WorldWideScience

Sample records for possibly link mechanisms

  1. [Suicidality and musical preferences: a possible link?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolajczak, Gladys; Desseilles, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Music is an important part of young people's lives. In this article, we attempt to answer two questions on the links between music et suicide. First, we examine if certain types of music favor suicidal process (ideation and acting out); and, secondly, we examine if music can constitute a tool to reduce the risk of suicide. Several factors possibly involved in links between musical preferences and the suicidal process are developed: the Velten effect and the musical mood induction procedure, the identification and the learning by imitation, the media influence as well as the individual characteristics. A multifactor approach is necessary to understand the complex and birectional links that unite musical preferences and suicide risk.

  2. Suppression of alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid in VEGF-induced angiogenesis and the possible mechanisms in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, Cheng-Hung; Liu, Chia-Hua; Lu, Ta-Jung; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid (α-TEA) has been reported to exhibit both anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities in cell culture and animal studies. However, it is unclear whether α-TEA possesses anti-angiogenic effects. In this study, we investigated the effect of α-TEA on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression both in vitro and ex vivo. We found that the α-TEA inhibited tube formation, invasion, and migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and that such actions were accompanied by reduced expression of MMP-2. α-TEA also inhibited ex vivo angiogenesis, as indicated by chicken egg chorioallantoic membrane assay. We further showed that α-TEA attenuated protein expression of VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2)-mediated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), phosphorylated p38, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Moreover, α-TEA (30 μM) significantly up-regulated protein expression of tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMP)-2 (by 138%) and the metastasis suppressor gene nm23-H1 (by 54%). These results demonstrate that the anti-angiogenic effect of α-TEA both in vitro and ex vivo and its possible mechanistic action appears to involve the inhibition of MMP-2 level through VEGFR-2-mediated FAK and p38 signaling pathways and through up-regulation of TIMP-2 and nm23-H1 expression. - Graphical abstract: Possible mechanisms of α-TEA on inhibited angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Brief summary In the present study, we have demonstrated that VEGF-mediated angiogenesis is significantly inhibited by α-TEA, and that this effect involves inhibition of MMP-2 level through VEGFR-2-mediated FAK and p38 signaling pathways related to invasion and migration. - Highlights: • The anti-angiogenic effect and the mechanistic action of α-TEA were investigated. • α-TEA significantly inhibited VEGF-mediated angiogenesis both in vitro and ex vivo. • α-TEA down

  3. Suppression of alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid in VEGF-induced angiogenesis and the possible mechanisms in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Cheng-Hung, E-mail: chchuang@hk.edu.tw [Department of Nutrition, Master Program of Biomedical Nutrition, Hungkuang University, 1018 Sec. 6 Taiwan Boulevard, Taichung 43302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Chia-Hua [Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, National Chung-Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lu, Ta-Jung [Department of Chemistry, Institute of Technology and Innovation Management, National Chung-Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hu, Miao-Lin, E-mail: mlhuhu@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, National Chung-Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-12-15

    Alpha-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid (α-TEA) has been reported to exhibit both anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities in cell culture and animal studies. However, it is unclear whether α-TEA possesses anti-angiogenic effects. In this study, we investigated the effect of α-TEA on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression both in vitro and ex vivo. We found that the α-TEA inhibited tube formation, invasion, and migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and that such actions were accompanied by reduced expression of MMP-2. α-TEA also inhibited ex vivo angiogenesis, as indicated by chicken egg chorioallantoic membrane assay. We further showed that α-TEA attenuated protein expression of VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2)-mediated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), phosphorylated p38, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Moreover, α-TEA (30 μM) significantly up-regulated protein expression of tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMP)-2 (by 138%) and the metastasis suppressor gene nm23-H1 (by 54%). These results demonstrate that the anti-angiogenic effect of α-TEA both in vitro and ex vivo and its possible mechanistic action appears to involve the inhibition of MMP-2 level through VEGFR-2-mediated FAK and p38 signaling pathways and through up-regulation of TIMP-2 and nm23-H1 expression. - Graphical abstract: Possible mechanisms of α-TEA on inhibited angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Brief summary In the present study, we have demonstrated that VEGF-mediated angiogenesis is significantly inhibited by α-TEA, and that this effect involves inhibition of MMP-2 level through VEGFR-2-mediated FAK and p38 signaling pathways related to invasion and migration. - Highlights: • The anti-angiogenic effect and the mechanistic action of α-TEA were investigated. • α-TEA significantly inhibited VEGF-mediated angiogenesis both in vitro and ex vivo. • α-TEA down

  4. Possible Brain Mechanisms of Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilman, Kenneth M

    2016-06-01

    Creativity is the new discovery, understanding, development and expression of orderly and meaningful relationships. Creativity has three major stages: preparation, the development (nature and nurture) of critical knowledge and skills; innovation, the development of a creative solution; and creative production. Successful preparation requires a basic level of general intelligence and domain specific knowledge and skills and highly creative people may have anatomic alterations of specific neocortical regions. Innovation requires disengagement and divergent thinking primarily mediated by frontal networks. Creative people are often risk-takers and novelty seekers, behaviors that activate their ventral striatal reward system. Innovation also requires associative and convergent thinking, activities that are dependent on the integration of highly distributed networks. People are often most creative when they are in mental states associated with reduced levels of brain norepinephrine, which may enhance the communication between distributed networks. We, however, need to learn more about the brain mechanisms of creativity. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  5. Possible X linked congenital mitochondrial cardiomyopathy in three families.

    OpenAIRE

    Orstavik, K H; Skjörten, F; Hellebostad, M; Hågå, P; Langslet, A

    1993-01-01

    Familial cases of childhood congestive cardiomyopathy with X linked recessive inheritance and abnormalities of heart muscle mitochondria have been previously reported. We report here three families with possible X linked congestive cardiomyopathy and specific mitochondrial abnormalities. The heart disorder presented as endocardial fibroelastosis with neonatal death in two brothers in one family, and as heart failure and death in infancy in two brothers in the other two families. In one family...

  6. Chaos. Possible underpinnings for quantum mechanics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHarris, Wm.C.

    2004-01-01

    Alternative, parallel explanations for a number of counter-intuitive concepts connected with the foundations of quantum mechanics can be constructed in terms of nonlinear dynamics. These include ideas as diverse as the statistical exponential decay law and spontaneous symmetry breaking to decoherence itself and the inference from violations of Bell's inequality that local reality is ruled out in hidden variable extensions of quantum mechanics. Such alternative explanations must not be taken as demonstrations of nonlinear underpinnings for quantum mechanics, but they do raise the possibility of their existence. In this article I delve a bit into ideas connected with the exponential decay law and with Bell's inequality as demonstrations. Then an investigation of the Klein-Gordon equation shows that it should not come as a complete surprise that quantum mechanics just might contain fundamental nonlinearities. (author)

  7. Identifying links between origami and compliant mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Greenberg

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Origami is the art of folding paper. In the context of engineering, orimimetics is the application of folding to solve problems. Kinetic origami behavior can be modeled with the pseudo-rigid-body model since the origami are compliant mechanisms. These compliant mechanisms, when having a flat initial state and motion emerging out of the fabrication plane, are classified as lamina emergent mechanisms (LEMs. To demonstrate the feasibility of identifying links between origami and compliant mechanism analysis and design methods, four flat folding paper mechanisms are presented with their corresponding kinematic and graph models. Principles from graph theory are used to abstract the mechanisms to show them as coupled, or inter-connected, mechanisms. It is anticipated that this work lays a foundation for exploring methods for LEM synthesis based on the analogy between flat-folding origami models and linkage assembly.

  8. Risks associated with preeclampsia: possible mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bentolhoda Sahebnasagh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Findings have shown that low serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D level is a possible risk factor for incidence of preeclampsia during pregnancy. Vitamin D has important effects on multiple biological pathways, including angiogenesis. Some studies have shown that vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent among women suffering from preeclampsia, influencing immune modulation and vascular function. Evidence has shown that an imbalance of pro-antigenic and anti-angiogenic proteins can be considered as a possible etiological factor in the development of preeclampsia. Besides, there is a series of studies linking the renin–angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS with preeclampsia. In this article, we review the current studies evaluating the association between maternal vitamin D status and vascular health, metabolism, placental immune function and the risk of preeclampsia. We provided evidence of the different factor involved in the metabolism of vitamin D and vitamin D receptor (VDR expression, gene regulations, immune function, and chronic disease when vitamin D is used optimally.

  9. Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNAdamage, then to investigate the possible mechanism.Methods: The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde(MDA. The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro,including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation, •O2- scavenging (pyrogallolautoxidation, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays.Results: Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-inducedDNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 μM. It also increased its radical-scavengingpercentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in•OH scavenging, •O2- scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 μM, 34.05±0.87 μM, 9.69±0.53 μM, 2.43±0.14μM, and 1.49±0.16 μM, respectively.Conclusion: Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damagepossibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging approach, which is assumed to behydrogen atom (H• and/or single electron (e donation (HAT/SET pathways. In the HATpathway, the 3’,4’-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an importantrole, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form.

  10. Possible mechanism of adhesion in a mica supported phospholipid bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertsin, Alexander; Grunze, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipid bilayers supported on hydrophilic solids like silica and mica play a substantial role in fundamental studies and technological applications of phospholipid membranes. In both cases the molecular mechanism of adhesion between the bilayer and the support is of primary interest. Since the possibilities of experimental methods in this specific area are rather limited, the methods of computer simulation acquire great importance. In this paper we use the grand canonical Monte Carlo technique and an atomistic force field to simulate the behavior of a mica supported phospholipid bilayer in pure water as a function of the distance between the bilayer and the support. The simulation reveals a possible adhesion mechanism, where the adhesion is due to individual lipid molecules that protrude from the bilayer and form widely spaced links with the support. Simultaneously, the bilayer remains separated from the bilayer by a thin water interlayer which maintains the bilayer fluidity

  11. Clouds and the Near-Earth Environment: Possible Links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Condurache-Bota Simona

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate variability is a hot topic not only for scientists and policy-makers, but also for each and every one of us. The anthropogenic activities are considered to be responsible for most climate change, however there are large uncertainties about the magnitude of effects of solar variability and other extraterrestrial influences, such as galactic cosmic rays on terrestrial climate. Clouds play an important role due to feedbacks of the radiation budget: variation of cloud cover/composition affects climate, which, in turn, affects cloud cover via atmospheric dynamics and sea temperature variations. Cloud formation and evolution are still under scientific scrutiny, since their microphysics is still not understood. Besides atmospheric dynamics and other internal climatic parameters, extraterrestrial sources of cloud cover variation are considered. One of these is the solar wind, whose effect on cloud cover might be modulated by the global atmospheric electrical circuit. Clouds height and composition, their seasonal variation and latitudinal distribution should be considered when trying to identify possible mechanisms by which solar energy is transferred to clouds. The influence of the solar wind on cloud formation can be assessed also through the ap index - the geomagnetic storm index, which can be readily connected with interplanetary magnetic field, IMF structure. This paper proposes to assess the possible relationship between both cloud cover and solar wind proxies, as the ap index, function of cloud height and composition and also through seasonal studies. The data covers almost three solar cycles (1984-2009. Mechanisms are looked for by investigating observed trends or correlation at local/seasonal scale

  12. The possible mechanisms for the antifertility action of methanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The possible mechanisms for the antifertility action of methanolic root extract of Rumex steudelii. ... African Health Sciences ... Objectives: The present study focused further on the possible mechanisms of the antifertility effect of the methanolic ...

  13. Possible mechanism of phthalates-induced tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chih Wang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Phthalates—substances used in the manufacture of plastics—are considered as possible human carcinogens and tumor-promoting agents. The worldwide annual production of plastics surpassed 300 million tons in 2010. Plastics are an indispensable material in modern society, and many products manufactured from plastics are a boon to public health; however, plastics also pose health risks. Animal studies have indicated that phthalates are carcinogenic, but human epidemiological data confirming this carcinogenicity in humans are limited. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα, which has been observed in rodent carcinogenesis, has not been observed in humans. Here, we review the hypothesis that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR and its downstream signaling cascade promote phthalate-induced tumorigenesis.

  14. Pathophysiological mechanisms linking obesity and esophageal adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Leo; Long, Elizabeth; Beales, Ian LP

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades there has been a dramatic rise in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in the developed world. Over approximately the same period there has also been an increase in the prevalence of obesity. Obesity, especially visceral obesity, is an important independent risk factor for the development of gastro-esophageal reflux disease, Barrett’s esophagus and EAC. Although the simplest explanation is that this mediated by the mechanical effects of abdominal obesity promoting gastro-esophageal reflux, the epidemiological data suggest that the EAC-promoting effects are independent of reflux. Several, not mutually exclusive, mechanisms have been implicated, which may have different effects at various points along the reflux-Barrett’s-cancer pathway. These mechanisms include a reduction in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection enhancing gastric acidity and possibly appetite by increasing gastric ghrelin secretion, induction of both low-grade systemic inflammation by factors secreted by adipose tissue and the metabolic syndrome with insulin-resistance. Obesity is associated with enhanced secretion of leptin and decreased secretion of adiponectin from adipose tissue and both increased leptin and decreased adiponectin have been shown to be independent risk factors for progression to EAC. Leptin and adiponectin have a set of mutually antagonistic actions on Barrett’s cells which appear to influence the progression of malignant behaviour. At present no drugs are of proven benefit to prevent obesity associated EAC. Roux-en-Y reconstruction is the preferred bariatric surgical option for weight loss in patients with reflux. Statins and aspirin may have chemopreventative effects and are indicated for their circulatory benefits. PMID:25400997

  15. Autophagy as a Possible Underlying Mechanism of Nanomaterial Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cohignac

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of nanotechnologies is raising safety concerns because of the potential effects of engineered nanomaterials on human health, particularly at the respiratory level. Since the last decades, many in vivo studies have been interested in the pulmonary effects of different classes of nanomaterials. It has been shown that some of them can induce toxic effects, essentially depending on their physico-chemical characteristics, but other studies did not identify such effects. Inflammation and oxidative stress are currently the two main mechanisms described to explain the observed toxicity. However, the exact underlying mechanism(s still remain(s unknown and autophagy could represent an interesting candidate. Autophagy is a physiological process in which cytoplasmic components are digested via a lysosomal pathway. It has been shown that autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis and the progression of human diseases, and is able to modulate the oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory responses. A growing amount of literature suggests that a link between nanomaterial toxicity and autophagy impairment could exist. In this review, we will first summarize what is known about the respiratory effects of nanomaterials and we will then discuss the possible involvement of autophagy in this toxicity. This review should help understand why autophagy impairment could be taken as a promising candidate to fully understand nanomaterials toxicity.

  16. Possible Links among Mirror Neurons and Genes Related to Autism

    OpenAIRE

    MOCHIZUKI, Mai; 望月,麻衣

    2016-01-01

    Autism includes many neurodevelopmental disorders and defi cits in communication. Althoughresearchers have considered various origins, the onset mechanism is still not clear. The aim ofthis article is to provide some clues for interaction of autism with mirror neuronal and geneticfactors. First, the impact of neural brain cells considered to infl uence autism will be discussedwith reference to mirror neurons. Then, the discussion will move to genes related to autism.Consequently, it is argued...

  17. Possible involvement of membrane lipids peroxidation and oxidation of catalytically essential thiols of the cerebral transmembrane sodium pump as component mechanisms of iron-mediated oxidative stress-linked dysfunction of the pump's activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.I. Omotayo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The precise molecular events defining the complex role of oxidative stress in the inactivation of the cerebral sodium pump in radical-induced neurodegenerative diseases is yet to be fully clarified and thus still open. Herein we investigated the modulation of the activity of the cerebral transmembrane electrogenic enzyme in Fe2+-mediated in vitro oxidative stress model. The results show that Fe2+ inhibited the transmembrane enzyme in a concentration dependent manner and this effect was accompanied by a biphasic generation of aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation. While dithiothreitol prevented both Fe2+ inhibitory effect on the pump and lipid peroxidation, vitamin E prevented only lipid peroxidation but not inhibition of the pump. Besides, malondialdehyde (MDA inhibited the pump by a mechanism not related to oxidation of its critical thiols. Apparently, the low activity of the pump in degenerative diseases mediated by Fe2+ may involve complex multi-component mechanisms which may partly involve an initial oxidation of the critical thiols of the enzyme directly mediated by Fe2+ and during severe progression of such diseases; aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation such as MDA may further exacerbate this inhibitory effect by a mechanism that is likely not related to the oxidation of the catalytically essential thiols of the ouabain-sensitive cerebral electrogenic pump.

  18. Feyerabend, interculturalism, and ethnobiology: some possible links in Biology teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thales de A. e Tréz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Usually, the training of educators in Biology is marked by a scientificist approach, legitimating the knowledge on Biology through the Western science, despite any other knowledge about life. Starting from the question on life preferred in the traditional educational approach of Biology, this paper aims to connect the implications of ethnosciences, especially ethnobiology, along with the discussion on inter/multiculturalism and Paul Feyerabend’s thought. According to this literature, it is reasonable to think another Biology is not only possible, but also needed, for the legitimacy of ethno-knowledge in Biology teaching. The selection of one or another ethno-knowledge, considering its context, as a counterpart to a unitism of the scientific view, may contribute to widen the horizons defining the knowledge about life.

  19. Economic recession and suicidal behaviour: Possible mechanisms and ameliorating factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haw, Camilla; Hawton, Keith; Gunnell, David; Platt, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    A growing body of research evidence from countries around the world indicates that economic recession is associated with increases in suicide, particularly in males of working age. To explore contributory and ameliorating factors associated with economic recession and suicide and thereby stimulate further research in this area and encourage policy makers to consider how best to reduce the impact of recession on mental health and suicidal behaviour. We conducted a selective review of the worldwide literature focusing on possible risk factors, mechanisms and preventative strategies for suicidal behaviour linked to economic recession. A model of how recession might affect suicide rates is presented. A major and often prolonged effect of recession is on unemployment and job insecurity. Other important effects include those exerted by financial loss, bankruptcy and home repossession. It is proposed these factors may lead directly or indirectly to mental health problems such as depression, anxiety and binge drinking and then to suicidal behaviour. Countries with active labour market programmes and sustained welfare spending during recessions have less marked increases in suicide rates than those that cut spending on welfare and job-search initiatives for the unemployed. Other measures likely to help include targeted interventions for unemployed people, membership of social organisations and responsible media reporting. Good primary care and mental health services are needed to cope with increased demand in times of economic recession but some governments have in fact reduced healthcare spending as an austerity measure. The research evidence linking recession, unemployment and suicide is substantial, but the evidence for the other mechanisms we have investigated is much more tentative. We describe the limitations of the existing body of research as well as make suggestions for future research into the effects of economic recession on suicidal behaviour. © The Author

  20. Gastrointestinal symptoms and autism spectrum disorder: links and risks – a possible new overlap syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasilewska J

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jolanta Wasilewska, Mark Klukowski Department of Pediatrics, Gastroenterology and Allergology, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland Abstract: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a genetically determined neurodevelopmental brain disorder presenting with restricted, repetitive patterns of behaviors, interests, and activities, or persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction. ASD is characterized by many different clinical endophenotypes and is potentially linked with certain comorbidities. According to current recommendations, children with ASD are at risk of having alimentary tract disorders – mainly, they are at a greater risk of general gastrointestinal (GI concerns, constipation, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. GI symptoms may overlap with ASD core symptoms through different mechanisms. These mechanisms include multilevel pathways in the gut–brain axis contributing to alterations in behavior and cognition. Shared pathogenetic factors and pathophysiological mechanisms possibly linking ASD and GI disturbances, as shown by most recent studies, include intestinal inflammation with or without autoimmunity, immunoglobulin E-mediated and/or cell-mediated GI food allergies as well as gluten-related disorders (celiac disease, wheat allergy, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, visceral hypersensitivity linked with functional abdominal pain, and dysautonomia linked with GI dysmotility and gastroesophageal reflux. Dysregulation of the gut microbiome has also been shown to be involved in modulating GI functions with the ability to affect intestinal permeability, mucosal immune function, and intestinal motility and sensitivity. Metabolic activity of the microbiome and dietary components are currently suspected to be associated with alterations in behavior and cognition also in patients with other neurodegenerative diseases. All the above-listed GI factors may contribute to brain dysfunction and neuroinflammation depending upon

  1. About the Possibility of Creation of a Deterministic Unified Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomyakov, G.K.

    2005-01-01

    The possibility of creation of a unified deterministic scheme of classical and quantum mechanics, allowing to preserve their achievements is discussed. It is shown that the canonical system of ordinary differential equation of Hamilton classical mechanics can be added with the vector system of ordinary differential equation for the variables of equations. The interpretational problems of quantum mechanics are considered

  2. A Possible Link between Anxiety and Schizophrenia and a Possible Role of Anhedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Grillo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the prodromal phase of schizophrenia, severe alterations of the visual appearance of the environment have been found, accompanied by a state of intense anxiety. The present study considers the possibility that these alterations really exist in the appearance of objects, but that healthy people do not see them. The image of the world that we see is continuously deformed and fragmented by foreshortenings, partial overlapping, and so on and must be constantly reassembled and interpreted; otherwise, it could change so much that we would hardly recognize it. Since pleasure has been found to be involved in visual and cognitive information processing, the possibility is considered that anhedonia (the reduction of the ability to feel pleasure might interfere with the correct reconstruction and interpretation of the image of the environment and alter its appearance. The possibility is also considered that these alterations might make the environment hostile, might at times evoke the sensation of being trapped by a predator, and might be the cause of the anxiety that accompanies them. According to some authors, they might also induce delusional ideas, in an attempt to restore meaning in a world that has become chaotic and frightening.

  3. Radon: possible links with leukaemia and other non-lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henshaw, D.L.; Eatough, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The evidence for possible links between domestic radon exposure and incidence of leukaemia and other non-lung cancers is reviewed. Recent calculations of the radon derived dose to red bone marrow suggests that if background radiation is linked to leukaemia in the general population then radon exposure may be a causative factor. Accordingly, statistically significant geographical correlations between domestic radon exposure and incidence of leukaemia have been observed in several data sets. In a preliminary study the level of hprt mutation in peripheral blood of individuals has been found to correlate with radon concentration in their homes. Geographical associations have also been observed between domestic radon exposure and certain other cancers. A model has been developed which predicts the possible carcinogenic effect of simultaneous exposure to alpha particles and gamma radiation and to radon and cigarette smoke, reflecting the nature of natural exposures. The model is used to suggest a mechanism for an antagonistic effect of radon and smoking at domestic levels but a synergistic effect at higher dose rates such as in uranium miners. (orig.)

  4. GABAergic Mechanisms in Schizophrenia: Linking Postmortem and In Vivo Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Jeroen C.; Vinkers, Christiaan H.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Marsman, Anouk

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder characterized by hallucinations, delusions, disorganized thinking, and impairments in cognitive functioning. Evidence from postmortem studies suggests that alterations in cortical γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic) neurons contribute to the clinical features of schizophrenia. In vivo measurement of brain GABA levels using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) offers the possibility to provide more insight into the relationship between problems in GABAergic neurotransmission and clinical symptoms of schizophrenia patients. This study reviews and links alterations in the GABA system in postmortem studies, animal models, and human studies in schizophrenia. Converging evidence implicates alterations in both presynaptic and postsynaptic components of GABAergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia, and GABA may thus play an important role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. MRS studies can provide direct insight into the GABAergic mechanisms underlying the development of schizophrenia as well as changes during its course. PMID:28848455

  5. GABAergic Mechanisms in Schizophrenia: Linking Postmortem and In Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen C. de Jonge

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder characterized by hallucinations, delusions, disorganized thinking, and impairments in cognitive functioning. Evidence from postmortem studies suggests that alterations in cortical γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic neurons contribute to the clinical features of schizophrenia. In vivo measurement of brain GABA levels using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS offers the possibility to provide more insight into the relationship between problems in GABAergic neurotransmission and clinical symptoms of schizophrenia patients. This study reviews and links alterations in the GABA system in postmortem studies, animal models, and human studies in schizophrenia. Converging evidence implicates alterations in both presynaptic and postsynaptic components of GABAergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia, and GABA may thus play an important role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. MRS studies can provide direct insight into the GABAergic mechanisms underlying the development of schizophrenia as well as changes during its course.

  6. Modular overconstrained weak-link mechanism for ultraprecision motion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu Deming; Toellner, Thomas S.; Alp, Esen E.

    2001-01-01

    We have designed and constructed a novel miniature overconstrained weak-link mechanism that will allow positioning of two crystals with better than 50 nrad angular resolution and nanometer linear driving sensitivity. The precision and stability of this structure allow the user to align or adjust an assembly of crystals to achieve the same performance as does a single channel-cut crystal, so we call it an ''artificial channel-cut crystal.'' Unlike the traditional kinematic linear spring mechanisms, the overconstrained weak-link mechanism provides much higher structure stiffness and stability. Using a laminar structure configured and manufactured by chemical etching and lithography techniques, we are able to design and build a planar-shape, high stiffness, high precision weak-link mechanism. In this paper, we present recent developments for the overconstrained weak-link mechanism. Applications of this new technique to synchrotron radiation instrumentation are also discussed

  7. Mechanism linking diabetes mellitus and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Goblan AS

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah S Al-Goblan,1 Mohammed A Al-Alfi,1 Muhammad Z Khan2 1Diabetes Center, King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Buraidah, Qassim, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2Sulaiman AlRajhi Colleges, Al Bukairiyah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Abstract: Body mass index has a strong relationship to diabetes and insulin resistance. In obese individuals, the amount of nonesterified fatty acids, glycerol, hormones, cytokines, proinflammatory markers, and other substances that are involved in the development of insulin resistance, is increased. The pathogenesis in the development of diabetes is based on the fact that the β-islet cells of the pancreas are impaired, causing a lack of control of blood glucose. The development of diabetes becomes more inevitable if the failure of β-islet cells of the pancreas is accompanied by insulin resistance. Weight gain and body mass are central to the formation and rising incidence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This literature review will demonstrate the facts that link obesity with insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. In conclusion, new approaches in managing and preventing diabetes in obese individuals must be studied and investigated based on the facts. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, obesity, insulin resistance

  8. Possible mechanism of disintegrin/like domain in mesenchymal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Possible mechanism of disintegrin/like domain in mesenchymal stem cells homing in mice liver injury ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Mesenchymal Stem cells have opened a new approach to deal with liver fibrosis.

  9. Mechanisms linking excess adiposity and carcinogenesis promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I. Pérez-Hernández

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity constitutes one of the most important metabolic diseases being associated to insulin resistance development and increased cardiovascular risk. Association between obesity and cancer has also been well-established for several tumor types, such as breast cancer in postmenopausal women, colorectal and prostate cancer. Cancer is the first death cause in developed countries and the second one in developing countries, with high incidence rates around the world. Furthermore, it has been estimated that 15-20% of all cancer deaths may be attributable to obesity. Tumor growth is regulated by interactions between tumor cells and their tissue microenvironment. In this sense, obesity may lead to cancer development through dysfunctional adipose tissue and altered signaling pathways. In this review, three main pathways relating obesity and cancer development are examined: i inflammatory changes leading to macrophage polarization and altered adipokine profile; ii insulin resistance development; and iii adipose tissue hypoxia. Since obesity and cancer present a high prevalence, the association between these conditions is of great public health significance and studies showing mechanisms by which obesity lead to cancer development and progression are needed to improve prevention and management of these diseases.

  10. Linking plants, fungi and soil mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Anil; Graf, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Plants provide important functions in respect soil strength and are increasingly considered for slope stabilisation within eco-engineering methods, particularly to prevent superficial soil failure. The protective functions include hydrological regulation through interception and evapo-transpiration as well as mechanical stabilisation through root reinforcement and, to a certain extent, chemical stabilisation through sticky metabolites. The ever-growing application of plants in slope stabilisation demanded more precise information of the vegetation effects and, concomitant, led the models for quantifying the reinforcement shoot up like mushrooms. However, so far, the framework and interrelationships for both the role of plants and the quantification concepts have not been thoroughly analysed and comprehensively considered, respectively, often resulting in unsatisfactory results. Although it seems obvious and is implicitly presupposed that the plant specific functions related to slope stability require growth and development, this is anything but given, particularly under the often hostile conditions dominating on bare and steep slopes. There, the superficial soil layer is often characterised by a lack of fines and missing medium-sized and fine pores due to an unstable soil matrix, predominantly formed by coarse grains. Low water retention capacity and substantial leaching of nutrients are the adverse consequences. Given this general set-up, sustainable plant growth and, particularly, root development is virtually unachievable. At exactly this point mycorrhizal fungi, the symbiotic partners of almost all plants used in eco-engineering, come into play. Though, they are probably well-known within the eco-engineering community, mycorrhizal fungi lead a humble existence. This is in spite of the fact that they supply their hosts with water and nutrients, improving the plant's ability to master otherwise unbridgeable environmental conditions. However, in order to support

  11. On the Possible Link between Vitamin D Deficiency and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Possible Link Between Vitamin D Deficiency and Cardiovascular Disease Should We D-Lighten Our Lives? Pelle G. ... Individuals with heart failure, hypertension, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases (CVD) tend to have lower vitamin D levels ...

  12. AUTOIMMUNITY AS A POSSIBLE MECHANISM OF PROTACTIN-INDUCED PROSTATITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    AUTOIMMUNITY AS A POSSIBLE MECHANISM OF PROLACTIN-INDUCED PROSTATITIS. RW Luebke, CB Copeland, and LR Bishop. US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NCStoker et al. reported inflammation of the lateral prostate (LP) lobes in 120 day old Wistar rats after manipulation of prolac...

  13. Linear modeling of possible mechanisms for parkinson tremor generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohnberg, P.

    1978-01-01

    The power of Parkinson tremor is expressed in terms of possibly changed frequency response functions between relevant variables in the neuromuscular system. The derivation starts out from a linear loopless equivalent model of mechanisms for general tremor generation. Hypothetical changes in this

  14. Skeletal muscle mechanics: questions, problems and possible solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Walter

    2017-09-16

    Skeletal muscle mechanics have been studied ever since people have shown an interest in human movement. However, our understanding of muscle contraction and muscle mechanical properties has changed fundamentally with the discovery of the sliding filament theory in 1954 and associated cross-bridge theory in 1957. Nevertheless, experimental evidence suggests that our knowledge of the mechanisms of contraction is far from complete, and muscle properties and muscle function in human movement remain largely unknown.In this manuscript, I am trying to identify some of the crucial challenges we are faced with in muscle mechanics, offer possible solutions to questions, and identify problems that might be worthwhile exploring in the future. Since it is impossible to tackle all (worthwhile) problems in a single manuscript, I identified three problems that are controversial, important, and close to my heart. They may be identified as follows: (i) mechanisms of muscle contraction, (ii) in vivo whole muscle mechanics and properties, and (iii) force-sharing among synergistic muscles. These topics are fundamental to our understanding of human movement and movement control, and they contain a series of unknowns and challenges to be explored in the future.It is my hope that this paper may serve as an inspiration for some, may challenge current beliefs in selected areas, tackle important problems in the area of muscle mechanics, physiology and movement control, and may guide and focus some of the thinking of future muscle mechanics research.

  15. A possible realization of Einstein's causal theory underlying quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yussouff, M.

    1979-06-01

    It is shown that a new microscopic mechanics formulated earlier can be looked upon as a possible causal theory underlying quantum mechanics, which removes Einstein's famous objections against quantum theory. This approach is free from objections raised against Bohm's hidden variable theory and leads to a clear physical picture in terms of familiar concepts, if self interactions are held responsible for deviations from classical behaviour. The new level of physics unfolded by this approach may reveal novel frontiers in high-energy physics. (author)

  16. Detection and a possible link between parvovirus B19 and thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemadi, Ashkan; Mostafaei, Shayan; Yari, Kheirollah; Ghasemi, Amir; Minaei Chenar, Hamzeh; Moghoofei, Mohsen

    2017-06-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is a small, non-enveloped virus and belongs to Parvoviridae family. B19 persists in many tissues such as thyroid tissue and even thyroid cancer. The main aim of this study was to determine the presence of B19, its association with increased inflammation in thyroid tissue, and thus its possible role in thyroid cancer progression. Studies have shown that virus replication in non-permissive tissue leads to overexpression of non-structural protein and results in upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha. A total of 36 paraffin-embedded thyroid specimens and serum were collected from patients and 12 samples were used as control. Various methods were employed, including polymerase chain reaction, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results have shown the presence of B19 DNA in 31 of 36 samples (86.11%). Almost in all samples, the levels of non-structural protein 1, nuclear factor kappa B, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin 6 were simultaneously high. The presence of parvovirus B19 has a significant positive correlation with nuclear factor kappa B, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin 6 levels. This study suggests that B19 infection may play an important role in tumorigenesis and thyroid cancer development via the inflammatory mechanisms.

  17. Linking Mechanisms of Work-Family Conflict and Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jesse S.; Hargis, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the abundance of work and family research, few studies have compared the linking mechanisms specified in theoretical models of work-family conflict and segmentation. Accordingly, the current study provides a greater degree of empirical clarity concerning the interplay of work and family by directly examining the indirect effects of…

  18. Linking project-based mechanisms with domestic greenhouse gas emissions trading schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bygrave, S.; Bosi, M.

    2004-01-01

    Although there are a number of possible links between emission trading and project-based mechanisms, the focus of this paper is on linking domestic GHG emission trading schemes with: (1) domestic; and, (2) international (JI and CDM) GHG reduction project activities. The objective is to examine some of the challenges in linking DETs and project-based mechanisms, as well as some possible solutions to address these challenges. The link between JI / CDM and intergovernmental international emissions trading (i.e. Article 17 of the Kyoto Protocol) is defined by the Kyoto Protocol, and therefore is not covered in this paper. The paper is written in the context of: (a) countries adhering to the Kyoto Protocol and elaborating their strategies to meet their GHG emission commitments, including through the use of the emissions trading and project-based mechanisms. For example, the European Union (EU) will be commencing a GHG Emissions Trading Scheme in January 2005, and recently, the Council of ministers and the European Parliament agreed on a text for an EU Linking Directive allowing the use of JI and CDM emission units in the EU Emission Trading Scheme (EU-ETS); and (b) all countries (and/or regions within countries) with GHG emission obligations that may choose to use domestic emissions trading and project-based mechanisms to meet their GHG commitments. The paper includes the following elements: (1) an overview of the different flexibility mechanisms (i.e. GHG emissions trading and PBMs), including a brief description and comparisons between the mechanisms (Section 3); (2) an exploration of the issues that emerge when project-based mechanisms link with domestic emissions trading schemes, as well as possible solutions to address some of the challenges raised (Section 4); (3) a case study examining the EU-ETS and the EU Linking Directive on project-based mechanisms, in particular on how the EU is addressing in a practical context relevant linking issues (Section 5); (4) a

  19. Sterilizing elastomeric chains without losing mechanical properties. Is it possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Melo Pithon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of different sterilization/disinfection methods on the mechanical properties of orthodontic elastomeric chains. METHODS: Segments of elastomeric chains with 5 links each were sent for sterilization by cobalt 60 (Co60 (20 KGy gamma ray technology. After the procedure, the elastomeric chains were contaminated with clinical samples of Streptococcus mutans. Subsequently, the elastomeric chains were submitted to sterilization/disinfection tests carried out by means of different methods, forming six study groups, as follows: Group 1 (control - without contamination, Group 2 (70°GL alcohol, Group 3 (autoclave, Group 4 (ultraviolet, Group 5 (peracetic acid and Group 6 (glutaraldehyde. After sterilization/disinfection, the effectiveness of these methods, by Colony forming units per mL (CFU/mL, and the mechanical properties of the material were assessed. Student's t-test was used to assess the number of CFUs while ANOVA and Tukey's test were used to assess elastic strength. RESULTS: Ultraviolet treatment was not completely effective for sterilization. No loss of mechanical properties occurred with the use of the different sterilization methods (p > 0.05. CONCLUSION: Biological control of elastomeric chains does not affect their mechanical properties.

  20. A possible contributory mechanism for impaired idiom perception in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, Tal; Lavidor, Michal; Mitchell, Rachel L C

    2015-09-30

    In this review, we focus on the ability of people with schizophrenia to correctly perceive the meaning of idioms; figurative language expressions in which intended meaning is not derived from the meaning of constituent words. We collate evidence on how idiom perception is impaired, ascertain the clinical relevance of this impairment, and consider possible psychological and neural mechanisms behind the impairment. In reviewing extant literature, we searched the PubMed database, from 1975-2014, focussing on articles that directly concerned schizophrenia and idioms, with follow up searches to explore the viability of possible underlying mechanisms. We learn that there is clear evidence of impairment, with a tendency to err towards literal interpretations unless the figurative meaning is salient, and despite contextual cues to figurative interpretations. Given the importance of idioms in everyday language, the potential impact is significant. Clinically, impaired idiom perception primarily relates to positive symptoms of schizophrenia, but also to negative symptoms. The origins of the impairment remain speculation, with impaired executive function, impaired semantic functions, and impaired context processing all proposed to explain the phenomenon. We conclude that a possible contributory mechanism at the neural level is an impaired dorsolateral prefrontal cortex system for cognitive control over semantic processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of Links Positions in Landing Gear Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewczyński, D.; Tora, G.

    2014-08-01

    This article contains a kinematic analysis of an aircraft chassis mechanism in a range of positions. The mechanism of the chassis is made up of several smaller subsystems with different functions. The first mechanism is used to eject the chassis before landing (touchdown) and fold it to hatchway after the lift off. The second mechanism is designed to perform rotation of the crossover with the wheel, in order to adjust the position of the wheel to fit it in the limited space in the hold. The third mechanism allows movement of the chassis resulting from the change in length of the damper. To determine the position of the following links of the mechanism calculus of vectors was applied in which unit vectors were used to represent the angular position of the links. The aim of the analysis is to determine the angle of convergence and the angle of heel wheels as a function of the variable length of hydraulic cylinder, length of the shock absorber, length of the regulations rods

  2. Links between fluid mechanics and quantum mechanics: a model for information in economics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Emmanuel

    2016-05-28

    This paper tallies the links between fluid mechanics and quantum mechanics, and attempts to show whether those links can aid in beginning to build a formal template which is usable in economics models where time is (a)symmetric and memory is absent or present. An objective of this paper is to contemplate whether those formalisms can allow us to model information in economics in a novel way. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Fisetin Protects DNA Against Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Lin, Huajuan; Tu, Qian; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xican

    2016-06-01

    The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNA damage, then to investigate the possible mechanism. The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro, including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation), •O2 (-) scavenging (pyrogallol autoxidation), DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•(+) scavenging, and Cu(2+)-reducing power assays. Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-induced DNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 µM). It also increased its radical-scavenging percentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in •OH scavenging, •O2(-) scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•(+) scavenging, and Cu(2+)-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 µM, 34.05±0.87 µM, 9.69±0.53 µM, 2.43±0.14 µM, and 1.49±0.16 µM, respectively. Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damage possibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging approach, which is assumed to be hydrogen atom (H•) and/or single electron (e) donation (HAT/SET) pathways. In the HAT pathway, the 3',4'-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an important role, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form.

  4. The 27 Possible Intrinsic Symmetry Groups of Two-Component Links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Parsley

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider the “intrinsic” symmetry group of a two-component link L, defined to be the image ∑(L of the natural homomorphism from the standard symmetry group MCG(S3, L to the product MCG(S3 × MCG(L. This group, first defined by Whitten in 1969, records directly whether L is isotopic to a link L′ obtained from L by permuting components or reversing orientations; it is a subgroup of Γ2, the group of all such operations. For two-component links, we catalog the 27 possible intrinsic symmetry groups, which represent the subgroups of Γ2 up to conjugacy. We are able to provide prime, nonsplit examples for 21 of these groups; some are classically known, some are new. We catalog the frequency at which each group appears among all 77,036 of the hyperbolic two-component links of 14 or fewer crossings in Thistlethwaite’s table. We also provide some new information about symmetry groups of the 293 non-hyperbolic two-component links of 14 or fewer crossings in the table.

  5. Parametrization of Combined Quantum Mechanical and Molecular Mechanical Methods: Bond-Tuned Link Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin-Ping; Gagliardi, Laura; Truhlar, Donald G

    2018-05-30

    Combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods are the most powerful available methods for high-level treatments of subsystems of very large systems. The treatment of the QM-MM boundary strongly affects the accuracy of QM/MM calculations. For QM/MM calculations having covalent bonds cut by the QM-MM boundary, it has been proposed previously to use a scheme with system-specific tuned fluorine link atoms. Here, we propose a broadly parametrized scheme where the parameters of the tuned F link atoms depend only on the type of bond being cut. In the proposed new scheme, the F link atom is tuned for systems with a certain type of cut bond at the QM-MM boundary instead of for a specific target system, and the resulting link atoms are call bond-tuned link atoms. In principle, the bond-tuned link atoms can be as convenient as the popular H link atoms, and they are especially well adapted for high-throughput and accurate QM/MM calculations. Here, we present the parameters for several kinds of cut bonds along with a set of validation calculations that confirm that the proposed bond-tuned link-atom scheme can be as accurate as the system-specific tuned F link-atom scheme.

  6. Parametrization of Combined Quantum Mechanical and Molecular Mechanical Methods: Bond-Tuned Link Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Ping Wu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM methods are the most powerful available methods for high-level treatments of subsystems of very large systems. The treatment of the QM−MM boundary strongly affects the accuracy of QM/MM calculations. For QM/MM calculations having covalent bonds cut by the QM−MM boundary, it has been proposed previously to use a scheme with system-specific tuned fluorine link atoms. Here, we propose a broadly parametrized scheme where the parameters of the tuned F link atoms depend only on the type of bond being cut. In the proposed new scheme, the F link atom is tuned for systems with a certain type of cut bond at the QM−MM boundary instead of for a specific target system, and the resulting link atoms are call bond-tuned link atoms. In principle, the bond-tuned link atoms can be as convenient as the popular H link atoms, and they are especially well adapted for high-throughput and accurate QM/MM calculations. Here, we present the parameters for several kinds of cut bonds along with a set of validation calculations that confirm that the proposed bond-tuned link-atom scheme can be as accurate as the system-specific tuned F link-atom scheme.

  7. Fundamental link between system theory and statistical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmanspacher, H.; Scheingraber, H.

    1987-01-01

    A fundamental link between system theory and statistical mechanics has been found to be established by the Kolmogorov entropy. By this quantity the temporal evolution of dynamical systems can be classified into regular, chaotic, and stochastic processes. Since K represents a measure for the internal information creation rate of dynamical systems, it provides an approach to irreversibility. The formal relationship to statistical mechanics is derived by means of an operator formalism originally introduced by Prigogine. For a Liouville operator L and an information operator M tilde acting on a distribution in phase space, it is shown that i[L, M tilde] = KI (I = identity operator). As a first consequence of this equivalence, a relation is obtained between the chaotic correlation time of a system and Prigogine's concept of a finite duration of presence. Finally, the existence of chaos in quantum systems is discussed with respect to the existence of a quantum mechanical time operator

  8. A possible mechanism for the pulsar radio emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinata, S.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of radio emission is considered within a model which produces the beam-plasma system near the pulsar. A longitudinal instability develops near the light cylinder for a particular choice of parameters adopted in the paper. The excited wave strongly oscillates the beam particles perpendicular to its average velocity on one hand, and forms bunches of them on the other hand. Consequently, coherent radiation is expected. The frequency of the emission falls within the radio band, but the intensity turns out to be too low to explain observations. An appreciable enhancement of the beam number density over the Goldreich-Julian value (nsub(b) approximately equal to BΩ/2πec) is needed if the mechanism discussed in the present paper is responsible for the pulsar radio emission. (Auth.)

  9. A possible mechanism for the seed island formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovitov, V.D.

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) is usually described by the generalized Rutherford equation allowing the mode growth from a finite level, which is referred to as seed island. It is generally accepted that the seed island is induced by some MHD event, but sometimes the NTMs start without visible triggers. Here we discuss a possible role of the error fields in producing the seeds. The analysis is based on Maxwell equations and Ohm's law for magnetic perturbation outside the plasma. The plasma enters the problem via boundary conditions. Its contribution is described by the decay/growth rate and the toroidal rotation frequency of perturbation. The model also assumes a resonant harmonic in the spectrum of the error field. It is shown that the resonant field amplification near the stability boundary of the mode may be a mechanism resulting in the 'spontaneous' formation of the seed island. In contrast to NTM seeding due to the sawteeth, fishbones, or ELMs, the considered mechanism needs some longer time. However, all the estimates give realistic values consistent with typical experimental conditions. (author)

  10. Possible mechanisms for arsenic-induced proliferative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetterhahn, K.E.; Dudek, E.J.; Shumilla, J.A. [Dartmouth College and Medical School, Hanover, NH (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Possible mechanisms for cardiovascular diseases and cancers which have been observed on chronic exposure to arsenic have been investigated. We tested the hypothesis that nonlethal levels of arsenic are mitogenic, cause oxidative stress, increase nuclear translocation of trans-acting factors, and increase expression of genes involved in proliferation. Cultured porcine vascular (from aorta) endothelial cells were used as a model cell system to study the effects of arsenic on the target cells for cardiovascular diseases. Treatment of postconfluent cell cultures with nonovertly toxic concentrations of arsenite increased DNA synthesis, similar to the mitogenic response observed with hydrogen peroxide. Within 1 hour of adding noncytotoxic concentrations of arsenite, cellular levels of oxidants increased relative to control levels, indicating that arsenite promotes cellular oxidations. Arsenite treatment increased nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, an oxidative stress-responsive transcription factor, in a manner similar to that observed with hydrogen peroxide. Pretreatment of intact cells with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and dimethylfumarate prevented the arsenite-induced increases in cellular oxidant formation and NF-KB translocation. Arsenite had little or no effect on binding of NF-KB to its DNA recognition sequence in vitro, indicating that it is unlikely that arsenite directly affects NF-KB. The steady-state mRNA levels of intracellular adhesion molecule and urokinase-like plasminogen activator, genes associated with the active endothelial phenotype in arteriosclerosis and cancer metastasis, were increased by nontoxic concentrations of arsenite. These data suggest that arsenite promotes proliferative diseases like heart disease and cancer by activating oxidant-sensitive endothelial cell signaling and gene expression. It is possible that antioxidant therapy would be useful in preventing arsenic-induced cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  11. POSSIBLE MECHANISMS UNDERLYING THE THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS OF TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eChervyakov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is an effective method used to diagnose and treat many neurological disorders. Although repetitive TMS (rTMS has been used to treat a variety of serious pathological conditions including stroke, depression, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, pain, and migraines, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the effects of long-term TMS remain unclear. In the present review, the effects of rTMS on neurotransmitters and synaptic plasticity are described, including the classic interpretations of TMS effects on synaptic plasticity via long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD. We also discuss the effects of rTMS on the genetic apparatus of neurons, glial cells and the prevention of neuronal death. The neurotrophic effects of rTMS on dendritic growth and sprouting and neurotrophic factors are described, including change in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF concentration under the influence of rTMS. Also, non-classical effects of TMS related to biophysical effects of magnetic fields are described, including the quantum effects, the magnetic spin effects, genetic magnetoreception, the macromolecular effects of TMS, and the electromagnetic theory of consciousness. Finally, we discuss possible interpretations of TMS effects according to dynamical systems theory. Evidence suggests that a rTMS-induced magnetic field should be considered a separate physical factor that can be impactful at the subatomic level and that rTMS is capable of significantly altering the reactivity of molecules (radicals. It is thought that these factors underlie the therapeutic benefits of therapy with TMS. Future research on these mechanisms will be instrumental to the development of more powerful and reliable TMS treatment protocols.

  12. Possible Mechanisms Underlying the Therapeutic Effects of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervyakov, Alexander V.; Chernyavsky, Andrey Yu.; Sinitsyn, Dmitry O.; Piradov, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is an effective method used to diagnose and treat many neurological disorders. Although repetitive TMS (rTMS) has been used to treat a variety of serious pathological conditions including stroke, depression, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, pain, and migraines, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the effects of long-term TMS remain unclear. In the present review, the effects of rTMS on neurotransmitters and synaptic plasticity are described, including the classic interpretations of TMS effects on synaptic plasticity via long-term potentiation and long-term depression. We also discuss the effects of rTMS on the genetic apparatus of neurons, glial cells, and the prevention of neuronal death. The neurotrophic effects of rTMS on dendritic growth and sprouting and neurotrophic factors are described, including change in brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentration under the influence of rTMS. Also, non-classical effects of TMS related to biophysical effects of magnetic fields are described, including the quantum effects, the magnetic spin effects, genetic magnetoreception, the macromolecular effects of TMS, and the electromagnetic theory of consciousness. Finally, we discuss possible interpretations of TMS effects according to dynamical systems theory. Evidence suggests that a rTMS-induced magnetic field should be considered a separate physical factor that can be impactful at the subatomic level and that rTMS is capable of significantly altering the reactivity of molecules (radicals). It is thought that these factors underlie the therapeutic benefits of therapy with TMS. Future research on these mechanisms will be instrumental to the development of more powerful and reliable TMS treatment protocols. PMID:26136672

  13. Epidemiological bases and molecular mechanisms linking obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Salmerón, María; Chocarro-Calvo, Ana; García-Martínez, José Manuel; de la Vieja, Antonio; García-Jiménez, Custodia

    2017-02-01

    The association between diabetes and cancer was hypothesized almost one century ago. Today, a vast number of epidemiological studies support that obese and diabetic populations are more likely to experience tissue-specific cancers, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Obesity, diabetes, and cancer share many hormonal, immune, and metabolic changes that may account for the relationship between diabetes and cancer. In addition, antidiabetic treatments may have an impact on the occurrence and course of some cancers. Moreover, some anticancer treatments may induce diabetes. These observations aroused a great controversy because of the ethical implications and the associated commercial interests. We report an epidemiological update from a mechanistic perspective that suggests the existence of many common and differential individual mechanisms linking obesity and type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus to certain cancers. The challenge today is to identify the molecular links responsible for this association. Classification of cancers by their molecular signatures may facilitate future mechanistic and epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. The possible evolution and future of CO2-concentrating mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A; Beardall, John; Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia

    2017-06-01

    CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs), based either on active transport of inorganic carbon (biophysical CCMs) or on biochemistry involving supplementary carbon fixation into C4 acids (C4 and CAM), play a major role in global primary productivity. However, the ubiquitous CO2-fixing enzyme in autotrophs, Rubisco, evolved at a time when atmospheric CO2 levels were very much higher than today and O2 was very low and, as CO2 and O2 approached (by no means monotonically), today's levels, at some time subsequently many organisms evolved a CCM that increased the supply of CO2 and decreased Rubisco oxygenase activity. Given that CO2 levels and other environmental factors have altered considerably between when autotrophs evolved and the present day, and are predicted to continue to change into the future, we here examine the drivers for, and possible timing of, evolution of CCMs. CCMs probably evolved when CO2 fell to 2-16 times the present atmospheric level, depending on Rubisco kinetics. We also assess the effects of other key environmental factors such as temperature and nutrient levels on CCM activity and examine the evidence for evolutionary changes in CCM activity and related cellular processes as well as limitations on continuity of CCMs through environmental variations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Martian gullies: possible formation mechanism by dry granular material..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedillo-Flores, Y.; Durand-Manterola, H. J.

    section Some of the geomorphological features in Mars are the gullies Some theories developed tried explain its origin either by liquid water liquid carbon dioxide or flows of dry granular material We made a comparative analysis of the Martian gullies with the terrestrial ones We propose that the mechanism of formation of the gullies is as follows In winter CO 2 snow mixed with sand falls in the terrain In spring the CO 2 snow sublimate and gaseous CO 2 make fluid the sand which flows like liquid eroding the terrain and forming the gullies By experimental work with dry granular material we simulated the development of the Martian gullies injecting air in the granular material section We present the characteristics of some terrestrial gullies forms at cold environment sited at Nevado de Toluca Volcano near Toluca City M e xico We compare them with Martian gullies choose from four different areas to target goal recognize or to distinguish to identify possible processes evolved in its formation Also we measured the lengths of those Martian gullies and the range was from 24 m to 1775 meters Finally we present results of our experimental work at laboratory with dry granular material

  16. Mountain building long after plate collision. Possible mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyushkov, Eugene; Chekhovich, Peter; Korikovsky, Sergei; Massonne, Hans-Joachim

    2016-04-01

    It is commonly believed that mountain building occurs synchronously to plate collision. However, it was well known long ago that in most cases mountain building began 10-100 Ma later. For example, in the Middle and Southern Urals collision occurred from the Late Devonian and until the Early Permian. The shortened regions remained covered by a shallow sea. High mountains began to form rapidly 10 Ma after the termination of collision. The Verkhoyansk Range in Northeastern Asia was strongly shortened at mid-Cretaceous time. It remained at a low altitude for 100 Ma and rose by 2 km in the Pleistocene. Compressive stresses most probably were acting in the Urals during all the epoch of collision. Strong shortening however occurred only as several impulses 1-2 Ma long. This can be explained by temporary weakening of the lithosphere due to a change in the mechanism of creep under infiltration of fluids from the mantle. To sustain a thickened crust at a low altitude, a density increase in the lithosphere was necessary. A possible cause could be metamorphism in crustal rocks, both mafic and felsic, under a pressure increase during collision. Rapid uplift of the shortened crust long after collision and establishment of a new temperature distribution indicates a density decrease in the lithosphere. Thus, on the Precambrian cratons which cover about 70% of continental areas collision terminated ≥ 500 Ma ago. However, during the last several Ma most of them underwent the uplift ranging from 100-200 m to 1000-1500 m. This occurred on the African continent, in central and eastern Australia, East Siberia, East Antarctica and in many other regions. Preservation of thick mantle roots precluded delamination of the lowermost lithosphere as a mechanism for the uplift. Due to a strong denudation of cratons deeply metamorphosed rocks of the lower crust emerged to a shallow depth. Under dry conditions for a long time they remained metastable. Recent inflow of fluid from the mantle

  17. Suanzaoren Formulae for Insomnia: Updated Clinical Evidence and Possible Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Hui Zhou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia disorder is a widespread and refractory disease. Semen Ziziphi Spinosae, Suanzaoren, a well-known Chinese herbal medicine, has been used for treating insomnia for thousands of years. Here, we aimed to assess the available evidence of Chinese herbal formulae that contains Suanzaoren (FSZR for insomnia according to high-quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs and reviewed their possible mechanisms based on animal-based studies. Electronic searches were performed in eight databases from inception to November 2016. The primary outcome measures were polysomnography index and Pittsburgh sleep quality index. The secondary outcome measures were clinical effective rate and adverse events. The methodological quality of RCTs was assessed by Cochrane's collaboration tool, and only RCTs with positive for 4 out of 7 for the Cochrane risk of bias domains were included in analyses. Thirteen eligible studies with 1,454 patients were identified. Meta-analysis of high-quality RCTs showed that FSZR monotherapy was superior to placebo (P < 0.01; FSZR plus Diazepam was superior to Diazepam alone (P < 0.05; there were mixed results comparing FSZR with Diazepam (P > 0.05 or P < 0.05. Furthermore, FSZR caused fewer side effects than that of Diazepam. Suanzaoren contains complex mixtures of phytochemicals including sanjoinine A, Jujuboside A, spinosin and other flavonoids, which has sedative and hypnotic functions primarily mediated by the GABAergic and serotonergic system. In conclusion, the findings of present study supported that FSZR could be an alternative treatment for insomnia in clinic. FSZR exerted sedative and hypnotic actions mainly through the GABAergic and serotonergic system.

  18. Inflammatory mechanisms linking periodontal diseases to cardiovascular diseases (also published in Journal of Periodontology 2013 Apr 84 (4 Suppl): S51-69)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenkein, H.A.; Loos, B.G.

    2013-01-01

    Aims In this article, inflammatory mechanisms that link periodontal diseases to cardiovascular diseases are reviewed. Methods This article is a literature review. Results Studies in the literature implicate a number of possible mechanisms that could be responsible for increased inflammatory

  19. Judgments of Risk Frequencies: Tests of Possible Cognitive Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertwig, Ralph; Pachur, Thorsten; Kurzenhauser, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    How do people judge which of 2 risks claims more lives per year? The authors specified 4 candidate mechanisms and tested them against people's judgments in 3 risk environments. Two mechanisms, availability by recall and regressed frequency, conformed best to people's choices. The same mechanisms also accounted well for the mapping accuracy of…

  20. Linking HRM and Knowledge Transfer via Individual-level Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minbaeva, Dana; Mäkelä, Kristiina; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    2012-01-01

    In response to recent calls for more research on micro-foundations, we seek to link human resource management (HRM) and knowledge transfer through individual-level mechanisms, arguing that individual-level conditions of action influence the extent to which employees engage in knowledge exchange. We...... examine four such conditions empirically using data from 811 employees in three Danish multinational corporations (MNCs). Our findings suggest that individual-level perceptions of organizational commitment to knowledge sharing, and extrinsic motivation, directly influence the extent to which employees...... engage in firm-internal knowledge exchange. We also find that intrinsic motivation and engagement in social interaction significantly mediate the relationship between perceived organizational commitment and knowledge exchange. Given that HRM can influence such conditions through an overall signaling...

  1. Pathogenic mechanisms linking periodontal diseases with adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, I; Pileri, P; Villa, A; Calabrese, S; Ottolenghi, L; Abati, S

    2012-06-01

    In the last 2 decades, a large proportion of studies have focused on the relationship between maternal periodontal disease and poor obstetric outcomes. The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge about human studies on the pathogenetic mechanisms linking periodontal diseases with adverse pregnancy outcomes. A search of the medical literature was conducted using NIH (National Institute of Health) Pubmed through April 2011. Articles were identified with the Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) and free text terms "small for gestational age (SGA)," "preeclampsia," "preterm labor," and "periodontal disease." Experimental human studies have shown that periodontal pathogens may disseminate toward placental and fetal tissues accompanied by an increase in inflammatory mediators in the placenta. As such, new inflammatory reactions within the placental tissues of the pregnant woman may occur, the physiological levels of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the amniotic fluid may increase and eventually lead to premature delivery. Although many data from clinical trials suggest that periodontal disease may increase the adverse pregnancy outcome, the exact pathogenetic mechanism involved remains controversial. The findings explain the potential link between periodontal infections and adverse pregnancy outcomes. First, periodontal bacteria can directly cause infections both of the uteroplacenta and the fetus; second, systemic inflammatory changes induced by periodontal diseases can activate responses at the maternal-fetal interface. Of note, associative studies have produced different results in different population groups and no conclusive evidence has still been produced for the potential role of preventive periodontal care to reduce the risk factors of preterm birth.

  2. Directed networks' different link formation mechanisms causing degree distribution distinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behfar, Stefan Kambiz; Turkina, Ekaterina; Cohendet, Patrick; Burger-Helmchen, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Within undirected networks, scientists have shown much interest in presenting power-law features. For instance, Barabási and Albert (1999) claimed that a common property of many large networks is that vertex connectivity follows scale-free power-law distribution, and in another study Barabási et al. (2002) showed power law evolution in the social network of scientific collaboration. At the same time, Jiang et al. (2011) discussed deviation from power-law distribution; others indicated that size effect (Bagrow et al., 2008), information filtering mechanism (Mossa et al., 2002), and birth and death process (Shi et al., 2005) could account for this deviation. Within directed networks, many authors have considered that outlinks follow a similar mechanism of creation as inlinks' (Faloutsos et al., 1999; Krapivsky et al., 2001; Tanimoto, 2009) with link creation rate being the linear function of node degree, resulting in a power-law shape for both indegree and outdegree distribution. Some other authors have made an assumption that directed networks, such as scientific collaboration or citation, behave as undirected, resulting in a power-law degree distribution accordingly (Barabási et al., 2002). At the same time, we claim (1) Outlinks feature different degree distributions than inlinks; where different link formation mechanisms cause the distribution distinctions, (2) in/outdegree distribution distinction holds for different levels of system decomposition; therefore this distribution distinction is a property of directed networks. First, we emphasize in/outlink formation mechanisms as causal factors for distinction between indegree and outdegree distributions (where this distinction has already been noticed in Barker et al. (2010) and Baxter et al. (2006)) within a sample network of OSS projects as well as Java software corpus as a network. Second, we analyze whether this distribution distinction holds for different levels of system decomposition: open

  3. A Possible Link Between Winter Arctic Sea Ice Decline and a Collapse of the Beaufort High?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Alek A.

