage to either of them. This anatomical approach can be used for dissection of the anterior urethral wall in urethral surgery. Based on precise anatomical knowledge, the ventral wall of the posterior urethra can be dissected and exposed without injuring the rhabdosphincter and the NVBs. This approach provides the basis for sparing of the rhabdosphincter and for successful outcomes in urethral surgery for the treatment of bulbo-membranous urethral strictures.

  11. Hematomas na fossa craniana posterior Haematomata in the posterior fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário S. Cademartori

    1969-09-01

    Full Text Available São relatados 6 casos de hematomas sub-tentorias (um de hematoma subdural crônico, quatro de hematomas intra-cerebelares, um de hematoma extra-dural. Salientando a pequena freqüência dos hematomas da fossa craniana posterior, o autor mostra a necessidade de vários exames complementares para o diagnóstico exato, indispensável para a aplicação de terapêutica cirúrgica adequada.Six cases of sub-tentorial haematomata (one chronic sub-dural, four intra-cerebellar, one extra-dural are reported. Emphasizing the relative rarity of haematomata in the posterior cranial fossa, the author claims the necessity of complementary examinations for proper diagnosis, indispensable for adequate surgical treatment.

  12. End-to-side neurorrhaphy repairs peripheral nerve injury: sensory nerve induces motor nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Zhang, She-Hong; Wang, Tao; Peng, Feng; Han, Dong; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2017-10-01

    End-to-side neurorrhaphy is an option in the treatment of the long segment defects of a nerve. It involves suturing the distal stump of the disconnected nerve (recipient nerve) to the side of the intimate adjacent nerve (donor nerve). However, the motor-sensory specificity after end-to-side neurorrhaphy remains unclear. This study sought to evaluate whether cutaneous sensory nerve regeneration induces motor nerves after end-to-side neurorrhaphy. Thirty rats were randomized into three groups: (1) end-to-side neurorrhaphy using the ulnar nerve (mixed sensory and motor) as the donor nerve and the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve as the recipient nerve; (2) the sham group: ulnar nerve and cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve were just exposed; and (3) the transected nerve group: cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve was transected and the stumps were turned over and tied. At 5 months, acetylcholinesterase staining results showed that 34% ± 16% of the myelinated axons were stained in the end-to-side group, and none of the myelinated axons were stained in either the sham or transected nerve groups. Retrograde fluorescent tracing of spinal motor neurons and dorsal root ganglion showed the proportion of motor neurons from the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve of the end-to-side group was 21% ± 5%. In contrast, no motor neurons from the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve of the sham group and transected nerve group were found in the spinal cord segment. These results confirmed that motor neuron regeneration occurred after cutaneous nerve end-to-side neurorrhaphy.

  13. Sciatic nerve compression by neurogenic heterotopic ossification: use of CT to determine surgical indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salga, Marjorie; Jourdan, Claire; Durand, Marie-Christine; Hangard, Chloe; Carlier, Robert-Yves; Denormandie, Philippe; Genet, Francois

    2015-01-01

    To describe the characteristics of neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) based on clinical tests, electroneuromyography (ENMG) and CT in a database of patients with lesions of the central nervous system who required sciatic nerve neurolysis along with posterior hip NHO resection, and to determine the respective roles of ENMG and CT in the management of posterior hip NHOs in patients who are unable to communicate or express pain. The consistency of the ENMG results with clinical findings, CT results and macroscopic signs of lesions was retrospectively assessed after sciatic nerve neurolysis and ablation of 55 posterior hip NHOs. Sciatic nerve neurolysis was necessary in 55 cases (47.4 %; 55 out of 116). CT showed contact of the NHO with the nerve in all cases: 5 in contact with no deflection, 3 in contact with deflection, 21 moulded into a gutter and 26 entrapped in the NHO. There were clinical signs of sciatic nerve lesion in 21.8 % of cases (12 out of 55). ENMG showed signs of sciatic nerve lesions in only 55.6 % (10 out of 18), only 4 of whom presented with clinical signs of a nerve lesion. No significant relationship was found between clinical symptoms and ENMG findings of sciatic nerve compression (n = 13, p = 0.77). Nerve compression by NHO is likely an underdiagnosed condition, particularly in patients who are unable to communicate. Diagnosis of sciatic compression by NHO should be based on regular clinical examinations and CT. ENMG is not sufficiently sensitive to be used alone for surgical decision-making. (orig.)

  14. Sciatic nerve compression by neurogenic heterotopic ossification: use of CT to determine surgical indications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salga, Marjorie [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Jourdan, Claire [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Handi-Resp, (EA4047), Versailles (France); Durand, Marie-Christine [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Neurophysiology, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Hangard, Chloe; Carlier, Robert-Yves [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Medical Imaging, Garches (France); Denormandie, Philippe [Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Garches (France); Genet, Francois [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Military Medical Service, Hopital d' Instruction des Armees Percy, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clamart (France)

    2014-09-14

    To describe the characteristics of neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) based on clinical tests, electroneuromyography (ENMG) and CT in a database of patients with lesions of the central nervous system who required sciatic nerve neurolysis along with posterior hip NHO resection, and to determine the respective roles of ENMG and CT in the management of posterior hip NHOs in patients who are unable to communicate or express pain. The consistency of the ENMG results with clinical findings, CT results and macroscopic signs of lesions was retrospectively assessed after sciatic nerve neurolysis and ablation of 55 posterior hip NHOs. Sciatic nerve neurolysis was necessary in 55 cases (47.4 %; 55 out of 116). CT showed contact of the NHO with the nerve in all cases: 5 in contact with no deflection, 3 in contact with deflection, 21 moulded into a gutter and 26 entrapped in the NHO. There were clinical signs of sciatic nerve lesion in 21.8 % of cases (12 out of 55). ENMG showed signs of sciatic nerve lesions in only 55.6 % (10 out of 18), only 4 of whom presented with clinical signs of a nerve lesion. No significant relationship was found between clinical symptoms and ENMG findings of sciatic nerve compression (n = 13, p = 0.77). Nerve compression by NHO is likely an underdiagnosed condition, particularly in patients who are unable to communicate. Diagnosis of sciatic compression by NHO should be based on regular clinical examinations and CT. ENMG is not sufficiently sensitive to be used alone for surgical decision-making. (orig.)

  15. Nerve transection repair using laser-activated chitosan in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Neel K; Khan, Taleef R; Mejias, Christopher; Paniello, Randal C

    2017-08-01

    Cranial nerve transection during head and neck surgery is conventionally repaired with microsuture. Previous studies have demonstrated recovery with laser nerve welding (LNW), a novel alternative to microsuture. LNW has been reported to have poorer tensile strength, however. Laser-activated chitosan, an adhesive biopolymer, may promote nerve recovery while enhancing the tensile strength of the repair. Using a rat posterior tibial nerve injury model, we compared four different methods of nerve repair in this pilot study. Animal study. Animals underwent unilateral posterior tibial nerve transection. The injury was repaired by potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser alone (n = 20), KTP + chitosan (n = 12), microsuture + chitosan (n = 12), and chitosan alone (n = 14). Weekly walking tracks were conducted to measure functional recovery (FR). Tensile strength (TS) was measured at 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, KTP laser alone had the best recovery (FR = 93.4% ± 8.3%). Microsuture + chitosan, KTP + chitosan, and chitosan alone all showed good FR (87.4% ± 13.5%, 84.6% ± 13.0%, and 84.1% ± 10.0%, respectively). One-way analysis of variance was performed (F(3,56) = 2.6, P = .061). A TS threshold of 3.8 N was selected as a control mean recovery. Three groups-KTP alone, KTP + chitosan, and microsuture + chitosan-were found to meet threshold 60% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 23.1%-88.3%), 75% (95% CI: 46.8%-91.1%), and 100% (95% CI: 75.8%-100.0%), respectively. In the posterior tibial nerve model, all repair methods promoted nerve recovery. Laser-activated chitosan as a biopolymer anchor provided good TS and appears to be a novel alternative to microsuture. This repair method may have surgical utility following cranial nerve injury during head and neck surgery. NA Laryngoscope, 127:E253-E257, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Nerve canals at the fundus of the internal auditory canal on high-resolution temporal bone CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Yoon Ha; Youn, Eun Kyung; Kim, Seung Chul

    2001-01-01

    To identify and evaluate the normal anatomy of nerve canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal which can be visualized on high-resolution temporal bone CT. We retrospectively reviewed high-resolution (1 mm thickness and interval contiguous scan) temporal bone CT images of 253 ears in 150 patients who had not suffered trauma or undergone surgery. Those with a history of uncomplicated inflammatory disease were included, but those with symptoms of vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, or facial nerve palsy were excluded. Three radiologists determined the detectability and location of canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial, superior vestibular and cochlear nerve, and the saccular branch and posterior ampullary nerve of the inferior vestibular nerve. Five bony canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal were identified as nerve canals. Four canals were identified on axial CT images in 100% of cases; the so-called singular canal was identified in only 68%. On coronal CT images, canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial and superior vestibular nerve were seen in 100% of cases, but those for the cochlear nerve, the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve, and the singular canal were seen in 90.1%, 87.4% and 78% of cases, respectiveIy. In all detectable cases, the canal for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve was revealed as one which traversed anterolateralIy, from the anterosuperior portion of the fundus of the internal auditory canal. The canal for the cochlear nerve was located just below that for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve, while that canal for the superior vestibular nerve was seen at the posterior aspect of these two canals. The canal for the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve was located just below the canal for the superior vestibular nerve, and that for the posterior ampullary nerve, the so-called singular canal, ran laterally or posteolateralIy from the posteroinferior aspect of

  17. Nerve canals at the fundus of the internal auditory canal on high-resolution temporal bone CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yoon Ha; Youn, Eun Kyung; Kim, Seung Chul [Sungkyunkwan Univ., School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-01

    To identify and evaluate the normal anatomy of nerve canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal which can be visualized on high-resolution temporal bone CT. We retrospectively reviewed high-resolution (1 mm thickness and interval contiguous scan) temporal bone CT images of 253 ears in 150 patients who had not suffered trauma or undergone surgery. Those with a history of uncomplicated inflammatory disease were included, but those with symptoms of vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, or facial nerve palsy were excluded. Three radiologists determined the detectability and location of canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial, superior vestibular and cochlear nerve, and the saccular branch and posterior ampullary nerve of the inferior vestibular nerve. Five bony canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal were identified as nerve canals. Four canals were identified on axial CT images in 100% of cases; the so-called singular canal was identified in only 68%. On coronal CT images, canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial and superior vestibular nerve were seen in 100% of cases, but those for the cochlear nerve, the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve, and the singular canal were seen in 90.1%, 87.4% and 78% of cases, respectiveIy. In all detectable cases, the canal for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve was revealed as one which traversed anterolateralIy, from the anterosuperior portion of the fundus of the internal auditory canal. The canal for the cochlear nerve was located just below that for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve, while that canal for the superior vestibular nerve was seen at the posterior aspect of these two canals. The canal for the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve was located just below the canal for the superior vestibular nerve, and that for the posterior ampullary nerve, the so-called singular canal, ran laterally or posteolateralIy from the posteroinferior aspect of

  18. Regeneration of Optic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-Fai So

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system (CNS and has a structure similar to other CNS tracts. The axons that form the optic nerve originate in the ganglion cell layer of the retina and extend through the optic tract. As a tissue, the optic nerve has the same organization as the white matter of the brain in regard to its glia. There are three types of glial cells: Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Little structural and functional regeneration of the CNS takes place spontaneously following injury in adult mammals. In contrast, the ability of the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS to regenerate axons after injury is well documented. A number of factors are involved in the lack of CNS regeneration, including: (i the response of neuronal cell bodies against the damage; (ii myelin-mediated inhibition by oligodendrocytes; (iii glial scarring, by astrocytes; (iv macrophage infiltration; and (v insufficient trophic factor support. The fundamental difference in the regenerative capacity between CNS and PNS neuronal cell bodies has been the subject of intensive research. In the CNS the target normally conveys a retrograde trophic signal to the cell body. CNS neurons die because of trophic deprivation. Damage to the optic nerve disconnects the neuronal cell body from its target-derived trophic peptides, leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, the axontomized neurons become less responsive to the peptide trophic signals they do receive. On the other hand, adult PNS neurons are intrinsically responsive to neurotrophic factors and do not lose trophic responsiveness after axotomy. In this talk different strategies to promote optic-nerve regeneration in adult mammals are reviewed. Much work is still needed to resolve many issues. This is a very important area of neuroregeneration and neuroprotection, as currently there is no cure after traumatic optic nerve injury or retinal disease such as glaucoma, which

  19. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of the tibial nerve and the common peroneal nerve with different motion probing gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Lianxin; Wang Guangbin; Liu Yubo; Wu Lebin; Bai Xue; Yang Li; Chen Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the image quality of diffusion-weighted MR neurography (DW-MRN) of the tibial nerve and the common peroneal nerve prospectively using different motion probing gradients (MPGs). Methods: A total of 21 healthy volunteers underwent DW-MRN at the knee (unilateral imaging) on a 3.0 T magnetic resonance system with unidirectional MPGs. The protocol included anterior-posterior unidirectional, right-left unidirectional, three-directional and six-directional MPGs. The apparent SNR and CNR of tibial nerve and common peroneal nerve were calculated. Three-dimensional MIP images of the nerves were evaluated blindly by two radiologists using a four-point grading scale on basis of entirety depiction and the signal intensity. Significance was determined by using Friedman and paired Wilcoxon tests. Results: The SNR of tibial nerves on DW-MRN with anterior-posterior, right-left, three directional and six directional MPGs were 4.17 (2.70-5.65), 4.35 (0.47-4.69), 3.46 (2.27-4.62) and 3.30 (2.06-4.43), respectively. CNR were 0.61 (0.46-0.70), 0.63 (0.36-0.73), 0.55 (0.39-0.64) and 0.53(0.35-0.63), respectively. The scores of tibial nerve image quality were 4.0 (2.0-4.0), 4.0 (3.0-4.0), 2.5 (2.0-3.5), 2.0 (1.0-2.5), respectively. Interobserver agreement was good and the Kappa value was 0.69 (P<0.05). The SNR of the common peroneal nerves on DW-MRN with anterior-posterior, right-left, three directional and six directional MPGs were 3.05 (2.30-4.20), 3.05 (2.26-4.34), 2.72 (1.84-13.80) and 2.68 (1.87-3.67), respectively. CNR were 0.51 (0.39-0.62), 0.51 (0.39-0.63), 0.46(0.30-0.86) and 0.46 (0.30-0.57), respectively. The scores of the common peroneal nerve image quality were 3.5 (2.0-4.0), 4.0 (2.0-4.0), 2.0 (1.0-3.0) and 2.0 (1.0-2.5), respectively. Interobserver agreement was good and the Kappa value was 0.70 (P<0.05). For SNR, CNR and nerve image quality of the tibial nerves and the common peroneal nerves, there were significant differences among different MPGs (

  20. Morphology of nerve endings in vocal fold of human newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves da Silva Leite, Janaina; Costa Cavalcante, Maria Luzete; Fechine-Jamacaru, Francisco Vagnaldo; de Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria; Leite, José Alberto Dias; Nascimento Coelho, Dulce Maria; Rabelo de Freitas, Marcos

    2016-10-01

    Sensory receptors are distributed throughout the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx. Laryngeal sensitivity is crucial for maintaining safe swallowing, thus avoiding silent aspiration. Morphologic description of different receptor types present in larynx vary because of the study of many different species, from mouse to humans. The most commonly sensory structures described in laryngeal mucosa are free nerve endings, taste buds, muscle spindles, glomerular and corpuscular receptors. This study aimed at describing the morphology and the distribution of nerve endings in premature newborn glottic region. Transversal serial frozen sections of the whole vocal folds of three newborns were analyzed using an immuno-histochemical process with a pan-neuronal marker anti-protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5). Imaging was done using a confocal laser microscope. Nerve fiber density in vocal cord was calculated using panoramic images in software Morphometric Analysis System v1.0. Some sensory structures, i.e. glomerular endings and intraepithelial free nerve endings were found in the vocal cord mucosa. Muscle spindles, complex nerve endings (Meissner-like, spherical, rectangular and growing) spiral-wharves nerve structures were identified in larynx intrinsic muscles. Nervous total mean density in vocal cord was similar in the three newborns, although they had different gestational age. The mean nerve fiber density was higher in the posterior region than anterior region of vocal cord. The present results demonstrate the occurrence of different morphotypes of sensory corpuscles and nerve endings premature newborn glottic region and provide information on their sensory systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Acellular Nerve Allografts in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Amy M.; MacEwan, Matthew; Santosa, Katherine B.; Chenard, Kristofer E.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Processed nerve allografts offer a promising alternative to nerve autografts in the surgical management of peripheral nerve injuries where short deficits exist. Methods Three established models of acellular nerve allograft (cold-preserved, detergent-processed, and AxoGen® -processed nerve allografts) were compared to nerve isografts and silicone nerve guidance conduits in a 14 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Results All acellular nerve grafts were superior to silicone nerve conduits in support of nerve regeneration. Detergent-processed allografts were similar to isografts at 6 weeks post-operatively, while AxoGen®-processed and cold-preserved allografts supported significantly fewer regenerating nerve fibers. Measurement of muscle force confirmed that detergent-processed allografts promoted isograft-equivalent levels of motor recovery 16 weeks post-operatively. All acellular allografts promoted greater amounts of motor recovery compared to silicone conduits. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that differential processing for removal of cellular constituents in preparing acellular nerve allografts affects recovery in vivo. PMID:21660979

  2. Visual attention in posterior stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Charlotte; Petersen, Anders; Iversen, Helle K

    Objective: Impaired visual attention is common following strokes in the territory of the middle cerebral artery, particularly in the right hemisphere. However, attentional effects of more posterior lesions are less clear. The aim of this study was to characterize visual processing speed...... and apprehension span following posterior cerebral artery (PCA) stroke. We also relate these attentional parameters to visual word recognition, as previous studies have suggested that reduced visual speed and span may explain pure alexia. Methods: Nine patients with MR-verified focal lesions in the PCA......-territory (four left PCA; four right PCA; one bilateral, all >1 year post stroke) were compared to 25 controls using single case statistics. Visual attention was characterized by a whole report paradigm allowing for hemifield-specific speed and span measurements. We also characterized visual field defects...

  3. Classification of posterior vitreous detachment

    OpenAIRE

    Kakehashi, Akihiro; Takezawa, Mikiko; Akiba, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Akihiro Kakehashi,1 Mikiko Takezawa,1 Jun Akiba21Department of Ophthalmology, Jichi Medical University, Saitama Medical Center, Saitama, 2Kanjodori Eye Clinic, Asahikawa, JapanAbstract: Diagnosing a posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) is important for predicting the prognosis and determining the indication for vitreoretinal surgery in many vitreoretinal diseases. This article presents both classifications of a PVD by slit-lamp biomicroscopy and of a shallow PVD by optical coherence tomography...

  4. A modified straight leg raise test to differentiate between sural nerve pathology and Achilles tendinopathy. A cross-sectional cadaver study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppieters, M.W.J.; Crooke, J.L.; Lawrenson, P.R.; Khoo, S.J.; Skulstad, T.; Bet-Or, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A modified straight leg raise test for the sural nerve (SLRSURAL) has been proposed to assist in the differential diagnosis of sural nerve pathology in people with posterior calf or ankle pain, or lateral foot pain. The biomechanical rationale is that strain in the

  5. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  6. Traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yukio; Nakazawa, Shozo; Yamakawa, Kazuomi; Kobayashi, Shiro; Tsuji, Yukihide

    1981-01-01

    In this paper three acute cases and two subacute cases are reported. CT findings in acute cases show two different types. ''Type I'' shows crescent or lenticular high density area which is not enhanced after contrast infusion. ''Type II'' shows lenticular low density area with membranous high density region in its medial side after contrast infusion. In subacute cases plain CT scan shows lenticular iso or low density area with membranous high density region in its medial side. Forty five cases of posterior fossa epidural hematoma in the review of literature of this country are discussed. Disturbances of the consciousness are the most predominant symptoms in acute cases, while in subacute cases cerebellar signs, vomiting, headache and choked disc are noted. Angiographical examinations may not always be valuable in collecting the direct information of the existence of the epidural hematoma. Liquor cavity in the posterior fossa which is thought to serve as a buffer action of hematoma is about 20 ml, so we discuss about the volume of hematoma, especially of 20 ml, associated with clinical course and prognosis. Volume of epidural hematoma is one of the most important factors affecting clinical course and prognosis. In summary of these our experiences, we again emphasize the value of CT scan as the rapid, noninvasive, accurate radiological examination in the diagnosis of traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematoma. (author)

  7. Chitin biological absorbable catheters bridging sural nerve grafts transplanted into sciatic nerve defects promote nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Jian-Wei; Qin, Li-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Guang; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Jiang, Bao-Guo

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy of chitin biological absorbable catheters in a rat model of autologous nerve transplantation. A segment of sciatic nerve was removed to produce a sciatic nerve defect, and the sural nerve was cut from the ipsilateral leg and used as a graft to bridge the defect, with or without use of a chitin biological absorbable catheter surrounding the graft. The number and morphology of regenerating myelinated fibers, nerve conduction velocity, nerve function index, triceps surae muscle morphology, and sensory function were evaluated at 9 and 12 months after surgery. All of the above parameters were improved in rats in which the nerve graft was bridged with chitin biological absorbable catheters compared with rats without catheters. The results of this study indicate that use of chitin biological absorbable catheters to surround sural nerve grafts bridging sciatic nerve defects promotes recovery of structural, motor, and sensory function and improves muscle fiber morphology. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. 142 Key words: Brachialis, radial nerve, musculocutaneous nerve.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AWORI KIRSTEEN

    The innervation of brachialis muscle by the musculocutaneous nerve has been described as either type I or type II and the main trunk to this muscle is rarely absent. The contribution .... brachialis muscle by fiber analysis of supply nerves].

  9. Nerve conduction and excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Moldovan, Mihai

    2009-01-01

    counterparts in the peripheral nervous system, in some instances without peripheral nervous system symptoms. Both hereditary and acquired demyelinating neuropathies have been studied and the effects on nerve pathophysiology have been compared with degeneration and regeneration of axons. SUMMARY: Excitability......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review is aimed at providing information about the role of nerve excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders. It has been known for many years that the insight into peripheral nerve pathophysiology provided by conventional nerve conduction studies is limited. Nerve...... excitability studies are relatively novel but are acquiring an increasingly important role in the study of peripheral nerves. RECENT FINDINGS: By measuring responses in nerve that are related to nodal function (strength-duration time constant, rheobase and recovery cycle) and internodal function (threshold...

  10. Clinical and imaging characteristics of foraminal nerve root disorders of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Tomio; Tani, Takayuki; Suzuki, Norio; Aonuma, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed cases of lumbar nerve root compression at intervertebral foramina, by comparing 19 cases of foraminal stenosis (FS), and 38 cases of foraminal hernia (FH) with 21 cases of lumbar canal stenosis (LCS). Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores, intervertebral disc degeneration, anatomical measurements of the nerve root foramina and the MRI findings were reviewed. The scores for pain in the lower extremities, and walking ability were both lowest in the FS group. The scores for low back pain, lower extremities, and sensory disturbances were lowest in the FH group. Anterior-posterior diameters of the nerve root foramina were smaller in the FS group and FH group than in the LCS group. More degenerated discs and short length of upper part of the nerve root foramina were seen in FS group than in the other groups. The MRI images of so-called black out nerve root foramina were positive in 63.6% of FS cases, 75% of FH cases. (author)

  11. The Relationship of the Facial Nerve to the Condylar Process: A Cadaveric Study with Implications for Open Reduction Internal Fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. P. Barham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The mandibular condyle is the most common site of mandibular fracture. Surgical treatment of condylar fractures by open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF demands direct visualization of the fracture. This project aimed to investigate the anatomic relationship of the tragus to the facial nerve and condylar process. Materials and Methods. Twelve fresh hemicadavers heads were used. An extended retromandibular/preauricular approach was utilized, with the incision being based parallel to the posterior edge of the ramus. Measurements were obtained from the tragus to the facial nerve and condylar process. Results. The temporozygomatic division of the facial nerve was encountered during each approach, crossing the mandible at the condylar neck. The mean tissue depth separating the facial nerve from the condylar neck was 5.5 mm (range: 3.5 mm–7 mm, SD 1.2 mm. The upper division of the facial nerve crossed the posterior border of the condylar process on average 2.31 cm (SD 0.10 cm anterior to the tragus. Conclusions. This study suggests that the temporozygomatic division of the facial nerve will be encountered in most approaches to the condylar process. As visualization of the relationship of the facial nerve to condyle is often limited, recognition that, on average, 5.5 mm of tissue separates condylar process from nerve should help reduce the incidence of facial nerve injury during this procedure.

  12. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, P.; Adelizzi, J.; Modic, M.T.; Ross, J.S.; Tkach, J.; Masaryk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  13. Lower cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cranial nerves in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, and in fossil relatives (Osteichthyes: Dipnoi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, A

    2017-02-01

    Three systems, two sensory and one protective, are present in the skin of the living Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, and in fossil lungfish, and the arrangement and innervation of the sense organs is peculiar to lungfish. Peripheral branches of nerves that innervate the sense organs are slender and unprotected, and form before any skeletal structures appear. When the olfactory capsule develops, it traps some of the anterior branches of cranial nerve V, which emerged from the chondrocranium from the lateral sphenotic foramen. Cranial nerve I innervates the olfactory organ enclosed within the olfactory capsule and cranial nerve II innervates the eye. Cranial nerve V innervates the sense organs of the snout and upper lip, and, in conjunction with nerve IX and X, the sense organs of the posterior and lateral head. Cranial nerve VII is primarily a motor nerve, and a single branch innervates sense organs in the mandible. There are no connections between nerves V and VII, although both emerge from the brain close to each other. The third associated system consists of lymphatic vessels covered by an extracellular matrix of collagen, mineralised as tubules in fossils. Innervation of the sensory organs is separate from the lymphatic system and from the tubule system of fossil lungfish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Surgical anatomy of the styloid muscles and the extracranial glossopharyngeal nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prades, J M; Gavid, M; Asanau, A; Timoshenko, A P; Richard, C; Martin, C H

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the relationships between the extracranial glossopharyngeal (IX) nerve and the muscles of the styloid diaphragm. In humans, the IX nerve is a hidden retrostyloid nerve which plays a critical role notably in swallowing and has to be preserved during infratemporal fossa and parapharyngeal spaces surgical procedures. In ten adult heads from cadavers (20 sides) fixed in formalin, dissection of the extracranial IX nerve was performed under operating microscope with special attention given to the relationships between this nerve and the styloid muscles of the styloid diaphragm. The three styloid muscles delimit three triangular intermuscular intervals which were each thoroughly explored. Different osseous landmarks were investigated for easy nerve location. The styloid process (SP) is the main superior osseous landmark for the three muscles of the styloid diaphragm. The stylohyoid muscle (SHM) is anteromedially located to the posterior belly of the digastric muscle. The styloglossus muscle (SGM) is medial and anterior to the SHM. The stylopharyngeal muscle (SPM) is the most vertical and medial of the three styloid muscles. It courses from the medial surface of the SP in a deep plane hidden between the SHM and the SGM. The extracranial IX nerve turns around the SPM superiorly with a vertical segment posterior to the SPM and inferiorly with a horizontal segment lateral to the SPM. The meeting point of the two segments of the IX nerve is about 10 mm anteriorly located from the transverse process of the atlas. The external carotid artery and some of its branches lie in contact with the lateral side of the IX nerve. Such relationships between the extracranial IX nerve, the styloid muscles and the transverse process of the atlas should be appreciated by clinician who treats patients with stylohyoid complex syndromes and by the surgeon for the parapharyngeal spaces approach.

  16. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... atrophy, but less than one-tenth of these tumors are confined to the optic nerve or its sheaths. No signs or symptoms are pathognomonic for tumors of the optic nerve. The tumors of the optic nerve may originate from the optic nerve itself (primary tumors) as a proliferation of cells normally present...... in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  17. Lingual nerve injury following surgical removal of mandibular third molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abduljaleel Azad Samad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The close proximity of lingual nerve in relation to the lingual cortical bone of the posterior mandibular third molar is clinically important because lingual nerve may be subjected to trauma during surgical removal of the impacted lower third molar. This prospective study aimed to evaluate the incidence of lingual nerve paresthesia following surgical removal of mandibular third molar in College of Dentistry, Hawler Medical University. Methods: A total of 116 third molars surgery were carried out under local anesthesia for 116 patients for removal of lower mandibular teeth Using Terence Ward's incision made in all cases, and after that, the buccal flap was reflected, lingual tissues had been retracted during bone removal with a periosteal elevator. The sensory disturbance was evaluated on the 7th postoperative day by standard questioning the patients: “Do you have any unusual feeling in your tongue, lingual gingiva and mucosa of the floor of the mouth?" Results: One patient experienced sensory disturbance, the lingual nerve paresthesia incidence was 0.9% as a transient sensory disturbance, while no patient of permanent sensory disturbance. Conclusion: The incidence of injury to the lingual nerve can be minimized by careful clinical evaluation, surgeon’s experience, surgical approach and knowledge about anatomical landmarks during surgical removal of an impacted lower third molar tooth.

  18. Anatomy of the trigeminal nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijden, T.M.G.J.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Baart, J.A.; Brand, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the fifth cranial nerve (n. V), which plays an important role in the innervation of the head and neck area, together with other cranial and spinal nerves. Knowledge of the nerve’s anatomy is very important for the correct application of local anaesthetics.

  19. Imaging the ocular motor nerves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, T.; Verbist, B.M.; Buchem, M. van; Osch, T. van; Webb, A.

    2010-01-01

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic

  20. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta...

  1. Hematomas na fossa craniana posterior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário S. Cademartori

    1969-09-01

    Full Text Available São relatados 6 casos de hematomas sub-tentorias (um de hematoma subdural crônico, quatro de hematomas intra-cerebelares, um de hematoma extra-dural. Salientando a pequena freqüência dos hematomas da fossa craniana posterior, o autor mostra a necessidade de vários exames complementares para o diagnóstico exato, indispensável para a aplicação de terapêutica cirúrgica adequada.

  2. Radioanatomy of the singular nerve canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muren, C. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Sabbatsbergs Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Wadin, K. [University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Dimopoulos, P. [University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1991-08-01

    The singular canal conveys vestibular nerve fibers from the ampulla of the posterior semicircular canal to the posteroinferior border of the internal auditory meatus. Radiographic identification of this anatomic structure helps to distinguish it from a fracture. It is also a landmark in certain surgical procedures. Computed tomography (CT) examinations of deep-frozen temporal bone specimens were compared with subsequently prepared plastic casts of these bones, showing good correlation between the anatomy and the images. The singular canal and its variable anatomy were studied in CT examinations of 107 patients. The singular canal could be identified, in both the axial and in the coronal planes. Its point of entry into the internal auditory meatus varied considerably. (orig.)

  3. MR findings of facial nerve on oblique sagittal MRI using TMJ surface coil: normal vs peripheral facial nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Ok; Lee, Myeong Jun; Lee, Chang Joon; Yoo, Jeong Hyun

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the findings of normal facial nerve, as seen on oblique sagittal MRI using a TMJ (temporomandibular joint) surface coil, and then to evaluate abnormal findings of peripheral facial nerve palsy. We retrospectively reviewed the MR findings of 20 patients with peripheral facial palsy and 50 normal facial nerves of 36 patients without facial palsy. All underwent oblique sagittal MRI using a T MJ surface coil. We analyzed the course, signal intensity, thickness, location, and degree of enhancement of the facial nerve. According to the angle made by the proximal parotid segment on the axis of the mastoid segment, course was classified as anterior angulation (obtuse and acute, or buckling), straight and posterior angulation. Among 50 normal facial nerves, 24 (48%) were straight, and 23 (46%) demonstrated anterior angulation; 34 (68%) showed iso signal intensity on T1W1. In the group of patients, course on the affected side was either straight (40%) or showed anterior angulation (55%), and signal intensity in 80% of cases was isointense. These findings were similar to those in the normal group, but in patients with post-traumatic or post-operative facial palsy, buckling, of course, appeared. In 12 of 18 facial palsy cases (66.6%) in which contrast materials were administered, a normal facial nerve of the opposite facial canal showed mild enhancement on more than one segment, but on the affected side the facial nerve showed diffuse enhancement in all 14 patients with acute facial palsy. Eleven of these (79%) showed fair or marked enhancement on more than one segment, and in 12 (86%), mild enhancement of the proximal parotid segment was noted. Four of six chronic facial palsy cases (66.6%) showed atrophy of the facial nerve. When oblique sagittal MR images are obtained using a TMJ surface coil, enhancement of the proximal parotid segment of the facial nerve and fair or marked enhancement of at least one segment within the facial canal always suggests pathology of

  4. Endovascular treatment of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradac, G.B.; Bergui, M. [Neuroradiology, Univ. di Torino, Turin (Italy)

    2004-12-01

    Aneurysms may arise at various locations along the course of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Brainstem and cranial nerves manipulation make the surgical approach to proximal aneurysms difficult, while the occlusion of the parent vessel is sometimes unavoidable in peripheral aneurysms. Endovascular treatment can be a good alternative, but also with this approach the location of the aneurysm is critical. If occlusion of the parent vessel is planned, anatomical variations and vascular territories of the brainstem should be considered. We report our experience with 18 consecutive aneurysms (12 proximal, 6 peripheral) treated by coils. Complete occlusion was achieved in 14 patients and subtotal in 4. In three patients the parent vessel had to be sacrificed. During treatment two perforations occurred; aneurysms were completely occluded without clinical consequences. Two small asymptomatic cerebellar infarctions were seen on postoperative computed tomography. Clinical outcome was good in 16 patients. (orig.)

  5. Genetics in Ophthalmology III – Posterior Segment Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Aslı Utine

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diseases are congenital or acquired hereditary diseases that result from structural/functional disorders of the human genome. Today, the genetic factors that play a role in many diseases are being highlighted with the rapid progress in the field of genetics science. It becomes increasingly important that physicians from all disciplines have knowledge about the basic principles of genetics, patterns of inheritance, etc., so that they can follow the new developments. In genetic eye diseases, ophthalmologists should know the basic clinical and recently rapidly developing genetic characteristics of these diseases in order to properly approach the diagnosis and treatment and to provide genetic counseling. In this paper, posterior segment eye diseases of genetic origin are reviewed, and retinoblastoma, mitochondrial diseases, retinal dysplasia, retinitis pigmentosa, choroideremia, gyrate atrophy, Alström disease, ocular albinism, optic nerve hypoplasia, anophthalmia/microphthalmia and Leber’s congenital amaurosis are covered. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 386-92

  6. Assessment of nerve regeneration across nerve allografts treated with tacrolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisheng, Han; Songjie, Zuo; Xin, Li

    2008-01-01

    Although regeneration of nerve allotransplant is a major concern in the clinic, there have been few papers quantitatively assessing functional recovery of animals' nerve allografts in the long term. In this study, functional recovery, histopathological study, and immunohistochemistry changes of rat nerve allograft with FK506 were investigated up to 12 weeks without slaughtering. C57 and SD rats were used for transplantation. The donor's nerve was sliced and transplanted into the recipient. The sciatic nerve was epineurally sutured with 10-0 nylon. In total, 30 models of transplantation were performed and divided into 3 groups that were either treated with FK506 or not. Functional recovery of the grafted nerve was serially assessed by the pin click test, walking track analysis and electrophysiological evaluations. A histopathological study and immunohistochemistry study were done in the all of the models. Nerve allografts treated with FK506 have no immune rejection through 12 weeks. Sensibility had similarly improved in both isografts and allografts. There has been no difference in each graft. Walk track analysis demonstrates significant recovery of motor function of the nerve graft. No histological results of difference were found up to 12 weeks in each graft. In the rodent nerve graft model, FK506 prevented nerve allograft rejection across a major histocompatibility barrier. Sensory recovery seems to be superior to motor function. Nerve isograft and allograft treated with FK506 have no significant difference in function recovery, histopathological result, and immunohistochemistry changes.

  7. Cranial nerve monitoring during subpial dissection in temporomesial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortler, Martin; Fiegele, Thomas; Walser, Gerald; Trinka, Eugen; Eisner, Wilhelm

    2011-06-01

    Cranial nerves (CNs) crossing between the brainstem and skull base at the level of the tentorial hiatus may be at risk in temporomesial surgery involving subpial dissection and/or tumorous growth leading to distorted anatomy. We aimed to identify the surgical steps most likely to result in CN damage in this type of surgery. Electromyographic responses obtained with standard neuromonitoring techniques and a continuous free-running EMG were graded as either contact activity or pathological spontaneous activity (PSA) during subpial resection of temporomesial structures in 16 selective amygdalohippocampectomy cases. Integrity of peripheral motor axons was tested by transpial/transarachnoidal electrical stimulation while recording compound muscle action potentials from distal muscle(s). Continuous EMG showed pathological activity in five (31.2%) patients. Nine events with PSA (slight activity, n = 8; strong temporary activity, n = 1) were recorded. The oculomotor nerve was involved three times, the trochlear nerve twice, the facial nerve once, and all monitored nerves on three occasions. Surgical maneuvers associated with PSA were the resection of deep parts of the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus (CN IV, twice; CN III, once), lining with or removing cotton patties from the resection cavity (III, twice; all channels, once) and indirect exertion of tension on the intact pia/arachnoid of the uncal region while mobilizing the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus en bloc (all channels, once; III, once). CMAPs were observed at 0.3 mA in two patients and at 0.6 mA in one patient, and without registering the exact amount of intensity in three patients. The most dangerous steps leading to cranial nerve damage during mesial temporal lobe surgery are the final stages of the intervention while the resection is being completed in the deep posterior part and the resection cavity is being lined with patties. Distant traction may act on nerves crossing the tentorial

  8. Huge interparietal posterior fontanel meningohydroencephalocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Félix Companioni Rosildo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital encephalocele is a neural tube defect characterized by a sac-like protrusion of the brain, meninges, and other intracranial structures through the skull, which is caused by an embryonic development abnormality. The most common location is at the occipital bone, and its incidence varies according to different world regions. We report a case of an 1-month and 7-day-old male child with a huge interparietal-posterior fontanel meningohydroencephalocele, a rare occurrence. Physical examination and volumetric computed tomography were diagnostic. The encephalocele was surgically resected. Intradural and extradural approaches were performed; the bone defect was not primarily closed. Two days after surgery, the patient developed hydrocephaly requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The surgical treatment of the meningohydroencephalocele of the interparietal-posterior fontanel may be accompanied by technical challenges and followed by complications due to the presence of large blood vessels under the overlying skin. In these cases, huge sacs herniate through large bone defects including meninges, brain, and blood vessels. The latter present communication with the superior sagittal sinus and ventricular system. A favorable surgical outcome generally follows an accurate strategy taking into account individual features of the lesion.

  9. Biocompatibility of Different Nerve Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stang, Felix; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Fansa, Hisham

    2009-01-01

    Bridging nerve gaps with suitable grafts is a major clinical problem. The autologous nerve graft is considered to be the gold standard, providing the best functional results; however, donor site morbidity is still a major disadvantage. Various attempts have been made to overcome the problems of autologous nerve grafts with artificial nerve tubes, which are “ready-to-use” in almost every situation. A wide range of materials have been used in animal models but only few have been applied to date clinically, where biocompatibility is an inevitable prerequisite. This review gives an idea about artificial nerve tubes with special focus on their biocompatibility in animals and humans.

  10. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Foer, Bert [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: bert.defoer@GZA.be; Kenis, Christoph [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: christophkenis@hotmail.com; Van Melkebeke, Deborah [Department of Neurology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Deborah.vanmelkebeke@Ugent.be; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: jphver@yahoo.com; Somers, Thomas [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Thomas.somers@GZA.be; Pouillon, Marc [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: marc.pouillon@GZA.be; Offeciers, Erwin [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Erwin.offeciers@GZA.be; Casselman, Jan W. [Department of Radiology, AZ Sint-Jan AV Hospital, Ruddershove 10, Bruges (Belgium); Consultant Radiologist, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Academic Consultent, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.casselman@azbrugge.be

    2010-05-15

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  11. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Foer, Bert; Kenis, Christoph; Van Melkebeke, Deborah; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe; Somers, Thomas; Pouillon, Marc; Offeciers, Erwin; Casselman, Jan W.

    2010-01-01

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  12. Orthodontic treatment for posterior crossbites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostino, Paola; Ugolini, Alessandro; Signori, Alessio; Silvestrini-Biavati, Armando; Harrison, Jayne E; Riley, Philip

    2014-08-08

    A posterior crossbite occurs when the top back teeth bite inside the bottom back teeth. When it affects one side of the mouth, the lower jaw may have to move to one side to allow the back teeth to meet together. Several treatments have been recommended to correct this problem. Some treatments widen the upper teeth while others are directed at treating the cause of the posterior crossbite (e.g. breathing problems or sucking habits). Most treatments have been used at each stage of dental development. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001. To assess the effects of orthodontic treatment for posterior crossbites. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 21 January 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 21 January 2014), and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 21 January 2014). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register and the World Health Organization (WHO) Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. We placed no restrictions on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of orthodontic treatment for posterior crossbites in children and adults. Two review authors, independently and in duplicate, screened the results of the electronic searches, and extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. We attempted to contact the first named authors of the included studies for missing data and for clarification. We used risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to summarise dichotomous (event) data, and mean differences (MD) with 95% CIs to summarise continuous data. We performed meta-analyses using fixed-effect models (we would have used random-effects models if we had included four or more studies in a meta-analysis) when comparisons and outcomes were sufficiently similar. We

  13. Detection of posterior vortex veins in eyes with pathologic myopia by ultra-widefield indocyanine green angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Muka; Cao, Kejia; Ogata, Satoko; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko

    2017-09-01

    To analyse the characteristics of posterior vortex veins detected in highly myopic eyes by wide-field indocyanine green angiography (ICGA). One hundred and fifty-eight consecutive patients (302 eyes) with high myopia (myopic refractive error >8.0 dioptres (D) or axial length ≥26.5 mm) were studied. Wide-field ICGA was performed with the Spectralis HRA module. Posterior vortex veins were found in 80 eyes (26%). The prevalence of posterior staphyloma was significantly higher in eyes in which posterior vortex vein was detected than in eyes without posterior vortex vein. The posterior vortex veins were classified into five types according to the site of exit from the eye; around the optic nerve in 28%, in the macular area in 17%, along the border of staphyloma in 6%, along the margin of macular atrophy or large peripapillary conus in 21%, and elsewhere in 28%. In one eye, two posterior vortex veins collected the choroidal venous blood from the entire fundus. Wide-field ICGA can analyse the characteristic features of choroidal blood outflow system through posterior vortex veins in highly myopic eyes. They may play an important role as routes of choroidal outflow in highly myopic eyes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Phrenic nerve block caused by interscalene brachial plexus block: breathing effects of different sites of injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Lars; Martini, Stefan; Kesselmeier, Miriam; Armbruster, Wolf; Notheisen, Thomas; Adamzik, Michael; Eichholz, Rϋdiger

    2016-07-29

    Interscalene brachial plexus (ISB) block is often associated with phrenic nerve block and diaphragmatic paresis. The goal of our study was to test if the anterior or the posterior ultrasound guided approach of the ISB is associated with a lower incidence of phrenic nerve blocks and impaired lung function. This was a prospective, randomized and single-blinded study of 84 patients scheduled for elective shoulder surgery who fullfilled the inclusion and exclusion critereria. Patients were randomized in two groups to receive either the anterior (n = 42) or the posterior (n = 42) approach for ISB. Clinical data were recorded. In both groups patients received ISB with a total injection volume of 15 ml of ropivacaine 1 %. Spirometry was conducted at baseline (T0) and 30 min (T30) after accomplishing the block. Changes in spirometrical variables between T0 and T30 were investigated by Wilcoxon signed-rank test for each puncture approach. The temporal difference between the posterior and the anterior puncture approach groups were again analyzed by the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. The spirometric results showed a significant decrease in vital capacity, forced expiratory volume per second, and maximum nasal inspiratory breathing after the Interscalene brachial plexus block; indicating a phrenic nerve block (p Wilcoxon signed-rank). A significant difference in the development of the spirometric parameters between the anterior and the posterior group could not be identified (Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test). Despite the changes in spirometry, no cases of dyspnea were reported. A different site of injection (anterior or posterior) did not show an effect in reducing the cervical block spread of the local anesthetic and the incidence of phrenic nerve blocks during during ultrasound guided Interscalene brachial plexus block. Clinical breathing effects of phrenic nerve blocks are, however, usually well compensated, and subjective dyspnea did not occur in our patients. German

  15. Anatomically based lower limb nerve model for electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soboleva Tanya K

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES is a technique that aims to rehabilitate or restore functionality of skeletal muscles using external electrical stimulation. Despite the success achieved within the field of FES, there are still a number of questions that remain unanswered. One way of providing input to the answers is through the use of computational models. Methods This paper describes the development of an anatomically based computer model of the motor neurons in the lower limb of the human leg and shows how it can be used to simulate electrical signal propagation from the beginning of the sciatic nerve to a skeletal muscle. One-dimensional cubic Hermite finite elements were used to represent the major portions of the lower limb nerves. These elements were fit to data that had been digitised using images from the Visible Man project. Nerves smaller than approximately 1 mm could not be seen in the images, and thus a tree-branching algorithm was used to connect the ends of the fitted nerve model to the respective skeletal muscle. To simulate electrical propagation, a previously published mammalian nerve model was implemented and solved on the anatomically based nerve mesh using a finite difference method. The grid points for the finite difference method were derived from the fitted finite element mesh. By adjusting the tree-branching algorithm, it is possible to represent different levels of motor-unit recruitment. Results To illustrate the process of a propagating nerve stimulus to a muscle in detail, the above method was applied to the nerve tree that connects to the human semitendinosus muscle. A conduction velocity of 89.8 m/s was obtained for a 15 μm diameter nerve fibre. This signal was successfully propagated down the motor neurons to a selected group of motor units in the muscle. Conclusion An anatomically and physiologically based model of the posterior motor neurons in the human lower limb was developed. This

  16. Removal of vestibular schwannoma and facial nerve preservation using small suboccipital retrosigmoid craniotomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ling; CHEN Li-hua; LING Feng; LIU Yun-sheng; Madjid Samii; Amir Samii

    2010-01-01

    Background Vestibular schwannoma, the commonest form of intracranial schwannoma, arises from the Schwann cells investing the vestibular nerve. At present, the surgery for vestibular schwannoma remains one of the most complicated operations demanding for surgical skills in neurosurgery. And the trend of minimal invasion should also be the major influence on the management of patients with vestibular schwannomas. We summarized the microsurgical removal experience in a recent series of vestibular schwannomas and presented the operative technique and cranial nerve preservation in order to improve the rates of total tumor removal and facial nerve preservation.Methods A retrospective analysis was performed in 145 patients over a 7-year period who suffered from vestibular schwannomas that had been microsurgicaily removed by suboccipital retrosigmoid transmeatus approach with small craniotomy. CT thinner scans revealed the tumor size in the internal auditory meatus and the relationship of the posterior wall of the internal acoustic meatus to the bone labyrinths preoperatively. Brain stem evoked potential was monitored intraoperatively. The posterior wall of the internal acoustic meatus was designedly drilled off. Patient records and operative reports, including data from the electrophysiological monitoring, follow-up audiometric examinations, and neuroradiological findings were analyzed.Results Total tumor resection was achieved in 140 cases (96.6%) and subtotal resection in 5 cases. The anatomical integrity of the facial nerve was preserved in 91.0% (132/145) of the cases. Intracranial end-to-end anastomosis of the facial nerve was performed in 7 cases. Functional preservation of the facial nerve was achieved in 115 patients (Grade Ⅰ and Grade Ⅱ, 79.3%). No patient died in this series. Preservation of nerves and vessels were as important as tumor removal dudng the operation. CT thinner scan could show the relationship between the posterior wall of the internal

  17. Roentgenological investigation of cavernous sinus structure with special reference to paracavernous cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuha, M.; Aoki, H.; Okamura, T.

    1987-01-01

    We have evaluated the anatomical structure of cavernous sinuses in parasellar blocks obtained from adult cadavers to gain clinically useful information. Ten microdissectional studies of parasellar blocks (20 sides of cavernous sinus) were carried out with special emphasis on the course of paracavernous cranial nerves (3rd to 6th). These were also examined on plain radiographs. Secondly, CT investigations of the cavernous sinuses (notably as to paracavernous cranial nerves) were undertaken in twenty clinical cases having presumed parasellar lesions and in three parasellar blocks from cadavers. The results from microdisectional studies and plain radiographs were as follows. It was found that the 3rd cranial nerve entered the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus close to the antero-inferior part of the posterior clinoid on lateral projection. The 4th cranial nerve, on the other hand, entered near the postero-inferior portion of the posterior clinoid on the same view. Variations in Parkinson's triangle were fairly often noted, although marked asymmetry was not seen in individual cases. From CT findings, it was found that a postenhanced, magnified direct coronal study was essential for identifying paracavernous cranial nerves more clearly. The 3rd and 5th cranial nerves were fairly well identified on axial and coronal projections. Careful radiological investigation including plain skull radiographs and CT seems to be of value for those who diagnose or treat parasellar lesions. (orig.)

  18. [Displacement of the posterior part of the eyeball in myopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akizawa, Yasuko; Masahiro, Ida

    2006-12-01

    The principal aim of this study was to investigate displacement of the posterior part of the eyeball within the muscle cone in myopic eyes, particularly in moderately myopic subjects as well as in high myopes. Secondly, the correlation of the amount of displacement and the outer axial length of the globe was studied. The direction of displacement was also examined to clarify whether the eyeball tends to shift toward a certain direction. Seven patients with moderate myopia (moderate myopia group), fifteen patients with high myopia without esotropia (high myopia group), five patients with high myopia and esotropia (myopic esotropia group), and twenty-two controls (control group) were examined. Using magnetic resonance imaging, the outer axial length and the displacement of the posterior portion of the eyeball in the muscle cone were measured. In order to eliminate interindividual differences in the facial configuration, the coronal scanning was done perpendicularly to the orbital axis. The displacement was measured in a plane 4 mm anterior to the globe-optic nerve junction. The displacement was represented by the distance and direction of the globe center from the center of the muscle cone. In the moderate myopia group, there was no displacement of the posterior part of the eyeball in the muscle cone. It was the same as in the control group. But among the three groups, the displacement (mean standard deviation) was significantly greater in the myopic esotropia group (1.53 +/- 0.49 mm) and the high myopia group (0.94 +/- 0.52 mm) than in the control group (0.11 +/- 0.18 mm) (one way ANOVA and multiple comparison). The outer axial length and the distance of the displacement in all cases was significantly correlated (r = 0.87, p = 0.01). Moreover, the posterior part of the eyeball of the myopic esotropia group and the high myopia group was displaced superiorly and temporally. The posterior part of the eyeball of myopic eyes was displaced superotemporally in the muscle

  19. Displacement of the posterior part of the eyeball in myopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akizawa, Yasuko; Ida, Masahiro

    2006-01-01

    The principal aim of this study was to investigate displacement of the posterior part of the eyeball within the muscle cone in myopic eyes, particularly in moderately myopic subjects as well as in high myopes. Secondly, the correlation of the amount of displacement and the outer axial length of the globe was studied. The direction of displacement was also examined to clarify whether the eyeball tends to shift toward a certain direction. Seven patients with moderate myopia (moderate myopia group), fifteen patients with high myopia without esotropia (high myopia group), five patients with high myopia and esotropia (myopic esotropia group), and twenty-two controls (control group) were examined. Using magnetic resonance imaging, the outer axial length and the displacement of the posterior portion of the eyeball in the muscle cone were measured. In order to eliminate interindividual differences in the facial configuration, the coronal scanning was done perpendicularly to the orbital axis. The displacement was measured in a plane 4 mm anterior to the globe-optic nerve junction. The displacement was represented by the distance and direction of the globe center from the center of the muscle cone. In the moderate myopia group, there was no displacement of the posterior part of the eyeball in the muscle cone. It was the same as in the control group. But among the three groups, the displacement (mean±standard deviation) was significantly greater in the myopic esotropia group (1.53±0.49 mm) and the high myopia group (0.94±0.52 mm) than in the control group (0.11±0.18 mm) (one way ANOVA and multiple comparison). The outer axial length and the distance of the displacement in all cases was significantly correlated (r=0.87, p=0.01). Moreover, the posterior part of the eyeball of the myopic esotropia group and the high myopia group was displaced superiorly and temporally. The posterior part of the eyeball of myopic eyes was displaced superotemporally in the muscle cone

  20. Guillain-Barre syndrome with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj F Banakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a clinicoradiologic entity commonly associated with eclampsia, septicemia, chemotherapeutic drugs etc. Concurrent occurrence of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS with PRES is a rare entity. Dysautonomia is a proposed mechanism for such occurrence. Here we present a non-diabetic, non-hypertensive 63-year-old male patient, who came with acute onset flaccid quadriparesis, developing generalized seizures, altered sensorium and raised blood pressure on fifth day of illness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of brain showed altered signal intensities involving the parieto-occipital areas suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed albuminocytological dissociation, nerve conduction studies revealed demyelinating type of polyneuropathy. The patient was treated with antihypertensives and antiepileptics. After resolution of the encephalopathy, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg was given. The patient recovered gradually over few months. Our case concludes GBS as independent risk factor, for PRES may be secondary to dysautonomia and physicians should be aware of such rare coexistence so that early treatment can be done to reduce the mortality and morbidity.

  1. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and transcutaneous spinal electroanalgesia: a preliminary efficacy and mechanisms-based investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Shea; Cramp, Fiona; Propert, Kate; Godfrey, Helen

    2009-09-01

    To determine the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and transcutaneous spinal electroanalgesia (TSE) on mechanical pain threshold (MPT) and vibration threshold (VT). A prospective, single-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Laboratory based. Thirty-four healthy volunteers (12 men and 22 women; mean age+/-standard deviation 30+/-8 years). Exclusion criteria were conditions affecting upper limb sensation and contraindications to electrical stimulation. Participants were allocated at random to receive TENS (n=8), TSE (n=8), placebo (n=9) or control (n=9). Electrical stimulation was applied for 30 minutes (from time 18 minutes to 48 minutes) via electrodes (5 cmx5 cm) placed centrally above and below the space between the C6 and C7 spinous processes, with 5 cm between electrodes. MPT (using an algometer) and VT (using a vibrameter) were recorded on seven occasions from the first dorsal interosseous muscle of the right hand - at baseline (0 minutes) and then at 10-minute intervals until the end of the 60-minute testing period. There were no statistically significant group differences in MPT (all p>0.05). Significant group differences in VT were found at 20, 30 and 40 minutes (all ptests showed that the TENS group had significantly greater VT than both the placebo [median difference 0.30 microm, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.05 to 0.66] and control (0.51 microm, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.97) groups at 20 minutes, and significantly greater VT than the control group (0.69 microm, 95% CI 0.20 to 1.17) at 30 minutes (all p<0.008). Electrical stimulation did not alter MPT. The increase in VT during TENS may be due to distraction or antidromic block of large-diameter nerve fibres. TSE failed to alter either outcome measure significantly.

  2. Morphometric characteristics of caudal cranial nerves at petroclival region in fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdogmus, Omer; Saban, Enis; Ozkan, Mazhar; Yildiz, Sercan Dogukan; Verimli, Ural; Cakmak, Ozgur; Arifoglu, Yasin; Sehirli, Umit

    2016-06-01

    Morphometric measurements of cranial nerves in posterior cranial fossa of fetus cadavers were carried out in an attempt to identify any asymmetry in their openings into the cranium. Twenty-two fetus cadavers (8 females, 14 males) with gestational age ranging between 22 and 38 weeks (mean 30 weeks) were included in this study. The calvaria were removed, the brains were lifted, and the cranial nerves were identified. The distance of each cranial nerve opening to midline and the distances between different cranial nerve openings were measured on the left and right side and compared. The mean clivus length and width were 21.2 ± 4.4 and 13.2 ± 1.5 mm, respectively. The distance of the twelfth cranial nerve opening from midline was shorter on the right side when compared with the left side (6.6 ± 1.1 versus 7.1 ± 0.8 mm, p = 0.038). Openings of other cranial nerves did not show such asymmetry with regard to their distance from midline, and the distances between different cranial nerves were similar on the left and right side. Cranial nerves at petroclival region seem to show minimal asymmetry in fetuses.

  3. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savleen Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65% than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED.

  4. Sensation, mechanoreceptor, and nerve fiber function after nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Rosén, Birgitta; Boeckstyns, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Sensation is essential for recovery after peripheral nerve injury. However, the relationship between sensory modalities and function of regenerated fibers is uncertain. We have investigated the relationships between touch threshold, tactile gnosis, and mechanoreceptor and sensory fiber...... function after nerve regeneration. Methods: Twenty-one median or ulnar nerve lesions were repaired by a collagen nerve conduit or direct suture. Quantitative sensory hand function and sensory conduction studies by near-nerve technique, including tactile stimulation of mechanoreceptors, were followed for 2...... years, and results were compared to noninjured hands. Results: At both repair methods, touch thresholds at the finger tips recovered to 81 ± 3% and tactile gnosis only to 20 ± 4% (p nerve action potentials (SNAPs) remained dispersed and areas recovered to 23 ± 2...

  5. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Spinal Accessory and Hypoglossal Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stino, Amro M; Smith, Benn E

    2018-01-01

    Multiple techniques have been developed for the electrodiagnostic evaluation of cranial nerves XI and XII. Each of these carries both benefits and limitations, with more techniques and data being available in the literature for spinal accessory than hypoglossal nerve evaluation. Spinal accessory and hypoglossal neuropathy are relatively uncommon cranial mononeuropathies that may be evaluated in the outpatient electrodiagnostic laboratory setting. A review of available literature using PubMed was conducted regarding electrodiagnostic technique in the evaluation of spinal accessory and hypoglossal nerves searching for both routine nerve conduction studies and repetitive nerve conduction studies. The review provided herein provides a resource by which clinical neurophysiologists may develop and implement clinical and research protocols for the evaluation of both of these lower cranial nerves in the outpatient setting.

  6. Anatomical study of middle cluneal nerve entrapment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konno T

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tomoyuki Konno,1 Yoichi Aota,2 Tomoyuki Saito,1 Ning Qu,3 Shogo Hayashi,3 Shinichi Kawata,3 Masahiro Itoh3 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Yokohama City University, 2Department of Spine and Spinal Cord, Yokohama Brain and Spine Center, Yokohama City, 3Department of Anatomy, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan Object: Entrapment of the middle cluneal nerve (MCN under the long posterior sacroiliac ligament (LPSL is a possible, and underdiagnosed, cause of low-back and/or leg symptoms. To date, detailed anatomical studies of MCN entrapment are few. The purpose of this study was to ascertain, using cadavers, the relationship between the MCN and LPSL and to investigate MCN entrapment. Methods: A total of 30 hemipelves from 20 cadaveric donors (15 female, 5 male designated for education or research, were studied by gross anatomical dissection. The age range of the donors at death was 71–101 years with a mean of 88 years. Branches of the MCN were identified under or over the gluteus maximus fascia caudal to the posterior superior iliac spine (PSIS and traced laterally as far as their finest ramification. Special attention was paid to the relationship between the MCN and LPSL. The distance from the branch of the MCN to the PSIS and to the midline and the diameter of the MCN were measured. Results: A total of 64 MCN branches were identified in the 30 hemipelves. Of 64 branches, 10 (16% penetrated the LPSL. The average cephalocaudal distance from the PSIS to where the MCN penetrated the LPSL was 28.5±11.2 mm (9.1–53.7 mm. The distance from the midline was 36.0±6.4 mm (23.5–45.2 mm. The diameter of the MCN branch traversing the LPSL averaged 1.6±0.5 mm (0.5–3.1 mm. Four of the 10 branches penetrating the LPSL had obvious constriction under the ligament. Conclusion: This is the first anatomical study illustrating MCN entrapment. It is likely that MCN entrapment is not a rare clinical entity. Keywords: middle cluneal nerve, sacroiliac joint

  7. Nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amakiri, S F; Ozoya, S E; Ogunnaike, P O

    1978-01-01

    The nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle were studied using histological and histochemical techniques. Many nerve trunks and fibres were present in the reticular and papillary dermis in both hairy and non-hairy skin sites. In non-hairy skin locations such as the muzzle and lower lip, encapsulated endings akin to Krause and Ruffini end bulbs, which arise from myelinated nerve trunks situated lower down the dermis were observed at the upper papillary layer level. Some fibre trunks seen at this level extended upwards to terminate within dermal papillae as bulb-shaped longitudinally lamellated Pacinian-type endings, while other onion-shaped lamellated nerve structures were located either within dermal papillae or near the dermo-epidermal area. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. On hairy skin sites, however, organized nerve endings or intraepidermal nerve endings were not readily identifiable.

  8. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Cranial Nerves IX and X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alberto R M; Martins, Melina P; Moreira, Ana Lucila; Martins, Carlos R; Kimaid, Paulo A T; França, Marcondes C

    2018-01-01

    The cranial nerves IX and X emerge from medulla oblongata and have motor, sensory, and parasympathetic functions. Some of these are amenable to neurophysiological assessment. It is often hard to separate the individual contribution of each nerve; in fact, some of the techniques are indeed a composite functional measure of both nerves. The main methods are the evaluation of the swallowing function (combined IX and X), laryngeal electromyogram (predominant motor vagal function), and heart rate variability (predominant parasympathetic vagal function). This review describes, therefore, the techniques that best evaluate the major symptoms presented in IX and X cranial nerve disturbance: dysphagia, dysphonia, and autonomic parasympathetic dysfunction.