    2018-03-01

    A new study by Moore et al. (2018, https://doi.org/10.1002/2017GL076446) highlights a collapse of the anticyclonic "Beaufort High" atmospheric circulation over the western Arctic Ocean in the winter of 2017 and an associated reversal of the sea ice drift through the southern Beaufort Sea (eastward instead of the predominantly westward circulation). The authors linked this to the loss of sea ice in the Barents Sea, anomalous warming over the region, and the intrusion of low-pressure cyclones along the eastern Arctic. In this commentary we discuss the significance of this observation, the challenges associated with understanding these possible linkages, and some of the alternative hypotheses surrounding the impacts of winter Arctic sea ice loss.

  4. Possible roles of transglutaminases in molecular mechanisms responsible for human neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Gaetano Gatta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Transglutaminases are a family of Ca2+-dependent enzymes which catalyze post-translational modifications of proteins. The main activity of these enzymes is the cross-linking of glutaminyl residues of a protein/peptide substrate to lysyl residues of a protein/peptide co-substrate. In addition to lysyl residues, other second nucleophilic co-substrates may include monoamines or polyamines (to form mono- or bi-substituted/crosslinked adducts or –OH groups (to form ester linkages. In absence of co-substrates, the nucleophile may be water, resulting in the net deamidation of the glutaminyl residue. Transglutaminase activity has been suggested to be involved in molecular mechanisms responsible for both physiological or pathological processes. In particular, transglutaminase activity has been shown to be responsible for human autoimmune diseases, Celiac Disease is just one of them. Interestingly, neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, supranuclear palsy, Huntington’s Disease and other polyglutamine diseases, are characterized in part by aberrant cerebral transglutaminase activity and by increased cross-linked proteins in affected brains. This review describes the possible molecular mechanisms by which these enzymes could be responsible for such diseases and the possible use of transglutaminase inhibitors for patients with diseases characterized by aberrant transglutaminase activity.

  5. Transglutaminase inhibition: possible therapeutic mechanisms to protect cells from death in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Gaetano Gatta

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Transglutaminases are a family of Ca2+-dependent enzymes which catalyze post-translational modifications of proteins. The main activity of these enzymes is the cross-linking of glutaminyl residues of a protein/peptide substrate to lysyl residues of a protein/peptide co-substrate. In addition to lysyl residues, other second nucleophilic co-substrates may include monoamines or polyamines (to form mono- or bi-substituted/crosslinked adducts or −OH groups (to form ester linkages. In absence of co-substrates, the nucleophile may be water, resulting in the net deamidation of the glutaminyl residue. Transglutaminase activity has been suggested to be involved in molecular mechanisms responsible for both physiological or pathological processes. In particular, transglutaminase activity has been shown to be responsible for human autoimmune diseases, and Celiac Disease is just one of them. Interestingly, neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, supranuclear palsy, Huntington’s Disease and other polyglutamine diseases, are characterized in part by aberrant cerebral transglutaminase activity and by increased cross-linked proteins in affected brains. Here we describe the possible molecular mechanisms by which these enzymes could be responsible for such diseases and the possible use of transglutaminase inhibitors for patients with diseases characterized by aberrant transglutaminase activity.

  6. Mechanisms linking brain insulin resistance to Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matioli, Maria Niures P.S.; Nitrini, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that Diabetes Mellitus (DM) can increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review briefly describes current concepts in mechanisms linking DM and insulin resistance/deficiency to AD. Insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) resistance can contribute to neurodegeneration by several mechanisms which involve: energy and metabolism deficits, impairment of Glucose transporter-4 function, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of AGEs, ROS and RNS with increased production of neuro-inflammation and activation of pro-apoptosis cascade. Impairment in insulin receptor function and increased expression and activation of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) have also been described. These processes compromise neuronal and glial function, with a reduction in neurotransmitter homeostasis. Insulin/IGF resistance causes the accumulation of AβPP-Aβ oligomeric fibrils or insoluble larger aggregated fibrils in the form of plaques that are neurotoxic. Additionally, there is production and accumulation of hyper-phosphorylated insoluble fibrillar tau which can exacerbate cytoskeletal collapse and synaptic disconnection. PMID:29213950

  7. Integrative modelling reveals mechanisms linking productivity and plant species richness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, James B; Anderson, T Michael; Seabloom, Eric W; Borer, Elizabeth T; Adler, Peter B; Harpole, W Stanley; Hautier, Yann; Hillebrand, Helmut; Lind, Eric M; Pärtel, Meelis; Bakker, Jonathan D; Buckley, Yvonne M; Crawley, Michael J; Damschen, Ellen I; Davies, Kendi F; Fay, Philip A; Firn, Jennifer; Gruner, Daniel S; Hector, Andy; Knops, Johannes M H; MacDougall, Andrew S; Melbourne, Brett A; Morgan, John W; Orrock, John L; Prober, Suzanne M; Smith, Melinda D

    2016-01-21

    How ecosystem productivity and species richness are interrelated is one of the most debated subjects in the history of ecology. Decades of intensive study have yet to discern the actual mechanisms behind observed global patterns. Here, by integrating the predictions from multiple theories into a single model and using data from 1,126 grassland plots spanning five continents, we detect the clear signals of numerous underlying mechanisms linking productivity and richness. We find that an integrative model has substantially higher explanatory power than traditional bivariate analyses. In addition, the specific results unveil several surprising findings that conflict with classical models. These include the isolation of a strong and consistent enhancement of productivity by richness, an effect in striking contrast with superficial data patterns. Also revealed is a consistent importance of competition across the full range of productivity values, in direct conflict with some (but not all) proposed models. The promotion of local richness by macroecological gradients in climatic favourability, generally seen as a competing hypothesis, is also found to be important in our analysis. The results demonstrate that an integrative modelling approach leads to a major advance in our ability to discern the underlying processes operating in ecological systems.

  8. Mechanisms linking brain insulin resistance to Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Niures P.S. Matioli

    Full Text Available Several studies have indicated that Diabetes Mellitus (DM can increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD. This review briefly describes current concepts in mechanisms linking DM and insulin resistance/deficiency to AD. Insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF resistance can contribute to neurodegeneration by several mechanisms which involve: energy and metabolism deficits, impairment of Glucose transporter-4 function, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of AGEs, ROS and RNS with increased production of neuro-inflammation and activation of pro-apoptosis cascade. Impairment in insulin receptor function and increased expression and activation of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE have also been described. These processes compromise neuronal and glial function, with a reduction in neurotransmitter homeostasis. Insulin/IGF resistance causes the accumulation of AβPP-Aβ oligomeric fibrils or insoluble larger aggregated fibrils in the form of plaques that are neurotoxic. Additionally, there is production and accumulation of hyper-phosphorylated insoluble fibrillar tau which can exacerbate cytoskeletal collapse and synaptic disconnection.

  9. On the Possible Interaction Mechanism between Collateral Vessels and Restenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zun, P.S.; Hoekstra, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    Several clinical studies and their meta-analysis suggest that developed collateral vessels in the heart correlate to an increased risk of in-stent restenosis. The possible physiological interaction between the collateral development and in-stent restenosis is investigated in this study. Based on

  10. Linking Pesticide Exposure with Pediatric Leukemia: Potential Underlying Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio F. Hernández

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia is the most common cancer in children, representing 30% of all childhood cancers. The disease arises from recurrent genetic insults that block differentiation of hematopoietic stem and/or progenitor cells (HSPCs and drives uncontrolled proliferation and survival of the differentiation-blocked clone. Pediatric leukemia is phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous with an obscure etiology. The interaction between genetic factors and environmental agents represents a potential etiological driver. Although information is limited, the principal toxic mechanisms of potential leukemogenic agents (e.g., etoposide, benzene metabolites, bioflavonoids and some pesticides include topoisomerase II inhibition and/or excessive generation of free radicals, which may induce DNA single- and double-strand breaks (DNA-DSBs in early HSPCs. Chromosomal rearrangements (duplications, deletions and translocations may occur if these lesions are not properly repaired. The initiating hit usually occurs in utero and commonly leads to the expression of oncogenic fusion proteins. Subsequent cooperating hits define the disease latency and occur after birth and may be of a genetic, epigenetic or immune nature (i.e., delayed infection-mediated immune deregulation. Here, we review the available experimental and epidemiological evidence linking pesticide exposure to infant and childhood leukemia and provide a mechanistic basis to support the association, focusing on early initiating molecular events.

  11. Possible mechanism of solar noise storm generation in meter wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genkin, L.G.; Erukhimov, L.M.; Levin, B.N.

    1989-01-01

    Fluctuation plasma mechanism of noise storm generation is proposed. The sporadic formation of density irregularities in plasma (Langmuir) turbulence region is shown to be the result of thermal stratification of plasma. The noise storm type 1 bursts in their typical parameters are like radio emission due to plasma turbulence conversion on this structures

  12. Possible Pathogenetic Mechanisms and New Therapeutic Approaches of Pes Equinovarus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ošťádal, M.; Lišková, Jana; Hadraba, Daniel; Eckhardt, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 3 (2017), s. 403-410 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-29153A Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Pes equinovarus * clubfoot * pathogenetic mechanisms * fibrosis Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics OBOR OECD: Orthopaedics Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  13. Possible mechanism for anthraquinone species diffusion in alkaline pulping

    Science.gov (United States)

    X.-S. Chai; J. Samp; Q.X. Hou; S.-H Yoon; J.Y. Zhu

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of the effectiveness of anthraquinone (AQ) in kraft-AQ pulping in terms of its mechanism of transport has been conducted. Our previous work showed that caustic solutions of wood lignin can decrease the membrane exclusion for anthraquinones, i.e., the presence of wood lignin enhances the ability of AQ to pass through a membrane when a reducing agent is...

  14. Concepts and possibilities of fracture mechanics for fracture safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blauel, J.

    1980-01-01

    In very tough materials for pressure vessels and pipelines of nuclear plants, cracking begins in a stable manner and only after macroscopic plastic deformations and crack blunting. It is possible to describe this elasto-plastic fracture behaviour and to quantify the safety margin compared to the assessment criteria based on linear elastic stressing and initiation by the concept of the J integral, the crack peak width and the crack resistance Jsub(R) curve. The numerous problems of details still open and the partly very limited validity range should not prevent the further investigation into the great possibilities of this concept and making greater use of the interpretation of large scale tests. (orig./RW) [de

  15. Phenomena of synchronized response in biosystems and the possible mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingjing; Yang, Fan; Han, Danhong; Xu, Shengyong

    2018-02-05

    Phenomena of synchronized response is common among organs, tissues and cells in biosystems. We have analyzed and discussed three examples of synchronization in biosystems, including the direction-changing movement of paramecia, the prey behavior of flytraps, and the simultaneous discharge of electric eels. These phenomena and discussions support an electrical communication mechanism that in biosystems, the electrical signals are mainly soliton-like electromagnetic pulses, which are generated by the transient transmembrane ionic current through the ion channels and propagate along the dielectric membrane-based softmaterial waveguide network to complete synchronized responses. This transmission model implies that a uniform electrical communication mechanism might have been naturally developed in biosystem. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Possible Depolarization Mechanism due to Low Beta Squeeze

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranjbar, V.; Luccio, A.; Bai, M.

    2008-01-01

    Simulations reveal a potential depolarization mechanism during low beta squeeze. This depolarization appears to be driven by a spin tune modulation caused by spin precession through the strong low beta quads due to the vertical fields. The modulation of the spin tune introduces an additional snake resonance condition at ν s0 ± nν x - ν z l = integer which while the same numerology as the well known sextupole resonance, can operate in the absence of sextupole elements

  17. Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Associated with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis: Coincidence or Possible Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaid Nabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a common form of chronic autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD and often coexists with other autoimmune diseases, but Hashimoto’s thyroiditis associated with an autosomal dominant neurofibromatosis type 1 is exceedingly rare. Case Presentation. A 30-year-old Bengali woman presented to the OPD with complaints of aching pain and tingling sensation in her hands and feet. Physical examination revealed dysmorphic facies, nodular swelling in the neck, cafe-au-lait spots, and neurofibromas covering the entire surface of her body. Her thyroid hormones were within normal limits. Thyroid ultrasound revealed a cystic area in the left lobe of the gland, and ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology revealed lymphocytic infiltration of the gland, suggesting Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. High levels of autoimmune antibodies such as antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies confirmed the diagnosis. Conclusion. When encountered with a patient of Neurofibromatosis type 1, a physician should be careful about the possibility of a concomitant autoimmune disease. Clinical presentation of neurofibromatosis and Noonan syndrome often overlaps and recent studies have implicated a mutation in NF1 gene in the etiology of NFNS. More extensive reports and further investigations of such patients having combination of neurofibromatosis type 1 and autoimmune thyroiditis will certainly provide better understanding of this link in the near future.

  18. Repulsive gravitational forces: A possible mechanism for clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenstaedt, J.

    1977-01-01

    It is well known that, in a homogeneous cosmological universe, a positive cosmological constant induces repulsive forces. We show here that in a locally inhomogeneous cosmological model these repulsive forces are related to the sign of q, the deceleration parameter of the associated cosmological space, and to the sign of m, the apparent mass of the central perturbation (which can be negative with a positive energy density everywhere). When q is almost zero--crossing the value zero--small random perturbations of the matter density are the sources of a gravitational instability which can generate a mechanism of fragmentation in an a priori homogeneous universe

  19. Neurocomputational mechanisms of prosocial learning and links to empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Patricia L; Apps, Matthew A J; Valton, Vincent; Viding, Essi; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2016-08-30

    Reinforcement learning theory powerfully characterizes how we learn to benefit ourselves. In this theory, prediction errors-the difference between a predicted and actual outcome of a choice-drive learning. However, we do not operate in a social vacuum. To behave prosocially we must learn the consequences of our actions for other people. Empathy, the ability to vicariously experience and understand the affect of others, is hypothesized to be a critical facilitator of prosocial behaviors, but the link between empathy and prosocial behavior is still unclear. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) participants chose between different stimuli that were probabilistically associated with rewards for themselves (self), another person (prosocial), or no one (control). Using computational modeling, we show that people can learn to obtain rewards for others but do so more slowly than when learning to obtain rewards for themselves. fMRI revealed that activity in a posterior portion of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex/basal forebrain (sgACC) drives learning only when we are acting in a prosocial context and signals a prosocial prediction error conforming to classical principles of reinforcement learning theory. However, there is also substantial variability in the neural and behavioral efficiency of prosocial learning, which is predicted by trait empathy. More empathic people learn more quickly when benefitting others, and their sgACC response is the most selective for prosocial learning. We thus reveal a computational mechanism driving prosocial learning in humans. This framework could provide insights into atypical prosocial behavior in those with disorders of social cognition.

  20. Hibernation Control Mechanism and Possible Applications to Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, N.

    Mammalian hibernation, characterized by the ability to survive temporarily at low body temperatures close to 0oC, has been reported to increase resistance to various lethal events such as low body temperature, severe ischemia, bacterial infection and irradiation, and to prolong the life span. The application of this physiological phenomenon to space life has been dreamed of. However, realization of this dream has been prevented by a poor understanding of the control mechanisms of hibernation. Recent findings of a novel and unique protein complex (HP) in the blood of chipmunks, a rodent hibernator, which is controlled by the endogenous circannual rhythm of hibernation, allowed new developments in understanding the molecular mechanism of hibernation and its physiological significance. From these studies, two hormones regulated by the brain were identified as promising candidate molecules controlling HP production in the liver, assuming that hibernation is controlled via the neuroendocrine system and regulated by the endogenous circannual rhythm in the brain. A circannual HP rhythm was observed in chipmunks maintaining euthermia under conditions of constant warmth, suggesting that the physiological control of hibernation progresses without a lowering of body temperature. Furthermore, the study of HP rhythm on longevity revealed that a circannual rhythm plays an essential role in the much longer life span of hibernators. The present progress in hibernation research may open a new pathway for manipulating a circannual rhythm controlling hibernation in humans. In the future, this will make it feasible to take advantage of hibernation in space life.

  1. A Possible Mechanism for Driving Oscillations in Hot Giant Planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dederick, Ethan; Jackiewicz, Jason

    2017-01-01

    The κ -mechanism has been successful in explaining the origin of observed oscillations of many types of “classical” pulsating variable stars. Here we examine quantitatively if that same process is prominent enough to excite the potential global oscillations within Jupiter, whose energy flux is powered by gravitational collapse rather than nuclear fusion. Additionally, we examine whether external radiative forcing, i.e., starlight, could be a driver for global oscillations in hot Jupiters orbiting various main-sequence stars at defined orbital semimajor axes. Using planetary models generated by the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics and nonadiabatic oscillation calculations, we confirm that Jovian oscillations cannot be driven via the κ -mechanism. However, we do show that, in hot Jupiters, oscillations can likely be excited via the suppression of radiative cooling due to external radiation given a large enough stellar flux and the absence of a significant oscillatory damping zone within the planet. This trend does not seem to be dependent on the planetary mass. In future observations, we can thus expect that such planets may be pulsating, thereby giving greater insight into the internal structure of these bodies.

  2. Exosomes as a tumor immune escape mechanism: possible therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanley Harold H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Advances in cancer therapy have been substantial in terms of molecular understanding of disease mechanisms, however these advances have not translated into increased survival in the majority of cancer types. One unsolved problem in current cancer therapeutics is the substantial immune suppression seen in patients. Conventionally, investigations in this area have focused on antigen-nonspecific immune suppressive molecules such as cytokines and T cell apoptosis inducing molecules such as Fas ligand. More recently, studies have demonstrated nanovesicle particles termed exosomes are involved not only in stimulation but also inhibition of immunity in physiological conditions. Interestingly, exosomes secreted by cancer cells have been demonstrated to express tumor antigens, as well as immune suppressive molecules such as PD-1L and FasL. Concentrations of exosomes from plasma of cancer patients have been associated with spontaneous T cell apoptosis, which is associated in some situations with shortened survival. In this paper we place the "exosome-immune suppression" concept in perspective of other tumor immune evasion mechanisms. We conclude by discussing a novel therapeutic approach to cancer immune suppression by extracorporeal removal of exosomes using hollow fiber filtration technology

  3. A Possible Mechanism for Driving Oscillations in Hot Giant Planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dederick, Ethan; Jackiewicz, Jason, E-mail: dederiej@nmsu.edu, E-mail: jasonj@nmsu.edu [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2017-03-10

    The κ -mechanism has been successful in explaining the origin of observed oscillations of many types of “classical” pulsating variable stars. Here we examine quantitatively if that same process is prominent enough to excite the potential global oscillations within Jupiter, whose energy flux is powered by gravitational collapse rather than nuclear fusion. Additionally, we examine whether external radiative forcing, i.e., starlight, could be a driver for global oscillations in hot Jupiters orbiting various main-sequence stars at defined orbital semimajor axes. Using planetary models generated by the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics and nonadiabatic oscillation calculations, we confirm that Jovian oscillations cannot be driven via the κ -mechanism. However, we do show that, in hot Jupiters, oscillations can likely be excited via the suppression of radiative cooling due to external radiation given a large enough stellar flux and the absence of a significant oscillatory damping zone within the planet. This trend does not seem to be dependent on the planetary mass. In future observations, we can thus expect that such planets may be pulsating, thereby giving greater insight into the internal structure of these bodies.

  4. Possible antipolar pairing mechanism in high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardwell, D.A.; Shorrocks, N.M.

    1989-01-01

    An antipolar pairing mechanism for free charge carriers in high-T c superconducting compounds is proposed qualitatively. This involves the establishment of a two-dimensional (2D) array of effective charge-coupling centers within the superconducting lattice via a specific phonon distortion of cation species along a nonmajor crystallographic direction. A fundamental requirement of this model is that the density of such coupling centers decreases with decreasing temperature. In the case of Y-Ba-Cu-O, it is asserted that charge carriers in a 2D oxygen band adjacent to the phonon-containing plane become localized by the resulting (local) field distortion. Cooper pairs may then form when the charge-coupling-center density falls below the charge-carrier density. Such a mechanism could be mediated by a longitudinal phonon which softens at low temperatures to produce an antipolar state, such as that incipient to an antiferroelectric distortion of the lattice (i.e., in the zero-frequency limiting case). This model, which may be investigated experimentally by low-temperature Raman spectroscopy, isotopic substitution, and x-ray diffractometry at 4.2 K, can be applied to all p-type high-T c systems. In addition, it may account for the observed lattice anisotropy and short coherence length characteristic of these materials

  5. Possible mechanism for d0 ferromagnetism mediated by intrinsic defects

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhenkui

    2014-01-01

    We examine the effects of several intrinsic defects on the magnetic behavior of ZnS nanostructures using hybrid density functional theory to gain insights into d0 ferromagnetism. Previous studies have predicted that the magnetism is due to a coupling between partially filled defect states. By taking into account the electronic correlations, we find an additional splitting of the defect states in Zn vacancies and thus the possibility of gaining energy by preferential filling of hole states, establishing ferromagnetism between spin polarized S 3p holes. We demonstrate a crucial role of neutral S vacancies in promoting ferromagnetism between positively charged S vacancies. S dangling bonds on the nanoparticle surface also induce ferromagnetism. This journal is

  6. A possible mechanism relating increased soil temperature to forest decline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, G.H.

    1993-01-01

    Nutrient cations are removed from the soil by uptake in biomass, and by leaching as a result of soil acidification. Such acidification results from acid deposition and/or from HNO 3 formed by mineralization and nitrification of humus, when at a rate in excess of the tree's nutritional requirements. This has been found to occur during and following periods of increased temperature and reduced rainfall. The cumulative loss of either Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ or K + by one or more of these processes, if greater than the amount released from the specific minerals in that soil, leads to nutrient deficiency, fine root mortality, poor growth, and eventually to die-back. Trees growing in soils derived from specific minerals in which there is a strong imbalance in the elements from which the exchangeable nutrients are formed, are vulnerable to nutrient deficiency. This paper discusses the relevance of earlier studies, when considered in relation to more recent findings. In Hawaii there have been frequent periods of increased temperature and drought resulting from the El Nino Southern Oscillation. This fact, when considered in relation to the relatively low K content, and its imbalance with Ca and Mg in the lava and volcanic ash on which the trees have grown, could result in K deficiency in the declining ohia trees. It is possible that the unusual periods of increased temperature and drought which have occurred in certain other localized areas may have led to the decline symptoms recently observed. In view of the threat of global warming, this possibility should be investigated. 39 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Bioprospecting as a possible development mechanism for Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melgarejo, Luz Marina

    2013-01-01

    Bioprospecting has been on the agenda for discussion by the government, the academic community, businesses and other pertinent actors for many years now; it is an integral topic representing a potential approach to exploit biodiversity to the fullest. This document presents some definitions of what bioprospecting is (some restrictive, others with a broader perspective, depending on different approaches, actors, target markets and countries) in the context of a mechanism for development and cooperation concerning the construction of capacities, advantages and disadvantages. it was found that bioprospecting in Colombia has been developing from a broad perspective (systematic study of biological-genetic resources, transformation into a product which has led to strengthening some value chains, small- and/or large-scale marketing and some advances in intellectual property rights and the distribution of benefits) in order to provide greater benefits for the nation.

  8. Possibility and potential of clean development mechanisms in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Weijun; Zhou Nan; Li Haifeng; Kammen, Daniel M

    2007-01-01

    China has become the world's second largest greenhouse gas (GHG) emitter behind the United States. It emits approximately three billion tons of CO 2 equivalents every year. Its growing economy and large population are making a wealthier, more consumption-oriented country. Energy demand is expected to grow 5-10% per year through 2030. Therefore, a large potential of GHG emission reduction in China can be expected. The clean development mechanism (CDM) put forward in the Kyoto Protocol for reductions of GHGs can support the sustainable development of developing countries and help developed countries to achieve their emission reduction targets at low cost. However, there are still many disagreements to be resolved between developing and developed countries. In this letter, we try to introduce the current development of CDM projects in China and discuss its potential and opportunities in the future decades

  9. Antioxidant Property of Jobelyn as the Possible Mechanism Underlying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Umukoro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: Amnesia or loss of memory is the cardinal hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with ageing process. Although, AD had been discovered over a century ago, drugs which could cure or halt the progression of the disease are yet to see the light of the day. However, there has been a growing interest in the use of phytomedicines with multipronged mechanisms of action that could target various aspects of the pathologies of AD. Jobelyn (JB is a potent antioxidant African polyherbal formulation with active components that have been acclaimed to show neuroprotection. T his investigation was carried out to evaluate whether JB has anti-amnesic and antioxidant activities.   Methods: The alteration of alternation behavior in the Y-maze paradigm was utilized as the test for memory function in mice. The effect of JB on a cetylcholinesterase (AChE activity, malondialdehyde (MDA level and the concentrations of glutathione (GSH in the frontal cortex and hippocampus were assessed in rats as means of providing insight into the mechanism underlying its anti-amnesic activity. The animals were given JB (1, 2.5 or 5mg/kg, i.p. daily for 7 days before the biochemical assays or test for memory functions were carried out.   Results: JB was found to produce a significant increase in the level of alternation behavior compared with the control, suggesting anti-amnesic activity. Also, JB reversed the memory impairment induced by scopolamine, which further indicates anti-amnesic property. Furthermore, JB demonstrated a significant inhibition of MDA formation in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats, indicating antioxidant property. In addition, it increased the defense armory of the brain tissues, as it significantly increased the concentrations of GSH in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats. However, JB did not demonstrate any inhibitory effect against AChE activity in the frontal cortex and

  10. The possible mechanisms of protocatechuic acid-induced central analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Arslan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available It is aimed to investigate the central antinociceptive effect of protocatechuic acid and the involvement of stimulation of opioidergic, serotonin 5-HT2A/2C, α2-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors in protocatechuic acid-induced central analgesia in mice. Time-dependent antinociceptive effects of protocatechuic acid at the oral doses of 75, 150 and 300 mg/kg were tested in hot-plate (integrated supraspinal response and tail-immersion (spinal reflex tests in mice. To investigate the mechanisms of action; the mice administered 300 mg/kg protocatechuic acid (p.o. were pre-treated with non-specific opioid antagonist naloxone (5 mg/kg, i.p., serotonin 5-HT2A/2C receptor antagonist ketanserin (1 mg/kg, i.p., α2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine (1 mg/kg, i.p. and non-specific muscarinic antagonist atropine (5 mg/kg, i.p., respectively. The antinociceptive effect of protocatechuic acid was observed at the doses of 75, 150 and 300 mg/kg in tail-immersion test, at the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg in hot-plate test at different time interval. The enhancement in the latency of protocatechuic acid-induced response to thermal stimuli was antagonized by yohimbine, naloxone and atropine in tail-immersion test, while it was antagonized only by yohimbine and naloxone pretreatments in hot-plate test. These results indicated that protocatechuic acid has the central antinociceptive action that is probably organized by spinal mediated cholinergic and opiodiergic, also spinal and supraspinal mediated noradrenergic modulation. However, further studies are required to understand how protocatechuic acid organizes the interactions of these modulatory systems. As a whole, these findings reinforce that protocatechuic acid is a potential agent that might be used for pain relief. Additionally, the clarification of the effect and mechanisms of action of protocatechuic acid will contribute to new therapeutic approaches and provide guidance for new drug

  11. Sexual orientation and eating disorders: exploring the possible link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Kuna

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at investigating the potential connection between the prevalence of eating disorders and sexual orientation, as well as to exploring the nature of the possible relationship. For that purpose, results of studies found in digital databases were searched and analysed. Such a link has been found to exist, yet its character is difficult to determine due to limited data, problems in classifying patients’ sexual orientation, or collecting honest answers to sensitive but crucial questions. Most studies on the subject have been conducted in the USA and, rather predictably, mainly among women. Higher incidence rates were found in non-heterosexual men and bisexual women. It is not clear if homosexual women are more susceptible as well. It may be a result of being exposed to unique risk factors, such as common body image dissatisfaction, fear of coming out, or falling a victim to bullying. The lack of family support among sexual minorities also seems to be a significant factor – not only regarding the development of eating disorders but their effective treatment as well. This knowledge may be helpful in the prevention of eating disorders, making clinical examination more accurate and facilitating adjustments of therapy for people with eating disorders. Further research is needed, including more eating disorders and sexual orientation groups.

  12. Maximum skin hyperaemia induced by local heating: possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Kim M; Hannemann, Michael M; Tooke, John E; Clough, Geraldine F; Shore, Angela C

    2006-01-01

    Maximum skin hyperaemia (MH) induced by heating skin to > or = 42 degrees C is impaired in individuals at risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Interpretation of these findings is hampered by the lack of clarity of the mechanisms involved in the attainment of MH. MH was achieved by local heating of skin to 42-43 degrees C for 30 min, and assessed by laser Doppler fluximetry. Using double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study designs, the roles of prostaglandins were investigated by inhibiting their production with aspirin and histamine, with the H1 receptor antagonist cetirizine. The nitric oxide (NO) pathway was blocked by the NO synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl esther (L-NAME), and enhanced by sildenafil (prevents breakdown of cGMP). MH was not altered by aspirin, cetirizine or sildenafil, but was reduced by L-NAME: median placebo 4.48 V (25th, 75th centiles: 3.71, 4.70) versus L-NAME 3.25 V (3.10, 3.80) (p = 0.008, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Inhibition of NO production (L-NAME) resulted in a more rapid reduction in hyperaemia after heating (p = 0.011), whereas hyperaemia was prolonged in the presence of sildenafil (p = 0.003). The increase in skin blood flow was largely confined to the directly heated area, suggesting that the role of heat-induced activation of the axon reflex was small. NO, but not prostaglandins, histamine or an axon reflex, contributes to the increase in blood flow on heating and NO is also a component of the resolution of MH after heating. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Has enhanced folate status during pregnancy altered natural selection and possibly Autism prevalence? A closer look at a possible link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Eugene J

    2008-09-01

    The inverse association between maternal folate status and incidence of infants born with neural tube defects (NTD's) was recognized over twenty years ago and led the US health agencies in the early 1990s to recommend that women of childbearing age consume 400 microg of folic acid each day. The FDA followed by mandating that certain foods be fortified with folic acid and this has resulted in a significant enhancement of maternal folate status to levels that are often difficult to otherwise achieve naturally. At least one study indicates that this has decreased the incidence of NTD's. However, this same time period directly coincides with what many feel is the apparent beginning and continuous increase in the prevalence of Autism and related Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD's) in the US. Are these similar time frames of changes in maternal folate status and possible Autism prevalence a random event or has improved maternal (and fetal) folate status during pregnancy played a role? It is not only plausible but highly likely. A particular polymorphic form to a key enzyme required to activate folate for methylation in neurodevelopment, 5-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), demonstrates reduced activity under low or normal folate levels but normal activity under conditions of higher folate nutritional status. A consequence of the presence of the polymorphic form of this enzyme during normal or reduced folate status are higher plasma homocysteine levels than noncarriers and the combination of these factors have been shown in several studies to result in an increase rate of miscarriage via thrombotic events. However, the incidence of hyperhomocysteinemia in the presence of the polymorphism is reduced under the common condition of enhanced folate status and thereby masks the latent adverse effects of the presence of this enzyme form during pregnancy. Of great importance is that this polymorphism, although common in the normal population, is found in significantly

  14. Progranulin and Its Related MicroRNAs after Status Epilepticus: Possible Mechanisms of Neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körtvelyessy, Peter; Huchtemann, Tessa; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Bittner, Daniel M

    2017-02-24

    The current knowledge about neuroprotective mechanisms in humans after status epilepticus is scarce. One reason is the difficulty to measure possible mediators of these neuroprotective mechanisms. The dawn of microRNA detection in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the recent advancements in measuring proteins in the CSF such as progranulin, which is, e.g., responsible for neurite outgrowth and limiting exceeding neuroinflammatory responses, have given us new insights into putative neuroprotective mechanisms following status epilepticus. This should complement the animal data. In this review, we cover what is known about the role of progranulin as well as the links between microRNA changes and the progranulin pathway following status epilepticus in humans and animals hypothesizing neuroprotective and neurorehabilitative effects. Progranulin has also been found to feature prominently in the neuroprotective processes under hypoxic conditions and initiating neurorehabilitative processes. These properties may be used therapeutically, e.g., through drugs that raise the progranulin levels and therefore the cerebral progranulin levels as well with the goal of improving the outcome after status epilepticus.

  15. Progranulin and Its Related MicroRNAs after Status Epilepticus: Possible Mechanisms of Neuroprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Körtvelyessy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The current knowledge about neuroprotective mechanisms in humans after status epilepticus is scarce. One reason is the difficulty to measure possible mediators of these neuroprotective mechanisms. The dawn of microRNA detection in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and the recent advancements in measuring proteins in the CSF such as progranulin, which is, e.g., responsible for neurite outgrowth and limiting exceeding neuroinflammatory responses, have given us new insights into putative neuroprotective mechanisms following status epilepticus. This should complement the animal data. In this review, we cover what is known about the role of progranulin as well as the links between microRNA changes and the progranulin pathway following status epilepticus in humans and animals hypothesizing neuroprotective and neurorehabilitative effects. Progranulin has also been found to feature prominently in the neuroprotective processes under hypoxic conditions and initiating neurorehabilitative processes. These properties may be used therapeutically, e.g., through drugs that raise the progranulin levels and therefore the cerebral progranulin levels as well with the goal of improving the outcome after status epilepticus.

  16. On the Possible Links Between Electroweak Symmetry Breaking and Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hambye, Thomas; Tytgat, Michel H. G.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism behind electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) and the nature of dark matter (DM) are currently very important issues in particle physics. Usually, in most models, these two issues are not or poorly connected. However, since a natural dark matter candidate is a weakly interacting massive particle or WIMP, with mass around the electroweak scale, it is clearly of interest to investigate the possibility that DM and EWSB are closely related. In the context of a very simple extension of the Standard Model, the Inert Doublet Model, we show that dark matter could play a crucial role in the breaking of the electroweak symmetry. In this model, dark matter is the lightest component of an inert scalar doublet which can induce dynamically electroweak symmetry breaking at one loop level. Moreover, in a large fraction of the parameter space of this model, the mass of the dark matter particle is essentially determined by the electroweak scale, so that the fact that the WIMP DM mass is around the electroweak scale is not a coincidence.

  17. Applications of Laminar Weak-Link Mechanisms for Ultraprecision Synchrotron Radiation Instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, D.; Toellner, T. S.; Alp, E. E.; Maser, J.; Ilavsky, J.; Shastri, S. D.; Lee, P. L.; Narayanan, S.; Long, G. G.

    2007-01-01

    Unlike traditional kinematic flexure mechanisms, laminar overconstrained weak-link mechanisms provide much higher structure stiffness and stability. Using a laminar structure configured and manufactured by chemical etching and lithography techniques, we are able to design and build linear and rotary weak-link mechanisms with ultrahigh positioning sensitivity and stability for synchrotron radiation applications. Applications of laminar rotary weak-link mechanism include: high-energy-resolution monochromators for inelastic x-ray scattering and x-ray analyzers for ultra-small-angle scattering and powder-diffraction experiments. Applications of laminar linear weak-link mechanism include high-stiffness piezo-driven stages with subnanometer resolution for an x-ray microscope. In this paper, we summarize the recent designs and applications of the laminar weak-link mechanisms at the Advanced Photon Source

  18. A link between maternal malnutrition and depletion of glutathione in the developing lens: a possible explanation for idiopathic childhood cataract?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepa; Lim, Julie C; Donaldson, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    Lens cataract is the leading cause of blindness in developing countries. While cataract is primarily a disease of old age and is relatively rare in children, accounting for only four per cent of global blindness, childhood cataract is responsible for a third of the economic cost of blindness. While many of the causes of cataract in children are known, over half of childhood cataracts are idiopathic with no known cause. The incidence of idiopathic cataract is highest in developing countries and studies have discovered that low birth weight is a risk factor in the development of idiopathic childhood cataract. As low birth weight is a reflection of poor foetal growth, it is possible that maternal malnutrition, which is endemic in some developing countries, results in the altered physiology of the foetal lens. We have conducted a review of the literature that provides evidence for a link between maternal malnutrition, low birth weight and the development of childhood cataract. Using our accumulated knowledge on the pathways that deliver nutrients to the adult lens, we propose a cellular mechanism, by which oxidative stress caused by maternal malnutrition affects the development of antioxidant defence pathways in the embryonic lens, leading to an accelerated onset of nuclear cataract in childhood. © 2013 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2013 Optometrists Association Australia.

  19. Mechanically Strong, Polymer Cross-linked Aerogels (X-Aerogels)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventis, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    Aerogels comprise a class of low-density, high porous solid objects consisting of dimensionally quasi-stable self-supported three-dimensional assemblies of nanoparticles. Aerogels are pursued because of properties above and beyond those of the individual nanoparticles, including low thermal conductivity, low dielectric constant and high acoustic impedance. Possible applications include thermal and vibration insulation, dielectrics for fast electronics, and hosting of functional guests for a wide variety of optical, chemical and electronic applications. Aerogels, however, are extremely fragile materials, hence they have found only limited application in some very specialized environments, for example as Cerenkov radiation detectors in certain types of nuclear reactors, aboard spacecraft as collectors of hypervelocity particles (refer to NASA's Stardust program) and as thermal insulators on planetary vehicles on Mars (refer to Sojourner Rover in 1997 and Spirit and Opportunity in 2004). Along these lines, the X-Aerogel is a new NASA-developed strong lightweight material that has resolved the fragility problem of traditional (native) aerogels. X-Aerogels are made by applying a conformal polymer coating on the surfaces of the skeletal nanoparticles of native aerogels (see Scanning Electron Micrographs). Since the relative amounts of the polymeric crosslinker and the backbone are comparable, X-Aerogels can be viewed either as aerogels modified by the templated accumulation of polymer on the skeletal nanoparticles, or as nanoporous polymers made by remplated casting of polymer on a nanostructured framework. The most striking feature of X-Aerogels is that for a nominal 3-fold increase in density (still a ultralighweight material), the mechanical strength can be up to 300 times higher than the strength of the underlying native aerogel. Thus, X-Aerogels combine a multiple of the specific compressive strength of steel, with the the thermal conductivity of styrofoam. X

  20. Time with friends and physical activity as mechanisms linking obesity and television viewing among youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandewater, Elizabeth A; Park, Seoung Eun; Hébert, Emily T; Cummings, Hope M

    2015-07-27

    Though bivariate relationships between childhood obesity, physical activity, friendships and television viewing are well documented, empirical assessment of the extent to which links between obesity and television may be mediated by these factors is scarce. This study examines the possibility that time with friends and physical activity are potential mechanisms linking overweight/obesity to television viewing in youth. Data were drawn from children ages 10-18 years old (M = 13.81, SD = 2.55) participating in the 2002 wave of Child Development Supplement (CDS) to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) (n = 1,545). Data were collected both directly and via self-report from children and their parents. Path analysis was employed to examine a model whereby the relationships between youth overweight/obesity and television viewing were mediated by time spent with friends and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Overweight/obesity was directly related to less time spent with friends, but not to MVPA. Time spent with friends was directly and positively related to MVPA, and directly and negatively related to time spent watching television without friends. In turn, MVPA was directly and negatively related to watching television without friends. There were significant indirect effects of both overweight/obesity and time with friends on television viewing through MVPA, and of overweight/obesity on MVPA through time with friends. Net of any indirect effects, the direct effect of overweight/obesity on television viewing remained. The final model fit the data extremely well (χ2 = 5.77, df = 5, ptelevision viewing in youth. These findings highlight the importance of moving from examinations of bivariate relationships between weight status and television viewing to more nuanced explanatory models which attempt to identify and unpack the possible mechanisms linking them.

  1. 49 CFR 238.207 - Link between coupling mechanism and car body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Link between coupling mechanism and car body. 238.207 Section 238.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.207 Link between coupling mechanism and car body. All...

  2. Exploring the Possible Link between Childhood and Adolescent Bestiality and Interpersonal Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Christopher; Tallichet, Suzanne E.; Singer, Stephen D.

    2006-01-01

    Bestiality is a serious although less frequently occurring form of animal cruelty that may be linked to subsequent aggression against humans. This investigation examines whether a perpetrator's race, childhood residence, education, commission of a personal crime, and the number of personal crimes committed affects acts of bestiality committed…

  3. Opioid receptor desensitization: mechanisms and its link to tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane eAllouche

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Opioid receptors are part of the class A of G-protein coupled receptors and the target of the opiates, the most powerful analgesic molecules used in clinic. During a protracted use, a tolerance to analgesic effect develops resulting in a reduction of the effectiveness. So understanding mechanisms of tolerance is a great challenge and may help to find new strategies to tackle this side effect. This review will summarize receptor-related mechanisms that could underlie tolerance especially receptor desensitization. We will focus on the latest data obtained on molecular mechanisms involved in opioid receptor desensitization: phosphorylation, receptor uncoupling, internalization and post-endocytic fate of the receptor.

  4. Integrating Mechanisms for Insulin Resistance: Common Threads and Missing Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Varman T.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a complex metabolic disorder that defies a single etiological pathway. Accumulation of ectopic lipid metabolites, activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and innate immune pathways have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. However, these pathways are also closely linked to changes in fatty acid uptake, lipogenesis, and energy expenditure that can impact ectopic lipid deposition. Ultimately, accumulation of specific lipid metabolites (diacylglycerols and/or ceramides) in liver and skeletal muscle, may be a common pathway leading to impaired insulin signaling and insulin resistance. PMID:22385956

  5. Possible links between intestinal permeablity and food processing: a potential therapeutic niche for glutamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Robert Rapin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased intestinal permeability is a likely cause of various pathologies, such as allergies and metabolic or even cardiovascular disturbances. Intestinal permeability is found in many severe clinical situations and in common disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome. In these conditions, substances that are normally unable to cross the epithelial barrier gain access to the systemic circulation. To illustrate the potential harmfulness of leaky gut, we present an argument based on examples linked to protein or lipid glycation induced by modern food processing. Increased intestinal permeability should be largely improved by dietary addition of compounds, such as glutamine or curcumin, which both have the mechanistic potential to inhibit the inflammation and oxidative stress linked to tight junction opening. This brief review aims to increase physician awareness of this common, albeit largely unrecognized, pathology, which may be easily prevented or improved by means of simple nutritional changes.

  6. Possible Links between Intestinal Permeablity and Food Processing: A Potential Therapeutic Niche for Glutamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapin, Jean Robert; Wiernsperger, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Increased intestinal permeability is a likely cause of various pathologies, such as allergies and metabolic or even cardiovascular disturbances. Intestinal permeability is found in many severe clinical situations and in common disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome. In these conditions, substances that are normally unable to cross the epithelial barrier gain access to the systemic circulation. To illustrate the potential harmfulness of leaky gut, we present an argument based on examples linked to protein or lipid glycation induced by modern food processing. Increased intestinal permeability should be largely improved by dietary addition of compounds, such as glutamine or curcumin, which both have the mechanistic potential to inhibit the inflammation and oxidative stress linked to tight junction opening. This brief review aims to increase physician awareness of this common, albeit largely unrecognized, pathology, which may be easily prevented or improved by means of simple nutritional changes. PMID:20613941

  7. Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Lazarova, Darina L; Bordonaro, Michael

    2014-02-15

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that dietary fiber plays an important role in colon cancer prevention. These findings may relate to the ability of fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut microbiota, which modifies the host's metabolism in various ways. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which dietary fiber-dependent changes in gut microbiota enhance bile acid deconjugation, produce short chain fatty acids, and modulate inflammatory bioactive substances can lead to a better understanding of the beneficial role of dietary fiber. This article reviews the current knowledge concerning the mechanisms via which dietary fiber protects against colon cancer.

  8. A Glider-Assisted Link Disruption Restoration Mechanism in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhigang; Wang, Ning; Su, Yishan; Yang, Qiuling

    2018-02-07

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs) have become a hot research topic. In UASNs, nodes can be affected by ocean currents and external forces, which could result in sudden link disruption. Therefore, designing a flexible and efficient link disruption restoration mechanism to ensure the network connectivity is a challenge. In the paper, we propose a glider-assisted restoration mechanism which includes link disruption recognition and related link restoring mechanism. In the link disruption recognition mechanism, the cluster heads collect the link disruption information and then schedule gliders acting as relay nodes to restore the disrupted link. Considering the glider's sawtooth motion, we design a relay location optimization algorithm with a consideration of both the glider's trajectory and acoustic channel attenuation model. The utility function is established by minimizing the channel attenuation and the optimal location of glider is solved by a multiplier method. The glider-assisted restoration mechanism can greatly improve the packet delivery rate and reduce the communication energy consumption and it is more general for the restoration of different link disruption scenarios. The simulation results show that glider-assisted restoration mechanism can improve the delivery rate of data packets by 15-33% compared with cooperative opportunistic routing (OVAR), the hop-by-hop vector-based forwarding (HH-VBF) and the vector based forward (VBF) methods, and reduce communication energy consumption by 20-58% for a typical network's setting.

  9. A Glider-Assisted Link Disruption Restoration Mechanism in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Jin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs have become a hot research topic. In UASNs, nodes can be affected by ocean currents and external forces, which could result in sudden link disruption. Therefore, designing a flexible and efficient link disruption restoration mechanism to ensure the network connectivity is a challenge. In the paper, we propose a glider-assisted restoration mechanism which includes link disruption recognition and related link restoring mechanism. In the link disruption recognition mechanism, the cluster heads collect the link disruption information and then schedule gliders acting as relay nodes to restore the disrupted link. Considering the glider’s sawtooth motion, we design a relay location optimization algorithm with a consideration of both the glider’s trajectory and acoustic channel attenuation model. The utility function is established by minimizing the channel attenuation and the optimal location of glider is solved by a multiplier method. The glider-assisted restoration mechanism can greatly improve the packet delivery rate and reduce the communication energy consumption and it is more general for the restoration of different link disruption scenarios. The simulation results show that glider-assisted restoration mechanism can improve the delivery rate of data packets by 15–33% compared with cooperative opportunistic routing (OVAR, the hop-by-hop vector-based forwarding (HH-VBF and the vector based forward (VBF methods, and reduce communication energy consumption by 20–58% for a typical network’s setting.

  10. Composite Control of the n–link Chained Mechanical Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zikmund, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 5 (2008), s. 664-684 ISSN 0023-5954 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/08/0186 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : nonlinear systems * exact linearization * underactuated mechanical systems Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 0.281, year: 2008

  11. Mechanisms of gender-linked ischemic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingyue; Dziennis, Suzan; Hurn, Patricia D.; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2010-01-01

    Biological sex is an important determinant of stroke risk and outcome. Women are protected from cerebrovascular disease relative to men, an observation commonly attributed to the protective effect of female sex hormones, estrogen and progesterone. However, sex differences in brain injury persist well beyond the menopause and can be found in the pediatric population, suggesting that the effects of reproductive steroids may not completely explain sexual dimorphism in stroke. We review recent advances in our understanding of sex steroids (estradiol, progesterone and testosterone) in the context of ischemic cell death and neuroprotection. Understanding the molecular and cell-based mechanisms underlying sex differences in ischemic brain injury will lead to a better understanding of basic mechanisms of brain cell death and is an important step toward designing more effective therapeutic interventions in stroke. PMID:19531872

  12. Ecological mechanisms linking protected areas to surrounding lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Andrew J; DeFries, Ruth

    2007-06-01

    Land use is expanding and intensifying in the unprotected lands surrounding many of the world's protected areas. The influence of this land use change on ecological processes is poorly understood. The goal of this paper is to draw on ecological theory to provide a synthetic framework for understanding how land use change around protected areas may alter ecological processes and biodiversity within protected areas and to provide a basis for identifying scientifically based management alternatives. We first present a conceptual model of protected areas embedded within larger ecosystems that often include surrounding human land use. Drawing on case studies in this Invited Feature, we then explore a comprehensive set of ecological mechanisms by which land use on surrounding lands may influence ecological processes and biodiversity within reserves. These mechanisms involve changes in ecosystem size, with implications for minimum dynamic area, species-area effect, and trophic structure; altered flows of materials and disturbances into and out of reserves; effects on crucial habitats for seasonal and migration movements and population source/sink dynamics; and exposure to humans through hunting, poaching, exotics species, and disease. These ecological mechanisms provide a basis for assessing the vulnerability of protected areas to land use. They also suggest criteria for designing regional management to sustain protected areas in the context of surrounding human land use. These design criteria include maximizing the area of functional habitats, identifying and maintaining ecological process zones, maintaining key migration and source habitats, and managing human proximity and edge effects.

  13. Developmental phonagnosia: Linking neural mechanisms with the behavioural phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roswandowitz, Claudia; Schelinski, Stefanie; von Kriegstein, Katharina

    2017-07-15

    Human voice recognition is critical for many aspects of social communication. Recently, a rare disorder, developmental phonagnosia, which describes the inability to recognise a speaker's voice, has been discovered. The underlying neural mechanisms are unknown. Here, we used two functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments to investigate brain function in two behaviourally well characterised phonagnosia cases, both 32 years old: AS has apperceptive and SP associative phonagnosia. We found distinct malfunctioned brain mechanisms in AS and SP matching their behavioural profiles. In apperceptive phonagnosia, right-hemispheric auditory voice-sensitive regions (i.e., Heschl's gyrus, planum temporale, superior temporal gyrus) showed lower responses than in matched controls (n AS =16) for vocal versus non-vocal sounds and for speaker versus speech recognition. In associative phonagnosia, the connectivity between voice-sensitive (i.e. right posterior middle/inferior temporal gyrus) and supramodal (i.e. amygdala) regions was reduced in comparison to matched controls (n SP =16) during speaker versus speech recognition. Additionally, both cases recruited distinct potential compensatory mechanisms. Our results support a central assumption of current two-system models of voice-identity processing: They provide the first evidence that dysfunction of voice-sensitive regions and impaired connectivity between voice-sensitive and supramodal person recognition regions can selectively contribute to deficits in person recognition by voice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Linked tandem mirror configuration as a possible steady state high β plasma container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari.

    1982-04-01

    A possibility of achieving steady state high β plasma confinement in toroidal geometry is considered in detail by closing off the ends of tandem mirrors entirely by flux bridges, where β is the ratio of plasma pressure to the magnetic pressure. The key problem of this approach seems to be the magnetic design of magneto-hydrodynamically stabilized, preferentially leaky bridges. (author)

  15. Shrinkage of body size of small insects: A possible link to global warming?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jihuan

    2007-01-01

    The increase of global mean surface temperature leads to the increase of metabolic rate. This might lead to an unexpected threat from the small insect world. Global warming shrinks cell size, shorten lifespan, and accelerate evolution. The present note speculates on possible connections between allometry and E-infinity theory

  16. Geomagnetic anomalies - possible earthquake precursors - linked with 2004 significant seismic activity in Vrancea, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enescu, D.

    2005-01-01

    The association between a precursory geomagnetic anomaly and a Vrancea earthquake of moderate-to-high magnitude (M W = 6.3) followed by weaker earthquakes (M W W ≤ 6.3 the conclusion of our earlier papers, i.e., that the great majority of Vrancea earthquakes of magnitudes 3.7 ≤ M W ≤5.0 were accompanied by observable precursory electromagnetic anomalies. Our works show that neither the precursor time nor the amplitude of the precursory magnetic anomaly can be linked reliably with the magnitude of the anticipated earthquake. Knowing the way electric resistivity varies ahead of an earthquake, we can assert that the earthquake-precursory growth in geomagnetic impedance is matched by an earthquake-precursory decrease of electric resistivity. (authors)

  17. Out of time: a possible link between mirror neurons, autism and electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Ian M

    2006-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests a link between autism and the human mirror neuron system. In this paper, I argue that temporal disruption from the environment may play an important role in the observed mirror neuron dysfunction, leading in turn to the pattern of deficits associated with autism. I suggest that the developing nervous system of an infant may be particularly prone to temporal noise that can interfere with the initial calibration of brain networks such as the mirror neuron system. The most likely source of temporal noise in the environment is artificially generated electromagnetic radiation. To date, there has been little evidence that electromagnetic radiation poses a direct biological hazard. It is clear, however, that time-varying electromagnetic waves have the potential to temporally modulate the nervous system, particularly when populations of neurons are required to act together. This modulation may be completely harmless for the fully developed nervous system of an adult. For an infant, this same temporal disruption might act to severely delay or disrupt vital calibration processes.

  18. Depression and cardiovascular disease: Epidemiological evidence on their linking mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2017-03-01

    Depression's burden of disease goes beyond functioning and quality of life and extends to somatic health. Results from longitudinal cohort studies converge in illustrating that major depressive disorder (MDD) subsequently increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality with about 80%. The impact of MDD on cardiovascular health may be partly explained by mediating mechanisms such as unhealthy lifestyle (smoking, excessive alcohol use, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, therapy non-compliance) and unfavorable pathophysiological disturbances (autonomic, HPA-axis, metabolic and immuno-inflammatory dysregulations). A summary of the literature findings as well as relevant results from the large-scale Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (N=2981) are presented. Persons with MDD have significantly worse lifestyles as well as more pathophysiological disturbances as compared to healthy controls. Some of these differences seem to be specific for (typical versus 'atypical', or antidepressant treated versus drug-naive) subgroups of MDD patients. Alternative explanations are also present, namely undetected confounding, iatrogenic effects or 'third factors' such as genetics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Possible Link between Gastric Mucosal Atrophy and Gastric Cancer after Helicobacter pylori Eradication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomitsu Tahara

    Full Text Available The effect of H. pylori eradication in gastric cancer prevention can be attributed to the improvement of atrophic gastritis, which is a known risk of gastric cancer. However, gastric cancer has also been diagnosed after long-term H. pylori eradication. This study aimed to clarify the association between gastric atrophy and gastric cancer after H. pylori eradication, including its clinicopathological features.A total of 55 consecutive patients with 64 early gastric cancers (EGCs diagnosed after H. pylori eradication were enrolled. The degree of endoscopic atrophy and the histological degrees of mononuclear cell infiltration, atrophy, and metaplasia in the corpus and adjacent mucosa of the EGCs were determined and scored.The majority of EGCs (63/64 were located within the endoscopically assessed atrophic mucosa or along the atrophic border. The adjacent mucosa of the EGCs presented significantly higher degrees of all histological parameters than in the corpus (mononuclear cell infiltration, 0.86+/-0.09 vs. 0.51+/-0.11, P = 0.016; atrophy, 1.77+/-0.13 vs. 0.65+/-0.14, P<0.0001; metaplasia, 1.68+/-0.13 vs. 0.48+/-0.1, P<0.0001. The degree of endoscopic atrophy improved in the patients with longer post-H. pylori eradication periods; however, this trend was not observed for the histological parameters, and high degrees of atrophy and metaplasia were observed in the adjacent mucosa of the EGCs compared with the corpus during all periods (all P<0.05. The histological degrees of atrophy and metaplasia in the adjacent mucosa were particularly higher in the patients who underwent eradication due to gastric ulcers.Severe gastric atrophy remained in the adjacent mucosa of the EGCs after H. pylori eradication, which may be linked to gastric carcinogenesis.

  20. Leptin in sarcopenic visceral obesity: possible link between adipocytes and myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko Kohara

    Full Text Available The combination of sarcopenia, age-related loss of muscle strength and mass, and obesity has been recognized as a new category of obesity among the elderly. Given that leptin has been hypothesized to be involved in the pathogenesis of sarcopenic obesity, we investigated the relationship between plasma leptin levels and thigh muscle sarcopenia and visceral obesity. Thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA and visceral fat area were measured using computed tomography as indices for muscle mass and visceral fat, respectively, in 782 middle-aged to elderly subjects (303 men and 479 women, participating in a medical check-up program. Visceral obesity was defined as visceral fat area >100 cm², and sarcopenia was defined as < (one standard deviation--mean of thigh muscle CSA/body weight of young subjects [aged <50 years].Thigh muscle CSA was significantly and negatively associated with plasma levels of leptin in both men (β = -0.28, p<0.0001 and women (β = -0.20, p<0.0001, even after correcting for other confounding parameters, including age, body weight, body height, visceral fat area, blood pressure, homeostatic model assessment index, and high sensitive C reactive protein. Subjects were divided into four groups based on presence or absence of sarcopenia or visceral obesity. Plasma levels of leptin were higher in subjects with sarcopenic visceral obesity than in those with either sarcopenia or visceral obesity alone. These findings indicate that sarcopenic visceral obesity is a more advanced, and suggest that leptin may link visceral obesity and sarcopenia.

  1. Temporal variability of gravity wave drag - vertical coupling and possible climate links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksovsky, Jiri; Sacha, Petr; Kuchar, Ales; Pisoft, Petr

    2017-04-01

    In the atmosphere, the internal gravity waves (IGW) are one of the fastest ways of natural information transfer in the vertical direction. Tropospheric changes that result in modification of sourcing, propagation or breaking conditions for IGWs almost immediately influence the distribution of gravity wave drag in the stratosphere. So far most of the related studies deal with IGW impacts higher in the upper stratospheric/mesospheric region and with the modulation of IGWs by planetary waves. This is most likely due to the fact that IGWs induce highest accelerations in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region. However, the imposed drag force is much bigger in the stratosphere. In the presented analysis, we have assessed the relationship between the gravity wave activity in the stratosphere and other climatic phenomena through statistical techniques. Multivariable regression has been applied to investigate the IGW-related eastward and northward wind tendencies in the CMAM30-SD data, subject to the explanatory variables involving local circulation characteristics (derived from regional configuration of the thermobaric field) as well as the phases of the large-scale internal climate variability modes (ENSO, NAO, QBO). Our tests have highlighted several geographical areas with statistically significant responses of the orographic gravity waves effect to each of the variability modes under investigation; additional experiments have also indicated distinct signs of nonlinearity in some of the links uncovered. Furthermore, we have also applied composite analysis of displaced and split stratospheric polar vortex events (SPV) from CMAM30-SD to focus on how the strength and occurrence of the IGW hotspots can play a role in SPV occurrence and frequency.

  2. Plasmas in the atmosphere, tectonics and earthquake: a possible link for the crustal diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straser, V.

    2017-12-01

    An important aspect in the crustal surmise is the potential link between luminous phenomena and the earthquake . The study want to added data to this new geophysics concepts. The method is based on the comparison approach and consist in the data connection on a field in the area of Po Plain (Italy) with professional equipment: cameras, video cameras, spectroscopes, ELF / VLF receivers, Geiger counters and EM fields detectors. The Luminous phenomena sighting is compared 24/7 online with INGV and USGS database. The results show the formation of 2 types of plasma near the soil: Spheroidal shape, yellow-orange, constant brightness, sudden appearances, elevation from the ground between 10 ° -20 °, no noise, no wake emitted, estimated size about 2m, and duration of few seconds. Spheroidal shape, intense red fuzzy coloration, constant brightness, sudden appearances and fast movements in a linear fashion or slow movements, elevation from the ground between 2° to 7 °, no noise, no waves emitted, estimated dimensions over 2m, with a duration from a few seconds to a few minutes. We suppose that the formation of gas, also radioactive such as radon, and the electric charges necessary to trigger plasma, are related to the crustal stress. The rocks are exposed to important tectonics efforts and the outcome is the air ionizations near the soil that produce plasma if there are gas. The appearance of plasma forerun the earthquake that will happen some days later. The Anomalous Luminous phenomena may be related to tectonic activity, and the area of investigation can become a "lab" for research in Physics and Geology for the crustal diagnosis of pre-seismic phase.

  3. Considerations in relation to some research on the possible neural underpinnings linked to visual artworks observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Bartoli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the observations conducted by Freedberg & Gallese (2007 on neural processes implication in organizing the empathetic/aesthetic response, some recent research carried out by neuroscientists and art historians are analyzed, as they demonstrated cortical sensorimotor activation during the observation of abstract artworks (2012, 2013. The role of the “embodied simulation” of artist’s gesture in the empathic perception of artworks is hereby confirmed. These results are commented in light of psychological studies about aesthetic experience, with special regard to those based on a phenomenological methodology. The intention is to further explore possible interactions between neurosciences and phenomenological psychology, in accordance with their respective theoretical and methodological differences.

  4. Imaging Mitochondrial Redox Potential and Its Possible Link to Tumor Metastatic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin Z.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular redox states can regulate cell metabolism, growth, differentiation, motility, apoptosis, signaling pathways, and gene expressions etc. Growing body of literature suggest importance of redox status for cancer progression. While most studies on redox state were done on cells and tissue lysates, it is important to understand the role of redox state in tissue in vivo/ex vivo and image its heterogeneity. Redox scanning is a clinically-translatable method for imaging tissue mitochondrial redox potential with a submillimeter resolution. Redox scanning data in mouse models of human cancers demonstrate a correlation between mitochondrial redox state and tumor metastatic potential. I will discuss the significance of this correlation and possible directions for future research. PMID:22895837

  5. Mechanisms of aqueous wollastonite carbonation as a possible CO2 sequestration process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.; Witkamp, G.J.; Comans, R.N.J.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms of aqueous wollastonite carbonation as a possible carbon dioxide sequestration process were investigated experimentally by systematic variation of the reaction temperature, CO2 pressure, particle size, reaction time, liquid to solid ratio and agitation power. The carbonation reaction

  6. Oxidized LDL receptor 1 (OLR1 as a possible link between obesity, dyslipidemia and cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magomed Khaidakov

    Full Text Available Recent studies have linked expression of lectin-like ox-LDL receptor 1 (OLR1 to tumorigenesis. We analyzed microarray data from Olr1 knockout (KO and wild type (WT mice for genes involved in cellular transformation and evaluated effects of OLR1 over-expression in normal mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A and breast cancer cells (HCC1143 in terms of gene expression, migration, adhesion and transendothelial migration. Twenty-six out of 238 genes were inhibited in tissues of OLR1 KO mice; the vast majority of OLR1 sensitive genes contained NF-κB binding sites in their promoters. Further studies revealed broad inhibition of NF-kB target genes outside of the transformation-associated gene pool, with enrichment themes of defense response, immune response, apoptosis, proliferation, and wound healing. Transcriptome of Olr1 KO mice also revealed inhibition of de novo lipogenesis, rate-limiting enzymes fatty acid synthase (Fasn, stearoyl-CoA desaturase (Scd1 and ELOVL family member 6 (Elovl6, as well as lipolytic phospholipase A2 group IVB (Pla2g4b. In studies comparing MCF10A and HCC1143, the latter displayed 60% higher OLR1 expression. Forced over-expression of OLR1 resulted in upregulation of NF-κB (p65 and its target pro-oncogenes involved in inhibition of apoptosis (BCL2, BCL2A1, TNFAIP3 and regulation of cell cycle (CCND2 in both cell lines. Basal expression of FASN, SCD1 and PLA2G4B, as well as lipogenesis transcription factors PPARA, SREBF2 and CREM, was higher in HCC1143 cells. Over-expression of OLR1 in HCC1143 cells also enhanced cell migration, without affecting their adherence to TNFα-activated endothelium or transendothelial migration. On the other hand, OLR1 neutralizing antibody inhibited both adhesion and transmigration of untreated HCC1143 cells. We conclude that OLR1 may act as an oncogene by activation of NF-kB target genes responsible for proliferation, migration and inhibition of apoptosis and de novo lipogenesis genes.

  7. A possible link between the Epstein-Barr virus infection and autoimmune thyroid disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwizdek, Katarzyna; Michalski, Marek; Wojnicz, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), also known as human herpesvirus 4, is a member of the Herpesviridae virus family. EBV infection can cause infectious mononucleosis (IM) in the lytic phase of EBV’s life cycle. Past EBV infection is associated with lymphomas, and may also result in certain allergic and autoimmune diseases. Although potential mechanisms of autoimmune diseases have not been clearly elucidated, both genetic and environmental factors, such as infectious agents, are considered to be responsible for their development. In addition, EBV modifies the host immune response. The worldwide prevalence of autoimmune diseases shows how common this pathogen is. Normally, the virus stays in the body and remains dormant throughout life. However, this is not always the case, and a serious EBV-related illness may develop later in life. This explains the chronic course of autoimmune diseases that is often accompanied by exacerbations of symptoms. Based on the present studies, EBV infection can cause autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Sjögren’s syndrome, and autoimmune hepatitis. The EBV has also been reported in patients with autoimmune thyroid disorders. Although EBV is not the only agent responsible for the development of autoimmune thyroid diseases, it can be considered a contributory factor. PMID:27833448

  8. Possible Link between Metabolic Syndrome and Chronic Kidney Disease in the Development of Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosaku Nitta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS is a clinical syndrome that consists of visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and impaired insulin sensitivity. Although individual components of MetS have been implicated in the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD, few studies have examined the effect of combinations of the components of MetS on the development of CKD and cardiovascular disease (CVD. The prevalence of MetS is increasing worldwide in both developing and developed countries, and early detection and treatment of MetS would be a cost-effective strategy for preventing the development of CKD. Visceral obesity and insulin resistance are two important features of MetS that may be associated with renal damage. Lifestyle modifications, including caloric restriction and exercise, are necessary to treat MetS. Initial antihypertensive therapy should consist of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker. An improved understanding of the mechanism responsible for the association between MetS and renal damage should be helpful in determining the treatment regimens directed at cardiovascular and renal protection.

  9. Protection by deferoxamine from endothelial injury: A possible link with inhibition of intracellular xanthine oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinaldo, J.E.; Gorry, M.

    1990-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical scavengers and xanthine oxidase inhibitors protect cultured bovine pulmonary endothelial cells (BPAEC) from lytic injury by the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We hypothesized that exposure of BPAEC to cytotoxic concentrations of LPS activated intracellular xanthine oxidase, and that intracellular iron-dependent hydroxyl radical formation (a Fenton reaction) ensued, resulting in cell lysis. To test this, the protective effects of deferoxamine against H2O2 and LPS-induced cytotoxicity to BPAEC was assessed by 51Cr release. Preincubation with 0.4 mM deferoxamine conferred 67 +/- 15% (mean +/- SE) protection from LPS-induced cytotoxicity but 48 h of preincubation were required to induce significant protection. Significant protection form a classical Fenton reaction model, injury by 50 microM H2O2, could be induced by a 1-h preincubation with a 0.4 mM deferoxamine. The dissociated time course suggested that deferoxamine might work by different mechanisms in these models. The effects of LPS and deferoxamine on BPAEC-associated xanthine oxidase (XO) and xanthine dehydrogenase (XD) activity were assessed using a spectrofluorophotometric measurement of the conversion of pterin to isoxanthopterin. BPAEC had 106 +/- 7 microU/mg XD+XO activity; XO activity constituted 48 +/- 1% of total XO+XD activity. LPS at a cytotoxic concentration did not alter XO, XD, or percent XO. Deferoxamine had striking proportional inhibitory effects on XO and XD in intact cells. XO+XD activity fell to 6 +/- 1% of control levels during a 48-h exposure of BPAEC to deferoxamine. Deferoxamine did not inhibit XO+XD ex vivo

  10. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus 3C-Like Protease-Mediated Nucleocapsid Processing: Possible Link to Viral Cell Culture Adaptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaru-Ampornpan, Peera; Jengarn, Juggragarn; Wanitchang, Asawin; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2017-01-15

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) causes severe diarrhea and high mortality rates in newborn piglets, leading to massive losses to the swine industry worldwide during recent epidemics. Intense research efforts are now focusing on defining viral characteristics that confer a growth advantage, pathogenicity, or cell adaptability in order to better understand the PEDV life cycle and identify suitable targets for antiviral or vaccine development. Here, we report a unique phenomenon of PEDV nucleocapsid (N) cleavage by the PEDV-encoded 3C-like protease (3Cpro) during infection. The identification of the 3Cpro cleavage site at the C terminus of N supported previous observations that PEDV 3Cpro showed a substrate requirement slightly different from that of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) 3Cpro and revealed a greater flexibility in its substrate recognition site. This cleavage motif is present in the majority of cell culture-adapted PEDV strains but is missing in emerging field isolates. Remarkably, reverse-genetics-derived cell culture-adapted PEDV AVCT12 harboring uncleavable N displayed growth retardation in Vero E6-APN cells compared to the wild-type virus. These observations altogether shed new light on the investigation and characterization of the PEDV nucleocapsid protein and its possible link to cell culture adaptation. Recurrent PEDV outbreaks have resulted in enormous economic losses to swine industries worldwide. To gain the upper hand in combating this disease, it is necessary to understand how this virus replicates and evades host immunity. Characterization of viral proteins provides important clues to mechanisms by which viruses survive and spread. Here, we characterized an intriguing phenomenon in which the nucleocapsids of some PEDV strains are proteolytically processed by the virally encoded main protease. Growth retardation in recombinant PEDV carrying uncleavable N suggests a replication advantage provided by the cleavage

  11. Physical and mechanical properties of gamma radiation cross-linked polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Maria E.; Romero, G.; Smolko, Eduardo E.

    1999-01-01

    Granulated LDPE 2003 polyethylene was extruded and irradiated under nitrogen with 150, 200 and 300 kGy gamma rays doses to produce cross-linking. The study of the physical and mechanical properties shows that the product has a high degree of molecular cross-linking, can be heated up to 200 C for 2 hours without deformation and that the mechanical properties improve. Preliminary aging tests indicate that after heating at 60 C for 4 weeks no physical or mechanical deterioration can be observed. (author)

  12. Study on predicting residual life of elevator links by fracture mechanics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Helin; Zhang Yi; Deng Zengjie [China National Petroleum Corp., Xi`an, Shaanxi (China). Tubular Goods Research Center; Jin Dazeng [Xi`an Jiaotong Univ., Xi`an, Shaanxi (China)

    1995-12-31

    On the basis of investigation, failure and fracture analysis of elevator links, residual life prediction of links using fracture mechanics approach is studied, and mechanical properties, fracture toughness value K{sub IC} and fatigue crack propagation rage da/dN of the steel for elevator links are determined. Using the relation between stress intensity factor K{sub I} and the strain-energy release rate, the two-dimensional conversion thickness finite element method has been used to calculate the stress intensity factors K{sub I} for dangerous sections in the ring part of links. Furthermore, the reliability of calculations of the finite element stress intensity factors K{sub I} for dangerous sections of elevator links and the residual life computation for links are verified by fatigue tests of actual links. Finally, the experimental verification of computed results by 150T link fractured at site indicates that the computed critical crack lengths and residual life tally well with those measured and meet the needs of oil drilling.

  13. Leptin and Leptin Resistance in the Pathogenesis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Possible Link to Oxidative Stress and Cardiovascular Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slava Berger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity-related sleep breathing disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS cause intermittent hypoxia (IH during sleep, a powerful trigger of oxidative stress. Obesity also leads to dramatic increases in circulating levels of leptin, a hormone produced in adipose tissue. Leptin acts in the hypothalamus to suppress food intake and increase metabolic rate. However, obese individuals are resistant to metabolic effects of leptin. Leptin also activates the sympathetic nervous system without any evidence of resistance, possibly because these effects occur peripherally without a need to penetrate the blood-brain barrier. IH is a potent stimulator of leptin expression and release from adipose tissue. Hyperleptinemia and leptin resistance may upregulate generation of reactive oxygen species, increasing oxidative stress and promoting inflammation. The current review summarizes recent data on a possible link between leptin and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of sleep breathing disorders.

  14. Clastic polygonal networks around Lyot crater, Mars: Possible formation mechanisms from morphometric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, L. M.; Balme, M. R.; Conway, S. J.; Hagermann, A.; Barrett, A. M.; Collins, G. S.; Soare, R. J.

    2018-03-01

    Polygonal networks of patterned ground are a common feature in cold-climate environments. They can form through the thermal contraction of ice-cemented sediment (i.e. formed from fractures), or the freezing and thawing of ground ice (i.e. formed by patterns of clasts, or ground deformation). The characteristics of these landforms provide information about environmental conditions. Analogous polygonal forms have been observed on Mars leading to inferences about environmental conditions. We have identified clastic polygonal features located around Lyot crater, Mars (50°N, 30°E). These polygons are unusually large (>100 m diameter) compared to terrestrial clastic polygons, and contain very large clasts, some of which are up to 15 metres in diameter. The polygons are distributed in a wide arc around the eastern side of Lyot crater, at a consistent distance from the crater rim. Using high-resolution imaging data, we digitised these features to extract morphological information. These data are compared to existing terrestrial and Martian polygon data to look for similarities and differences and to inform hypotheses concerning possible formation mechanisms. Our results show the clastic polygons do not have any morphometric features that indicate they are similar to terrestrial sorted, clastic polygons formed by freeze-thaw processes. They are too large, do not show the expected variation in form with slope, and have clasts that do not scale in size with polygon diameter. However, the clastic networks are similar in network morphology to thermal contraction cracks, and there is a potential direct Martian analogue in a sub-type of thermal contraction polygons located in Utopia Planitia. Based upon our observations, we reject the hypothesis that polygons located around Lyot formed as freeze-thaw polygons and instead an alternative mechanism is put forward: they result from the infilling of earlier thermal contraction cracks by wind-blown material, which then became

  15. Epigenetic mechanisms: A possible link between autism spectrum disorders and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadinova, Miroslava; Boyadjieva, Nadka

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) still remains unclear and seems to involve a considerable overlap between polygenic, epigenetic and environmental factors. We have summarized the current understanding of the interplay between gene expression dysregulation via epigenetic modifications and the potential epigenetic impact of environmental factors in neurodevelopmental deficits. Furthermore, we discuss the scientific controversies of the relationship between prenatal exposure to alcohol and alcohol-induced epigenetic dysregulations, and gene expression alterations which are associated with disrupted neural plasticity and causal pathways for ASDs. The review of the literature suggests that a better understanding of developmental epigenetics should contribute to furthering our comprehension of the etiology and pathogenesis of ASDs and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comet nuclei and Trojan asteroids - A new link and a possible mechanism for comet splittings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, W.K.; Tholen, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Relatively elongated shapes, implied by recent evidence of a greater incidence of high amplitude lightcurves for comet nuclei and Trojan asteroids than for similarly scaled main belt asteroids, are suggested to have evolved among comet nuclei and Trojans due to volatile loss. It is further suggested that such an evolutionary course may account for observed comet splitting; rotational splitting may specifically occur as a result of evolution in the direction of an elongated shape through sublimation. Supporting these hypotheses, the few m/sec separation velocities projected for rotationally splitting elongated nuclei are precisely in the observed range. 40 refs

  17. Analytical expression for an optimised link bar mechanism for a beta-type Stirling engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Henrik; Bovin, Jonas Kabell

    2007-01-01

    The design of a mechanism for kinematic beta-type Stirling engines, where the displacer piston and the working piston share the same cylinder, is complicated. A well-known solution is the rhombic drive, but this solution depends on oil lubrication because of the gear wheels connecting the two...... counter rotating crank shafts. In a hermetically sealed Stirling engine it is an advantage to avoid oil in the crank case, making the application of the rhombic drive difficult. In this paper, another crank mechanism is presented, which has been developed for a 9 kW single cylinder engine. The new crank...... mechanism is a further development of the mechanism in a previous 9 kW engine. The crank mechanism for the beta-type Stirling engine is based on two four-link straight line mechanisms pointing up and down, respectively. The mechanism pointing upwards is connected to the working piston, while the mechanism...

  18. In-situcross-linked PVDF membranes with enhanced mechanical durability for vacuum membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Zuo, Jian; Chung, Neal Tai-Shung

    2016-01-01

    A novel and effective one-step method has been demonstrated to fabricate cross-linked polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes with better mechanical properties and flux for seawater desalination via vacuum membrane distillation (VMD). This method involves the addition of two functional nonsolvent additives; namely, water and ethylenediamine (EDA), into the polymer casting solution. The former acts as a pore forming agent, while the latter performs as a cross-linking inducer. The incorporation of water tends to increase membrane flux via increasing porosity and pore size but sacrifices membrane mechanical properties. Conversely, the presence of EDA enhances membrane mechanical properties through in-situ cross-linking reaction. Therefore, by synergistically combining the effects of both functional additives, the resultant PVDF membranes have shown good MD performance and mechanical properties simultaneously. The parameters that affect the cross-link reaction and membrane mechanical properties such as reaction duration and EDA concentration have been systematically studied. The membranes cast from an optimal reaction condition comprising 0.8 wt % EDA and 3-hour reaction not only shows a 40% enhancement in membrane Young's Modulus compared to the one without EDA but also achieves a good VMD flux of 43.6 L/m2-h at 60°C. This study may open up a totally new approach to design next-generation high performance MD membranes. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 62: 4013–4022, 2016

  19. In-situcross-linked PVDF membranes with enhanced mechanical durability for vacuum membrane distillation

    KAUST Repository

    Zuo, Jian

    2016-05-12

    A novel and effective one-step method has been demonstrated to fabricate cross-linked polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes with better mechanical properties and flux for seawater desalination via vacuum membrane distillation (VMD). This method involves the addition of two functional nonsolvent additives; namely, water and ethylenediamine (EDA), into the polymer casting solution. The former acts as a pore forming agent, while the latter performs as a cross-linking inducer. The incorporation of water tends to increase membrane flux via increasing porosity and pore size but sacrifices membrane mechanical properties. Conversely, the presence of EDA enhances membrane mechanical properties through in-situ cross-linking reaction. Therefore, by synergistically combining the effects of both functional additives, the resultant PVDF membranes have shown good MD performance and mechanical properties simultaneously. The parameters that affect the cross-link reaction and membrane mechanical properties such as reaction duration and EDA concentration have been systematically studied. The membranes cast from an optimal reaction condition comprising 0.8 wt % EDA and 3-hour reaction not only shows a 40% enhancement in membrane Young\\'s Modulus compared to the one without EDA but also achieves a good VMD flux of 43.6 L/m2-h at 60°C. This study may open up a totally new approach to design next-generation high performance MD membranes. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 62: 4013–4022, 2016

  20. Contemporary Art and Citizenship Education: The Possibilities of Cross-Curricular Links on the Level of Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metoda Kemperl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike the previous phenomenon of modern art, contemporary art strives to return to society and everyday life, while thematising the current issues that the individual faces here and now. One of its more frequent topics is that of sustainable development, and the accompanying issues of environment, values, relations to others, etc. All such topics are part of the concept of active citizenship, which is why understanding contemporary art calls for active citizenship. This particularly holds true for relational art, which demands active participation on the part of the viewer. This paper inquires into the possibilities of the connection of contemporary art and citizenship education in elementary schools. Contemporary pedagogic doctrine highly encourages cross-curricular teaching; therefore, I have focused my analysis on the curricula of the subjects of Art Education, and Citizenship and Patriotic Education and Ethics, determining that (from this perspective their link is quite troublesome. The absence of contemporary art from the curriculum of Art Education has been criticised on many occasions, but the problem of its curriculum seems to be of a conceptual nature. Only by a more intense inter-institutional link between schools and contemporary art galleries and museums can the common goals of art education and citizenship education be realised. This paper will, therefore, strive to show potential cross curricular links in content on three examples of participatory practices (Proletarians of All Countries, Beggar Robot and EU/Others, while warning (from the pedagogic perspective against the often neglected fact that contemporary art is experienced here and now.

  1. Pregnancy follow-up in a patient with mechanical valve: possible in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pregnancy follow-up in a patient with mechanical valve: possible in sub-Saharan Africa? ... Background: In Africa in general and in Cameroon in particular, post rheumatic cardiopathies are a health care problem, one of the causes of infertility in the women population and a major cause of death among children and adults.

  2. A possible generalization of the concept of symmetry in analytical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigore, D.R.

    1987-09-01

    A theorem of Lee Hwa Chung suggests a possible generalization of the symmetry concept in classical mechanics. It is shown that the theory of Konstant-Souriau-Kirillov can be adapted to this more general case. The theory is illustrated with a number of exaples.(author)

  3. On the possibility of extending the tests of quantum mechanical correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergia, S.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental tests of quantum mechanical correlations in connection with Bell's inequality have generally considered decays in sub-systems characterized by two-valued observables. The author analyses the possibility of extending these tests to a much wider class of cases. (Auth.)

  4. A novel strategy for preparing mechanically robust ionically cross-linked alginate hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jejurikar, Aparna; Lawrie, Gwen; Groendahl, Lisbeth; Martin, Darren

    2011-01-01

    The properties of alginate films modified using two cross-linker ions (Ca 2+ and Ba 2+ ), comparing two separate cross-linking techniques (the traditional immersion (IM) method and a new strategy in a pressure-assisted diffusion (PD) method), are evaluated. This was achieved through measuring metal ion content, water uptake and film stability in an ionic solution ([Ca 2+ ] = 2 mM). Characterization of the internal structure and mechanical properties of hydrated films were established by cryogenic scanning electron microscopy and tensile testing, respectively. It was found that gels formed by the PD technique possessed greater stability and did not exhibit any delamination after 21 day immersion as compared to gels formed by the IM technique. The Ba 2+ cross-linked gels possessed significantly higher cross-linking density as reflected in lower water content, a more dense internal structure and higher Young's modulus compared to Ca 2+ cross-linked gels. For the Ca 2+ cross-linked gels, a large improvement in the mechanical properties was observed in gels produced by the PD technique and this was attributed to thicker pore walls observed within the hydrogel structure. In contrast, for the Ba 2+ cross-linked gels, the PD technique resulted in gels that had lower tensile strength and strain energy density and this was attributed to phase separation and larger macropores in this gel.

  5. Oxidized-low density lipoprotein in gingival crevicular fluid of patients with chronic periodontitis: a possible link to atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rucha; Thomas, Raison; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2014-02-01

    To investigate a possible link between periodontitis and atherogenesis by examining the levels of anti-oxidized low density lipoprotien (ox LDL) and low density lipoprotien (LDL) in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum of healthy subjects and chronic periodontitis patients. Sixty male subjects (35-55 years) were grouped into 30 healthy individuals and 30 subjects with chronic periodontitis. Serum and GCF samples were obtained from each subject and were assessed for anti-ox LDL and LDL levels. A significant difference (p chronic periodontitis groups. Also the ratio of GCF anti-ox LDL to GCF LDL was significantly higher (p chronic periodontitis patients as compared to the healthy group. A significant rise in ox LDL level in otherwise systemically healthy chronic periodontitis patients may put these subjects at an increased risk of developing atherosclerosis.

  6. Photo-degradation of poly(neopentyl isophthalate). Part II: Mechanism of cross-linking.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malanowski, P.; Benthem, van R.A.T.M.; Ven, van der L.G.J.; Laven, J.; Kisin, S.; With, de G.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of cross-linking of poly(neopentyl isophthalate) (PNI) by photo-degradation in nitrogen atmosphere was investigated. The exposure of PNI to UV light resulted in gel (insoluble material) formation. The gel material was collected and the morphology of the gel material was characterized

  7. Psychosocial mechanisms linking the social environment to mental health in African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resource-poor social environments predict poor health, but the mechanisms and processes linking the social environment to psychological health and well-being remain unclear. This study explored psychosocial mediators of the association between the social environment and mental health in African Amer...

  8. Air rudder mechanism dynamics considering two elements:Joint clearance and link flexibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuntao; Quan, Qiquan; Li, He; Tang, Dewei; Li, Zhonghong; Fan, Wenyang; Deng, Zongquan [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China)

    2017-07-15

    Both the impact phenomenon in the clearance revolute joint and the link deformation will influence the dynamics of the air rudder transmission mechanism, which could reduce the flight quality of an aircraft. Given the effect of the two elements, a feasible simulation method with two improvements of previous methods is proposed to analyze the dynamic characteristics of the mechanism. In previous studies, the parameters of the contact force model in multi-body dynamics software were generally determined by experience, which may cause uncertainty in the calculation precision of the contact force. Furthermore, it is difficult to solve for the elastic link deformation in the practical mechanism using the available analytical methods due to the complicated section of the link. In this paper, a Continuous contact force (CCF) model was proposed and embedded in the ADAMS by developing a routine of the CCF model. Then, the flexible model was obtained by ANSYS to obtain the elastic link deformation. The experimental results indicate that the proposed simulation method can be effectively applied to predict the dynamic behavior of the mechanism.

  9. Abstract recall of a happy memory to repair sad mood in dysphoria: A possible link to negative cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetherington, Kate; Moulds, Michelle L

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to repair sad mood through the deliberate recall of happy memories has been found to be impaired in dysphoric individuals. Rumination, or adopting an abstract processing mode, has been proposed as a possible mechanism underpinning this effect. In low and high dysphoric participants, we examined the relative consequences of adopting an abstract or concrete processing mode during happy memory recall or engaging in distraction for (1) mood repair and (2) cognitive content. Recalling a happy memory in either an abstract or concrete way resulted in greater happiness than distraction. Engaging in abstract recall of a happy memory resulted in high dysphoric participants generating negative evaluations and negative generalisations. These findings raise the interesting possibility that abstract processing of positive memories has the potential to generate negative cognition.

  10. Mechanical Strength Improvements of Carbon Nanotube Threads through Epoxy Cross-Linking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingyue Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Individual Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs have a great mechanical strength that needs to be transferred into macroscopic fiber assemblies. One approach to improve the mechanical strength of the CNT assemblies is by creating covalent bonding among their individual CNT building blocks. Chemical cross-linking of multiwall CNTs (MWCNTs within the fiber has significantly improved the strength of MWCNT thread. Results reported in this work show that the cross-linked thread had a tensile strength six times greater than the strength of its control counterpart, a pristine MWCNT thread (1192 MPa and 194 MPa, respectively. Additionally, electrical conductivity changes were observed, revealing 2123.40 S·cm−1 for cross-linked thread, and 3984.26 S·cm−1 for pristine CNT thread. Characterization suggests that the obtained high tensile strength is due to the cross-linking reaction of amine groups from ethylenediamine plasma-functionalized CNT with the epoxy groups of the cross-linking agent, 4,4-methylenebis(N,N-diglycidylaniline.

  11. On possible contribution of a leptoquark intermediate boson mechanism in the free neutron beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponov, Yu.V.

    2000-01-01

    A possible mechanism of the virtual leptoquark scalar intermediate boson exchange connected with a contribution of the right-handed nucleon currents to the free beta decay is demonstrated. The extension of the hypothesis can be associated with the realization of the same mechanism in the beta decay via the emission of right-handed neutrino (left-handed antineutrino). It is shown that a hypothesis of this kind leads to appearance of scalar and tensor terms in the effective Hamiltonian of weak interaction, and these terms include the right-handed neutrinos. The relevant experimental data are discussed [ru

  12. Purinergic signalling - a possible mechanism for KCNQ1 channel response to cell volume challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomholtz, Sofia Hammami; Willumsen, Niels J.; Meinild, A.-K.

    2013-01-01

    AIM: A number of K(+) channels are regulated by small, fast changes in cell volume. The mechanisms underlying cell volume sensitivity are not known, but one possible mechanism could be purinergic signalling. Volume activated ATP release could trigger signalling pathways that subsequently lead...... stimuli. Basal ATP release was approx. three times higher in the KCNQ1 + AQP1 and KCNQ1 injected oocytes compared to the non-injected ones. Exogenously added ATP (0.1 mm) did not have any substantial effect on volume-induced KCNQ1 currents. Nevertheless, apyrase decreased all currents by about 50...

  13. On a possible mechanism of the brain for responding to dynamical features extracted from input signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zengrong; Chen Guanrong

    2003-01-01

    Based on the general theory of nonlinear dynamical systems, a possible mechanism for responding to some dynamical features extracted from input signals in brain activities is described and discussed. This mechanism is first converted to a nonlinear dynamical configuration--a generalized synchronization of complex dynamical systems. Then, some general conditions for achieving such synchronizations are derived. It is shown that dynamical systems have potentials of producing different responses for different features extracted from various input signals, which may be used to describe brain activities. For illustration, some numerical examples are given with simulation figures

  14. The mechanism of collagen cross-linking in diabetes: a puzzle nearing resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, V M; Glomb, M; Elgawish, A; Sell, D R

    1996-07-01

    Considerable interest has been focused in recent years on the mechanism of collagen cross-linking by high glucose in vitro and in vivo. Experiments in both diabetic humans and in animals have shown that over time collagen becomes less soluble, less digestible by collagenase, more stable to heat-induced denaturation, and more glycated. In addition, collagen becomes more modified by advanced products of the Maillard reaction, i.e., immunoreactive advanced glycation end products and the glycoxidation markers carboxymethyllysine and pentosidine. Mechanistic studies have shown that collagen cross-linking in vitro can be uncoupled from glycation by the use of antioxidants and chelating agents. Experiments in the authors' laboratory revealed that approximately 50% of carboxymethyllysine formed in vitro originates from pathways other than oxidation of Amadori products, i.e., most likely the oxidation of Schiff base-linked glucose. In addition, the increase in thermal stability of rat tail tendons exposed to high glucose in vitro or in vivo was found to strongly depend on H2O2 formation. The final missing piece of the puzzle is that of the structure of the major cross-link. We speculate that it is a nonfluorescent nonultraviolet active cross-link between two lysine residues, which includes a fragmentation product of glucose linked in a nonreducible bond labile to both strong acids and bases.

  15. A Mobility-Aware Link Enhancement Mechanism for Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Wen Hu

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available With the growth up of internet in mobile commerce, researchers have reproduced various mobile applications that vary from entertainment and commercial services to diagnostic and safety tools. Mobility management has widely been recognized as one of the most challenging problems for seamless access to wireless networks. In this paper, a novel link enhancement mechanism is proposed to deal with mobility management problem in vehicular ad hoc networks. Two machine learning techniques, namely, particle swarm optimization and fuzzy logic systems, are incorporated into the proposed schemes to enhance the accuracy of prediction of link break and congestion occurrence. The experimental results verify the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed schemes.

  16. A Mobility-Aware Link Enhancement Mechanism for Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chenn-Jung

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the growth up of internet in mobile commerce, researchers have reproduced various mobile applications that vary from entertainment and commercial services to diagnostic and safety tools. Mobility management has widely been recognized as one of the most challenging problems for seamless access to wireless networks. In this paper, a novel link enhancement mechanism is proposed to deal with mobility management problem in vehicular ad hoc networks. Two machine learning techniques, namely, particle swarm optimization and fuzzy logic systems, are incorporated into the proposed schemes to enhance the accuracy of prediction of link break and congestion occurrence. The experimental results verify the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed schemes.

  17. Ochratoxin A as possible factor trigging autism and its male prevalence via epigenetic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzelani, A; Raggi, M E; Marabotti, A; Milanesi, L

    2016-01-01

    The role of dysbiosis causing leaky gut with xenobiotic production and absorption is increasingly demonstrated in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) pathogenesis. Among xenobiotics, we focused on ochratoxin A (one of the major food contaminating mycotoxin), that in vitro and in vivo exerts a male-specific neurotoxicity probably via microRNA modulation of a specific target gene. Among possible targets, we focused on neuroligin4X. Interestingly, this gene carries some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) already correlated with the disease and with illegitimate microRNA binding sites and, being located on X-chromosome, could explain the male prevalence. In conclusion, we propose a possible gene-environment interaction triggering ASD explaining the epigenetic neurotoxic mechanism activated by ochratoxin A in genetically predisposed children. This mechanism offers a clue for male prevalence of the disease and may have an important impact on prevention and cure of ASD.

  18. Potential mechanisms linking probiotics to diabetes: a narrative review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Miraghajani, Maryam; Dehsoukhteh, Somayeh Shahraki; Rafie, Nahid; Hamedani, Sahar Golpour; Sabihi, Sima; Ghiasvand, Reza

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Some studies have suggested a wide range of possible mechanisms through which probiotics may play a role in diabetes prevention and treatment. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We conducted this study to review the potential mechanisms suggested for the effect of probiotics in diabetes. DESIGN AND SETTING: Narrative review conducted at the Food Security Research Center of Isfahan. METHODS: A search in the electronic databases ME...

  19. Impact of nutrition on canine behaviour: current status and possible mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Bosch, G.; Beerda, B.; Hendriks, W.H.; Poel, van der, A.F.B.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Each year, millions of dogs worldwide are abandoned by their owners, relinquished to animal shelters, and euthanised because of behaviour problems. Nutrition is rarely considered as one of the possible contributing factors of problem behaviour. This contribution presents an overview of current knowledge on the influence of nutrition on canine behaviour and explores the underlying mechanisms by which diet may affect behaviour in animals. Behaviour is regulated by neurotransmitters and hormones...

  20. Quantum Mechanics and locality in the K0 K-bar0 system experimental verification possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, A.

    1994-11-01

    It is shown that elementary Quantum Mechanics, applied to the K 0 K-bar 0 system, predicts peculiar long range EPR correlations. Possible experimental verifications are discussed, and a concrete experiment with anti-protons annihilations at rest is proposed. A pedestrian approach to local models shows that K 0 K-bar 0 experimentation could provide arguments to the local realism versus quantum theory controversy. (author). 17 refs., 23 figs

  1. Mechanical design of ultraprecision weak-link stages for nanometer-scale x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, D [APS Engineering Support Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Maser, J, E-mail: shu@aps.anl.go [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-09-01

    A nanopositioning diagnostic setup has been built to support the Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) nanoprobe instrument commissioning process at the APS. Its laser Doppler interferometer system provides subnanometer positioning diagnostic resolution with large dynamic range. A set of original APS designed ultraprecision PZT-driven weak-link stages with high-stiffness motor-driven stages has been tested with this diagnostic setup. In this paper we present a preliminary test result of the ultraprecision weak-link stage system developed for the CNM hard x-ray nanoprobe instrument at APS sector 26. A test result for a novel laminar weak-link mechanism with sub-centimeter travel range and sub-nanometer positioning resolution is also introduced in this paper as a future work.

  2. Design of a deterministic link initialization mechanism for serial LVDS interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatral, S; Lemke, F; Bruening, U

    2014-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment at FAIR in Darmstadt has special requirements for the Data Acquisition Network. One of them is deterministic latency for all the links from the back-end to the front-end, which enables synchronization in the whole read-out tree. Since the front-end electronics (FEE) contain mixed-signal circuits for processing the raw detector data, special ASICs were developed. DDR LVDS links are used to interconnect the FEEs and readout controllers. An adapted link initialization mechanism ensures determinism for them by balancing cable lengths, adjusting for phase differences, and handling environmental behavior. After re-initialization, timing must be accurate to the bit-clock level

  3. The Phanerozoic diversification of silica-cycling testate amoebae and its possible links to changes in terrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosak, Tanja; Lara, Enrique; Mitchell, Edward A.D.

    2015-01-01

    The terrestrial cycling of Si is thought to have a large influence on the terrestrial and marine primary production, as well as the coupled biogeochemical cycles of Si and C. Biomineralization of silica is widespread among terrestrial eukaryotes such as plants, soil diatoms, freshwater sponges, silicifying flagellates and testate amoebae. Two major groups of testate (shelled) amoebae, arcellinids and euglyphids, produce their own silica particles to construct shells. The two are unrelated phylogenetically and acquired biomineralizing capabilities independently. Hyalosphenids, a group within arcellinids, are predators of euglyphids. We demonstrate that hyalosphenids can construct shells using silica scales mineralized by the euglyphids. Parsimony analyses of the current hyalosphenid phylogeny indicate that the ability to “steal” euglyphid scales is most likely ancestral in hyalosphenids, implying that euglyphids should be older than hyalosphenids. However, exactly when euglyphids arose is uncertain. Current fossil record contains unambiguous euglyphid fossils that are as old as 50 million years, but older fossils are scarce and difficult to interpret. Poor taxon sampling of euglyphids has also prevented the development of molecular clocks. Here, we present a novel molecular clock reconstruction for arcellinids and consider the uncertainties due to various previously used calibration points. The new molecular clock puts the origin of hyalosphenids in the early Carboniferous (∼370 mya). Notably, this estimate coincides with the widespread colonization of land by Si-accumulating plants, suggesting possible links between the evolution of Arcellinid testate amoebae and the expansion of terrestrial habitats rich in organic matter and bioavailable Si. PMID:26734499

  4. Melatonin: a possible link between the presence of artificial light at night and reductions in biological fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Therésa M.; Durrant, Joanna; Michaelides, Ellie B.; Green, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underpinning the ecological impacts of the presence of artificial night lighting remain elusive. One suspected underlying cause is that the presence of light at night (LAN) supresses nocturnal production of melatonin, a key driver of biological rhythm and a potent antioxidant with a proposed role in immune function. Here, we briefly review the evidence for melatonin as the link between LAN and changes in behaviour and physiology. We then present preliminary data supporting the potential for melatonin to act as a recovery agent mitigating the negative effects of LAN in an invertebrate. Adult crickets (Teleogryllus commodus), exposed to constant illumination, were provided with dietary melatonin (concentrations: 0, 10 or 100 µg ml−1) in their drinking water. We then compared survival, lifetime fecundity and, over a 4-week period, immune function (haemocyte concentration, lysozyme-like and phenoloxidase (PO) activity). Melatonin supplementation was able only partially to mitigate the detrimental effects of LAN: it did not improve survival or fecundity or PO activity, but it had a largely dose-dependent positive effect on haemocyte concentration and lysozyme-like activity. We discuss the implications of these relationships, as well as the usefulness of invertebrates as model species for future studies that explore the effects of LAN. PMID:25780235

  5. Mechanical properties and collagen cross-linking of the patellar tendon in old and young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppé, C; Hansen, P; Kongsgaard, M

    2009-01-01

    were higher in OM than in YM (73 +/- 13 vs. 11 +/- 2 mmol/mol; P appreciably influence the dimensions or mechanical properties of the human patellar tendon in vivo. Collagen concentration was reduced, whereas both enzymatic......Age-related loss in muscle mass and strength impairs daily life function in the elderly. However, it remains unknown whether tendon properties also deteriorate with age. Cross-linking of collagen molecules provides structural integrity to the tendon fibrils and has been shown to change with age...... in animals but has never been examined in humans in vivo. In this study, we examined the mechanical properties and pyridinoline and pentosidine cross-link and collagen concentrations of the patellar tendon in vivo in old (OM) and young men (YM). Seven OM (67 +/- 3 years, 86 +/- 10 kg) and 10 YM (27 +/- 2...

  6. Possible Mechanisms of Mercury Toxicity and Cancer Promotion: Involvement of Gap Junction Intercellular Communications and Inflammatory Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Zefferino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of observations indicate that heavy metals are able to alter cellular metabolic pathways through induction of a prooxidative state. Nevertheless, the outcome of heavy metal-mediated effects in the development of human diseases is debated and needs further insights. Cancer is a well-established DNA mutation-linked disease; however, epigenetic events are perhaps more important and harmful than genetic alterations. Unfortunately, we do not have reliable screening methods to assess/validate the epigenetic (promoter effects of a physical or a chemical agent. We propose a mechanism of action whereby mercury acts as a possible promoter carcinogen. In the present contribution, we resume our previous studies on mercury tested at concentrations comparable with its occurrence as environmental pollutant. It is shown that Hg(II elicits a prooxidative state in keratinocytes linked to inhibition of gap junction-mediated intercellular communication and proinflammatory cytokine production. These combined effects may on one hand isolate cells from tissue-specific homeostasis promoting their proliferation and on the other hand tamper the immune system defense/surveillance checkmating the whole organism. Since Hg(II is not a mutagenic/genotoxic compound directly affecting gene expression, in a broader sense, mercury might be an example of an epigenetic tumor promoter or, further expanding this concept, a “metagenetic” effector.

  7. Effects of alginate hydrogel cross-linking density on mechanical and biological behaviors for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jinah; Seol, Young-Joon; Kim, Hyeon Ji; Kundu, Joydip; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2014-09-01

    An effective cross-linking of alginate gel was made through reaction with calcium carbonate (CaCO3). We used human chondrocytes as a model cell to study the effects of cross-linking density. Three different pore size ranges of cross-linked alginate hydrogels were fabricated. The morphological, mechanical, and rheological properties of various alginate hydrogels were characterized and responses of biosynthesis of cells encapsulated in each gel to the variation in cross-linking density were investigated. Desired outer shape of structure was maintained when the alginate solution was cross-linked with the applied method. The properties of alginate hydrogel could be tailored through applying various concentrations of CaCO3. The rate of synthesized GAGs and collagens was significantly higher in human chondrocytes encapsulated in the smaller pore structure than that in the larger pore structure. The expression of chondrogenic markers, including collagen type II and aggrecan, was enhanced in the smaller pore structure. It was found that proper structural morphology is a critical factor to enhance the performance and tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impulsivity as a mechanism linking child abuse and neglect with substance use in adolescence and adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshri, Assaf; Kogan, Steve M; Kwon, Josephine A; Wickrama, K A S; Vanderbroek, Lauren; Palmer, Abraham A; MacKillop, James

    2018-05-01

    Emerging developmental perspectives suggest that adverse rearing environments promote neurocognitive adaptations that heighten impulsivity and increase vulnerability to risky behavior. Although studies document links between harsh rearing environments and impulsive behavior on substance use, the developmental hypothesis that impulsivity acts as mechanism linking adverse rearing environments to downstream substance use remains to be investigated. The present study investigated the role of impulsivity in linking child abuse and neglect with adult substance use using data from (a) a longitudinal sample of youth (Study 1, N = 9,421) and (b) a cross-sectional sample of adults (Study 2, N = 1,011). In Study 1, the links between child abuse and neglect and young adult smoking and marijuana use were mediated by increases in adolescent impulsivity. In Study 2, indirect links between child abuse and neglect and substance use were evidenced via delayed reward discounting and impulsivity traits. Among impulsivity subcomponents, robust indirect effects connecting childhood experiences to cigarette use emerged for negative urgency. Negative urgency, positive urgency, and sensation seeking mediated the effect of child abuse and neglect on cannabis and alcohol use. Results suggest that child abuse and neglect increases risk for substance use in part, due to effects on impulsivity. Individuals with adverse childhood experiences may benefit from substance use preventive intervention programs that target impulsive behaviors.

  9. [Pontomedullary lacerations and concomitant injuries: a review of possible underlying mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Živković, Vladimir; Nikolić, Slobodan

    2013-01-01

    Anatomically, brainstem is constituted of medulla oblongata, pons and mesencephalon. Traumatic lesions of brainstem most commonly occur on pontomedullary junction. There are several possible mechanisms of pontomedullary lacerations. The first mechanism includes impact to the chin, with or without a skull base fracture, and most often leads to this fatal injury, due to impact force transmission through the jawbone and temporomandibular joint. The second mechanism includes lateral and posterior head impacts with subsequent hinge fractures, where occurrence of pontomedullary lacerations in these cases may depend on the energy of impact, as well as on the exact position of the fracture line, but less so on the head's movement. The third mechanism includes frontoposterior hyperextension of the head, due to frontal impact, concomitant with fractures or dislocations of upper spine. In the fourth mechanism, there is an absence of direct impact to the head, due to the indirect force of action after feet or buttocks-first impact. Most of these cases are accompanied by ring fractures as well. In situations such as these, the impact force is transmitted up the spinal column and upper vertebrae, and telescopically intruded into the skull, causing brainstem laceration. The jawbone and other facial bones can act as shock absorbers, and their fracture could diminish the energy transfer towards the skull and protect the brain and brainstem from injury. In all the cases with pontomedullary laceration posterior neck dissection should be performed during the autopsy, since upper spine injuries are often associated with this type of injury.

  10. Are quantum-mechanical-like models possible, or necessary, outside quantum physics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnitsky, Arkady

    2014-01-01

    This article examines some experimental conditions that invite and possibly require recourse to quantum-mechanical-like mathematical models (QMLMs), models based on the key mathematical features of quantum mechanics, in scientific fields outside physics, such as biology, cognitive psychology, or economics. In particular, I consider whether the following two correlative features of quantum phenomena that were decisive for establishing the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics play similarly important roles in QMLMs elsewhere. The first is the individuality and discreteness of quantum phenomena, and the second is the irreducibly probabilistic nature of our predictions concerning them, coupled to the particular character of the probabilities involved, as different from the character of probabilities found in classical physics. I also argue that these features could be interpreted in terms of a particular form of epistemology that suspends and even precludes a causal and, in the first place, realist description of quantum objects and processes. This epistemology limits the descriptive capacity of quantum theory to the description, classical in nature, of the observed quantum phenomena manifested in measuring instruments. Quantum mechanics itself only provides descriptions, probabilistic in nature, concerning numerical data pertaining to such phenomena, without offering a physical description of quantum objects and processes. While QMLMs share their use of the quantum-mechanical or analogous mathematical formalism, they may differ by the roles, if any, the two features in question play in them and by different ways of interpreting the phenomena they considered and this formalism itself. This article will address those differences as well. (paper)

  11. Morphological and molecular variations induce mitochondrial dysfunction as a possible underlying mechanism of athletic amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ruo-Hong; Wen, Shi-Lei; Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Hong-Ying; Feng, Shi

    2018-01-01

    Female athletes may experience difficulties in achieving pregnancy due to athletic amenorrhea (AA); however, the underlying mechanisms of AA remain unknown. The present study focuses on the mitochondrial alteration and its function in detecting the possible mechanism of AA. An AA rat model was established by excessive swimming. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, and transmission electron microscopic methods were performed to evaluate the morphological changes of the ovary, immunohistochemical examinations and radioimmunoassays were used to detect the reproductive hormones and corresponding receptors. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to test the mtDNA copy number. PCR and western blot analysis were used to test the expression of ND2. The change of morphological features of the rat ovaries revealed evident abnormalities. Particularly, the features of the mitochondria were markedly altered. In addition, reproductive hormones in the serum and tissues of AA rats were also detected to evaluate the function of the ovaries, and the levels of these hormones were significantly decreased. Furthermore, the mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNA) and expression of NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2) were quantitated by qPCR or western blot analysis. Accordingly, the mtDNA copy number and expression of ND2 expression were markedly reduced in the AA rats. In conclusion, mitochondrial dysfunction in AA may affect the cellular energy supply and, therefore, result in dysfunction of the ovary. Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction may be considered as a possible underlying mechanism for the occurrence of AA.

  12. About possible mechanisms of current transfer in the bio-polymer - semiconductor heterostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, A.A.; Dosmailov, M.A.; Karibaeva, M.K.; Kenshinbaev, N.K.; Kokanbaev, M.; Uristembekov, B.B.; Tynyshtykbaev, K.B.

    2003-01-01

    Earlier by the bio-polymer films deposition on silicon the bio-polymer - semiconductor heterostructures were created. The influence of silicon surface atoms on self-organization processes in these bio-molecules were studied. Particularly the silicon - bio-cholesterol aqueous solution and the silicon - bio-chlorophyll aqueous solution spectral photo-sensitivity were considered. In this case the of photo-response broadening in the spectral photo-sensitivity short-wave part of these systems have been observed. The similar broadening is explained by both the passivation of surface recombination centers by OH-groups and the anti-reflecting properties of aqueous solutions. Besides it is possible the additional charge carriers generation caused by quasi-inter-zone transfers in the bio-polymers depending on electron-conformation properties of macromolecules. In the paper the possible mechanisms of current transfer in the bio-polymer - semiconductor heterostructure are discussed

  13. Candidaemia and antifungal therapy in a French University Hospital: rough trends over a decade and possible links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Standaert Annie

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence for an increased prevalence of candidaemia and for high associated mortality in the 1990s led to a number of different recommendations concerning the management of at risk patients as well as an increase in the availability and prescription of new antifungal agents. The aim of this study was to parallel in our hospital candidemia incidence with the nature of prescribed antifungal drugs between 1993 and 2003. Methods During this 10-year period we reviewed all cases of candidemia, and collected all the data about annual consumption of prescribed antifungal drugs Results Our centralised clinical mycology laboratory isolates and identifies all yeasts grown from blood cultures obtained from a 3300 bed teaching hospital. Between 1993 and 2003, 430 blood yeast isolates were identified. Examination of the trends in isolation revealed a clear decrease in number of yeast isolates recovered between 1995–2000, whereas the number of positive blood cultures in 2003 rose to 1993 levels. The relative prevalence of Candida albicans and C. glabrata was similar in 1993 and 2003 in contrast to the period 1995–2000 where an increased prevalence of C. glabrata was observed. When these quantitative and qualitative data were compared to the amount and type of antifungal agents prescribed during the same period (annual mean defined daily dose: 2662741; annual mean cost: 615629 € a single correlation was found between the decrease in number of yeast isolates, the increased prevalence of C. glabrata and the high level of prescription of fluconazole at prophylactic doses between 1995–2000. Conclusion Between 1993 and 2000, the number of cases of candidemia halved, with an increase of C. glabrata prevalence. These findings were probably linked to the use of Fluconazole prophylaxis. Although it is not possible to make any recommendations from this data the information is nevertheless interesting and may have considerable implications with

  14. Behavioral Effects of Upper Respiratory Tract Illnesses: A Consideration of Possible Underlying Cognitive Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Smith

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that both experimentally induced upper respiratory tract illnesses (URTIs and naturally occurring URTIs influence mood and performance. The present study investigated possible cognitive mechanisms underlying the URTI-performance changes. Those who developed a cold (N = 47 had significantly faster, but less accurate, performance than those who remained healthy (N = 54. Illness had no effect on manipulations designed to influence encoding, response organisation (stimulus-response compatilibility or response preparation. Similarly, there was no evidence that different components of working memory were impaired. Overall, the present research confirms that URTIs can have an effect on performance efficiency. Further research is required to identify the physiological and behavioral mechanisms underlying these effects.

  15. Smooth muscle relaxant activity of Crocus sativus (saffron and its constituents: possible mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Mokhtari-Zaer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Saffron, Crocus sativus L. (C. sativus is rich in carotenoids and used in traditional medicine for treatment of various conditions such as coughs, stomach disorders, amenorrhea, asthma and cardiovascular disorders. These therapeutic effects of the plant are suggested to be due to its relaxant effect on smooth muscles. The effect of C. sativus and its constituents on different smooth muscles and the underlying mechanisms have been studied. Several studies have shown the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents including safranal, crocin, crocetin and kaempferol on blood vessels. In addition, it was reported that saffron stigma lowers systolic blood pressure. The present review highlights the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents on various smooth muscles. The possible mechanisms of this relaxing effect including activation of ß2-adrenoceptors, inhibition of histamine H1 and muscarinic receptors and calcium channels and modulation of nitric oxide (NO are also reviewed.

  16. Possible mechanisms underlying slow component of V̇O2 on-kinetics in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Bernard; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2015-05-15

    A computer model of a skeletal muscle bioenergetic system is used to study the background of the slow component of oxygen consumption V̇O2 on-kinetics in skeletal muscle. Two possible mechanisms are analyzed: inhibition of ATP production by anaerobic glycolysis by progressive cytosol acidification (together with a slow decrease in ATP supply by creatine kinase) and gradual increase of ATP usage during exercise of constant power output. It is demonstrated that the former novel mechanism is potent to generate the slow component. The latter mechanism further increases the size of the slow component; it also moderately decreases metabolite stability and has a small impact on muscle pH. An increase in anaerobic glycolysis intensity increases the slow component, elevates cytosol acidification during exercise, and decreases phosphocreatine and Pi stability, although slightly increases ADP stability. A decrease in the P/O ratio (ATP molecules/O2 molecules) during exercise cannot also be excluded as a relevant mechanism, although this issue requires further study. It is postulated that both the progressive inhibition of anaerobic glycolysis by accumulating protons (together with a slow decrease of the net creatine kinase reaction rate) and gradual increase of ATP usage during exercise, and perhaps a decrease in P/O, contribute to the generation of the slow component of the V̇O2 on-kinetics in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Possible health effects of 50/60 Hz electric and magnetic fields: review of proposed mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    There is inconclusive evidence from both epidemiological and laboratory studies that fields similar to those produced by electrical power transmission lines may contribute to certain diseases including cancer. There are several objections to a hypothesis of a direct causative link, based on identifying a mechanism of interaction. One is that the energy density of the fields is several orders of magnitude smaller than that associated with random thermal motion in biological tissue. Secondly, the induced currents are many times smaller than endogenous currents associated with normal membrane processes. A comparison of current densities and characteristics associated with field-related phenomena such as electro sensitivity in species of fish, night-time melatonin depression in rodents, limb regeneration in amphibians and magnetophosphenes in humans reveals little that can be of use in determining a 'response metric'. Nevertheless, guide-lines for the general public are in fact based on this quantity, for immediate effects at least. Indeed, currents induced by the electric component of environmental 50 Hz fields are of similar magnitude to those induced by the magnetic component, yet epidemiological studies have identified surrogates of the latter as the significant exposure metric in relation to cancer incidence. Proposed mechanisms, many of which are still at the 'working hypothesis' stage, are compared with experimental evidence. Some conflict with epidemiological evidence, itself not strong, but becoming stronger, is apparent. 131 refs., 6 figs

  18. Linking new information to a reactivated memory requires consolidation and not reconsolidation mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A new memory is initially labile and becomes stabilized through a process of consolidation, which depends on gene expression. Stable memories, however, can again become labile if reactivated by recall and require another phase of protein synthesis in order to be maintained. This process is known as reconsolidation. The functional significance of the labile phase of reconsolidation is unknown; one hypothesis proposes that it is required to link new information with reactivated memories. Reconsolidation is distinct from the initial consolidation, and one distinction is that the requirement for specific proteins or general protein synthesis during the two processes occurs in different brain areas. Here, we identified an anatomically distinctive molecular requirement that doubly dissociates consolidation from reconsolidation of an inhibitory avoidance memory. We then used this requirement to investigate whether reconsolidation and consolidation are involved in linking new information with reactivated memories. In contrast to what the hypothesis predicted, we found that reconsolidation does not contribute to the formation of an association between new and reactivated information. Instead, it recruits mechanisms similar to those underlying consolidation of a new memory. Thus, linking new information to a reactivated memory is mediated by consolidation and not reconsolidation mechanisms.

  19. Investigating the work-family conflict and health link: Repetitive thought as a mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kelly D; Gere, Judith; Sliwinski, Martin J

    2017-10-01

    Research is needed to investigate mechanisms linking work-family conflict to poor health in working adults. We took a novel approach to build on extant studies by testing a potential mechanism in these associations - repetitive thought. Data came from a sample of 203 partnered working adults. There were significant direct effects of work-family conflict with lower life satisfaction, positive affect, and perceived health as well as greater fatigue. As for total effects, work-family conflict was significantly associated with all health outcomes - life satisfaction, positive affect, negative affect, fatigue, perceived health, and chronic health conditions - in the expected directions through repetitive thought. This study provides support that repetitive thought is one potential mechanism of how work-family conflict can take a toll on psychological and physical health. Findings are discussed in relation to improving workplace policies to improve the health of working adults managing work-family conflict. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Sources, factors, mechanisms and possible solutions to pollutants in marine ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostofa, Khan M.G.; Liu, Cong-Qiang; Vione, Davide; Gao, Kunshan; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Algal toxins or red-tide toxins produced during algal blooms are naturally-derived toxic emerging contaminants (ECs) that may kill organisms, including humans, through contaminated fish or seafood. Other ECs produced either naturally or anthropogenically ultimately flow into marine waters. Pharmaceuticals are also an important pollution source, mostly due to overproduction and incorrect disposal. Ship breaking and recycle industries (SBRIs) can also release various pollutants and substantially deteriorate habitats and marine biodiversity. Overfishing is significantly increasing due to the global food crisis, caused by an increasing world population. Organic matter (OM) pollution and global warming (GW) are key factors that exacerbate these challenges (e.g. algal blooms), to which acidification in marine waters should be added as well. Sources, factors, mechanisms and possible remedial measures of these challenges to marine ecosystems are discussed, including their eventual impact on all forms of life including humans. -- Review of sources, factors, mechanisms and possible remedial measures of key pollutants (contaminants, toxins, ship breaking, overfishing) in marine ecosystems

  1. Chinese herbal medicine for Alzheimer's disease: Clinical evidence and possible mechanism of neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Ting; Zheng, Xia-Wei; Chen, Shuang; Shan, Chun-Shuo; Xu, Qing-Qing; Zhu, Jia-Zhen; Bao, Xiao-Yi; Lin, Yan; Zheng, Guo-Qing; Wang, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Currently, there is lack of cure or disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) is purported to ameliorate AD progression, perhaps by promoting hippocampal neurogenesis. Here, we conducted an updated systematic review to investigate the efficacy and safety of CHM for AD based on high-quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and reviewed its possible mechanisms of neurogenesis according to animal-based researches. Twenty eligible studies with 1767 subjects were identified in eight database searches from inception to February 2017. The studies investigated the CHM versus placebo (n=3), CHM versus donepezil (n=9 with 10 comparisons), CHM plus donepezil versus donepezil (n=3), CHM versus a basic treatment (n=3), and CHM plus basic treatment versus basic treatment (n=2). Adverse events were reported in 11 studies, analyzed but not observed in 3 studies, and not analyzed in 6 studies. The main findings of present study are that CHM as adjuvant therapy exerted an additive anti-AD benefit, whereas the efficacy of CHM as a monotherapy was inconclusive. Additionally, CHMs were generally safe and well tolerated in AD patients. Active molecules in frequent constituents of CHMs can alter multiple critical signaling pathways regulating neurogenesis. Thus, the present evidence supports, to a limited extent, the conclusion that CHM can be recommended for routine use in AD patients and its possible mechanism enhances adult hippocampal neurogenesis through activating the multi-signal pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Astragaloside IV for Experimental Focal Cerebral Ischemia: Preclinical Evidence and Possible Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Lin Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Astragaloside IV (AST-IV is a principal component of Radix Astragali seu Hedysari (Huangqi and exerts potential neuroprotection in experimental ischemic stroke. Here, we systematically assessed the effectiveness and possible mechanisms of AST-IV for experimental acute ischemic stroke. An electronic search in eight databases was conducted from inception to March 2016. The study quality score was evaluated using the CAMARADES. Rev Man 5.0 software was used for data analyses. Thirteen studies with 244 animals were identified. The study quality score of included studies ranged from 3/10 to 8/10. Eleven studies showed significant effects of AST-IV for ameliorating the neurological function score (P<0.05; seven studies for reducing the infarct volume (P<0.05; and three or two studies for reducing the brain water content and Evans blue leakage (P<0.05, respectively, compared with the control. The mechanisms of AST-IV for ischemic stroke are multiple such as antioxidative/nitration stress reaction, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptosis. In conclusion, the findings of present study indicated that AST-IV could improve neurological deficits and infarct volume and reduce the blood-brain barrier permeability in experimental cerebral ischemia despite some methodological flaws. Thus, AST-IV exerted a possible neuroprotective effect during the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury largely through its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptosis properties.

  3. Ginsenoside Rb1 for Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury: Preclinical Evidence and Possible Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginseng is an important herbal drug that has been used worldwide for many years. Ginsenoside Rb1 (G-Rb1, the major pharmacological extract from ginseng, possesses a variety of biological activities in the cardiovascular systems. Here, we conducted a preclinical systematic review to investigate the efficacy of G-Rb1 for animal models of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury and its possible mechanisms. Ten studies involving 211 animals were identified by searching 6 databases from inception to May 2017. The methodological quality was assessed by using the CAMARADES 10-item checklist. All the data were analyzed using RevMan 5.3 software. As a result, the score of study quality ranged from 3 to 7 points. Meta-analyses showed that G-Rb1 can significantly decrease the myocardial infarct size and cardiac enzymes (including lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and creatine kinase-MB when compared with control group (P<0.01. Significant decrease in cardiac troponin T and improvement in the degree of ST-segment depression were reported in one study (P<0.05. Additionally, the possible mechanisms of G-Rb1 for myocardial infarction are antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiapoptosis, promoting angiogenesis and improving the circulation. Thus, G-Rb1 is a potential cardioprotective candidate for further clinical trials of myocardial infarction.