  9. [Morphology research of the rat sciatic nerve bridged by collage-heparin sulfate scaffold].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-sen; Hu, Yun-yu; Luo, Zhuo-jing; Chen, Liang-wei; Liu, Hui-ling; Meng, Guo-lin; Lü, Rong; Xu, Xin-zhi

    2005-04-15

    To observe the treating effect of collage-heparin sulfate after the 10 mm rat sciatic nerve defect was bridged by it. A new kind of nervous tissue engineering scaffold was produced by freeze-drying technique from collagen-heparin sulfate. Thirty-two SD rats were randomly divided into A, B, C and D groups. Sciatic nerve defect in group A was bridged by collagen-heparin sulfate. In group B, sciatic nerve was bridged by auto-nerve transplantation. Group C was the blank control group. Animals in group D were normal. And 10 mm sciatic nerve defect was bridged in the experiment. Thirty-six weeks after the operation, the experimental animals were detected by HRP labeled retrograde trace, HE staining, toluidine staining, silvering staining, S100, GAP-43 and NF immunohistological staining, MBP immunofluorescence staining and transmission electron microscope to observe the nerve regeneration inducing effect of this new scaffold. Nine months after operation, the collage-heparin sulfate scaffold was replaced by newly regenerated nerve. The number of HRP labeled spinal cord anterior horn cells and the area of sensation nerve fiber at the posterior horn were similar with that was repaired by auto-nerve. GAP-43, NF and S100 labeled regenerated nerve fiber had passed the total scaffold and entered the distal terminal. The regenerated nerve fibers were paralleled, lineage arranged, coincide with the prearranged regenerating "channel" in the collagen-heparin sulfate scaffold. MBP immunofluorescence staining also proved that the newly regenerated nerve fiber could be ensheathed. In the experimental group, the area of myelinated nerve fiber and the thickness of the myelin sheath had no obvious difference with that of the group repaired by auto-nerve, except that the density of the regenerated myelinated sheath fiber was lower than that of the control group. Nervous tissue engineering scaffold produced by collagen-heparin sulfate can guide the regeneration of nerve fibers. The nerve

  10. Modeling the Effects of Spaceflight on the Posterior Eye in VIIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, A. J.; Raykin, J.; Mulugeta, L.; Gleason, R.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E. S.; Samuels, B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a new and significant health concern for long-duration space missions. Its etiology is unknown, but is thought to involve elevated intracranial pressure (ICP)that induces connective tissue changes and remodeling in the posterior eye (Alexander et al. 2012). Here we study the acute biomechanical response of the lamina cribrosa (LC) and optic nerve to elevations in ICP utilizing finite element (FE) modeling. Methods: Using the geometry of the posterior eye from previous axisymmetric FE models (Sigal et al. 2004), we added an elongated optic nerve and optic nerve sheath, including the pia and dura. Tissues were modeled as linear elastic solids. Intraocular pressure and central retinal vessel pressures were set at 15 mmHg and 55 mmHg, respectively. ICP varied from 0 mmHg (suitable for standing on earth) to 30 mmHg (representing severe intracranial hypertension, thought to occur in space flight). We focused on strains and deformations in the LC and optic nerve (within 1 mm of the LC) since we hypothesize that they may contribute to vision loss in VIIP. Results: Elevating ICP from 0 to 30 mmHg significantly altered the strain distributions in both the LC and optic nerve (Figure), notably leading to more extreme strain values in both tension and compression. Specifically, the extreme (95th percentile) tensile strains in the LC and optic nerve increased by 2.7- and 3.8-fold, respectively. Similarly, elevation of ICP led to a 2.5- and 3.3-fold increase in extreme (5th percentile) compressive strains in the LC and optic nerve, respectively. Conclusions: The elevated ICP thought to occur during spaceflight leads to large acute changes in the biomechanical environment of the LC and optic nerve, and we hypothesize that such changes can activate mechanosensitive cells and invoke tissue remodeling. These simulations provide a foundation for more comprehensive studies of microgravity effects on human vision, e

  11. Posterior epidural disc fragment masquerading as spinal tumor: Review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Taejune; Lee, Ho Jun; Kim, Jae Seong; Nam, Kiyeun

    2018-03-09

    Posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment is infrequent because of anatomical barriers, and it is difficult to diagnose posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment because of its rare incidence and the ambiguity of radiologic evaluations. And it is difficult to differentiate it from other diseases such as spinal tumors. Differential diagnosis of posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment is clinically important because its diagnosis can affect treatment and prognosis. To investigate the incidence, anatomical concern, etiology, symptom, diagnostic tool, management and prognosis of posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment, we reviewed articles including case report. We performed a search of all clinical studies of posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment published to date. The following keywords were searched: Posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment, disc migration, posterior epidural disc, extradural migration, dorsal epidural migration, sequestrated disc, and disc fragment. We identified 40 patients of posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment from 28 studies. The most common presentation of posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment was sudden onset radiculopathy (70.0%), followed by cauda equina syndrome (27.5%). The most frequently used diagnostic modality was magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), conducted in 36 cases (90.0%), and followed by computed tomography in 14 cases (35.0%). After the imaging studies, the preoperative diagnoses were 45.0% masses, 20.0% lesions, and 12.5% tumors. Characteristic MRI findings in posterior epidural lumbar disc fragment are helpful for diagnosis; it typically displays low signals on T1-weighted images and high signals on T2-weighted images with respect to the parent disc. In addition, most of the disc fragments show peripheral rim enhancement on MRI with gadolinium administration. Electrodiagnostic testing is useful for verifying nerve damage. Surgical treatment was performed in all cases, and neurologic complications were observed in 12.5%. As

  12. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  13. Primary oculomotor nerve palsy due to mild head injury. Report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuno, Makoto; Kobayashi, Shiro; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Teramoto, Akira

    2008-01-01

    Two patients with primary oculomotor nerve palsy due to direct mild head injury are reported. They presented with internal ophthalmoplegia, dilated nonreactive pupils, and very mild disturbance in consciousness. Except for the persistent oculomotor nerve palsy, both the patients recovered fully within one week. Neither demonstrated a history that was suggestive of a cause for their oculomotor nerve palsy. Initial CT scans demonstrated localized subarachnoid hemorrhage around the brain stem. One of the patients had sustained a fracture of the anterior clinoid process. As the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism underlying the oculomotor nerve palsy we suspected mild injury to the pupillomotor fibers at the anterior petroclinoidal ligament and that of the pupillary fibers at the posterior petroclinoidal ligament. We speculate that these perforating fibers at the anterior petroclinoidal ligament acted as a fulcrum due to downward displacement of the brainstem at the time of impact. (author)

  14. A Case Study Of Dietary Deficiency On Peripheral Nerve Functions In Chronic Alcoholic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbind Kumar Choudhary

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alcoholic neuropathy is most likely result of dietary deficiency rather than direct neurotoxic effect of alcohol. A male alcoholic patient aged 34- years old with clear clinical sign of peripheral neuropathy was examined after his habit of six years chronic alcoholic drinking. Conduction velocities latencies and nerve action potential amplitudes was measured from median radial common peroneal and sural nerves on respective upper and lower limb and the results showed that there was decrease in conduction velocity of common peroneal and posterior tibial in lower limbs. However sensory nerve conduction SNCV of sural nerve right and left was normal in lower limb. Based on the results observed in our study we conclude that the combination of vitamin B12 uridine and cytidine can be safe and effective in the treatment of patients presenting alcoholic polyneuropathy. So the prognosis of alcoholic peripheral neuropathy is good and independent of age provided that intake of alcohol is withdrawn completely.

  15. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Methods: Rat models of facia...

  16. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  17. Cisternography of the posterior fossa with metrizamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, N.; Saito, Y.; Miyashita, T.; Tajika, Y.

    1981-12-01

    Nine patients underwent metrizamide cisternography of the posterior fossa. Excellent opacification of the fourth ventricle resulted when the patient's head was suitably positioned and the contrast material was introduced via a C1-2 puncture. With this technique, a benign aqueductal stenosis can be readily identified and the posterior fossa and fourth ventricle can be studied easily.

  18. Selective posterior lumbosacral rhizotomy for the management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tion in 95% of cases. The majority showed ... selective posterior rhizotomy technique whereby the cauda equina ... assessed pre- and postoperatively by means of clinical examination ... were attending cerebral palsy schools and receiving spe- cialised ... root sections on cats demonstrated clearly that posterior root section ...

  19. Evaluation of the outcomes after posterior urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, Daniel; Pagliara, Travis J; Pisansky, Andrew; Elliott, Sean P

    2015-03-01

    Posterior urethral injury is a clinically significant complication of pelvic fractures. The management is complicated by the associated organ injuries, distortion of the pelvic anatomy and the ensuing fibrosis that occurs with urethral injury. We report a review of the outcomes after posterior urethroplasty in the context of pelvic fracture urethral injury.

  20. [Local involvement of the optic nerve by acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardczyk-Meller, Jadwiga; Stefańska, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    The leucemias quite commonly involve the eyes and adnexa. In some cases it causes visual complants. Both, the anterior chamber of the eye and the posterior portion of the globe may sites of acute or chronic leukemia and leucemic relapse. We report an unique case of a 14 years old leucemic patient who suffered visual loss and papilloedema, due to a unilateral local involvement within optic nerve, during second relapse of acute lymphocytic leuemia. In spite of typical treatment of main disease, the boy had died. The authors present typical ophthalmic features of the leucemia, too.

  1. Anatomical variations within the deep posterior compartment of the leg and important clinical consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hislop, M; Tierney, P

    2004-09-01

    The management of musculoskeletal conditions makes up a large part of a sports medicine practitioner's practice. A thorough knowledge of anatomy is an essential component of the armament necessary to decipher the large number of potential conditions that may confront these practitioners. To cloud the issue further, anatomical variations may be present, such as supernumerary muscles, thickened fascial bands or variant courses of nerves and blood vessels, which can themselves manifest as acute or chronic conditions that lead to significant morbidity or limitation of activity. There are a number of contentious areas within the literature surrounding the anatomy of the leg, particularly involving the deep posterior compartment. Conditions such as chronic exertional compartment syndrome, tibial periostitis (shin splints), peripheral nerve entrapment and tarsal tunnel syndrome may all be affected by subtle anatomical variations. This paper primarily focuses on the deep posterior compartment of the leg and uses the gross dissection of cadaveric specimens to describe definitively the anatomy of the deep posterior compartment. Variant fascial attachments of flexor digitorum longus are documented and potential clinical sequelae such as chronic exertional compartment syndrome and tarsal tunnel syndrome are discussed.

  2. Posterior subscapular dissection: An improved approach to the brachial plexus for human anatomy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Shaun; Backus, Timothy Charles; Futterman, Bennett; Solounias, Nikos; Mihlbachler, Matthew C

    2014-05-01

    Students of human anatomy are required to understand the brachial plexus, from the proximal roots extending from spinal nerves C5 through T1, to the distal-most branches that innervate the shoulder and upper limb. However, in human cadaver dissection labs, students are often instructed to dissect the brachial plexus using an antero-axillary approach that incompletely exposes the brachial plexus. This approach readily exposes the distal segments of the brachial plexus but exposure of proximal and posterior segments require extensive dissection of neck and shoulder structures. Therefore, the proximal and posterior segments of the brachial plexus, including the roots, trunks, divisions, posterior cord and proximally branching peripheral nerves often remain unobserved during study of the cadaveric shoulder and brachial plexus. Here we introduce a subscapular approach that exposes the entire brachial plexus, with minimal amount of dissection or destruction of surrounding structures. Lateral retraction of the scapula reveals the entire length of the brachial plexus in the subscapular space, exposing the brachial plexus roots and other proximal segments. Combining the subscapular approach with the traditional antero-axillary approach allows students to observe the cadaveric brachial plexus in its entirety. Exposure of the brachial dissection in the subscapular space requires little time and is easily incorporated into a preexisting anatomy lab curriculum without scheduling additional time for dissection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Transient femoral nerve palsy following ilioinguinal nerve block for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Surgery ... Background: Elective inguinal hernia repair in young fit patients is preferably done under ilioinguinal nerve block anesthesia in the ambulatory setting to improve ... Conclusion: TFNP is a rare complication of ilioinguinal nerve block which delays patient discharge postambulatory hernioplasty.

  4. Preservation of cranial nerves during removal of the brain for an enhanced student experience in neuroanatomy classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jennifer; Roberts, David J H; Pickering, James D

    2014-01-01

    Neuroanatomy teaching at the University of Leeds includes the examination of isolated brains by students working in small groups. This requires the prosected brains to exhibit all 12 pairs of cranial nerves. Traditional methods of removing the brain from the skull involve elevating the frontal lobes and cutting each cranial nerve as the brain is reflected posteriorly. This can leave a substantial length of each nerve attached to the skull base rather than to the removed brain. We have found a posterior approach more successful. In this study, five adult heads were disarticulated at the level of the thyroid cartilage and placed, prone, in a head stand. A wedge of bone from the occipital region was removed before the cerebellum and brainstem were elevated to visualize the cranial nerves associated with the medulla oblongata, cerebellopontine angle and mesencephalic-pontine junction prior to cutting them as close to the skull as possible. Five brains were successfully removed from the skull, each having a full complement of cranial nerves of good length attached to them. This approach significantly increases the length and number of cranial nerves remaining attached to the brain, which supports student education. For integration into head and neck dissection courses, careful consideration will be required to ensure the necks are suitably dissected and to decide whether the cranial nerves are best left attached to the skull base or brain. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Evaluation of the Predictive Value of Intraoperative Changes in Motor-Evoked Potentials of Caudal Cranial Nerves for the Postoperative Functional Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Marcel; Tatagiba, Marcos; Liebsch, Marina; Feigl, Guenther C

    2016-11-01

    The predictive value of changes in intraoperatively acquired motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) IX-X (glossopharyngeal-vagus nerve) and CN XII (hypoglossal nerve) on operative outcomes was investigated. MEPs of CN IX-X and CN XII were recorded intraoperatively in 63 patients undergoing surgery of the posterior cranial fossa. We correlated the changes of the MEPs with postoperative nerve function. For CN IX-X, we found a correlation between the amplitude of the MEP ratio and uvula deviation (P = 0.028) and the amplitude duration of the MEP and gag reflex function (P = 0.027). Patients with an MEP ratio of the glossopharyngeal-vagus amplitude ≤1.47 μV had a 3.4 times increased risk of developing a uvula deviation. Patients with a final MEP duration of the CN IX-X ≤11.6 milliseconds had a 3.6 times increased risk for their gag reflex to become extinct. Our study greatly contributes to the current knowledge of intraoperative MEPs as a predictor for postoperative cranial nerve function. We were able to extent previous findings on MEP values of the facial nerve on postoperative nerve function to 3 additional cranial nerves. Finding reliable predictors for postoperative nerve function is of great importance to the overall quality of life for a patient undergoing surgery of the posterior cranial fossa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Trigeminal and Facial Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka, Iryna M; Estephan, Bachir

    2018-01-01

    The clinical examination of the trigeminal and facial nerves provides significant diagnostic value, especially in the localization of lesions in disorders affecting the central and/or peripheral nervous system. The electrodiagnostic evaluation of these nerves and their pathways adds further accuracy and reliability to the diagnostic investigation and the localization process, especially when different testing methods are combined based on the clinical presentation and the electrophysiological findings. The diagnostic uniqueness of the trigeminal and facial nerves is their connectivity and their coparticipation in reflexes commonly used in clinical practice, namely the blink and corneal reflexes. The other reflexes used in the diagnostic process and lesion localization are very nerve specific and add more diagnostic yield to the workup of certain disorders of the nervous system. This article provides a review of commonly used electrodiagnostic studies and techniques in the evaluation and lesion localization of cranial nerves V and VII.

  7. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation vs sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence: a comparative case-matched study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Asari, S; Meurette, G; Mantoo, S; Kubis, C; Wyart, V; Lehur, P-A

    2014-11-01

    The study assessed the initial experience with posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) for faecal incontinence and compared it with sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) performed in a single centre during the same timespan. A retrospective review of a prospectively collected database was conducted at the colorectal unit, University Hospital, Nantes, France, from May 2009 to December 2010. Seventy-eight patients diagnosed with chronic severe faecal incontinence underwent neurostimulation including PTNS in 21 and SNS in 57. The main outcome measures were faecal incontinence (Wexner score) and quality of life (Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life, FIQL) scores in a short-term follow-up. No significant differences were observed in patients' characteristics. Of 57 patients having SNS, 18 (32%) failed peripheral nerve evaluation and 39 (68%) received a permanent implant. Two (5%) developed a wound infection. No adverse effects were recorded in the PTNS group. There was no significant difference in the mean Wexner and FIQL scores between patients having PTNS and SNS at 6 (P = 0.39 and 0.09) and 12 months (P = 0.79 and 0.37). A 50% or more improvement in Wexner score was seen at 6 and 12 months in 47% and 30% of PTNS patients and in 50% and 58% of SNS patients with no significant difference between the groups. Posterior tibial nerve stimulation is a valid method of treating faecal incontinence in the short term when conservative treatment has failed. It is easier, simpler, cheaper and less invasive than SNS with a similar short-term outcome. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. Side Effects: Nerve Problems (Peripheral Neuropathy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve problems, such as peripheral neuropathy, can be caused by cancer treatment. Learn about signs and symptoms of nerve changes. Find out how to prevent or manage nerve problems during cancer treatment.

  9. Ultrasound-Guided Interscalene Catheter Complicated by Persistent Phrenic Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T. Koogler

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old male presented for reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA in the beach chair position. A preoperative interscalene nerve catheter was placed under direct ultrasound-guidance utilizing a posterior in-plane approach. On POD 2, the catheter was removed. Three weeks postoperatively, the patient reported worsening dyspnea with a subsequent chest X-ray demonstrating an elevated right hemidiaphragm. Pulmonary function testing revealed worsening deficit from presurgical values consistent with phrenic nerve palsy. The patient decided to continue conservative management and declined further invasive testing or treatment. He was followed for one year postoperatively with moderate improvement of his exertional dyspnea over that period of time. The close proximity of the phrenic nerve to the brachial plexus in combination with its frequent anatomical variation can lead to unintentional mechanical trauma, intraneural injection, or chemical injury during performance of ISB. The only previously identified risk factor for PPNP is cervical degenerative disc disease. Although PPNP has been reported following TSA in the beach chair position without the presence of a nerve block, it is typically presumed as a complication of the interscalene block. Previously published case reports and case series of PPNP complicating ISBs all describe nerve blocks performed with either paresthesia technique or localization with nerve stimulation. We report a case of a patient experiencing PPNP following an ultrasound-guided placement of an interscalene nerve catheter.

  10. Diagnostic nerve ultrasonography; Diagnostische Nervensonographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeumer, T. [Universitaet zu Luebeck CBBM, Haus 66, Institut fuer Neurogenetik, Luebeck (Germany); Grimm, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Schelle, T. [Staedtisches Klinikum Dessau, Neurologische Klinik, Dessau (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    For the diagnostics of nerve lesions an imaging method is necessary to visualize peripheral nerves and their surrounding structures for an etiological classification. Clinical neurological and electrophysiological investigations provide functional information about nerve lesions. The information provided by a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination is inadequate for peripheral nerve diagnostics; however, MRI neurography is suitable but on the other hand a resource and time-consuming method. Using ultrasonography for peripheral nerve diagnostics. With ultrasonography reliable diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies and traumatic nerve lesions are possible. The use of ultrasonography for neuropathies shows that a differentiation between different forms is possible. Nerve ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool. In addition to the clinical examination and clinical electrophysiology, structural information can be obtained, which results in a clear improvement in the diagnostics. Ultrasonography has become an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in neurophysiological departments. Nerve ultrasonography is recommended for the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in addition to clinical and electrophysiological investigations. It should be used in the clinical work-up of entrapment neuropathies, traumatic nerve lesions and spacy-occupying lesions of nerves. (orig.) [German] Fuer die Diagnostik von Nervenlaesionen ist ein bildgebendes Verfahren zur Darstellung des peripheren Nervs und seiner ihn umgebenden Strukturen fuer eine aetiologische Einordnung erforderlich. Mit der klinisch-neurologischen Untersuchung und Elektrophysiologie ist eine funktionelle Aussage ueber die Nervenlaesion moeglich. In der Standard-MRT-Untersuchung wird der periphere Nerv nur unzureichend gut dargestellt. Die MRT-Neurographie ist ein sehr gutes, aber auch zeit- und ressourcenintensives Verfahren. Nutzung des Ultraschalls fuer die

  11. Posterior labral injury in contact athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, S D; Zarzour, R H; Speer, K P

    1998-01-01

    Nine athletes (seven football offensive linemen, one defensive lineman, and one lacrosse player) were found at arthroscopy to have posterior labral detachment from the glenoid. In our series, this lesion is specific to contact athletes who engage their opponents with arms in front of the body. All patients had pain with bench pressing and while participating in their sport, diminishing their ability to play effectively. Conservative measures were ineffective in relieving their symptoms. Examination under anesthesia revealed symmetric glenohumeral translation bilaterally, without evidence of posterior instability. Treatment consisted of glenoid rim abradement and posterior labral repair with a bioabsorbable tack. All patients returned to complete at least one full season of contact sports and weightlifting without pain (minimum follow-up, > or = 2 years). Although many injuries leading to subluxation of the glenohumeral joint occur when an unanticipated force is applied, contact athletes ready their shoulder muscles in anticipation of impact with opponents. This leads to a compressive force at the glenohumeral joint. We hypothesize that, in combination with a posteriorly directed force at impact, the resultant vector is a shearing force to the posterior labrum and articular surface. Repeated exposure leads to posterior labral detachment without capsular injury. Posterior labral reattachment provides consistently good results, allowing the athlete to return to competition.

  12. Treatment implications of posterior fossa ependymoma subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taylor, Michael D

    2016-11-15

    Posterior fossa ependymoma comprises two distinct molecular entities, ependymoma_posterior fossa A (EPN_PFA) and ependymoma_posterior fossa B (EPN_PFB), with differentiable gene expression profiles. As yet, the response of the two entities to treatment is unclear. To determine the relationship between the two molecular subgroups of posterior fossa ependymoma and treatment, we studied a cohort of 820 patients with molecularly profiled, clinically annotated posterior fossa ependymomas. We found that the strongest predictor of poor outcome in patients with posterior fossa ependymoma across the entire age spectrum was molecular subgroup EPN_PFA, which was recently reported in the paper entitled "Therapeutic impact of cytoreductive surgery and irradiation of posterior fossa ependymoma in the molecular era: a retrospective multicohort analysis" in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Patients with incompletely resected EPN_PFA tumors had a very poor outcome despite receiving adjuvant radiation therapy, whereas a substantial proportion of patients with EPN_PFB tumors can be cured with surgery alone.

  13. Posterior encephalopathy with vasospasm: MRI and angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidauer, S.; Gaa, J.; Lanfermann, H.; Zanella, F.E.; Sitzer, M.; Hefner, R.

    2003-01-01

    Posterior encephalopathy is characterised by headache, impairment of consciousness, seizures and progressive visual loss. MRI shows bilateral, predominantly posterior, cortical and subcortical lesions with a distribution. Our aim was to analyse the MRI lesion pattern and angiographic findings because the pathophysiology of posterior encephalopathy is incompletely understood. We report three patients with clinical and imaging findings consistent with posterior encephalopathy who underwent serial MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and construction of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, and four-vessel digital subtraction angiography (DSA). DWI revealed symmetrical subcortical and cortical parieto-occipital high signal. High and also low ADCs indicated probable vasogenic and cytotoxic oedema. On follow-up there was focal cortical laminar necrosis, while the white-matter lesions resolved almost completely, except in the arterial border zones. DSA revealed diffuse arterial narrowing, slightly more marked in the posterior circulation. These findings suggest that posterior encephalopathy may in some cases be due to diffuse, severe vasospasm affecting especially in the parieto-occipital grey matter, with its higher vulnerability to ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm due to digitoxin intoxication, resulting in posterior encephalopathy, has not yet been described previously. (orig.)

  14. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  15. Expansions of the neurovascular scleral canal and contained optic nerve occur early in the hypertonic saline rat experimental glaucoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Marta; Yang, Hongli; Gardiner, Stuart K; Cepurna, William O; Johnson, Elaine C; Morrison, John C; Burgoyne, Claude F

    2016-04-01

    To characterize early optic nerve head (ONH) structural change in rat experimental glaucoma (EG). Unilateral intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation was induced in Brown Norway rats by hypertonic saline injection into the episcleral veins and animals were sacrificed 4 weeks later by perfusion fixation. Optic nerve cross-sections were graded from 1 (normal) to 5 (extensive injury) by 5 masked observers. ONHs with peripapillary retina and sclera were embedded, serial sectioned, 3-D reconstructed, delineated, and quantified. Overall and animal-specific EG versus Control eye ONH parameter differences were assessed globally and regionally by linear mixed effect models with significance criteria adjusted for multiple comparisons. Expansions of the optic nerve and surrounding anterior scleral canal opening achieved statistical significance overall (p < 0.0022), and in 7 of 8 EG eyes (p < 0.005). In at least 5 EG eyes, significant expansions (p < 0.005) in Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) (range 3-10%), the anterior and posterior scleral canal openings (8-21% and 5-21%, respectively), and the optic nerve at the anterior and posterior scleral canal openings (11-30% and 8-41%, respectively) were detected. Optic nerve expansion was greatest within the superior and inferior quadrants. Optic nerve expansion at the posterior scleral canal opening was significantly correlated to optic nerve damage (R = 0.768, p = 0.042). In the rat ONH, the optic nerve and surrounding BMO and neurovascular scleral canal expand early in their response to chronic experimental IOP elevation. These findings provide phenotypic landmarks and imaging targets for detecting the development of experimental glaucomatous optic neuropathy in the rat eye. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Posterior fossa meningioma (surgical experiences) | Moussa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Symptoms included headache (75%), cerebellar manifestations (60%), cranial nerve affection (40%) and hearing disturbances (15%). Most of the cases (50%) were cerebellopontine angle meningioma while the least (5%) were foramen magnum meningioma. Surgical approaches used included retrosigmoid approach ...

  17. Prevalence of saphenous nerve injury after adductor-canal-blockade in patients receiving total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Maja; Jæger, Pia; Hilsted, K L

    2013-01-01

    , 76 patients could not discriminate between blunt and sharp stimulation with a needle, 81 patients could not discriminate between cold and warmth, and 82 patients displayed an altered sensation to light brush. CONCLUSION: We found no indications of saphenous nerve injury caused by the adductor...... of the saphenous nerve), as well as the anterior, posterior, lateral and infrapatellar part of the affected and contralateral lower leg. Sensory function was tested with pinprick (sharp and blunt needle), temperature discrimination (cold disinfectant swabs) and light brush. RESULTS: We included 97 patients. None...

  18. Sacral nerve stimulation increases activation of the primary somatosensory cortex by anal canal stimulation in an experimental model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Griffin, K M

    2011-08-01

    Sacral and posterior tibial nerve stimulation may be used to treat faecal incontinence; however, the mechanism of action is unknown. The aim of this study was to establish whether sensory activation of the cerebral cortex by anal canal stimulation was increased by peripheral neuromodulation.

  19. Infraclavicular brachial plexus block: Comparison of posterior cord stimulation with lateral or medial cord stimulation, a prospective double blinded study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dushyant Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infraclavicular approach to the brachial plexus sheath provides anesthesia for surgery on the distal arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand. It has been found that evoked distal motor response or radial nerve-type motor response has influenced the success rate of single-injection infraclavicular brachial plexus block. Aim: We conducted this study to compare the extent and effectiveness of infraclavicular brachial plexus block achieved by injecting a local anesthetic drug after finding specific muscle action due to neural stimulator guided posterior cord stimulation and lateral cord/medial cord stimulation. Methods: After ethical committee approval, patients were randomly assigned to one of the two study groups of 30 patients each. In group 1, posterior cord stimulation was used and in group 2 lateral/medial cord stimulation was used for infraclavicular brachial plexus block. The extent of motor block and effectiveness of sensory block were assessed. Results: All four motor nerves that were selected for the extent of block were blocked in 23 cases (76.7% in group 1 and in 15 cases (50.0% in group 2 (P:0.032. The two groups did not differ significantly in the number of cases in which 0, 1, 2, and 3 nerves were blocked (P>0.05. In group 1, significantly lesser number of patients had pain on surgical manipulation compared with patients of group 2 (P:0.037. Conclusion: Stimulating the posterior cord guided by a nerve stimulator before local anesthetic injection is associated with greater extent of block (in the number of motor nerves blocked and effectiveness of block (in reporting no pain during the surgery than stimulation of either the lateral or medial cord.

  20. Sacral Fracture Nonunion Treated by Bone Grafting through a Posterior Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Yang Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonunion of a sacral fracture is a rare but serious clinical condition which can cause severe chronic pain, discomfort while sitting, and significant restriction of the level of activities. Fracture nonunions reportedly occur most often after nonoperative initial treatment or inappropriate operative treatment. We report a case of fracture nonunion of the sacrum and pubic rami that resulted from non-operative initial treatment, which was treated successfully using bone grafting through a posterior approach and CT-guided percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation combined with anterior external fixation. Although autologous bone grafting has been the gold standard for the treatment of pelvic fracture nonunions, little has been written describing the approach. We utilized a posterior approach for bone grafting, which could allow direct visualization of the nonunion site and preclude nerve root injury. By this procedure, we were able to obtain the healing of fracture nonunion, leading to pain relief and functional recovery.

  1. Reactive histiocytosis of the orbit and posterior segment in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumphrey, Stephanie A; Pizzirani, Stefano; Pirie, Christopher G; Sato, Amy F; Buckley, Faith I

    2013-05-01

    We present a case of reactive histiocytic disease involving the orbit, optic nerve, retina, and choroid in a Border Collie dog initially presenting for vision loss. Long-term partial return of vision has been achieved with systemic immunosuppression. Anterior segment and ocular surface manifestations of reactive histiocytic disease in dogs are relatively common. Posterior segment and orbital involvement, however, are minimally documented in the existing literature. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of disease confined to the orbit and posterior segment as well as the first report of vision loss as a presenting complaint for reactive histiocytic disease. Clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, cytologic, and histopathologic findings are reviewed. © 2012 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  2. Posterior alien hand syndrome: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, S.; Weidauer, S.; Lanfermann, H.; Zanella, F.

    2002-01-01

    The alien hand syndrome (AHS) is involuntary uncontrolled movement of an arm with a sense of estrangement from the limb itself. AHS was initially used to describe interhemispheric disconnection phenomena in patients with lesions in the anterior corpus callosum, but it has been found in patients with posterior cerebral lesions without involvement of the corpus callosum, for example parietal infarcts or corticobasal degeneration. The posterior alien hand syndrome is less frequent and presents with nonpurposive behaviour like lifting the arm or writhing fingers. We report an 80-year-old woman with a posterior AHS of the dominant right hand. MRI showed atrophy of the pre- and postcentral gyri without involvement of the corpus callosum. We discuss the aetiology of the posterior AHS and the differences from the anterior varieties. (orig.)