  4. Pontomedullary lacerations and concomitant injuries: A review of possible underlying mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anatomically, brainstem is constituted of medulla oblongata, pons and mesencephalon. Traumatic lesions of brainstem most commonly occur on pontomedullary junction. There are several possible mechanisms of pontomedullary lacerations. The first mechanism includes impact to the chin, with or without a skull base fracture, and most often leads to this fatal injury, due to impact force transmission through the jawbone and temporomandibular joint. The second mechanism includes lateral and posterior head impacts with subsequent hinge fractures, where occurrence of pontomedullary lacerations in these cases may depend on the energy of impact, as well as on the exact position of the fracture line, but less so on the head’s movement. The third mechanism includes frontoposterior hyperextension of the head, due to frontal impact, concomitant with fractures or dislocations of upper spine. In the fourth mechanism, there is an absence of direct impact to the head, due to the indirect force of action after feet or buttocks­first impact. Most of these cases are accompanied by ring fractures as well. In situations such as these, the impact force is transmitted up the spinal column and upper vertebrae, and telescopically intruded into the skull, causing brainstem laceration. The jawbone and other facial bones can act as shock absorbers, and their fracture could diminish the energy transfer towards the skull and protect the brain and brainstem from injury. In all the cases with pontomedullary laceration posterior neck dissection should be performed during the autopsy, since upper spine injuries are often associated with this type of injury. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 45005

  5. A Systems Biology Approach Reveals Converging Molecular Mechanisms that Link Different POPs to Common Metabolic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Patricia; Perlina, Ally; Mumtaz, Moiz; Fowler, Bruce A

    2016-07-01

    A number of epidemiological studies have identified statistical associations between persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and metabolic diseases, but testable hypotheses regarding underlying molecular mechanisms to explain these linkages have not been published. We assessed the underlying mechanisms of POPs that have been associated with metabolic diseases; three well-known POPs [2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD), 2,2´,4,4´,5,5´-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), and 4,4´-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p´-DDE)] were studied. We used advanced database search tools to delineate testable hypotheses and to guide laboratory-based research studies into underlying mechanisms by which this POP mixture could produce or exacerbate metabolic diseases. For our searches, we used proprietary systems biology software (MetaCore™/MetaDrug™) to conduct advanced search queries for the underlying interactions database, followed by directional network construction to identify common mechanisms for these POPs within two or fewer interaction steps downstream of their primary targets. These common downstream pathways belong to various cytokine and chemokine families with experimentally well-documented causal associations with type 2 diabetes. Our systems biology approach allowed identification of converging pathways leading to activation of common downstream targets. To our knowledge, this is the first study to propose an integrated global set of step-by-step molecular mechanisms for a combination of three common POPs using a systems biology approach, which may link POP exposure to diseases. Experimental evaluation of the proposed pathways may lead to development of predictive biomarkers of the effects of POPs, which could translate into disease prevention and effective clinical treatment strategies. Ruiz P, Perlina A, Mumtaz M, Fowler BA. 2016. A systems biology approach reveals converging molecular mechanisms that link different POPs to common metabolic diseases. Environ

  6. Collective excitations and superconductivity in reduced dimensional systems - Possible mechanism for high Tc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoyo, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    The author studies in full detail a possible mechanism of superconductivity in slender electronic systems of finite cross section. This mechanism is based on the pairing interaction mediated by the multiple modes of acoustic plasmons in these structures. First, he shows that multiple non-Landau-damped acoustic plasmon modes exist for electrons in a quasi-one dimensional wire at finite temperatures. These plasmons are of two basic types. The first one is made up by the collective longitudinal oscillations of the electrons essentially of a given transverse energy level oscillating against the electrons in the neighboring transverse energy level. The modes are called Slender Acoustic Plasmons or SAP's. The other mode is the quasi-one dimensional acoustic plasmon mode in which all the electrons oscillate together in phase among themselves but out of phase against the positive ion background. He shows numerically and argues physically that even for a temperature comparable to the mode separation Δω the SAP's and the quasi-one dimensional plasmon persist. Then, based on a clear physical picture, he develops in terms of the dielectric function a theory of superconductivity capable of treating the simultaneous participation of multiple bosonic modes that mediate the pairing interaction. The effect of mode damping is then incorporated in a simple manner that is free of the encumbrance of the strong-coupling, Green's function formalism usually required for the retardation effect. Explicit formulae including such damping are derived for the critical temperature T c and the energy gap Δ 0 . With those modes and armed with such a formalism, he proceeds to investigate a possible superconducting mechanism for high T c in quasi-one dimensional single-wire and multi-wire systems

  7. Efficacy and possible mechanisms of perillaldehyde in control of Aspergillus niger causing grape decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun; Wang, Yanzhen; Zeng, Hong; Li, Zongyun; Zhang, Peng; Tessema, Akalate; Peng, Xue

    2015-06-02

    A variety of plant products have been recognized for their antifungal activity and recently have attracted food industry attention for their efficacy in controlling postharvest fungal decay of fruits. The antifungal activity of perillaldehyde (PAE) was evaluated against Aspergillus niger, a known cause of grape spoilage, and possible mechanisms were explored. PAE showed notable antifungal activity against A. niger, with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and a minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of 0.25 and 1 μl/ml, respectively. The accumulation of mycelial biomass was also inhibited by PAE in a dose-dependent manner, completely inhibiting mycelial growth at 1 μl/ml. In vivo data confirmed that the vapour treatment of grapes with various concentrations of PAE markedly improved control of A. niger and suppressed natural decay. Concentrations of PAE of 0.075 μl/ml air showed the greatest inhibition of fungal growth compared to the controls. Further experiments indicated that PAE activated a membrane-active mechanism that inhibits ergosterol synthesis, increases membrane permeability (as evidenced by extracellular pH and conductivity measurements), and disrupts membrane integrity, leading to cell death. Our findings suggest that this membrane-active mechanism makes PAE a promising potential antifungal agent for postharvest control of grape spoilage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Do reflex seizures and spontaneous seizures form a continuum? - triggering factors and possible common mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmen, Friederike; Wehner, Tim; Lemieux, Louis

    2015-02-01

    Recent changes in the understanding and classification of reflex seizures have fuelled a debate on triggering mechanisms of seizures and their conceptual organization. Previous studies and patient reports have listed extrinsic and intrinsic triggers, albeit their multifactorial and dynamic nature is poorly understood. This paper aims to review literature on extrinsic and intrinsic seizure triggers and to discuss common mechanisms among them. Among self-reported seizure triggers, emotional stress is most frequently named. Reflex seizures are typically associated with extrinsic sensory triggers; however, intrinsic cognitive or proprioceptive triggers have also been assessed. The identification of a trigger underlying a seizure may be more difficult if it is intrinsic and complex, and if triggering mechanisms are multifactorial. Therefore, since observability of triggers varies and triggers are also found in non-reflex seizures, the present concept of reflex seizures may be questioned. We suggest the possibility of a conceptual continuum between reflex and spontaneous seizures rather than a dichotomy and discuss evidence to the notion that to some extent most seizures might be triggered. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanisms of aqueous wollastonite carbonation as a possible CO2 sequestration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.; Comans, R.N.J.; Witkamp, G.J.

    2006-02-01

    The mechanisms of aqueous wollastonite carbonation as a possible carbon dioxide sequestration process were investigated experimentally by systematic variation of the reaction temperature, CO2 pressure, particle size, reaction time, liquid to solid ratio and agitation power. The carbonation reaction was observed to occur via the aqueous phase in two steps: (1) Ca leaching from the CaSiO3 matrix and (2) CaCO3 nucleation and growth. Leaching is hindered by a Ca-depleted silicate rim resulting from incongruent Ca-dissolution. Two temperature regimes were identified in the overall carbonation process. At temperatures below an optimum reaction temperature, the overall reaction rate is probably limited by the leaching rate of Ca. At higher temperatures, nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate is probably limiting the conversion, due to a reduced (bi)carbonate activity. The mechanisms for the aqueous carbonation of wollastonite were shown to be similar to those reported previously for an industrial residue and a Mg-silicate. The carbonation of wollastonite proceeds rapidly relative to Mg-silicates, with a maximum conversion in 15 min of 70% at 200C, 20 bar CO2 partial pressure and a particle size of <38 μm. The obtained insight in the reaction mechanisms enables the energetic and economic assessment of CO2 sequestration by wollastonite carbonation, which forms an essential next step in its further development

  10. Studies on the metabolism and possible mechanisms of atherogenesis of lipoprotein (a)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krempler, F.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanisms of atherogenesis are under intensive clinical and experimental investigation. It is commonly accepted that lipoproteins play a major role in atherogenesis. The results of several clinical studies suggest that lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] represents an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis. In order to obtain information on the physiological and pathological role of LP(a), studies were undertaken to investigate the metabolism, removal sites, and possible atherogenic mechanism of Lp(a). It was found that Lp(a) is not metabolic product of other apoprotein B containing lipoproteins, but appears to be synthesized as a separate lipoprotein. The turnover parameters of Lp(a) resemble those of LDL. Binding studies of Lp(a) with cultured human fibroblasts demonstrated that Lp(a) is bound by the B-E receptor. After binding, Lp(a) is internalized and inhibits cellular cholesterol synthesis. In the presence of dextran sulfate or antibodies to the specific Lp(a) apoprotein or apoprotein B, Lp(a) is avidly taken up by macrophages. A similar mechanism might be responsible for the atherogenic effect of Lp(a). (Author)

  11. Traditional uses of plants in a rural community of Mozambique and possible links with Miombo degradation and harvesting sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, Piero; Mancini, Matteo; Mattioli, Elisabetta; Morganti, Michela; Signorini, Maria Adele

    2014-07-23

    Miombo woodlands play an important role in the livelihood of people living in sub-equatorial African countries, contributing to satisfy basic human needs such as food, medicine, fuelwood and building materials. However, over-exploitation of plant resources and unsustainable harvest practices can potentially degrade forests. The aim of this study was to document the use of Miombo plant products, other than medicinal plants, in local communities, within a wider framework in which we discussed possible links between traditional uses and conservation status of the used species and of the whole Miombo environment. Fieldwork took place in four communities of Muda-Serração, central Mozambique. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 52 informants about their knowledge, use and harvesting practices of useful plants. A survey on local Miombo vegetation was also carried out in order to assess abundance and distribution of useful woody plants cited in the interviews in areas exposed to different exploitation rates. A Conservation Priority index was also applied to rank conservation values of each used woody species. Ninety-eight plants cited by the informants were botanically identified. The most relevant general category was represented by food plants (45 species), followed by handicraft plants (38 species) and domestic plants (37 species). Among the 54 woody species observed in vegetation plots, 52% were cited as useful in the interviews. Twenty-six woody species found in 'natural' Miombo areas were not found in 'degraded' ones: of these, 46% were cited in the interviews (58% in the food category, 50% in the handicraft category, 25% in the domestic category and 8% in the fishing category). Results of conservation ranking showed that 7 woody species deserve conservation priority in the investigated area. This study shows that the communities investigated rely heavily on local forest products for their daily subsistence requirements in food, firewood/charcoal and

  12. Where is the comfort in comfort foods? Mechanisms linking fat signaling, reward, and emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltens, N; Zhao, D; Van Oudenhove, L

    2014-03-01

    Food in general, and fatty foods in particular, have obtained intrinsic reward value throughout evolution. This reward value results from an interaction between exteroceptive signals from different sensory modalities, interoceptive hunger/satiety signals from the gastrointestinal tract to the brain, as well as ongoing affective and cognitive processes. Further evidence linking food to emotions stems from folk psychology ('comfort foods') and epidemiological studies demonstrating high comorbidity rates between disorders of food intake, including obesity, and mood disorders such as depression. This review paper aims to give an overview of current knowledge on the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the link between (fatty) foods, their reward value, and emotional responses to (anticipation of) their intake in humans. Firstly, the influence of exteroceptive sensory signals, including visual, olfactory ('anticipatory food reward'), and gustatory ('consummatory food reward'), on the encoding of reward value in the (ventral) striatum and of subjective pleasantness in the cingulate and orbitofrontal cortex will be discussed. Differences in these pathways and mechanisms between lean and obese subjects will be highlighted. Secondly, recent studies elucidating the mechanisms of purely interoceptive fatty acid-induced signaling from the gastrointestinal tract to the brain, including the role of gut peptides, will be presented. These studies have demonstrated that such subliminal interoceptive stimuli may impact on hedonic circuits in the brain, and thereby influence the subjective and neural responses to negative emotion induction. This suggests that the effect of foods on mood may even occur independently from their exteroceptive sensory properties. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Evaluation of Possible Proximate Mechanisms Underlying the Kinship Theory of Intragenomic Conflict in Social Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, David A; Yi, Soojin V; Grozinger, Christina M

    2016-12-01

    Kinship theory provides a universal framework in which to understand the evolution of altruism, but there are many molecular and genetic mechanisms that can generate altruistic behaviors. Interestingly, kinship theory specifically predicts intragenomic conflict between maternally-derived alleles (matrigenes) and paternally-derived alleles (patrigenes) over the generation of altruistic behavior in cases where the interests of the matrigenes and patrigenes are not aligned. Under these conditions, individual differences in selfish versus altruistic behavior are predicted to arise from differential expression of the matrigenes and patrigenes (parent-specific gene expression or PSGE) that regulate selfish versus altruistic behaviors. As one of the leading theories to describe PSGE and genomic imprinting, kinship theory has been used to generate predictions to describe the reproductive division of labor in social insect colonies, which represents an excellent model system to test the hypotheses of kinship theory and examine the underlying mechanisms driving it. Recent studies have confirmed the predicted differences in the influence of matrigenes and patrigenes on reproductive division of labor in social insects, and demonstrated that these differences are associated with differences in PSGE of key genes involved in regulating reproductive physiology, providing further support for kinship theory. However, the mechanisms mediating PSGE in social insects, and how PSGE leads to differences in selfish versus altruistic behavior, remain to be determined. Here, we review the available supporting evidence for three possible epigenetic mechanisms (DNA methylation, piRNAs, and histone modification) that may generate PSGE in social insects, and discuss how these may lead to variation in social behavior. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email

  14. Involvement of Hookworm Co-Infection in the Pathogenesis and Progression of Podoconiosis: Possible Immunological Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damilare O. Famakinde

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Podoconiosis is an endemic, non-infectious, geochemical and non-filarial inflammatory cause of tropical elephantiasis. The immunology of podoconiosis is not yet expressly understood. In spite of this, co-infection and co-morbidity with the infectious, soil-transmitted hookworm disease that causes iron deficiency anemia has been found to be predominant among affected individuals living in co-endemic settings, thus creating a more complex immunological interplay that still has not been investigated. Although deworming and iron-rich nutrient supplementation have been suggested in podoconiosis patients living under resource-poor conditions, and it is thought that hookworm infection may help to suppress inflammatory responses, the undisputed link that exists between a non-infectious and an infectious disease may create a scenario whereby during a co-infection, treatment of one exacerbates the other disease condition or is dampened by the debilitation caused by the other. In this paper, we elaborate on the immunopathogenesis of podoconiosis and examine the possible immunological dynamics of hookworm co-infection in the immunopathology of podoconiosis, with a view toward improved management of the disease that will facilitate its feasible elimination.

  15. Low-carbohydrate diet induces metabolic depression: a possible mechanism to conserve glycogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winwood-Smith, Hugh S; Franklin, Craig E; White, Craig R

    2017-10-01

    Long-term studies have found that low-carbohydrate diets are more effective for weight loss than calorie-restricted diets in the short term but equally or only marginally more effective in the long term. Low-carbohydrate diets have been linked to reduced glycogen stores and increased feelings of fatigue. We propose that reduced physical activity in response to lowered glycogen explains the diminishing weight loss advantage of low-carbohydrate compared with low-calorie diets over longer time periods. We explored this possibility by feeding adult Drosophila melanogaster a standard or a low-carbohydrate diet for 9 days and measured changes in metabolic rate, glycogen stores, activity, and body mass. We hypothesized that a low-carbohydrate diet would cause a reduction in glycogen stores, which recover over time, a reduction in physical activity, and an increase in resting metabolic rate. The low-carbohydrate diet reduced glycogen stores, which recovered over time. Activity was unaffected by diet, but metabolic rate was reduced, in the low-carbohydrate group. We conclude that metabolic depression could explain the decreased effectiveness of low-carbohydrate diets over time and recommend further investigation of long-term metabolic effects of dietary interventions and a greater focus on physiological plasticity within the study of human nutrition. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Disturbances in VHF/UHF telemetry links as a possible effect of the 2003 Hokkaido Tokachi-oki earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nagamoto

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The data on radio telemetry links (for water information at VHF/UHF in Hokkaido are used to investigate the rate of disturbances on radio links (or connection failure and its association with a huge earthquake, Tokachi-oki earthquake on 26 September 2003. Especially, the telemetry links at the Tokachi region closest to the earthquake epicenter, showed a significant increase in disturbances on radio links two weeks to a few days before the earthquake on the basis of analysis during a long interval from 1 June 2002 to 3 November 2007 (over 5 years. We suggest that these severe disturbances in VHF/UHF telemetry links are attributed to the generation of seismogenic VHF/UHF radio noises (emissions. Based on this idea, we have estimated that the intensity of these seismogenic emissions is on the order of 10–19 dB μV/m. Finally, the present result was compared with other physical parameters already obtained for this earthquake.

  17. Possibilities for Automatic Control of Hydro-Mechanical Transmission and Birotating Electric Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Mikhailov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents mathematical models and results of virtual investigations pertaining to the selected motion parameters of a mobile machine equipped with hydro mechanical and modernized transmissions. The machine has been tested in similar technological cycles and it has been equipped with a universal automatic control system. Changes in structure and type of power transmission have been obtained with the help of a control algorithm including an extra reversible electric machine which is switched in at some operational modes.Implementation of the proposed  concept makes it possible to obtain and check the improved C-code of the control system and enhance operational parameters of the transmission and machine efficiency, reduce slippage and tire wear while using braking energy for its later beneficial use which is usually considered as a consumable element.

  18. The possibility of clean development mechanism in a nuclear power expansion in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paris, Alexandre G.; Oliveira, Wagner S.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear power expansion is a very controversial topic in Brazil, which needs to be carefully addressed, especially because the national energy supply system is becoming more carbon-intensive. Although most of the electricity generated in Brazil is by hydropower plants, the country's electricity matrix expansion is moving towards a larger participation of fossil fuel thermo power generation which is contrarily the global objects of climate change mitigation. Climate change is a reality and the choice facing this problem is between action and delay. There will be needed a huge international mobilization, associated with a great amount of financial, political and engineering resources interested for preventing the aggravation of the greenhouse effect. This article analyses, in the possibility of including nuclear power in the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) criteria, the revenue that could be generated from the trading of Certified Emission Reduction (CER) in different scenarios of nuclear power expansion in Brazil. (author)

  19. TRENDS IN OFFICIAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE TO DEVELOPING COUNTRIES AND POSSIBILITIES OF ALTERNATIVE FINANCING MECHANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talknice Saungweme

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The study analyses trends in Official Development Assistance (ODA to developing countries, mainly Africa, and possibilities of new financing instruments. Economies of most developing countries, especially those in Sub-Saharan Africa, are characterised by low investment flows, huge import bills and lower exports. Subsequently, development assistance is the major source of external finance and has taken the form of budget support, humanitarian and development finance. However, the noted fall in ODA in 2005, 2009 and 2012 might adversely impact directly on the attainment of millennium development goals in 2015. This negative trend in ODA is a result of a combination of factors such as economic constraints in the donor countries (for example, the debt crisis and/or a new shift in financing mechanisms to developing countries.

  20. On possible mechanisms of rim-layer formation in the high-burnup UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zborovskii, V.; Likhanskii, V.

    2006-01-01

    Two models determining threshold conditions for onset of UO 2 fuel restructuring are developed. In the first model the conditions for fuel restructuring are related with development of the Kinoshita instability. The second model is based upon attainment of critical values by radius of over pressurised bubbles. Possibility of large bubbles formation on dislocation lines is considered with account of Xe atoms drift in the field of mechanical strain of dislocation and irradiation-induced Xe drift in vacancy concentration gradient. Computer simulations of behaviour of point defects and Xe atoms near dislocation core are carried out, results are compared with experimental data. The computer program is developed which consistently calculates point defects and Xe atoms distributions inside fuel grain with account of their behaviour near dislocation core

  1. Antihyperlipidemic effect of Trichilia connaroides in hypercholesterolemic rats and its possible mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Gurunath Subbarao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to investigate the antihyperlipidemic effect of the chloroform (CETC and methanol (METC extracts of leaves of Trichilia connaroides in hypercholesterolemic rats and, subsequently, to evaluate the possible mechanism of its antihyperlipidemic effect. Materials and Methods: The antihyperlipidemic activity of CETC and METC (100 mg/kg in hypercholesterolemic rats was investigated by recording the serum lipid profile after a month-long oral treatment of these extracts. Further, hypercholesterolemic regression test and hypercholesterolemic progression test were carried out to understand the possible mechanism of its antihypercholesterolemic effect. The data were analyzed for statistical significance by one-way ANOVA, followed by Dunnet′s test. Results and Conclusion: Hypercholesterolemic rats treated with CETC and METC produced a significant fall (P<0.05 in plasma triglyceride, total cholesterol, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL -cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol and rise (P < 0.05 in high density lipoprotein (HDL -cholesterol. A significant reduction (P < 0.01 in atherogenic index, increase (P < 0.05 in body weight and an insignificant influence on food intake were also observed at the end of the study. A hypercholesterolemic regression test revealed a significant reduction (P < 0.05 in the serum cholesterol level in both CETC and METC extract-treated animals. During the hypercholesterolemic progression test, a similar reduction in the serum cholesterol level was observed only in the METC extract-treated animals. The antihyperlipidemic effect was similar to fenofibrate and ezitimibe. Significant changes in the lipid profile in hypercholesterolemic animals confirm a potential antihyperlipidemic activity of the extracts. The CETC and METC extracts influenced the absorption and metabolism of dietary cholesterol to elicit the antihyperlipidemic effect.

  2. Intestinal uptake of bone seeking radiotracer: possible mechanisms and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. W.; Kim, C. G.; Park, S. A.; Chang, J. A. [WonKwang University Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the frequency of intestinal accumulation of Tc-99m 3, 3-diphosphono-1, 2-propanedicarboxylic acid (DPD) on bone scans, describe the patterns of intestinal Tc-99m DPD uptake and discuss the possible mechanisms of this unusual finding. Three thousand, one hundred and ninety-four consecutive patients have been evaluated for intestinal Tc-99m DPD uptake on bone scans. A whole-body bone scan and various spot views were obtained to evaluate the location and intensity of intestinal uptake. Delayed scan and SPECT study were performed to define characteristics of intestinal uptake in some of patients. Available reports of co-relative radiologic imaging, endoscopic studies and laboratory tests were also reviewed to explain the intestinal uptake. Eighteen (9 female, 9 male) patients out of 3194 with a mean age of 57 years showed intestinal Tc-99m DPD uptake. The locations of intestinal uptake were well dispersed throughout the abdomen. The majority of the cases showed lower intensity than iliac spine (12/18, 67%). Eight patients didn't show significant change of uptake characteristics on the delayed images, while intestinal uptake traveled distally in nine patients. Two cases were revealed uptake of peritoneal carcinomatosis with small amount ascites and three cases were revealed tumoral uptake of intestine. Four patients with gastritis showed similar characteristic of intestinal uptake. Six cases of distally traveled intestinal uptake suggested intraluminal Tc-99m DPD activity such as gastrointestinal bleeding. However, stool occult blood tests were negative in three patients, and there is no clinical evidence of gastrointestinal bleeding in other three patients. Intestinal Tc-99m DPD uptake can be observed in 0.5% of bone scans. The mechanism of intestinal uptake is still unclear in some of the patients. Delayed imaging additional spot views and SPECT studies help in the differentiation of this finding from possible

  3. Possible Peroxo State of the Dicopper Site of Particulate Methane Monooxygenase from Combined Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoyama, Shuhei; Doitomi, Kazuki; Kamachi, Takashi; Shiota, Yoshihito; Yoshizawa, Kazunari

    2016-03-21

    Enzymatic methane hydroxylation is proposed to efficiently occur at the dinuclear copper site of particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO), which is an integral membrane metalloenzyme in methanotrophic bacteria. The resting state and a possible peroxo state of the dicopper active site of pMMO are discussed by using combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics calculations on the basis of reported X-ray crystal structures of the resting state of pMMO by Rosenzweig and co-workers. The dicopper site has a unique structure, in which one copper is coordinated by two histidine imidazoles and another is chelated by a histidine imidazole and primary amine of an N-terminal histidine. The resting state of the dicopper site is assignable to the mixed-valent Cu(I)Cu(II) state from a computed Cu-Cu distance of 2.62 Å from calculations at the B3LYP-D/TZVP level of theory. A μ-η(2):η(2)-peroxo-Cu(II)2 structure similar to those of hemocyanin and tyrosinase is reasonably obtained by using the resting state structure and dioxygen. Computed Cu-Cu and O-O distances are 3.63 and 1.46 Å, respectively, in the open-shell singlet state. Structural features of the dicopper peroxo species of pMMO are compared with those of hemocyanin and tyrosinase and synthetic dicopper model compounds. Optical features of the μ-η(2):η(2)-peroxo-Cu(II)2 state are calculated and analyzed with TD-DFT calculations.

  4. Cardiovascular reactivity as a mechanism linking child trauma to adolescent psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heleniak, Charlotte; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Ormel, Johan; Riese, Harriette

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in physiological reactivity to stress are argued to be central mechanisms linking adverse childhood environmental experiences to internalizing and externalizing psychopathology. Childhood trauma exposure may influence physiological reactivity to stress in distinct ways from other forms of childhood adversity. This study applied a novel theoretical model to investigate the impact of childhood trauma on cardiovascular stress reactivity – the biopsychosocial model of challenge and threat. This model suggests that inefficient cardiovascular responses to stress – a threat as opposed to challenge profile – are characterized by blunted cardiac output (CO) reactivity and increased vascular resistance. We examined whether childhood trauma exposure predicted an indicator of the threat profile of cardiovascular reactivity and whether such a pattern was associated with adolescent psychopathology in a population-representative sample of 488 adolescents (M = 16.17 years old, 49.2% boys) in the TRacking Adolescents’ Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS). Exposure to trauma was associated with both internalizing and externalizing symptoms and a pattern of cardiovascular reactivity consistent with the threat profile, including blunted CO reactivity during a social stress task. Blunted CO reactivity, in turn, was positively associated with externalizing, but not internalizing symptoms and mediated the link between trauma and externalizing psychopathology. None of these associations varied by gender. The biopsychosocial model of challenge and threat provides a novel theoretical framework for understanding disruptions in physiological reactivity to stress following childhood trauma exposure, revealing a potential pathway linking such exposure with externalizing problems in adolescents. PMID:27568327

  5. Neural mechanisms linking social status and inflammatory responses to social stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatell, Keely A; Dedovic, Katarina; Slavich, George M; Jarcho, Michael R; Breen, Elizabeth C; Bower, Julienne E; Irwin, Michael R; Eisenberger, Naomi I

    2016-06-01

    Social stratification has important implications for health and well-being, with individuals lower in standing in a hierarchy experiencing worse outcomes than those higher up the social ladder. Separate lines of past research suggest that alterations in inflammatory processes and neural responses to threat may link lower social status with poorer outcomes. This study was designed to bridge these literatures to investigate the neurocognitive mechanisms linking subjective social status and inflammation. Thirty-one participants reported their subjective social status, and underwent a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan while they were socially evaluated. Participants also provided blood samples before and after the stressor, which were analysed for changes in inflammation. Results showed that lower subjective social status was associated with greater increases in inflammation. Neuroimaging data revealed lower subjective social status was associated with greater neural activity in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) in response to negative feedback. Finally, results indicated that activation in the DMPFC in response to negative feedback mediated the relation between social status and increases in inflammatory activity. This study provides the first evidence of a neurocognitive pathway linking subjective social status and inflammation, thus furthering our understanding of how social hierarchies shape neural and physiological responses to social interactions. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Harvesting Low-Frequency (<5 Hz) Irregular Mechanical Energy: A Possible Killer Application of Triboelectric Nanogenerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zi, Yunlong; Guo, Hengyu; Wen, Zhen; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Hu, Chenguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-26

    Electromagnetic generators (EMGs) and triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are the two most powerful approaches for harvesting ambient mechanical energy, but the effectiveness of each depends on the triggering frequency. Here, after systematically comparing the performances of EMGs and TENGs under low-frequency motion (frequency, while that of TENGs is approximately in proportion to the frequency. Therefore, the TENG has a much better performance than that of the EMG at low frequency (typically 0.1-3 Hz). Importantly, the extremely small output voltage of the EMG at low frequency makes it almost inapplicable to drive any electronic unit that requires a certain threshold voltage (∼0.2-4 V), so that most of the harvested energy is wasted. In contrast, a TENG has an output voltage that is usually high enough (>10-100 V) and independent of frequency so that most of the generated power can be effectively used to power the devices. Furthermore, a TENG also has advantages of light weight, low cost, and easy scale up through advanced structure designs. All these merits verify the possible killer application of a TENG for harvesting energy at low frequency from motions such as human motions for powering small electronics and possibly ocean waves for large-scale blue energy.

  7. Participation of citral in the bronchodilatory effect of ginger oil and possible mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangprayool, Thitiya; Kupittayanant, Sajeera; Chudapongse, Nuannoi

    2013-09-01

    The extract of ginger, the rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae), has been reported to possess anti-hyperactivity and anti-inflammation on airway. The present study described brochodilatory activity of ginger oil and identified its active compound. Ginger oil was extracted by hydro-distillation. The compositions of ginger oil were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometer. Citral, eucalyptol and camphene were found to be the major components. Ginger oil and citral, but not camphene, suppressed rat tracheal contraction induced by carbachol (CCh). Consistent with previous report, eucalyptol showed a relaxing effect on rat airway. Since the content of eucalyptol in ginger oil was relatively low, the contribution of eucalyptol to the bronchodilatory effect of ginger oil was small. To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the myorelaxing effect, propranolol (a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist), indomethacin (a COX inhibitor) and L-NAME (a NOS inhibitor) were used to block the inhibitory effects of ginger oil and citral. It was found that propranolol, but not indomethacin and L-NAME, reversed bronchodilatory effects of both ginger oil and citral, suggesting that a possible mechanism involved β-adrenergic receptor. This study provides the pharmacological basis supporting the therapeutic potential of Z. officinale rhizomes as a bronchodilator. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields Induce Spermatogenic Germ Cell Apoptosis: Possible Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Kon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy generated by an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF is too weak to directly induce genotoxicity. However, it is reported that an extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF is related to DNA strand breakage and apoptosis. The testes that conduct spermatogenesis through a dynamic cellular process involving meiosis and mitosis seem vulnerable to external stress such as heat, MF exposure, and chemical or physical agents. Nevertheless the results regarding adverse effects of ELF-EMF on human or animal reproductive functions are inconclusive. According to the guideline of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP; 2010 for limiting exposure to time-varying MF (1 Hz to 100 kHz, overall conclusion of epidemiologic studies has not consistently shown an association between human adverse reproductive outcomes and maternal or paternal exposure to low frequency fields. In animal studies there is no compelling evidence of causal relationship between prenatal development and ELF-MF exposure. However there is increasing evidence that EL-EMF exposure is involved with germ cell apoptosis in testes. Biophysical mechanism by which ELF-MF induces germ cell apoptosis has not been established. This review proposes the possible mechanism of germ cell apoptosis in testes induced by ELF-MF.

  9. Numerical Simulation on a Possible Formation Mechanism of Interplanetary Magnetic Cloud Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Quan-Lin; Wei, Feng-Si; Feng, Xue-Shang

    2003-08-01

    The formation mechanism of the interplanetary magnetic cloud (MC) boundaries is numerically investigated by simulating the interactions between an MC of some initial momentum and a local interplanetary current sheet. The compressible 2.5D MHD equations are solved. Results show that the magnetic reconnection process is a possible formation mechanism when an MC interacts with a surrounding current sheet. A number of interesting features are found. For instance, the front boundary of the MCs is a magnetic reconnection boundary that could be caused by a driven reconnection ahead of the cloud, and the tail boundary might be caused by the driving of the entrained flow as a result of the Bernoulli principle. Analysis of the magnetic field and plasma data demonstrates that at these two boundaries appear large value of the plasma parameter β, clear increase of plasma temperature and density, distinct decrease of magnetic magnitude, and a transition of magnetic field direction of about 180 degrees. The outcome of the present simulation agrees qualitatively with the observational results on MC boundary inferred from IMP-8, etc. The project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 40104006, 49925412, and 49990450

  10. The Possibility of a New Metaphysics for Quantum Mechanics from Meinong's Theory of Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffigna, Matías

    According to de Ronde it was Bohr's interpretation of Quantum Mechanics (QM) which closed the possibility of understanding physical reality beyond the realm of the actual, so establishing the Orthodox Line of Research. In this sense, it is not the task of any physical theory to look beyond the language and metaphysics supposed by classical physics, in order to account for what QM describes. If one wishes to maintain a realist position (though not nave) regarding physical theories, one seems then to be trapped by an array of concepts that do not allow to understand the main principles involved in the most successful physical theory thus far, mainly: the quantum postulate, the principle of indetermination and the superposition principle. If de Ronde is right in proposing QM can only be completed as a physical theory by the introduction of `new concepts' that admit as real a domain beyond actuality, then a new ontology that goes beyond Aristotelian and Newtonian actualism is needed. It was already in the early 20th century that misunderstood philosopher Alexius von Meinong proposed a Theory of Objects that admits a domain of being beyond existence-actuality. Member of the so called `School of Brentano', Meinong's concerns were oriented to provide an ontology of everything that can be thought of, and at the same time an intentionality theory of how objects are thought of. I wish to argue that in Meinong's theory of objects we find the rudiments of the ontology and the intentionality theory we need to account for QM's basic principles: mainly the possibility of predicating properties of non-entities, or in other words, the possibility of objectively describing a domain of what is, that is different from the domain of actual existence.

  11. Rapid effects of estrogens on short-term memory: Possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paletta, Pietro; Sheppard, Paul A S; Matta, Richard; Ervin, Kelsy S J; Choleris, Elena

    2018-06-01

    Estrogens affect learning and memory through rapid and delayed mechanisms. Here we review studies on rapid effects on short-term memory. Estradiol rapidly improves social and object recognition memory, spatial memory, and social learning when administered systemically. The dorsal hippocampus mediates estrogen rapid facilitation of object, social and spatial short-term memory. The medial amygdala mediates rapid facilitation of social recognition. The three estrogen receptors, α (ERα), β (ERβ) and the G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) appear to play different roles depending on the task and brain region. Both ERα and GPER agonists rapidly facilitate short-term social and object recognition and spatial memory when administered systemically or into the dorsal hippocampus and facilitate social recognition in the medial amygdala. Conversely, only GPER can facilitate social learning after systemic treatment and an ERβ agonist only rapidly improved short-term spatial memory when given systemically or into the hippocampus, but also facilitates social recognition in the medial amygdala. Investigations into the mechanisms behind estrogens' rapid effects on short term memory showed an involvement of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) kinase pathways. Recent evidence also showed that estrogens interact with the neuropeptide oxytocin in rapidly facilitating social recognition. Estrogens can increase the production and/or release of oxytocin and other neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and acetylcholine. Therefore, it is possible that estrogens' rapid effects on short-term memory may occur through the regulation of various neurotransmitters, although more research is need on these interactions as well as the mechanisms of estrogens' actions on short-term memory. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Natural outdoor environments and mental health: Stress as a possible mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triguero-Mas, Margarita; Donaire-Gonzalez, David; Seto, Edmund; Valentín, Antònia; Martínez, David; Smith, Graham; Hurst, Gemma; Carrasco-Turigas, Glòria; Masterson, Daniel; van den Berg, Magdalena; Ambròs, Albert; Martínez-Íñiguez, Tania; Dedele, Audrius; Ellis, Naomi; Grazulevicius, Tomas; Voorsmit, Martin; Cirach, Marta; Cirac-Claveras, Judith; Swart, Wim; Clasquin, Eddy; Ruijsbroek, Annemarie; Maas, Jolanda; Jerret, Michael; Gražulevičienė, Regina; Kruize, Hanneke; Gidlow, Christopher J; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2017-11-01

    Better mental health has been associated with exposure to natural outdoor environments (NOE). However, comprehensive studies including several indicators of exposure and outcomes, potential effect modifiers and mediators are scarce. We used novel, objective measures to explore the relationships between exposure to NOE (i.e. residential availability and contact) and different indicators of mental health, and possible modifiers and mediators. A nested cross-sectional study was conducted in: Barcelona, Spain; Stoke-on-Trent, United Kingdom; Doetinchem, Netherlands; Kaunas, Lithuania. Participants' exposure to NOE (including both surrounding greenness and green and/or blue spaces) was measured in terms of (a) amount in their residential environment (using Geographical Information Systems) and (b) their contact with NOE (using smartphone data collected over seven days). Self-reported information was collected for mental health (psychological wellbeing, sleep quality, vitality, and somatisation), and potential effect modifiers (gender, age, education level, and city) and mediators (perceived stress and social contacts), with additional objective NOE physical activity (potential mediator) derived from smartphone accelerometers. Analysis of data from 406 participants showed no statistically significant associations linking mental health and residential NOE exposure. However, NOE contact, especially surrounding greenness, was statistically significantly tied to better mental health. There were indications that these relationships were stronger for males, younger people, low-medium educated, and Doetinchem residents. Perceived stress was a mediator of most associations, and physical activity and social contacts were not. Our findings indicate that contact with NOE benefits mental health. Our results also suggest that having contact with NOE that can facilitate stress reduction could be particularly beneficial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Glacier surge mechanism based on linked cavity configuration of the basal water conduit system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamb, Barclay

    1987-08-01

    Based on observations of the 1982-1983 surge of Variegated Glacier, Alaska, a model of the surge mechanism is developed in terms of a transition from the normal tunnel configuration of the basal water conduit system to a linked cavity configuration that tends to restrict the flow of water, resulting in increased basal water pressures that cause rapid basal sliding. The linked cavity system consists of basal cavities formed by ice-bedrock separation (cavitation), ˜1 m high and ˜10 m in horizontal dimensions, widely scattered over the glacier bed, and hydraulically linked by narrow connections where separation is minimal (separation gap ≲ 0.1 m). The narrow connections, called orifices, control the water flow through the conduit system; by throttling the flow through the large cavities, the orifices keep the water flux transmitted by the basal water system at normal levels even though the total cavity cross-sectional area (˜200 m2) is much larger than that of a tunnel system (˜10 m2). A physical model of the linked cavity system is formulated in terms of the dimensions of the "typical" cavity and orifice and the numbers of these across the glacier width. The model concentrates on the detailed configuration of the typical orifice and its response to basal water pressure and basal sliding, which determines the water flux carried by the system under given conditions. Configurations are worked out for two idealized orifice types, step orifices that form in the lee of downglacier-facing bedrock steps, and wave orifices that form on the lee slopes of quasisinusoidal bedrock waves and are similar to transverse "N channels." The orifice configurations are obtained from the results of solutions of the basal-sliding-with-separation problem for an ice mass constituting of linear half-space of linear rheology, with nonlinearity introduced by making the viscosity stress-dependent on an intuitive basis. Modification of the orifice shapes by melting of the ice roof due to

  14. Forever Young: Mechanisms of Natural Anoxia Tolerance and Potential Links to Longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Krivoruchko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available While mammals cannot survive oxygen deprivation for more than a few minutes without sustaining severe organ damage, some animals have mastered anaerobic life. Freshwater turtles belonging to the Trachemys and Chrysemys genera are the champion facultative anaerobes of the vertebrate world, often surviving without oxygen for many weeks at a time. The physiological and biochemical mechanisms that underlie anoxia tolerance in turtles include profound metabolic rate depression, post-translational modification of proteins, strong antioxidant defenses, activation of specific stress-responsive transcription factors, and enhanced expression of cyto-protective proteins. Turtles are also known for their incredible longevity and display characteristics of “negligible senescence.” We propose that the robust stress-tolerance mechanisms that permit long term anaerobiosis by turtles may also support the longevity of these animals. Many of the mechanisms involved in natural anoxia tolerance, such as hypometabolism or the induction of various protective proteins/pathways, have been shown to play important roles in mammalian oxygen-related diseases and improved understanding of how cells survive without oxygen could aid in the understanding and treatment of various pathological conditions that involve hypoxia or oxidative stress. In the present review we discuss the recent advances made in understanding the molecular nature of anoxia tolerance in turtles and the potential links between this tolerance and longevity.

  15. Forever young: Mechanisms of natural anoxia tolerance and potential links to longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoruchko, Anastasia

    2010-01-01

    While mammals cannot survive oxygen deprivation for more than a few minutes without sustaining severe organ damage, some animals have mastered anaerobic life. Freshwater turtles belonging to the Trachemys and Chrysemys genera are the champion facultative anaerobes of the vertebrate world, often surviving without oxygen for many weeks at a time. The physiological and biochemical mechanisms that underlie anoxia tolerance in turtles include profound metabolic rate depression, post-translational modification of proteins, strong antioxidant defenses, activation of specific stress-responsive transcription factors, and enhanced expression of cyto-protective proteins. Turtles are also known for their incredible longevity and display characteristics of “negligible senescence.” We propose that the robust stress-tolerance mechanisms that permit long term anaerobiosis by turtles may also support the longevity of these animals. Many of the mechanisms involved in natural anoxia tolerance, such as hypometabolism or the induction of various protective proteins/pathways, have been shown to play important roles in mammalian oxygen-related diseases and improved understanding of how cells survive without oxygen could aid in the understanding and treatment of various pathological conditions that involve hypoxia or oxidative stress. In the present review we discuss the recent advances made in understanding the molecular nature of anoxia tolerance in turtles and the potential links between this tolerance and longevity. PMID:20716943

  16. Biochemical mechanisms of pallidal deep brain stimulation in X-linked dystonia parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronnier, V M; Domingo, A; Moll, C K; Rasche, D; Mohr, C; Rosales, R; Capetian, P; Jamora, R D; Lee, L V; Münchau, A; Diesta, C C; Tadic, V; Klein, C; Brüggemann, N; Moser, A

    2015-08-01

    Invasive techniques such as in-vivo microdialysis provide the opportunity to directly assess neurotransmitter levels in subcortical brain areas. Five male Filipino patients (mean age 42.4, range 34-52 years) with severe X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism underwent bilateral implantation of deep brain leads into the internal part of the globus pallidus (GPi). Intraoperative microdialysis and measurement of gamma aminobutyric acid and glutamate was performed in the GPi in three patients and globus pallidus externus (GPe) in two patients at baseline for 25/30 min and during 25/30 min of high-frequency GPi stimulation. While the gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration increased in the GPi during high frequency stimulation (231 ± 102% in comparison to baseline values), a decrease was observed in the GPe (22 ± 10%). Extracellular glutamate levels largely remained unchanged. Pallidal microdialysis is a promising intraoperative monitoring tool to better understand pathophysiological implications in movement disorders and therapeutic mechanisms of high frequency stimulation. The increased inhibitory tone of GPi neurons and the subsequent thalamic inhibition could be one of the key mechanisms of GPi deep brain stimulation in dystonia. Such a mechanism may explain how competing (dystonic) movements can be suppressed in GPi/thalamic circuits in favour of desired motor programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation-induced genomic instability: Are epigenetic mechanisms the missing link?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: This review examines the evidence for the hypothesis that epigenetics are involved in the initiation and perpetuation of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI). Conclusion: In addition to the extensively studied targeted effects of radiation, it is now apparent that non-targeted delayed effects such as RIGI are also important post-irradiation outcomes. In RIGI, unirradiated progeny cells display phenotypic changes at delayed times after radiation of the parental cell. RIGI is thought to be important in the process of carcinogenesis, however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be elucidated. In the genomically unstable clones developed by Morgan and colleagues, radiation-induced mutations, double-strand breaks, or changes in mRNA levels alone could not account for the initiation or perpetuation of RIGI. Since changes in the DNA sequence could not fully explain the mechanism of RIGI, inherited epigenetic changes may be involved. Epigenetics are known to play an important role in many cellular processes and epigenetic aberrations can lead to carcinogenesis. Recent studies in the field of radiation biology suggest that the changes in methylation patterns may be involved in RIGI. Together these clues have led us to hypothesize that epigenetics may be the missing link in understanding the mechanism behind RIGI.

  18. Radiation-induced DNA-protein cross-links: Mechanisms and biological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Toshiaki; Xu, Xu; Salem, Amir M H; Shoulkamy, Mahmoud I; Ide, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Ionizing radiation produces various DNA lesions such as base damage, DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs), DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs). Of these, the biological significance of DPCs remains elusive. In this article, we focus on radiation-induced DPCs and review the current understanding of their induction, properties, repair, and biological consequences. When cells are irradiated, the formation of base damage, SSBs, and DSBs are promoted in the presence of oxygen. Conversely, that of DPCs is promoted in the absence of oxygen, suggesting their importance in hypoxic cells, such as those present in tumors. DNA and protein radicals generated by hydroxyl radicals (i.e., indirect effect) are responsible for DPC formation. In addition, DPCs can also be formed from guanine radical cations generated by the direct effect. Actin, histones, and other proteins have been identified as cross-linked proteins. Also, covalent linkages between DNA and protein constituents such as thymine-lysine and guanine-lysine have been identified and their structures are proposed. In irradiated cells and tissues, DPCs are repaired in a biphasic manner, consisting of fast and slow components. The half-time for the fast component is 20min-2h and that for the slow component is 2-70h. Notably, radiation-induced DPCs are repaired more slowly than DSBs. Homologous recombination plays a pivotal role in the repair of radiation-induced DPCs as well as DSBs. Recently, a novel mechanism of DPC repair mediated by a DPC protease was reported, wherein the resulting DNA-peptide cross-links were bypassed by translesion synthesis. The replication and transcription of DPC-bearing reporter plasmids are inhibited in cells, suggesting that DPCs are potentially lethal lesions. However, whether DPCs are mutagenic and induce gross chromosomal alterations remains to be determined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sorbitol-based osmotic diarrhea: possible causes and mechanism of prevention investigated in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Shahidul; Sakaguchi, Ei

    2006-12-21

    To study the possible causes of sorbitol (S)-based diarrhea and its mechanism of reduction by rice gruel (RG) in cecectomized rats. S was dissolved either in distilled water or in RG (50 g/L) and ingested as a single oral dose (1.2 g/kg body mass, containing 0.5 g/L phenol red as a recovery marker) by S (control) and S + RG groups (n = 7), respectively. This dose is over the laxative dose for humans. Animals were sacrificed exactly 1 h after dose ingestion, without any access to drinking water. The whole gastro-intestinal tract was divided into seven segments and sampled to analyze the S and marker remaining in its contents. Gastric-emptying and intestinal transit were comparatively slower in the S + RG group. Also, the S absorption index in the 3(rd) and last quarter of the small intestine (24.85 +/- 18.88% vs 0.0 +/- 0.0% and 39.09 +/- 32.75% vs 0.0 +/- 0.0%, respectively, P osmotic diarrhea. Where RG enhanced the absorption of S through passive diffusion, the degree of diarrhea was reduced in cecectomized rats.

  20. The extremely high 137Cs inventory in the Sulu Sea: a possible mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Wang Zhongliang; Zheng Jian

    2006-01-01

    Large-volume seawater samples were collected in the Sulu and South China Seas and their 137 Cs activities were determined by γ-ray spectrometry using a low background type high-purity Ge detector. Vertical distributions of 137 Cs activity showed an exponential decrease in the South China Sea, whereas a subsurface maximum at 200 m depth and monotonic decrease below 300 m were observed in the Sulu Sea. A significant difference in intermediate water 137 Cs activities in the 500-2000 m depth was observed between the Sulu and South China Seas, i.e., the 137 Cs activities in the Sulu Sea were remarkably higher than those in the South China Sea. The difference in the 137 Cs inventory below 500 m was ∼1200 Bq m -2 between the Sulu and South China Seas. The 137 Cs total inventory of 3200 Bq m -2 in the Sulu Sea was 5.7 times higher than that expected from global fallout. A possible mechanism controlling this extremely high 137 Cs total inventory may be inflows of the 137 Cs rich water masses through the Luzon Strait, lateral transport across the Mindoro Strait into the Sulu Sea, and then subduction into the deep layer in the basin

  1. A birdcage model for the Chinese meridian system: part III. Possible mechanism of magnetic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Kaung-Ti

    2005-01-01

    Based on the electromagnetic model of the transmission line for the channel and the birdcage resonator for the meridian network, we interpret two effects, seemingly incomprehensible in terms of current Western physiology, the lasting effect and the remote effect. For the lasting effect, acupuncture enhances the amplitude of the Qi standing wave, and this increased amplitude is retained and thus is able to sustain a gradual remodeling of the extracellular matrix in interstitial connective tissues, resulting in a lasting therapeutic effect. For the remote effect (acupuncture effect far from the site of needle insertion), our model puts the mechanism of magnetic therapy on an equal footing with that of acupuncture. It may not be a coincidence that accounts of investigators in both acupuncture and magnetotherapy about the depth of the effective site--along cleavage planes between muscles, or between muscle and bone or tendon--are in accord with that of the Huang Di Nei Jing about the course of channels: "they are embedded and travel between interstitial muscles, deep and invisible." A possible magnetic field generated outside the birdcage may be manipulated to produce local areas of higher temperature or very strong fields.

  2. Paramecium tetraurelia growth stimulation under low-level chronic irradiation: investigations on a possible mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croute, F.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Vidal, S.; Dupouy, D.; Planel, H.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to demonstrate the effects of low-level chronic irradiation on Paramecium tetraurelia proliferation. Biological effects were strongly dependent on the bacterial density of culture medium and more exactly on the catalase content of the medium. Significant growth stimulation was found under 60 Co chronic irradiation at a dose rate of 2 rad/year when paramecia were grown in a medium containing a high bacterial concentration (2.5 x 10 2 cells/m) or supplemented with catalase (300 U/ml). In a medium with a low bacterial density (1 x 10 6 cell/ml) or supplemented with a catalase activity inhibitor, growth simulation was preceded by a transitory inhibiting effect which could be correlated with extracellularly radioproduced H 2 O 2 . H 2 O 2 addition appeared to be able to simulate the biological effects of chronic irradiation. A possible mechanism is discussed.We proposed that the stimulating effects were the result of intracellular enzymatic scavenging of radioproduced H 2 O 2

  3. Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope: experimental observations and possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, H; Su, D; Egerton, R F; Konno, M; Wu, L; Ciston, J; Wall, J; Zhu, Y

    2011-06-01

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondary electrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. A possible mechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Tangential vitreous traction: a possible mechanism of development of cystoid macular edema in retinitis pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikiko Takezawa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Mikiko Takezawa, Soichi Tetsuka, Akihiro KakehashiDepartment of Ophthalmology, Jichi Medical University, Saitama Medical Center, Saitama, Saitama, JapanAbstract: We report the possible mechanism of development of cystoid macular edema (CME in retinitis pigmentosa (RP in the case of a 68-year-old woman with RP and CME in the right eye and resolving CME in the left eye. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography showed CME and posterior vitreoschisis in the nasal quadrant of the fundus without a posterior vitreous detachment (PVD. This vitreous pathology suggested bilateral thickening and shrinkage of the posterior vitreous cortex. In the right eye, CME was evident with no vitreofoveal separation. However, in the left eye, minimal change was seen in the CME associated with a focal shallow PVD over the fovea. The best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA in the left eye increased to 0.3 from 0.15 7 years after the first visit. Tangential vitreous traction on the macula may have caused the CME in the right eye. The shallow PVD over the fovea might have released the tangential vitreous traction from the fovea, induced spontaneous resolution of the CME, and improved the BCVA in the left eye.Keywords: retinitis pigmentosa, cystoid macular edema, posterior vitreous detachment, posterior vitreoschisis, optical coherence tomography

  5. Physical Activity and Gastrointestinal Cancers: Primary and Tertiary Preventive Effects and Possible Biological Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Steindorf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal cancers account for 37% of all cancer deaths worldwide, underlining the need to further investigate modifiable factors for gastrointestinal cancer risk and prognosis. This review summarizes the corresponding evidence for physical activity (PA, including, briefly, possible biological mechanisms. Despite high public health relevance, there is still a scarcity of studies, especially for tertiary prevention. Besides the convincing evidence of beneficial effects of PA on colon cancer risk, clear risk reduction for gastroesophageal cancer was identified, as well as weak indications for pancreatic cancer. Inverse associations were observed for liver cancer, yet based on few studies. Only for rectal cancer, PA appeared to be not associated with cancer risk. With regard to cancer-specific mortality of the general population, published data were rare but indicated suggestive evidence of protective effects for colon and liver cancer, and to a lesser extent for rectal and gastroesophageal cancer. Studies in cancer patients on cancer-specific and total mortality were published for colorectal cancer only, providing good evidence of inverse associations with post-diagnosis PA. Overall, evidence of associations of PA with gastrointestinal cancer risk and progression is promising but still limited. However, the already available knowledge further underlines the importance of PA to combat cancer.

  6. [Possible evolutionary mechanisms of 'culture' in animals: The hypothesis of distributed social learning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznikova, Zh I; Panteleeva, S N

    2015-01-01

    There is a plethora of works on the origin and genesis of behavioral traditions in different animal species. Nevertheless, it still remains unclear as for which factors facilitate and which factors hinder the spreading those forms of behavior that are new for a population. Here, we present an analytical review on the topic, considering also the results of studies on 'culture' in animals and analyzing contradictions that arise when attempting to clarify the ethological mechanisms of cultural succession. The hypothesis of 'distributed social learning' is formulated, meaning that for spreading of complex behavioral stereotypes in a population the presence of few carriers of consistent stereotypes is enough under the condition that the rest of animals carry incomplete genetic programmes that start up these stereotypes. Existence of 'dormant' fragments of such programmes determines an inborn predisposition of their bearer to perform a certain sequence of acts. To complete the consistent stereotype, the simplest forms of social learning ('social alleviation') turn to be enough. The hypothesis is examined at the behavioral level and supported by experimental data obtained when studying the scenarios of hunting behavior development in ants Myrmica rubra L. It makes possible to explain the spreading of behavioral models in animal communities in a simpler way than cultural succession.

  7. Gamma-radiolysis of dimethyl sulfoxide. II. Radiolysis yields and possible mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, M. C.; Barrera, R.

    1978-01-01

    As result of quantitative studies on gamma-radiolysis of DMSO at a dose range of 90-850 Mrads, constant G values have been obtained for the following radiolysis compounds: G(-DMSO) - 6.7 ±0.2; G(dimethyl sulphide) - 3.4 ±0.3; G(methane) - 0,75 ± 0.04; G(dimethyl disulphide) -0.33 ±0,03; G(tri methylsulphonium methanesulphonate) - 0.26 ± 0,01; G(methyl methanethiosulphonate) - 0,25 ±0.02; G(dimethyl sulphona)-0.21±0.02; G(H 2 )-0.18±0.02; and G(propane)--0.0092±0.0007. Initial G values have been obtained for other identified compounds: Gi(ethane)-0,46; Gi(CO)-0.052; and Gi(CO 2 )-0.030. Possible mechanisms on the radiolysis process are proposed. (Author) 17 refs

  8. Laser irradiation effects and its possible mechanisms of action on spermatozoa functions in domestic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Lone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a review pertains the laser irradiation effects and its possible mechanisms of action on spermatozoa functions in domestic animals. To improve artificial insemination, laser is sensitive and cost effective technique, when compared to other conventional methods. Laser may have both positive and negative effects on spermatozoa functions. Since the effects of light are mediated by reactive oxygen species, and the levels of these reactive oxygen species following irradiating spermatozoa with laser may be responsible for determining the effects of laser on sperm. Dose of laser may be regarded as of great significance and this dosage of laser may be responsible for determining its effects on spermatozoa. Optimum dosage of laser for improving seminal attributes may vary among various species and this need to be standardized in each of them. The beneficial effects include improving sperm livability, acrosomal integrity, hypo-osmotic swelling response, mitochondrial function and computer-aided sperm analysis parameters. The increase in cytochrome c oxidase activity, ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential, in laser irradiated cells may be responsible for enhanced sperm quality parameters. Improving fertility with laser irradiated spermatozoa has been reported in few species like boar and need to be elaborated in other species. In conclusion laser may be regarded as an easy, cheap and time saving technology for improving artificial insemination; in addition, laser may have various potential applications in the field of reproductive biotechnology as well as in livestock farms and veterinary polyclinics.

  9. Potential mechanisms linking probiotics to diabetes: a narrative review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Miraghajani

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Some studies have suggested a wide range of possible mechanisms through which probiotics may play a role in diabetes prevention and treatment. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We conducted this study to review the potential mechanisms suggested for the effect of probiotics in diabetes. DESIGN AND SETTING: Narrative review conducted at the Food Security Research Center of Isfahan. METHODS: A search in the electronic databases MEDLINE (PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Google scholar was performed up to October 2016. RESULTS: The initial search yielded 1214 reports. After removing duplicates, 704 titles and abstracts were screened. Finally, out of 83 full-text articles that were reviewed for eligibility, 30 articles were included in the final analysis. The anti-diabetic mechanisms for probiotics reported encompass intraluminal and direct effects on the intestinal mucosa and microbiota (n = 13, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects (n = 10, antioxidative effects (n = 5, effects on endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and expression of genes involved in glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance (n = 6, with some studies pointing to more than one mechanism. CONCLUSION: The results may throw some light on the capacity of probiotics as a novel approach towards controlling diabetes. However, further human studies are warranted to elucidate and confirm the potential role of probiotics in diabetes prevention and treatment. Also, it needs to be ascertained whether the effectiveness of probiotics in diabetes prevention and treatment is dependent on the strain of the microorganisms.

  10. Dually cross-linked single network poly(acrylic acid) hydrogels with superior mechanical properties and water absorbency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ming; Liu, Yi-Tao; Liu, Xiao-Ying; Shi, Fu-Kuan; Zhang, Li-Qin; Zhu, Mei-Fang; Xie, Xu-Ming

    2016-06-28

    Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) hydrogels with superior mechanical properties, based on a single network structure with dual cross-linking, are prepared by one-pot free radical polymerization. The network structure of the PAA hydrogels is composed of dual cross-linking: a dynamic and reversible ionic cross-linking among the PAA chains enabled by Fe(3+) ions, and a sparse covalent cross-linking enabled by a covalent cross-linker (Bis). Under deformation, the covalently cross-linked PAA chains remain intact to maintain their original configuration, while the Fe(3+)-enabled ionic cross-linking among the PAA chains is broken to dissipate energy and then recombined. It is found that the mechanical properties of the PAA hydrogels are significantly influenced by the contents of covalent cross-linkers, Fe(3+) ions and water, which can be adjusted within a substantial range and thus broaden the applications of the hydrogels. Meanwhile, the PAA hydrogels have excellent recoverability based on the dynamic and reversible ionic cross-linking enabled by Fe(3+) ions. Moreover, the swelling capacity of the PAA hydrogels is as high as 1800 times in deionized water due to the synergistic effects of ionic and covalent cross-linkings. The combination of balanced mechanical properties, efficient recoverability, high swelling capacity and facile preparation provides a new method to obtain high-performance hydrogels.

  11. Insights into the swelling process and drug release mechanisms from cross-linked pectin/high amylose starch matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda M. Carbinatto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cross-linked pectin/high amylose mixtures were evaluated as a new excipient for matrix tablets formulations, since the mixing of polymers and cross-linking reaction represent rational tools to reach materials with modulated and specific properties that meet specific therapeutic needs. Objective: In this work the influence of polymer ratio and cross-linking process on the swelling and the mechanism driving the drug release from swellable matrix tablets prepared with this excipient was investigated. Methods: Cross-linked samples were characterized by their micromeritic properties (size and shape, density, angle of repose and flow rate and liquid uptake ability. Matrix tablets were evaluated according their physical properties and the drug release rates and mechanisms were also investigated. Results: Cross-linked samples demonstrated size homogeneity and irregular shape, with liquid uptake ability insensible to pH. Cross-linking process of samples allowed the control of drug release rates and the drug release mechanism was influenced by both polymer ratio and cross-linking process. The drug release of samples with minor proportion of pectin was driven by an anomalous transport and the increase of the pectin proportion contributed to the erosion of the matrix. Conclusion: The cross-linked mixtures of high amylose and pectin showed a suitable excipient for slowing the drug release rates.

  12. Signaling in a polluted world: oxidative stress as an overlooked mechanism linking contaminants to animal communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Marasco

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The capacity to communicate effectively with other individuals plays a critical role in the daily life of an individual and can have important fitness consequences. Animals rely on a number of visual and non-visual signals, whose production brings costs to the individual. The theory of honest signaling states that these costs are higher for low than for high-quality individuals, which prevents cheating and makes signals, such as skin and plumage colouration, indicators of individual’s quality or condition. The condition-dependent nature of signals makes them ideally suited as indicators of environmental quality, implying that signal production might be affected by contaminants. In this mini-review article, we have made the point that oxidative stress (OS is one overlooked mechanism linking exposure to contaminants to signaling because (i many contaminants can influence the individual’s oxidative balance, and (ii generation of both visual and non-visual signals is sensitive to oxidative stress. To this end, we have provided the first comprehensive review on the way both non-organic (heavy metals, especially mercury and organic (persistent organic pollutants contaminants may influence either OS or sexual signaling. We have also paid special attention to emerging classes of pollutants like brominated flame-retardants and perfluoroalkoxy alkanes in order to stimulate research in this area. We have finally provided suggestions and warnings for future work on the links among OS, sexual signaling and contaminant exposure.

  13. Double strand break repair: two mechanisms in competition but tightly linked to cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delacote, F.