  3. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Some novel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The third, a thalassaemic child receiving regular blood transfusions, had PRES ... anterior brain instead of the classically described posterior parts of .... 7 months. 3 years. 5 years. 4 years. Gender. Female. Male. Female. Female ... Developed.

  4. Congenital abnormalities of the posterior fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Orman, Gunes; Boltshauser, Eugen; Tekes, Aylin; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The frequency and importance of the evaluation of the posterior fossa have increased significantly over the past 20 years owing to advances in neuroimaging. Nowadays, conventional and advanced neuroimaging techniques allow detailed evaluation of the complex anatomic structures within the posterior fossa. A wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities has been demonstrated, including malformations (anomalies due to an alteration of the primary developmental program caused by a genetic defect) and disruptions (anomalies due to the breakdown of a structure that had a normal developmental potential). Familiarity with the spectrum of congenital posterior fossa anomalies and their well-defined diagnostic criteria is crucial for optimal therapy, an accurate prognosis, and correct genetic counseling. The authors discuss the spectrum of posterior fossa malformations and disruptions, with emphasis on neuroimaging findings (including diagnostic criteria), neurologic presentation, systemic involvement, prognosis, and risk of recurrence. RSNA, 2015

  5. POSTERIOR APPROACH FOR HIP ARTHROPLASTY: A SINGLE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    postulated advantages and disadvantages. Objective: Presentation of a case series of primary and revision arthroplasty utilizing the posterior approach. ... Centre over a period of one year were queried and data extracted and recorded.

  6. Posterior Fossa Tumors and Intellectual Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cerebellar damage on intellectual function in 76 children treated surgically for malignant posterior fossa tumor was investigated at the Gustave Roussy Institute, Villejuif, and the Department of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Necker Hospital, Paris, France.

  7. Sex differences in the branching position of the nerve to the abductor digiti minimi muscle: an anatomical study of cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Daisuke; Naito, Munekazu; Hayashi, Shogo; Ohmichi, Yusuke; Ohmichi, Mika; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The nerve to the abductor digiti minimi muscle (ADMM nerve) is the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve or originates directly from the posterior tibial nerve. Damage to the ADMM nerve is a cause of heel pain and eventually results in ADMM atrophy. It is known that ADMM atrophy occurs more often in females than in males, and the reason remains unclear. This study aimed to explore sex differences in the branching pattern, position, and angle of the ADMM nerve. Forty-two cadavers (20 males, 22 females) were dissected at Aichi Medical University between 2011 and 2015. Cases of foot deformity or atrophy were excluded and 67 ft (30 male, 37 female) were examined to assess the branching pattern, position, and angle of the ADMM nerve. The branching positions of the ADMM nerve were superior to the malleolar-calcaneal axis (MCA) in 37 ft (55 %), on the MCA in 10 ft (15 %), and inferior to the MCA in 20 ft (30 %). There was no case among male feet in which the ADMM nerve branched inferior to the MCA, whereas this pattern was observed in 19 of 37 female feet (51 %). The branching position of the ADMM nerve was significantly closer to the MCA in female feet than in male feet. There were no significant sex differences in the branching pattern and angle of the ADMM nerve. The ADMM nerve sometimes branches off inferior to the MCA in females, but not in males. This difference may be the reason for the more frequent occurrence of ADMM atrophy in females than in males.

  8. Treatment of Spinal Tuberculosis by Debridement, Interbody Fusion and Internal Fixation via Posterior Approach Only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming-xing; Zhang, Hong-qi; Wang, Yu-xiang; Guo, Chao-feng; Liu, Jin-yang

    2016-02-01

    Surgical treatment for spinal tuberculosis includes focal tuberculosis debridement, segmental stability reconstruction, neural decompression and kyphotic deformity correction. For the lesions mainly involved anterior and middle column of the spine, anterior operation of debridement and fusion with internal fixation has been becoming the most frequently used surgical technique for the spinal tuberculosis. However, high risk of structural damage might relate with anterior surgery, such as damage in lungs, heart, kidney, ureter and bowel, and the deformity correction is also limited. Due to the organs are in the front of spine, there are less complications in posterior approach. Spinal pedicle screw passes through the spinal three-column structure, which provides more powerful orthopedic forces compared with the vertebral body screw, and the kyphotic deformity correction effect is better in posterior approach. In this paper, we report a 68-year-old male patient with thoracic tuberculosis who underwent surgical treatment by debridement, interbody fusion and internal fixation via posterior approach only. The patient was placed in prone position under general anesthesia. Posterior midline incision was performed, and the posterior spinal construction was exposed. Then place pedicle screw, and fix one side rod temporarily. Make the side of more bone destruction and larger abscess as lesion debridement side. Resect the unilateral facet joint, and retain contralateral structure integrity. Protect the spinal cord, nerve root. Clear sequestrum, necrotic tissue, abscess of paravertebral and intervertebral space. Specially designed titanium mesh cages or bone blocks were implanted into interbody. Fix both side rods and compress both sides to make the mesh cages and bone blocks tight. Reconstruct posterior column structure with allogeneic bone and autologous bone. Using this technique, the procedures of debridement, spinal cord decompression, deformity correction, bone grafting

  9. Sensory nerve function and auto-mutilation after reconstruction of various gap lengths with nerve guides and autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dunnen, WFA; Meek, MF

    The aim of this study was to evaluate sensory nerve recovery and auto-mutilation after reconstruction of various lengths of nerve gaps in the sciatic nerve of the rat, using different techniques. Group 4, in which the longest nerve gap (15 mm) was reconstructed with a thin-walled

  10. Posterior atlantoaxial dislocation without odontoid fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, Reema; Raut, Abhijit; Chaudhary, Kshitij; Metkar, Umesh; Rathod, Ashok; Sanghvi, Darshana

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of posterior atlantoaxial dislocation without a fracture of the odontoid in a 35-year-old woman. There have been nine reported cases of similar injury in the English literature. The integrity of the transverse ligament following posterior atlantoaxial dislocations has not been well documented in these reports. In the present case, MRI revealed an intact transverse ligament, which probably contributed to the stability of the C1-C2 complex following closed reduction. (orig.)

  11. Posterior amorphous corneal dystrophy: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Lauro Augusto de [UNIFESP; Vieira, Luiz Antônio [UNIFESP; Freitas, Denise de [UNIFESP; Sousa, Luciene Barbosa de [UNIFESP

    2006-01-01

    O objetivo deste trabalho é alertar o oftalmologista da possibilidade de se deparar com casos raros de distrofias corneanas. Neste caso correlacionamos os achados clínicos da distrofia amorfa posterior com refração, topografia e biomicroscopia ultra-sônica.The purpose of this paper is to warn the ophthalmologist about the possibility of facing rare cases of corneal dystrophies. Clinical findings of a case of posterior amorphous dystrophy were correlated with refraction, topography, and ultras...

  12. Vermian agenesis without posterior fossa cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamsbaum, C.; Moreau, V.; Bulteau, C.; Burstyn, J.; Lair Milan, F.; Kalifa, G.

    1994-01-01

    We report 11 cases of vermian partial agenesis without posterior fossa cyst or hemispheric abnormalities. Characteristic MR signs were: absence of the posterior lobe, hypoplasia of the anterior lobe, a narrow sagittal cleft separating the hemispheres (''buttocks sign'') and fourth ventricle deformity. The main clinical signs were complex oculomotor dysfunction and developmental delay. None of the patients had respiratory symptoms. Consideration is given to the relationship between Joubert syndrome and this entity as well as to embroyological data. (orig.)

  13. Mature teratoma of the posterior mediastinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosaki, Y.; Tanaka, Y.O.; Itai, Y. [Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken 305 (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    The vast majority of germ cell tumors in the thorax arise at or near the thymus. We report a case of a 41-year-old man with mature teratoma of the posterior mediastinum. He was asymptomatic and was incidentally found to have a posterior mediastinal mass. Computed tomography was helpful in suggesting a diagnosis of mature teratoma by demonstrating the presence of fat and calcification. The differential diagnosis included neurogenic tumors, liposarcoma, and extramedullary hematopoiesis. (orig.) With 2 figs., 18 refs.

  14. Mature teratoma of the posterior mediastinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Y.; Tanaka, Y.O.; Itai, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The vast majority of germ cell tumors in the thorax arise at or near the thymus. We report a case of a 41-year-old man with mature teratoma of the posterior mediastinum. He was asymptomatic and was incidentally found to have a posterior mediastinal mass. Computed tomography was helpful in suggesting a diagnosis of mature teratoma by demonstrating the presence of fat and calcification. The differential diagnosis included neurogenic tumors, liposarcoma, and extramedullary hematopoiesis. (orig.)

  15. An unusual cause of posterior mediastinal cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahajal Dhooria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic lesions of the mediastinum may be congenital or acquired. The differential diagnosis depends on their location in the mediastinum. Cysts in the posterior mediastinum are generally developmental cysts and are neurogenic or of foregut origin. We report the case of a 14-year-old boy, who presented with dry cough and progressively increasing breathlessness, and was found to have a cystic lesion in the posterior mediastinum. Fine needle aspiration from the cyst helped make a diagnosis of tuberculosis.

  16. Analytic posteriors for Pearson's correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Alexander; Marsman, Maarten; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan

    2018-02-01

    Pearson's correlation is one of the most common measures of linear dependence. Recently, Bernardo (11th International Workshop on Objective Bayes Methodology, 2015) introduced a flexible class of priors to study this measure in a Bayesian setting. For this large class of priors, we show that the (marginal) posterior for Pearson's correlation coefficient and all of the posterior moments are analytic. Our results are available in the open-source software package JASP.

  17. Analytic posteriors for Pearson's correlation coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Ly, A.; Marsman, M.; Wagenmakers, E.-J.

    2018-01-01

    Pearson's correlation is one of the most common measures of linear dependence. Recently, Bernardo (11th International Workshop on Objective Bayes Methodology, 2015) introduced a flexible class of priors to study this measure in a Bayesian setting. For this large class of priors, we show that the (marginal) posterior for Pearson's correlation coefficient and all of the posterior moments are analytic. Our results are available in the open‐source software package JASP.

  18. Post-partum posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    B. V. Triveni; Salman Mohammed Sheikh; Deepak Shedde

    2014-01-01

    Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) is a clinicopathological syndrome associated with various clinical conditions presenting with headache, encephalopathy, seizure and cortical visual disturbances. Radiological findings in PRES are thought to be due to vasogenic edema predominantly in posterior cerebral hemispheres and are reversible with appropriate management. We present a case of post partum PRES,A 29 year old primigravida of 33 weeks 3 days period of gestation who prese...

  19. Optic nerve head biomechanics in aging and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, J Crawford

    2015-04-01

    This nontechnical review is focused upon educating the reader on optic nerve head biomechanics in both aging and disease along two main themes: what is known about how mechanical forces and the resulting deformations are distributed in the posterior pole and ONH (biomechanics) and what is known about how the living system responds to those deformations (mechanobiology). We focus on how ONH responds to IOP elevations as a structural system, insofar as the acute mechanical response of the lamina cribrosa is confounded with the responses of the peripapillary sclera, prelaminar neural tissues, and retrolaminar optic nerve. We discuss the biomechanical basis for IOP-driven changes in connective tissues, blood flow, and cellular responses. We use glaucoma as the primary framework to present the important aspects of ONH biomechanics in aging and disease, as ONH biomechanics, aging, and the posterior pole extracellular matrix (ECM) are thought to be centrally involved in glaucoma susceptibility, onset and progression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Modified skin incision for avoiding the lesser occipital nerve and occipital artery during retrosigmoid craniotomy: potential applications for enhancing operative working distance and angles while minimizing the risk of postoperative neuralgias and intraoperative hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Fries, Fabian N; Kulwin, Charles; Mortazavi, Martin M; Loukas, Marios; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2016-10-01

    Chronic postoperative neuralgias and headache following retrosigmoid craniotomy can be uncomfortable for the patient. We aimed to better elucidate the regional nerve anatomy in an effort to minimize this postoperative complication. Ten adult cadaveric heads (20 sides) were dissected to observe the relationship between the lesser occipital nerve and a traditional linear versus modified U incision during retrosigmoid craniotomy. Additionally, the relationship between these incisions and the occipital artery were observed. The lesser occipital nerve was found to have two types of course. Type I nerves (60%) remained close to the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and some crossed anteriorly over the sternocleidomastoid muscle near the mastoid process. Type II nerves (40%) left the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and swung medially (up to 4.5cm posterior to the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle) as they ascended over the occiput. The lesser occipital nerve was near a midpoint of a line between the external occipital protuberance and mastoid process in all specimens with the type II nerve configuration. Based on our findings, the inverted U incision would be less likely to injure the type II nerves but would necessarily cross over type I nerves, especially more cranially on the nerve at the apex of the incision. As the more traditional linear incision would most likely transect the type I nerves and more so near their trunk, the U incision may be the overall better choice in avoiding neural and occipital artery injury during retrosigmoid approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. OUR EXPERINCE WITH USE OF POSTERIOR MESH RECTOPEXY IN COMPLETE RECTAL PROLAPSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhansu Sekhar Mohanty

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Mesh rectopexy is one of the accepted treatment options for rectal prolapse. We used polypropylene posterior mesh rectopexy for prolapse rectum. The aim of the study was to see demographic, clinical and functional outcome of posterior mesh rectopexy in our setup. MATERIALS AND METHODS The case report of 33 patients under gone posterior abdominal mesh rectopexy in MKCG medical college and hospital from 1st July 2012 to 1st July 2017 were reviewed retrospectively and the patients were followed up in surgical OPD/telephonic questionnaire. All patients had undergone standard posterior abdominal mesh rectopexy without the division of lateral ligaments with utmost care for prevention of bleeding and nerve damage. RESULTS Out of 33 cases of abdominal rectopexy, 12 (36% were males and 21 (64% were females. 27 (82% were within 61-80 years of age group. The most common symptoms were mass per annum (100% followed by incontinence for liquid stool and flatus 24 (72%. There was no operative mortality. The average hospital stay 7.8 days (5-11 days. The constipation (p=0.019 and incontinence (p=0.0165 were better postoperatively. There was 1 (3% partial recurrence of rectal prolapse in 91-year-old lady in 2 years follow up. CONCLUSION The recurrence rate as well as clinical and functional outcome of open abdominal mesh rectopexy seems to be satisfactory, however, long-term effect has to be seen.

  2. Application of Crestal Anesthesia for Treatment of Class I Caries in Posterior Mandibular Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Taheri Talesh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Current infiltration techniques for achieving anesthesia in dental procedures are not applicable in posterior mandibular region because of its dense cortical bone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a specific infiltration anesthesia in posterior mandibular teeth instead of inferior alveolar nerve block for restorative procedures. Materials and methods. Crestal anesthesia (CA was assessed both clinically and by computed tomography scan for its efficacy and side effects. A combination of an opaque material (Ultravist and 2% lidocaine was used to trace the anesthetic solution. The combination was primarily injected in the gingival tissue of rabbit and was followed-up regularly for two weeks to assess any possible injury. After confirming its safety, a combination of these materials was injected to volunteers to assess efficacy and diffusion route. A total of 154 patients (77 female, 77 male with matched bilateral posterior teeth in mandible were selected randomly and an IANB and CA were performed randomly and separately in different sessions for the contra lateral teeth. The onset of anesthesia, anesthesia duration, pain, blood pressure, pulse rate, and consumed volume of anesthetic solution was recorded for each technique. Data were analyzed using paired t-test. Results. There were no significant differences in clinical attachment loss, pocket depth, bone level, plaque index, and free gingival margin between the two flaps (p>0.05. Conclusion. CA could be considered as a reliable and safe primary injection in posterior mandibular teeth for restorative treatments.

  3. Delayed Single Stage Perineal Posterior Urethroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.; Shahnawaz; Shahzad, I.; Baloch, M. U.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the delayed single stage perineal posterior urethroplasty for treatment of posterior urethral stricture/distraction defect. Study Design: Descriptive case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Urology, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from January 2009 to December 2011. Methodology: Patients were selected for delayed single stage perineal posterior urethroplasty for treatment of posterior urethral stricture / distraction defect. All were initially suprapubically catheterized followed by definitive surgery after at least 3 months. Results: Thirty male patients were analyzed with a mean follow-up of 10 months, 2 patients were excluded as they developed failure in first 3 months postoperatively. Mean patients age was 26.25 ± 7.9 years. On follow-up, 7 patients (23.3 percentage) experienced recurrent stricture during first 10 months. Five (16.6 percentage) patients were treated successfully with single direct visual internal urethrotomy. Two patients (6.6 percentage) had more than one direct visual internal urethrotomy and considered failed. Re-do perineal urethroplasty was eventually performed. The overall success rate was 93.3 percentage with permissive criteria allowing single direct visual internal urethrotomy and 76.6% with strict criteria allowing no more procedures postoperatively. Conclusion: Posterior anastomotic urethroplasty offers excellent long-term results to patients with posterior urethral trauma and distraction defect even after multiple prior procedures. (author)

  4. Delayed Single Stage Perineal Posterior Urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shahzad; Shahnawaz; Shahzad, Iqbal; Baloch, Muhammad Umar

    2015-06-01

    To determine the delayed single stage perineal posterior urethroplasty for treatment of posterior urethral stricture/distraction defect. Descriptive case series. Department of Urology, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from January 2009 to December 2011. Patients were selected for delayed single stage perineal posterior urethroplasty for treatment of posterior urethral stricture / distraction defect. All were initially suprapubically catheterized followed by definitive surgery after at least 3 months. Thirty male patients were analyzed with a mean follow-up of 10 months, 2 patients were excluded as they developed failure in first 3 months postoperatively. Mean patient's age was 26.25 ± 7.9 years. On follow-up, 7 patients (23.3%) experienced recurrent stricture during first 10 months. Five (16.6%) patients were treated successfully with single direct visual internal urethrotomy. Two patients (6.6%) had more than one direct visual internal urethrotomy and considered failed. Re-do perineal urethroplasty was eventually performed. The overall success rate was 93.3% with permissive criteria allowing single direct visual internal urethrotomy and 76.6% with strict criteria allowing no more procedures postoperatively. Posterior anastomotic urethroplasty offers excellent long-term results to patients with posterior urethral trauma and distraction defect even after multiple prior procedures.

  5. Early endoscopic realignment in posterior urethral injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, B; Baidya, J L

    2013-01-01

    Posterior urethral injury requires meticulous tertiary care and optimum expertise to manage successfully. The aim of our study is to describe our experiences with pelvic injuries involving posterior urethra and their outcome after early endoscopic realignment. A prospective study was carried out in 20 patients with complete posterior urethral rupture, from November 2007 till October 2010. They presented with blunt traumatic pelvic fracture and underwent primary realignment of posterior urethra in our institute. The definitive diagnosis of urethral rupture was made after retrograde urethrography and antegrade urethrography where applicable. The initial management was suprapubic catheter insertion after primary trauma management in casualty. After a week of conservative management with intravenous antibiotics and pain management, patients were subjected to the endoscopic realignment. The follow up period was at least six months. The results were analyzed with SPSS software. After endoscopic realignment, all patients were advised CISC for the initial 3 months. All patients voided well after three months of CISC. However, 12 patients were lost to follow up by the end of 6 postoperative months. Out of eight remaining patients, two had features of restricture and were managed with DVU followed by CISC again. One patient with restricture had some degree of erectile dysfunction who improved significantly after phospodiesterase inhibitors. None of the patients had features of incontinence. Early endoscopic realignment of posterior urethra is a minimally invasive modality in the management of complete posterior urethral injury with low rates of incontinence and impotency.

  6. Traumatic lesions of the posterior urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde-Ramos, L; Gómez-Illanes, R; Campos-Juanatey, F; Portillo-Martín, J A

    2016-11-01

    The posterior urethral lesions are associated with pelvis fractures in 5-10% of cases. The posterior urethra is attached to the pelvis bone by puboprostatic ligaments and the perineal membrane, which explains why disruption of the pelvic ring can injure the urethra at this level. To identify suspected cases of posterior urethral trauma and to perform the diagnosis and its immediate or deferred management. Search in PubMed of articles related to traumatic posterior urethral lesions, written in English or Spanish. We reviewed the relevant publications including literature reviews and chapters from books related to the topic. With patients with pelvis fractures, we must always rule out posterior urethral lesions. The diagnostic examination of choice is retrograde urethrography, which, along with the severity of the condition, will determine the management in the acute phase and whether the treatment will be performed immediately or deferred. Early diagnosis and proper acute management decrease the associated complications, such as strictures, urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Despite the classical association between posterior urethral lesions and pelvic fractures, the management of those lesions (whether immediate or deferred) remains controversial. Thanks to the growing interest in urethral disease, there are an increasing number of studies that help us achieve better management of these lesions. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Occasional head of flexor pollicis longus muscle: a study of its morphology and clinical significance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemmady M

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A cadaveric dissection study of 54 upper extremities to determine the incidence of occurrence, morphology and relations of the occasional head of the flexor pollicis longus muscle is presented. The occasional head of the flexor pollicis longus muscle was found to be present more frequently (66.66% than absent. It mainly arose from the medical epicondyle of the humerus (55.55% and the medial border of the coronoid process of the ulna (16.66%. It was found to be in close association with the median nerve (anteriorly and the anterior interosseous nerve (posteriorly. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed viz. entrapment neuropathies of the median and anterior interosseous nerves, cicatricial contraction of the occasional head leading to flexion deformity of the thumb and the likely necessity to lengthen/release the occasional head in spastic paralysis of the flexor pollicis longus muscle.

  8. Microsurgical reconstruction of large nerve defects using autologous nerve grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoutis, N K; Gerostathopoulos, N E; Efstathopoulos, D G; Misitizis, D P; Bouchlis, G N; Anagnostou, S K

    1994-01-01

    Between 1986 and 1993, 643 patients with peripheral nerve trauma were treated in our clinic. Primary neurorraphy was performed in 431 of these patients and nerve grafting in 212 patients. We present the functional results after nerve grafting in 93 patients with large nerve defects who were followed for more than 2 years. Evaluation of function was based on the Medical Research Council (MRC) classification for motor and sensory recovery. Factors affecting functional outcome, such as age of the patient, denervation time, length of the defect, and level of the injury were noted. Good results according to the MRC classification were obtained in the majority of cases, although function remained less than that of the uninjured side.

  9. Electrophysiology of Extraocular Cranial Nerves: Oculomotor, Trochlear, and Abducens Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Praveen; Balzer, Jeffery R; Anetakis, Katherine; Crammond, Donald J; Thirumala, Parthasarathy D

    2018-01-01

    The utility of extraocular cranial nerve electrophysiologic recordings lies primarily in the operating room during skull base surgeries. Surgical manipulation during skull base surgeries poses a risk of injury to multiple cranial nerves, including those innervating extraocular muscles. Because tumors distort normal anatomic relationships, it becomes particularly challenging to identify cranial nerve structures. Studies have reported the benefits of using intraoperative spontaneous electromyographic recordings and compound muscle action potentials evoked by electrical stimulation in preventing postoperative neurologic deficits. Apart from surgical applications, electromyography of extraocular muscles has also been used to guide botulinum toxin injections in patients with strabismus and as an adjuvant diagnostic test in myasthenia gravis. In this article, we briefly review the rationale, current available techniques to monitor extraocular cranial nerves, technical difficulties, clinical and surgical applications, as well as future directions for research.

  10. Intrapontine malignant nerve sheath tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozić, Dusko; Nagulić, Mirjana; Samardzić, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    . On pathological examination, the neoplasm appeared to be an intrapontine nerve sheath tumor originating most likely from the intrapontine segment of one of the cranial nerve fibres. The tumor showed exophytic growth, with consequent spread to adjacent subaracnoid space. MR spectroscopy revealed the presence......The primary source of malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumors is still unclear We report the imaging and MR spectroscopic findings in a 39-year-old man with a very rare brain stem tumor MR examination revealed the presence of intraaxial brain stem tumor with a partial exophytic growth...

  11. Echocardiographic Wall Motion Abnormality in Posterior Myocardial Infarction: The Diagnostic Value of Posterior Leads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Darehzereshki

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: For the purpose of ascertaining myocardial infarction (MI and ischemia, the sensitivity of the initial 12-lead ECG is inadequate. It is risky to diagnose posterior MI using only precordial reciprocal changes, since the other leads may be more optimally positioned for the identification of electrocardiographic changes. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between electrocardiography changes and wall motion abnormalities in patients with posterior MI for earlier and better diagnosis of posterior MI.Methods: In this prospective cross-sectional study, we enrolled patients with posterior MI who had come to the Emergency Department of Shariati Hospital with their first episode of chest pain. A 12-lead surface electrocardiogram using posterior leads (V7-V9 was performed for all participants. Patients with ST elevation >0.05 mV or pathologic Q wave in the posterior leads, as well as those with specific changes indicating posterior MI in V1-V2, were evaluated by echocardiography in terms of wall motion abnormalities. All data were analyzed using SPSS and p<0.05 were considered statistically significant.Results: Of a total 79 patients enrolled, 48 (60.8% were men, and the mean age was 57.35±8.22 years. Smoking (54.4% and diabetes (48% were the most prevalent risk factors. In the echocardiographic evaluation, all patients had wall motion abnormalities in the left ventricle and 19 patients (24.1% had wall motion abnormalities in the right ventricle. The most frequent segment with motion abnormality among the all patients was the mid-posterior. The posterior leads showed better positive predictive value than the anterior leads for posterior wall motion abnormality.Conclusion: Electrocardiography of the posterior leads in patients with acute chest pain can help in earlier diagnosis and in time treatment of posterior MI.

  12. Preventing lower cranial nerve injuries during fourth ventricle tumor resection by utilizing intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Faisal R; Minhas, Mazhar; Jane, John

    2012-12-01

    We present two cases illustrating the benefit of utilizing intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) for prevention of injuries to the lower cranial nerves during fourth ventricle tumor resection surgeries. Multiple cranial nerve nuclei are located on the floor of the fourth ventricle with a high risk of permanent damage. Two male patients (ages 8 and 10 years) presented to the emergency department and had brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans showing brainstem/fourth ventricle tumors. During surgery, bilateral posterior tibial and median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs); four-limb and cranial nerves transcranial electrical motor evoked potentials (TCeMEPs); brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAERs); and spontaneous electromyography (s-EMG) were recorded. Electromyography (EMG) was monitored bilaterally from cranial nerves V VII, IX, X, XI, and XII. Total intravenous anesthesia was used. Neuromuscular blockade was used only for initial intubation. Pre-incision baselines were obtained with good morphology of waveforms. After exposure the floor of the fourth ventricle was mapped by triggered-EMG (t-EMG) using 0.4 to 1.0 mA. In both patients the tumor was entangled with cranial nerves VII to XII on the floor of the fourth ventricle. The surgeon made the decision not to resect the tumor in one case and limited the resection to 70% of the tumor in the second case on the basis of neurophysiological monitoring. This decision was made to minimize any post-operative neurological deficits due to surgical manipulation of the tumor involving the lower cranial nerves. Intraoperative spontaneous and triggered EMG was effectively utilized in preventing injuries to cranial nerves during surgical procedures. All signals remained stable during the surgical procedure. Postoperatively both patients were well with no additional cranial nerve weakness. At three months follow-up, the patients continued to have no deficits.

  13. [Treatment of bilateral vocal cord paralysis by hemi-phrenic nerve transfer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W; Li, M; Zheng, H L; Sun, L; Chen, S C; Chen, D H; Liu, F; Zhu, M H; Zhang, C Y; Wang, W

    2017-04-07

    Objective: To investigate the surgical effect of reinnervation of bilateral posterior cricoarytenoid muscles(PCA) with left hemi-phrenic nerve and endoscopic laser arytenoid resection in bilateral vocal cord fold paralysis(BVFP) and to analyze the pros and cons of the two methods. Methods: One hundred and seventeen BVFP patients who underwent reinnervation of bilateral PCA using the left hemi-phrenic nerve approach (nerve group, n =52) or laser arytenoidectomy(laser group, n =65) were enrolled in this study from Jan.2009 to Dec.2015.Vocal perception evaluation, video stroboscopy, pulmonary function test and laryngeal electromyography were preformed in all patients both preoperatively and postoperative1y.Extubution rate was calculated postoperative1y. Results: Most of the vocal function parameters in nerve group were improved postoperatively compared with preoperative parameters, albeit without a significant difference( P >0.05), while laser group showed a significant deterioration in voice quality postoperative1y( P nerve group was larger than that in laser group ( P nerve group were inhale physiological vocal cord abductions. Postoperative glottal closure showed no significant difference in nerve group ( P >0.05), while showed various increment in laser group( P nerve group and laser group respectively. In both groups, patients presented aspiration symptoms postoperatively, and rdieved soon, except 2 patients in laser group suffered repeated aspiration. Conclusions: Reinnervation of bilateral PCA muscles using left hemi-phrenic nerve can restore inspiratory vocal fold abduction to a satisfactory extent while preserving phonatory function at the preoperative level without evident morbidity, and do not affect swallowing function, greatly improving the quality of life of the patients.

  14. Sonoanatomical Change of Phrenic Nerve According to Posture During Ultrasound-Guided Stellate Ganglion Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joeng, Eui Soo; Jeong, Young Cheol; Park, Bum Jun; Kang, Seok; Yang, Seung Nam; Yoon, Joon Shik

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the risk of phrenic nerve injury during ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block (US-SGB) according to sonoanatomy of the phrenic nerve, and determine a safer posture for needle insertion by assessing its relationship with surrounding structure according to positional change. Twenty-nine healthy volunteers were recruited and underwent ultrasound in two postures, i.e., supine position with the neck extension and head rotation, and lateral decubitus position. The transducer was placed at the anterior tubercle of the C6 level to identify phrenic nerve. The cross-sectional area (CSA), depth from skin, distance between phrenic nerve and anterior tubercle of C6 transverse process, and the angle formed by anterior tubercle, posterior tubercle and phrenic nerve were measured. The phrenic nerve was clearly identified in the intermuscular fascia layer between the anterior scalene and sternocleidomastoid muscles. The distance between the phrenic nerve and anterior tubercle was 10.33±3.20 mm with the supine position and 9.20±3.31 mm with the lateral decubitus position, respectively. The mean CSA and skin depth of phrenic nerve were not statistically different between the two positions. The angle with the supine position was 48.37°±27.43°, and 58.89°±30.02° with the lateral decubitus position. The difference of angle between the two positions was statistically significant. Ultrasound is a useful tool for assessing the phrenic nerve and its anatomical relation with other cervical structures. In addition, lateral decubitus position seems to be safer by providing wider angle for needle insertion than the supine position in US-SGB.

  15. POROSITY OF THE WALL OF A NEUROLAC (R) NERVE CONDUIT HAMPERS NERVE REGENERATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, Marcel F.; Den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.