    2002-11-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB) are highly toxic damage although they can be induced to create genetic diversity. Two distinct pathways can repair DSB: Homologous Recombination (HR) and Non Homologous End Joining (NHEJ). If un- or mis-repaired, this damage can lead to cancer. Thus, it is essential to investigate how these two pathways are regulated for DSB repair. NHEJ inhibition leads to HR DSB repair stimulation. However, this channeling to HR is tightly linked to cell cycle since NHEJ and HR are active in G1/early S and late S/G2, respectively. Our results suggest that G1-unrepaired DSB go through S phase to be repaired by HR in G2. Those results allow a better understanding of DSB repair mechanisms regulation. (author)

  14. Generation of nitric oxide from nitrite by carbonic anhydrase: a possible link between metabolic activity and vasodilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamand, Rasmus; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2009-01-01

    In catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate and protons, the ubiquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) plays a crucial role in CO2 transport, in acid-base balance, and in linking local acidosis to O2 unloading from hemoglobin. Considering the structural similarity between...... bicarbonate and nitrite, we hypothesized that CA uses nitrite as a substrate to produce the potent vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) to increase local blood flow to metabolically active tissues. Here we show that CA readily reacts with nitrite to generate NO, particularly at low pH, and that the NO produced...

  15. Possible biophysical mechanism of the effect of the solar activity on the human central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, G. A.; Mikhailov, Y. M.

    Numerous studies, beginning with Tchizhevsky's works, demonstrated the undeniable effect of the solar activity on the human body. A possible geophysical mechanism of the effect of the solar activity on the human body was proposed by Vladimirsky. In this mechanism solar disturbances (powerful chromospheres flares) cause "magnetosphere and plasmasphere disturbances on the Earth (sudden magnetic storms), which are accompanied by a change in the spectrum of the electromagnetic field on the Earth's surface in the extremely low frequency band. In its turn, this brings about shifts in the phisiological indices of the human body". In this model, the human body is regarded as a self-oscillating system affected by external geophysical factors. We also adhere to the main principles of this model but refine the part of this model that describes the change in the spectrum of the electromagnetic field on the Earth's surface in the extremely low frequency band. Unlike Vladimirsky model, we regard the human is not as a self-oscillating system but as one of two coupled oscillating system with discrete resonance frequencies in the human-habitat ensemble. Solar processes and their induced changes in one of the two coupled oscillating systems, specifically, the habitat play the role of an external force. Such an approach is based on the fact that the brain rhythms have the following definite frequencies: the alpha rhythm, 8-13 Hz; the beta rhythm, 14-30 Hz; the gamma rhythm, above 30 Hz; the delta rhythm, 1.5-3 Hz; and the theta rhythm, 4-7 Hz. On the other hand, the natural electromagnetic field on the Earth's surface in the extremely low frequency band also has a quite distinct resonance distribution. There are so-called Schuman resonances of the cavity formed by the Earth's surface and the lower boundary of the ionosphere (the D and E layers) at f1=10.6; f2=18.3; f3=25.9; f4=33.5; f5=41.1 Hz. These resonance frequencies are variable and most sensitive to variations of the

  16. A possible CO2 conducting and concentrating mechanism in plant stomata SLAC1 channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Shi Du

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The plant SLAC1 is a slow anion channel in the membrane of stomatal guard cells, which controls the turgor pressure in the aperture-defining guard cells, thereby regulating the exchange of water vapour and photosynthetic gases in response to environmental signals such as drought, high levels of carbon dioxide, and bacterial invasion. Recent study demonstrated that bicarbonate is a small-molecule activator of SLAC1. Higher CO(2 and HCO(3(- concentration activates S-type anion channel currents in wild-type Arabidopsis guard cells. Based on the SLAC1 structure a theoretical model is derived to illustrate the activation of bicarbonate to SLAC1 channel. Meanwhile a possible CO(2 conducting and concentrating mechanism of the SLAC1 is proposed. METHODOLOGY: The homology structure of Arabidopsis thaliana SLAC1 (AtSLAC1 provides the structural basis for study of the conducting and concentrating mechanism of carbon dioxide in SLAC1 channels. The pK(a values of ionizable amino acid side chains in AtSLAC1 are calculated using software PROPKA3.0, and the concentration of CO(2 and anion HCO(3(- are computed based on the chemical equilibrium theory. CONCLUSIONS: The AtSLAC1 is modeled as a five-region channel with different pH values. The top and bottom layers of channel are the alkaline residue-dominated regions, and in the middle of channel there is the acidic region surrounding acidic residues His332. The CO(2 concentration is enhanced around 10(4 times by the pH difference between these regions, and CO(2 is stored in the hydrophobic region, which is a CO(2 pool. The pH driven CO(2 conduction from outside to inside balances the back electromotive force and maintain the influx of anions (e.g. Cl(- and NO(3(- from inside to outside. SLAC1 may be a pathway providing CO(2 for photosynthesis in the guard cells.

  17. Mechanical pain sensitivity of deep tissues in children - possible development of myofascial trigger points in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ting-I

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is still unclear when latent myofascial trigger points (MTrPs develop during early life. This study is designed to investigate the mechanical pain sensitivity of deep tissues in children in order to see the possible timing of the development of latent MTrPs and attachment trigger points (A-TrPs in school children. Methods Five hundreds and five healthy school children (age 4- 11 years were investigated. A pressure algometer was used to measure the pressure pain threshold (PPT at three different sites in the brachioradialis muscle: the lateral epicondyle at elbow (site A, assumed to be the A-TrP site, the mid-point of the muscle belly (site B, assumed to be the MTrP site, and the muscle-tendon junction as a control site (site C. Results The results showed that, for all children in this study, the mean PPT values was significantly lower (p p Conclusions It is concluded that a child had increased sensitivity at the tendon attachment site and the muscle belly (endplate zone after age of 4 years. Therefore, it is likely that a child may develop an A-Trp and a latent MTrP at the brachioradialis muscle after the age of 4 years. The changes in sensitivity, or the development for these trigger points, may not be related to the activity level of children aged 7-11 years. Further investigation is still required to indentify the exact timing of the initial occurrence of a-Trps and latent MTrPs.

  18. A possible new mechanism for the control of miRNA expression in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Erika Reime; Higa, Guilherme Shigueto Vilar; de Sousa, Erica; Casado, Otávio Augusto Nocera; Damico, Marcio Vinicius; Britto, Luiz Roberto G; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki

    2013-10-01

    The control of gene expression by miRNAs has been widely investigated in different species and cell types. Following a probabilistic rather than a deterministic regimen, the action of these short nucleotide sequences on specific genes depends on intracellular concentration, which in turn reflects the balance between biosynthesis and degradation. Recent studies have described the involvement of XRN2, an exoribonuclease, in miRNA degradation and PAPD4, an atypical poly(A) polymerase, in miRNA stability. Herein, we examined the expression of XRN2 and PAPD4 in developing and adult rat hippocampi. Combining bioinformatics and real-time PCR, we demonstrated that XRN2 and PAPD4 expression is regulated by the uncorrelated action of transcription factors, resulting in distinct gene expression profiles during development. Analyses of nuclei position and nestin labeling revealed that both proteins progressively accumulated during neuronal differentiation, and that they are weakly expressed in immature neurons and absent in glial and endothelial cells. Despite the differences in subcellular localization, both genes were concurrently identified within identical neuronal subpopulations, including specific inhibitory interneurons. Thus, we cope with a singular circumstance in biology: an almost complete intersected expression of functional-opposed genes, reinforcing that their antagonistically driven actions on miRNAs "make sense" if simultaneously present at the same cells. Considering that the transcriptome in the nervous system is finely tuned to physiological processes, it was remarkable that miRNA stability-related genes were concurrently identified in neurons that play essential roles in cognitive functions such as memory and learning. In summary, this study reveals a possible new mechanism for the control of miRNA expression. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Possible Mechanisms for Turbofan Engine Ice Crystal Icing at High Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching; Struk, Peter M.; Oliver, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    A thermodynamic model is presented to describe possible mechanisms of ice formation on unheated surfaces inside a turbofan engine compression system from fully glaciated ice crystal clouds often formed at high altitude near deep convective weather systems. It is shown from the analysis that generally there could be two distinct types of ice formation: (1) when the "surface freezing fraction" is in the range of 0 to 1, dominated by the freezing of water melt from fully or partially melted ice crystals, the ice structure is formed from accretion with strong adhesion to the surface, and (2) when the "surface melting fraction" is the range of 0 to 1, dominated by the further melting of ice crystals, the ice structure is formed from accumulation of un-melted ice crystals with relatively weak bonding to the surface. The model captures important qualitative trends of the fundamental ice-crystal icing phenomenon reported earlier (Refs. 1 and 2) from the research collaboration work by NASA and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada. Further, preliminary analysis of test data from the 2013 full scale turbofan engine ice crystal icing test (Ref. 3) conducted in the NASA Glenn Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) has also suggested that (1) both types of ice formation occurred during the test, and (2) the model has captured some important qualitative trend of turning on (or off) the ice crystal ice formation process in the tested engine low pressure compressor (LPC) targeted area under different icing conditions that ultimately would lead to (or suppress) an engine core roll back (RB) event.

  20. Possible mechanism for species difference on the toxicity of pivalic acid between dogs and rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Toshiro; Nakajima, Yoshitsugu; Nakamura, Yutaka

    2006-01-01

    In a high dose toxicity study of pivalic acid (PA), PA caused skeletal muscle disorder in dog, and a significant increase of pivaloyl carnitine (PC) was observed in canine muscle, but not in rat muscle. In order to understand species difference of the toxicity of PA, we compared the in vitro metabolism of PA among dog, rat and rabbit, especially focussing on the carnitine conjugate. Canine muscle showed low, but significant carnitine conjugating activity, while that of rat was negligible. Canine kidney mitochondria had significant activity in the pivaloyl CoA synthesis (7 nmol/mg protein/h), but muscle mitochondria showed only trace activity. Both kidney and muscle mitochondria displayed similar carnitine acyltransferase activity (2-3 nmol/mg protein/h) towards pivaloyl CoA. On the other hand, with respect to the activity of carnitine acyltransferase in the reverse direction using PC as substrate, canine muscle mitochondria showed higher activity than that of kidney mitochondria. This means that PC is not the final stable metabolite, but is converted easily to pivaloyl CoA in canine muscle. These results suggest one of the possible mechanisms for canine selective muscle disorder to be as follows. Only canine muscle can metabolize PA to its carnitine conjugate slowly, but significantly. In canine muscle, PC is not the final stable metabolite; it is easily converted to pivaloyl CoA. As carnitine conjugation is thought to be the only detoxification metabolic route in canine muscle, under certain circumstances such as carnitine deficiency, the risk of exposure with toxic pivaloyl CoA might increase and the CoASH pool in canine muscle might be exhausted, resulting in toxicity in canine muscle

  1. Two Emission Mechanisms in the Fermi Bubbles: A Possible Signal of Annihilating Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan; Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2013-09-01

    We study the variation of the spectrum of the Fermi Bubbles with Galactic latitude. Far from the Galactic plane (|b| > 30 degrees), the observed gamma-ray emission is nearly invariant with latitude, and is consistent with arising from inverse Compton scattering of the interstellar radiation field by cosmic-ray electrons with an approximately power-law spectrum. The same electrons in the presence of microgauss-scale magnetic fields can also generate the the observed microwave "haze". At lower latitudes (b < 20 degrees), in contrast, the spectrum of the emission correlated with the Bubbles possesses a pronounced spectral feature peaking at 1-4 GeV (in E^2 dN/dE) which cannot be generated by any realistic spectrum of electrons. Instead, we conclude that a second (non-inverse-Compton) emission mechanism must be responsible for the bulk of the low-energy, low-latitude emission. This second component is spectrally similar to the excess GeV emission previously reported from the Galactic Center (GC), and also appears spatially consistent with a luminosity per volume falling approximately as r^-2.4, where r is the distance from the GC. We argue that the spectral feature visible in the low-latitude Bubbles is the extended counterpart of the GC excess, now detected out to at least 2-3 kpc from the GC. The spectrum and angular distribution of the signal is consistent with that predicted from ~10 GeV dark matter particles annihilating to leptons, or from ~50 GeV dark matter particles annihilating to quarks, following a distribution similar to the canonical Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile. We also consider millisecond pulsars as a possible astrophysical explanation for the signal, as observed millisecond pulsars possess a spectral cutoff at approximately the required energy. Any such scenario would require a large population of unresolved millisecond pulsars extending at least 2-3 kpc from the GC.

  2. Possible mechanism of the interplanetary medium effect on the diurnal rotation rate of the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krymskij, P.F.

    1993-01-01

    Mechanism is proposed for effect of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field on the Earth rotation. In the mechanism base is Hall current generation in the plasma layer of the magnetosphere tail

  3. Translating Mechanism-Based Strategies to Break the Obesity-Cancer Link: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laura A; O'Flanagan, Ciara H; Bowers, Laura W; Allott, Emma H; Hursting, Stephen D

    2018-04-01

    Prevalence of obesity, an established risk factor for many cancers, has increased dramatically over the past 50 years in the United States and across the globe. Relative to normoweight cancer patients, obese cancer patients often have poorer prognoses, resistance to chemotherapies, and are more likely to develop distant metastases. Recent progress on elucidating the mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer connection suggests that obesity exerts pleomorphic effects on pathways related to tumor development and progression and, thus, there are multiple opportunities for primary prevention and treatment of obesity-related cancers. Obesity-associated alterations, including systemic metabolism, adipose inflammation, growth factor signaling, and angiogenesis, are emerging as primary drivers of obesity-associated cancer development and progression. These obesity-associated host factors interact with the intrinsic molecular characteristics of cancer cells, facilitating several of the hallmarks of cancer. Each is considered in the context of potential preventive and therapeutic strategies to reduce the burden of obesity-related cancers. In addition, this review focuses on emerging mechanisms behind the obesity-cancer link, as well as relevant dietary interventions, including calorie restriction, intermittent fasting, low-fat diet, and ketogenic diet, that are being implemented in preclinical and clinical trials, with the ultimate goal of reducing incidence and progression of obesity-related cancers. Copyright © 2018 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Psychosocial Mechanisms Linking the Social Environment to Mental Health in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mama, Scherezade K; Li, Yisheng; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Lee, Rebecca E; Thompson, Deborah; Wetter, David W; Nguyen, Nga T; Reitzel, Lorraine R; McNeill, Lorna H

    2016-01-01

    Resource-poor social environments predict poor health, but the mechanisms and processes linking the social environment to psychological health and well-being remain unclear. This study explored psychosocial mediators of the association between the social environment and mental health in African American adults. African American men and women (n = 1467) completed questionnaires on the social environment, psychosocial factors (stress, depressive symptoms, and racial discrimination), and mental health. Multiple-mediator models were used to assess direct and indirect effects of the social environment on mental health. Low social status in the community (p health. Psychosocial factors significantly jointly mediated the relationship between the social environment and mental health in multiple-mediator models. Low social status and social support were associated with greater perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and perceived racial discrimination, which were associated with poor mental health. Results suggest the relationship between the social environment and mental health is mediated by psychosocial factors and revealed potential mechanisms through which social status and social support influence the mental health of African American men and women. Findings from this study provide insight into the differential effects of stress, depression and discrimination on mental health. Ecological approaches that aim to improve the social environment and psychosocial mediators may enhance health-related quality of life and reduce health disparities in African Americans.

  5. Psychosocial Mechanisms Linking the Social Environment to Mental Health in African Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherezade K Mama

    Full Text Available Resource-poor social environments predict poor health, but the mechanisms and processes linking the social environment to psychological health and well-being remain unclear. This study explored psychosocial mediators of the association between the social environment and mental health in African American adults. African American men and women (n = 1467 completed questionnaires on the social environment, psychosocial factors (stress, depressive symptoms, and racial discrimination, and mental health. Multiple-mediator models were used to assess direct and indirect effects of the social environment on mental health. Low social status in the community (p < .001 and U.S. (p < .001 and low social support (p < .001 were associated with poor mental health. Psychosocial factors significantly jointly mediated the relationship between the social environment and mental health in multiple-mediator models. Low social status and social support were associated with greater perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and perceived racial discrimination, which were associated with poor mental health. Results suggest the relationship between the social environment and mental health is mediated by psychosocial factors and revealed potential mechanisms through which social status and social support influence the mental health of African American men and women. Findings from this study provide insight into the differential effects of stress, depression and discrimination on mental health. Ecological approaches that aim to improve the social environment and psychosocial mediators may enhance health-related quality of life and reduce health disparities in African Americans.

  6. A Neurobehavioral Mechanism Linking Behaviorally Inhibited Temperament and Later Adolescent Social Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzell, George A; Troller-Renfree, Sonya V; Barker, Tyson V; Bowman, Lindsay C; Chronis-Tuscano, Andrea; Henderson, Heather A; Kagan, Jerome; Pine, Daniel S; Fox, Nathan A

    2017-12-01

    Behavioral inhibition (BI) is a temperament identified in early childhood that is a risk factor for later social anxiety. However, mechanisms underlying the development of social anxiety remain unclear. To better understand the emergence of social anxiety, longitudinal studies investigating changes at behavioral neural levels are needed. BI was assessed in the laboratory at 2 and 3 years of age (N = 268). Children returned at 12 years, and an electroencephalogram was recorded while children performed a flanker task under 2 conditions: once while believing they were being observed by peers and once while not being observed. This methodology isolated changes in error monitoring (error-related negativity) and behavior (post-error reaction time slowing) as a function of social context. At 12 years, current social anxiety symptoms and lifetime diagnoses of social anxiety were obtained. Childhood BI prospectively predicted social-specific error-related negativity increases and social anxiety symptoms in adolescence; these symptoms directly related to clinical diagnoses. Serial mediation analysis showed that social error-related negativity changes explained relations between BI and social anxiety symptoms (n = 107) and diagnosis (n = 92), but only insofar as social context also led to increased post-error reaction time slowing (a measure of error preoccupation); this model was not significantly related to generalized anxiety. Results extend prior work on socially induced changes in error monitoring and error preoccupation. These measures could index a neurobehavioral mechanism linking BI to adolescent social anxiety symptoms and diagnosis. This mechanism could relate more strongly to social than to generalized anxiety in the peri-adolescent period. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  7. The missing link between sleep disorders and age-related dementia: recent evidence and plausible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Zhong, Rujia; Li, Song; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; Le, Weidong

    2017-05-01

    Sleep disorders are among the most common clinical problems and possess a significant concern for the geriatric population. More importantly, while around 40% of elderly adults have sleep-related complaints, sleep disorders are more frequently associated with co-morbidities including age-related neurodegenerative diseases and mild cognitive impairment. Recently, increasing evidence has indicated that disturbed sleep may not only serve as the consequence of brain atrophy, but also contribute to the pathogenesis of dementia and, therefore, significantly increase dementia risk. Since the current therapeutic interventions lack efficacies to prevent, delay or reverse the pathological progress of dementia, a better understanding of underlying mechanisms by which sleep disorders interact with the pathogenesis of dementia will provide possible targets for the prevention and treatment of dementia. In this review, we briefly describe the physiological roles of sleep in learning/memory, and specifically update the recent research evidence demonstrating the association between sleep disorders and dementia. Plausible mechanisms are further discussed. Moreover, we also evaluate the possibility of sleep therapy as a potential intervention for dementia.

  8. Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Is a Novel Molecular Mechanism Linking Folate Availability and Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Elena; Rosario, Fredrick J; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Folate deficiency has been linked to a wide range of disorders, including cancer, neural tube defects, and fetal growth restriction. Folate regulates cellular function mediated by its involvement in the synthesis of nucleotides, which are needed for DNA synthesis, and its function as a methyl donor, which is critical for DNA methylation. Here we review current data showing that folate sensing by mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) constitutes a novel and distinct pathway by which folate modulates cell functions such as nutrient transport, protein synthesis, and mitochondrial respiration. The mTOR signaling pathway responds to growth factors and changes in nutrient availability to control cell growth, proliferation, and metabolism. mTOR exists in 2 complexes, mTOR complex (mTORC) 1 and mTORC2, which have distinct upstream regulators and downstream targets. Folate deficiency in pregnant mice caused a marked inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling in multiple maternal and fetal tissues, downregulation of placental amino acid transporters, and fetal growth restriction. In addition, folate deficiency in primary human trophoblast (PHT) cells resulted in inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling and decreased the activity of key amino acid transporters. Folate sensing by mTOR in PHT cells is independent of the accumulation of homocysteine and requires the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT; solute carrier 46A1). Furthermore, mTORC1 and mTORC2 regulate trophoblast folate uptake by modulating the cell surface expression of folate receptor α and the reduced folate carrier. These findings, which provide a novel link between folate availability and cell function, growth, and proliferation, may have broad biological significance given the critical role of folate in normal cell function and the multiple diseases that have been associated with decreased or excessive folate availability. Low maternal folate concentrations are linked to restricted fetal growth, and we

  9. A possible link of gut microbiota alteration in type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease pathogenicity: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Z; Alam, Qamre; Kamal, Mohammad A; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Haque, Absarul

    2014-04-01

    Imbalances in gut microbiota are associated with metabolic disorder, which are a group of obesity-related metabolic abnormalities that increase an individual's risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although a number of risk factors have been postulated that may trigger the development of AD, the root cause of this disease is still a matter of debate. This review further investigates the etiology of AD by accumulating the current role played by gut microbiota in human, and trying to establish an inter-link between T2D and AD pathogenesis. There is a growing body of evidence which suggests that obesity is associated with alteration in the normal gut flora, reduced bacterial diversity, metabolic pathways and altered representation of bacterial genes. Obesity and T2D are considered to be induced as a result of changes within the composition of gut microbiota. The evidence gathered so far clearly advocates the involvement of gut microbes in causing obesity, a state of chronic and low-grade inflammation. Hence, understanding the microbiota of the gut is significant in relation to inflammation, as it is a key contributor for diabetes which has a direct relation to the AD pathogenesis. Comparative analysis of gut microbiota may enable further novel insight into the complex biology of AD, which is very important in order to take preventive measure such as early diagnosis, identification of new therapeutic targets and development of novel drugs.

  10. Thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) - A possible link between coagulation and complement activation in the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Giorgia; Vikerfors, Anna; Woodhams, Barry; Adam, Mariette; Bremme, Katarina; Holmström, Margareta; Ågren, Anna; Eelde, Anna; Bruzelius, Maria; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Antovic, Aleksandra

    2017-10-01

    Thrombosis and complement activation are pathogenic features of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Their molecular link is Plasma carboxypeptidase-B, also known as thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa), which plays a dual role: anti-fibrinolytic, by cleaving carboxyl-terminal lysine residues from partially degraded fibrin, and anti-inflammatory, by downregulating complement anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. To investigate the levels of TAFI (proenzyme) and TAFIa (active enzyme) in relation to complement activation, fibrin clot permeability and fibrinolytic function in clinical and immunological subsets of 52 APS patients and 15 controls. TAFI (pAPS patients compared to controls. Furthermore, TAFIa was increased (pAPS patients affected by arterial thrombosis compared to other APS-phenotypes. Positive associations were found between TAFI and age, fibrinogen and C5a, and between TAFIa and age, fibrinogen and thrombomodulin. TAFI and TAFIa levels were increased in patients with APS as a potential response to complement activation. Interestingly, TAFI activation was associated with arterial thrombotic APS manifestations. Thus, TAFIa may be considered a novel biomarker for arterial thrombosis in APS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Glutaraldehyde Cross-Linking of TendonMechanical Effects at the Level of the Tendon Fascicle and Fibril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P.; Svensson, R.B.; Aagaard, P.

    2009-01-01

    were examined by atomic force microscopy. Peak forces increased from 1379 to 2622 pN while an extended Hertz fit of force-indentation data showed a 24 fold increase in Young's modulus on indentation. The effect of glutaraldehyde cross-linking on the tensile properties of a single collagen fibril......Conclusive insight into the microscopic principles that govern the strength of tendon and related connective tissues is lacking and the importance of collagen cross-linking has not been firmly established. The combined application of whole-tissue mechanical testing and atomic force spectroscopy...... allowed for a detailed characterization of the effect of cross-linking in rat-tail tendon. The cross-link inducing agent glutaraldehyde augmented the tensile strength of tendon fascicles. Stress at failure increased from 8 MPa to 39 MPa. The mechanical effects of glutaraldehyde at the tendon fibril level...

  12. Possible effects of two-phase flow pattern on the mechanical behavior of mudstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, H.; Tokunaga, T.; Aichi, M.

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the influence of two-phase flow pattern on the mechanical behavior of mudstones, laboratory experiments were conducted. In the experiment, air was injected from the bottom of the water-saturated Quaternary Umegase mudstone sample under hydrostatic external stress condition. Both axial and circumferential strains at half the height of the sample and volumetric discharge of water at the outlet were monitored during the experiment. Numerical simulation of the experiment was tried by using a simulator which can solve coupled two-phase flow and poroelastic deformation assuming the extended-Darcian flow with relative permeability and capillary pressure as functions of the wetting-phase fluid saturation. In the numerical simulation, the volumetric discharge of water was reproduced well while both strains were not. Three dimensionless numbers, i.e., the viscosity ratio, the Capillary number, and the Bond number, which characterize the two-phase flow pattern (Lenormand et al., 1988; Ewing and Berkowitz, 1998) were calculated to be 2×10-2, 2×10-11, and 7×10-11, respectively, in the experiment. Because the Bond number was quite small, it was possible to apply Lenormand et al. (1988)'s diagram to evaluate the flow regime, and the flow regime was considered to be capillary fingering. While, in the numerical simulation, air moved uniformly upward with quite low non-wetting phase saturation conditions because the fluid flow obeyed the two-phase Darcy's law. These different displacement patterns developed in the experiment and assumed in the numerical simulation were considered to be the reason why the deformation behavior observed in the experiment could not be reproduced by numerical simulation, suggesting that the two-phase flow pattern could affect the changes of internal fluid pressure patterns during displacement processes. For further studies, quantitative analysis of the experimental results by using a numerical simulator which can solve the coupled

  13. Inhibition of HSV-1 replication by laser diode-irradiation: possible mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnarumma, G; De Gregorio, V; Fusco, A; Farina, E; Baroni, A; Esposito, V; Contaldo, M; Petruzzi, M; Pannone, G; Serpico, R

    2010-01-01

    Herpes labialis are the most frequent clinical manifestations of HSV-1 infection. Epithelial cells are able to respond to HSV-1 presence inducing the expression of IL-6, IL-1, TNF-α and IL-8. These proinflammatory cytokines have a function in the acute-phase response mediation, chemotaxis, inflammatory cell activation and antigen-presenting cells. In the human epithelial cell models, it has been demonstrated that, after an early induction of proinflammatory host response, HSV-1 down-modulates the proinflammatory cytokine production through the accumulation of two viral proteins, ICP4 and ICP27, whose transcription is induced by tegument protein VP16. These viral proteins, through the decreasing of stabilizing the mRNAs of proinflammatory genes, delay cytokine production to an extent that allows the virus to replicate. Moreover, viral transactivating proteins, ICP-0 and VP-16 induce IL-10 expression. The conventional treatment of herpes labialis involves the topical and systemic use of antiviral drugs but it is necessary to find new therapies that can act in a selective and non-cytotoxic manner in viral infection. Laser diode therapy has been considered as a non-invasive alternative treatment to the conventional treatment of herpes labialis in pain therapy, in modulation of inflammation and in wound healing. This study aims to report a possible mechanism of action of laser diode irradiation in prevention and reduction of severity of labial manifestations of herpes labialis virus. We investigated, in an in vitro model of epithelial cells HaCat, the laser-effect on HSV-1 replication and we evaluated the modulation of expression of certain proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6), antimicrobial peptide HBD2, chemokine IL-8 and the immunosuppressive cytokine, IL-10. Our results lead us to hypothesize that LD-irradiation acts in the final stage of HSV-1 replication by limiting viral spread from cell to cell and that laser therapy acts also on the host immune

  14. Pathways and mechanisms linking dietary components to cardiometabolic disease: thinking beyond calories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, K L; Goran, M I; Bosy-Westphal, A; King, J C; Schmidt, L A; Schwarz, J-M; Stice, E; Sylvetsky, A C; Turnbaugh, P J; Bray, G A; Gardner, C D; Havel, P J; Malik, V; Mason, A E; Ravussin, E; Rosenbaum, M; Welsh, J A; Allister-Price, C; Sigala, D M; Greenwood, M R C; Astrup, A; Krauss, R M

    2018-05-14

    Calories from any food have the potential to increase risk for obesity and cardiometabolic disease because all calories can directly contribute to positive energy balance and fat gain. However, various dietary components or patterns may promote obesity and cardiometabolic disease by additional mechanisms that are not mediated solely by caloric content. Researchers explored this topic at the 2017 CrossFit Foundation Academic Conference 'Diet and Cardiometabolic Health - Beyond Calories', and this paper summarizes the presentations and follow-up discussions. Regarding the health effects of dietary fat, sugar and non-nutritive sweeteners, it is concluded that food-specific saturated fatty acids and sugar-sweetened beverages promote cardiometabolic diseases by mechanisms that are additional to their contribution of calories to positive energy balance and that aspartame does not promote weight gain. The challenges involved in conducting and interpreting clinical nutritional research, which preclude more extensive conclusions, are detailed. Emerging research is presented exploring the possibility that responses to certain dietary components/patterns are influenced by the metabolic status, developmental period or genotype of the individual; by the responsiveness of brain regions associated with reward to food cues; or by the microbiome. More research regarding these potential 'beyond calories' mechanisms may lead to new strategies for attenuating the obesity crisis. © 2018 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity Federation.

  15. Hormones and hibernation: possible links between hormone systems, winter energy balance and white-nose syndrome in bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Craig K R; Wilcox, Alana

    2014-06-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Energy Balance". Hibernation allows mammals to survive in cold climates and during times of reduced food availability. Drastic physiological changes are required to maintain the energy savings that characterize hibernation. These changes presumably enable adjustments in endocrine activity that control metabolism and body temperature, and ultimately influence expression of torpor and periodic arousals. Despite challenges that exist when examining hormonal pathways in small-bodied hibernators, bats represent a potential model taxon for comparative neuroendocrinological studies of hibernation due to their diversity of species and the reliance of many species on heterothermy. Understanding physiological mechanisms underlying hibernation in bats is also important from a conservation physiology perspective due to white-nose syndrome, an emerging infectious disease causing catastrophic mortality among hibernating bats in eastern North America. Here we review the potential influence of three key hormonal mechanisms--leptin, melatonin and glucocorticoids--on hibernation in mammals with an emphasis on bats. We propose testable hypotheses about potential effects of WNS on these systems and their evolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Possible Link Between Stress-related Factors and Altered Body Composition in Women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Barnali Ray; Chowdhury, Olivia; Saha, Sudip Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Stress is an invisible factor affecting modern day living and is strongly associated with many disease pathogenesis including polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) in women. PCOS is the most frequent endocrinological disorder that affects women of reproductive age, leading to metabolic dysfunction and body composition alterations. Salivary amylase and cortisol are major stress mediators that have been implicated in PCOS. However, their role in altering body composition in PCOS is yet to be deciphered. The present study aimed at understanding the relation between stress-associated factors and alterations in body composition among PCOS patients. This study enrolled a total of 100 patients (PCOS) and 60 age-matched controls. The female patients were of ages between 13 and 30 years. Standard assay kits were used to evaluate the α-amylase activity and cortisol level in saliva. The participants were chosen on the basis of the Rotterdam American Society for Reproductive Medicine/European Society of Human Reproduction criteria. Saliva was collected from each participant as per the protocol of Salimetrics, USA. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 20 for Windows. The quantitative variables are described as mean ± standard deviation. P stress scenario in their system. Moreover, overweight PCOS participants reflected higher amylase activity than the lean patients participants. Pulse rate, body mass index (BMI), visceral adiposity, and waist-hip ratio (WHR) was considerably higher in the PCOS patients participants compared to controls. A significant correlation could be drawn between the α-amylase activity and BMI or WHR, respectively, among PCOS patients. These observations indicate a strong link between the stress marker and alterations in the body composition parameters of PCOS patients participants. Higher prevalence of stress in PCOS patients participants has a critical role in their altered body composition.

  17. Renal response to L-arginine in diabetic rats. A possible link between nitric oxide system and aquaporin-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María C Ortiz

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate whether L-Arginine (L-Arg supplementation modifies nitric oxide (NO system and consequently aquaporin-2 (AQP2 expression in the renal outer medulla of streptozotocin-diabetic rats at an early time point after induction of diabetes. Male Wistar rats were divided in four groups: Control, Diabetic, Diabetic treated with L-Arginine and Control treated with L-Arginine. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity was estimated by [14C] L-citrulline production in homogenates of the renal outer medulla and by NADPH-diaphorase staining in renal outer medullary tubules. Western blot was used to detect the expression of AQP2 and NOS types I and III; real time PCR was used to quantify AQP2 mRNA. The expression of both NOS isoforms, NOS I and NOS III, was decreased in the renal outer medulla of diabetic rats and L-Arg failed to prevent these decreases. However, L-Arg improved NO production, NADPH-diaphorase activity in collecting ducts and other tubular structures, and NOS activity in renal homogenates from diabetic rats. AQP2 protein and mRNA were decreased in the renal outer medulla of diabetic rats and L-Arg administration prevented these decreases. These results suggest that the decreased NOS activity in collecting ducts of the renal outer medulla may cause, at least in part, the decreased expression of AQP2 in this model of diabetes and constitute additional evidence supporting a role for NO in contributing to renal water reabsorption through the modulation of AQP2 expression in this pathological condition. However, we cannot discard that another pathway different from NOS also exists that links L-Arg to AQP2 expression.

  18. Aerobic Fitness Linked to Cortical Brain Development in Adolescent Males: Preliminary Findings Suggest a Possible Role of BDNF Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herting, Megan M.; Keenan, Madison F.; Nagel, Bonnie J.

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic exercise has been shown to impact brain structure and cognition in children and adults. Exercise-induced activation of a growth protein known as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is thought to contribute to such relationships. To date, however, no study has examined how aerobic fitness relates to cortical brain structure during development and if BDNF genotype moderates these relationships. Using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FreeSurfer, the current study examined how aerobic fitness relates to volume, thickness, and surface area in 34 male adolescents, 15 to 18 years old. Moreover, we examined if the val66met BDNF genotype moderated these relationships. We hypothesized that aerobic fitness would relate to greater thickness and volumes in frontal, parietal, and motor regions, and that these relationships would be less robust in individuals carrying a Met allele, since this genotype leads to lower BDNF expression. We found that aerobic fitness positively related to right rostral middle frontal cortical volume in all adolescents. However, results also showed BDNF genotype moderated the relationship between aerobic fitness and bilateral medial precuneus surface area, with a positive relationship seen in individuals with the Val/Val allele, but no relationship detected in those adolescents carrying a Met allele. Lastly, using self-reported levels of aerobic activity, we found that higher-fit adolescents showed larger right medial pericalcarine, right cuneus and left precuneus surface areas as compared to their low-fit peers. Our findings suggest that aerobic fitness is linked to cortical brain development in male adolescents, and that more research is warranted to determine how an individual’s genes may influence these relationships. PMID:27445764

  19. Low Retinal Dehydrogenase 1 (RALDH1) Level in Prepubertal Boys with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Possible Link to Dopamine Dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavăl, Denis; Rad, Florina; Rusu, Răzvan; Niculae, Alexandru-Ştefan; Colosi, Horaţiu Alexandru; Dobrescu, Iuliana; Dronca, Eleonora

    2017-08-31

    Retinal dehydrogenase 1 (RALDH1) is a cytosolic enzyme which acts both as a source of retinoic acid (RA) and as a detoxification enzyme. RALDH1 has key functions in the midbrain dopaminergic system, which influences motivation, cognition, and social behavior. Since dopamine has been increasingly linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD), we asked whether RALDH1 could contribute to the autistic phenotype. Therefore, we investigated for the first time the levels of RALDH1 in autistic patients. To further assess the detoxification function of RALDH1, we also explored 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts (4-HNE PAs) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels. Moreover, considering the effect of testosterone on RALDH1 expression, we measured the second to fourth digit ratio (2D:4D ratio) for both hands, which reflects exposure to prenatal testosterone. Male patients with ASD (n=18; age, 62.9±4.3 months) and healthy controls (n=13; age, 78.1±4.9 months) were examined. Erythrocyte RALDH1, serum 4-HNE PAs and erythrocyte GSH levels were measured using colorimetric assays, and digit lengths were measured using digital calipers. We found significantly lower (-42.9%) RALDH1 levels in autistic patients as compared to controls ( p =0.032). However, there was no difference in 4-HNE PAs levels ( p =0.368), GSH levels ( p =0.586), or 2D:4D ratios ( p =0.246 in the left hand, p =0.584 in the right hand) between healthy controls and autistic subjects. We concluded that a subset of autistic patients had a low RALDH1 level. These results suggest that low RALDH1 levels could contribute to the autistic phenotype by reflecting a dopaminergic dysfunction.

  20. Aerobic Fitness Linked to Cortical Brain Development in Adolescent Males: Preliminary Findings Suggest a Possible Role of BDNF Genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herting, Megan M; Keenan, Madison F; Nagel, Bonnie J

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic exercise has been shown to impact brain structure and cognition in children and adults. Exercise-induced activation of a growth protein known as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is thought to contribute to such relationships. To date, however, no study has examined how aerobic fitness relates to cortical brain structure during development and if BDNF genotype moderates these relationships. Using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FreeSurfer, the current study examined how aerobic fitness relates to volume, thickness, and surface area in 34 male adolescents, 15 to 18 years old. Moreover, we examined if the val66met BDNF genotype moderated these relationships. We hypothesized that aerobic fitness would relate to greater thickness and volumes in frontal, parietal, and motor regions, and that these relationships would be less robust in individuals carrying a Met allele, since this genotype leads to lower BDNF expression. We found that aerobic fitness positively related to right rostral middle frontal cortical volume in all adolescents. However, results also showed BDNF genotype moderated the relationship between aerobic fitness and bilateral medial precuneus surface area, with a positive relationship seen in individuals with the Val/Val allele, but no relationship detected in those adolescents carrying a Met allele. Lastly, using self-reported levels of aerobic activity, we found that higher-fit adolescents showed larger right medial pericalcarine, right cuneus and left precuneus surface areas as compared to their low-fit peers. Our findings suggest that aerobic fitness is linked to cortical brain development in male adolescents, and that more research is warranted to determine how an individual's genes may influence these relationships.

  1. Affect the Cross Linking Degree and Polymer Composition on the Mechanical Properties of Poly (vinyl alcohol/ Pullu-lan Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shemaa Abdul Satar Soud

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study Cross-linked PVA/Pullulan film was prepared. Cross-linking reaction done by addi-tion of gluteraldehyde at different reaction time (10,30and 60 min. Chemical interaction, me-chanical, thermal properties, water solubility and film morphology was studied for cross-linked PVA/Pullulan, PVA and Pullulan only. Thus FTIR investigated formation of hydrogen bonding between pullulan and PVA with (GA. Tensile strength, tensile modulus and elongation (% at break for PVA/Pullulan film was improved with addition of (GA as the reaction time proceed equivalent with increasing PVA content

  2. A possible link between food and mood: dietary impact on gut microbiota and behavior in BALB/c mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Pyndt Jørgensen

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder is a debilitating disease in the Western World. A western diet high in saturated fat and refined sugar seems to play an important part in disease development. Therefore, this study is aimed at investigating whether saturated fat or sucrose predisposes mice to develop behavioral symptoms which can be interpreted as depression-like, and the possible influence of the gut microbiota (GM in this. Fourty-two mice were randomly assigned to one of three experimental diets, a high-fat, a high-sucrose or a control diet for thirteen weeks. Mice on high-fat diet gained more weight (p = 0.00009, displayed significantly less burrowing behavior than the control mice (p = 0.034, and showed decreased memory in the Morris water maze test compared to mice on high-sucrose diet (p = 0.031. Mice on high-sucrose diet burrowed less goal-oriented, showed greater latency to first bout of immobility in the forced swim test when compared to control mice (p = 0.039 and high-fat fed mice (p = 0.013, and displayed less anxiety than mice on high-fat diet in the triple test (p = 0.009. Behavioral changes were accompanied by a significant change in GM composition of mice fed a high-fat diet, while no difference between diet groups was observed for sucrose preferences, LPS, cholesterol, HbA1c, BDNF and the cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12(p70, IL-17 and TNF-α. A series of correlations was found between GM, behavior, BDNF and inflammatory mediators. In conclusion, the study shows that dietary fat and sucrose affect behavior, sometimes in opposite directions, and suggests a possible association between GM and behavior.

  3. On two possible mechanisms of metallic island remotion from solid surface at heavy multicharged ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'eva, I.V.; Geguzin, Ya.E.; Monastyrenko, V.E.

    1986-01-01

    Two mechanisms of energy transfer from a moving ion to a metallic island film on a solid surface are described. A particular case when the energy transfer quantity is enough to remove an island from the solid surface breaking adhesion bond is considered. One mechanism is 'shaking off', another one is a 'jumping up' mechanism. The essence of the first mechanism is that an ion bombarding the surface excites a cylindrical shock wave with a front that can 'shake off' islands from the solid surface along the ion trajectory when it reaches the surface. An island is heated in pulsed mode, and during thermal expansion it should push off the substrate, and so it jumps up. The pure case of such mechanism is observed when an ion transverses an island and transfers energy to the latter one that is defined by the quantity of ion energy losses in the island

  4. The link between high-fat meals and postprandial activation of blood coagulation factor VII possibly involves kallikrein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, L F; Marckmann, P; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie

    2000-01-01

    Contrary to low-fat meals, high-fat meals are known to cause postprandial factor VII (FVII) activation, but the mechanism is unknown. To study the postprandial FVII activation in detail, 18 young men consumed in randomized order high-fat or low-fat test meals. Fasting and non-fasting blood samples...... that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins may activate prokallikrein. Neither plasma triglycerides nor kallikrein and activated FVII were statistically associated. This may suggest that additional factors are involved in the postprandial FVII activation. No clear evidence for a role of tissue factor expression...... by monocytes, factor XII or insulin in postprandial FVII activation was observed. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor and prothrombin fragment 1+2, a marker of thrombin generation, were not affected postprandially after either the high-fat or the low-fat meals. Our findings indicate that triglyceride...

  5. Linking GHG Emission Trading Systems and Markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    Several different types of links are possible between different GHG-mitigation systems. These include: Linking two or more emission trading schemes so that emissions trading can occur both within and between different schemes ('direct links'); and Linking emission trading systems to registries/mechanisms and systems that generate offsets from project based mechanisms or from direct purchases/transfers of AAUs ('indirect links').

  6. Possible link between stress-related factors and altered body composition in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnali Ray Basu

    2018-01-01

    indicate a strong link between the stress marker and alterations in the body composition parameters of PCOS patients participants. Conclusion: Higher prevalence of stress in PCOS patients participants has a critical role in their altered body composition.

  7. Vegetation and erosion: comments on the linking mechanisms from the perspective of the Australian drylands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkerley, D.

    2009-04-01

    John Thorne's wide-ranging research included an emphasis on the diverse roles of vegetation in modifying erosion processes under Mediterranean conditions, with primary field studies in Spain. Different global drylands reflect some differences in the nature or strength of the mechanisms linking vegetation and erosion. In Australia, low topographic gradients and plants adapted to water scarcity have facilitated the widespread development of contour-aligned vegetation groves. In these landscapes, the role of individual plants in modifying raindrop impact energy or overland flow erosivity is secondary to the community-level effects of the grove structures. Erosion in common rain events is limited to quite local redistribution of soil materials on metre scales. This highlights one of the unresolved issues that warrants more attention in drylands globally: under what range of rain events does the protective role of individual plants (or of groves) operate, and what is the threshold event size beyond which their effect is swamped by integrated overland flow arriving from upslope? In contrast with, for example, the well-understood role of bankfull flows in river architecture, general principles underlying dryland hillslope and channel responses to events of various magnitudes remain obscure. Clearly, however, there is no single role for plant cover; rather, that role varies with event magnitude and related properties such as the time since the last rain event. An important conclusion is therefore that context is important when evaluating the links between vegetation and erosion. The developing view of overland flow generally, but particularly relevant in drylands where plant cover is sparse, is that the connectedness of runoff flowpaths is a key parameter. It partly determines the extent to which the downslope movement of resources (soil, water, organic matter) is free or constrained, and this conception has the potential to support the formulation of some general models

  8. Characterization and performance evaluation of a vertical seismic isolator using link and crank mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujiuchi, N; Ito, A; Sekiya, Y; Nan, C; Yasuda, M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, various seismic isolators have been developed to prevent earthquake damage to valuable art and other rare objects. Many seismic isolators only defend against horizontal motions, which are the usual cause of falling objects. However, the development of a seismic isolator designed for vertical vibration is necessary since such great vertical vibration earthquakes as the 2004 Niigata Prefecture Chuetsu Earthquake have occurred, and their increased height characteristics are undesirable. In this study, we developed a vertical seismic isolator that can be installed at a lower height and can support loads using a horizontal spring without requiring a vertical spring. It has a mechanism that combines links and cranks. The dynamic model was proposed and the frequency characteristics were simulated when the sine waves were the input. Shaking tests were also performed. The experimental value of the natural frequency was 0.57 Hz, and the theoretical values of the frequency characteristics were close to the experimental values. In addition, we verified this vertical seismic isolator's performance through shaking tests and simulation for typical seismic waves in Japan. We verified the seismic isolation's performance from the experimental result because the average reduction rate of the acceleration was 0.21. (paper)

  9. The origins of cognitive vulnerability in early childhood: mechanisms linking early attachment to later depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Tara E; Moran, Greg

    2011-11-01

    This paper examines the theory and research linking attachment relationships to cognitive vulnerability to depression and assesses evidence that early attachment experiences contribute to the development of these cognitive processes. Most research in this area has involved adult participants using self-report measures of both attachment and depressive vulnerabilities and thus cannot convincingly speak to the existence of such a developmental pathway. Several studies, however, have followed individuals from infancy and examined the emergence of self-esteem and responses to failure throughout childhood and adolescence. These studies suggest that early experiences in non-secure attachment relationships place an individual at-risk for developing a cognitive framework that increases their vulnerability to depression following stressful life events. The paper concludes with a discussion of how future research might best explore specific mechanisms through which distinct attachment relationships may lead to divergent developmental pathways sharing the common outcome of cognitive processes that place individuals at risk for depression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. ATRX ADD domain links an atypical histone methylation recognition mechanism to human mental-retardation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwase, Shigeki; Xiang, Bin; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Ren, Ting; Lewis, Peter W.; Cochrane, Jesse C.; Allis, C. David; Picketts, David J.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Li, Haitao; Shi, Yang (Harvard-Med); (Ottawa Hosp.); (MSKCC); (Rockefeller); (CH-Boston); (Tsinghua); (Mass. Gen. Hosp.)

    2011-07-19

    ATR-X (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) syndrome is a human congenital disorder that causes severe intellectual disabilities. Mutations in the ATRX gene, which encodes an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeler, are responsible for the syndrome. Approximately 50% of the missense mutations in affected persons are clustered in a cysteine-rich domain termed ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L, ADD{sub ATRX}), whose function has remained elusive. Here we identify ADD{sub ATRX} as a previously unknown histone H3-binding module, whose binding is promoted by lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) but inhibited by lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). The cocrystal structure of ADD{sub ATRX} bound to H3{sub 1-15}K9me3 peptide reveals an atypical composite H3K9me3-binding pocket, which is distinct from the conventional trimethyllysine-binding aromatic cage. Notably, H3K9me3-pocket mutants and ATR-X syndrome mutants are defective in both H3K9me3 binding and localization at pericentromeric heterochromatin; thus, we have discovered a unique histone-recognition mechanism underlying the ATR-X etiology.

  11. ATRX ADD Domain Links an Atypical Histone Methylation Recognition Mechanism to Human Mental-Retardation Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Iwase; B Xiang; S Ghosh; T Ren; P Lewis; J Cochrane; C Allis; D Picketts; D Patel; et al.

    2011-12-31

    ATR-X (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) syndrome is a human congenital disorder that causes severe intellectual disabilities. Mutations in the ATRX gene, which encodes an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeler, are responsible for the syndrome. Approximately 50% of the missense mutations in affected persons are clustered in a cysteine-rich domain termed ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L, ADD{sub ATRX}), whose function has remained elusive. Here we identify ADD{sub ATRX} as a previously unknown histone H3-binding module, whose binding is promoted by lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) but inhibited by lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). The cocrystal structure of ADD{sub ATRX} bound to H3{sub 1-15}K9me3 peptide reveals an atypical composite H3K9me3-binding pocket, which is distinct from the conventional trimethyllysine-binding aromatic cage. Notably, H3K9me3-pocket mutants and ATR-X syndrome mutants are defective in both H3K9me3 binding and localization at pericentromeric heterochromatin; thus, we have discovered a unique histone-recognition mechanism underlying the ATR-X etiology.

  12. Nutritional links to plausible mechanisms underlying pancreatic cancer: a conference report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, R Jean; Srivastava, Sudhir; Milner, John A; Ross, Sharon A

    2003-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is one of most catastrophic and least understood of cancers. Evidence from clinical studies indicates that the development of pancreas cancer progresses over many years before symptoms appear. Most people with pancreatic cancer die within six months of diagnosis. The lack of early disease markers, the paucity of direct subject/patient interview data and limited availability of high quality biological samples have slowed progress toward identifying environmental and genetic disease risk factors. Much remains to be learned about the development of pancreatic cancer and about potential interventions for disease prevention. Epidemiological and mechanistic studies examining risk factors for pancreatic cancer supply little consistent or strong evidence to provide a cohesive prevention strategy for this cancer, but offer clues for future research concerning the prevention and early detection of this devastating disease. This Executive Summary provides background discussion on pancreatic cancer and summaries of each of the topics discussed at the workshop, including 1) Molecular aspects, 2) Dietary and other risk factors for pancreatic cancer, 3) The metabolic hypothesis for pancreatic cancer, 4) Preclinical studies on pancreatic cancer, 5) Methylation, 6) Oxidative stress and 7) Biomarker Profiling. This document also contains a compilation of recommendations for future research, concluding remarks, a list of speakers and participants attending the workshop, and a selection of key references to aid future research into nutritional links to mechanisms underlying pancreas cancer. The recommendations section suggests gaps in current knowledge and articulates future directions for this area of investigation.

  13. Possible links between extreme levels of space weather changes and human health state in middle latitudes: direct and indirect indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaraly-Oghlu Babayev, Elchin

    The Sun is the main driver of space weather. The possibility that solar activity variations and related changes in the Earth's magnetosphere can affect human life and health has been debated for many decades. This problem is being studied extensively in the late 20th and early 21st centuries and it is still being contradictory in some cases. The relations between space weather changes and the human health have global implications, but they are especially significant for habitants living at high geomagnetic latitudes where the geomagnetic disturbances have larger amplitudes. Nevertheless, the relevant researches are also important for humans living at any geomagnetic latitudes with different levels of geomagnetic activity; recent researches show that weak geomagnetic disturbances can also have adverse effects. Unfortunately, limited comparison of results of investigations on possible effects to humans from geomagnetic activity exists between studies conducted in high, middle and low latitudes. Knowledge about the relationship between solar and geomagnetic activity and the human health would allow to get better prepared beforehand for any future geomagnetic event and its impacts anywhere. For these purposes there are conducted collaborative (jointly with scientists from Israel, Bulgaria, Russia and Belgium) and cross-disciplinary space weather studies in the Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences for revealing possible effects of solar, geomagnetic and cosmic ray variability on certain technological, biological and ecological systems in different phases of solar cycle 23. This paper describes some recently obtained results of the complex (theoretical, experimental and statistical) studies of influence of the periodical and aperiodical changes of solar, geomagnetic and cosmic ray activities upon human cardio-health state as well as human physiological and psycho-emotional state. It also covers the conclusions of studies on influence of violent solar events and severe

  14. Spared behavioral repetition effects in Alzheimer's disease linked to an altered neural mechanism at posterior cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broster, Lucas S; Li, Juan; Wagner, Benjamin; Smith, Charles D; Jicha, Gregory A; Schmitt, Frederick A; Munro, Nancy; Haney, Ryan H; Jiang, Yang

    2018-02-20

    Individuals with dementia of the Alzheimer type (AD) classically show disproportionate impairment in measures of working memory, but repetition learning effects are relatively preserved. As AD affects brain regions implicated in both working memory and repetition effects, the neural basis of this discrepancy is poorly understood. We hypothesized that the posterior repetition effect could account for this discrepancy due to the milder effects of AD at visual cortex. Participants with early AD, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy controls performed a working memory task with superimposed repetition effects while electroencephalography was collected to identify possible neural mechanisms of preserved repetition effects. Participants with AD showed preserved behavioral repetition effects and a change in the posterior repetition effect. Visual cortex may play a role in maintained repetition effects in persons with early AD.

  15. On possibility of agreement of quantum mechanics with classical probability theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavnov, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    Paper describes a scheme to carry out a construction of the quantum mechanics where the quantum system is assumed to be a pattern of the open classical subsystems. It enables to make use both of the formal classical logic and the classical probability theory in the quantum mechanics. On the other hand, in terms of the mentioned approach one manages to ensure complete reconstruction of the quantum mechanics standard mathematical tool specifying its application limits. The problem dealing with the quantum state reduction is scrutinized [ru

  16. Genetic diversity of the NE Atlantic sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis unveils chaotic genetic patchiness possibly linked to local selective pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norderhaug, K M; Anglès d'Auriac, M B; Fagerli, C W; Gundersen, H; Christie, H; Dahl, K; Hobæk, A

    We compared the genetic differentiation in the green sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis from discrete populations on the NE Atlantic coast. By using eight recently developed microsatellite markers, genetic structure was compared between populations from the Danish Strait in the south to the Barents Sea in the north (56-79°N). Urchins are spread by pelagic larvae and may be transported long distances by northwards-going ocean currents. Two main superimposed patterns were identified. The first showed a subtle but significant genetic differentiation from the southernmost to the northernmost of the studied populations and could be explained by an isolation by distance model. The second pattern included two coastal populations in mid-Norway (65°N), NH and NS, as well as the northernmost population of continental Norway (71°N) FV. They showed a high degree of differentiation from all other populations. The explanation to the second pattern is most likely chaotic genetic patchiness caused by introgression from another species, S. pallidus, into S. droebachiensis resulting from selective pressure. Ongoing sea urchin collapse and kelp forests recovery are observed in the area of NH, NS and FV populations. High gene flow between populations spanning more than 22° in latitude suggests a high risk of new grazing events to occur rapidly in the future if conditions for sea urchins are favourable. On the other hand, the possibility of hybridization in association with collapsing populations may be used as an early warning indicator for monitoring purposes.

  17. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin-I in copper-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in rats: A possible link with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaoui, Abdellatif; Chatoui, Hicham; El Hiba, Omar; Gamrani, Halima

    2017-11-01

    Numerous findings indicate an involvement of heavy metals in the neuropathology of several neurodegenerative disorders, especially Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous studies have demonstrated that Copper (Cu) exhibits a potent neurotoxic effect on dopaminergic neurons and triggers profound neurobehavioral alterations. Curcumin is a major component of Curcuma longa rhizomes and a powerful medicinal plant that exerts many pharmacological effects. However, the neuroprotective action of curcumin on Cu-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity is yet to be investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of acute Cu-intoxication (10mg/kg B.W. i.p) for 3days on the dopaminergic system and locomotor performance as well as the possible therapeutic efficacy of curcumin I (30mg/kg B.W.). Intoxicated rats showed a significant loss of Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH) expression within substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the striatal outputs. This was correlated with a clear decrease in locomotor performance. Critically, curcumin-I co-treatment reversed these changes and showed a noticeable protective effect; both TH expression and locomotor performance was reinstated in intoxicated rats. These results demonstrate altered dopaminergic innervations following Cu intoxication and a new therapeutic potential of curcumin against Cu-induced dopaminergic neurotransmission failure. Curcumin may therefore prevent heavy metal related Parkinsonism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Possible genetic link between I-type granite and orogenic gold deposits in Egypt (metamorphic-magmatic interaction?)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Monsef, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    ores revealed two main groups of fluid inclusions in both areas: A) Aqueous inclusions (H2O-NaCl±KCl system), and B) Carbonic inclusions (H2O-CO2-NaCl±CH4). A drop of pressure during the migration of these fluids to shallower depths along the shear zones was the main reason for phase separation. Isochores calculation from microthermometric results proved that, the P-T boundary conditions outlined for Fatira gold deposits are of 275° to 297° C and between (0.2 - 1.2 Kbar); and of 277° to 300° C and between (0.2 - 1 Kbar) for Gidami gold deposits. The normalization Chondrite patterns of rare earth elements (REEs) for the gold-ore deposits with the surrounding I-type granitic rocks exhibit an obvious similarity and positive correlation. The geological, mineralogical, geochemical and fluid inclusions studies revealed a genetic link between gold mineralization and intrusion of calc-alkaine granitic magma. Whereas, The granitic magma acts as a supplier for the ore-bearing fluid and as a heat source for metamorphic processes, leading to hydrothermal convection currents.

  19. Axial focusing of impact energy in the earth`s interior: A possible link to flood basalts and hotspots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boslough, M.B.; Chael, E.P.; Trucano, T.G.; Crawford, D.A.; Campbell, D.L.

    1994-12-01

    We present the results of shock physics and seismological computational simulations that show how energy from a large impact can be coupled to the interior of the Earth. The radially-diverging shock wave generated by the impact decays to linearly elastic seismic waves. These waves reconverge (minus attenuation) along the axis of symmetry between the impact and its antipode. The locations that experience the most strain cycles with the largest amplitudes will dissipate the most energy and have the largest increases in temperature (for a given attenuation efficiency). We have shown that the locus of maximum energy deposition in the mantle lies along the impact axis. Moreover, the most intense focusing is within the asthenosphere at the antipode, within the range of depths where mechanical energy is most readily converted to heat. We propose that if large impacts on the Earth leave geological evidence anywhere other than the impact site itself, it will be at the antipode. We suggest that the most likely result of the focusing for a sufficiently large impact, consistent with features observed in the geological record, would be a flood basalt eruption at the antipode followed by hotspot volcanism. A direct prediction of this model would be the existence of undiscovered impact structures whose reconstructed locations would be antipodal to flood basalt provinces. One such structure would be in the Indian Ocean, associated with the Columbia River Basalts and Yellowstone; another would be a second K/T impact structure in the Pacific Ocean, associated with the Deccan Traps and Reunion.

  20. Is thrombosis a contributor to heart failure pathophysiology? Possible mechanisms, therapeutic opportunities, and clinical investigation challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zannad, F.; Stough, W.G.; Regnault, V.; Gheorghiade, M.; Deliargyris, E.; Gibson, C.M.; Agewall, S.; Berkowitz, S.D.; Burton, P.; Calvo, G.; Goldstein, S.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Koglin, J.; O'Connor, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Thrombotic events (coronary thrombosis, venous thromboembolism, intraventricular thrombosis, intracranial and systemic thromboembolism) occur frequently in patients with heart failure. These events may be precipitated by several mechanisms including hypercoagulability through enhancement of

  1. In vitro Anti-Gastric Tumor Activities and Possible Mechanisms of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mechanisms of Action of Paederosidic Acid from Paederia scandens (Lour) ... After treatment with PA, obvious condensation of the nucleus was observed in fluorescence photomicrographs ..... gastric cancer: Molecular pathways and ongoing investigations. ... cisplatin for enhanced chemotherapy efficacy and reduced ...

  2. Water Diffusion Mechanism in Carbon Nanotube and Polyamide Nanocomposite Reverse Osmosis Membranes: A Possible Percolation-Hopping Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Takumi; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Tejima, Syogo; Ortiz-Medina, Josue; Morelos-Gomez, Aaron; Takeuchi, Kenji; Hayashi, Takuya; Terrones, Mauricio; Endo, Morinobu

    2018-02-01

    This paper is a contribution to the Physical Review Applied collection in memory of Mildred S. Dresselhaus. The mechanism of water diffusion across reverse osmosis nanocomposite membranes made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and aromatic polyamide is not completely understood despite its high potential for desalination applications. While most of the groups have proposed that superflow inside the CNT might positively impact the water flow across membranes, here we show theoretical evidence that this is not likely the case in composite membranes because CNTs are usually oriented parallel to the membrane surface, not to mention that sometimes the nanotube cores are occluded. Instead, we propose an oriented diffusion mechanism that explains the high water permeation by decreasing the diffusion path of water molecules across the membranes, even in the presence of CNTs that behave as impermeable objects. Finally, we provide a comprehensive description of the molecular dynamics occurring in water desalination membranes by considering the bond polarizability caused by dynamic charge transfer and explore the use of molecular-dynamics-derived stochastic diffusion simulations. The proposed water diffusion mechanism offers an alternative and most likely explanation for the high permeation phenomena observed in CNTs and PA nanocomposite membranes, and its understanding can be helpful to design the next generation of reverse osmosis desalination membranes.

  3. First Detection of Water Ice and Organics on an Asteroid: A Possible Link to the Origin of Earth's Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Kelsey D.; Campins, H.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Howell, E. S.; Kelley, M. S.; Licandro, J.; Mothédiniz, T.; Fernández, Y.; Ziffer, J.

    2010-05-01

    We report the detection of water ice and organics on the surface of asteroid 24 Themis. Our rotationally-resolved infrared (2-4 µm) spectra of this asteroid indicate that the ice and organics are widespread on its surface. The spectral difference with other asteroids observed in the same manner, makes 24 Themis unique so far. Our identification of water ice and organic compounds on this asteroid agrees with independent results (Rivkin and Emery 2010). At first glance, the presence of any surface ice on 24 Themis, particularly over a significant fraction of its surface, is puzzling because of the instability for exposed water ice at Themis's heliocentric distance ( 3.2 AU). Nevertheless, there are several possible sources for this unstable ice and identifying them is likely to be diagnostic of other processes on primitive asteroids. The presence of water ice on 24 Themis supports the idea that ice sublimation drives the cometary activity in two small members of the Themis dynamical family, labeled "Main Belt comets” by Hsieh and Jewitt (2006). It also helps to address other relevant questions, such as, how abundant is water ice in the outer asteroid belt and where was the "snow” line when the solar system formed? The answers to these questions could transform current views of primitive asteroids, delivery of water and organic molecules to Earth, and models of Solar System formation. This research was published in the April 29, 2010 issue of the journal Nature. Hargrove and Campins are visiting astronomers at the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), which is operated by the University of Hawaii under Cooperative Agreement no. NCC 5-538 with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  4. Asymmetric dimethyl-L-arginine (ADMA): a possible link between homocyst(e)ine and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stühlinger, Markus C; Stanger, Olaf

    2005-02-01

    Hyperhomocyst(e)inemia is associated with an increased risk for atherosclerotic disease and venous thromboembolism. The impact of elevated plasma homocysteine levels seems to be clinically relevant, since the total cardiovascular risk of hyperhomocyst(e)inemia is comparable to the risk associated with hyperlipidemia or smoking. There is substantial evidence for impairment of endothelial function in human and animal models of atherosclerosis, occurring even before development of overt plaques. Interestingly endothelial dysfunction appears to be a sensitive indicator of the process of atherosclerotic lesion development and predicts future vascular events. NO is the most potent endogenous vasodilator known. It is released by the endothelium, and reduced NO bioavailability is responsible for impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in hyperhomocyst(e)inemia and other metabolic disorders associated with vascular disease. Substances leading to impaired endothelial function as a consequence of reduced NO generation are endogenous NO synthase inhibitors such as ADMA. Indeed there is accumulating evidence from animal and human studies that ADMA, endothelial function and homocyst(e)ine might be closely interrelated. Specifically elevations of ADMA associated with impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation were found in chronic hyperhomocyst(e)inemia, as well as after acute elevation of plasma homocyst(e)ine following oral methionine intake. The postulated mechanisms for ADMA accumulation are increased methylation of arginine residues within proteins, as well as reduced metabolism of ADMA by the enzyme DDAH, but they still need to be confirmed to be operative in vivo. Hyperhomocyst(e)inemia, as well as subsequent endothelial dysfunction can be successfully treated by application of folate and B vitamins. Since ADMA seems to play a central role in homocyst(e)ine-induced endothelial dysfunction, another way of preventing vascular disease in patients with elevated homocyst

  5. Mechanisms of migration development at the community level: Migrant networks and types of links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Serban

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper approaches the problem of the development mechanism of international migration at community level.Some empirical observations cumulated during several researches,at origin and destination area, regarding Romanian migration to Spain constitute the starting points. Appealing to the distinction introduced by Mark Granovetter in 1976 between weak and strongties, we find that, if initially migration develops almost exclusively based on social relations that could be assimilated to strong ties,there is a moment in the process of development when the departures on the base of weak ties, with important consequences on the migrant’s situation at destination, increase.The paper tries to clarify, preponderantly invoking theoretical arguments,in what measure the departures based on weak ties between migrant and non migrant are normal in the process of international migration development at community level. The study concludes that, because of cumulative effects, migration evolution to a phase when the departure is possible based on weak ties is explainable.Two mechanisms mainly contribute to this result: enhancement of incentives to migrate (because of quantitative and qualitative information increase; visibility of migration effects in the origin area;changes of relative deprivation at community level and migration costs and risk lowering, with the consequence of reduction of effective support that a non-migrant needs from one migrant in order to migrate.

  6. Rapid evolution and copy number variation of primate RHOXF2, an X-linked homeobox gene involved in male reproduction and possibly brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ao-lei; Wang, Yin-qiu; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Cheng-hong; Wang, Jin-kai; Zhang, Rui; Che, Jun; Su, Bing

    2011-10-12

    Homeobox genes are the key regulators during development, and they are in general highly conserved with only a few reported cases of rapid evolution. RHOXF2 is an X-linked homeobox gene in primates. It is highly expressed in the testicle and may play an important role in spermatogenesis. As male reproductive system is often the target of natural and/or sexual selection during evolution, in this study, we aim to dissect the pattern of molecular evolution of RHOXF2 in primates and its potential functional consequence. We studied sequences and copy number variation of RHOXF2 in humans and 16 nonhuman primate species as well as the expression patterns in human, chimpanzee, white-browed gibbon and rhesus macaque. The gene copy number analysis showed that there had been parallel gene duplications/losses in multiple primate lineages. Our evidence suggests that 11 nonhuman primate species have one RHOXF2 copy, and two copies are present in humans and four Old World monkey species, and at least 6 copies in chimpanzees. Further analysis indicated that the gene duplications in primates had likely been mediated by endogenous retrovirus (ERV) sequences flanking the gene regions. In striking contrast to non-human primates, humans appear to have homogenized their two RHOXF2 copies by the ERV-mediated non-allelic recombination mechanism. Coding sequence and phylogenetic analysis suggested multi-lineage strong positive selection on RHOXF2 during primate evolution, especially during the origins of humans and chimpanzees. All the 8 coding region polymorphic sites in human populations are non-synonymous, implying on-going selection. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that besides the preferential expression in the reproductive system, RHOXF2 is also expressed in the brain. The quantitative data suggests expression pattern divergence among primate species. RHOXF2 is a fast-evolving homeobox gene in primates. The rapid evolution and copy number changes of RHOXF2 had been driven by

  7. Rapid evolution and copy number variation of primate RHOXF2, an X-linked homeobox gene involved in male reproduction and possibly brain function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Rui

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeobox genes are the key regulators during development, and they are in general highly conserved with only a few reported cases of rapid evolution. RHOXF2 is an X-linked homeobox gene in primates. It is highly expressed in the testicle and may play an important role in spermatogenesis. As male reproductive system is often the target of natural and/or sexual selection during evolution, in this study, we aim to dissect the pattern of molecular evolution of RHOXF2 in primates and its potential functional consequence. Results We studied sequences and copy number variation of RHOXF2 in humans and 16 nonhuman primate species as well as the expression patterns in human, chimpanzee, white-browed gibbon and rhesus macaque. The gene copy number analysis showed that there had been parallel gene duplications/losses in multiple primate lineages. Our evidence suggests that 11 nonhuman primate species have one RHOXF2 copy, and two copies are present in humans and four Old World monkey species, and at least 6 copies in chimpanzees. Further analysis indicated that the gene duplications in primates had likely been mediated by endogenous retrovirus (ERV sequences flanking the gene regions. In striking contrast to non-human primates, humans appear to have homogenized their two RHOXF2 copies by the ERV-mediated non-allelic recombination mechanism. Coding sequence and phylogenetic analysis suggested multi-lineage strong positive selection on RHOXF2 during primate evolution, especially during the origins of humans and chimpanzees. All the 8 coding region polymorphic sites in human populations are non-synonymous, implying on-going selection. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that besides the preferential expression in the reproductive system, RHOXF2 is also expressed in the brain. The quantitative data suggests expression pattern divergence among primate species. Conclusions RHOXF2 is a fast-evolving homeobox gene in primates. The rapid

  8. Epigenetics as a mechanism linking developmental exposures to long-term toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barouki, R; Melén, E; Herceg, Z; Beckers, J; Chen, J; Karagas, M; Puga, A; Xia, Y; Chadwick, L; Yan, W; Audouze, K; Slama, R; Heindel, J; Grandjean, P; Kawamoto, T; Nohara, K

    2018-05-01

    A variety of experimental and epidemiological studies lend support to the Developmental Origin of Health and Disease (DOHaD) concept. Yet, the actual mechanisms accounting for mid- and long-term effects of early-life exposures remain unclear. Epigenetic alterations such as changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications and the expression of certain RNAs have been suggested as possible mediators of long-term health effects of environmental stressors. This report captures discussions and conclusions debated during the last Prenatal Programming and Toxicity meeting held in Japan. Its first aim is to propose a number of criteria that are critical to support the primary contribution of epigenetics in DOHaD and intergenerational transmission of environmental stressors effects. The main criteria are the full characterization of the stressors, the actual window of exposure, the target tissue and function, the specificity of the epigenetic changes and the biological plausibility of the linkage between those changes and health outcomes. The second aim is to discuss long-term effects of a number of stressors such as smoking, air pollution and endocrine disruptors in order to identify the arguments supporting the involvement of an epigenetic mechanism. Based on the developed criteria, missing evidence and suggestions for future research will be identified. The third aim is to critically analyze the evidence supporting the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in intergenerational and transgenerational effects of environmental exposure and to particularly discuss the role of placenta and sperm. While the article is not a systematic review and is not meant to be exhaustive, it critically assesses the contribution of epigenetics in the long-term effects of environmental exposures as well as provides insight for future research. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Essential role of cyclophilin A for hepatitis C virus replication and virus production and possible link to polyprotein cleavage kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Kaul

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites and therefore their replication completely depends on host cell factors. In case of the hepatitis C virus (HCV, a positive-strand RNA virus that in the majority of infections establishes persistence, cyclophilins are considered to play an important role in RNA replication. Subsequent to the observation that cyclosporines, known to sequester cyclophilins by direct binding, profoundly block HCV replication in cultured human hepatoma cells, conflicting results were obtained as to the particular cyclophilin (Cyp required for viral RNA replication and the underlying possible mode of action. By using a set of cell lines with stable knock-down of CypA or CypB, we demonstrate in the present work that replication of subgenomic HCV replicons of different genotypes is reduced by CypA depletion up to 1,000-fold whereas knock-down of CypB had no effect. Inhibition of replication was rescued by over-expression of wild type CypA, but not by a mutant lacking isomerase activity. Replication of JFH1-derived full length genomes was even more sensitive to CypA depletion as compared to subgenomic replicons and virus production was completely blocked. These results argue that CypA may target an additional viral factor outside of the minimal replicase contributing to RNA amplification and assembly, presumably nonstructural protein 2. By selecting for resistance against the cyclosporine analogue DEBIO-025 that targets CypA in a dose-dependent manner, we identified two mutations (V2440A and V2440L close to the cleavage site between nonstructural protein 5A and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in nonstructural protein 5B that slow down cleavage kinetics at this site and reduce CypA dependence of viral replication. Further amino acid substitutions at the same cleavage site accelerating processing increase CypA dependence. Our results thus identify an unexpected correlation between HCV polyprotein processing and CypA dependence

  10. Essential role of cyclophilin A for hepatitis C virus replication and virus production and possible link to polyprotein cleavage kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Artur; Stauffer, Sarah; Berger, Carola; Pertel, Thomas; Schmitt, Jennifer; Kallis, Stephanie; Zayas, Margarita; Lopez, Margarita Zayas; Lohmann, Volker; Luban, Jeremy; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2009-08-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites and therefore their replication completely depends on host cell factors. In case of the hepatitis C virus (HCV), a positive-strand RNA virus that in the majority of infections establishes persistence, cyclophilins are considered to play an important role in RNA replication. Subsequent to the observation that cyclosporines, known to sequester cyclophilins by direct binding, profoundly block HCV replication in cultured human hepatoma cells, conflicting results were obtained as to the particular cyclophilin (Cyp) required for viral RNA replication and the underlying possible mode of action. By using a set of cell lines with stable knock-down of CypA or CypB, we demonstrate in the present work that replication of subgenomic HCV replicons of different genotypes is reduced by CypA depletion up to 1,000-fold whereas knock-down of CypB had no effect. Inhibition of replication was rescued by over-expression of wild type CypA, but not by a mutant lacking isomerase activity. Replication of JFH1-derived full length genomes was even more sensitive to CypA depletion as compared to subgenomic replicons and virus production was completely blocked. These results argue that CypA may target an additional viral factor outside of the minimal replicase contributing to RNA amplification and assembly, presumably nonstructural protein 2. By selecting for resistance against the cyclosporine analogue DEBIO-025 that targets CypA in a dose-dependent manner, we identified two mutations (V2440A and V2440L) close to the cleavage site between nonstructural protein 5A and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in nonstructural protein 5B that slow down cleavage kinetics at this site and reduce CypA dependence of viral replication. Further amino acid substitutions at the same cleavage site accelerating processing increase CypA dependence. Our results thus identify an unexpected correlation between HCV polyprotein processing and CypA dependence of HCV

  11. Amplification mechanism of ion-ripple lasers and its possible application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.R.; Dawson, J.M.

    1992-05-01

    The IRL is an advanced scheme for generating coherent high-power radiation, in which a relativistic electron beam propagates obliquely through an ion ripple in a plasma. Its amplification mechanism is described by a low gain theory while the linear growth rate is given by the dispersion relation. The efficiency of the lasing is determined by the nonlinear saturation mechanism discussed. By proper choice of device parameters, sources of microwaves, optical, and perhaps even x-rays can be made. The availability of tunable sources for wide wavelength regimes, coherence and high-power, as well as lower cost and simplicity of equipment are emphasized

  12. Trends in mechanical ventilation: are we ventilating our patients in the best possible way?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele L. Dellaca’

    2017-06-01

    To learn how mechanical ventilation developed in recent decades and to provide a better understanding of the actual technology and practice. To learn how and why interdisciplinary research and competences are necessary for providing the best ventilation treatment to patients. To understand which are the most relevant technical limitations in modern mechanical ventilators that can affect their performance in delivery of the treatment. To better understand and classify ventilation modes. To learn the classification, benefits, drawbacks and future perspectives of automatic ventilation tailoring algorithms.

  13. The direction of water transport on Mars: A possible pumping mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, P. B.

    1987-01-01

    It is suggested that an atmospheric pumping mechanism might be at work in which water is preferentially transported into the north by a mass outflow wind (due to sublimation from polar cap) that is stronger during southern spring than it is during northern spring. The mechanism is provided by the asymmetric seasonal temperature distribution produced by the eccentric martial orbit and by the associated seasonal asymmetry in the carbon dioxide cycle. The alternating condensation and sublimation of CO2 at the poles produces condensation winds which, in turn, contribute to the meridional transport of water vapor.

  14. Impact of nutrition on canine behaviour: current status and possible mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, G.; Beerda, B.; Hendriks, W.H.; Poel, van der A.F.B.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Each year, millions of dogs worldwide are abandoned by their owners, relinquished to animal shelters, and euthanised because of behaviour problems. Nutrition is rarely considered as one of the possible contributing factors of problem behaviour. This contribution presents an overview of current

  15. Hormones and phenotypic plasticity in an ecological context: linking physiological mechanisms to evolutionary processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lema, Sean C

    2014-11-01

    Hormones are chemical signaling molecules that regulate patterns of cellular physiology and gene expression underlying phenotypic traits. Hormone-signaling pathways respond to an organism's external environment to mediate developmental stage-specific malleability in phenotypes, so that environmental variation experienced at different stages of development has distinct effects on an organism's phenotype. Studies of hormone-signaling are therefore playing a central role in efforts to understand how plastic phenotypic responses to environmental variation are generated during development. But, how do adaptive, hormonally mediated phenotypes evolve if the individual signaling components (hormones, conversion enzymes, membrane transporters, and receptors) that comprise any hormone-signaling pathway show expressional flexibility in response to environmental variation? What relevance do these components hold as molecular targets for selection to couple or decouple correlated hormonally mediated traits? This article explores how studying the endocrine underpinnings of phenotypic plasticity in an ecologically relevant context can provide insights into these, and other, crucial questions into the role of phenotypic plasticity in evolution, including how plasticity itself evolves. These issues are discussed in the light of investigations into how thyroid hormones mediate morphological plasticity in Death Valley's clade of pupfishes (Cyprinodon spp.). Findings from this work with pupfish illustrate that the study of hormone-signaling from an ecological perspective can reveal how phenotypic plasticity contributes to the generation of phenotypic novelty, as well as how physiological mechanisms developmentally link an organism's phenotype to its environmental experiences. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Mechanisms That Link Parenting Practices to Adolescents' Risky Sexual Behavior: A Test of Six Competing Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Leslie Gordon; Sutton, Tara E; Simons, Ronald L; Gibbons, Frederick X; Murry, Velma McBride

    2016-02-01

    Risky sexual behavior, particularly among adolescents, continues to be a major source of concern. In order to develop effective education and prevention programs, there is a need for research that identifies the antecedents of such behavior. This study investigated the mediators that link parenting experiences during early adolescence to subsequent risky sexual behaviors among a diverse sample of African American youth (N = 629, 55 % female). While there is ample evidence that parenting practices (e.g., supportive parenting, harsh parenting, parental management) are antecedent to risky sexual behavior, few studies have examined whether one approach to parenting is more strongly related to risky sex than others. Using a developmental approach, the current study focused on factors associated with six theories of risky sexual behavior. While past research has provided support for all of the theories, few studies have assessed the relative contribution of each while controlling for the processes proposed by the others. The current study addresses these gaps in the literature and reports results separately by gender. Longitudinal analyses using structural equation modeling revealed that the mediating mechanisms associated with social learning and attachment theories were significantly related to the risky sexual behavior of males and females. Additionally, there was support for social control and self-control theories only for females and for life history theory only for males. We did not find support for problem behavior theory, a perspective that dominates the risky sex literature, after controlling for the factors associated with the other theories. Finally, supportive parenting emerged as the parenting behavior most influential with regard to adolescents' risky sexual behavior. These results provide insight regarding efficacious approaches to education and preventative programs designed to reduce risky sexual behaviors among adolescents.

  17. Trends in mechanical ventilation: are we ventilating our patients in the best possible way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellaca', Raffaele L; Veneroni, Chiara; Farre', Ramon

    2017-06-01

    This review addresses how the combination of physiology, medicine and engineering principles contributed to the development and advancement of mechanical ventilation, emphasising the most urgent needs for improvement and the most promising directions of future development. Several aspects of mechanical ventilation are introduced, highlighting on one side the importance of interdisciplinary research for further development and, on the other, the importance of training physicians sufficiently on the technological aspects of modern devices to exploit properly the great complexity and potentials of this treatment. To learn how mechanical ventilation developed in recent decades and to provide a better understanding of the actual technology and practice.To learn how and why interdisciplinary research and competences are necessary for providing the best ventilation treatment to patients.To understand which are the most relevant technical limitations in modern mechanical ventilators that can affect their performance in delivery of the treatment.To better understand and classify ventilation modes.To learn the classification, benefits, drawbacks and future perspectives of automatic ventilation tailoring algorithms.

  18. On a possible mechanism of quasi periodic pulses of the quiet Sun decametric radio emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, B.N.; Snegireva, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    The observed fluctuations of the quiet Sun decametric radio emission are interpreted on the basis of the plasma mechanism of generation. These fluctuations may be caused by modulation of the optical depth of the radio source due to propagation of the sound wave packet through the corona

  19. Possible mechanisms for interaction of poly electrolytes with ions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siyam, T.

    1995-01-01

    The interaction between the active groups of water soluble poly electrolytes such as polyacrylamide 'neutral polymers PAM', poly sodium acrylate 'anionic polymer PAANA', polyacrylamide-diallyamine-hydrochloride 'cationic polymer PAM-DAA-HCl and polyacrylamide-diallylethylamine-hydrochloride 'cationic polymer PAM-DAEA-HCl' with copper sulphate has been carried out under different experimental conditions. Spectroscopic studies show that the mechanism of the flock formation due to interaction between the polymer and copper sulphate is a bond formation between the active group of polymeric chains and copper sulphate. This bond formation depends on the nature of polymer chain. It was also found that the amide groups form complexes with hydrated cations, while both carboxylate-and ammonium groups interact by ion-exchange mechanism. The same studies were applied on polyacrylamideacrylic acid resin 'PAM-AA' resin and copper sulphate. The obtained results show that the resin interacts by the same mechanism, where the amide groups form a complex with hydrated cations, while the carboxylic group interacts by ion-exchange mechanism. 1 fig., 1 tab

  20. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking of tendon mechanical effects at the level of the tendon fascicle and fibril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Philip; Hassenkam, Tue; Svensson, Rene Bruggebusch

    2009-01-01

    at the tendon fibril level were examined by atomic force microscopy. Peak forces increased from approximately 1379 to approximately 2622 pN while an extended Hertz fit of force-indentation data showed a approximately 24 fold increase in Young's modulus on indentation. The effect of glutaraldehyde cross......Conclusive insight into the microscopic principles that govern the strength of tendon and related connective tissues is lacking and the importance of collagen cross-linking has not been firmly established. The combined application of whole-tissue mechanical testing and atomic force spectroscopy...... allowed for a detailed characterization of the effect of cross-linking in rat-tail tendon. The cross-link inducing agent glutaraldehyde augmented the tensile strength of tendon fascicles. Stress at failure increased from approximately 8 MPa to approximately 39 MPa. The mechanical effects of glutaraldehyde...

  1. From Theory-Inspired to Theory-Based Interventions: A Protocol for Developing and Testing a Methodology for Linking Behaviour Change Techniques to Theoretical Mechanisms of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michie, Susan; Carey, Rachel N; Johnston, Marie; Rothman, Alexander J; de Bruin, Marijn; Kelly, Michael P; Connell, Lauren E

    2018-05-18

    Understanding links between behaviour change techniques (BCTs) and mechanisms of action (the processes through which they affect behaviour) helps inform the systematic development of behaviour change interventions. This research aims to develop and test a methodology for linking BCTs to their mechanisms of action. Study 1 (published explicit links): Hypothesised links between 93 BCTs (from the 93-item BCT taxonomy, BCTTv1) and mechanisms of action will be identified from published interventions and their frequency, explicitness and precision documented. Study 2 (expert-agreed explicit links): Behaviour change experts will identify links between 61 BCTs and 26 mechanisms of action in a formal consensus study. Study 3 (integrated matrix of explicit links): Agreement between studies 1 and 2 will be evaluated and a new group of experts will discuss discrepancies. An integrated matrix of BCT-mechanism of action links, annotated to indicate strength of evidence, will be generated. Study 4 (published implicit links): To determine whether groups of co-occurring BCTs can be linked to theories, we will identify groups of BCTs that are used together from the study 1 literature. A consensus exercise will be used to rate strength of links between groups of BCT and theories. A formal methodology for linking BCTs to their hypothesised mechanisms of action can contribute to the development and evaluation of behaviour change interventions. This research is a step towards developing a behaviour change 'ontology', specifying relations between BCTs, mechanisms of action, modes of delivery, populations, settings and types of behaviour.

  2. On the possible detection of quantum-mechanical interferences between gravitational forces and nucleus-nucleus Coulomb forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, R. da

    1996-07-01

    Possible effects of quantum-mechanical interferences between gravitational forces and the nucleus-nucleus Coulomb interaction are discussed. It is shown that, although very small, these effects could be measured using low energy scattering between identical heavy nuclei, e.g. for the system 208 Pb + 208 Pb (E L = 5 MeV). (author)

  3. Response of cat inferior colliculus neurons to binaural beat stimuli: possible mechanisms for sound localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwada, S; Yin, T C; Wickesberg, R E

    1979-11-02

    The interaural phase sensitivity of neurons was studied through the use of binaural beat stimuli. The response of most cells was phase-locked to the beat frequency, which provides a possible neural correlate to the human sensation of binaural beats. In addition, this stimulus allowed the direction and rate of interaural phase change to be varied. Some neurons in our sample responded selectively to manipulations of these two variables, which suggests a sensitivity to direction or speed of movement.

  4. Biological defense mechanisms against DNA double-strand break and their possible medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2011-01-01

    Radiation is now widely used for clinical diagnosis and therapeutics. On the other hand, radiation influences various tissues represented by immunological and reproductive systems, and is also recognized as one of the cause of carcinogenesis. Such pleiotropic effects of radiation are mediated through generation of damages on DNA molecule, vitally important genetic macromolecule. Among various types of DNA damages, double-strand break (DSB) is considered most critical and, therefore, responsible for biological effects. DSB is repaired mainly through two pathways: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Understanding of these mechanisms has been greatly deepened in past 20 years and is now providing a promising approach toward cancer therapy. We have studied the mechanisms of NHEJ, focusing especially on the role of phosphorylation and the assembly of machinery therein, which will be introduced below. (author)

  5. A possible mechanism for electron-bombardment-induced loop punching in helium-implanted materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    The recently proposed mechanism for the punching of dislocation loops by overpressurized helium bubbles in molybdenum is studied quantitatively. According to this mechanism, under the electron beam of the transmission microscope, He atoms are excited or ionized and the resulting excited species (excited He atoms and free electrons) are responsible for the pressure rise in the gas beyond the threshold for loop punching. In the model, the pressure increase is attributed to a reduction of the effective volume accessible to the gas due to the formation of a cavity around each excited species. The radius of this cavity is evaluated and, also, the excited fraction required to reach the threshold is discussed in terms of excitation life times. (author)

  6. Glutamate transporter type 3 knockout leads to decreased heart rate possibly via parasympathetic mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Jiao; Li, Jiejie; Li, Liaoliao; Feng, Chenzhuo; Xiong, Lize; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-01-01

    Parasympathetic tone is a dominant neural regulator for basal heart rate. Glutamate transporters (EAAT) via their glutamate uptake functions regulate glutamate neurotransmission in the central nervous system. We showed that EAAT type 3 (EAAT3) knockout mice had a slower heart rate than wild-type mice when they were anesthetized. We design this study to determine whether non-anesthetized EAAT3 knockout mice have a slower heart rate and, if so, what may be the mechanism for this effect. Young a...

  7. Possible mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxant effect produced by clobenzorex in aortic segments of rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano-Cuenca, J.; González-Hernández, A.; López-Canales, O.A.; Villagrana-Zesati, J.R.; Rodríguez-Choreão, J.D.; Morín-Zaragoza, R.; Castillo-Henkel, E.F.; López-Canales, J.S.

    2017-01-01

    Clobenzorex is a metabolic precursor of amphetamine indicated for the treatment of obesity. Amphetamines have been involved with cardiovascular side effects such as hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the direct application of 10?9?10?5 M clobenzorex on isolated phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings produces vascular effects, and if so, what mechanisms may be involved. Clobenzorex produced an immediate concentration-...

  8. Possible mechanisms of chromosome aberrations. 2. Formation of aberrations after UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedeva, L.I.

    1982-01-01

    One of mechanisms of chromosome aberrations after UV-radiation of animal cells initiated by thymine dimerization from different dna threads (by cross joints) and finished in mitosis metaphase is discussed. The model of aberration formation, taking a count of peculiarities of chromosome ansate structure and predicting the important role of chromosome isolation during mitosis in realization of structural aberrations, is suggested. An attempt to present aberration formation under conditions of exact repair is the distinguishing feature of the model

  9. Chronic Wasting Disease: Transmission Mechanisms and the Possibility of Harvest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, Alex; Merrill, Evelyn; Pybus, Margo; Lewis, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    We develop a model of CWD management by nonselective deer harvest, currently the most feasible approach available for managing CWD in wild populations. We use the model to explore the effects of 6 common harvest strategies on disease prevalence and to identify potential optimal harvest policies for reducing disease prevalence without population collapse. The model includes 4 deer categories (juveniles, adult females, younger adult males, older adult males) that may be harvested at different rates, a food-based carrying capacity, which influences juvenile survival but not adult reproduction or survival, and seasonal force of infection terms for each deer category under differing frequency-dependent transmission dynamics resulting from environmental and direct contact mechanisms. Numerical experiments show that the interval of transmission coefficients β where the disease can be controlled is generally narrow and efficiency of a harvest policy to reduce disease prevalence depends crucially on the details of the disease transmission mechanism, in particular on the intensity of disease transmission to juveniles and the potential differences in the behavior of older and younger males that influence contact rates. Optimal harvest policy to minimize disease prevalence for each of the assumed transmission mechanisms is shown to depend on harvest intensity. Across mechanisms, a harvest that focuses on antlered deer, without distinguishing between age classes reduces disease prevalence most consistently, whereas distinguishing between young and older antlered deer produces higher uncertainty in the harvest effects on disease prevalence. Our results show that, despite uncertainties, a modelling approach can determine classes of harvest strategy that are most likely to be effective in combatting CWD. PMID:26963921

  10. Clustering of 2008 West Bohemian seismic swarm mechanisms and its possible interpretation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, Petr; Boušková, Alena

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2018), s. 27-40 ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03950S Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : West Bohemian earthquake swarm region * source mechanism * slip distribution * finite seismic source model Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure OBOR OECD: 1.5. Earth and related environmental sciences Impact factor: 0.699, year: 2016

  11. A reformulation and a possible modification of quantum mechanics and the EPR paradox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.; Rimini, A.; Weber, T.

    1976-01-01

    A reformulation of quantum mechanics is introduced, which describes the ''states'' of an ensemble of quantum systems by means of positive real functionals on the Hilbert space of the systems. This reformulation allows us to generalize quantum mechanics in such a wau as to induce the transition from second-to first-kind mixtures, which has been suggested to occur by various authors in order to eliminate the EPR paradox. A dynamical equation for the functionals is explicitely build up, which reduces to the Schroedinger equation when the sub-systems of a composite quantum system are close together, and gives rise, altering the quantum-mechanical evolution, to a transition to a first-kind mixture when the component subsystems are far apart. This transition is such that, at any time, the predictions concerning measurements of observables referring to one of the subsystems coincide with those which would follow from the pure Schroedinger evolution. The deviations from the standard theory affect, therefore, only the correlations between the subsystems

  12. Phenanthrene causes ocular developmental toxicity in zebrafish embryos and the possible mechanisms involved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Lixing; Wang, Chonggang; Zhang, Youyu; Wu, Meifang; Zuo, Zhenghong

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Phe exposure caused obvious morphological changes in the retina. • Phe exposure caused apoptosis and reduction of cell proliferation in the retina. • Phe causes ocular toxicity might be via the AhR/Zeb1/Mitf/Pax6 signaling pathway. • AhR is a repressor of Zeb1. -- Abstract: Recent studies show that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may be a candidate cause of developmental defects of the retina, but the mechanism is still unclear. We evaluated the mechanism(s) underlying PAH-induced retinal development defects due to exposure to environmental concentrations of Phenanthrene (Phe) in zebrafish. We found that exposure to environmental concentrations of Phe caused obvious morphological changes, developmental retardation, apoptosis, and reduction of cell proliferation in the retina. Our results indicated that Phe could cause visual system developmental defects. Phe exposure up-regulated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mtif) expression, and down-regulated zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (Zeb1) and paired box 6 (Pax6). Moreover, we demonstrated that AhR was a repressor of Zeb1. We propose that Phe's ocular toxicity is mediated by up-regulating AhR, which then down-regulates Zeb1, in turn inducing Mitf expression while inhibiting Pax6 expression

  13. Possible mechanism of polyspermy block in human oocytes observed by time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mio, Yasuyuki; Iwata, Kyoko; Yumoto, Keitaro; Kai, Yoshiteru; Sargant, Haruka C; Mizoguchi, Chizuru; Ueda, Minako; Tsuchie, Yuka; Imajo, Akifumi; Iba, Yumiko; Nishikori, Kyoko

    2012-09-01

    To analyze the fertilization process related to polyspermy block in human oocytes using an in vitro culturing system for time-lapse cinematography. We had 122 oocytes donated for this study from couples that provided informed consent. We recorded human oocytes at 2,000 to 2,800 frames every 10 s during the fertilization process and thereafter every 2 min using a new in vitro culture system originally developed by the authors for time-lapse cinematography. We displayed 30 frames per second for analysis of the polyspermy block during fertilization. Three oocytes showed the leading and following sperm within the zona pellucida in the same microscopic field. The dynamic images obtained during the fertilization process using this new system revealed that once a leading sperm penetrated the zona pellucida and attached to the oocyte membrane, a following sperm was arrested from further penetration into the zona pellucida within 10 s. The present results strongly suggest the existence of a novel mechanism of polyspermy block that takes place at the zona pellucida immediately after fertilization. These findings are clearly different from previous mechanisms describing polyspermy block as the oocyte membrane block to sperm penetration and the zona reaction. The finding presented herein thus represents a novel discovery about the highly complicated polyspermy block mechanism occurring in human oocytes.

  14. Evaluating Computer Screen Time and Its Possible Link to Psychopathology in the Context of Age: A Cross-Sectional Study of Parents and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Aviv; Mimouni-Bloch, Aviva; Ross, Sharon; Silman, Zmira; Maoz, Hagai; Bloch, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that high levels of computer use are linked to psychopathology. However, there is ambiguity about what should be considered normal or over-use of computers. Furthermore, the nature of the link between computer usage and psychopathology is controversial. The current study utilized the context of age to address these questions. Our hypothesis was that the context of age will be paramount for differentiating normal from excessive use, and that this context will allow a better understanding of the link to psychopathology. In a cross-sectional study, 185 parents and children aged 3-18 years were recruited in clinical and community settings. They were asked to fill out questionnaires regarding demographics, functional and academic variables, computer use as well as psychiatric screening questionnaires. Using a regression model, we identified 3 groups of normal-use, over-use and under-use and examined known factors as putative differentiators between the over-users and the other groups. After modeling computer screen time according to age, factors linked to over-use were: decreased socialization (OR 3.24, Confidence interval [CI] 1.23-8.55, p = 0.018), difficulty to disengage from the computer (OR 1.56, CI 1.07-2.28, p = 0.022) and age, though borderline-significant (OR 1.1 each year, CI 0.99-1.22, p = 0.058). While psychopathology was not linked to over-use, post-hoc analysis revealed that the link between increased computer screen time and psychopathology was age-dependent and solidified as age progressed (p = 0.007). Unlike computer usage, the use of small-screens and smartphones was not associated with psychopathology. The results suggest that computer screen time follows an age-based course. We conclude that differentiating normal from over-use as well as defining over-use as a possible marker for psychiatric difficulties must be performed within the context of age. If verified by additional studies, future research should integrate

  15. The telltale face: possible mechanisms behind defector and cooperator recognition revealed by emotional facial expression metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács-Bálint, Zsófia; Bereczkei, Tamás; Hernádi, István

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of facial cues in cooperator and defector recognition. First, a face image database was constructed from pairs of full face portraits of target subjects taken at the moment of decision-making in a prisoner's dilemma game (PDG) and in a preceding neutral task. Image pairs with no deficiencies (n = 67) were standardized for orientation and luminance. Then, confidence in defector and cooperator recognition was tested with image rating in a different group of lay judges (n = 62). Results indicate that (1) defectors were better recognized (58% vs. 47%), (2) they looked different from cooperators (p towards the cooperator category (p < .01), and (4) females were more confident in detecting defectors (p < .05). According to facial microexpression analysis, defection was strongly linked with depressed lower lips and less opened eyes. Significant correlation was found between the intensity of micromimics and the rating of images in the cooperator-defector dimension. In summary, facial expressions can be considered as reliable indicators of momentary social dispositions in the PDG. Females may exhibit an evolutionary-based overestimation bias to detecting social visual cues of the defector face. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  16. The grand unified link between the Peccei-Quinn mechanism and the generation puzzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, A.; Wali, K.C.

    1982-03-01

    The essential ingredients of the Peccei-Quinn mechanism are shown to be dictated by a proper choice of a grand unification scheme. The presence of U(1)sub(PQ) gives rise to the possibility that the same physics which resolves the strong CP-violation problem may decode the generation puzzle with no extra cost. Multigenerational signatures of the invisible axion scenario, such as the canonical fermion mass matrix, are discussed. The uniqueness and the special values of the quantized PQ-assignments, namely 1,-3,5-7,... for successive generations, acquire an automatic explanation once the idea of ''horizontal compositeness'' is invoked. A characteristic feature then is that the muon appears to have a less complicated structure than the electron. Furthermore, U(1)sub(PQ) chooses SO(10) to be its only tenable gauge symmetry partner, and at the same time crucially restricts the associated Higgs system. All this finally results in a consistent fermion mass hierarchy with log m, to the crudest estimation, varying linearly with respect to the generation index. (author)

  17. Reactivity of NO with small transition metal clusters II. Possible reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, A.; Vela, A.; Robles, J.

    1994-01-01

    Through extended Huckel (EHMO) calculations, we followed six possible reaction paths for the formation of Co 2 NO'+ and co 4 NO'+, whose stable structures were discussed in the previous paper of this series. The adduct formation enthalpy (DELTA h f ) and the global hardness (n) have been calculated in order to establish the more probable structures and the more probable routes of reaction for the chemisorption of NO on Co'+ x (x=2-4). It is shown that the maximum hardness principle, at the EHMO level, produces more realistic geometries. (Author) 11 refs

  18. On the Quantum Mechanical Wave Function as a Link Between Cognition and the Physical World A Role for Psychology

    CERN Document Server

    Snyder, D

    2002-01-01

    A straightforward explanation of fundamental tenets of quantum mechanics concerning the wave function results in the thesis that the quantum mechanical wave function is a link between human cognition and the physical world. The reticence on the part of physicists to adopt this thesis is discussed. A comparison is made to the behaviorists' consideration of mind, and the historical roots of how the problem concerning the quantum mechanical wave function arose are discussed. The basis for an empirical demonstration that the wave function is a link between human cognition and the physical world is provided through developing an experiment using methodology from psychology and physics. Based on research in psychology and physics that relied on this methodology, it is likely that Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen's theoretical result that mutually exclusive wave functions can simultaneously apply to the same concrete physical circumstances can be implemented on an empirical level.

  19. The Spliced Leader Trans-Splicing Mechanism in Different Organisms: Molecular Details and Possible Biological Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainá eBitar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The spliced leader (SL is a gene that generates a functional ncRNA that is composed of two regions: an intronic region of unknown function (SLi and an exonic region (SLe, which is transferred to the 5’ end of independent transcripts yielding mature mRNAs, in a process known as spliced leader trans-splicing (SLTS. The best described function for SLTS is to solve polycistronic transcripts into monocistronic units, specifically in Trypanosomatids. In other metazoans, it is speculated that the SLe addition could lead to increased mRNA stability, differential recruitment of the translational machinery, modification of the 5' region or a combination of these effects. Although important aspects of this mechanism have been revealed, several features remain to be elucidated. We have analyzed 157 SLe sequences from 148 species from 7 phyla and found a high degree of conservation among the sequences of species from the same phylum, although no considerable similarity seems to exist between sequences of species from different phyla. When analyzing case studies, we found evidence that a given SLe will always be related to a given set of transcripts in different species from the same phylum, and therefore, different SLe sequences from the same species would regulate different sets of transcripts. In addition, we have observed distinct transcript categories to be preferential targets for the SLe addition in different phyla. This work sheds light into crucial and controversial aspects of the SLTS mechanism. It represents a comprehensive study concerning various species and different characteristics of this important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism.

  20. A Possible Mechanism: Vildagliptin Prevents Aortic Dysfunction through Paraoxonase and Angiopoietin-Like 3

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qian; Xiao, Xinhua; Zheng, Jia; Li, Ming; Yu, Miao; Ping, Fan; Wang, Tong; Wang, Xiaojing

    2018-01-01

    The collected data have revealed the beneficial effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors on the vascular endothelium, including vildagliptin. However, the involved mechanisms are not yet clear. In this study, Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following four groups: control, diabetic, diabetic + low-dose vildagliptin (10 mg/kg/d), and diabetic + high-dose vildagliptin (20 mg/kg/d). The diabetic model was created by feeding a high-fat diet for four weeks and injecti...

  1. Neurofilament phosphorylation and disruption: A possible mechanism of chronic aluminium toxicity in Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Amarpreet; Joshi, Kusum; Minz, Ranjana Walker; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2006-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the possible effects of chronic aluminium exposure on neurofilament phosphorylation and its subsequent disruption in various regions of the rat brain. An intra-gastric dose of aluminium (10 mg/kg bw for 12 weeks) resulted in a marked enhancement of Ca 2+ /CaM dependent protein kinase activity as compared to cAMP dependent protein kinase. The levels of phosphoprotein phosphatase were found to be significantly depleted only in the cerebral cortex. After in vitro phosphorylation using [ 32 γ-P] ATP, various proteins were resolved on one-dimensional 8% SDS-PAGE, stained with Coomassie Blue and autoradiographed. The amount of 32 P-incorporated was quantified using ADOPE PHOTOSHOP (7.0). The 200 kDa neurofilament protein was identified using immunoblotting. Finally, the extent of phosphorylation induced neurofilamentous damage was assessed using immunocytochemical studies. The cytoskeletal proteins were found to be aggregated and disrupted in all the three neuronal regions following 12 weeks of aluminium treatment. This study lends further support to the possible role of aluminium as a potent neurotoxic agent and in the etiopathogenisis of various neurodegenerative diseases

  2. Magnetized SASI: its mechanism and possible connection to some QPOs in XRBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhang, Prasun; Sharma, Prateek; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2018-05-01

    The presence of a surface at the inner boundary, such as in a neutron star or a white dwarf, allows the existence of a standing shock in steady spherical accretion. The standing shock can become unstable in 2D or 3D; this is called the standing accretion shock instability (SASI). Two mechanisms - advective-acoustic and purely acoustic - have been proposed to explain SASI. Using axisymmetric hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we find that the advective-acoustic mechanism better matches the observed oscillation time-scales in our simulations. The global shock oscillations present in the accretion flow can explain many observed high frequency (≳100 Hz) quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in X-ray binaries. The presence of a moderately strong magnetic field adds more features to the shock oscillation pattern, giving rise to low frequency modulation in the computed light curve. This low frequency modulation can be responsible for ˜100 Hz QPOs (known as hHz QPOs). We propose that the appearance of hHz QPO determines the separation of twin peak QPOs of higher frequencies.

  3. Change of blood glucose level and its possible mechanism in patients with cerebral stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Weizhen; Zhang Yong; Zhang Zikang; Mo Congjian

    2003-01-01

    To study the mechanism of the change of blood glucose levels in patients with cerebral stroke, the levels of blood glucose, cortisol, glucogen, insulin, growth hormone, triiodothyronine (T 3 ), thyroxine (T 4 ) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were dynamically measured in 90 patients with cerebral stroke. The circumstances of brain middle line movement, lateral ventricle oppression and entrance brain ventricle of burst hematoma of the patients were examines by CT scan. The total incidence of hyperglycemia in the patients was 42.22%. The blood glucose level was positively related to the cortisol and glucogen levels, and negatively related to the T 3 level. The changed level of blood glucose and its related hormones both returned to normal range in 10 days. Both the ACTH level and the rate of cerebral pathological change in hyperglycemia group were significantly higher than that in normoglycemia and control groups. The rate of cerebral pathological change in elevated ACTH level group was higher than that in normal ACTH level group. The mechanism of hyperglycemia in the patients with cerebral stroke might be related to the stimulation of the hypothalamus, which may induce the discharge of ACTH and glucagon releasing factor, and to that the level of cortisol and glucagon increased, the level of T 3 decreased

  4. Irregular focal mechanisms observed at Salton Sea Geothermal Field: Possible influences of anthropogenic stress perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall-Bear, Aren; Barbour, Andrew J.; Schoenball, Martin; Schoenball, Martin

    2018-01-01

    At the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), strain accumulation is released through seismic slip and aseismic deformation. Earthquake activity at the SSGF often occurs in swarm-like clusters, some with clear migration patterns. We have identified an earthquake sequence composed entirely of focal mechanisms representing an ambiguous style of faulting, where strikes are similar but deformation occurs due to steeply-dipping normal faults with varied stress states. In order to more accurately determine the style of faulting for these events, we revisit the original waveforms and refine estimates of P and S wave arrival times and displacement amplitudes. We calculate the acceptable focal plane solutions using P-wave polarities and S/P amplitude ratios, and determine the preferred fault plane. Without constraints on local variations in stress, found by inverting the full earthquake catalog, it is difficult to explain the occurrence of such events using standard fault-mechanics and friction. Comparing these variations with the expected poroelastic effects from local production and injection of geothermal fluids suggests that anthropogenic activity could affect the style of faulting.

  5. Wind-wave amplification mechanisms: possible models for steep wave events in finite depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Montalvo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We extend the Miles mechanism of wind-wave generation to finite depth. A β-Miles linear growth rate depending on the depth and wind velocity is derived and allows the study of linear growth rates of surface waves from weak to moderate winds in finite depth h. The evolution of β is plotted, for several values of the dispersion parameter kh with k the wave number. For constant depths we find that no matter what the values of wind velocities are, at small enough wave age the β-Miles linear growth rates are in the known deep-water limit. However winds of moderate intensities prevent the waves from growing beyond a critical wave age, which is also constrained by the water depth and is less than the wave age limit of deep water. Depending on wave age and wind velocity, the Jeffreys and Miles mechanisms are compared to determine which of them dominates. A wind-forced nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived and the Akhmediev, Peregrine and Kuznetsov–Ma breather solutions for weak wind inputs in finite depth h are obtained.

  6. The paleomagnetic field and possible mechanisms for the formation of reversed rock magnetization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trukhin, Vladimir I.; Bezaeva, Natalia; Kurochkina, Evgeniya

    2006-01-01

    Investigations of ancient magnetized rocks show that their natural remanent magnetization (NRM) can be oriented in the direction of modern geomagnetic field (GMF) as well as in the opposite direction. It is supposed that reversed NRM is related to reversals of the GMF in the past geological periods. During reversals, the strength of the GMF is near zero and can cause the destruction of living organisms as a result of powerful space and solar radiation, which, in the absence of the GMF, can reach the Earth's surface. That is why the question of reality of the GMF reversals is of global ecological importance. There is also another natural mechanism for the formation of reversed NRM-the self-reversal of magnetization as a result of thermomagnetization of rocks. In the paper, both natural processes for the formation of reversed NRM in rocks are discussed, and the results of experimental research on the physical mechanism of self-reversal of magnetization in continental and oceanic rocks are presented. The results of computer modeling of the self-reversal phenomenon are also presented

  7. The paleomagnetic field and possible mechanisms for the formation of reversed rock magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trukhin, Vladimir I. [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: trukhin@phys.msu.ru; Bezaeva, Natalia [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kurochkina, Evgeniya [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-05-15

    Investigations of ancient magnetized rocks show that their natural remanent magnetization (NRM) can be oriented in the direction of modern geomagnetic field (GMF) as well as in the opposite direction. It is supposed that reversed NRM is related to reversals of the GMF in the past geological periods. During reversals, the strength of the GMF is near zero and can cause the destruction of living organisms as a result of powerful space and solar radiation, which, in the absence of the GMF, can reach the Earth's surface. That is why the question of reality of the GMF reversals is of global ecological importance. There is also another natural mechanism for the formation of reversed NRM-the self-reversal of magnetization as a result of thermomagnetization of rocks. In the paper, both natural processes for the formation of reversed NRM in rocks are discussed, and the results of experimental research on the physical mechanism of self-reversal of magnetization in continental and oceanic rocks are presented. The results of computer modeling of the self-reversal phenomenon are also presented.

  8. Possible Mechanism of Infrared Radiation Reception: The Role of the Temperature Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yachnev, I. L.; Penniyaynen, V. A.; Podzorova, S. A.; Rogachevskii, I. V.; Krylov, B. V.

    2018-02-01

    The role of the temperature factor in the mechanism of reception of the CO2 laser low-power infrared (IR) radiation (λ = 10.6 μm) by a sensory neuron membrane has been studied. Organotypic embryonic tissue culture has been used to measure and estimate the temperature of a sensory ganglia monolayer exposed to radiation at different energy densities. The effects of tissue exposure to low-power IR radiation have been investigated. It has been found that inhibition of tissue growth by radiation of low energy density (10-14-10-10 J/cm2) is replaced by tissue growth (10-7-10-4 J/cm2), and again followed by inhibition in the range of 0.1-6 J/cm2. A statistically significant specific reaction to nonthermal radiation has been detected at the radiation power density of 3 × 10-10 J/cm2, which is due to activation of the Na+,K+-ATPase transducer function. The mechanisms of interaction of IR radiation with embryonic nerve tissue have been considered. Low-power IR radiation with the wavelength of 10.6 μm has been demonstrated to specifically activate a novel signal transducer function of the sodium pump, which controls the reception of nonthermal IR radiation in the energy density range of 10-14 to 10-10 J/cm2.

  9. Possible Mechanisms Involved in Attenuation of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Memory Deficits by Methyl Jasmonate in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eduviere, Anthony Taghogho; Umukoro, Solomon; Adeoluwa, Olusegun A; Omogbiya, Itivere Adrian; Aluko, Oritoke Modupe

    2016-12-01

    This present study was carried out to investigate the likely mechanisms by which methyl jasmonate (MJ), 'an agent widely used in aromatherapy for neurological disorders, attenuates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced memory deficits in mice. Mice were given intraperitoneal administration of LPS (250 µg/kg) alone or in combination with MJ (10-40 mg/kg), donepezil, DP (1 mg/kg), or vehicle for 7 successive days. Thereafter, memory was assessed using object recognition test (ORT). Acetylcholinesterase and myeloperoxidase activities were estimated in brain tissue homogenates. Brain levels of nitric oxide and markers of oxidative stress as well as histopathologic changes of the prefrontal cortex and cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) of the hippocampal region were also assessed. MJ (10-40 mg/kg) attenuated LPS-induced memory impairment in ORT. Moreover, the increased brain activities of acetylcholinesterase and myeloperoxidase enzymes were suppressed by MJ when compared with control (p memory deficits via mechanisms related to inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, myeloperoxidase, oxidative stress and neuronal degeneration.

  10. Aluminum-induced dreierketten chain cross-links increase the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline calcium aluminosilicate hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Guoqing; Myers, Rupert J.; Li, Jiaqi; Maboudian, Roya; Carraro, Carlo; Shapiro, David A.; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2017-03-01

    The incorporation of Al and increased curing temperature promotes the crystallization and cross-linking of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate (C-(A-)S-H), which is the primary binding phase in most contemporary concrete materials. However, the influence of Al-induced structural changes on the mechanical properties at atomistic scale is not well understood. Herein, synchrotron radiation-based high-pressure X-ray diffraction is used to quantify the influence of dreierketten chain cross-linking on the anisotropic mechanical behavior of C-(A-)S-H. We show that the ab-planar stiffness is independent of dreierketten chain defects, e.g. vacancies in bridging tetrahedra sites and Al for Si substitution. The c-axis of non-cross-linked C-(A-)S-H is more deformable due to the softer interlayer opening but stiffens with decreased spacing and/or increased zeolitic water and Ca2+ of the interlayer. Dreierketten chain cross-links act as ‘columns’ to resist compression, thus increasing the bulk modulus of C-(A-)S-H. We provide the first experimental evidence on the influence of the Al-induced atomistic configurational change on the mechanical properties of C-(A-)S-H. Our work advances the fundamental knowledge of C-(A-)S-H on the lowest level of its hierarchical structure, and thus can impact the way that innovative C-(A-)S-H-based cementitious materials are developed using a ‘bottom-up’ approach.

  11. [Possible changes in energy-minimizer mechanisms of locomotion due to chronic low back pain - a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Alberito Rodrigo; Andrade, Alexandro; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    One goal of the locomotion is to move the body in the space at the most economical way possible. However, little is known about the mechanical and energetic aspects of locomotion that are affected by low back pain. And in case of occurring some damage, little is known about how the mechanical and energetic characteristics of the locomotion are manifested in functional activities, especially with respect to the energy-minimizer mechanisms during locomotion. This study aimed: a) to describe the main energy-minimizer mechanisms of locomotion; b) to check if there are signs of damage on the mechanical and energetic characteristics of the locomotion due to chronic low back pain (CLBP) which may endanger the energy-minimizer mechanisms. This study is characterized as a narrative literature review. The main theory that explains the minimization of energy expenditure during the locomotion is the inverted pendulum mechanism, by which the energy-minimizer mechanism converts kinetic energy into potential energy of the center of mass and vice-versa during the step. This mechanism is strongly influenced by spatio-temporal gait (locomotion) parameters such as step length and preferred walking speed, which, in turn, may be severely altered in patients with chronic low back pain. However, much remains to be understood about the effects of chronic low back pain on the individual's ability to practice an economic locomotion, because functional impairment may compromise the mechanical and energetic characteristics of this type of gait, making it more costly. Thus, there are indications that such changes may compromise the functional energy-minimizer mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. A discussion of possible mechanisms affecting fission product transport in irradiated and unirradiated nuclear grade graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firth, M.J.

    1977-09-01

    137 Cs, 85 Sr, and sup(110m)Ag adsorption experiments were conducted on three graphite powders with differing amounts of specific basal and edge surface areas. No direct proportionality was found between the specific amounts of the isotopes adsorbed and either of the surface characteristics. There appears to be some correlation with the specific basal surface area despite the fact that each isotope behaves differently. Factors that might influence the adsorption behaviour of Cs and Ag during reactor irradiation and heat treatment of nuclear grade graphites are discussed. These include the form of Cs with the graphite surface. A model based on Cs adsorption at vacancy clusters is used to analyse adsorption experiments. A possible explanation for the behaviour of Ag through the migration of graphite impurities from the bulk of the graphite to the pore surface is also discussed. (author)

  13. Possible mechanisms of action of Caesalpinia pyramidalis against ethanol-induced gastric damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Polyana B F; Ribeiro, Ana Roseli S; Estevam, Charles S; Bani, Cristiane C; Thomazzi, Sara M

    2015-06-20

    Caesalpinia pyramidalis Tul. (Fabaceae), known as "catingueira", is an endemic tree of the Northeast region of Brazil. This plant, mainly inner bark and flowers, has been used in traditional medicine to treat gastritis, heartburn, indigestion, stomachache, dysenteries, and diarrheas. The ethanol extract of C. pyramidalis inner bark was used in rats via oral route, at the doses of 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg, in the ethanol-induced ulcer model and some of the mechanisms underlying to the gastroprotective effect of this plant investigated. The ethanol extract of C. pyramidalis inner bark (100 mg/kg) produced reduction (P process with imbalance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators, supporting the popular usage of this plant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanical injuries of the eyeball: Frequency, structure, and possibility of the prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Miloš

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Some factors significant for development of mechanical injuries of the eyeball have been analyzed in the study. Objective. Basic objective of such analysis was prevention and reduction of these injuries. Method. Mechanical injuries of the eyeball in patients hospitalized at the Institute of Eye Disease, CCS in Belgrade, in five year period have been analyzed. Only patients with severe eye injuries were hospitalized. The following parameters were analyzed: sex, age, occupation of patients, residence, time of the inflicted injury, i.e. by months in a year, days in a week and hours in a day, place and way of inflicting the injury as well as visual acuity on admission. In addition, the type of injury was analyzed, i.e. contusion or penetrating with all resulting complications. Finally, the timing of primary surgical management of the eye injury was specified, if required. Results. A total number of hospitalized patients with mechanical eye injuries was 1642 during the last five years, meaning that one injury occurred daily. There were 1381 males and 261 females, meaning that males were 5.3 times more the victims of mechanical eye injuries. Out of all the injured, 861 (52.4% were from rural environment, while 781 (47.6% were urban population. The proportion of injuries of the right or the left eye was nearly equal, while both eyes were simultaneously injured in 21 (1.3% cases. The injuries were inflicted in all ages, but most frequently in working population ranging from 16 to 55 years, accounting for 60.8%. Unfortunately, a lot of the injured were children up to 15 years of age - 19.4%. The most commonly injured were workers - 39.8%, followed by students - 17.5%. A piece of wood was the cause of injury in 21.8%, sharp and pointed objects in 17.2%, hammer and metal in 14.2%, glass in 11.6%, and other different causes in varying percentage. There were also rare causes of injuries, such as those caused by zip, dog bite, rooster’s bill

  15. Trophic cascades triggered by overfishing reveal possible mechanisms of ecosystem regime shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalov, Georgi M; Grishin, Alexander N; Rodionov, Sergei; Mihneva, Vesselina

    2007-06-19

    Large-scale transitions between alternative states in ecosystems are known as regime shifts. Once described as healthy and dominated by various marine predators, the Black Sea ecosystem by the late 20th century had experienced anthropogenic impacts such as heavy fishing, cultural eutrophication, and invasions by alien species. We studied changes related to these "natural experiments" to reveal the mechanisms of regime shifts. Two major shifts were detected, the first related to a depletion of marine predators and the second to an outburst of the alien comb jelly Mnemiopsis leidyi; both shifts were triggered by intense fishing resulting in system-wide trophic cascades. The complex nature of ecosystem responses to human activities calls for more elaborate approaches than currently provided by traditional environmental and fisheries management. This implies challenging existing practices and implementing explanatory models of ecosystem interactions that can better reconcile conservation and ecosystem management ideals.

  16. Intrauterine infection/inflammation during pregnancy and offspring brain damages: Possible mechanisms involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golan Hava

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intrauterine infection is considered as one of the major maternal insults during pregnancy. Intrauterine infection during pregnancy could lead to brain damage of the developmental fetus and offspring. Effects on the fetal, newborn, and adult central nervous system (CNS may include signs of neurological problems, developmental abnormalities and delays, and intellectual deficits. However, the mechanisms or pathophysiology that leads to permanent brain damage during development are complex and not fully understood. This damage may affect morphogenic and behavioral phenotypes of the developed offspring, and that mice brain damage could be mediated through a final common pathway, which includes over-stimulation of excitatory amino acid receptor, over-production of vascularization/angiogenesis, pro-inflammatory cytokines, neurotrophic factors and apoptotic-inducing factors.

  17. Mechanical injuries of the eye: Incidence, structure and possibilities for prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Miloš

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Despite technological advances used in everyday clinical practice, injuries of the eye caused by various agents still produce blindness and poor vision in a significant number of people. The aim of this study was to analyze factors leading to occurrence of mechanical injuries of the eye. Methods. Mechanic injuries of the eye in patients treated at the Institute for Eye Diseases of the Clinical Center of Serbia in Belgrade, in an eight-year period were analyzed. Investigated parameters were: sex and age of patients, their profession, time of injury (months, days and hours, place and way of injury and a visual acuity on admission and dismiss, as well as further follow-up. Type of injury (closed or opened injuries of the eyeball, with all the complications that followed were carefully noted and monitored. The time of primary surgical repair was noted and analyzed, whenever necessary. Results. In the period of eight years, 2701 patients (2 257 males and 444 females were treated in the hospital due to mechanical injury of the eye. Almost equally, both the right (50.5% and the left eye (49.5% were injured, while in 39 (1.4% patients both eyes were injured at the same time. The injuries occurred in all age groups, but mostly in adults, employed persons, aged from 16 to 65 (70%. Among injured children, 18.8% were beyond the age of 15. Most frequent injuries occurred in workers (39%, and then in pupils (16.3%. Wood was the mean of injury in 23.7% of cases, sharp and pointed objects in 16.1%, hammering and metal particles in 14.4%, glass in 10.1%, and other different objects in the rest of 35.7% of all injured persons. There were other very serious means or mechanisms of eye injuries, like hair band, dog bite, rooster’s beak, rubber bullet, etc. Considering months in the year and days in the week, the injuries were almost equally distributed, and related to the time of day even 75% occurred between 10 a.m. and 10 p.m. Most injuries (38

  18. Kundalini Yoga for Generalized Anxiety Disorder: An Exploration of Treatment Efficacy and Possible Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, M G; Curtiss, Joshua; Hofmann, Stefan G; Khalsa, Sat Bir S

    2018-04-26

    The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of Kundalini Yoga in reducing symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) compared to a common treatment-as-usual condition using cognitive techniques. A secondary objective was to explore potential treatment mechanisms. Females aged 24 to 75 years with GAD ( n = 49) received either an 8-week Kundalini Yoga intervention ( n = 34) or an 8-week treatment-as-usual condition ( n = 15). The yoga condition resulted in lower levels of anxiety relative to the treatment-as-usual condition. Furthermore, changes in somatic symptoms mediated treatment outcome for Kundalini Yoga. Kundalini Yoga may show promise as a treatment for GAD, and this treatment might convey its effect on symptom severity by reducing somatic symptoms.