    2009-01-01

    One way to improve nerve regeneration and bridge longer nerve gaps may be the use of semipermeable/porous conduits. With porosity less biomaterial is used for the nerve conduit. We evaluated the short-term effects of porous Neurolac (R) nerve conduits for in vivo peripheral nerve regeneration. In 10

  16. Poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guides perform better than autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DenDunnen, WFA; VanderLei, B; Schakenraad, JM; Stokroos, [No Value; Blaauw, E; Pennings, AJ; Robinson, PH; Bartels, H.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the speed and quality of nerve regeneration after reconstruction using a biodegradable nerve guide or an autologous nerve graft. We evaluated nerve regeneration using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and morphometric analysis. Nerve regeneration

  17. POSTERIOR SEGMENT CAUSES OF BLINDNESS AMONG CHILDREN IN BLIND SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is estimated that there are 1.4 million irreversibly blind children in the world out of which 1 million are in Asia alone. India has the highest number of blind children than any other country. Nearly 70% of the childhood blindness is avoidable. There i s paucity of data available on the causes of childhood blindness. This study focuses on the posterior segment causes of blindness among children attending blind schools in 3 adjacent districts of Andhra Pradesh. MATERIAL & METHODS: This is a cross sectiona l study conducted among 204 blind children aged 6 - 16 years age. Detailed eye examination was done by the same investigator to avoid bias. Posterior segment examination was done using a direct and/or indirect ophthalmoscope after dilating pupil wherever nec essary. The standard WHO/PBL for blindness and low vision examination protocol was used to categorize the causes of blindness. A major anatomical site and underlying cause was selected for each child. The study was carried out during July 2014 to June 2015 . The results were analyzed using MS excel software and Epi - info 7 software version statistical software. RESULTS: Majority of the children was found to be aged 13 - 16 years (45.1% and males (63.7%. Family history of blindness was noted in 26.0% and consa nguinity was reported in 29.9% cases. A majority of them were belonged to fulfill WHO grade of blindness (73.0% and in majority of the cases, the onset of blindness was since birth (83.7%. The etiology of blindness was unknown in majority of cases (57.4% while hereditary causes constituted 25.4% cases. Posterior segment causes were responsible in 33.3% cases with retina being the most commonly involved anatomical site (19.1% followed by optic nerve (14.2%. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need for mandatory oph thalmic evaluation, refraction and assessment of low vision prior to admission into blind schools with periodic evaluation every 2 - 3 years

  18. Scaffoldless tissue-engineered nerve conduit promotes peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery after tibial nerve injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aaron M. Adams; Keith W. VanDusen; Tatiana Y. Kostrominova; Jacob P. Mertens; Lisa M. Larkin

    2017-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerve tissue may cause loss of function in both the nerve and the targeted muscles it innervates. This study compared the repair capability of engineered nerve conduit (ENC), engineered fibroblast conduit (EFC), and autograft in a 10-mm tibial nerve gap. ENCs were fabricated utilizing primary fibroblasts and the nerve cells of rats on embryonic day 15 (E15). EFCs were fabricated utilizing primary fi-broblasts only. Following a 12-week recovery, nerve repair was assessed by measuring contractile properties in the medial gastrocnemius muscle, distal motor nerve conduction velocity in the lateral gastrocnemius, and histology of muscle and nerve. The autografts, ENCs and EFCs reestablished 96%, 87% and 84% of native distal motor nerve conduction velocity in the lateral gastrocnemius, 100%, 44% and 44% of native specific force of medical gastrocnemius, and 63%, 61% and 67% of native medial gastrocnemius mass, re-spectively. Histology of the repaired nerve revealed large axons in the autograft, larger but fewer axons in the ENC repair, and many smaller axons in the EFC repair. Muscle histology revealed similar muscle fiber cross-sectional areas among autograft, ENC and EFC repairs. In conclusion, both ENCs and EFCs promot-ed nerve regeneration in a 10-mm tibial nerve gap repair, suggesting that the E15 rat nerve cells may not be necessary for nerve regeneration, and EFC alone can suffice for peripheral nerve injury repair.

  19. Bilateral absence of musculocutaneous nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathada V Ravishankar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus is an important group of spinal nerve plexus that supplies the muscles of the upper limb via the ventral rami of the Cervical 5 - Thoracic 1 fibers of the spinal nerves. It is not uncommon to notice the variations during cadaveric dissections in many regions of the body, at different levels, such as, roots, trunks, division, cords, communications, and branches as reported in the literature. Although the nerve supply of the body musculature takes place in the fetal life itself, its course, branching pattern, innervations, and communication can show variable patterns as the fetal development progresses. One such anomaly was noticed during our routine cadaveric dissection in the Department of Anatomy, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Belgaum, showing bilateral absence of the musculocutaneous nerve, which obviously drew the attention of the students of medicine, physiotherapy, and learning clinicians as well.

  20. Imaging of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veillon, F. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)], E-mail: Francis.Veillon@chru-strasbourg.fr; Ramos-Taboada, L.; Abu-Eid, M. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Charpiot, A. [Service d' ORL, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Riehm, S. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    The facial nerve is responsible for the motor innervation of the face. It has a visceral motor function (lacrimal, submandibular, sublingual glands and secretion of the nose); it conveys a great part of the taste fibers, participates to the general sensory of the auricle (skin of the concha) and the wall of the external auditory meatus. The facial mimic, production of tears, nasal flow and salivation all depend on the facial nerve. In order to image the facial nerve it is mandatory to be knowledgeable about its normal anatomy including the course of its efferent and afferent fibers and about relevant technical considerations regarding CT and MR to be able to achieve high-resolution images of the nerve.

  1. Diagnostic gait pattern of a patient with longstanding left femoral nerve palsy: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Neil G

    2010-12-01

    The gait pattern of a 35-year-old man with longstanding, left femoral nerve palsy was assessed using 3-dimensional kinematic and kinetic analysis. Stability of his left knee in stance was achieved by manipulating the external moments of the limb so that the ground reaction force passes in front of the knee joint. This compensatory mechanism of locking the knee in extension is reliant on the posterior capsular structures. The patient was managed conservatively and continued to walk without aids.

  2. Non-formation of the main trunk of the sciatic nerve and unusual relationships to the piriformis muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stoyanov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The sciatic nerve is the largest branch of the sacral plexus. Variations of its origin, exit from the pelvis, emergence and branching in the posterior region of the thigh, especially in regards to the piriformis muscle, are an object of interest due to the possibility to be involved in the pathogenensis of clinically significant non-discogenic sciatica or piriformis syndrome. Case report: We present a case of variant anatomy of the sciatic nerve, discovered during routine dissection of the left gluteal region of an adult female cadaver. We observed a non-formation of the main trunk of the nerve; rather, the tibial nerve passed inferiorly to the piriformis muscle, while the common peroneal nerve went through the body of the bifid piriformis muscle, immediately next to its tendon. The two branches continued their course in the thigh without joining and forming a proper sciatic nerve. The medical records of the body donor did not reveal any neurological impairment which could be linked to this anatomical peculiarity. Conclusion: The anatomy of the sciatic nerve could be considered to be a factor of clinical significance. The high prevalence of similar anatomical variations should be kept in mind during the diagnostic process of clinical entities involving the sciatic nerve.

  3. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    These antimicrobial peptides are implicated in the resistance of epithelial surfaces to microbial colonisation and have been shown to be upregulated...be equivalent to standard autograft repair in rodent models. Outcomes have now been validated in a large animal (swine) model with 5 cm ulnar nerve...Goals of the Project Task 1– Determine mechanical properties, seal strength and resistance to biodegradation of candidate photochemical nerve wrap

  4. Outcome of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Aboshanif; Omi, Eigo; Honda, Kohei; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Ishikawa, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: There is no technique of facial nerve reconstruction that guarantees facial function recovery up to grade III. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques. Methods: Facial nerve reconstruction was performed in 22 patients (facial nerve interpositional graft in 11 patients and hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer in another 11 patients). All patients had facial function House-Brackmann (HB) grade VI, either caused by...

  5. Neurophysiological approach to disorders of peripheral nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, Clarissa; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nerve system (PNS) are heterogeneous and may involve motor fibers, sensory fibers, small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers and autonomic nerve fibers, with variable anatomical distribution (single nerves, several different nerves, symmetrical affection of all nerves......, plexus, or root lesions). Furthermore pathological processes may result in either demyelination, axonal degeneration or both. In order to reach an exact diagnosis of any neuropathy electrophysiological studies are crucial to obtain information about these variables. Conventional electrophysiological...

  6. Optic nerve invasion of uveal melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Isager, Peter; Prause, Jan Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    in Denmark between 1942 and 2001 were reviewed (n=157). Histopathological characteristics and depth of optic nerve invasion were recorded. The material was compared with a control material from the same period consisting of 85 cases randomly drawn from all choroidal/ciliary body melanomas without optic nerve...... juxtapapillary tumors invading the optic nerve because of simple proximity to the nerve. A neurotropic subtype invades the optic nerve and retina in a diffuse fashion unrelated to tumor size or location. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Jan...

  7. A simple and successful sonographic technique to identify the sciatic nerve in the parasacral area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Ahmad Muhammad

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe detailed sonographic anatomy of the parasacral area for rapid and successful identification of the sciatic nerve. Fifty patients scheduled for knee surgery were included in this observational study. An ultrasound-guided parasacral sciatic nerve block was performed in all patients. The ultrasound probe was placed on an axial plane 8 cm lateral to the uppermost point of the gluteal cleft. Usually, at this level the posterior border of the ischium (PBI), a characteristically curved hyperechoic line, could be identified. The sciatic nerve appeared as a hyperechoic structure just medial to the PBI. The nerve lies deep to the piriformis muscle lateral to the inferior gluteal vessels, and if followed caudally, it rests directly on the back of the ischium. After confirmation with electrical stimulation, a 20-mL mixture of 1% ropivacaine and 1% lidocaine with epinephrine was injected. The sciatic nerve was identified successfully in 48 patients (96%). In those patients, the median time required for its ultrasonographic identification was ten seconds [interquartile range, 8-13.7 sec], and the block success rate was 100%. The described sonographic details of the parasacral area allowed for rapid and successful identification of the sciatic nerve.

  8. Cranial nerve clock. Part II: functional MR imaging of brain activation during a declarative memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, K L; Welsh, R C; Eldevik, P; Bieliauskas, L A; Steinberg, B A

    2001-12-01

    The authors performed this study to assess brain activation during encoding and successful recall with a declarative memory paradigm that has previously been demonstrated to be effective for teaching students about the cranial nerves. Twenty-four students underwent functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging during encoding and recall of the name, number, and function of the 12 cranial nerves. The students viewed mnemonic graphic and text slides related to individual nerves, as well as their respective control slides. For the recall paradigm, students were prompted with the numbers 1-12 (test condition) intermixed with the number 14 (control condition). Subjects were tested about their knowledge of cranial nerves outside the MR unit before and after functional MR imaging. Students learned about the cranial nerves while undergoing functional MR imaging (mean post- vs preparadigm score, 8.1 +/- 3.4 [of a possible 12] vs 0.75 +/- 0.94, bilateral prefrontal cortex, left greater than right; P brain activation. Encoding revealed statistically significant activation in the bilateral prefrontal cortex, left greater than right [corrected]; bilateral occipital and parietal associative cortices, parahippocampus region, fusiform gyri, and cerebellum. Successful recall activated the left much more than the right prefrontal, parietal associative, and anterior cingulate cortices; bilateral precuneus and cerebellum; and right more than the left posterior cingulate. A predictable pattern of brain activation at functional MR imaging accompanies the encoding and successful recall of the cranial nerves with this declarative memory paradigm.

  9. Unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asari, Syoji; Satoh, Toru; Yamamoto, Yuji

    1982-01-01

    The present authors report a case of unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis which shows interesting CT findings which suggest its mechanism. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a cerebral concussion soon after a traffic accident. A CT scan was performed soon after admission. A high-density spot was noted at the medial aspect of the left cerebral peduncle, where the oculomotor nerve emerged from the midbrain, and an irregular, slender, high-density area was delineated in the right dorsolateral surface of the midbrain. Although the right hemiparesis had already improved by the next morning, the function of the left oculomotor nerve has been completely disturbed for the three months since the injury. In our case, it is speculated that an avulsion of the left oculomotor nerve rootlet occurred at the time of impact as the mechanism of the oculomotor nerve paralysis. A CT taken soon after the head injury showed a high-density spot; this was considered to be a hemorrhage occurring because of the avulsion of the nerve rootlet at the medial surface of the cerebral peduncle. (J.P.N.)

  10. Pleural malignant mesothelioma causing cord infiltration through the nerve root. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, Hidehiro; Suga, Yasuo; Akiyama, Osamu; Kudo, Kentaro; Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Abe, Yusuke; Yasumoto, Yukimasa; Ito, Masanori; Izumi, Hiroshi; Shiomi, Kazu

    2009-04-01

    A 61-year-old man presented with a rare pleural malignant mesothelioma of the spine manifesting as progressive weakness of the bilateral lower extremities, numbness in the body and both legs, and dysfunction of the bladder and bowel. He had previous occupational exposure to asbestos while working at a car repair shop and had undergone right panpleuropneumonectomy under a diagnosis of sarcomatous type mesothelioma in the right pleural space. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine with gadolinium showed an enhanced intramedullary tumor at the T4 level. Operative findings disclosed the clouded and swollen right posterior nerve root, and the pial surface was covered by clouded arachnoid-like membrane. The removed part of the T4 posterior nerve root and intramedullary tumor revealed malignant mesothelioma with invasion spreading along the posterior nerve root. He died of respiratory failure 3 months after the diagnosis. This case shows that spinal metastasis must be considered if a patient with pleural malignant mesothelioma shows neurological worsening and neuroimaging shows an abnormal lesion in the thoracic spinal cord. However, the patient's neurological condition is very difficult to improve in the presence of spinal cord infiltration.

  11. Management of posterior urethral disruption injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jeremy B; McAninch, Jack W

    2009-03-01

    Posterior urethral disruption is a traumatic injury to the male urethra, which most often results from pelvic fracture. After trauma, the distraction defect between the two ends of the urethra often scars and becomes fibrotic, blocking the urethra and bladder emptying. Increasing evidence suggests that many posterior urethral disruptions occur at the junction between the membranous urethra and the bulbar urethra, which is distal to the rhabdosphincter. In the acute setting, when a posterior urethral disruption is suspected, retrograde urethrography should be performed. Posterior urethral disruptions can be managed acutely by realignment of the urethra over a urethral catheter or by placement of a suprapubic catheter for bladder drainage only. Once fibrosis has stabilized, the patient can undergo posterior urethroplasty. In most cases, this procedure can be performed via a perineal approach in a single-stage surgery. The results of this single-stage perineal urethroplasty are excellent, and a patent urethra can be re-established in the majority of men who undergo surgery.

  12. The Role of Nerve Exploration in Supracondylar Humerus Fracture in Children with Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar RIM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The supracondylar humerus fracture (SCHF in children is common and can be complicated with nerve injury either primarily immediate post-trauma or secondarily posttreatment. The concept of neurapraxic nerve injury makes most surgeons choose to ‘watch and see’ the nerve recovery before deciding second surgery if the nerve does not recover. We report three cases of nerve injury in SCHF, all of which underwent nerve exploration for different reasons. Early reduction in the Casualty is important to release the nerve tension before transferring the patient to the operation room. If close reduction fails, we proceed to explore the nerve together with open reduction of the fracture. In iatrogenic nerve injury, we recommend nerve exploration to determine the surgical procedure that is causing the injury. Primary nerve exploration will allow early assessment of the injured nerve and minimize subsequent surgery.

  13. Tibial nerve stimulation for overactive bladder syndrome unresponsive to medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridout, A E; Yoong, W

    2010-02-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome is defined as a symptom syndrome which includes urinary urgency, with or without urge incontinence, usually accompanied by frequency (>8 micturitions/24 h) and nocturia. Conservative treatment usually comprises behavioural techniques, bladder retraining, pelvic floor re-education and pharmacotherapy but up to 30% of patients will remain refractory to treatment. Although second-line treatment options such as sacral nerve stimulation and intravesical botulinum A injections are valuable additions to the therapeutic arsenal, they are relatively invasive and can have serious side-effects. Inhibition of detrusor activity by peripheral neuromodulation of the posterior tibial nerve was first described in 1983, with recent authors further confirming a 60-80% positive response rate. This review was undertaken to examine published literature on percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation and to discuss outcome measures, maintenance therapy and prognostic factors of this technique.

  14. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma / primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the sacral nerve plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narula, MK; Gupta, Nishant; Anand, Rama; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2009-01-01

    We report an unusual case of Ewing's sarcoma / primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of the sacral nerve plexus in a 9-year-old boy who presented with a soft tissue swelling and severe piercing pain in the lower back region. MRI of the lumbosacral spine showed a lobulated soft tissue mass with clubbed finger-like projections along the path of the sacral nerves, which had caused widening of the spinal canal and the sacral foramina (S2–S4 level). There was presacral extension and posterior scalloping of the sacral vertebrae. Histopathology of the lesion confirmed Ewing's sarcoma / PNET of the sacral spinal nerve plexus. The patient responded favorably to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, showing clinical and radiological improvement

  15. Differences in the motor unit firing rates and amplitudes in relation to recruitment thresholds during submaximal contractions of the first dorsal interosseous between chronically resistance trained and physically active men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterczala, Adam J; Miller, Jonathan D; Trevino, Michael A; Dimmick, Hannah L; Herda, Trent J

    2018-02-26

    Previous investigations report no changes in motor unit (MU) firing rates during submaximal contractions following resistance training. These investigations did not account for MU recruitment or examine firing rates as a function of recruitment threshold (REC).Therefore, MU recruitment and firing rates in chronically resistance trained (RT) and physically active controls (CON) were examined. Surface electromyography signals were collected from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) during isometric muscle actions at 40% and 70% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). For each MU, force at REC, mean firing rate (MFR) during the steady force, and MU action potential amplitude (MUAPAMP) were analyzed. For each individual and contraction, the MFRs were linearly regressed against REC, whereas, exponential models were applied to the MFR vs. MUAPAMP and MUAPAMP vs. REC relationships with the y-intercepts and slopes (linear) and A and B terms (exponential) calculated. For the 40% MVC, the RT group had less negative slopes (p=0.001) and lower y-intercepts (p=0.006) of the MFR vs. REC relationships and lower B terms (p=0.011) of the MUAPAMP vs. REC relationships. There were no differences in either relationship between groups for the 70% MVC. During the 40% MVC, the RT had a smaller range of MFRs and MUAPAMPS in comparison to the CON, likely due to reduced MU recruitment. The RT had lower MFRs and recruitment during the 40% MVC that may indicate a leftward shift in the force-frequency relationship, and thus require less excitation to the motoneuron pool to match the same relative force.

  16. Brain imaging signatures of the relationship between epidermal nerve fibers and heat pain perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Kong, Yazhuo; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Chao, Chi-Chao; Tseng, Wen-Yih I; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2015-11-15

    Although the small-diameter primary afferent fibers in the skin promptly respond to nociceptive stimuli and convey sensory inputs to the central nervous system, the neural signatures that underpin the relationship between cutaneous afferent fibers and pain perception remain elusive. We combined skin biopsy at the lateral aspect of the distal leg, which is used to quantify cutaneous afferent fibers, with fMRI, which is used to assess brain responses and functional connectivity, to investigate the relationship between cutaneous sensory nerves and the corresponding pain perception in the brain after applying heat pain stimulation to the dorsum of the right foot in healthy subjects. During painful stimulation, the degree of cutaneous innervation, as measured by epidermal nerve fiber density, was correlated with individual blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals of the posterior insular cortex and of the thalamus, periaqueductal gray, and rostral ventromedial medulla. Pain perception was associated with the activation of the anterior insular cortex and with the functional connectivity from the anterior insular cortex to the primary somatosensory cortex during painful stimulation. Most importantly, both epidermal nerve fiber density and activity in the posterior insular cortex showed a positive correlation with the strength of coupling under pain between the anterior insular cortex and the primary somatosensory cortex. Thus, our findings support the notion that the neural circuitry subserving pain perception interacts with the cerebral correlates of peripheral nociceptive fibers, which implicates an indirect role for skin nerves in human pain perception. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Late presentation of posterior urethral valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbani, Imran Khan; Biyabani, Syed Raziuddin

    2014-05-01

    Presence of posterior urethral valves (PUV) is the most common cause of urinary tract obstruction in the male neonate. Late presentation occurs in 10% of cases. We present a case of PUVs in an adult male who presented with history of obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms and hematuria. On evaluation, he was found to have raised serum creatinine level. A voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) could not be completely performed because of narrowing in the posterior urethra. A rigid urethrocystoscopy was performed at which he was found to have type-I posterior urethral valve which were fulgurated. A repeat uroflowmetry revealed maximum flow rate of 12 ml/second. This case highlights that PUVs is not solely a disease of infancy but may also present late. VCUG is the radiological investigation of choice but the diagnosis may be missed. A urethrocystoscopy is advised if there is a high index of suspicion.

  18. The bihemispheric posterior inferior cerebellar artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, Sean P.; Ozanne, Augustin; Alvarez, Hortensia; Lasjaunias, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Rarely, a solitary posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) will supply both cerebellar hemispheres. We report four cases of this variant. We present a retrospective review of clinical information and imaging of patients undergoing angiography at our institution to identify patients with a bihemispheric PICA. There were four patients: three males and one female. One patient presented with a ruptured arteriovenous malformation, and one with a ruptured aneurysm. Two patients had normal angiograms. The bihemispheric PICA was an incidental finding in all cases. The bihemispheric vessel arose from the dominant left vertebral artery, and the contralateral posterior inferior cerebellar artery was absent or hypoplastic. In all cases, contralateral cerebellar supply arose from a continuation of the ipsilateral PICA distal to the choroidal point and which crossed the midline dorsal to the vermis. We conclude that the PICA may supply both cerebellar hemispheres. This rare anatomic variant should be considered when evaluating patients with posterior fossa neurovascular disease. (orig.)

  19. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical ?cross-bridging? to promote nerve regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Tessa; Eva, Placheta; Borschel, Gregory H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour per...

  20. Carotid artery and lower cranial nerve exposure with increasing surgical complexity to the parapharyngeal space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos-Rodriguez, Ana M; Sreenath, Satyan B; Rawal, Rounak B; Overton, Lewis J; Farzal, Zainab; Zanation, Adam M

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the extent of carotid artery exposure attained, including the identification of the external carotid branches and lower cranial nerves in five sequential external approaches to the parapharyngeal space, and to provide an anatomical algorithm. Anatomical study. Six latex-injected adult cadaver heads were dissected in five consecutive approaches: transcervical approach with submandibular gland removal, posterior extension of the transcervical approach, transcervical approach with parotidectomy, parotidectomy with lateral mandibulotomy, and parotidectomy with mandibulectomy. The degree of carotid artery exposure attained, external carotid branches, and lower cranial nerves visualized was documented. The transcervical approach exposed 1.5 cm (Standard Deviation (SD) 0.5) of internal carotid artery (ICA) and 1.25 cm (SD 0.25) of external carotid artery (ECA). The superior thyroid and facial arteries and cranial nerve XII and XI were identified. The posterior extension exposed 2.9 cm (SD 0.7) of ICA and 2.7 cm (SD 1.0) of ECA. Occipital and ascending pharyngeal arteries were visualized. The transparotid approach exposed 4.0 cm (SD 1.1) of ICA and 3.98 cm (SD 1.8) of ECA. Lateral mandibulotomy exposed the internal maxillary artery, cranial nerve X, the sympathetic trunk, and 4.6 cm (SD 2.4) of ICA. Mandibulectomy allowed for complete ECA exposure, cranial nerve IX, lingual nerve, and 6.9 cm (SD 1.3) of ICA. Approaches for the parapharyngeal space must be based on anatomic and biological patient factors. This study provides a guide for the skull base surgeon for an extended approach based on the desired anatomic exposure. N/A. Laryngoscope, 127:585-591, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Malignant ectomesenchymoma of the posterior mediastinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M. H.; Iqbal, R.; Hafeez-UR-Rehman; Yaqub, N.; Anwar-ul-Haq

    2001-01-01

    The surgical management of a four years old female child, presented at the Islamic International Medical Complex (IIMC), Islamabad, with three months history of recurrent chest infections and failure to thrive, is discussed. Posterior mediastinal tumor was diagnosed radiologically. Tumor had flimsy attachments with pericardium and thoracic aorta but was densely adherent with lower lobe of left lung. The tumor was completely removed along with a segment of lung. The postoperative recovery was uneventful. The diagnosis of malignant ectomesenchymoma was made on histopathology. The patients is well in follow-up. This is the first reported case of malignant ectomesenchymoma arising within posterior mediastinum. (author)

  2. Transverse posterior element fractures associated with torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abel, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Six examples of a previously undescribed class of transverse vertebral element fractures are presented. These fractures differ from Chance and Smith fractures and their variants in the following respects: (1) the etiology is torsion and not flexion; (2) there is neither distraction of posterior ring fragments nor posterior ligament tears; (3) in contrast to Chance and Smith fractures, extension of the fracture into the vertebral body is absent or minimal; (4) the transverse process of the lumbar vertebra is avulsed at its base with a vertical fracture, not split horizontally. These fractures occur in cervical, lumbar, and sacral vertebrae in normal or compromised areas of the spine. (orig.)

  3. Treatment planning of implants in posterior quadrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jivraj, S; Chee, W

    2006-07-08

    Differences in anatomy and biomechanics make treatment of posterior quadrants with dental implants substantially different to that of anterior areas. Without implants, when posterior teeth were lost, treatment options included a long span fixed partial denture or a removable prosthesis, especially when no terminal abutment was available. Today, with the use of implants, options are available that allow preservation of unrestored teeth.(1) When teeth are missing, implant supported restorations can be considered the treatment of choice from the perspective of occlusal support, preservation of adjacent teeth and avoidance of a removable partial denture.

  4. Posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome in poststretococcal acute glomerulonephritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazzino Borzone, F.; Pandolfo Arias, M.; Protasio Palomino, L.; Pujadas Ferrer, M.; Cerisola Cardozo, A.; Gonzalez, G.; Caggiani Malzone, M.; Rubio Santoro, I.

    2005-01-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy (LEPR) is a clinical entity that affects radiation usually the white matter of the cerebral hemispheres. It is frequently associated with acute arterial hypertension and immunosuppressive therapy, among other causes. The clinical presentation is varied, with headache, nausea, vomiting, impaired consciousness and abnormal behavior, seizures and visual disturbances, symptoms that often regress. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images show white matter edema predominantly in posterior regions of the brain. We present a 10 year old boy with leprosy in the course of a nephrotic syndrome secondary to acute diffuse glomerunefritis (GNDA) poststreptococcal. (author) [es

  5. Neurenteric cyst of the posterior mediastinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setty, H.A.N.; Hegde, K.K.S.; Narvekar, V.N.

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of a large posterior mediastinal neurenteric cyst in a neonate demonstrated by chest radiographs, barium swallow examination, ultrasonography and CT of the thorax. All the investigations revealed a large posterior mediastinal cystic mass with vertebral anomalies in the form of scoliosis and hemivertebra. The cyst was completely excised by a right posterolateral thoracotomy and biopsy showed the features of a neurenteric cyst. The rarity of the lesion prompted us to report this case Copyright (2005) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  6. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  7. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Xun-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Li, Su-Rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yue

    2015-02-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering 'excellent' and 'good' muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  8. The pig as preclinical model for laparoscopic vagus nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolthuis, A M; Stakenborg, N; D'Hoore, A; Boeckxstaens, G E

    2016-02-01

    Cervical vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) prevents manipulation-induced intestinal inflammation and improves intestinal transit in a mouse model of postoperative ileus (POI). Cervical VNS, however, is accompanied by cardiovascular and respiratory side effects. In view of potential clinical application, we therefore evaluated the safety and feasibility of abdominal VNS via laparoscopic approach in a porcine model. Six pigs were used in a non-survival study for both cervical and abdominal VNS. Two cardiac pacing electrodes were positioned around the right cervical and posterior abdominal vagus nerve and connected to an external stimulator. VNS was performed using four different settings (5 and 20 Hz, 0.5 and 1 ms pulse width) during 2 min with ECG recording. Laparoscopic VNS was timed and videotaped, and technical difficulties were noted. A validated National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) questionnaire was used to evaluate the task and workload. The procedure was completed in all pigs with 4-port laparoscopic technique. Cervical and abdominal VNS were performed after correct identification and isolation of the nerve, and positioning of the electrodes around the nerve. Median laparoscopic operating time was 16 min (range 8-33 min), and median NASA-TLX was 31 (range 11-74). No major complications were encountered. Reduction of heart rate was between 5.5 and 14% for cervical VNS and undetectable for abdominal VNS. In a porcine model, laparoscopic VNS is feasible and safe with cardiac pacing electrodes and may lead to a similar novel approach in humans in the near future.

  9. Neurological complications in thyroid surgery: a surgical point of view on laryngeal nerves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMANUELA eVARALDO

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The cervical branches of the vagus nerve that are pertinent to endocrine surgery are the superior and the inferior laryngeal nerves: their anatomical course in the neck places them at risk during thyroid surgery. The external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EB is at risk during thyroid surgery because of its close anatomical relationship with the superior thyroid vessels and the superior thyroid pole region. The rate of EB injury (which leads to the paralysis of the cricothyroid muscle varies from 0 to 58%. The identification of the EB during surgery helps avoiding both an accidental transection and an excessive stretching. When the nerve is not identified,the ligation of superior thyroid artery branches close to the thyroid gland is suggested, as well as the abstention from an indiscriminate use of energy-based devices that might damage it. The inferior laryngeal nerve (RLN runs in the tracheoesophageal groove toward the larynx, close to the posterior aspect of the thyroid. It is the main motor nerve of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles, and also provides sensory innervation to the larynx. Its injury finally causes the paralysis of the omolateral vocal cord and various sensory alterations: the symptoms range from mild to severe hoarseness, to acute airway obstruction and swallowing impairment. Permanent lesions of the RNL occur from 0.3 to 7% of cases, according to different factors. The surgeon must be aware of the possible anatomical variations of the nerve which should be actively searched for and identified. Visual control and gentle dissection of RLN are imperative. The use of intraoperative nerve monitoring has been safely applied but, at the moment, its impact in the incidence of RLN injuries has not been clarified. In conclusion, despite a thorough surgical technique and the use of intraoperative neuromonitoring, the incidence of neurological complications after thyroid surgery cannot be suppressed, but should be maintained in a

  10. Endovascular treatment of ruptured distal posterior inferior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... there are lots of reports regarding the interventional therapy of the artery aneurysms (including proximal and distal), all of which are considered to be safe and effective. All the incidences of interventional-related complications are below 10% and there is no report of injury of lower cranial nerves [11, 12].

  11. Isolated posterior fossa involvement of progressive multifocal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-14

    Nov 14, 2017 ... and the HIV pandemic has resulted in an increased prevalence of PML, affecting 3% – 7% of HIV- infected ... majority of HIV-infected patients with PML have CD4 lymphocyte counts < 200 cells/mm3. JC ... infrequent contrast enhancement.3 There is no involvement of the optic nerves or spinal cord. Isolated ...