  19. Possible mechanisms by which electric fields from power lines might affect airborne particles harmful to health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, J.; Jeffers, D.

    1999-01-01

    Power lines produce alternating electric fields and modify static electric fields in their vicinity. These electric fields, if large enough, can alter the concentration or transport of airborne particles (including particles harmful to health), for example by causing deposition of charged particles, polarisation of neutral particles, or by production of ions. It has been suggested that this could lead to adverse health effects being associated with power lines. Theoretical considerations and experimental evidence relevant to eight separate postulated mechanisms involving power lines and airborne particles are examined. On theoretical grounds, none should lead to any adverse health effect, primarily because the effects produced are very small and are swamped by air currents or by gravity, and because people spend limited time in the relevant conditions. The experimental evidence also weighs against any adverse health effects. Further, even if significant health effects were produced, they would be different from those suggested by existing epidemiology concerning power lines. (author)

  20. ERAP1 overexpression in HPV-induced malignancies: A possible novel immune evasion mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Alina; Winter, Jan; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Blatnik, Renata; Klevenz, Alexandra; Bertrand, Miriam; Hoppe, Stephanie; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Grabowska, Agnieszka K; Riemer, Angelika B

    2017-01-01

    Immune evasion of tumors poses a major challenge for immunotherapy. For human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced malignancies, multiple immune evasion mechanisms have been described, including altered expression of antigen processing machinery (APM) components. These changes can directly influence epitope presentation and thus T-cell responses against tumor cells. To date, the APM had not been studied systematically in a large array of HPV + tumor samples. Therefore in this study, systematic expression analysis of the APM was performed on the mRNA and protein level in a comprehensive collection of HPV16 + cell lines. Subsequently, HPV + cervical tissue samples were examined by immunohistochemistry. ERAP1 (endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1) was the only APM component consistently altered - namely overexpressed - in HPV16 + tumor cell lines. ERAP1 was also found to be overexpressed in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer samples; expression levels were increasing with disease stage. On the functional level, the influence of ERAP1 expression levels on HPV16 E7-derived epitope presentation was investigated by mass spectrometry and in cytotoxicity assays with HPV16-specific T-cell lines. ERAP1 overexpression did not cause a complete destruction of any of the HPV epitopes analyzed, however, an influence of ERAP1 overexpression on the presentation levels of certain HPV epitopes could be demonstrated by HPV16-specific CD8 + T-cells. These showed enhanced killing toward HPV16 + CaSki cells whose ERAP1 expression had been attenuated to normal levels. ERAP1 overexpression may thus represent a novel immune evasion mechanism in HPV-induced malignancies, in cases when presentation of clinically relevant epitopes is reduced by overactivity of this peptidase.

  1. Sertraline-induced reproductive toxicity in male rats: evaluation of possible underlying mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Atli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to clarify the toxic effects of sertraline (SRT on the reproductive system of male rats and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Rats were treated orally with SRT at doses of 5, 10, and 20 mg kg−1 for 28 consecutive days. At the end of the treatment period, sperm concentration, sperm motility, and sperm morphology were investigated by computer-assisted sperm analysis system whereas sperm DNA damage was detected by comet assay. The oxidative status of the testes was investigated, and a histopathological examination was conducted. Serum testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, and luteinizing hormone (LH levels were measured to determine the effects of SRT on the spermatogenesis process. One-way ANOVA, post-hoc Dunnett′s T3 test for the sperm comet assay, and post-hoc Tukey′s test for the others were performed for statistical analysis. The results showed that SRT caused an increase in sperm DNA damage and induced histopathological lesions in all groups treated with SRT. There was abnormal sperm morphology and increased malondialdehyde (MDA in the 10 mg kg−1 treatment group. More dramatic changes were observed in the 20 mg kg−1 treatment group. Decreased sperm count was accompanied by a significant increase in abnormal sperm morphology, DNA damage, and degeneration in cellular-tubular structures. Serum LH and testosterone levels were elevated in the 20 mg kg−1 treatment group. Decreased glutathione (GSH and increased MDA were signs of enhanced oxidative stress (OS. In conclusion, SRT induced testicular toxicity in a dose-dependent manner and OS is suggested as a crucial mechanism.

  2. Beneficial effect of low ethanol intake on the cardiovascular system: possible biochemical mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudesh Vasdev

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Sudesh Vasdev1, Vicki Gill1, Pawan K Singal21Discipline of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada; 2Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Manitoba, Faculty of Medicine, Winnipeg, Manitoba, CanadaAbstract: Low ethanol intake is known to have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular disease. In cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance leads to altered glucose and lipid metabolism resulting in an increased production of aldehydes, including methylglyoxal. Aldehydes react non-enzymatically with sulfhydryl and amino groups of proteins forming advanced glycation end products (AGEs, altering protein structure and function. These alterations cause endothelial dysfunction with increased cytosolic free calcium, peripheral vascular resistance, and blood pressure. AGEs produce atherogenic effects including oxidative stress, platelet adhesion, inflammation, smooth muscle cell proliferation and modification of lipoproteins. Low ethanol intake attenuates hypertension and atherosclerosis but the mechanism of this effect is not clear. Ethanol at low concentrations is metabolized by low Km alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase, both reactions resulting in the production of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH. This creates a reductive environment, decreasing oxidative stress and secondary production of aldehydes through lipid peroxidation. NADH may also increase the tissue levels of the antioxidants cysteine and glutathione, which bind aldehydes and stimulate methylglyoxal catabolism. Low ethanol improves insulin resistance, increases high-density lipoprotein and stimulates activity of the antioxidant enzyme, paraoxonase. In conclusion, we suggest that chronic low ethanol intake confers its beneficial effect mainly through its ability to increase antioxidant capacity and lower AGEs.Keywords: low ethanol, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, biochemical

  3. Evaluation of the possible role of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae as mechanical vectors of nematodes and protists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Villani

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Nematodes and protists can be transmitted to humans in many ways and little concern has been given to the mechanical transmission by ants. This study aimed at analysing how the eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides and cysts of Entamoeba coli could be mechanically transmitted to the man by Formicidae. Through the experiments using nests of Tapinoma melanocephalum, Linepithema humile and Monomorium pharaonis reared in the laboratory allied to observations of some 17 ant species in an urban park area in Mogi das Cruzes (SP, it was found that L. humile was capable of carrying eggs of A. lumbricoides both in the field and laboratory conditions (1 worker, as well as was Camponotus rufipes (2, Solenopsis saevissima (1 and Acromyrmex niger (1. The cysts of Escherichia coli were found over three workers of C. rufipes. Although the frequency of the workers found transporting pathogens was low, the capacity of common household species in carrying pathogens like nematodes and protists was demonstrated.Os Nematoda e Protista podem ser transmitidos ao homem de diversas maneiras, mas pouca ênfase é dada para a transmissão mecânica por intermédio de formigas. Assim, esse trabalho procurou investigar a transmissão mecânica de ovos de Ascaris lumbricoides e cistos de Entamoeba coli pelos Formicidae. Através de experimentos com espécies mantidas em ninhos no laboratório (Tapinoma melanocephalum, Linepithema humile e Monomorium pharaonis e com 17 espécies de formigas de uma área antropizada na região de Mogi as Cruzes (SP, foi possível constar que os ovos A. lumbricoides foram transportados por L. humile, tanto no campo (1 operária como no laboratório (1 operária, por Camponotus rufipes (2, por Solenopsis saevissima (1 e por Acromyrmrex niger (1. Em três operárias de C. rufipes foram encontrados cistos de E. coli. Apesar da baixa incidência de transporte, as três primeiras espécies pelo fato de viverem muito próximas ao ser humano, podem levar para

  4. Insecticides resistance in the Culex quinquefasciatus populations from northern Thailand and possible resistance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanola, Jintana; Chamnanya, Saowanee; Lumjuan, Nongkran; Somboon, Pradya

    2015-09-01

    The mosquito vector Culex quinquefasciatus is known to be resistant to insecticides worldwide, including Thailand. This study was the first investigation of the insecticide resistance mechanisms, involving metabolic detoxification and target site insensitivity in C. quinquefasciatus from Thailand. Adult females reared from field-caught larvae from six provinces of northern Thailand were determined for resistant status by exposing to 0.05% deltamethrin, 0.75% permethrin and 5% malathion papers using the standard WHO susceptibility test. The overall mortality rates were 45.8%, 11.4% and 80.2%, respectively. A fragment of voltage-gated sodium channel gene was amplified and sequenced to identify the knock down resistance (kdr) mutation. The ace-1 gene mutation was determined by using PCR-RFLP. The L1014F kdr mutation was observed in all populations, but the homozygous mutant F/F1014 genotype was found only in two of the six provinces where the kdr mutation was significantly correlated with deltamethrin resistance. However, none of mosquitoes had the G119S mutation in the ace-1 gene. A laboratory deltamethrin resistant strain, Cq_CM_R, has been established showing a highly resistant level after selection for a few generations. The mutant F1014 allele frequency was significantly increased after one generation of selection. A synergist assay was performed to assess the metabolic detoxifying enzymes. Addition of bis(4-nitrophenyl)-phosphate (BNPP) and diethyl maleate (DEM), inhibitors of esterases and glutathione S-transferases (GST), respectively, into the larval bioassay of the Cq_CM strain with deltamethrin showed no significant reduction. By contrast, addition of piperonyl butoxide (PBO), an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, showed a 9-fold reduction of resistance. Resistance to pyrethroids in C. quinquefasciatus is widely distributed in northern Thailand. This study reports for the first time for the detection of the L1014F kdr mutation in wild populations

  5. Antioxidant Property of Jobelyn as the Possible Mechanism Underlying its Anti-amnesic Activity in Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Umukoro

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Amnesia or loss of memory is the cardinal hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with ageing process. Although, AD had been discovered over a century ago, drugs which could cure or halt the progression of the disease are yet to see the light of the day. However, there has been a growing interest in the use of phytomedicines with multipronged mechanisms of action that could target various aspects of the pathologies of AD. Jobelyn (JB is a potent antioxidant African polyherbal formulation with active components that have been acclaimed to show neuroprotection. This investigation was carried out to evaluate whether JB has anti-amnesic and antioxidant activities. Methods: The alteration of alternation behavior in the Y-maze paradigm was utilized as the test for memory function in mice.  The effect of JB on acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity, malondialdehyde (MDA level and the concentrations of glutathione (GSH in the frontal cortex and hippocampus were assessed in rats as means of providing insight into the mechanism underlying its anti-amnesic activity. The animals were given JB (1, 2.5 or 5mg/kg, i.p. daily for 7 days before the biochemical assays or test for memory functions were carried out.  Results: JB was found to produce a signi.cant increase in the level of alternation behavior compared with the control, suggesting anti-amnesic activity. Also, JB reversed the memory impairment induced by scopolamine, which further indicates anti-amnesic property. Furthermore, JB demonstrated a signi.cant inhibition of MDA formation in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats, indicating antioxidant property.  In addition, it increased the defense armory of the brain tissues, as it signi.cantly increased the concentrations of GSH in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats. However, JB did not demonstrate any inhibitory effect against AChE activity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus

  6. A possible mechanism for earthquakes found in the mantle wedge of the Nazca subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, L. M.; Chang, Y.; Prieto, G. A.

    2017-12-01

    Beneath Colombia, the Cauca cluster of intermediate-depth earthquakes extends for 200 km along the trench (3.5°N-5.5°N, 77.0°W-75.3°W) and, with 58 earthquakes per year with local magnitude ML >= 2.5, has a higher rate of seismicity than the subduction zone immediately to the north or south. By precisely locating 433 cluster earthquakes from 1/2010-3/2014 with data from the Colombian National Seismic Network, we found that the earthquakes are located both in a continuous Nazca plate subducting at an angle of 33°-43° and in the overlying mantle wedge. The mantle wedge earthquakes (12% of the earthquakes) form two isolated 40-km-tall columns extending perpendicular to the subducting slab. Using waveform inversion, we computed focal mechanisms for 69 of the larger earthquakes. The focal mechanisms are variable, but the intraslab earthquakes are generally consistent with an in-slab extensional stress axis oriented 25° counterclockwise from the down-dip direction. We suggest that the observed mantle wedge earthquakes are the result of hydrofracture in a relatively cool mantle wedge. This segment of the Nazca Plate is currently subducting at a normal angle, but Wagner et al. (2017) suggested that a flat slab slowly developed in the region between 9-5.9 Ma and persisted until 4 Ma. During flat slab subduction, the overlying mantle wedge typically cools because it is cut off from mantle corner flow. After hydrous minerals in the slab dehydrate, the dehydrated fluid is expelled from the slab and migrates through the mantle wedge. If a cool mantle wedge remains today, fluid dehydrated from the slab may generate earthquakes by hydrofracture, with the mantle wedge earthquakes representing fluid migration pathways. Dahm's (2000) model of water-filled fracture propagation in the mantle wedge shows hydrofractures propagating normal to the subducting slab and extending tens of km into the mantle wedge, as we observe.

  7. The Alternative complex III: properties and possible mechanisms for electron transfer and energy conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refojo, Patrícia N; Teixeira, Miguel; Pereira, Manuela M

    2012-10-01

    Alternative complexes III (ACIII) are recently identified membrane-bound enzymes that replace functionally the cytochrome bc(1/)b(6)f complexes. In general, ACIII are composed of four transmembrane proteins and three peripheral subunits that contain iron-sulfur centers and C-type hemes. ACIII are built by a combination of modules present in different enzyme families, namely the complex iron-sulfur molybdenum containing enzymes. In this article a historical perspective on the investigation of ACIII is presented, followed by an overview of the present knowledge on these enzymes. Electron transfer pathways within the protein are discussed taking into account possible different locations (cytoplasmatic or periplasmatic) of the iron-sulfur containing protein and their contribution to energy conservation. In this way several hypotheses for energy conservation modes are raised including linear and bifurcating electron transfer pathways. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 17th European Bioenergetics Conference (EBEC 2012). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Risk factors and possible mechanisms of superior vena cava intravenous port malfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ching-Yang; Hu, Han-Chung; Ko, Po-Jen; Fu, Jui-Ying; Wu, Ching-Feng; Liu, Yun-Hen; Li, Hao-Jui; Kao, Tsung-Chi; Kao, Kuo-Chin; Yu, Sheng-Yueh; Chang, Chee-Jen; Hsieh, Hong-Chang

    2012-05-01

    To identify the risk factors leading to catheter malfunction. Reliable venous access is crucial for cancer patients. Malfunction of intravenous ports may lead to discontinuation of treatment and repeated interventions. We retrospectively reviewed the independent risk factors for catheter malfunction among patients receiving intravenous port implantations. A total of 1508 procedures were included from the calendar year 2006, and clinical data and chest plain films were analyzed. The patients were followed-up until June 30, 2010. For patients still alive, the last outpatient follow-up date was considered as the end point. For the remaining patients, the date of death or discharge against advice was considered as the end points. The risk factors for catheter malfunction were then evaluated. The intervention-free periods of the malfunction group and nonmalfunction group were 317 and 413 days, respectively. Statistical analyses showed that the Nut-Catheter Angle was the only risk factor for catheter malfunction (P = 0.001). A logistic model also confirmed that the Nut-Catheter Angle was the only risk factor for catheter malfunction (P risk for catheter malfunction. Catheter impingement caused by inadequate pocket creation and port implantation lead to compromised catheter lumen and difficulty flushing. The possibility of retained blood and medications increased thin thrombotic biofilm formation and medication precipitation. Catheter malfunctions can be avoided by using proper surgical techniques and adequate maintenance.

  9. ELECTRON THERMAL CONDUCTION AS A POSSIBLE PHYSICAL MECHANISM TO MAKE THE INNER HELIOSHEATH THINNER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izmodenov, V. V.; Alexashov, D. B.; Ruderman, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    We show that electron thermal conductivity may strongly affect the heliosheath plasma flow and the global pattern of the solar wind's interaction with the local interstellar medium. In particular, it leads to strong reduction of the inner heliosheath thickness, which makes it possible to explain (qualitatively) why Voyager 1 (V1) has crossed the heliopause at an unexpectedly small heliocentric distance of 122 AU. To estimate the effect of thermal conductivity, we consider a limiting case when thermal conduction is very effective. To do that, we assume the plasma flow in the entire heliosphere is nearly isothermal. Due to this effect, the heliospheric distance of the termination shock has increased by about 15 AU in the V1 direction compared with the adiabatic case with γ = 5/3. The heliospheric distance of the heliopause has decreased by about 27 AU. As a result, the thickness of the inner heliosheath in the model has decreased by about 42 AU and has become equal to 32 AU

  10. Peroxisome proliferation due to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP): species differences and possible mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elcombe, C.R.; Mitchell, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The exposure of cultured rat hepatocytes to mono(2-ethyhexyl)phthalate (MEHP) for 72 hr resulted in marked induction of peroxisomal enzyme activity (β-oxidation; cyanide-insensitive palmitoyl CoA oxidase) and concomitant increases in the number of peroxisomes. Similar treatment of cultured guinea pig, marmoset, or human hepatocytes revealed little or no effect of MEHP. In order to eliminate possible confounding influences of biotransformation, the proximate peroxisome proliferator(s) derived from MEHP have been identified. Using cultured hepatocytes these agents were found to be metabolite VI [mono(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate] and metabolite IX [mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate]. The addition of these active metabolites to cultured guinea pig, marmoset, or human hepatocytes again revealed little effect upon peroxisomes or related enzyme activities (peroxisomal β-oxidation or microsomal lauric acid hydroxylation). These studies demonstrate a marked species difference in the response of hepatocytes to MEHP-elicited peroxisome proliferation. Preliminary studies have also suggested that peroxisome proliferation due to MEHP may be due to an initial biochemical lesion of fatty acid metabolism

  11. Subendocardial hemorrhages in a case of extrapercardial cardiac tamponade: A possible mechanism of appearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Slobodan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Subendocardial hemorrhages are grossly visible bleedings in the inner surface of the left ventricle, the interventricular septum, and the opposing papillary muscles and adjacent columnae carneae of the free wall of the ventricle. These are commonly seen in sudden profound hypotension either from severe blood loss from “shock” in the widest sense and, even more often, in combination with brain injuries. Case Outline. We present a case of a 38-year-old man, injured as a car driver in a frontal collision, who died c. 45 minutes after the accident. The autopsy revealed severe chest trauma, including multiple right-sided direct rib fractures with the torn parietal pleura and right-sided pneumothorax, several right lung ruptures, and a rupture of one of the lobar bronchi with pneumomediastinum, and prominent subcutaneous emphysema of the trunk, shoulders, neck and face. The patchy subendocardial hemorrhage of the left ventricle was observed. The cause of death is attributed to severe blunt force chest trauma. Conclusion. We postulate pneumomediastinum leading to extrapericardial tamponade as the underlying mechanism of this subendocardial hemorrhage. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 45005

  12. A Possible Mechanism: Vildagliptin Prevents Aortic Dysfunction through Paraoxonase and Angiopoietin-Like 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The collected data have revealed the beneficial effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors on the vascular endothelium, including vildagliptin. However, the involved mechanisms are not yet clear. In this study, Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following four groups: control, diabetic, diabetic + low-dose vildagliptin (10 mg/kg/d, and diabetic + high-dose vildagliptin (20 mg/kg/d. The diabetic model was created by feeding a high-fat diet for four weeks and injection of streptozotocin. Then, vildagliptin groups were given oral vildagliptin for twelve weeks, and the control and diabetic groups were given the same volume of saline. The metabolic parameters, endothelial function, and whole genome expression in the aorta were examined. After 12 weeks of treatment, vildagliptin groups showed significantly reduced blood glucose, blood total cholesterol, and attenuated endothelial dysfunction. Notably, vildagliptin may inhibit angiopoietin-like 3 (Angptl3 and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (Bhmt expression and activated paraoxonase-1 (Pon1 in the aorta of diabetic rats. These findings may demonstrate the vasoprotective pathway of vildagliptin in vivo.

  13. Possible mechanism to enhance spin-fluctuation-mediated superconductivity in two-dimensional organic conductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonoyama, Yoshito; Maekawa, Yukiko; Kobayashi, Akito; Suzumura, Yoshikazu [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Yamada, Jun-ichi [Department of Material Science, Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan)], E-mail: nonoyama@slab.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2008-10-15

    Mechanisms of superconductivity in quasi-two-dimensional organic conductors have been investigated using an extended Hubbard model by using the transfer energies between BDA-TTP molecules for {beta}-(BDA-TTP){sub 2}I{sub 3} based on the X-ray experiment data and the extended Hueckel calculation. We obtain several mean-field solutions with charge orderings which may represent short-range orderings or low-energy fluctuations in the low-dimensional electronic system. In the pressure-temperature phase diagram, a charge ordered metal state almost degenerates with a normal metal state between an insulating phase with charge ordering and the normal metal phase. Using the random phase approximation (RPA) and the linearized gap equation, the transition temperature of the superconducting state is estimated for the charge-ordered metal state and the normal metal state. It is found that transition temperature of the superconductivity induced by spin fluctuations in the charge-ordered metal state is much higher than that of the normal metal state and that the superconductivity in the charge-ordered metal state is the gapless d-wave. This suggests that the short range charge ordering may also contribute to an enhancement of spin-fluctuation-mediated superconductivity. The difference in the superconducting states between {beta}-(BDA-TTP){sub 2}I{sub 3} and {beta}-(BDA-TTP){sub 2}SbF{sub 6} are briefly discussed.

  14. Possible mechanism to enhance spin-fluctuation-mediated superconductivity in two-dimensional organic conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonoyama, Yoshito; Maekawa, Yukiko; Kobayashi, Akito; Suzumura, Yoshikazu; Yamada, Jun-ichi

    2008-01-01

    Mechanisms of superconductivity in quasi-two-dimensional organic conductors have been investigated using an extended Hubbard model by using the transfer energies between BDA-TTP molecules for β-(BDA-TTP) 2 I 3 based on the X-ray experiment data and the extended Hueckel calculation. We obtain several mean-field solutions with charge orderings which may represent short-range orderings or low-energy fluctuations in the low-dimensional electronic system. In the pressure-temperature phase diagram, a charge ordered metal state almost degenerates with a normal metal state between an insulating phase with charge ordering and the normal metal phase. Using the random phase approximation (RPA) and the linearized gap equation, the transition temperature of the superconducting state is estimated for the charge-ordered metal state and the normal metal state. It is found that transition temperature of the superconductivity induced by spin fluctuations in the charge-ordered metal state is much higher than that of the normal metal state and that the superconductivity in the charge-ordered metal state is the gapless d-wave. This suggests that the short range charge ordering may also contribute to an enhancement of spin-fluctuation-mediated superconductivity. The difference in the superconducting states between β-(BDA-TTP) 2 I 3 and β-(BDA-TTP) 2 SbF 6 are briefly discussed.

  15. A possible non-pairing mechanism for high-Tsub(c) perfect conductors in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.C.

    1987-01-01

    We have generalised Froehlich's model of 1D superconductivity to systems with 2D layers associated with nearly nested Fermi surfaces. In the ground state phonons with wavevectors that span opposite sides of the Fermi surface are found to have coherent, macroscopic amplitudes when they are coupled resonantly to the corresponding electron density waves. Umklapp processes notwithstanding. These quantum mechanical wave amplitudes constitute the order parameter of the system, decreasing to zero as T → Tsub(c), the critical temperature. They also give rise to a temperature-dependent energy gap. In the absence of Umklapp processes, such a gap would lead to perfect conductivity for T < Tsub(c), as for the original 1D version given by Froehlich. The scale of Tsub(c) is determined by the much higher εsub(F), rather than by ωsub(D); hence also the absence of an isotope effect. This model, with independent electrons and phonons and the associated order parameter, should serve as a new and significantly different zeroth-order system, a springboard from which BCS pairing could then be built. (author)

  16. Possible mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxant effect produced by clobenzorex in aortic segments of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Cuenca, J; González-Hernández, A; López-Canales, O A; Villagrana-Zesati, J R; Rodríguez-Choreão, J D; Morín-Zaragoza, R; Castillo-Henkel, E F; López-Canales, J S

    2017-08-07

    Clobenzorex is a metabolic precursor of amphetamine indicated for the treatment of obesity. Amphetamines have been involved with cardiovascular side effects such as hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the direct application of 10-9-10-5 M clobenzorex on isolated phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings produces vascular effects, and if so, what mechanisms may be involved. Clobenzorex produced an immediate concentration-dependent vasorelaxant effect at the higher concentrations (10-7.5-10-5 M). The present outcome was not modified by 10-6 M atropine (an antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors), 3.1×10-7 M glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker), 10-3 M 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; a voltage-activated K+ channel blocker), 10-5 M indomethacin (a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor), 10-5 M clotrimazole (a cytochrome P450 inhibitor) or 10-5 M cycloheximide (a general protein synthesis inhibitor). Contrarily, the clobenzorex-induced vasorelaxation was significantly attenuated (Pclobenzorex on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings involved stimulation of the NO/cGMP/PKG/Ca2+-activated K+ channel pathway.

  17. Evaluation of the Possible Mechanisms of Antihypertensive Activity of Loranthus micranthus: An African Mistletoe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamidele A. Iwalokun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Loranthus micranthus (LM, also called African mistletoe is a major Nigerian Loranthaceae plant used traditionally to treat hypertension. The methanolic leaf extract of the plant (LMME has been shown to elicit anti-hypertensive activity in rats but mechanism remains unclear. This study was undertaken to study the effect of LM on pressor-induced contraction of rat aorta smooth muscles and serum lipid profiles in mice. The LMME was partitioned to produce n-butanol (NBF-LMME, chloroform (CF-LMME, ethyl acetate (EAF-LMME and water (WF-LMME fractions. The median effective concentrations and maximum relaxation of the fractions were determined against epinephrine and KCl pre-contracted rat aorta ring model. Serum lipid profiles and nitric oxide (NO were determined spectrophotometrically in mice administered per orally 250 mg/kg b.w. of each fraction for 21 days. Data were analyzed statistically. NBF-LMME elicited the highest dose-dependent inhibitory effect on rat aorta pre-contracted with norepinephrine and KCl, followed in decreasing order by WF-LMME > CF-LMME > EAF-LMME. Similar order of activity was observed in the ability of these fractions to inhibit elevation in artherogenic lipids, raise serum nitric oxide and reduce cardiac arginase in mice. We conclude the anti-hypertensive activity of L. micranthus involve anti-artherogenic events, vasorelaxation, cardiac arginase reduction and NO elevation.

  18. Analgesic effects of Marasmius androsaceus mycelia ethanol extract and possible mechanisms in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Song

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Marasmius androsaceus is a medicinal fungus mainly used to treat various forms of pain in China. This study investigated the analgesic effects of an ethanol extract of M. androsaceus (MAE and its potential molecular mechanisms. Oral administration of MAE (50, 200, and 1000 mg/kg had significant analgesic effects in an acid-induced writhing test, a formalin test, and a hot-plate test, with effectiveness similar to tramadol (the positive control drug. The autonomic activity test showed that MAE had no harmful effects on the central nervous system in mice. MAE resulted in significantly enhanced levels of noradrenalin and 5-hydroxytryptamine in serum but suppressed both of these neurotransmitters in the hypothalamus after 30 s of hot-plate stimulation. Co-administration with nimodipine (10 mg/kg; a Ca2+ channel blocker strongly enhanced the analgesic effect in the hot-plate test compared to MAE alone. Moreover, MAE down-regulated the expression of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII in the hypothalamus after a 30-s thermal stimulus. These results suggested that the analgesic ability of MAE is related to the regulation of metabolism by monoamine neurotransmitters and Ca2+/CaMKII-mediated signaling, which can potentially aid the development of peripheral neuropathic pain treatments obtained from M. androsaceus.

  19. Possible Mechanisms for Generation of Anomalously High PGA During the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlenko, O. V.

    2017-08-01

    Mechanisms are suggested that could explain anomalously high PGAs (peak ground accelerations) exceeding 1 g recorded during the 2011 Tohoku earthquake ( M w = 9.0). In my previous research, I studied soil behavior during the Tohoku earthquake based on KiK-net vertical array records and revealed its `atypical' pattern: instead of being reduced in the near-source zones as usually observed during strong earthquakes, shear moduli in soil layers increased, indicating soil hardening, and reached their maxima at the moments of the highest intensity of strong motion, then reduced. We could explain this assuming that the soils experienced some additional compression. The observed changes in the shapes of acceleration time histories with distance from the source, such as a decrease of the duration and an increase of the intensity of strong motion, indicate phenomena similar to overlapping of seismic waves and a shock wave generation, which led to the compression of soils. The phenomena reach their maximum in the vicinity of stations FKSH10, TCGH16, and IBRH11, where the highest PGAs were recorded; at larger epicentral distances, PGAs sharply fall. Thus, the occurrence of anomalously high PGAs on the surface can result from the combination of the overlapping of seismic waves at the bottoms of soil layers and their increased amplification by the pre-compressed soils.

  20. TRANSPORT PROPERTIES FOR 1-ETHYL-3-METHYLIMIDAZOLIUM n-ALKYL SULFATES: POSSIBLE EVIDENCE OF GROTTHUSS MECHANISM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Garabal, S.; Vila, J.; Rilo, E.; Domínguez-Pérez, M.; Segade, L.; Tojo, E.; Verdía, P.; Varela, L.M.; Cabeza, O.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of the temperature and the lengthening of the linear alkyl chain of the anion in the transport physical properties of the pure ionic liquids 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium n-alkyl sulphate (being n = 0, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8). Density, viscosity and electrical conductivities were measured at atmospheric pressure in a wide temperature range. In the bibliography, data existed for these magnitudes for all ionic liquids studied but none of these had information about the electrical conductivity of 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium n-alkyl sulfate whith n = 0, 4, 6 and 8. The experimental results show clearly 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium hydrogen sulphate cannot be considered part of the 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium n-alkyl sulphate family because of its hydrogen bonding ability. Results of density and viscosity behave as expected. However, in the case of the electrical conductivity due to the lack of alkyl chain in the hydrogen sulfate we expected to get extreme values but in practise, we obtained intermediate values between 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium butyl sulphate and 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium hexyl sulphate. This suggests that a Grotthus mechanism exists as result of a protonic current in addition to ionic conductivity, being Waldeńs plot consistent with this idea.

  1. Possible mechanisms of action of Gymnodinium breve toxin at the mammalian neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinnick-Gallagher, P.

    1980-01-01

    1 The mechanism of action of a crude fraction of Gymnodinium breve toxin (GBTX) was investigated by intracellular recording techniques in the rat phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation. 2 GBTX (2 micrograms/ml) decreased the input resistance of the muscle membrane concomitantly with a depolarization of the resting membrane potential. 3 A low sodium solution reversed or prevented a GBTX-induced membrane depolarization. 4 Tetrodotoxin (TTX) antagonized a GBTX-induced increase in miniature endplate potential (m.e.p.p.) frequency and repolarized a GBTX-depolarized membrane. Pretreatment with TTX prevented GBTX effects. 5 GBTX reversibly reduced depolarizations produced by bath applied acetylcholine (ACh). The membrane depolarization was not responsible for the depression of ACh responses. 6 These findings suggest that GBTX increases m.e.p.p. frequency and depolarizes the resting membrane potential by increasing sodium permeability. The reduction of ACh-induced depolarizations suggests that GBTX may be acting at some site on the ACh receptor. PMID:7190452

  2. MPP1 directly interacts with flotillins in erythrocyte membrane - Possible mechanism of raft domain formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernatowska, Agnieszka; Augoff, Katarzyna; Podkalicka, Joanna; Tabaczar, Sabina; Gajdzik-Nowak, Weronika; Czogalla, Aleksander; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2017-11-01

    Flotillins are prominent, oligomeric protein components of erythrocyte (RBC) membrane raft domains and are considered to play an important structural role in lateral organization of the plasma membrane. In our previous work on erythroid membranes and giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) derived from them we have shown that formation of functional domains (resting state rafts) depends on the presence of membrane palmitoylated protein 1 (MPP1/p55), pointing to its new physiological role. Exploration of the molecular mechanism of MPP1 function in organizing membrane domains described here, through searching for its molecular partners in RBC membrane by using different methods, led to the identification of the raft-marker proteins, flotillin 1 and flotillin 2, as hitherto unreported direct MPP1 binding-partners in the RBC membrane. These proteins are found in high molecular-weight complexes in native RBC membrane and, significantly, their presence was shown to be separate from the well-known protein 4.1-dependent interactions of MPP1 with membrane proteins. Furthermore, FLIM analysis revealed that loss of the endogenous MPP1-flotillins interactions resulted in significant changes in RBC membrane-fluidity, emphasizing the physiological importance of such interactions in vivo. Therefore, our data establish a new perspective on the role of MPP1 in erythroid cells and suggests that direct MPP1-flotillins interactions could be the major driving-force behind the formation of raft domains in RBC. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dimerization of human immunodeficiency virus (type 1) RNA: stimulation by cations and possible mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, R; Baudin, F; Gabus, C; Darlix, J L; Mougel, M; Ehresmann, C; Ehresmann, B

    1991-05-11

    The retroviral genome consists of two identical RNA molecules joined close to their 5' ends by the dimer linkage structure. Recent findings indicated that retroviral RNA dimerization and encapsidation are probably related events during virion assembly. We studied the cation-induced dimerization of HIV-1 RNA and results indicate that all in vitro generated HIV-1 RNAs containing a 100 nucleotide domain downstream from the 5' splice site are able to dimerize. RNA dimerization depends on the concentration of RNA, mono- and multivalent cations, the size of the monovalent cation, temperature, and pH. Up to 75% of HIV-1 RNA is dimeric in the presence of spermidine. HIV-1 RNA dimer is fairly resistant to denaturing agents and unaffected by intercalating drugs. Antisense HIV-1 RNA does not dimerize but heterodimers can be formed between HIV-1 RNA and either MoMuLV or RSV RNA. Therefore retroviral RNA dimerization probably does not simply proceed through mechanisms involving Watson-Crick base-pairing. Neither adenine and cytosine protonation, nor quartets containing only guanines appear to determine the stability of the HIV-1 RNA dimer, while quartets involving both adenine(s) and guanine(s) could account for our results. A consensus sequence PuGGAPuA found in the putative dimerization-encapsidation region of all retroviral genomes examined may participate in the dimerization process.

  4. Role of myocardial ischemia in a infarcted area as a possible mechanism for postinfarction angina pectoris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Muneyasu; Sumiyoshi, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Kenji; Haze, Kazuo; Fukami, Ken-ichi; Hiramori, Katsuhiko; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Uehara, Toshiisa; Hayashida, Kouhei

    1984-01-01

    Perfusion defects and 201 Tl redistribution on scintigraphic images were compared with clinical findings in 140 patients with myocardial infarction (consisting of 84 with single vessel disease and 56 with double vessel disease), 28 patients with one vessel disease not accompanied by infarction, and 18 healthy persons who underwent left coronary arteriography and 201 Tl stress myocardial scintigraphy. In 30 patients with single vessel disease accompanied by postinfarction angina pectoris, perfusion defects was smaller and Tl redistribution was larger than those in 54 patients with single vessel desease not accompanied by it. The 30 patients with postinfarction angina pectoris had a slight abnormality of left ventricular contraction and marked stenosis of 90% or more of the vessels. These findings were similar to those in the 28 angina patients who had one vessel disease but not accompanied by infarction. In 56 cases of double vessel disease, Tl redistribution was significantly larger in the group with angina than in the group without it. These results suggested that ischemia in an infarct area plays an important role as a mechanism for postinfarction angina pectoris. (Namekawa, K.)

  5. Young coconut water ameliorates depression via modulation of neurotransmitters: possible mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sadia Saleem; Najam, Rahila

    2016-10-01

    In the current era, plants are frequently tested for its antidepressant potential. Therefore young coconut water, a commonly used plant based beverage, was selected to explore its antidepressant potential. Rodents were selected for this study and forced swim test was conducted to explore antidepressant activity. Analysis of brain biogenic amines using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detection and potentiation of noradrenaline toxicity model were also incorporated in this study to demonstrate probable antidepressant mechanism of action. Coconut water was administered orally at the dose of 4 ml/100 g. Young coconut water showed highly significant increase in struggling time (p coconut water. In noradrenaline toxicity model, it was observed that young coconut water is not a good adrenergic component as its lethality percentage in this test was observed 0 % unlike imipramine which showed lethality of 100 %. High performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection of rodent's brain revealed decline in 5-hydroxytryptamine, noradrenaline and dopamine, with concomitant decline in metabolites 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid and increase in 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid/5-hydroxytryptamine ratio. Findings from the exploration of monoamines suggest antidepressant effect of young coconut water via homeostasis of monoamines synthesis.

  6. Strength Training with Vascular Occlusion: A Review of Possible Adaptive Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Castro Fábio Marzliak Pozzi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Strength training with blood flow restriction, or KAATSU training, has been shown to be as effective as conventional strength training to promote muscular strength and hypertrophy. Several mechanisms have been suggested as hypotheses to explain the adaptations arising from this training method. Among these is metabolic stress, which exerts important physiological effects and may influence the training adaptations in question. In addition, hypoxia produced by the technique may change the neural recruitment pattern. Growth hormone (GH concentrations increase as a result of practicing this method, which can trigger an increase in plasmatic and, perhaps, muscular insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 concentrations. The increase in concentrations of these factors can play a leading role in responses to KAATSU training. Among the effects of the GH/IGF-1 axis in muscle cells is the increase in the signalling pathway activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, which has been associated with increased protein synthesis. On the other hand, the decrease in the activity of the myostatin pathway, which has an antagonistic effect to mTOR, has been demonstrated after training with occlusion. Other factors, such as increases in the expression of heat shock proteins, may play an important role in adaptations to exercise. Nitric oxide synthase could increase nitric oxide concentration, which in turn has an effect on satellite cells and blood flow. However, despite the results obtained, the transfer to other situations (e.g. speed sports is not yet clear.

  7. A look at the possible mechanism and potential of magneto therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, J I

    1991-03-07

    A testable theoretical model for the mechanism of magneto-therapy is presented. The theory delineated is the equation mc2 = Bvl coulomb which sets in dual resonance gravitational and electromagnetic potentials. This proposed unification of Einstein's gravity and Maxwell's electromagnetism is designated Jacobson's resonance and is a general expression of Zeeman and cyclotron resonance. The application of this theory involves the utilization of exogenously sourced very weak magnetic fields on the order of magnitude 10(-8) gauss to reorient the atomic crystal lattice structures of genomic magnetic domains. Examples of genomic magnetic domains are homeoboxes and oncogenes and associated structures like peptide hormone trophic factors. Various phenomena are also analyzed in terms of how they may relate to biological systems such as solitons, phonons, cyclotron resonance, the piezoelectric effect, the fractional quantum Hall effect, string theory, and biologically closed electric circuits. The potential of magneto-therapy in the treatment of various genomic and associated disorders is explored. The ultimate question "Can an oncogene be electromagnetically induced into becoming a structurally homologous normal gene?" is posed.

  8. Tetracycline compounds with non-antimicrobial organ protective properties: possible mechanisms of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Michael O.; Ceballos, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Tetracyclines were developed as a result of the screening of soil samples for antibiotics. The firstt of these compounds, chlortetracycline, was introduced in 1947. Tetracyclines were found to be highly effective against various pathogens including rickettsiae, as well as both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, thus becoming the first class of broad spectrum antibiotics. Many other interesting properties, unrelated to their antibiotic activity, have been identified for tetracyclines which have led to widely divergent experimental and clinical uses. For example, tetracyclines are also an effective anti-malarial drug. Minocycline, which can readily cross cell membranes, is known to be a potent anti-apoptotic agent. Another tetracycline, doxycycline is known to exert anti-protease activities. Doxycycline can inhibit matrix metalloproteinases which contribute to tissue destruction activities in diseases such as periodontitis. A large body of literature has provided additional evidence for the “beneficial” actions of tetracyclines, including their ability to act as reactive oxygen species scavengers and anti-inflammatory agents. This review provides a summary of tetracycline’s multiple mechanisms of action as a means to understand their beneficial effects. PMID:20951211

  9. Antinociceptive activity of Inula britannica L. and patuletin: In vivo and possible mechanisms studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Saeed; Komaki, Alireza

    2018-06-12

    Inula britannica L. is a predominant medicinal plant traditionally utilized in the treatments of arthritis and back pain in Iranian folk medicine. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the antinociceptive effects of Inula britannica L. flower essential oil (IBLEO) and one of its major constituents, Patuletin (Pn), in male mice. In this study, we used pain assessment tests including acetic acid-induced writhing, tail-flick (TF), formalin induced paw licking (FIPL) model, and glutamate-induced paw licking (GPL). For understanding the supposed antinociceptive mechanisms of IBLEO, opioid and L-arginine/NO/cGMP/ KATP pathways were examined. In the TF, writhing, GPL, and FIPL tests, a dosage of 100 mg/kg of IBLEO showed noteworthy antinociceptive effects in comparison with control (p L-arginine or sodium nitroprusside fundamentally potentiated the antinociception induced by IBLEO in phase II of the FIPL (p L-arginine/NO/cGMP/KATP pathway in IBLEO antinociceptive effects. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Possible Mechanism for the Generation of a Fundamental Unit of Charge (long version)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lestone, John Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-16

    Various methods for calculating particle-emission rates from hot systems are reviewed. Semi-classically derived photon-emission rates often contain the term exp(-ε/T) which needs to be replaced with the corresponding Planckian factor of [exp(-ε/T)-1]-1 to obtain the correct rate. This replacement is associated with the existence of stimulated emission. Simple arguments are used to demonstrate that black holes can also undergo stimulated emission, as previously determined by others. We extend these concepts to fundamental particles, and assume they can be stimulated to emit virtual photons with a cross section of πλ2, in the case of an isolated particle when the incident virtual-photon energy is < 2πmc2. Stimulated-virtual photons can be exchanged with other particles generating a force. With the inclusion of near-field effects, the model choices presented give a calculated fundamental unit of charge of 1.6022x10-19 C. If these choices are corroborated by detailed calculations then an understanding of the numerical value of the fine structure constant may emerge. The present study suggests charge might be an emergent property generated by a simple interaction mechanism between point-like particles and the electromagnetic vacuum, similar to the process that generates the Lamb shift.

  11. Common resting brain dynamics indicate a possible mechanism underlying zolpidem response in severe brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shawniqua T; Conte, Mary M; Goldfine, Andrew M; Noirhomme, Quentin; Gosseries, Olivia; Thonnard, Marie; Beattie, Bradley; Hersh, Jennifer; Katz, Douglas I; Victor, Jonathan D; Laureys, Steven; Schiff, Nicholas D

    2013-01-01

    Zolpidem produces paradoxical recovery of speech, cognitive and motor functions in select subjects with severe brain injury but underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In three diverse patients with known zolpidem responses we identify a distinctive pattern of EEG dynamics that suggests a mechanistic model. In the absence of zolpidem, all subjects show a strong low frequency oscillatory peak ∼6–10 Hz in the EEG power spectrum most prominent over frontocentral regions and with high coherence (∼0.7–0.8) within and between hemispheres. Zolpidem administration sharply reduces EEG power and coherence at these low frequencies. The ∼6–10 Hz activity is proposed to arise from intrinsic membrane properties of pyramidal neurons that are passively entrained across the cortex by locally-generated spontaneous activity. Activation by zolpidem is proposed to arise from a combination of initial direct drug effects on cortical, striatal, and thalamic populations and further activation of underactive brain regions induced by restoration of cognitively-mediated behaviors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01157.001 PMID:24252875

  12. Intracellular uptake: a possible mechanism for silver engineered nanoparticle toxicity to a freshwater alga Ochromonas danica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Jun Miao

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The behavior and toxicity of silver engineered nanoparticles (Ag-ENs to the mixotrophic freshwater alga Ochromonas danica were examined in the present study to determine whether any other mechanisms are involved in their algal toxicity besides Ag(+ liberation outside the cells. Despite their good dispersability, the Ag-ENs were found to continuously aggregate and dissolve rapidly. When the initial nanoparticle concentration was lower than 10 µM, the total dissolved Ag(+ concentration ([Ag(+](T in the suspending media reached its maximum after 1 d and then decreased suggesting that Ag(+ release might be limited by the nanoparticle surface area under these conditions. Furthermore, Ag-EN dissolution extent remarkably increased in the presence of glutathione. In the Ag-EN toxicity experiment, glutathione was also used to eliminate the indirect effects of Ag(+ that was released. However, remarkable toxicity was still observed although the free Ag(+ concentration in the media was orders of magnitude lower than the non-observed effect concentration of Ag(+ itself. Such inhibitive effects were mitigated when more glutathione was added, but could never be completely eliminated. Most importantly, we demonstrate, for the first time, that Ag-ENs can be taken in and accumulated inside the algal cells, where they exerted their toxic effects. Therefore, nanoparticle internalization may be an alternative pathway through which algal growth can be influenced.

  13. Inhibitory effects of sanguinarine against the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIES-843 and possible mechanisms of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Jihai [College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Farmland Pollution Control and Agricultural Resources Use, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Liu, Deming [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Crop Germplasm Innovation and Resource Utilization, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Gong, Daoxin; Zeng, Qingru; Yan, Zhiyong [College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Gu, Ji-Dong, E-mail: jdgu@hku.hk [Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Farmland Pollution Control and Agricultural Resources Use, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology and Toxicology, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Sanguinarine was found as a strong algicidal biologically derived substance. •Sanguinarine can induce oxidative stress in the cells of Microcystis aeruginosa. •Photosystem is a target of toxicity of sanguinarine on M. aeruginosa. •Sanguinarine can induce DNA damage and inhibit cell division. -- Abstract: Sanguinarine showed strong inhibitory effect against Microcystis aeruginosa, a typical water bloom-forming and microcystins-producing cyanobacterium. The EC50 of sanguinarine against the growth of M. aeruginosa NIES-843 was 34.54 ± 1.17 μg/L. Results of chlorophyll fluorescence transient analysis indicated that all the electron donating side, accepting side, and the reaction center of the Photosystem II (PS II) were the targets of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa NIES-843. The elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in the cells of M. aeruginosa NIES-843 upon exposure indicated that sanguinarine induced oxidative stress in the active growing cells of M. aeruginosa NIES-843. Further results of gene expression analysis indicated that DNA damage and cell division inhibition were also involved in the inhibitory action mechanism of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa NIES-843. The inhibitory characteristics of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa suggest that the ecological- and public health-risks need to be evaluated before its application in cyanobacterial bloom control to avoid devastating events irreversibly.

  14. Triggered creep as a possible mechanism for delayed dynamic triggering of tremor and earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.; Peng, Zhigang; Hill, David P.; Aiken, Chastity

    2011-01-01

    The passage of radiating seismic waves generates transient stresses in the Earth's crust that can trigger slip on faults far away from the original earthquake source. The triggered fault slip is detectable in the form of earthquakes and seismic tremor. However, the significance of these triggered events remains controversial, in part because they often occur with some delay, long after the triggering stress has passed. Here we scrutinize the location and timing of tremor on the San Andreas fault between 2001 and 2010 in relation to distant earthquakes. We observe tremor on the San Andreas fault that is initiated by passing seismic waves, yet migrates along the fault at a much slower velocity than the radiating seismic waves. We suggest that the migrating tremor records triggered slow slip of the San Andreas fault as a propagating creep event. We find that the triggered tremor and fault creep can be initiated by distant earthquakes as small as magnitude 5.4 and can persist for several days after the seismic waves have passed. Our observations of prolonged tremor activity provide a clear example of the delayed dynamic triggering of seismic events. Fault creep has been shown to trigger earthquakes, and we therefore suggest that the dynamic triggering of prolonged fault creep could provide a mechanism for the delayed triggering of earthquakes. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermal convection as a possible mechanism for the origin of polygonal structures on Pluto's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilella, Kenny; Deschamps, Frédéric

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution pictures of Pluto's surface obtained by the New Horizons spacecraft revealed, among other surface features, a large nitrogen ice glacier informally named Sputnik Planitia. The surface of this glacier is separated into a network of polygonal cells with a wavelength of ˜20-40 km. This network is similar to the convective patterns obtained under certain conditions by laboratory experiments, suggesting that it is the surface expression of thermal convection. Here we investigate the surface planform obtained for different convective systems in 3-D Cartesian geometry with different modes of heating and rheologies. We find that bottom heated systems, as assumed by previous studies, do not produce surface planforms consistent with the observed pattern. Alternatively, for a certain range of Rayleigh-Roberts number, RaH, a volumetrically heated system produces a surface planform similar to this pattern. We then combine scaling laws with values of RaH within its possible range to establish relationships between the critical parameters of Sputnik Planitia. In particular, our calculations indicate that the glacier thickness and the surface heat flux are in the ranges 2-10 km and 0.1-10 mW m-2, respectively. However, a difficulty is to identify a proper source of internal heating. We propose that the long-term variations of surface temperature caused by variations in Pluto's orbit over millions of years produces secular cooling equivalent to internal heating. We find that this source of heating is sufficient to trigger thermal convection, but additional investigations are needed to determine under which conditions it can produce surface patterns similar to those of Sputnik Planitia.

  16. Quantum Mechanics and locality in the K{sup 0} K-bar{sup 0} system experimental verification possibilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, A.

    1994-11-01

    It is shown that elementary Quantum Mechanics, applied to the K{sup 0} K-bar{sup 0} system, predicts peculiar long range EPR correlations. Possible experimental verifications are discussed, and a concrete experiment with anti-protons annihilations at rest is proposed. A pedestrian approach to local models shows that K{sup 0} K-bar{sup 0} experimentation could provide arguments to the local realism versus quantum theory controversy. (author). 17 refs., 23 figs.

  17. Unstable relationship between the Arctic Oscillation and East Asian jet stream in winter and possible mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; He, Shengping; Li, Fei; Wang, Huijun; Zhu, Yali

    2017-12-01

    Based on long-term reanalysis datasets, this study revealed that the relationship between the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and the East Asian jet stream (EAJS) is significant negative during 1925-1945 and 1985-2005 (significant periods; hereafter SPs) whereas insignificant during 1900-1920 and 1955-1975 (insignificant periods; ISPs). The unstable AO-EAJS relationship might be related to the interdecadal change of AO's spatial structure. During SPs winters, anomalous positive AO events are characterized by atmospheric negative anomalies in the Arctic with two anomalous positive centers located in the extratropical Atlantic and Pacific, exhibiting a quasi-barotropic structure. By contrast, the anomalous center in the North Pacific is barely observed during ISPs winters. Further analysis indicated that such interdecadal change might be attributed to change of troposphere-stratosphere coupling and the North Pacific air-sea interaction. On the one hand, anomalous AO at surface is closely related to obvious planetary waves downward from the stratosphere during SPs, which favors the subtropics-Arctic teleconnection. On the other hand, the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) shows warm phase during SPs, which induces larger variance of the Aleutian Low and more intensive divergence anomalies at upper level troposphere. Due to the advection of vorticity induced by stronger divergence is favorable for stronger Rossby wave source, the Rossby wave activity is much stronger and could further propagate eastward to the North Atlantic during SPs, resulting in the Pacific-Atlantic teleconnection. Such a mechanism is supported by the numerical simulations from two individual models that are perturbed by warm/cold IPO sea surface temperature anomalies.

  18. Possible mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxant effect produced by clobenzorex in aortic segments of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lozano-Cuenca

    Full Text Available Clobenzorex is a metabolic precursor of amphetamine indicated for the treatment of obesity. Amphetamines have been involved with cardiovascular side effects such as hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the direct application of 10–9–10–5 M clobenzorex on isolated phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings produces vascular effects, and if so, what mechanisms may be involved. Clobenzorex produced an immediate concentration-dependent vasorelaxant effect at the higher concentrations (10–7.5–10–5 M. The present outcome was not modified by 10–6 M atropine (an antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, 3.1×10–7 M glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker, 10–3 M 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; a voltage-activated K+ channel blocker, 10–5 M indomethacin (a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor, 10–5 M clotrimazole (a cytochrome P450 inhibitor or 10–5 M cycloheximide (a general protein synthesis inhibitor. Contrarily, the clobenzorex-induced vasorelaxation was significantly attenuated (P<0.05 by 10–5 M L-NAME (a direct inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, 10–7 M ODQ (an inhibitor of nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase, 10–6 M KT 5823 (an inhibitor of protein kinase G, 10–2 M TEA (a Ca2+-activated K+ channel blocker and non-specific voltage-activated K+ channel blocker and 10–7 M apamin plus 10–7 M charybdotoxin (blockers of small- and large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, respectively, and was blocked by 8×10–2 M potassium (a high concentration and removal of the vascular endothelium. These results suggest that the direct vasorelaxant effect by clobenzorex on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings involved stimulation of the NO/cGMP/PKG/Ca2+-activated K+ channel pathway.

  19. Induction of apoptosis by pinostrobin in human cervical cancer cells: Possible mechanism of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Jaudan

    Full Text Available Pinostrobin (PN is a naturally occurring dietary bioflavonoid, found in various medicinal herbs/plants. Though anti-cancer potential of many such similar constituents has been demonstrated, critical biochemical targets and exact mechanism for their apoptosis-inducing actions have not been fully elucidated. The present study was aimed to investigate if PN induced apoptosis in cervical cancer cells (HeLa of human origin. It is demonstrated that PN at increasing dose effectivity reduced the cell viability as well as GSH and NO2- levels. Condensed nuclei with fragmented chromatin and changes in mitochondrial matrix morphology clearly indicated the role of mitochondria in PN induced apoptosis. A marked reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and increased ROS production after PN treatment showed involvement of free radicals, which in turn further augment ROS levels. PN treatment resulted in DNA damage, which could have been triggered by an increase in ROS levels. Decrease in apoptotic cells in the presence of caspase 3 inhibitor in PN-treated cells suggested that PN induced apoptosis via caspase dependent pathways. Additionally, a significant increase in the expression of proteins of extrinsic (TRAIL R1/DR4, TRAIL R2/DR5, TNF RI/TNFRSF1A, FADD, Fas/TNFRSF6 and intrinsic pathway (Bad, Bax, HTRA2/Omi, SMAC/Diablo, cytochrome C, Pro-Caspase-3, Cleaved Caspase-3 was observed in the cells exposed to PN. Taken together, these observations suggest that PN efficiently induces apoptosis through ROS mediated extrinsic and intrinsic dependent signaling pathways, as well as ROS mediated mitochondrial damage in HeLa cells.

  20. Variability of East Asian summer monsoon precipitation during the Holocene and possible forcing mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fuzhi; Ma, Chunmei; Zhu, Cheng; Lu, Huayu; Zhang, Xiaojian; Huang, Kangyou; Guo, Tianhong; Li, Kaifeng; Li, Lan; Li, Bing; Zhang, Wenqing

    2018-03-01

    mechanisms, which are very helpful for calibration of paleoclimate models and prediction of future precipitation changes in East Asia in the scenario of global warming.

  1. Computational Models Describing Possible Mechanisms for Generation of Excessive Beta Oscillations in Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Pavlides

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In Parkinson's disease, an increase in beta oscillations within the basal ganglia nuclei has been shown to be associated with difficulty in movement initiation. An important role in the generation of these oscillations is thought to be played by the motor cortex and by a network composed of the subthalamic nucleus (STN and the external segment of globus pallidus (GPe. Several alternative models have been proposed to describe the mechanisms for generation of the Parkinsonian beta oscillations. However, a recent experimental study of Tachibana and colleagues yielded results which are challenging for all published computational models of beta generation. That study investigated how the presence of beta oscillations in a primate model of Parkinson's disease is affected by blocking different connections of the STN-GPe circuit. Due to a large number of experimental conditions, the study provides strong constraints that any mechanistic model of beta generation should satisfy. In this paper we present two models consistent with the data of Tachibana et al. The first model assumes that Parkinsonian beta oscillation are generated in the cortex and the STN-GPe circuits resonates at this frequency. The second model additionally assumes that the feedback from STN-GPe circuit to cortex is important for maintaining the oscillations in the network. Predictions are made about experimental evidence that is required to differentiate between the two models, both of which are able to reproduce firing rates, oscillation frequency and effects of lesions carried out by Tachibana and colleagues. Furthermore, an analysis of the models reveals how the amplitude and frequency of the generated oscillations depend on parameters.

  2. NDE of Possible Service-Induced PWSCC in Control Rod Drive Mechanism Housings Removed from Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Harris, Robert V.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2006-01-01

    Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are being performed to assess the effectiveness of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques on removed-from-service control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and the associated J-groove attachment welds. This work is being performed to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE techniques such as ultrasonic testing (UT), eddy current testing (ET), and visual testing (VT) as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. The basic NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory-based NDE methods were employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper describes the NDE measurements that were employed on the two CRDMs to detect and characterize the indications and the analysis of these indications. The two CRDM assemblies were removed from service from the North Anna 2 vessel head, including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material. One nozzle contains suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data; the second contains evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, although this was unconfirmed. A destructive test plan is being developed to directly characterize the indications found using nondestructive testing. The results of this destructive testing will be included when the destructive testing is completed.

  3. Myofibroblasts and their resistance to apoptosis: a possible mechanism of osteoradionecrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lei Tian,1 Li-Sheng He,1 Bhavesh Soni,2 Hong-Tao Shang11Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, China; 2Maxillofacial Unit, Morriston Hospital, Swansea, Wales, UKAbstract: Osteoradionecrosis (ORN in the head and neck area is the most devastating long-term complication of radiotherapy, with slow progression and inability to heal spontaneously. ORN can lead to intolerable pain, fractures, and sequestration of devitalized bone and fistulae, making oral feeding impossible and causing facial deformation. In spite of its notorious reputation over at least 90 years, the precise pathogenesis of ORN has not been fully clarified, which has led to obstacles in the management of the disease. Several theories about its pathogenesis have been formulated, and radiation-induced fibrosis is the newest one. According to this theory, ORN is essentially a type of fibrosis induced by radiotherapy, and antifibrosis therapy has been shown to be effective in its treatment. We assumed that ORN, like fibrosis in other organs, is the result of a process of fibrogenesis in which myofibroblasts are the key effector cells. The uninterrupted accumulation of myofibroblasts and consequent persistent excess production of collagenous extracellular matrix and tensile force result in loss of normal function and ultimately radiation-induced fibrosis. During this process, myofibroblasts may be protected from apoptosis by acquiring an immune-privileged capacity, which allows continuous matrix synthesis. If this hypothesis proves to be correct, it would enable better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis and progression of ORN, and would help improve our ability to prevent occurrence of ORN, give an earlier diagnosis, and treat it more effectively.Keywords: osteoradionecrosis, apoptosis, fibrosis, mandible, myofibroblast

  4. Generation of ROS mediated by mechanical waves (ultrasound) and its possible applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duco, Walter; Grosso, Viviana; Zaccari, Daniel; Soltermann, Arnaldo T

    2016-10-15

    The thermal decomposition of 9,10 diphenylanthracene peroxide (DPAO 2 ) generates DPA and a mix of triplet and singlet molecular oxygen. For DPAO 2 the efficiency to produce singlet molecular oxygen is 0.35. On the other hand, it has shown that many thermal reactions can be carried out through the interaction of molecules with ultrasound. Ultrasound irradiation can create hydrodynamic stress (sonomechanical process), inertial cavitation (pyrolitic process) and long range effects mediated by radicals or ROS. Sonochemical reactions can be originated by pyrolytic like process, shock mechanical waves, thermal reactions and radical and ROS mediated reactions. Sonolysis of pure water can yield hydrogen or hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide (ROS). When DPAO 2 in 1,4 dioxane solution is treated with 20 or 24kHz and different power intensity the production of molecular singlet oxygen is observed. Specific scavengers like tetracyclone (TC) are used to demonstrate it. The efficiency now is 0.85 showing that the sonochemical process is much more efficient that the thermal one. Another endoperoxide, artemisinin was also studied. Unlike the concept of photosensitizer of photodynamic therapy, in spite of large amount of reported results in literature, the term sonosensitizer and the sonosensitization process are not well defined. We define sonosensitized reaction as one in which a chemical species decompose as consequence of cavitation phenomena producing ROS or other radicals and some other target species does undergo a chemical reaction. The concept could be reach rapidly other peroxides which are now under experimental studies. For artemisinin, an important antimalarian and anticancer drug, was established that ultrasound irradiation increases the effectiveness of the treatment but without any explanation. We show that artemisinin is an endoperoxide and behaves as a sonosensitizer in the sense of our definition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Patterns and possible mechanisms of soil CO2 uptake in sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Ke-Yu; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Wu, Bin; Qin, Shu-Gao; Liu, Zhen; She, Wei-Wei

    2016-02-15

    It has been reported that soils in drylands can absorb CO2, although the patterns and mechanisms of such a process remain under debate. To address this, we investigated the relationships between soil CO2 flux and meteorological factors and soil properties in Northwest China to reveal the reasons for "anomalous" soil CO2 flux in a desert ecosystem. Soil CO2 flux increased significantly and exponentially with surficial turbulence at the diel scale under dry conditions (Psoil CO2 flux demonstrated remarkable negative correlation with soil air pressure (Psoil water content was insufficient to dissolve the absorbed CO2 in dry conditions, but was sufficient in wet conditions. The concentration of soil HCO3(-) in the morning was higher than in the evening in dry conditions, but this pattern was reversed in wet conditions. These results imply that CO2 outgassing induced by turbulence, expansion of soil air, CO2 effusion from soil water, and carbonate precipitation during daytime can explain the abiotic diurnal CO2 release. Moreover, CO2 pumping from the atmosphere into the soil, caused mainly by carbonate dissolution, can account for nocturnal CO2 absorption in dry conditions. The abiotic soil CO2 flux pattern (CO2 absorption throughout the diel cycle) in wet conditions can be attributed to downward mass flow of soil CO2 and intensified soil air shrinkage, CO2 dissolving in soil water, and carbonate dissolution. These results provide a basis for determining the location of abiotic fixed carbon within soils in desert ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Possible mechanism of PNS protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinwen; Huang, Zhenguang; Zou, Xiaoqin; Yang, Yufang; Qiu, Yue; Wen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanism of the protective effect of Panax notoginsenosides (PNS) against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via the hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1)/Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3) pathway of autophagy. The rats underwent intraperitoneal injection with a single dose of cisplatin and a subset of rats were also intraperitoneally injected with 31.35 mg/kg PNS once a day. After 24 h exposure to cisplatin, the concentrations of urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (Scr) were determined. The rat renal tissue was examined using H&E-staining, and the mitochondria of renal tubular epithelial cells were observed using transmission electron microscopy. The expressions of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain (LC)3, autophagy-related gene (Atg)5, Beclin-1 and BNIP3 in rat renal tissue were detected using western blotting. The expression of HIF-1 was detected by immunohistochemistry. The results showed that PNS significantly protected against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, as evidenced by decreasing the concentration of blood BUN and Scr, the attenuation of renal histopathological changes and the mitochondrial damages of renal cells, and the increase of mitochondria autophagosome in renal tubular epithelial cells. Additionally, PNS significantly increased the expression of LC3 and the ratio of LC3II/LC3I in rat renal tissue. Moreover, PNS significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α, BNIP3, Atg5 and Beclin-1 in rat renal tissue. In conclusion, the protective effect of PNS on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was mainly due to its ability to enhancing the mitochondrial autophagy of renal tissue via the HIF-1α/BNIP3 pathway, and here is the first demonstration about it.