  12. Imaging the ocular motor nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Teresa [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: T.A.Ferreira@lumc.nl; Verbist, Berit [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: B.M.Verbist@lumc.nl; Buchem, Mark van [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.A.van_Buchem@lumc.nl; Osch, Thijs van [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.J.P.van_Osch@lumc.nl; Webb, Andrew [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: A.Webb@lumc.nl

    2010-05-15

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of the normal and pathologic ocular motor nerves. CT still plays a limited but important role in the evaluation of the intraosseous portions at the skull base and bony foramina. We describe for each segment of these cranial nerves, the normal anatomy, the most appropriate image sequences and planes, their imaging appearance and pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields is a developing and promising technique. We describe our initial experience with a Phillips 7.0 T MRI scanner in the evaluation of the brainstem segments of the OMNs. As imaging becomes more refined, an understanding of the detailed anatomy is increasingly necessary, as the demand on radiology to diagnose smaller lesions also increases.

  13. Electrodiagnosis and nerve conduction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posuniak, E A

    1984-08-01

    The use of electrodiagnostic techniques in evaluation of complaints in the lower extremities provides an objective method of assessment. A basic understanding of principles of neurophysiology, EMG and NCV methodology, and neuropathology of peripheral nerves greatly enhances physical diagnosis and improves the state of the art in treatment of the lower extremity, especially foot and ankle injuries. Familiarity with the method of reporting electrodiagnostic studies and appreciation of the electromyographer's interpretation of the EMG/NCV studies also reflects an enhanced fund of knowledge, skills, and attitudes as pertains to one's level of professional expertise. Information regarding the etiology of positive sharp waves, fibrillation potentials, fasciculation, and normal motor action potentials and conduction studies serves as a sound basis for the appreciation of the categories of nerve injury. Competence in understanding the degree of axonal or myelin function or dysfunction in a nerve improve one's effectiveness not only in medical/surgical treatment but in prognostication of recovery of function. A review of the entrapment syndromes in the lower extremity with emphasis on tarsal tunnel syndrome summarizes the most common nerve entrapments germane to the practice of podiatry. With regard to tarsal tunnel syndrome, the earliest electrodiagnostic study to suggest compression was reported to be the EMG of the foot and leg muscles, even before prolonged nerve latency was noted.

  14. Intraoperative Ultrasound for Peripheral Nerve Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willsey, Matthew; Wilson, Thomas J; Henning, Phillip Troy; Yang, Lynda J-S

    2017-10-01

    Offering real-time, high-resolution images via intraoperative ultrasound is advantageous for a variety of peripheral nerve applications. To highlight the advantages of ultrasound, its extraoperative uses are reviewed. The current intraoperative uses, including nerve localization, real-time evaluation of peripheral nerve tumors, and implantation of leads for peripheral nerve stimulation, are reviewed. Although intraoperative peripheral nerve localization has been performed previously using guide wires and surgical dyes, the authors' approach using ultrasound-guided instrument clamps helps guide surgical dissection to the target nerve, which could lead to more timely operations and shorter incisions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies

  16. Nerve ultrasound shows subclinical peripheral nerve involvement in neurofibromatosis type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telleman, Johan A; Stellingwerff, Menno D; Brekelmans, Geert J; Visser, Leo H

    2018-02-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is mainly associated with central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Peripheral nerve involvement is described in symptomatic patients, but evidence of subclinical peripheral nerve involvement is scarce. We conducted a cross-sectional pilot study in 2 asymptomatic and 3 minimally symptomatic patients with NF2 to detect subclinical peripheral nerve involvement. Patients underwent clinical examination, nerve conduction studies (NCS), and high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS). A total of 30 schwannomas were found, divided over 20 nerve segments (33.9% of all investigated nerve segments). All patients had at least 1 schwannoma. Schwannomas were identified with HRUS in 37% of clinically unaffected nerve segments and 50% of nerve segments with normal NCS findings. HRUS shows frequent subclinical peripheral nerve involvement in NF2. Clinicians should consider peripheral nerve involvement as a cause of weakness and sensory loss in the extremities in patients with this disease. Muscle Nerve 57: 312-316, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The Use of Degradable Nerve Conduits for Human Nerve Repair: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Meek

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of peripheral nerve injury continues to be a major clinical challenge. The most widely used technique for bridging defects in peripheral nerves is the use of autologous nerve grafts. This technique, however, has some disadvantages. Many alternative experimental techniques have thus been developed, such as degradable nerve conduits. Degradable nerve guides have been extensively studied in animal experimental studies. However, the repair of human nerves by degradable nerve conduits has been limited to only a few clinical studies. In this paper, an overview of the available international published literature on degradable nerve conduits for bridging human peripheral nerve defects is presented for literature available until 2004. Also, the philosophy on the use of nerve guides and nerve grafts is given.

  18. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Some novel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two cases occurred following cerebral anoxia due to accidental strangulation and near-drowning, respectively. The third patient, a child known to have E-β thalassaemia, presented with transient encephalopathy following blood transfusion but involving the anterior brain rather than the posterior part classically described in ...

  19. Surgical site infection in posterior spine surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-20

    Mar 20, 2016 ... Methodology: All consecutive patients who had posterior spine surgeries between January 2012 ... However, spinal instrumentation, surgery on cervical region and wound inspection on or ... While advances have been made in infection control ... costs, due to loss of productivity, patient dissatisfaction and.

  20. A posterior tibial tendon skipping rope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sterkenburg, M. N.; Haverkamp, D.; van Dijk, C. N.; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents an athletic patient with swelling and progressive pain on the posteromedial side of his right ankle on weight bearing. MRI demonstrated tenosynovitis and suspicion of a length rupture. On posterior tibial tendoscopy, there was no rupture, but medial from the tendon a tissue cord

  1. Hindfoot endoscopy for posterior ankle pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. Niek

    2006-01-01

    Hindfoot pain can be caused by a variety of pathologies, most of which can be diagnosed and treated with endoscopy. The main indications are posterior tibial tenosynovectomy, diagnosis of a longitudinal peroneus brevis rupture, peroneal tendon adhesiolysis, flexor hallucis longus release, os

  2. Posterior arch defects of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, A.M.; Wechsler, R.J.; Landy, M.D.; Wetzner, S.M.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    Spondylolysis and absence of the pedicle are congenital anomalies of the posterior cervical spine. Their roentgenographic changes may be confused with other more serious entities which may necessitate either emergent therapy or require extensive diagnostic testing and treatment. Four cases are present and the literature is reviewed. A hypothesis for the embryologic etiology of these entities is proposed. (orig.)

  3. Frozen shoulder or missed posterior dislocation?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    initial diagnosis and management. ... D Leijnen,1,2 MD, MMed (Sports Med); J T Viljoen,1 BSc (Physio), MPhil (Exercise Sci); J H Kirby,1 MB ChB, MSc (Sports Med); ... diagnosis of posterior shoulder dislocation at the time of injury could.

  4. Restoration of the endodontically treated posterior tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Polesel

    2014-06-01

    Results and conclusions: Direct adhesive restorations, indirect bonded restorations and traditional full crown are three therapeutic options for the single posterior endodontically treated teeth. The amount of remaining sound tooth structure is the most significant factor influencing the therapeutic approach. The clinician's operative skill is a determining aspect for long-term success of adhesive inlays.

  5. Posterior arch defects of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, A.M.; Wechsler, R.J.; Landy, M.D.; Wetzner, S.M.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1982-05-01

    Spondylolysis and absence of the pedicle are congenital anomalies of the posterior cervical spine. Their roentgenographic changes may be confused with other more serious entities which may necessitate either emergent therapy or require extensive diagnostic testing and treatment. Four cases are present and the literature is reviewed. A hypothesis for the embryologic etiology of these entities is proposed.

  6. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-05-26

    May 26, 2015 ... reversible Posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome [1, 2]. The. PRES is a clinical and radiological entity associating varying degrees, headaches, impaired consciousness, seizures and visual disturbances to neurological and radiological abnormalities of the parietal-occipital white matter [3]. PRES has a ...

  7. Extensive Supratentorial Hemorrhages Following Posterior Fossa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Remote supratentorial hematoma soon after posterior fossa surgery for the removal of a space-occupying lesion is a rare but dramatic and dreaded complication, carrying significant morbidity and mortality. A 47-year-old woman presented with headache of 1-year duration that worsened over last 2 months, progressive ...

  8. CT findings of posterior pararenal effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Byung Hee; Cho, On Koo; Kim, Sonn Yong

    1990-01-01

    The posterior pararenal space(PPS) is a potential space between the posterior renal fascia and the transversalis fascia. We reviewed 12 cases of posterior pararenal effusion. The causes of the effusion were retroperitoneal hemorrhage due to trauma(7 cases) or rupture of renal tumor(1 case), pancreatitis(2 cases), urinoma (1 case) and amebic colitis of the cecum(1 case). The CT findings of the effusion were semilunar fluid density in the dependant portion of the PPS(9/12), partial obliteration of the PPS extending to the flank stripe(2/12), and total obliteration of the PPS extending to the anterior abdominal wall(1/12). The effusion in the ipsilateral perirenal space and thickening of the ipsilateral posterior renal fascia were combined in all cases. The effusion in the ipsilateral anterior pararenal space was associated in 11 cases of 12. The effusion in the PPS is not uncommon findings of retroperitoneal hemorrhage or effusion, but usually related with perirenal or anterior pararenal effusion with no clinical significance

  9. Multiple Identified Neurons and Peripheral Nerves Innervating the Prothoracic Defense Glands in Stick Insects Reveal Evolutionary Conserved and Novel Elements of a Chemical Defense System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Strauß

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The defense glands in the dorsal prothorax are an important autapomorphic trait of stick insects (Phasmatodea. Here, we study the functional anatomy and neuronal innervation of the defense glands in Anisomorpha paromalus (Westwood, 1859 (Pseudophasmatinae, a species which sprays its defense secretions when disturbed or attacked. We use a neuroanatomical approach to identify the nerves innervating the gland muscles and the motoneurons with axons in the different nerves. The defense gland is innervated by nerves originating from two segments, the subesophageal ganglion (SOG, and the prothoracic ganglion. Axonal tracing confirms the gland innervation via the anterior subesophageal nerve, and two intersegmental nerves, the posterior subesophageal nerve, and the anterior prothoracic nerve. Axonal tracing of individual nerves reveals eight identified neuron types in the subesophageal or prothoracic ganglion. The strongest innervating nerve of the gland is the anterior subesophageal nerve, which also supplies dorsal longitudinal thorax muscles (neck muscles by separate nerve branches. Tracing of individual nerve branches reveals different sets of motoneurons innervating the defense gland (one ipsilateral and one contralateral subesophageal neuron or the neck muscle (ventral median neurons. The ipsilateral and contralateral subesophageal neurons have no homologs in related taxa like locusts and crickets, and thus evolved within stick insects with the differentiation of the defense glands. The overall innervation pattern suggests that the longitudinal gland muscles derived from dorsal longitudinal neck muscles. In sum, the innervating nerves for dorsal longitudinal muscles are conserved in stick insects, while the neuronal control system was specialized with conserved motoneurons for the persisting neck muscles, and evolutionarily novel subesophageal and prothoracic motoneurons innervating the defense gland.

  10. Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Arteries Juxtaposed with the Internal Acoustic Meatus and Their Relationship to the Cranial Nerve VII/VIII Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Fernando; Kassem, Mohammad W; Iwanaga, Joe; Oskouian, Rod J; Loukas, Marios; Demerdash, Amin; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-08-16

    Vascular loops in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) and their relationship to cranial nerves have been used to explain neurological symptoms. The anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) has variable branches producing vascular loops that can compress the facial cranial nerve (CN) VII and vestibulocochlear (CN VIII) nerves. AICA compression of the facial-vestibulocochlear nerve complex can lead to various clinical presentations, including hemifacial spasm (HFS), tinnitus, and hemiataxia. The formation of arterial loops inside or outside of the internal auditory meatus (IAM) can cause abutment or compression of CN VII and CN VIII. Twenty-five (50 sides) fresh adult cadavers underwent dissection of the cerebellopontine angle in the supine position. In regard to relationships between the AICA and the nerves of the facial/vestibulocochlear complex, 33 arteries (66%) traveled in a plane between the facial/nervus intermedius nerves and the cochlear and vestibular nerves. Five arteries (10%) traveled below the CN VII/VIII complex, six (12%) traveled posterior to the nerve complex, four (8%) formed a semi-circle around the upper half of the nerve complex, and two (4%) traveled between and partially separated the nervus intermedius and facial nerve proper. Our study found that the majority of AICA will travel in a plane between the facial/nervus intermedius nerves and the cochlear and vestibular nerves. Although the relationship between the AICA and porus acusticus and AICA and the nerves of the CN VII/VIII complex are variable, based on our findings, some themes exist. Surgeons should consider these with approaches to the cerebellopontine angle.

  11. Raman spectroscopic detection of peripheral nerves towards nerve-sparing surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2017-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery, namely nerve-sparing surgery, is now promising technique to avoid functional deficits of the limbs and organs following surgery as an aspect of the improvement of quality of life of patients. Detection of peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves is required for the nerve-sparing surgery; however, conventional nerve identification scheme is sometimes difficult to identify peripheral nerves due to similarity of shape and color to non-nerve tissues or its limited application to only motor peripheral nerves. To overcome these issues, we proposed a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerves by means of Raman spectroscopy. We found several fingerprints of peripheral myelinated and unmyelinated nerves by employing a modified principal component analysis of typical spectra including myelinated nerve, unmyelinated nerve, and adjacent tissues. We finally realized the sensitivity of 94.2% and the selectivity of 92.0% for peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves against adjacent tissues. Although further development of an intraoperative Raman spectroscopy system is required for clinical use, our proposed approach will serve as a unique and powerful tool for peripheral nerve detection for nerve-sparing surgery in the future.

  12. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  13. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslantunali D

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available D Arslantunali,1–3,* T Dursun,1,2,* D Yucel,1,4,5 N Hasirci,1,2,6 V Hasirci,1,2,7 1BIOMATEN, Center of Excellence in Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Middle East Technical University (METU, Ankara, Turkey; 2Department of Biotechnology, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 3Department of Bioengineering, Gumushane University, Gumushane, Turkey; 4Faculty of Engineering, Department of Medical Engineering, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 5School of Medicine, Department of Histology and Embryology, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 6Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 7Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey *These authors have contributed equally to this work Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type are being presented. Keywords: peripheral nerve injury, natural biomaterials, synthetic biomaterials

  14. Enhanced peripheral nerve regeneration through asymmetrically porous nerve guide conduit with nerve growth factor gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Heang; Kang, Jun Goo; Kim, Tae Ho; Namgung, Uk; Song, Kyu Sang; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Lee, Jin Ho

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a nerve guide conduit (NGC) with nerve growth factor (NGF) gradient along the longitudinal direction by rolling a porous polycaprolactone membrane with NGF concentration gradient. The NGF immobilized on the membrane was continuously released for up to 35 days, and the released amount of the NGF from the membrane gradually increased from the proximal to distal NGF ends, which may allow a neurotrophic factor gradient in the tubular NGC for a sufficient period. From the in vitro cell culture experiment, it was observed that the PC12 cells sense the NGF concentration gradient on the membrane for the cell proliferation and differentiation. From the in vivo animal experiment using a long gap (20 mm) sciatic nerve defect model of rats, the NGC with NGF concentration gradient allowed more rapid nerve regeneration through the NGC than the NGC itself and NGC immobilized with uniformly distributed NGF. The NGC with NGF concentration gradient seems to be a promising strategy for the peripheral nerve regeneration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 52-64, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics and Permeability in VIIP Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykin, Julia; Best, Lauren; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.; Ethier, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  16. Biomechanics of the Optic Nerve Sheath in VIIP Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. Ross; Raykin, Julia; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  17. Posterior-only approach for lumbar vertebral column resection and expandable cage reconstruction for spinal metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandial, Rahul; Kelly, Brandon; Chen, Mike Yue

    2013-07-01

    remained paraparetic after the surgery. No patients had lasting intraoperative neuromonitoring changes, and none died. Complications included 2 reoperations, 1 delayed hardware failure (cage subsidence that did not require revision), and 3 incidental durotomies (none of which required reoperation). No postoperative pneumonia, ileus, or deep venous thrombosis developed in any patient. A posterior-only approach for vertebral segment resection with preservation of spinal nerve roots is a viable technique that can be used throughout the entire lumbar spine. Extensive mobilization of the nerve roots is of utmost importance and allows for insertion and expansion of medium-sized, in situ expandable cages in the midline. This approach, although technically challenging, might reduce the morbidity associated with an anterior approach.

  18. Imaging of the optic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Minerva [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)], E-mail: minerva.becker@hcuge.ch; Masterson, Karen [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Delavelle, Jacqueline [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Viallon, Magalie [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Vargas, Maria-Isabel [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D. [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    This article provides an overview of the imaging findings of diseases affecting the optic nerve with special emphasis on clinical-radiological correlation and on the latest technical developments in MR imaging and CT. The review deals with congenital malformations, tumors, toxic/nutritional and degenerative entities, inflammatory and infectious diseases, compressive neuropathy, vascular conditions and trauma involving the optic nerve from its ocular segment to the chiasm. The implications of imaging findings on patient management and outcome and the importance of performing high-resolution tailored examinations adapted to the clinical situation are discussed.

  19. Imaging of the optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Minerva; Masterson, Karen; Delavelle, Jacqueline; Viallon, Magalie; Vargas, Maria-Isabel; Becker, Christoph D.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the imaging findings of diseases affecting the optic nerve with special emphasis on clinical-radiological correlation and on the latest technical developments in MR imaging and CT. The review deals with congenital malformations, tumors, toxic/nutritional and degenerative entities, inflammatory and infectious diseases, compressive neuropathy, vascular conditions and trauma involving the optic nerve from its ocular segment to the chiasm. The implications of imaging findings on patient management and outcome and the importance of performing high-resolution tailored examinations adapted to the clinical situation are discussed.

  20. Imaging findings in posterior instability of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harish, Srinivasan; Rebello, Ryan; O'Neill, John; Nagar, Arpit; Moro, Jaydeep; Pugh, David

    2008-01-01

    Posterior shoulder instability refers to the symptoms and signs resulting from excessive posterior translation of the humerus. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the radiological modality of choice in the diagnostic assessment of posterior instability. Computed tomography (CT) is useful in the evaluation of osseous abnormalities associated with posterior instability. A detailed description of the posterior osseous and labroligamentous abnormalities has evolved recently, and many variant lesions of the posteroinferior labrum and/or capsular structures have been described. As the recommended surgical management of lesions associated with posterior instability is a lesion-specific approach, awareness of the specific lesions that have been described in association with posterior instability helps in pre-surgical planning. The purpose of this article is to review the classification of, and injury mechanisms leading to, posterior shoulder instability and to describe imaging findings associated with posterior instability, with emphasis on MR imaging. (orig.)

  1. Imaging findings in posterior instability of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harish, Srinivasan; Rebello, Ryan; O' Neill, John [St. Joseph' s Healthcare, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hamilton, ON (Canada); McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hamilton (Canada); Nagar, Arpit [St. Joseph' s Healthcare, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Moro, Jaydeep [St. Joseph' s Healthcare, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hamilton, ON (Canada); McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hamilton (Canada); Pugh, David [Brantford General Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brantford, ON (Canada)

    2008-08-15

    Posterior shoulder instability refers to the symptoms and signs resulting from excessive posterior translation of the humerus. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the radiological modality of choice in the diagnostic assessment of posterior instability. Computed tomography (CT) is useful in the evaluation of osseous abnormalities associated with posterior instability. A detailed description of the posterior osseous and labroligamentous abnormalities has evolved recently, and many variant lesions of the posteroinferior labrum and/or capsular structures have been described. As the recommended surgical management of lesions associated with posterior instability is a lesion-specific approach, awareness of the specific lesions that have been described in association with posterior instability helps in pre-surgical planning. The purpose of this article is to review the classification of, and injury mechanisms leading to, posterior shoulder instability and to describe imaging findings associated with posterior instability, with emphasis on MR imaging. (orig.)

  2. Subtemporal approach to basilar tip aneurysm with division of posterior communicating artery: Technical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Kakino

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Shunsuke Kakino, Kuniaki Ogasawara, Yoshitaka Kubo, Hideaki Nishimoto, Akira OgawaDepartment of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Morioka, Iwate, JapanAbstract: The subtemporal approach with division of the posterior communicating artery (PcomA is described for treating aneurysms of the basilar tip. When the ipsilateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA interferes with visibility and manipulation around the aneurysm neck and the artery is tethered by the PcomA and not mobilized, the PcomA can be divided near the junction with the PCA. The procedure permits PCA mobilization and exposes the neck of the aneurysm. We applied this procedure to a patient with a ruptured aneurysm of the basilar tip. The postoperative course was uneventful except for transient left oculomotor nerve palsy. Postoperative cerebral angiography and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the respective disappearance of the aneurysm and no new ischemic lesions. The subtemporal approach allows safer and easier division of the PcomA near the junction to the PCA compared with the pterional approach, and the present procedure is more suitable for the subtemporal approach.Keywords: basilar tip aneurysm, subtemporal approach, posterior communicating artery

  3. Posterior malleolar fracture: technique and clinical ex-perience of the posterolateral approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Ruo-kun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To introduce the postero-lateral surgical approach to the posterior malleolar fracture and report its clinical outcomes in 32 cases. Methods: This study consisted of 32 cases, 22 males and 10 females with the mean age of 48 years (range, 21-63 years, suffering from posterior malleolar fracture. All cases were treated with the posterolateral surgical approach to the ankle. The average follow-up period was 28 months (range, 24-35 months. The clinical outcomes of these cases were evaluated on the basis of the Olerud-Molander Ankle (OMA score and plain radiographs. Results: All cases showed radiological evidence of bony union at follow-up. The average OMA score was 82 points; 21 cases had excellent scores (90-100 points, 9 good (61-90 points, and 2 fair (31-60 points. The excellent-to-good rate was 93.8%. Although most cases did not show any wound dehiscence or necrosis, one patient had a su-perficial infection which healed after using antibiotic dress-ing and one had sural cutaneous nerve injury that under-went spontaneous remission without any treatment after three months. In addition, one presented with mild symp-toms of peroneal tendonitis that disappeared after plate removal. Conclusion: The posterolateral approach offers an effective technique for fracture reduction and fixation of large posterior malleolar fragments. Key words: Ankle injuries; Dislocations; Fracture fixation, internal

  4. Occurrence of phrenic nerve stimulation in cardiac resynchronization therapy patients: the role of left ventricular lead type and placement site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Mauro; Exner, Derek V; Crossley, George H; Ramza, Brian; Coutu, Benoit; Tomassoni, Gery; Kranig, Wolfgang; Li, Shelby; Kristiansen, Nina; Voss, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    Unwanted phrenic nerve stimulation (PNS) has been reported in ∼1 in 4 patients undergoing left ventricular (LV) pacing. The occurrence of PNS over mid-term follow-up and the significance of PNS are less certain. Data from 1307 patients enrolled in pre-market studies of LV leads manufactured by Medtronic (models 4193 and 4195 unipolar, 4194, 4196, 4296, and 4396 bipolar) were pooled. Left ventricular lead location was recorded at implant using a common classification scheme. Phrenic nerve stimulation symptoms were either spontaneously reported or identified at scheduled follow-up visits. A PNS-related complication was defined as PNS resulting in invasive intervention or the termination of LV pacing. Average follow-up was 14.9 months (range 0.0-46.6). Phrenic nerve stimulation symptoms occurred in 169 patients (12.9%). Phrenic nerve stimulation-related complications occurred in 21 of 1307 patients (1.6%); 16 of 738 (2.2%) in the unipolar lead studies, and 5 of 569 (0.9%) in the bipolar lead studies (P = 0.08). Phrenic nerve stimulation was more frequent at middle-lateral/posterior, and apical LV sites (139/1010) vs. basal-posterior/lateral/anterior, and middle-anterior sites (20/297; P= 0.01). As compared with an anterior LV lead position, a lateral LV pacing site was associated with over a four-fold higher risk of PNS (P= 0.005) and an apical LV pacing site was associated with over six-fold higher risk of PNS (P= 0.001). Phrenic nerve stimulation occurred in 13% of patients undergoing LV lead placement and was more common at mid-lateral/posterior, and LV apical sites. Most cases (123/139; 88%) of PNS were mitigated via electrical reprogramming, without the need for invasive intervention.

  5. Transient Femoral Nerve Palsy Following Ilioinguinal Nerve Block ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-20

    Apr 20, 2018 ... a 3‑year period under ilioinguinal nerve block only were assessed for evidence of TFNP. All patients ... loss over the anterior aspect of the thigh, weakness of extension at the knee joint, .... and may result in falls with fractures which carry severe ... recovery of the palsy and subsequently discharged same.

  6. Functional nerve recovery after bridging a 15 mm gap in rat sciatic nerve with a biodegradable nerve guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Klok, F; Robinson, PH; Nicolai, JPA; Gramsbergen, A; van der Werf, J.F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Recovery of nerve function was evaluated after bridging a 15 mm sciatic nerve gap in 51 rats with a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guide. Recovery of function was investigated by analysing the footprints, by analysing video recordings of gait, by electrically eliciting the

  7. Nerve supply to the pelvis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nerves that branch off the central nervous system (CNS) provide messages to the muscles and organs for normal ... be compromised. In multiple sclerosis, the demyelinization of nerve cells may lead to bowel incontinence, bladder problems ...

  8. Specialized Nerve Tests: EMG, NCV and SSEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Treatments Specialized Nerve Tests: EMG, NCV and SSEP Ajay Jawahar MD ... spinal cord is the thick, whitish bundle of nerve tissue that extends from the lowest part of ...

  9. Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000326.htm Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care To use the ... or at other unusual times. Treating and Preventing Nerve Damage from Diabetes Treating diabetic neuropathy can make ...

  10. Reconstruction of facial nerve injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah, Adel; Borschel, Gregory H; Zuker, Ron M

    2011-05-01

    Facial nerve trauma is uncommon in children, and many spontaneously recover some function; nonetheless, loss of facial nerve activity leads to functional impairment of ocular and oral sphincters and nasal orifice. In many cases, the impediment posed by facial asymmetry and reduced mimetic function more significantly affects the child's psychosocial interactions. As such, reconstruction of the facial nerve affords great benefits in quality of life. The therapeutic strategy is dependent on numerous factors, including the cause of facial nerve injury, the deficit, the prognosis for recovery, and the time elapsed since the injury. The options for treatment include a diverse range of surgical techniques including static lifts and slings, nerve repairs, nerve grafts and nerve transfers, regional, and microvascular free muscle transfer. We review our strategies for addressing facial nerve injuries in children.

  11. Cranial nerve palsies in Nigerian children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... Introduction. Cranial nerve palsy is a common clinical problem ... Methodology ... The two cases with three-nerve involvement were re- lated to viral encephalitis and cerebral contusion from ... RTA = road traffic accident.

  12. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and their FAMILIES VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION FOR TREATING EPILEPSY This information sheet is provided to help you ... how vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may help treat epilepsy. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the ...

  13. a technique to repair peripheral nerve injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    attached nerve does occi.rr, and functional recovery (sensory and motor) has been demonstrated. ..... Brachial plexus. Upper trunk to lower. 19 Nov 1998 ... Fractured. 13 Mar 1998 Mid shaft hiunerus Radial nerve to. 14 Mar 1999 humerus cut.

  14. External laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery: is the nerve stimulator necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aina, E N; Hisham, A N

    2001-09-01

    To find out the incidence and type of external laryngeal nerves during operations on the thyroid, and to assess the role of a nerve stimulator in detecting them. Prospective, non-randomised study. Teaching hospital, Malaysia. 317 patients who had 447 dissections between early January 1998 and late November 1999. Number and type of nerves crossing the cricothyroid space, and the usefulness of the nerve stimulator in finding them. The nerve stimulator was used in 206/447 dissections (46%). 392 external laryngeal nerves were seen (88%), of which 196/206 (95%) were detected with the stimulator. However, without the stimulator 196 nerves were detected out of 241 dissections (81%). The stimulator detected 47 (23%) Type I nerves (nerve > 1 cm from the upper edge of superior pole); 86 (42%) Type IIa nerves (nerve edge of superior pole); and 63 (31%) Type IIb nerves (nerve below upper edge of superior pole). 10 nerves were not detected. When the stimulator was not used the corresponding figures were 32 (13%), 113 (47%), and 51 (21%), and 45 nerves were not seen. If the nerve cannot be found we recommend dissection of capsule close to the medial border of the upper pole of the thyroid to avoid injury to the nerve. Although the use of the nerve stimulator seems desirable, it confers no added advantage in finding the nerve. In the event of uncertainty about whether a structure is the nerve, the stimulator may help to confirm it. However, exposure of the cricothyroid space is most important for good exposure in searching for the external laryngeal nerve.

  15. Secondary digital nerve repair in the foot with resorbable p(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve conduits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Nicolai, JPA; Robinson, PH

    Nerve guides are increasingly being used in peripheral nerve repair. In the last decade, Much preclinical research has been undertaken into a resorbable nerve guide composed of p(DLLA-epsilon-CL). This report describes the results of secondary digital nerve reconstruction in the foot in a patient

  16. Peripheral nerve regeneration through P(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Dunnen, WFA; Meek, MF; Robinson, PH; Schakernraad, JM

    1998-01-01

    P(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides can be used perfectly for short nerve gaps in rats, and are even better than short autologous nerve grafts. The tube dimensions, such as the internal diameter and wall thickness, are very important for the final outcome of peripheral nerve regeneration, as well as the

  17. An anatomical study of porcine peripheral nerve and its potential use in nerve tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilic, Leyla; Garner, Philippa E; Yu, Tong; Roman, Sabiniano; Haycock, John W; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Current nerve tissue engineering applications are adopting xenogeneic nerve tissue as potential nerve grafts to help aid nerve regeneration. However, there is little literature that describes the exact location, anatomy and physiology of these nerves to highlight their potential as a donor graft. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the structural and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of porcine peripheral nerves in the hind leg. Methods included the dissection of porcine nerves, localisation, characterisation and quantification of the ECM components and identification of nerve cells. Results showed a noticeable variance between porcine and rat nerve (a commonly studied species) in terms of fascicle number. The study also revealed that when porcine peripheral nerves branch, a decrease in fascicle number and size was evident. Porcine ECM and nerve fascicles were found to be predominately comprised of collagen together with glycosaminoglycans, laminin and fibronectin. Immunolabelling for nerve growth factor receptor p75 also revealed the localisation of Schwann cells around and inside the fascicles. In conclusion, it is shown that porcine peripheral nerves possess a microstructure similar to that found in rat, and is not dissimilar to human. This finding could extend to the suggestion that due to the similarities in anatomy to human nerve, porcine nerves may have utility as a nerve graft providing guidance and support to regenerating axons. PMID:26200940

  18. Multiple Cranial Nerve Involvement In Cryptococcal Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan A

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon cause of multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case report illustrates one such case of cryptococcal meningitis clinically manifesting with extensive cranial nerve involvement in an HIV seronegative individual. Histology revealed infiltration of the cranial nerves by cryptococci causing axonal disruption with secondary demyelination in the absence of any evidence of inflammation or vasculitis. We believe that axonal damage underlies the pathogenesis of cranial nerve involvement in cryptococcal meningitis.

  19. Isolated trochlear nerve palsy with midbrain hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain hemorrhage causing isolated fourth nerve palsy is extremely rare. Idiopathic, traumatic and congenital abnormalities are the most common causes of fourth nerve palsy. We report acute isolated fourth nerve palsy in an 18-year-old lady due to a midbrain hemorrhage probably due to a midbrain cavernoma. The case highlights the need for neuroimaging in selected cases of isolated trochlear nerve palsy.

  20. Late-onset Alzheimer disease genetic variants in posterior cortical atrophy and posterior AD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Khan, Qurat ul Ain; Murray, Melissa E; Krishnan, Siddharth; Aakre, Jeremiah; Pankratz, V Shane; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Bisceglio, Gina; Petersen, Ronald C; Younkin, Steven G; Dickson, Dennis W; Boeve, Bradley F; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2014-04-22

    To investigate association of genetic risk factors for late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) with risk of posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), a syndrome of visual impairment with predominant Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology in posterior cortical regions, and with risk of "posterior AD" neuropathology. We assessed 81 participants with PCA diagnosed clinically and 54 with neuropathologic diagnosis of posterior AD vs 2,523 controls for association with 11 significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from published LOAD risk genome-wide association studies. There was highly significant association with APOE ε4 and increased risk of PCA (p = 0.0003, odds ratio [OR] = 3.17) and posterior AD (p = 1.11 × 10(-17), OR = 6.43). No other locus was significant after corrections for multiple testing, although rs11136000 near CLU (p = 0.019, OR = 0.60) and rs744373 near BIN1 (p = 0.025, OR = 1. 63) associated nominally significantly with posterior AD, and rs3851179 at the PICALM locus had significant association with PCA (p = 0.0003, OR = 2.84). ABCA7 locus SNP rs3764650, which was also tested under the recessive model because of Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium, also had nominally significant association with PCA risk. The direction of association at APOE, CLU, and BIN1 loci was the same for participants with PCA and posterior AD. The effects for all SNPs, except rs3851179, were consistent with those for LOAD risk. We identified a significant effect for APOE and nominate CLU, BIN1, and ABCA7 as additional risk loci for PCA and posterior AD. Our findings suggest that at least some of the genetic risk factors for LOAD are shared with these atypical conditions and provide effect-size estimates for their future genetic studies.

  1. Serratus muscle stimulation effectively treats notalgia paresthetica caused by long thoracic nerve dysfunction: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barad Meredith

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently, notalgia paresthetica (NP is a poorly-understood condition diagnosed on the basis of pruritus, pain, or both, in the area medial to the scapula and lateral to the thoracic spine. It has been proposed that NP is caused by degenerative changes to the T2-T6 vertebrae, genetic disposition, or nerve entrapment of the posterior rami of spinal nerves arising at T2-T6. Despite considerable research, the etiology of NP remains unclear, and a multitude of different treatment modalities have correspondingly met with varying degrees of success. Here we demonstrate that NP can be caused by long thoracic nerve injury leading to serratus anterior dysfunction, and that electrical muscle stimulation (EMS of the serratus anterior can successfully and conservatively treat NP. In four cases of NP with known injury to the long thoracic nerve we performed transcutaneous EMS to the serratus anterior in an area far lateral to the site of pain and pruritus, resulting in significant and rapid pain relief. These findings are the first to identify long thoracic nerve injury as a cause for notalgia paresthetica and electrical muscle stimulation of the serratus anterior as a possible treatment, and we discuss the implications of these findings on better diagnosing and treating notalgia paresthetica.

  2. Origins, distributions, and ramifications of the femoral nerves in giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla Linnaeus, 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseâmely Angélica de Carvalho-Barros

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The study of nerves making up the lumbosacral plexus is extremely important, because it relates the various evolutionary aspects of animals’ posture and locomotion. Taking into account that the femoral nerve is the largest one in the cranial part of the lumbosacral plexus, one aimed to describe the origins, distributions, and ramifications of femoral nerves in giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla, comparing them to the literature describing domestic and wild animals, in order to establish correlations of morphological similarities and provide the related areas with means. One used three specimens, prepared through an injection of 10% aqueous formaldehyde solution via femoral artery, for their conservation and posterior dissection. The origins in the right and left antimeres took place in the ventral braches of lumbar spinal nerves 1, 2, and 3. The distributions and ramifications were observed for the major and minor psoas, lateral and medial iliac, pectineus, adductor magnus, sartorius, and femoral quadriceps muscles. Having the origins of the M. tridactyla femoral nerves as a basis, a reframing was observed due to the variance in the number of lumbar vertebrae (L1, L2, and L3. However, a partial morphological similarity was kept with regard to the distributions and ramifications, when compared to the domestic and wild animals taken into account in this study.

  3. Endoscopic resection of acetabular screw tip to decompress sciatic nerve following total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sun-Jung; Park, Myung-Sik; Matsuda, Dean K; Choi, Yun Ho

    2018-06-04

    Sciatic nerve injuries following total hip arthroplasty are disabling complications. Although degrees of injury are variable from neuropraxia to neurotmesis, mechanical irritation of sciatic nerve might be occurred by protruding hardware. This case shows endoscopic decompression for protruded acetabular screw irritating sciatic nerve, the techniques described herein may permit broader arthroscopic/endoscopic applications for management of complications after reconstructive hip surgery. An 80-year-old man complained of severe pain and paresthesias following acetabular component revision surgery. Physical findings included right buttock pain with radiating pain to lower extremity. Radiographs and computed tomography imaging showed that the sharp end of protruded screw invaded greater sciatic foramen anterior to posterior and distal to proximal direction at sciatic notch level. A protruding tip of the acetabular screw at the sciatic notch was decompressed by use of techniques gained from experience performing endoscopic sciatic nerve decompression. The pre-operative pain and paresthesias resolved post-operatively after recovering from anesthesia. This case report describes the first documented endoscopic resection of the tip of the acetabular screw irritating sciatic nerve after total hip arthroplasty. If endoscopic resection of an offending acetabular screw can be performed in a safe and minimally invasive manner, one can envision a future expansion of the role of hip arthroscopic surgery in several complications management after total hip arthroplasty.

  4. Posterior Mediastinal Tumors: Outcome of Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Rahman, A.M.; Sedera, M.A.; Mourad, I.A.; Aziz, S.A.; Saber, T.K.H.; Al Sakary, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of posterior mediastinal tumors relative to all tumors of the mediastinum is 23% to 30%. The posterior mediastinum is a potential space along each side of the vertebral column and adjacent proximal portion of the ribs. Primary tumors of posterior mediastinum are usually neurogenic. The aim of this study was to evaluate different surgical approaches used for the resection of posterior mediastinal tumors, and to assess morbidity, mortality and patients survival. Patients and Methods: Between January 200 I and January 2004, 30 patients with posterior mediastinal tumors were included. CT scan of the chest and CT guided biopsy were done for all patients; whereas MRI was done for suspected intraspinal extension. Posterolateral thoracotomy was the approach used in most of the patients. The Akwari approach was used in most of the patients with Dumbbell tumors. Neurogenic tumors constituted 67% of cases, being neuroblastoma in 60%. The non neurogenic tumors included a heterogenous group of rare tumors (n=10). Dumbbell tumors were found in 10 patients. Neuroblastoma was the commonest tumor to cause intraspinal extension (40%). Wide local excision was done in 13 patients; whereas extended resection was done in the remaining 17 patients. The mean intra-operative blood loss was 800cc and the mean hospital stay was 12 days. The size of the resected tumor ranged from 3X4cm to 30X22cm, 80% of tumors were malignant. Morbidity in relation to the procedures developed in 8 patients (atelectasis, meningitis, paraplegia, Horner syndrome and mild wound sepsis in 4, I, I, 1 and I of the patients; respectively). One postoperative mortality, due to meningitis was recorded. The overall survival by the end of three years was 87.7% with a mean survival of 30.4 months. The overall disease free survival was 55.9% with a mean disease free survival of 26.2 months. Posterior mediastinal tumors may reach large size before becoming symptomatic. Complete surgical excision (including

  5. Evidence Suggesting that the Buccal and Zygomatic Branches of the Facial Nerve May Contain Parasympathetic Secretomotor Fibers to the Parotid Gland by Means of Communications from the Auriculotemporal Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansatit, Tanvaa; Apinuntrum, Prawit; Phetudom, Thavorn

    2015-12-01

    The auriculotemporal nerve is one of the peripheral nerves that communicates with the facial nerve. However, the function of these communications is poorly understood. Details of how these communications form and connect with each other are still unclear. In addition, a reliable anatomical landmark for locating these communications during surgery has not been sufficiently described. Microdissection was performed on 20 lateral hemifaces of 10 soft-embalmed cadavers to investigate facial-auriculotemporal nerve communications with emphasis on determining their function. The auriculotemporal nerve was identified in the retromandibular space and traced towards its terminations. The communicating branches were followed and the anatomical relationships to surrounding structures observed. The auriculotemporal nerve is suspended above the maxillary artery in the dense retromandibular fascia behind the mandibular ramus. It forms a knot and fans out, providing multiple branches in all directions in the sagittal plane. Inferiorly, it connects the maxillary periarterial plexus, while minute branches supply the temporomandibular joint anteriorly. The larger branches mainly communicate with the branches of the temporofacial division of the facial nerve, and the auricular branches enter the fascia of the auricular cartilage posteriorly. The temporal branches and occasionally the zygomatic branches arise superiorly to distribute within the temporoparietal fascia. The auriculotemporal nerve forms the parotid retromandibular plexus through two types of communication. It sends one to three branches to join the zygomatic and buccal branches of the facial nerve at the branching area of the temporofacial division. It also communicates with the periarterial plexus of the superficial temporal and maxillary arteries. This plexus continues anteriorly along the branches of the facial nerve and the periarterial plexus of the transverse facial artery as the parotid periductal autonomic plexus

  6. Posterior Pole Sparing Laser Photocoagulation Combined with Intravitreal Bevacizumab Injection in Posterior Retinopathy of Prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To report the results of the posterior pole sparing laser photocoagulation combined with intravitreal bevacizumab injection (IVB in retinopathy of prematurity (ROP. Methods. A retrospective chart review of premature babies with ROP, all of whom received laser photocoagulation with IVB. Eleven eyes of 6 infants with advanced zone I ROP underwent laser ablation sparing posterior pole with concurrent IVB. The results were compared with those of full-laser treatment combined with IVB to 8 eyes of 5 infants with advanced ROP without involvement of the posterior pole. Results. The posterior pole sparing laser with IVB was performed with zone I, stage 3+ ROP at the mean postmenstrual age of 36 weeks and 5 days. The plus sign decreased significantly at postoperative day 1, the neovascular proliferation regressed by postoperative week 1, and the normal vascularization started at postoperative day 32 on the average. Two months after treatment, vascularization of the spared avascular area was completed. There was no macular dragging, tractional retinal detachment, foveal destruction by laser scars, or any other adverse event. No significant anatomical differences were identified from those of full-laser ablation combined with IVB. Conclusions. Posterior pole sparing laser with IVB can give favorable results without destruction of posterior pole retina.

  7. Ganglioglioma of the trigeminal nerve: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athale, S.; Jinkins, J.R. [Neuroradiology Section, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 F. Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78284-7800 (United States); Hallet, K.K. [Neuropathology Department, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Texas (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Ganglioglioma of the cranial nerves is extremely rare; only a few cases involving the optic nerves have been reported. We present a case of ganglioglioma of the trigeminal nerve, which was isointense with the brain stem on all MRI sequences and showed no contrast enhancement. (orig.) With 2 figs., 6 refs.

  8. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... An infant's facial nerve is also called the seventh cranial nerve. It can be damaged just before or at the time of delivery. ...

  9. Ephaptic coupling of myelinated nerve fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binczak, S.; Eilbeck, J. C.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical predictions of a simple myelinated nerve fiber model are compared with theoretical results in the continuum and discrete limits, clarifying the nature of the conduction process on an isolated nerve axon. Since myelinated nerve fibers are often arranged in bundles, this model is used...

  10. Neuromodulation of the Suprascapular Nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurt, E.; Eijk, T. van; Henssen, D.J.H.A.; Arnts, I.; Steegers, M.A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic intractable shoulder pain (CISP) is defined as shoulder pain which is present for longer than 6 months and does not respond to standard treatments like medication, physical therapy, rehabilitation, selective nerve blocks and local infiltrations, or orthopedic procedures. The etiology of CISP

  11. Transdermal optogenetic peripheral nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimon, Benjamin E.; Zorzos, Anthony N.; Bendell, Rhys; Harding, Alexander; Fahmi, Mina; Srinivasan, Shriya; Calvaresi, Peter; Herr, Hugh M.

    2017-06-01

    Objective: A fundamental limitation in both the scientific utility and clinical translation of peripheral nerve optogenetic technologies is the optical inaccessibility of the target nerve due to the significant scattering and absorption of light in biological tissues. To date, illuminating deep nerve targets has required implantable optical sources, including fiber-optic and LED-based systems, both of which have significant drawbacks. Approach: Here we report an alternative approach involving transdermal illumination. Utilizing an intramuscular injection of ultra-high concentration AAV6-hSyn-ChR2-EYFP in rats. Main results: We demonstrate transdermal stimulation of motor nerves at 4.4 mm and 1.9 mm depth with an incident laser power of 160 mW and 10 mW, respectively. Furthermore, we employ this technique to accurately control ankle position by modulating laser power or position on the skin surface. Significance: These results have the potential to enable future scientific optogenetic studies of pathologies implicated in the peripheral nervous system for awake, freely-moving animals, as well as a basis for future clinical studies.

  12. Nerve growth factor receptor immunostaining suggests an extrinsic origin for hypertrophic nerves in Hirschsprung's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, H; O'Briain, D S; Puri, P

    1994-01-01

    The expression of nerve growth factor receptor in colon from 20 patients with Hirshsprung's disease and 10 controls was studied immunohistochemically. The myenteric and submucous plexuses in the ganglionic bowel and hypertrophic nerve trunks in the aganglionic bowel displayed strong expression of nerve growth factor receptor. The most important finding was the identical localisation of nerve growth factor receptor immunoreactivity on the perineurium of both hypertrophic nerve trunks in Hirshs...

  13. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Dejan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is characterized by the following symptoms: seizures, impaired consciousness and/or vision, vomiting, nausea, and focal neurological signs. Diagnostic imaging includes examination by magnetic resonance (MR and computed tomography (CT, where brain edema is visualized bi-laterally and symmetrically, predominantly posteriorly, parietally, and occipitally. Case report. We presented a 73-year-old patient with the years-long medical history of hipertension and renal insufficiency, who developed PRES with the symptomatology of the rear cranium. CT and MR verified changes in the white matter involving all lobes on both sides of the brain. After a two-week treatment (antihypertensive, hypolipemic and rehydration therapy clinical improvement with no complications occurred, with complete resolution of changes in the white matter observed on CT and MR. Conclusion. PRES is a reversible syndrome in which the symptoms withdraw after several days to several weeks if early diagnosis is made and appropriate treatment started without delay.

  14. Visual Dysfunction in Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia da Silva, Mari N.; Millington, Rebecca S.; Bridge, Holly; James-Galton, Merle; Plant, Gordon T.

    2017-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a syndromic diagnosis. It is characterized by progressive impairment of higher (cortical) visual function with imaging evidence of degeneration affecting the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes bilaterally. Most cases will prove to have Alzheimer pathology. The aim of this review is to summarize the development of the concept of this disorder since it was first introduced. A critical discussion of the evolving diagnostic criteria is presented and the differential diagnosis with regard to the underlying pathology is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the visual dysfunction that defines the disorder, and the classical deficits, such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognized visual field defects, are reviewed, along with the evidence on their neural correlates. The latest developments on the imaging of PCA are summarized, with special attention to its role on the differential diagnosis with related conditions. PMID:28861031

  15. Shining a light on posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Boeve, Bradley F; Cappa, Stefano F; Dickerson, Bradford C; Dubois, Bruno; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre; Lehmann, Manja; Mendez, Mario F; Pijnenburg, Yolande; Ryan, Natalie S; Scheltens, Philip; Shakespeare, Tim; Tang-Wai, David F; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Bain, Lisa; Carrillo, Maria C; Fox, Nick C

    2013-07-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a clinicoradiologic syndrome characterized by progressive decline in visual processing skills, relatively intact memory and language in the early stages, and atrophy of posterior brain regions. Misdiagnosis of PCA is common, owing not only to its relative rarity and unusual and variable presentation, but also because patients frequently first seek the opinion of an ophthalmologist, who may note normal eye examinations by their usual tests but may not appreciate cortical brain dysfunction. Seeking to raise awareness of the disease, stimulate research, and promote collaboration, a multidisciplinary group of PCA research clinicians formed an international working party, which had its first face-to-face meeting on July 13, 2012 in Vancouver, Canada, prior to the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. Copyright © 2013 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Visual Dysfunction in Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari N. Maia da Silva

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA is a syndromic diagnosis. It is characterized by progressive impairment of higher (cortical visual function with imaging evidence of degeneration affecting the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes bilaterally. Most cases will prove to have Alzheimer pathology. The aim of this review is to summarize the development of the concept of this disorder since it was first introduced. A critical discussion of the evolving diagnostic criteria is presented and the differential diagnosis with regard to the underlying pathology is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the visual dysfunction that defines the disorder, and the classical deficits, such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognized visual field defects, are reviewed, along with the evidence on their neural correlates. The latest developments on the imaging of PCA are summarized, with special attention to its role on the differential diagnosis with related conditions.

  17. Surgical management of giant posterior communicating artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velat, Gregory J; Zabramski, Joseph M; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F

    2012-09-01

    Giant posterior communicating artery (PCoA) aneurysms (> 25 mm) are rare lesions associated with a poor prognosis and high rates of morbidity and mortality. To review the clinical results of giant PCoA aneurysms surgically treated at our institution, focusing on operative nuances. All cases of giant PCoA aneurysms treated surgically at our institution were identified from a prospectively maintained patient database. Patient demographic factors, medical comorbidities, rupture status, neurological presentation, clinical outcomes, and surgical records were critically reviewed. From 1989 to 2010, 11 patients (10 women) underwent surgical clipping of giant PCoA aneurysms. Presenting signs and symptoms included cranial nerve palsies, diminished mental status, headache, visual changes, and seizures. Five aneurysms were ruptured on admission. All aneurysms were clipped primarily except 1, which was treated by parent artery sacrifice and extracranial-to-intracranial bypass after intraoperative aneurysm rupture. Perioperative morbidity and mortality rates were 36% (4 of 11) and 18.3% (2 of 11), respectively. Excellent or good clinical outcomes, defined as modified Rankin Scale scores ≤ 2, were achieved in 86% (5 of 6) of patients available for long-term clinical follow-up (mean, 12.5 ± 13.6 months). Giant PCoA aneurysms are rare vascular lesions that may present with a variety of neurological signs and symptoms. These lesions can be successfully managed surgically with satisfactory morbidity and mortality rates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest surgical series of giant PCoA aneurysms published to date.

  18. Posterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy following Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Pakravan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To report a case of posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION following herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO. CASE REPORT: A 58-year-old woman with history of recent HZO in her right eye presented with acute painless loss of vision in the same eye to no light perception. Examination revealed a positive relative afferent pupillary defect and a normal appearing optic disc. Inflammatory and infiltrative lesions of the optic nerve were ruled out by laboratory and imaging studies. The patient received systemic acyclovir and prednisolone. Three months later, visual acuity improved to counting fingers, but the optic disc became pale and atrophic leading to a presumptive diagnosis of PION. Considering the positive PCR test for varicella zoster virus and the short time interval between the two presentations, HZO was considered as the most probable cause of the optic neuropathy. CONCLUSION: Herpes zoster ophthalmicus can be associated with PION.

  19. Posterior sternoclavicular dislocation: an American football injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marker, L B; Klareskov, B

    1996-01-01

    Posterior dislocation of the sternoclavicular joint is uncommon, accounting for less than 0.1% of all dislocations. Since 1824 a little more than 100 cases have been reported, and the majority in the past 20 years. A review of published reports suggests that this injury is seen particularly in co...... in connection with American football. A typical case is described. The importance of this injury is that there is often a delay in diagnosis with potentially serious complications....

  20. Complications in posterior lumbar interbody fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kreuzer, Rolf-Peter

    2010-01-01

    From 1993 to 2000, 220 consecutive patients with unstable degenerative spondylolisthesis were studied after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using different types of grafts and pedicle screw systems. In a retrospective review the author detail the associated complications and their correlation with perioperative factors. The causes, strategies for their avoidance, and the clinical course of these complications are also disscused. The study group was composed of 136 women and 84 men...

  1. Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Induced by Pazopanib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelis Leonidas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is a clinical/radiological syndrome characterized by headache, seizures, impaired vision, acute hypertension, and typical magnetic resonance imaging findings. There are several reports in the literature that depict its occurrence in cancer patients. The list of common anticancer and supportive care drugs that predispose to reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is expanding and includes not only a large number of chemotherapeutic agents but also an increased number of new targeted drugs, particularly angiogenesis inhibitors such as bevacizumab,sorefenib and sunitinib. Pazopanib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and c-Kit which after a positive phase III randomized clinical trial in patients with advanced renal cell cancer received FDA approval for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Until now no cases of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome induced by pazopanib have been reported. Case report We present the case of a 40 years old female patient with heavily pre-treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma who received pazopanib as salvage treatment. After 21 days of pazopanib therapy the patient referred to the emergency department with epileptic seizure, impaired vision at both eyes and headache. MRI of the brain revealed subcortical oedema at the occipital and parietal lobes bilaterally. She was treated with anticonvulsants, i.v. administration of mannitol and antihypertensives and she recovered completely from her symptoms and was discharged on the tenth hospital day. A brain MRI performed 3 weeks after showed that the subcortical oedema had been subsided. Conclusion In conclusion this is the first case of pazopanib induced reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Although usually reversible, this syndrome is a serious and

  2. Cervical disc hernia operations through posterior laminoforaminotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolas, Coskun; Ozdemir, Nuriye Guzin; Okay, Hilmi Onder; Kanat, Ayhan; Senol, Mehmet; Atci, Ibrahim Burak; Yilmaz, Hakan; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Kahraman, Umit

    2016-01-01

    The most common used technique for posterolateral cervical disc herniations is anterior approach. However, posterior cervical laminotoforaminomy can provide excellent results in appropriately selected patients with foraminal stenosis in either soft disc prolapse or cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical outcomes following posterior laminoforaminotomy in patients with radiculopathy. We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients diagnosed with posterolateral cervical disc herniation and cervical spondylosis with foraminal stenosis causing radiculopathy operated by the posterior cervical keyhole laminoforaminotomy between the years 2010 and 2015. The file records and the radiographic images of the 35 patients were assessed retrospectively. The mean age was 46.4 years (range: 34-66 years). Of the patients, 19 were males and 16 were females. In all of the patients, the neurologic deficit observed was radiculopathy. The posterolaterally localized disc herniations and the osteophytic structures were on the left side in 18 cases and on the right in 17 cases. In 10 of the patients, the disc level was at C5-6, in 18 at C6-7, in 2 at C3-4, in 2 at C4-5, in 1 at C7-T1, in 1 patient at both C5-6 and C6-7, and in 1 at both C4-5 and C5-6. In 14 of these 35 patients, both osteophytic structures and protruded disc herniation were present. Intervertebral foramen stenosis was present in all of the patients with osteophytes. Postoperatively, in 31 patients the complaints were relieved completely and four patients had complaints of neck pain and paresthesia radiating to the arm (the success of operation was 88.5%). On control examinations, there was no finding of instability or cervical kyphosis. Posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy is an alternative appropriate choice in both cervical soft disc herniations and cervical stenosis.

  3. Cervical disc hernia operations through posterior laminoforaminotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coskun Yolas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The most common used technique for posterolateral cervical disc herniations is anterior approach. However, posterior cervical laminotoforaminomy can provide excellent results in appropriately selected patients with foraminal stenosis in either soft disc prolapse or cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical outcomes following posterior laminoforaminotomy in patients with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients diagnosed with posterolateral cervical disc herniation and cervical spondylosis with foraminal stenosis causing radiculopathy operated by the posterior cervical keyhole laminoforaminotomy between the years 2010 and 2015. Results: The file records and the radiographic images of the 35 patients were assessed retrospectively. The mean age was 46.4 years (range: 34-66 years. Of the patients, 19 were males and 16 were females. In all of the patients, the neurologic deficit observed was radiculopathy. The posterolaterally localized disc herniations and the osteophytic structures were on the left side in 18 cases and on the right in 17 cases. In 10 of the patients, the disc level was at C5-6, in 18 at C6-7, in 2 at C3-4, in 2 at C4-5, in 1 at C7-T1, in 1 patient at both C5-6 and C6-7, and in 1 at both C4-5 and C5-6. In 14 of these 35 patients, both osteophytic structures and protruded disc herniation were present. Intervertebral foramen stenosis was present in all of the patients with osteophytes. Postoperatively, in 31 patients the complaints were relieved completely and four patients had complaints of neck pain and paresthesia radiating to the arm (the success of operation was 88.5%. On control examinations, there was no finding of instability or cervical kyphosis. Conclusion: Posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy is an alternative appropriate choice in both cervical soft disc herniations and cervical stenosis.

  4. Primary posterior perineal herniation of urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurumboor Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary perineal hernia is a rare clinical condition wherein herniation of viscera occurs through pelvic diaphragm. They are usually mistaken for sciatic hernia, rectal prolapse or other diseases in the perineum. Correct identification of the type of hernia by imaging is crucial for planning treatment. We present a case of primary posterior herniation of urinary bladder and rectal wall through levator ani repaired laparoscopically using a mesh repair.

  5. Posterior midline cervical fetal cystic hygroma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oak S

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available Posterior midline cervical cystic hygromas (PMC are frequently found associated with chromosomal aberrations and usually do not survive. The present report illustrates diagnosis of this condition by sonography in an 18 weeks old fetus and an amniocentesis revealed 45 x0 karyotype and increased concentration of alpha-fetoproteins. Pregnancy was terminated in view of Turner′s syndrome. The etiology and natural history of the condition is reviewed.

  6. Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Induced by Pazopanib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelis, Leonidas; Kakolyris, Stylianos; Souftas, Vasilios; Amarantidis, Kiriakos; Xenidis, Nikolaos; Chamalidou, Eleni; Dimopoulos, Prokopios; Michailidis, Prodromos; Christakidis, Evagelos; Prassopoulos, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    The reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is a clinical/radiological syndrome characterized by headache, seizures, impaired vision, acute hypertension, and typical magnetic resonance imaging findings. There are several reports in the literature that depict its occurrence in cancer patients. The list of common anticancer and supportive care drugs that predispose to reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is expanding and includes not only a large number of chemotherapeutic agents but also an increased number of new targeted drugs, particularly angiogenesis inhibitors such as bevacizumab,sorefenib and sunitinib. Pazopanib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and c-Kit which after a positive phase III randomized clinical trial in patients with advanced renal cell cancer received FDA approval for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Until now no cases of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome induced by pazopanib have been reported. We present the case of a 40 years old female patient with heavily pre-treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma who received pazopanib as salvage treatment. After 21 days of pazopanib therapy the patient referred to the emergency department with epileptic seizure, impaired vision at both eyes and headache. MRI of the brain revealed subcortical oedema at the occipital and parietal lobes bilaterally. She was treated with anticonvulsants, i.v. administration of mannitol and antihypertensives and she recovered completely from her symptoms and was discharged on the tenth hospital day. A brain MRI performed 3 weeks after showed that the subcortical oedema had been subsided. In conclusion this is the first case of pazopanib induced reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Although usually reversible, this syndrome is a serious and potentially life threatening adverse effect, if untreated, that should

  7. Cyclosporine-related reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarosz, J.M.; Howlett, D.C.; Cox, T.C.S.; Bingham, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    Three patients aged 48, 11 and 40 years, two of whom were recent recipients of renal transplants and one of a bone marrow transplant, developed seizures, with cortical blindness in two cases. All were immunosuppressed with cyclosporine and were hypertensive at the onset of symptoms. MRI showed predominantly posterior signal changes in all three cases. The abnormalities were more conspicuous on fast FLAIR images than on conventional T2-weighted spin-echo images. (orig.). With 4 figs

  8. Anatomical variations of pronator teres muscle: predispositional role for nerve entrapment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edie Benedito Caetano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To assess the anatomical variations of the pronator teres muscle (PTM and its implication in the compression of the median nerve, which passes through the humeral and ulnar heads of the PTM. METHODS: For the present study, 100 upper limbs from human cadavers from the anatomy laboratory were dissected. Forty-six specimens were male and four, female, whose aged ranged from 28 to 77 years; 27 were white and 23, non-white. A pilot study consisting of six hands from three fresh cadaver dissections was conducted to familiarize the authors with the local anatomy; these were not included in the present study. RESULTS: The humeral and ulnar heads of PTM were present in 86 limbs. In 72 out of the 86 limbs, the median nerve was positioned between the two heads of the PTM; in 11, it passed through the muscle belly of ulnar head of the PTM, and in three, posteriorly to both heads of the PTM. When both heads were present, the median nerve was not observed as passing through the muscle belly of the humeral head of PTM. In 14 out of the 100 dissected limbs, the ulnar head of the PTM was not observed; in this situation, the median nerve was positioned posteriorly to the humeral head in 11 limbs, and passed through the humeral head in three. In 17 limbs, the ulnar head of PTM was little developed, with a fibrous band originating from the ulnar coronoid process, associated with a distal muscle component near the union with the humeral head. In four limbs, the ulnar head of the MPR was represented by a fibrous band. In both limbs of one cadaver, a fibrous band was observed between the supinator muscle and the humeral head of the PTM, passing over median nerve. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that these anatomical variations in relationship median nerve and PTM are potential factors for median nerve compression, as they narrow the space through which the median nerve passes.

  9. Management of Posterior Urethral Valves in Rural Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of Posterior Urethral Valves in Rural. Kenya .... Antwi S. Audit of Posterior Urethral Valve (PUV) in Children at ... Community Paediatrics Committee, Infectious. Diseases ... Effect of Circumcision on Risk of Urinary Tract. Infection in ...

  10. X-tip intraosseous injection system as a primary anesthesia for irreversible pulpitis of posterior mandibular teeth: A randomized clinical trail

    OpenAIRE

    Razavian, Hamid; Kazemi, Shantia; Khazaei, Saber; Jahromi, Maryam Zare

    2013-01-01

    Background: Successful anesthesia during root canal therapy may be difficult to obtain. Intraosseous injection significantly improves anesthesia′s success as a supplemental pulpal anesthesia, particularly in cases of irreversible pulpitis. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of X-tip intraosseous injection and inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block in primary anesthesia for mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis. Materials and Methods: Forty emergency patients wi...

  11. Aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, U D; Adhikari, S

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve is most commonly due to its damage by trauma. A ten-month old child presented with the history of a fall from a four-storey building. She developed traumatic third nerve palsy and eventually the clinical features of aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve. The adduction of the eye improved over time. She was advised for patching for the strabismic amblyopia as well. Traumatic third nerve palsy may result in aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve. In younger patients, motility of the eye in different gazes may improve over time. © NEPjOPH.

  12. [Morphologic changes during neuroplastic nerve restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalski, E P; Rozhkov, E N

    1976-06-01

    The dynamics of ultrastructural changes in plastic recovery of the function of the additional nerve by the anterior branch of the second cervical nerve was studied. The nerve cells at the level of the donor-nerve were found to be highly reactive and plastic. It was established that in the process of heterogenic regeneration of the nerve the most substantial changes in neuronal structures were observed during the first two months. The cysterns of the endoplasmic network remained dilated for a long time after platic operation with might be related with the increased protein metabolism in the neuron.

  13. Feasibility of thoracoscopic approach for retrosternal goitre (posterior mediastinal goitre: Personal experiences of 11 cases

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    Panchangam Ramakanth Bhargav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Posterior mediastinal goitres constitute of a unique surgical thyroid disorder that requires expert management. Occasionally, they require thoracic approach for the completion of thyroidectomy. In this paper, we describe the feasibility and utility of a novel thoracoscopic approach for such goitres. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study conducted at a tertiary care endocrine surgery department in South India over a period of 5 years from January 2010 to December 2014. We developed a novel thoracoscopic technique for posterior mediastinal goitres instead of a more morbid thoracotomy or sternotomy. All the clinical, investigative, operative, pathological and follow-up data were collected from our prospectively filled database. Statistical analysis was done with SPSS 15.0 version. Descriptive analysis was done. Operative Technique of Thoracoscopic Thyroidectomy: Single lumen endotracheal tube (SLETT was used of anaesthetic intubation and general inhalational anaesthesia. Operative decubitus was supine with extension and abduction of the ipsilateral arm. Access to mediastinum was obtained by two working ports in the third and fifth intercostal spaces. Mediastinal extension was dissected thoracoscopically and delivered cervically. Results: Out of 1,446 surgical goitres operated during the study period, 72 (5% had retrosternal goitre. Also, 27/72 (37.5% cases had posterior mediastinal extension (PME, out of which 11 cases required thoracic approach. We utilised thoracoscopic technique for these 11 cases. The post-operative course was uneventful with no major morbidity. There was one case of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN injury and hoarseness of voice in the third case. Histopathologies in 10 cases were benign, out of which two had subclinical hyperthyroidism. One case had multifocal papillary microcarcinoma. Conclusions: We opine that novel thoracoscopic technique is a feasibly optimal approach for posterior mediastinal

  14. Tractography of lumbar nerve roots: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbi, Vincent; Budzik, Jean-Francois; Thuc, Vianney le; Cotten, Anne [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service de Radiologie et d' Imagerie musculo-squelettique, Lille Cedex (France); Duhamel, Alain [Universite de Lille 2, UDSL, Lille (France); Bera-Louville, Anne [Service de Rhumatologie, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille (France)

    2011-06-15

    The aims of this preliminary study were to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fibre tracking (FT) of the lumbar nerve roots, and to assess potential differences in the DTI parameters of the lumbar nerves between healthy volunteers and patients suffering from disc herniation. Nineteen patients with unilateral sciatica related to posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation and 19 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. DTI with tractography of the L5 or S1 nerves was performed. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were calculated from tractography images. FA and MD values could be obtained from DTI-FT images in all controls and patients. The mean FA value of the compressed lumbar nerve roots was significantly lower than the FA of the contralateral nerve roots (p=0.0001) and of the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.0001). MD was significantly higher in compressed nerve roots than in the contralateral nerve root (p=0.0002) and in the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.04). DTI with tractography of the lumbar nerves is possible. Significant changes in diffusion parameters were found in the compressed lumbar nerves. (orig.)

  15. Microsurgical anatomy of the abducens nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Wonil; Yoshioka, Fumitaka; Funaki, Takeshi; Rhoton, Albert L

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate and review the detailed microsurgical anatomy of the abducens nerve and surrounding structures along its entire course and to provide its topographic measurements. Ten cadaveric heads were examined using ×3 to ×40 magnification after the arteries and veins were injected with colored silicone. Both sides of each cadaveric head were dissected using different skull base approaches to demonstrate the entire course of the abducens nerve from the pontomedullary sulcus to the lateral rectus muscle. The anatomy of the petroclival area and the cavernous sinus through which the abducens nerve passes are complex due to the high density of critically important neural and vascular structures. The abducens nerve has angulations and fixation points along its course that put the nerve at risk in many clinical situations. From a surgical viewpoint, the petrous tubercle of the petrous apex is an intraoperative landmark to avoid damage to the abducens nerve. The abducens nerve is quite different from the other nerves. No other cranial nerve has a long intradural path with angulations and fixations such as the abducens nerve in petroclival venous confluence. A precise knowledge of the relationship between the abducens nerve and surrounding structures has allowed neurosurgeon to approach the clivus, petroclival area, cavernous sinus, and superior orbital fissure without surgical complications. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Tractography of lumbar nerve roots: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbi, Vincent; Budzik, Jean-Francois; Thuc, Vianney le; Cotten, Anne; Duhamel, Alain; Bera-Louville, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this preliminary study were to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fibre tracking (FT) of the lumbar nerve roots, and to assess potential differences in the DTI parameters of the lumbar nerves between healthy volunteers and patients suffering from disc herniation. Nineteen patients with unilateral sciatica related to posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation and 19 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. DTI with tractography of the L5 or S1 nerves was performed. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were calculated from tractography images. FA and MD values could be obtained from DTI-FT images in all controls and patients. The mean FA value of the compressed lumbar nerve roots was significantly lower than the FA of the contralateral nerve roots (p=0.0001) and of the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.0001). MD was significantly higher in compressed nerve roots than in the contralateral nerve root (p=0.0002) and in the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.04). DTI with tractography of the lumbar nerves is possible. Significant changes in diffusion parameters were found in the compressed lumbar nerves. (orig.)

  17. Factors that influence peripheral nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Archibald, Simon J; Madison, Roger D

    2002-01-01

    median nerve lesions (n = 46) in nonhuman primates over 3 to 4 years, a time span comparable with such lesions in humans. Nerve gap distances of 5, 20, or 50mm were repaired with nerve grafts or collagen-based nerve guide tubes, and three electrophysiological outcome measures were followed: (1) compound...... muscle action potentials in the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, (2) the number and size of motor units in reinnervated muscle, and (3) compound sensory action potentials from digital nerve. A statistical model was used to assess the influence of three variables (repair type, nerve gap distance, and time...... to earliest muscle reinnervation) on the final recovery of the outcome measures. Nerve gap distance and the repair type, individually and concertedly, strongly influenced the time to earliest muscle reinnervation, and only time to reinnervation was significant when all three variables were included as outcome...

  18. Suprascapular nerve entrapment in newsreel cameramen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karataş, Gülçin Kaymak; Göğüş, Feride

    2003-03-01

    To determine presence of suprascapular nerve entrapment in a group of newsreel cameramen. Thirty-six men working as newsreel cameramen participated in the study. In addition to musculoskeletal and neurologic examinations, bilateral suprascapular nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography were performed. A group of 19 healthy, male volunteers were included in the study as normal controls for suprascapular nerve conduction studies. In newsreel cameramen, mean suprascapular nerve latency was 3.20 +/- 0.56 msec and 2.84 +/- 0.36 msec for right and left shoulders, respectively (P = 0.001). The mean latency difference between right and left suprascapular nerves was -0.05 +/- 0.19 msec in the control group and 0.36 +/- 0.58 msec in the cameramen group (P mobile camera on the shoulder might cause suprascapular nerve entrapment in newsreel cameramen. This could be considered an occupational disorder of the suprascapular nerve, like meat-packer's neuropathy.

  19. Convergence of posteriors for discretized log Gaussian Cox processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waagepetersen, Rasmus Plenge

    2004-01-01

    In Markov chain Monte Carlo posterior computation for log Gaussian Cox processes (LGCPs) a discretization of the continuously indexed Gaussian field is required. It is demonstrated that approximate posterior expectations computed from discretized LGCPs converge to the exact posterior expectations...... when the cell sizes of the discretization tends to zero. The effect of discretization is studied in a data example....

  20. Atypical clinical presentation and long-term survival in a patient with optic nerve medulloepithelioma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastora-Salvador Natalia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Medulloepithelioma is a rare congenital tumor of the primitive medullary neuroepithelium. A significant proportion of patients with medulloepithelioma arising from the optic nerve die from intracranial spread or cerebral metastasis. Because it has no known distinct clinical features and because of its low frequency, this tumor presents within the first two to six years of life and is usually misdiagnosed clinically as a different type of optic nerve tumor. Here, we describe a new and atypical case of medulloepithelioma of the optic nerve in a 12-year-old boy. To the best of our knowledge, he is the oldest reported patient to present with this disease and, now as an adult, has the longest documented period of disease-free survival. Case presentation A 12-year-old Caucasian boy with headache and unilateral amaurosis was referred for a presumed optic nerve glioma to our hospital. A computed tomography scan showed optic nerve enlargement, and fundoscopy showed a whitish mass at the optic disc. Our patient had been followed at his local hospital for four years for an 'optic disc cyst' with no change or progression. He experienced mild progressive visual impairment during that period. He was admitted for resection, and a histopathological analysis revealed a medulloepithelioma of the optic nerve. Supplemental orbital radiotherapy was performed. He remained disease-free for 25 years. Conclusions Medulloepithelioma of the optic nerve can clinically mimic more common pediatric tumors, such as optic glioma, meningioma, or retinoblastoma. Thus, medulloepithelioma should be included in the differential diagnoses of pediatric optic nerve lesions. Fundoscopy in these patients may provide relevant information for diagnosis. Anterior optic nerve medulloepitheliomas may behave differently from and have a better prognosis than medulloepitheliomas that have a more posterior location. Our case report illustrates that long-term survival can be

  1. The analysis of the effective of preserving sacral nerve root during surgical treatment of chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Yiming; Chen Kangwu; Yang Huilin; Zhu Lifan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the effective of preserving sacral nerve root during surgical treatment of sacral chordoma. Methods: This retrospective study included 30 cases of sacral chordomas. All the cases were operated with posterior approach. The blood loss and blood transfusion during operation, the drainged blood after operation were reviewed. The sphincter muscle function of bladder and bowl were observed. Results: Tremendous reduction of blood loss during surgery was found in all cases, the blood loss was 1280 ml in average, the blood transfusion was 1080 ml in average, the drainged blood after ope-ration was 650 ml. Nine patients whose sacral nerve roots had been reserved bilaterally at and above S 3 level, the sphincter muscle function of bladder and bowl was good, whereas the function of sphincter muscle impaired in the other 21 patients and in one case colostomy and ureterocutaneostomy were used. Conclusion: Preoperative arterial embolization is effective method and can lead to excellent results. Even if the tumor is relatively huge and the upper resection margin is as high as at S 1 or S 2 level, the tumor can be removed successfully by posterior approach. Sacral nerve should be preserved as possible. (authors)

  2. Isolated optic nerve gliomas: a multicenter historical cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shofty, Ben; Ben-Sira, Liat; Kesler, Anat; Jallo, George; Groves, Mari L; Iyer, Rajiv R; Lassaletta, Alvaro; Tabori, Uri; Bouffet, Eric; Thomale, Ulrich-Wilhelm; Hernáiz Driever, Pablo; Constantini, Shlomi

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Isolated optic nerve gliomas (IONGs) constitute a rare subgroup of optic pathway gliomas (OPGs). Due to the rarity of this condition and the difficulty in differentiating IONGs from other types of OPGs in most clinical series, little is known about these tumors. Currently, due to lack of evidence, they are managed the same as any other OPG. METHODS The authors conducted a multicenter retrospective cohort study aimed at determining the natural history of IONGs. Included were patients with clear-cut glioma of the optic nerve without posterior (chiasmatic/hypothalamic) involvement. At least 1 year of follow-up, 2 MRI studies, and 2 neuro-ophthalmological examinations were required for inclusion. RESULTS Thirty-six patients with 39 tumors were included in this study. Age at diagnosis ranged between 6 months and 16 years (average 6 years). The mean follow-up time was 5.6 years. Twenty-five patients had neurofibromatosis Type 1. During the follow-up period, 59% of the tumors progressed, 23% remained stable, and 18% (all with neurofibromatosis Type 1) displayed some degree of spontaneous regression. Fifty-one percent of the patients presented with visual decline, of whom 90% experienced further deterioration. Nine patients were treated with chemotherapy, 5 of whom improved visually. Ten patients underwent operation, and no local or distal recurrence was noted. CONCLUSIONS Isolated optic nerve gliomas are highly dynamic tumors. Radiological progression and visual deterioration occur in greater percentages than in the general population of patients with OPGs. Response to chemotherapy may be better in this group, and its use should be considered early in the course of the disease.

  3. Computerized tomography-guided neurolytic splanchnic nerve block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriquet, Franco; De Martini, Giuseppe; Roy, Maria Teresa; Pretrolesi, Fabio; Martinoli, Carlo; Cariati, Maurizio; Fiorentini, Franco.

    1997-01-01

    Computerized tomography-guided neurolytic splanchnic nerve block is a technique for relieving abdominal cancer pain; the goal is the alcoholic neurolytic interruption of the sensitive structures in retroperitoneal space. Computerized tomography yields accurate anatomical detailing and the course for needle placement and alcohol spread. January, 1993, to July, 1996, twenty-one bilateral splanchnic nerve blocks were performed through the posterior access. Forty-eight hours after alcoholism. 14 patients (66%) had complete pain regression; 52% of the patients needed no analgesics for 6 to 54 days and only 9 patients (42%) needed another low opioid therapy. Complications included hypotension and diarrhea in all cases. One had a cardiac arrest and diet 8 days after the procedure. There were no other complications. The whole procedure usually lasted 60 min (range: 45 to 90 min). Splanchnic nerve neurolysis is a useful treatment in the patients with severe chronic abdominal pain. It is used as a second line treatment when large lesions change celia anatomy and complicate the percutaneous block of the celiac plexus. Endosulfan, Malathion and Methyl parathion, on the metabolic rate of the estuarine clam, Villorita cyprinoides var. cochinensis, have been investigated. The animals exposed to the lower sublethal concentrations of Endosulfan, Malthion and Methyl parathion consumed oxygen at the rate of 1.60, 1.98 and 2.09 ml. 0 2 g - 1 h -1 respectively, while at the higher concentrations of the pesticides, consumption of oxygen by the animal dropped to nearly half the control value. When compared to Malathion and Methyl parathion. Endosulfan induced animals recorded a greater reduction in her percentage deviation (from control) of oxygen consumption, possibly due to hypoxia induced by the pollutants

  4. Complement components of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid influence the microenvironment of nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-shuai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve regeneration conditioned fluid is secreted by nerve stumps inside a nerve regeneration chamber. A better understanding of the proteinogram of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid can provide evidence for studying the role of the microenvironment in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, we used cylindrical silicone tubes as the nerve regeneration chamber model for the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation proteomics technology and western blot analysis confirmed that there were more than 10 complement components (complement factor I, C1q-A, C1q-B, C2, C3, C4, C5, C7, C8ß and complement factor D in the nerve regeneration conditioned fluid and each varied at different time points. These findings suggest that all these complement components have a functional role in nerve regeneration.

  5. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical 'cross-bridging' to promote nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Tessa; Eva, Placheta; Borschel, Gregory H

    2015-10-01

    Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour period of 20 Hz electrical nerve stimulation via electrodes proximal to an injury site accelerates axon outgrowth to hasten target reinnervation in rats and humans, even after delayed surgery. A novel strategy of enticing donor axons from an otherwise intact nerve to grow through small nerve grafts (cross-bridges) into a denervated nerve stump, promotes improved axon regeneration after delayed nerve repair. The efficacy of this technique has been demonstrated in a rat model and is now in clinical use in patients undergoing cross-face nerve grafting for facial paralysis. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation, combined with the surgical technique of promoting the regeneration of some donor axons to 'protect' chronically denervated Schwann cells, improves nerve regeneration and, in turn, functional outcomes in the management of peripheral nerve injuries.

  6. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical ′cross-bridging′ to promote nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour period of 20 Hz electrical nerve stimulation via electrodes proximal to an injury site accelerates axon outgrowth to hasten target reinnervation in rats and humans, even after delayed surgery. A novel strategy of enticing donor axons from an otherwise intact nerve to grow through small nerve grafts (cross-bridges into a denervated nerve stump, promotes improved axon regeneration after delayed nerve repair. The efficacy of this technique has been demonstrated in a rat model and is now in clinical use in patients undergoing cross-face nerve grafting for facial paralysis. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation, combined with the surgical technique of promoting the regeneration of some donor axons to ′protect′ chronically denervated Schwann cells, improves nerve regeneration and, in turn, functional outcomes in the management of peripheral nerve injuries.

  7. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-long Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery.

  8. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Rat models of facial nerve cut (FC), facial nerve end to end anastomosis (FF), facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy (FG), and control (Ctrl) were established. Apex nasi amesiality observation, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays were employed to investigate the function and mechanism. In apex nasi amesiality observation, it was found apex nasi amesiality of FG group was partly recovered. Additionally, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays revealed that facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy could transfer nerve impulse and express AChR which was better than facial nerve cut and worse than facial nerve end to end anastomosis. The present study indicated that great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy is a substantial solution for facial lesion repair, as it is efficiently preventing facial muscles atrophy by generating neurotransmitter like ACh.

  9. Future Perspectives in the Management of Nerve Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, Susan E

    2018-04-01

     The author presents a solicited "white paper" outlining her perspective on the role of nerve transfers in the management of nerve injuries.  PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were evaluated to compare nerve graft and nerve transfer. An evaluation of the scientific literature by review of index articles was also performed to compare the number of overall clinical publications of nerve repair, nerve graft, and nerve transfer. Finally, a survey regarding the prevalence of nerve transfer surgery was administrated to the World Society of Reconstructive Microsurgery (WSRM) results.  Both nerve graft and transfer can generate functional results and the relative success of graft versus transfer depended on the function to be restored and the specific transfers used. Beginning in the early 1990s, there has been a rapid increase from baseline of nerve transfer publications such that clinical nerve transfer publication now exceeds those of nerve repair or nerve graft. Sixty-two responses were received from WSRM membership. These surgeons reported their frequency of "usually or always using nerve transfers for repairing brachial plexus injuries as 68%, radial nerves as 27%, median as 25%, and ulnar as 33%. They reported using nerve transfers" sometimes for brachial plexus 18%, radial nerve 30%, median nerve 34%, ulnar nerve 35%.  Taken together this evidence suggests that nerve transfers do offer an alternative technique along with tendon transfers, nerve repair, and nerve grafts. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. The nerves around the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, Alain; Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Wassel, Johnny; Moisei, Andreea; Teixeira, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathies of the shoulder are considered to be entrapment syndromes. They are relatively common, accounting for about 2% of cases of sport-related shoulder pain. Many instances involve suprascapular neuropathy, but the clinical diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Classically, EMG is the gold standard investigation but MRI currently reveals muscular abnormality in 50% of cases. Muscle edema, the most characteristic symptom, is nonspecific. In general, the topography of edema, the presence of a lesion compressing the nerve and clinical history contribute to the diagnosis. Although atrophy and fatty degeneration may persist after the disappearance of edema, they are rarely symptomatic. The main differential diagnosis is Parsonage–Turner syndrome. Evidence of a cyst pressing on a nerve may prompt puncture-infiltration guided by ultrasonography or CT-scan

  11. The nerves around the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Alain, E-mail: alain.blum@gmail.com [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France); Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Wassel, Johnny; Moisei, Andreea; Teixeira, Pedro [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France)

    2013-01-15

    Neuropathies of the shoulder are considered to be entrapment syndromes. They are relatively common, accounting for about 2% of cases of sport-related shoulder pain. Many instances involve suprascapular neuropathy, but the clinical diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Classically, EMG is the gold standard investigation but MRI currently reveals muscular abnormality in 50% of cases. Muscle edema, the most characteristic symptom, is nonspecific. In general, the topography of edema, the presence of a lesion compressing the nerve and clinical history contribute to the diagnosis. Although atrophy and fatty degeneration may persist after the disappearance of edema, they are rarely symptomatic. The main differential diagnosis is Parsonage–Turner syndrome. Evidence of a cyst pressing on a nerve may prompt puncture-infiltration guided by ultrasonography or CT-scan.

  12. Peroneal nerve injury in three patients with knee trauma: MR imaging and correlation with anatomic findings in volunteers and anatomic specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trappeniers, Laurence; Osteaux, Michel [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); De Maeseneer, Michel [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Department of Radiology, AZ VUB, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090, Jette (Belgium); Van Roy, Peter [Department of Experimental Anatomy, Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Chaskis, Christo [Department of Neurosurgery, Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Brussels (Belgium)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this article is to report on three patients with injuries of the peroneal nerve along the posterolateral aspect of the knee. Injuries in this area are less common than the injuries occurring at the level of the fibular head. In this article we report on three patients with posterolateral knee trauma who had peroneal nerve dysfunction. To better understand the precise location of the nerve on MR images, we performed MR imaging in five volunteers, and studied the position of the nerve on anatomic dissection (n=1) and anatomic slices (n=1). The common peroneal nerve is easily depicted on MR images and has a typical location along the posterior margin of the biceps tendon. Non-visualisation of the peroneal nerve at the posterolateral aspect of the knee, as seen on MR images, is consistent with nerve injury. Scar tissue at the posterolateral aspect of the knee indicates injury of this specific area, and involvement of the peroneal nerve is likely. (orig.)

  13. Posterior axilla sling traction for shoulder dystocia: case review and a new method of shoulder rotation with the sling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluver, Catherine Anne; Hofmeyr, G Justus

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to report on all cases in which posterior axilla sling traction (PAST) has been used to deliver cases of intractable shoulder dystocia and to describe a new method of shoulder rotation with the sling. A record of all published and known cases was collected that included information on preliminary obstetric techniques that were used and how the PAST technique was performed. Maternal outcomes that included maternal injury and length of hospital stay and fetal outcomes, which included birthweight, Apgar scores, nerve injuries, fractures, hospital stay, and outcome, were documented. We have recorded 19 cases where PAST has been used. In 5 cases, the babies had died in utero. Ten were assisted deliveries. PAST was successful in 18 cases. In one case, it was partially successful because it enabled delivery of the posterior shoulder with digital axillary traction. The most commonly used material was suction tubing. Once the posterior shoulder was delivered, the shoulder dystocia was resolved in all cases. Time from insertion to delivery was dystocia fail. Advantages are that it is easy to use (even by someone who has not seen it used previously), that the sling material is readily available, and that it is inserted quickly with 2 fingers. This is the first report of its use to rotate the posterior shoulder to the anterior position for delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    LM, de Crombrugghe B. Some recent advances in the chemistry and biology of trans- forming growth factor-beta. J Cell Biol 1987;105:1039e45. 12. Hao Y...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT In current war trauma, 20-30% of all extremity injuries and >80% of penetrating injuries being associated with peripheral nerve...through both axonal advance and in revascularization of the graft following placement. We are confident that this technology may allow us to

  15. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    this (Figure 14). Task 2g . Decision on wrap/fixation method for AvanceΤΜ nerve graft studies in rodent model. (Month 16, All PI’s) This decision...completed 3g . Preparation of manuscript based on Task 3 studies and evaluation for recommendation for human studies. This final task will be...significantly reduced mean hospital stay, dressings changes, mean time to epithelialisation, reduced pain, increased mobility . Patient and surgeon 666 N

  16. MRI of the fetal posterior fossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamsbaum, Catherine; Andre, Christine; Merzoug, Valerie; Ferey, Solene [St Vincent de Paul Hospital, Department of Radiology, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Moutard, Marie Laure [St Vincent de Paul Hospital, Department of Neuropaediatrics, Paris (France); Quere, Marie Pierre [CHU, Department of Radiology, Nantes (France); Lewin, Fanny [St Vincent de Paul Hospital, Maternity Department, Paris (France); Fallet-Bianco, Catherine [Ste Anne Hospital, Department of Neuropathology, Paris (France)

    2005-02-01

    MRI is a useful tool to complement US for imaging of the fetal posterior fossa (PF). In France, the discovery of a PF malformation in the fetus frequently leads to termination of pregnancy (80% in a personal series). However, despite improved accuracy in the diagnosis of PF abnormalities, prognosis remains uncertain. The first objective of this review is to document the normal MRI landmarks of the developing fetal PF. Because of their thinness, the visibility of the cerebellar fissures is dramatically delayed on MRI compared to macroscopic data. An important landmark is identification of the primary fissure of the vermis, normally seen at around 25-26 weeks' gestation (WG) on the sagittal slice, separating the larger posterior lobe from the anterior lobe (volume ratio around 2:1). The prepyramidal and secondary fissures are usually only identifiable after 32 WG and the hemispheric fissures are difficult to see until the end of pregnancy. Considering the signal changes, high signal on T2-weighted (T2-W) sequences is seen from 25 WG in the posterior part of the brain stem (tegmentum and ascending sensory tracts) related to myelination. The low signal intensities seen within the cerebellum on T2-W images correspond to high cellularity of grey matter (deep nuclei), as there is no myelination within the white matter before 38 WG. The second objective is to highlight the signs highly predictive of a poor neurological prognosis. Lack of pontine curvature or vermian agenesis without a PF cyst (small volume of PF) is greatly associated with poor neurological status. The third objective is to propose a diagnostic strategy in difficult cases where prognosis is important, e.g. the Dandy Walker continuum. (orig.)

  17. Oral azithromycin for treatment of posterior blepharitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igami, Thais Zamudio; Holzchuh, Ricardo; Osaki, Tammy Hentona; Santo, Ruth Miyuki; Kara-Jose, Newton; Hida, Richard Y

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of oral azithromycin in patients with posterior blepharitis. Twenty-six eyes of 13 patients with posterior blepharitis diagnosed by a qualified ophthalmologist were enrolled in this study. Patients were instructed to use oral azithromycin 500 mg per day for 3 days in 3 cycles with 7-day intervals. Subjective clinical outcomes were graded and scored 1 day before and 30 days after the end of the treatment (53 days after initiating the treatment) based on severity scores of: (1) eyelid debris; (2) eyelid telangiectasia; (3) swelling of the eyelid margin; (4) redness of the eyelid margin; and (5) ocular mucus secretion. For the assessment of global efficacy, patients were asked by the investigator to rate the subjective symptoms (eyelid itching, ocular itching, eyelid hyperemia, ocular hyperemia, ocular mucus secretion, photophobia, foreign body sensation, and dry eye sensation) on a scale of 0 (no symptoms) to 5 (severe symptoms). Break-up time, Schirmer I test, corneal fluorescein staining score, and rose bengal staining score were also performed in all patients. All clinical outcomes scoring showed statistically significant improvement after oral azithromycin, except for eyelid swelling. Average subjective symptom grading improved statistically after treatment with oral azithromycin, except for eyelid hyperemia, photophobia, and foreign body sensation. Average tear film break-up time values showed statistically significant improvement after the treatment with oral azithromycin. No statistically significant improvement was observed on average values of Schirmer I test, corneal fluorescein staining score, and rose bengal staining score. The combination of multiple clinical parameters shown in this study supports the clinical efficacy of pulsed oral azithromycin therapy for the management of posterior blepharitis.

  18. MRI of the fetal posterior fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamsbaum, Catherine; Andre, Christine; Merzoug, Valerie; Ferey, Solene; Moutard, Marie Laure; Quere, Marie Pierre; Lewin, Fanny; Fallet-Bianco, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    MRI is a useful tool to complement US for imaging of the fetal posterior fossa (PF). In France, the discovery of a PF malformation in the fetus frequently leads to termination of pregnancy (80% in a personal series). However, despite improved accuracy in the diagnosis of PF abnormalities, prognosis remains uncertain. The first objective of this review is to document the normal MRI landmarks of the developing fetal PF. Because of their thinness, the visibility of the cerebellar fissures is dramatically delayed on MRI compared to macroscopic data. An important landmark is identification of the primary fissure of the vermis, normally seen at around 25-26 weeks' gestation (WG) on the sagittal slice, separating the larger posterior lobe from the anterior lobe (volume ratio around 2:1). The prepyramidal and secondary fissures are usually only identifiable after 32 WG and the hemispheric fissures are difficult to see until the end of pregnancy. Considering the signal changes, high signal on T2-weighted (T2-W) sequences is seen from 25 WG in the posterior part of the brain stem (tegmentum and ascending sensory tracts) related to myelination. The low signal intensities seen within the cerebellum on T2-W images correspond to high cellularity of grey matter (deep nuclei), as there is no myelination within the white matter before 38 WG. The second objective is to highlight the signs highly predictive of a poor neurological prognosis. Lack of pontine curvature or vermian agenesis without a PF cyst (small volume of PF) is greatly associated with poor neurological status. The third objective is to propose a diagnostic strategy in difficult cases where prognosis is important, e.g. the Dandy Walker continuum. (orig.)

  19. SINDROME DE COLAPSO DE MORDIDA POSTERIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Alejandra Baldión

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El Síndrome de Colapso de Mordida posterior es una patología oclusal que se presenta como consecuencia de problemas dentales, periodontales y oclusales, que exige la correcta evaluación de los signos y síntomas que lo caracterizan.  El objetivo del artículo es describir la manera como evoluciona la enfermedad, la evaluación multidisciplinaria para obtener un diagnóstico preciso y la secuencia de tratamiento integral, revisando los conceptos para un mejor entendimiento del tratamiento periodontal y restaurativo que requieren los pacientes con síndrome de colapso de mordida posterior; caracterizado por procesos patológicos como enfermedad periodontal, caries dental con subsecuente alteración de la integridad del arco dentario que genera perdida de soporte posterior conllevando a un trauma oclusal secundario y disminución de la dimensión vertical oclusal. El control del proceso inflamatorio y la estabilización periodontal son puntos de partida indispensables en el tratamiento integral del paciente. La migración patológica de los dientes y las alteraciones del plano oclusal pueden exigir la corrección ortodóntica de los arcos y en algunos casos el concurso de cirugía oral para la nivelación del plano oclusal. La secuencia organizada del tratamiento por fases permite la restauración predecible de los pacientes con este síndrome, tomando en cuenta las diferentes alternativas protésicas tanto removibles como fijas con o sin implantes de oseointegración, para el éxito integral a largo plazo.

  20. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [IPOFG, Department of Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)