  7. Nondestructive Examination of Possible PWSCC in Control Rod Drive Mechanism Housings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Schuster, George J.; Harris, Rob V.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are focused on assessing the effectiveness of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for inspecting control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE methods as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. In describing two CRDM assemblies removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE measurements, this paper will address the following questions: (1) What did each technique detect? (2) What did each technique miss? and (3) How accurately did each technique characterize the detected flaws? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. One contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data and through-wall leakage; the other contained evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, but this was unconfirmed. The selected NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory based NDE methods were employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper will also describe the NDE methods used and discuss the NDE results. Future work will involve using the results from these NDE studies to guide the development of a destructive characterization plan to reveal the crack morphology and a comparison of the degradation found by the destructive evaluation with the recorded NDE responses

  8. Anti-amnesic effects of Ganoderma species: A possible cholinergic and antioxidant mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Ravneet; Singh, Varinder; Shri, Richa

    2017-08-01

    Mushrooms are valued for their nutritional as well as medicinal properties. Ganoderma species are used traditionally to treat neurological disorders but scientific evidence for this is insufficient. The present study was designed to systematically evaluate the anti-amnesic effect of selected Ganoderma species i.e. G. mediosinense and G. ramosissimum. Extracts of selected mushroom species were evaluated for their antioxidant activity and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition using in-vitro assays (DPPH and Ellman tests respectively). The anti-amnesic potential of the most active extract (i.e. 70% methanol extract of G. mediosinense) was confirmed using mouse model of scopolamine-induced amnesia. Mice were treated with bioactive extract and donepezil once orally before the induction of amnesia. Cognitive functions were evaluated using passive shock avoidance (PSA) and novel object recognition (NOR) tests. The effect on brain AChE activity, brain oxidative stress (TBARS level) and neuronal damage (H & E staining) were also assessed. In-vitro results showed strong antioxidant and AChE inhibitory activities by G. mediosinense extract (GME). Therefore, it was selected for in-vivo studies. GME pre-treatment (800mg/kg, p.o.) reversed the effect of scopolamine in mice, evident by significant decrease (p <0.05) in the transfer latency time and increase in object recognition index in PSA and NOR, respectively. GME significantly reduced the brain AChE activity and oxidative stress. Histopathological examination of brain tissues showed decrease in vacuolated cytoplasm and increase in pyramidal cells in brain hippocampal and cortical regions. GME exerts anti-amnesic effect through AChE inhibition and antioxidant mechanisms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. DHEA metabolism to the neurosteroid androsterone: a possible mechanism of DHEA's antidepressant action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Dor, Rivka; Marx, Christine E; Shampine, Lawrence J; Rubinow, David R; Schmidt, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Alterations in neurosteroid secretion have been implicated in the efficacy of antidepressants. In a previous study, the adrenal androgen DHEA, a precursor of the neurosteroid androsterone, produced antidepressant and libido-enhancing effects in patients with midlife depression. To investigate the mechanisms underlying DHEA's behavioral effects in this same patient group, we examined plasma levels of four additional neurosteroids implicated in the regulation of affective behavior. Blood samples were assayed for neurosteroids in men (n = 13) and women (n = 10) with midlife depression who previously participated in a crossover study in which DHEA and placebo were administered for 6 weeks each. Depression severity was measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Plasma levels of androsterone (ADT), allopregnanolone, pregnanolone, and pregnenolone were measured by GC-MS at baseline and week 6 of each treatment phase. Data were analyzed with repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA-R) and Bonferroni t tests. ADT levels (but not allopregnanolone, pregnanolone, and pregnenolone) increased after DHEA but not after placebo (F 2,42 = 3.3, p < 0.05). Post-DHEA ADT levels were higher in women than men [t 63 = 2.9, p < 0.05]. However, in both men and women who met criteria for clinical response on the CES-D, baseline ADT levels significantly increased post-DHEA, and the magnitude of the ADT increase post-DHEA treatment was similar in men and women. Consequently, it was the non-responders who accounted for the sex difference in post-DHEA plasma ADT levels, a difference that was driven by values in two women (the only female non-responders). The small sample size notwithstanding, these data emphasize the potential behavioral relevance of ADT in humans, which may include contribution to the antidepressant effects of DHEA.

  10. Comorbidity between Type 2 Diabetes and Depression in the Adult Population: Directions of the Association and Its Possible Pathophysiological Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Line Iden Berge

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes and depression are regarded as comorbid conditions, and three possible directions of the association between the diseases can underlie this observation of comorbidity. First, common etiology can increase a person’s risk of both diseases; second, persons with type 2 diabetes have increased prevalence or risk of future development of depression; or third, persons with depression have increased prevalence or risk of development of type 2 diabetes. This review gives an overview over possible pathophysiological mechanisms for each of the directions of the association between type 2 diabetes and depression and further discusses epigenetics as an additional, direction independent approach. We argue that unspecific pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the stress response might, at least to some extent, explain each of the directions of the association between type 2 diabetes and depression, while changes in brain structure and function among persons with diabetes and possible increased risk of development of type 2 diabetes after use of antidepressant agents could represent more disease specific mechanisms underlying the comorbidity.

  11. Chronotype and depressive symptoms in students: An investigation of possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berg, Julia F; Kivelä, Liia; Antypa, Niki

    2018-05-15

    Individuals with an evening chronotype are at increased risk of experiencing emotional problems, including depressive symptoms. However, the mechanisms underlying these associations remain unclear. The present study aimed to determine whether poor sleep quality, substance use and cognitive emotion regulation difficulties - which have been implicated in the etiology of depression - mediate the relationship between chronotype and depressive symptoms in a student sample, which was assessed cross-sectionally and after 1 year. A total of 742 Dutch students (75% women, mean age 21.4 ± 2.9 years) completed the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology, the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, a questionnaire assessing alcohol, caffeine, tobacco and cannabis use, the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire and the Behavioral Inhibition/Activation Scale. A subsample (n = 115) was assessed 1 year later with the same questionnaires. Cross-sectional analyses showed that evening chronotype was associated with more depressive symptoms, adjusted for age and gender (β = -0.082, p = 0.028). The relationship between eveningness and depressive symptoms was mediated by sleep quality, alcohol consumption and the cognitive emotion regulation strategies of self-blame and positive reappraisal. In longitudinal analyses, eveningness at baseline predicted more depressive symptoms at follow-up, adjusted for age and gender (β = -0.29, p = 0.002); after additional adjustment for baseline depressive symptoms, chronotype remained a significant predictor of depressive symptoms at T2 (β = -0.16, t = -2.01, p = 0.047). Only poor sleep quality at follow-up was a significant mediator of this relationship. Even though the effect is small in terms of explained variance, eveningness is related to depressive symptoms and this relationship is mediated by poor sleep quality, also in a prospective design. Self-blame and reduced positive

  12. Stable chlorine isotopes in arid non-marine basins: Instances and possible fractionation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastoe, C.J.

    2016-01-01

    Stable chlorine isotopes are useful geochemical tracers in processes involving the formation and evolution of evaporitic halite. Halite and dissolved chloride in groundwater that has interacted with halite in arid non-marine basins has a δ 37 Cl range of 0 ± 3‰, far greater than the range for marine evaporites. Basins characterized by high positive (+1 to +3‰), near-0‰, and negative (−0.3 to −2.6‰) are documented. Halite in weathered crusts of sedimentary rocks has δ 37 Cl values as high as +5.6‰. Salt-excluding halophyte plants excrete salt with a δ 37 Cl range of −2.1 to −0.8‰. Differentiated rock chloride sources exist, e.g. in granitoid micas, but cannot provide sufficient chloride to account for the observed data. Single-pass application of known fractionating mechanisms, equilibrium salt-crystal interaction and disequilibrium diffusive transport, cannot account for the large ranges of δ 37 Cl. Cumulative fractionation as a result of multiple wetting-drying cycles in vadose playas that produce halite crusts can produce observed positive δ 37 Cl values in hundreds to thousands of cycles. Diffusive isotope fractionation as a result of multiple wetting-drying cycles operating at a spatial scale of 1–10 cm can produce high δ 37 Cl values in residual halite. Chloride in rainwater is subject to complex fractionation, but develops negative δ 37 Cl values in certain situations; such may explain halite deposits with bulk negative δ 37 Cl values. Future field studies will benefit from a better understanding of hydrology and rainwater chemistry, and systematic collection of data for both Cl and Br. - Highlights: • δ 37 Cl in halite from arid, non-marine sedimentary basins ranges from −3 to +5.5‰. • Cl − in vadose playas may develop large isotope fractionation through cyclic wetting and drying. • Cl − in phreatic playas undergoes no fractionation as a result of cyclic wetting and drying. • Cl − in weathered

  13. Compassionate love as a mechanism linking sacred qualities of marriage to older couples' marital satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabey, Allen K; Rauer, Amy J; Jensen, Jakob F

    2014-10-01

    Previous work has underscored the robust links between sanctification of marriage and marital outcomes, and recent developments in the literature suggest that compassionate love, which is important for intimate relationships, may act as a mediator of that relationship. Accordingly, the current study used actor-partner interdependence models to examine the relationship between a spiritual cognition (i.e., perceived sacred qualities of marriage) and marital satisfaction, and to determine whether that relationship is mediated by compassionate love, in a sample of older married couples (N = 64). Results revealed that wives' greater sacred qualities of marriage were significantly and positively linked to marital satisfaction on the part of both spouses, and that these links were partially mediated by couples' reports of compassionate love. These findings highlight the importance of moving beyond simply establishing the existence of the link between global markers of involvement of religion and marriage to understanding how specific spiritual cognitions may foster better relationship quality, especially among older couples. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Children's Attentional Biases and "5-HTTLPR" Genotype: Potential Mechanisms Linking Mother and Child Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Brandon E.; Benas, Jessica S.; Grassia, Marie; McGeary, John

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examined the roles of specific cognitive (attentional bias) and genetic ("5-HTTLPR") risk factors in the intergenerational transmission of depression. Focusing first on the link between maternal history of major depressive disorder (MDD) and children's attentional biases, we found that children of mothers with a history…

  15. The Link between the Appendix and Ulcerative Colitis: Clinical Relevance and Potential Immunological Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahami, S.; Kooij, I. A.; Meijer, S. L.; van den Brink, G. R.; Buskens, C. J.; te Velde, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The human appendix has long been considered as a vestigial organ, an organ that has lost its function during evolution. In recent years, however, reports have emerged that link the appendix to numerous immunological functions in humans. Evidence has been presented for an important role of the

  16. Control Effect and Possible Mechanism of the Natural Compound Phenazine-1-Carboxamide against Botrytis cinerea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Zhang

    Full Text Available To develop new agents against strawberry grey mould and to aid in the development of biological pesticides, we investigated the inhibitory effect of a natural compound, phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN, against Botrytis cinerea using a growth rate assay. Additionally, indoor toxicity and the in vitro control effect of PCN were further studied to determine its potential mechanisms of action on B. cinerea. PCN was inhibitory against B. cinerea with a 50% effective concentration (EC50 of 108.12 μg/mL; the toxicity of PCN was equivalent to that of carbendazim (CBM. The best in vitro control effect of PCN against grey mould in strawberry (fruit reached 75.32%, which was slightly higher than that of CBM. The field control effect of PCN against grey mould reached a maximum of 72.31% at a PCN concentration of 700 μg/mL, which was 1.02 times higher than that of CBM. Fungistatic activity was observed at low concentrations of PCN, while high concentrations of PCN resulted in fungicidal activity against B. cinerea. This natural compound strongly inhibited both spore and sclerotium germination of B. cinerea, with the best relative inhibition rates of 77.03% and 82.11%, respectively. The inhibitory effect of PCN on mycelial growth of B. cinerea was significant and reached levels of 87.32%. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed that after 48 h of PCN treatment, the mycelia appeared loose, locally twisted, and folded, with exudation of contents; the mycelia was withered and twisted, with edge burrs, deformations, ruptures and a sheet-like structure. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that after 48 h of PCN treatment, the structure of the cell nucleus was unclear and the vacuoles had ruptured; additionally, various organelles exhibited disordered structures, there were substantial non-membrane transparent inclusions, the cells were plasmolysed, the cell walls were collapsed in some cases, and the hyphal tissue was essentially

  17. The possible physical mechanism for the EAP–SR co-action

    KAUST Repository

    Gong, Zhiqiang

    2017-11-17

    The anomalous characteristics of summer precipitation and atmospheric circulation in the East Asia–West Pacific Region (EA–WP) associated with the co-action of East Asia/Pacific teleconnection–Silk Road teleconnection (EAP–SR) are investigated in this study. The compositions of EAP–SR phase anomalies can be expressed as pattern I (+ +), pattern II (+ −), pattern III (− −), and pattern IV (− +) using EAP and SR indices. It is found that the spatial distribution of summer precipitation anomalies in EA–WP corresponding to pattern I (III) shows a tripole structure in the meridional direction and a zonal dipole structure in the subtropical region, while pattern II (IV) presents a tripole pattern in meridional direction with compressed and continuous anomalies in the zonal direction over the subtropical region. The similar meridional and zonal structures are also found in the geopotential height anomalies at 500-hPa, as well as wind anomalies and moisture convergence at 850-hPa. Finally, a schematic mechanism for the EAP–SR co-action upon the summer precipitation in EA–WP is built: (1) Pattern I (III) exhibits that the negative (positive) sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies over tropical East Pacific may cause the enhanced (weakened) convective activity dominating the West Pacific, trigger the positive (negative) EAP teleconnection and produce more (less) precipitation. Besides, the negative (positive) SST anomalies over the Indonesia Maritime Continent (IMC) may further weaken (strengthen) anomalous downward (upward) motion over the South China Sea (SCS), cause negative (positive) geopotential height anomalies at the middle troposphere and surrounding regions through the function of the tropical Hadley circulation. Then the negative (positive) geopotential height anomalies could motivate the positive (negative) EAP teleconnection through the northward propagation of wave-activity perturbation. Meanwhile, a positive (negative) geopotential

  18. The possible physical mechanism for the EAP-SR co-action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhiqiang; Feng, Guolin; Dogar, Muhammad Mubashar; Huang, Gang

    2017-11-01

    The anomalous characteristics of summer precipitation and atmospheric circulation in the East Asia-West Pacific Region (EA-WP) associated with the co-action of East Asia/Pacific teleconnection-Silk Road teleconnection (EAP-SR) are investigated in this study. The compositions of EAP-SR phase anomalies can be expressed as pattern I (+ +), pattern II (+ -), pattern III (- -), and pattern IV (- +) using EAP and SR indices. It is found that the spatial distribution of summer precipitation anomalies in EA-WP corresponding to pattern I (III) shows a tripole structure in the meridional direction and a zonal dipole structure in the subtropical region, while pattern II (IV) presents a tripole pattern in meridional direction with compressed and continuous anomalies in the zonal direction over the subtropical region. The similar meridional and zonal structures are also found in the geopotential height anomalies at 500-hPa, as well as wind anomalies and moisture convergence at 850-hPa. Finally, a schematic mechanism for the EAP-SR co-action upon the summer precipitation in EA-WP is built: (1) Pattern I (III) exhibits that the negative (positive) sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies over tropical East Pacific may cause the enhanced (weakened) convective activity dominating the West Pacific, trigger the positive (negative) EAP teleconnection and produce more (less) precipitation. Besides, the negative (positive) SST anomalies over the Indonesia Maritime Continent (IMC) may further weaken (strengthen) anomalous downward (upward) motion over the South China Sea (SCS), cause negative (positive) geopotential height anomalies at the middle troposphere and surrounding regions through the function of the tropical Hadley circulation. Then the negative (positive) geopotential height anomalies could motivate the positive (negative) EAP teleconnection through the northward propagation of wave-activity perturbation. Meanwhile, a positive (negative) geopotential height anomalous pattern

  19. Inflammation and lithium: clues to mechanisms contributing to suicide-linked traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beurel, E; Jope, R S

    2014-12-16

    Suicide is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, yet it remains difficult to understand the mechanistic provocations and to intervene therapeutically. Stress is recognized as a frequent precursor to suicide. Psychological stress is well established to cause activation of the inflammatory response, including causing neuroinflammation, an increase of inflammatory molecules in the central nervous system (CNS). Neuroinflammation is increasingly recognized as affecting many aspects of CNS functions and behaviors. In particular, much evidence demonstrates that inflammatory markers are elevated in traits that have been linked to suicidal behavior, including aggression, impulsivity and depression. Lithium is recognized as significantly reducing suicidal behavior, is anti-inflammatory and diminishes aggression, impulsivity and depression traits, each of which is associated with elevated inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effects of lithium result from its inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). GSK3 has been demonstrated to strongly promote inflammation, aggressive behavior in rodents and depression-like behaviors in rodents, whereas regulation of impulsivity by GSK3 has not yet been investigated. Altogether, evidence is building supporting the hypothesis that stress activates GSK3, which in turn promotes inflammation, and that inflammation is linked to behaviors associated with suicide, including particularly aggression, impulsivity and depression. Further investigation of these links may provide a clearer understanding of the causes of suicidal behavior and provide leads for the development of effective preventative interventions, which may include inhibitors of GSK3.

  20. Alzheimer ’s Disease: Possible Mechanisms Behind Neurohormesis Induced by Exposure to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevelacqua, J.J.; Mortazavi, S.M.J.

    2018-01-01

    In 2016, scientists reported that human exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (CT scans of the brain) might relieve symptoms of both Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD). The findings were unbelievable for those who were not familiar with neurohormesis. X-ray stimulation of the patient’s adaptive protection systems against neurodegenerative diseases was the mechanism proposed by those authors. Now, some more recent studies performed in the field of neurobiological research confirm that low levels of stress can produce protective responses against the pathogenic processes. This paper outlines possible protective consequences of LDR in preventing the pathogenesis of AD through mechanisms such as restoring the myelin sheath and preventing neurodegeneration caused by oxidative stress. Focal demyelination is frequently reported in the proximity of beta-amyloid plaques within neocortex. Extracellular accumulation of amyloid is among well-characterized pathological changes in AD. It should be noted that LDR has been shown to contribute to the regeneration and functional recovery after transverse peripheral nerve injury (through inducing increased production of VEGF and GAP-43), which advances both the axonal regeneration and myelination. Another mechanism which is possibly involved is preventing neurodegeneration caused by oxidative stress. While high doses can induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, oxidative stress and neuro-inflammation, substantial evidence now indicates that LDR can mitigate tissue damage through antioxidant defenses. Although adult neurogenesis has been reported to be beneficial for the regeneration of nervous system, some studies demonstrate that neurogenesis increases in AD brains. In spite of these reports, cellular therapy is introduced as a promising strategy for AD, and hence, LDR can affect the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Although such mechanisms are not fully known yet, it is hoped

  1. Decrease of intracellular pH as possible mechanism of embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louisse, Jochem; Bai Yanqing; Verwei, Miriam; Sandt, Johannes J.M. van de; Blaauboer, Bas J.; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Embryotoxicity of glycol ethers is caused by their alkoxyacetic acid metabolites, but the mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of these acid metabolites is so far not known. The present study investigates a possible mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites using the methoxyacetic acid (MAA) metabolite of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether as the model compound. The results obtained demonstrate an MAA-induced decrease of the intracellular pH (pH i ) of embryonic BALB/c-3T3 cells as well as of embryonic stem (ES)-D3 cells, at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation. These results suggest a mechanism for MAA-mediated embryotoxicity similar to the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the drugs valproic acid and acetazolamide (ACZ), known to decrease the pH i in vivo, and therefore used as positive controls. The embryotoxic alkoxyacetic acid metabolites ethoxyacetic acid, butoxyacetic acid and phenoxyacetic acid also caused an intracellular acidification of BALB/c-3T3 cells at concentrations that are known to inhibit ES-D3 cell differentiation. Two other embryotoxic compounds, all-trans-retinoic acid and 5-fluorouracil, did not decrease the pH i of embryonic cells at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation, pointing at a different mechanism of embryotoxicity of these compounds. MAA and ACZ induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of ES-D3 cell differentiation, which was enhanced by amiloride, an inhibitor of the Na + /H + -antiporter, corroborating an important role of the pH i in the embryotoxic mechanism of both compounds. Together, the results presented indicate that a decrease of the pH i may be the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the alkoxyacetic acid metabolites of the glycol ethers.

  2. Possibility of applying mechanized coal mining in the mine 'Soko', with the comparative advantages of production results and impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denić Miodrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mining method applied in the RMU 'Soko', is repeatedly technologically modified and reached the maximum limit in terms of productivity, level of job performance and safety at work. And all the other methods, which are in the technological process of obtaining coal rely on the technology of drilling-blasting works, in terms of the mine 'Soko', can not allow mass production of coal, regarding natural and technical-technological conditions prevailing in Sokobanja coal basin. Therefore, this paper proposes a possible solution which would enable a significant increase in annual production by appling mechanized coal mining system.

  3. Fetal Stress and Programming of Hypoxic/Ischemic-Sensitive Phenotype in the Neonatal Brain: Mechanisms and Possible Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Gonzalez, Pablo; Zhang, Lubo

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence of epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies has clearly shown a close link between adverse in utero environment and the increased risk of neurological, psychological and psychiatric disorders in later life. Fetal stresses, such as hypoxia, malnutrition, and fetal exposure to nicotine, alcohol, cocaine and glucocorticoids may directly or indirectly act at cellular and molecular levels to alter the brain development and result in programming of heightened brain vulnerability to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and the development of neurological diseases in the postnatal life. The underlying mechanisms are not well understood. However, glucocorticoids may play a crucial role in epigenetic programming of neurological disorders of fetal origins. This review summarizes the recent studies about the effects of fetal stress on the abnormal brain development, focusing on the cellular, molecular and epigenetic mechanisms and highlighting the central effects of glucocorticoids on programming of hypoxicischemic-sensitive phenotype in the neonatal brain, which may enhance the understanding of brain pathophysiology resulting from fetal stress and help explore potential targets of timely diagnosis, prevention and intervention in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and other for brain disorders. PMID:22627492

  4. Fetal stress and programming of hypoxic/ischemic-sensitive phenotype in the neonatal brain: mechanisms and possible interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Gonzalez, Pablo; Zhang, Lubo

    2012-08-01

    Growing evidence of epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies has clearly shown a close link between adverse in utero environment and the increased risk of neurological, psychological and psychiatric disorders in later life. Fetal stresses, such as hypoxia, malnutrition, and fetal exposure to nicotine, alcohol, cocaine and glucocorticoids may directly or indirectly act at cellular and molecular levels to alter the brain development and result in programming of heightened brain vulnerability to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and the development of neurological diseases in the postnatal life. The underlying mechanisms are not well understood. However, glucocorticoids may play a crucial role in epigenetic programming of neurological disorders of fetal origins. This review summarizes the recent studies about the effects of fetal stress on the abnormal brain development, focusing on the cellular, molecular and epigenetic mechanisms and highlighting the central effects of glucocorticoids on programming of hypoxic-ischemic-sensitive phenotype in the neonatal brain, which may enhance the understanding of brain pathophysiology resulting from fetal stress and help explore potential targets of timely diagnosis, prevention and intervention in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and other brain disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Epigenetics as a mechanism linking developmental exposures to long-term toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barouki, R; Melén, E; Herceg, Z

    2018-01-01

    A variety of experimental and epidemiological studies lend support to the Developmental Origin of Health and Disease (DOHaD) concept. Yet, the actual mechanisms accounting for mid- and long-term effects of early-life exposures remain unclear. Epigenetic alterations such as changes in DNA methylat......A variety of experimental and epidemiological studies lend support to the Developmental Origin of Health and Disease (DOHaD) concept. Yet, the actual mechanisms accounting for mid- and long-term effects of early-life exposures remain unclear. Epigenetic alterations such as changes in DNA...

  6. Phase stability, mechanical properties, hardness, and possible reactive routing of chromium triboride from first-principle investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Ming-Min; Kuang, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Shao, Peng; Ding, Li-Ping; Huang, Xiao-Fen

    2013-01-01

    The first-principles calculations are employed to provide a fundamental understanding of the structural features and relative stability, mechanical and electronic properties, and possible reactive route for chromium triboride. The predicted new phase of CrB 3 belongs to the rhombohedral phase with R-3m symmetry and it transforms into a hexagonal phase with P-6m2 symmetry at 64 GPa. The mechanical and thermodynamic stabilities of CrB 3 are verified by the calculated elastic constants and formation enthalpies. Also, the full phonon dispersion calculations confirm the dynamic stability of predicted CrB 3 . Considering the role of metallic contributions, the calculated hardness values from our semiempirical method for rhombohedral and hexagonal phases are 23.8 GPa and 22.1 GPa, respectively. In addition, the large shear moduli, Young's moduli, low Poisson's ratios, and small B/G ratios indicate that they are potential hard materials. Relative enthalpy calculations with respect to possible constituents are also investigated to assess the prospects for phase formation and an attempt at high-pressure synthesis is suggested to obtain chromium triboride

  7. Linking susceptibility genes and pathogenesis mechanisms using mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, Steve P.; Morawski, Peter A.; Bolland, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) represents a challenging autoimmune disease from a clinical perspective because of its varied forms of presentation. Although broad-spectrum steroids remain the standard treatment for SLE, they have many side effects and only provide temporary relief from the symptoms of the disease. Thus, gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic traits and biological pathways that confer susceptibility to SLE will help in the design of more targeted and effective therapeutics. Both human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and investigations using a variety of mouse models of SLE have been valuable for the identification of the genes and pathways involved in pathogenesis. In this Review, we link human susceptibility genes for SLE with biological pathways characterized in mouse models of lupus, and discuss how the mechanistic insights gained could advance drug discovery for the disease. PMID:25147296

  8. The Kynurenine Pathway: a Proposed Mechanism Linking Diabetes and Periodontal Disease in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishabh Kapila

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characte-rized by dysregulation of carbohydrate, protein and lipid metabolism. Diabetes could result, in part, in activation of tryptophan metabolism. Diabetic patients are more susceptible to gingivitis and periodontitis than healthy subjects. The salivary kynurenine derivatives are also implicated in the onset and development of periodontal dis-ease in humans.The hypothesis: We propose that the tryptophan metabolites via kynurenine pathway may lead to diabetes and an increased severity of periodontal disease in diabetic patients, thus linking both diabetes and periodontal disease.Evaluation of the hypothesis: Tryptophan has been found in significant amount in saliva in diabetic individuals in some studies, particularly tryptophan metabolites like kynurenine and anthranilic acid. Moreover, altered tryptophan metabolism has also been reported in the onset of periodontal disease. Thus, this correlation between diabetes mellitus, periodontal disease and salivary tryptophan metabolite levels could be related to the impaired kynurenine pathway metabolism of tryptophan.

  9. Linking susceptibility genes and pathogenesis mechanisms using mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve P. Crampton

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE represents a challenging autoimmune disease from a clinical perspective because of its varied forms of presentation. Although broad-spectrum steroids remain the standard treatment for SLE, they have many side effects and only provide temporary relief from the symptoms of the disease. Thus, gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic traits and biological pathways that confer susceptibility to SLE will help in the design of more targeted and effective therapeutics. Both human genome-wide association studies (GWAS and investigations using a variety of mouse models of SLE have been valuable for the identification of the genes and pathways involved in pathogenesis. In this Review, we link human susceptibility genes for SLE with biological pathways characterized in mouse models of lupus, and discuss how the mechanistic insights gained could advance drug discovery for the disease.

  10. Essential Features of Serious Games Design in Higher Education: Linking Learning Attributes to Game Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameras, Petros; Arnab, Sylvester; Dunwell, Ian; Stewart, Craig; Clarke, Samantha; Petridis, Panagiotis

    2017-01-01

    This paper consolidates evidence and material from a range of specialist and disciplinary fields to provide an evidence-based review and synthesis on the design and use of serious games in higher education. Search terms identified 165 papers reporting conceptual and empirical evidence on how learning attributes and game mechanics may be planned,…

  11. 3D mechanical stratigraphy of a deformed multi-layer: Linking sedimentary architecture and strain partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawood, Adam J.; Bond, Clare E.

    2018-01-01

    Stratigraphic influence on structural style and strain distribution in deformed sedimentary sequences is well established, in models of 2D mechanical stratigraphy. In this study we attempt to refine existing models of stratigraphic-structure interaction by examining outcrop scale 3D variations in sedimentary architecture and the effects on subsequent deformation. At Monkstone Point, Pembrokeshire, SW Wales, digital mapping and virtual scanline data from a high resolution virtual outcrop have been combined with field observations, sedimentary logs and thin section analysis. Results show that significant variation in strain partitioning is controlled by changes, at a scale of tens of metres, in sedimentary architecture within Upper Carboniferous fluvio-deltaic deposits. Coupled vs uncoupled deformation of the sequence is defined by the composition and lateral continuity of mechanical units and unit interfaces. Where the sedimentary sequence is characterized by gradational changes in composition and grain size, we find that deformation structures are best characterized by patterns of distributed strain. In contrast, distinct compositional changes vertically and in laterally equivalent deposits results in highly partitioned deformation and strain. The mechanical stratigraphy of the study area is inherently 3D in nature, due to lateral and vertical compositional variability. Consideration should be given to 3D variations in mechanical stratigraphy, such as those outlined here, when predicting subsurface deformation in multi-layers.

  12. The Weakest Link : Spatial Variability in the Piping Failure Mechanism of Dikes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanning, W.

    2012-01-01

    Piping is an important failure mechanism of flood defense structures. A dike fails due to piping when a head difference causes first the uplift of an inland blanket layer, and subsequently soil erosion due to a ground water flow. Spatial variability of subsoil parameters causes the probability of

  13. Bisphenol A accelerates toxic amyloid formation of human islet amyloid polypeptide: a possible link between bisphenol A exposure and type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Gong

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is a chemical compound widely used in manufacturing plastic products. Recent epidemiological studies suggest BPA exposure is positively associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, however the mechanisms underlying this link remain unclear. Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP is a hormone synthesized and secreted by the pancreatic β-cells. Misfolding of hIAPP into toxic oligomers and mature fibrils can disrupt cell membrane and lead to β-cell death, which is regarded as one of the causative factors of T2DM. To test whether there are any connections between BPA exposure and hIAPP misfolding, we investigated the effects of BPA on hIAPP aggregation using thioflavin-T based fluorescence, transmission electronic microscopy, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, size-exclusion chromatography, fluorescence-dye leakage assay in an artificial micelle system and the generation of reactive oxygen species in INS-1 cells. We demonstrated that BPA not only dose-dependently promotes the aggregation of hIAPP and enhances the membrane disruption effects of hIAPP, but also promotes the extent of hIAPP aggregation related oxidative stress. Taken together, our results suggest that BPA exposure increased T2DM risk may involve the exacerbated toxic aggregation of hIAPP.

  14. Effect of food azo dye tartrazine on learning and memory functions in mice and rats, and the possible mechanisms involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yonglin; Li, Chunmei; Shen, Jingyu; Yin, Huaxian; An, Xiulin; Jin, Haizhu

    2011-08-01

    Tartrazine is an artificial azo dye commonly used in human food and pharmaceutical products. The present study was conducted to evaluate the toxic effect of tartrazine on the learning and memory functions in mice and rats. Animals were administered different doses of tartrazine for a period of 30 d and were evaluated by open-field test, step-through test, and Morris water maze test, respectively. Furthermore, the biomarkers of the oxidative stress and pathohistology were also measured to explore the possible mechanisms involved. The results indicated that tartrazine extract significantly enhanced active behavioral response to the open field, increased the escape latency in Morris water maze test and decreased the retention latency in step-through tests. The decline in the activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) as well as a rise in the level of malonaldehyde (MDA) were observed in the brain of tartrazine-treated rats, and these changes were associated with the brain from oxidative damage. The dose levels of tartrazine in the present study produced a few adverse effects in learning and memory functions in animals. The mechanisms might be attributed to promoting lipid peroxidation products and reactive oxygen species, inhibiting endogenous antioxidant defense enzymes and the brain tissue damage. Tartrazine is an artificial azo dye commonly used in human food and pharmaceutical products. Since the last assessment carried out by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives in 1964, many new studies have been conducted. However, there is a little information about the effects on learning and memory performance. The present study was conducted to evaluate the toxic effect of tartrazine on the learning and memory functions in animals and its possible mechanism involved. Based on our results, we believe that more extensive assessment of food additives in current use is warranted. © 2011 Institute of Food

  15. Benzodiazepine receptor ligand influences on learning: an endogenous modulatory mechanism mediated by benzodiazepines possibly of alimentary origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Izquierdo

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available In rats pre-but not post-training ip administration of either flumazenil, a central benzodiazepine (BSD receptor antagonist, or of n-butyl-B-carboline-carboxylate (BCCB, an inverse agonist, enhanced retention of inhibitory avoidance learning. Flumazenil vlocked the enhancing effect of BCCB, and the inhibitory effect of the BZD agonists clonazepam and diazepam also given pre-training. Post-training administration of these drugs had no effects. The peripheral BZD receptor agonist/chloride channel blocker Ro5-4864 had no effect on the inhibitory avoidance task when given ip prior to training, buth it caused enhancement when given immediately post-training either ip or icv. This effect was blocked by PK11195, a competitive antagonist of Ro5-4864. These results suggest that ther is an endogenous mechanism mediated by BZD agonists, which is sensitive to inverse agonists and that normally down-regulates the formation of memories through a mechanism involving GABA-A receptors and the corresponding chloride channels. The most likely agonists for the endogenous mechanism suggested are the diazepam-like BZDs found in brain whose origin is possibly alimentary. Levels of these BZDs in the cortex were found to sharply decrease after inhibitory acoidance training or mere exposure to the training apparatus.

  16. Efficacy of topical tofacitinib in promoting hair growth in non-scarring alopecia: possible mechanism via VEGF induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meephansan, Jitlada; Thummakriengkrai, J; Ponnikorn, S; Yingmema, W; Deenonpoe, R; Suchonwanit, P

    2017-11-01

    Tofacitinib is a Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) inhibitor that promotes hair growth; however, the efficacy and mechanism of this effect are not yet understood. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and mechanism of topical tofacitinib on hair growth in mice. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were divided equally into four groups and treated topically with tofacitinib, minoxidil, or vehicle once daily for 21 days. Weekly photographs were taken to determine the area and rate of hair growth, and tissue samples were collected for histopathological evaluation. mRNA and protein expression of anagen-maintaining growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), were determined via RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. Tofacitinib-treated mice exhibited more hair regrowth than either minoxidil-treated or control mice did between day 7 and 21 (P tofacitinib also promoted more rapid hair growth rate than topical minoxidil or control did (P tofacitinib-treated group. Hair follicles in the minoxidil- and vehicle-treated groups were more often classified as catagen and anagen. VEGF mRNA and protein expression in the tofacitinib-treated group was significantly greater than those in the other groups (P tofacitinib-treated mice. Topical tofacitinib is effective in promoting hair growth, and the possible mechanism involves increased VEGF levels and lowered inflammation. This study will help develop a new therapeutic option for non-scarring alopecia.

  17. Migraine, vertigo and migrainous vertigo: Links between vestibular and pain mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Carey D

    2011-01-01

    This review develops the hypothesis that co-morbid balance disorders and migraine can be understood as additive effects of processing afferent vestibular and pain information in pre-parabrachial and pre-thalamic pathways, that have consequences on cortical mechanisms influencing perception, interoception and affect. There are remarkable parallel neurochemical phenotypes for inner ear and trigeminal ganglion cells and these afferent channels appear to converge in shared central pathways for vestibular and nociceptive information processing. These pathways share expression of receptors targeted by anti-migraine drugs. New evidence is also presented regarding the distribution of serotonin receptors in the planum semilunatum of the primate cristae ampullaris, which may indicate involvement of inner ear ionic homeostatic mechanisms in audiovestibular symptoms that can accompany migraine.

  18. Barrier and mechanical properties of plasticized and cross-linked nanocellulose coatings for paper packaging applications

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera, M. A. (Martha A.); Mathew, A. P. (Aji P.); Oksman, K. (Kristiina)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Barrier, mechanical and thermal properties of porous paper substrates dip-coated with nanocellulose (NC) were studied. Sorbitol plasticizer was used to improve the toughness, and citric acid cross-linker to improve the moisture stability of the coatings. In general, the addition of sorbitol increased the barrier properties, maximum strength and toughness as well as the thermal stability of the samples when compared to the non-modified NC coatings. The barrier properties significan...

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Resistance in Humans and Their Potential Links With Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Morino, Katsutaro; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies using magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown that decreased insulin-stimulated muscle glycogen synthesis due to a defect in insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity is a major factor in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. The molecular mechanism underlying defective insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity can be attributed to increases in intramyocellular lipid metabolites such as fatty acyl CoAs and diacylglycerol, which in turn activate a serine/threonine kina...

  20. The link between bond forfeiture and pretrial release mechanism: The case of Dallas County, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clipper, Stephen J; Morris, Robert G; Russell-Kaplan, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of four pretrial jail release mechanisms (i.e., bond types) commonly used during the pretrial phase of the criminal justice process in terms of their ability to discriminate between defendants failing to appear in court (i.e., bond forfeiture). These include attorney bonds, cash bonds, commercial bail bonds, and release via a pretrial services agency. A multi-treatment propensity score matching protocol was employed to assess between-release-mechanism differences in the conditional probability of failure to appear/bond forfeiture. Data were culled from archival state justice records comprising all defendants booked into the Dallas County, Texas jail during 2008 (n = 29,416). The results suggest that defendants released via commercial bail bonds were less likely to experience failure to appear leading to the bond forfeiture process compared to equivalent defendants released via cash, attorney, and pretrial services bonds. This finding held across different offense categories. The study frames these differences within a discussion encompassing procedural variation within and between each release mechanism, thereby setting the stage for further research and dialog regarding potential justice reform.

  1. The link between bond forfeiture and pretrial release mechanism: The case of Dallas County, Texas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Clipper

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of four pretrial jail release mechanisms (i.e., bond types commonly used during the pretrial phase of the criminal justice process in terms of their ability to discriminate between defendants failing to appear in court (i.e., bond forfeiture. These include attorney bonds, cash bonds, commercial bail bonds, and release via a pretrial services agency.A multi-treatment propensity score matching protocol was employed to assess between-release-mechanism differences in the conditional probability of failure to appear/bond forfeiture. Data were culled from archival state justice records comprising all defendants booked into the Dallas County, Texas jail during 2008 (n = 29,416.The results suggest that defendants released via commercial bail bonds were less likely to experience failure to appear leading to the bond forfeiture process compared to equivalent defendants released via cash, attorney, and pretrial services bonds. This finding held across different offense categories. The study frames these differences within a discussion encompassing procedural variation within and between each release mechanism, thereby setting the stage for further research and dialog regarding potential justice reform.

  2. Plantar Fasciitis and the Windlass Mechanism: A Biomechanical Link to Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Terry R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Plantar fasciitis is a prevalent problem, with limited consensus among clinicians regarding the most effective treatment. The purpose of this literature review is to provide a systematic approach to the treatment of plantar fasciitis based on the windlass mechanism model. Data Sources: We searched MEDLINE, SPORT Discus, and CINAHL from 1966 to 2003 using the key words plantar fasciitis, windlass mechanism, pronation, heel pain, and heel spur. Data Synthesis: We offer a biomechanical application for the evaluation and treatment of plantar fasciitis based on a review of the literature for the windlass mechanism model. This model provides a means for describing plantar fasciitis conditions such that clinicians can formulate a potential causal relationship between the conditions and their treatments. Conclusions/Recommendations: Clinicians' understanding of the biomechanical causes of plantar fasciitis should guide the decision-making process concerning the evaluation and treatment of heel pain. Use of this approach may improve clinical outcomes because intervention does not merely treat physical symptoms but actively addresses the influences that resulted in the condition. Principles from this approach might also provide a basis for future research investigating the efficacy of plantar fascia treatment. PMID:16558682

  3. Conduction mechanism in assemblies of metal nanoparticles linked by organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, K.-H.; Herrmann, J.; Raguse, B.; Baxter, G.; Reda, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: We have investigated theoretically and experimentally electron transport through thin films of gold nanoparticles which are linked by alkanedithiol molecules of different chain lengths. We find that conduction between neighbouring nanoparticles takes place by electron tunnelling along weakly conducting organic linker molecules. Using a tight binding model for the alkanedithiol molecules to describe the tunnelling process we predict the conductivity to decrease exponentially with the length of the molecules. During tunnelling the electron has to overcome a charging energy due to the electron-hole interaction between tunnelling electrons and the corresponding holes left behind on the donor nanoparticle. Experimentally we find that large applied voltages cause nonlinear I-V characteristics and that the temperature dependence of the conductivity does not show Arrhenius behaviour but instead is of the form exp[-(E o /kT) 1/2 ]. Using percolation theory for a network of metal nanoparticles separated by barriers we show that strong disorder caused by variations in nanoparticle size and linker length as well as randomly trapped electric charges on the linker molecules can well explain our experimental data

  4. Pore Pressure Diffusion as a possible mechanism for the Ag. Ioanis 2001 earthquake swarm activity (Gulf of Corinth, Central Greece).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallianatos, F.; Michas, G.; Papadakis, G.; Sammonds, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Gulf of Corinth rift (Central Greece) is one of the most seismotectonically active areas in Europe (Ambraseys and Jackson, 1990; 1997), with an important continental N-S extension of about 13 mm/yr and 6 mm/yr at the west and east part respectively (Clarke et al., 1997a). The seismicity of the area includes 5 main earthquakes of magnitude greater than 5.8 since 1960. In the western part of the rift, where the extension reaches its maximum value, earthquake swarms are often being observed (Bourouis and Cornet, 2009). Such an earthquake crisis has been occurred on 2001 at the southern margin of the west part of the rift. The crisis lasted about 100 days with a major event the Ag. Ioanis earthquake (4.3 Mw) on 8th of April 2001 (Pacchiani and Lyon-Caen, 2010). The possible relation between fluids flow and the observed earthquake swarms at the west part of the Gulf of Corinth rift has been discussed in the works of Bourouis and Cornet (2009) and Pacchiani and Lyon-Caen (2010). In the present work we examine the spatiotemporal properties of the Ag. Ioanis 2001 earthquake swarm, using data from the CRL network (http://crlab.eu/). We connect these properties to a mechanism due to pore pressure diffusion (Shapiro et al., 1997) and we estimate the hydraulic diffusivity and the permeability of the surrounding rocks. A back front of the seismicity (Parotidis et al., 2004) is also been observed, related to the migration of seismicity and the development of a quiescence region near the area of the initial pore pressure perturbation. Moreover, anisotropy of the hydraulic diffusivity has been observed, revealing the heterogeneity of the surrounding rocks and the fracture systems. This anisotropy is consistent in direction with the fault zone responsible for the Ag. Ioanis earthquake (Pacchiani and Lyon-Caen, 2010). Our results indicate that fluids flow and pore pressure perturbations are possible mechanisms for the initiation and the evolution of the Ag. Ioanis 2001

  5. Endocrine and metabolic mechanisms linking postpartum glucose with early embryonic and foetal development in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucy, M C; Butler, S T; Garverick, H A

    2014-05-01

    Milk and milk solids production per cow is increasing annually in dairy systems. Peak milk production is in early lactation when the uterus and ovary are recovering from the previous pregnancy. The competing processes of milk production and restoration of reproductive function can be at odds, particularly if unique homeorhetic mechanisms that typify early lactation become imbalanced and cows experience metabolic disease. Homeorhesis leads to an increase in the synthesis of glucose that is irreversibly lost to milk lactose. Irreversible loss of glucose during lactation can invoke an endocrine and metabolic state that impinges upon postpartum uterine health, oestrous cyclicity and subsequent establishment of pregnancy. The first 30 days postpartum may be most critical in terms of the impact that metabolites and metabolic hormones have on reproduction. Depressed immune function caused in part by the postpartum metabolic profile leads to a failure in uterine involution and uterine disease. Oestrous cyclicity (interval to first ovulation and subsequent periodicity) is affected by the same hormones and metabolites that control postpartum immune function. Slower growth of the embryo or foetus perhaps explained by the unique metabolic profile during lactation may predispose cows to pregnancy loss. Understanding homeorhetic mechanisms that involve glucose and collectively affect postpartum uterine health, oestrous cyclicity and the establishment of pregnancy should lead to methods to improve postpartum fertility in dairy cows.

  6. Linking the mechanics and energetics of hopping with elastic ankle exoskeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Dominic James; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2012-12-15

    The springlike mechanics of the human leg during bouncing gaits has inspired the design of passive assistive devices that use springs to aid locomotion. The purpose of this study was to test whether a passive spring-loaded ankle exoskeleton could reduce the mechanical and energetic demands of bilateral hopping on the musculoskeletal system. Joint level kinematics and kinetics were collected with electromyographic and metabolic energy consumption data for seven participants hopping at four frequencies (2.2, 2.5, 2.8, and 3.2 Hz). Hopping was performed without an exoskeleton; with an springless exoskeleton; and with a spring-loaded exoskeleton. Spring-loaded ankle exoskeletons reduced plantar flexor muscle activity and the biological contribution to ankle joint moment (15-25%) and average positive power (20-40%). They also facilitated reductions in metabolic power (15-20%) across frequencies from 2.2 to 2.8 Hz compared with hopping with a springless exoskeleton. Reductions in metabolic power compared with hopping with no exoskeleton were restricted to hopping at 2.5 Hz only (12%). These results highlighted the importance of reducing the rate of muscular force production and work to achieve metabolic reductions. They also highlighted the importance of assisting muscles acting at the knee joint. Exoskeleton designs may need to be tuned to optimize exoskeleton mass, spring stiffness, and spring slack length to achieve greater metabolic reductions.

  7. Moist Orographic Convection: Physical Mechanisms and Links to Surface-Exchange Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Kirshbaum

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current understanding of moist orographic convection and its regulation by surface-exchange processes. Such convection tends to develop when and where moist instability coincides with sufficient terrain-induced ascent to locally overcome convective inhibition. The terrain-induced ascent can be owing to mechanical (airflow over or around an obstacle and/or thermal (differential heating over sloping terrain forcing. For the former, the location of convective initiation depends on the dynamical flow regime. In “unblocked” flows that ascend the barrier, the convection tends to initiate over the windward slopes, while in “blocked” flows that detour around the barrier, the convection tends to initiate upstream and/or downstream of the high terrain where impinging flows split and rejoin, respectively. Processes that destabilize the upstream flow for mechanically forced moist convection include large-scale moistening and ascent, positive surface sensible and latent heat fluxes, and differential advection in baroclinic zones. For thermally forced flows, convective initiation is driven by thermally direct circulations with sharp updrafts over or downwind of the mountain crest (daytime or foot (nighttime. Along with the larger-scale background flow, local evapotranspiration and transport of moisture, as well as thermodynamic heterogeneities over the complex terrain, regulate moist instability in such events. Longstanding limitations in the quantitative understanding of related processes, including both convective preconditioning and initiation, must be overcome to improve the prediction of this convection, and its collective effects, in weather and climate models.

  8. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus k c and k ¯ and the preferred monolayer curvature J 0 m , and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of k c and the area compression modulus k A are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k ¯ and J 0 m can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k ¯ and J 0 m change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k ¯ 0 m ≫0, especially at low ionic strengths. We anticipate that these changes lead to unstable membranes as these become vulnerable to pore formation or disintegration into lipid disks

  9. A polypeptide-DNA hybrid with selective linking capability applied to single molecule nano-mechanical measurements using optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Moayed

    Full Text Available Many applications in biosensing, biomaterial engineering and single molecule biophysics require multiple non-covalent linkages between DNA, protein molecules, and surfaces that are specific yet strong. Here, we present a novel method to join proteins and dsDNA molecule at their ends, in an efficient, rapid and specific manner, based on the recently developed linkage between the protein StrepTactin (STN and the peptide StrepTag II (ST. We introduce a two-step approach, in which we first construct a hybrid between DNA and a tandem of two STs peptides (tST. In a second step, this hybrid is linked to polystyrene bead surfaces and Maltose Binding Protein (MBP using STN. Furthermore, we show the STN-tST linkage is more stable against forces applied by optical tweezers than the commonly used biotin-Streptavidin (STV linkage. It can be used in conjunction with Neutravidin (NTV-biotin linkages to form DNA tethers that can sustain applied forces above 65 pN for tens of minutes in a quarter of the cases. The method is general and can be applied to construct other surface-DNA and protein-DNA hybrids. The reversibility, high mechanical stability and specificity provided by this linking procedure make it highly suitable for single molecule mechanical studies, as well as biosensing and lab on chip applications.

  10. 5-HTTLPR polymorphism is linked to neural mechanisms of selective attention in preschoolers from lower socioeconomic status backgrounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Isbell

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available While a growing body of research has identified experiential factors associated with differences in selective attention, relatively little is known about the contribution of genetic factors to the skill of sustained selective attention, especially in early childhood. Here, we assessed the association between the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR genotypes and the neural mechanisms of selective attention in young children from lower socioeconomic status (SES backgrounds. Event-related potentials (ERPs were recorded during a dichotic listening task from 121 children (76 females, aged 40–67 months, who were also genotyped for the short and long allele of 5-HTTLPR. The effect of selective attention was measured as the difference in ERP mean amplitudes elicited by identical probe stimuli embedded in stories when they were attended versus unattended. Compared to children homozygous for the long allele, children who carried at least one copy of the short allele showed larger effects of selective attention on neural processing. These findings link the short allele of the 5-HTTLPR to enhanced neural mechanisms of selective attention and lay the groundwork for future studies of gene-by-environment interactions in the context of key cognitive skills.

  11. 5-HTTLPR polymorphism is linked to neural mechanisms of selective attention in preschoolers from lower socioeconomic status backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbell, Elif; Stevens, Courtney; Hampton Wray, Amanda; Bell, Theodore; Neville, Helen J

    2016-12-01

    While a growing body of research has identified experiential factors associated with differences in selective attention, relatively little is known about the contribution of genetic factors to the skill of sustained selective attention, especially in early childhood. Here, we assessed the association between the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) genotypes and the neural mechanisms of selective attention in young children from lower socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during a dichotic listening task from 121 children (76 females, aged 40-67 months), who were also genotyped for the short and long allele of 5-HTTLPR. The effect of selective attention was measured as the difference in ERP mean amplitudes elicited by identical probe stimuli embedded in stories when they were attended versus unattended. Compared to children homozygous for the long allele, children who carried at least one copy of the short allele showed larger effects of selective attention on neural processing. These findings link the short allele of the 5-HTTLPR to enhanced neural mechanisms of selective attention and lay the groundwork for future studies of gene-by-environment interactions in the context of key cognitive skills. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Framing Mechanisms Linking HIV-Related Stigma, Adherence to Treatment, and Health Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Abigail M.; Weiser, Sheri D.; Johnson, Mallory O.; Rice, Whitney S.; Turan, Janet M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a conceptual framework that highlights how unique dimensions of individual-level HIV-related stigma (perceived community stigma, experienced stigma, internalized stigma, and anticipated stigma) might differently affect the health of those living with HIV. HIV-related stigma is recognized as a barrier to both HIV prevention and engagement in HIV care, but little is known about the mechanisms through which stigma leads to worse health behaviors or outcomes. Our conceptual framework posits that, in the context of intersectional and structural stigmas, individual-level dimensions of HIV-related stigma operate through interpersonal factors, mental health, psychological resources, and biological stress pathways. A conceptual framework that encompasses recent advances in stigma science can inform future research and interventions aiming to address stigma as a driver of HIV-related health. PMID:28426316

  13. Student-Centered Instruction and Academic Achievement: Linking Mechanisms of Educational Inequality to Schools’ Instructional Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ida Gran; Andersen, Simon Calmar

    2017-01-01

    educational inequality. We analyze whether the impact of student-centered instructional strategies on academic achievement differs for students with different socioeconomic backgrounds. Results suggest that a student-centered instructional strategy has a negative impact on academic achievement in general......, and for students with low parental education in particular. Our findings support the argument that the instructional strategy of schools is an important mechanism in generating educational inequality through the stratification of learning opportunities.......Research in the sociology of education argues that the educational system provides different learning opportunities for students with different socioeconomic backgrounds and that this circumstance makes the educational process an important institutional context for the reproduction of educational...

  14. Linking definitions, mechanisms, and modeling of drought-induced tree death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderegg, William R L; Berry, Joseph A; Field, Christopher B

    2012-12-01

    Tree death from drought and heat stress is a critical and uncertain component in forest ecosystem responses to a changing climate. Recent research has illuminated how tree mortality is a complex cascade of changes involving interconnected plant systems over multiple timescales. Explicit consideration of the definitions, dynamics, and temporal and biological scales of tree mortality research can guide experimental and modeling approaches. In this review, we draw on the medical literature concerning human death to propose a water resource-based approach to tree mortality that considers the tree as a complex organism with a distinct growth strategy. This approach provides insight into mortality mechanisms at the tree and landscape scales and presents promising avenues into modeling tree death from drought and temperature stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Linking governance mechanisms to health outcomes: a review of the literature in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccone, Dana Karen; Vian, Taryn; Maurer, Lydia; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2014-09-01

    We conducted a synthesis of peer-reviewed literature to shed light on links between governance mechanisms and health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries. Our review yielded 30 studies, highlighting four key governance mechanisms by which governance may influence health outcomes in these settings: Health system decentralization that enables responsiveness to local needs and values; health policymaking that aligns and empowers diverse stakeholders; enhanced community engagement; and strengthened social capital. Most, but not all, studies found a positive association between governance and health. Additionally, the nature of the association between governance mechanisms and health differed across studies. In some studies (N = 9), the governance effect was direct and positive, while in others (N = 5), the effect was indirect or modified by contextual factors. In still other studies (N = 4), governance was found to have a moderating effect, indicating that governance mechanisms influenced other system processes or structures that improved health. The remaining studies reported mixed findings about the association between governance and health (N = 6), no association between governance and health (N = 4), or had inconclusive results (N = 2). Further exploration is needed to fully understand the relationship between governance and health and to inform the design and delivery of evidence-based, effective governance interventions around the world. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Linking morphology and motion: a test of a four-bar mechanism in seahorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Gert; Leysen, Heleen; Van Wassenbergh, Sam; Herrel, Anthony; Jacobs, Patric; Dierick, Manuel; Aerts, Peter; Adriaens, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Syngnathid fishes (seahorses, pipefish, and sea dragons) possess a highly modified cranium characterized by a long and tubular snout with minute jaws at its end. Previous studies indicated that these species are extremely fast suction feeders with their feeding strike characterized by a rapid elevation of the head accompanied by rotation of the hyoid. A planar four-bar model is proposed to explain the coupled motion of the neurocranium and the hyoid. Because neurocranial elevation as well as hyoid rotation are crucial for the feeding mechanism in previously studied Syngnathidae, a detailed evaluation of this model is needed. In this study, we present kinematic data of the feeding strike in the seahorse Hippocampus reidi. We combined these data with a detailed morphological analysis of the important linkages and joints involved in rotation of the neurocranium and the hyoid, and we compared the kinematic measurements with output of a theoretical four-bar model. The kinematic analysis shows that neurocranial rotation never preceded hyoid rotation, thus indicating that hyoid rotation triggers the explosive feeding strike. Our data suggest that while neurocranium and hyoid initially (first 1.5 ms) behave as predicted by the four-bar model, eventually, the hyoid rotation is underestimated by the model. Shortening, or a posterior displacement of the sternohyoid muscle (of which the posterior end is confluent with the hypaxial muscles in H. reidi), probably explains the discrepancy between the model and our kinematic measurements. As a result, while four-bar modeling indicates a clear coupling between hyoid rotation and neurocranial elevation, the detailed morphological determination of the linkages and joints of this four-bar model remain crucial in order to fully understand this mechanism in seahorse feeding.

  17. Genotoxic Effects of Diuron Contaminated Soil on the Root Meristem Cells of Allium sativum: A Possible Mechanism of Chromosome Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, P N; Chauhan, L K S; Chandra, Saurabh; Gupta, S K

    2004-01-01

    Diuron, a persistant substituted urea herbicide, was tested in the root meristem cells of Allium sativum for the possible cytogenetic effects and to compare the sensitivity with Allium cepa. Test concentrations of diuron 22.5, 45.0, and 90.0 ppm were mixed in soil and the cloves of A. sativum were placed over diuron-contaminated soils. Root meristematic cells were sampled at 48 h to score Mitotic/Chromosomal aberrations and to analyze the effect on mitotic index (MI). Microscopic analyses revealed significant and dose-dependent induction of mitotic as well as chromosomal breaks. The frequency of mitotic aberrations was every time found much higher than that of chromosomal aberrations. Mild percentage of Micronucleated and Binucleated cells was observed, as MI also declined during the analysis. Based on the data of valence charge densities on the atoms of herbicide molecule and spectroscopic studies, a possible mechanism of interaction of diuron with DNA molecule for chromosomal aberrations has been proposed.

  18. Synergistic effect of (+)-pinitol from Saraca asoca with β-lactam antibiotics and studies on the in silico possible mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Furkan; Misra, Laxminarain; Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Darokar, Mahendra Pandurang; Prakash, Om; Khan, Feroz; Shukla, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Saraca asoca bark has been used in the Ayurvedic system of medicine for female urino-genital disorders. We have recently reported the isolation and characterization of several compounds as markers to develop HPLC profiling of its methanol and aqueous methanol extracts. Now, a HPLC-PDA inactive compound, (+)-pinitol has been isolated and characterized from the bark of this medicinally important tree. Pinitol is a well known bioactive compound for a variety of biological activities, including hypoglycemic and anti-inflammatory activities. A process for the isolation of relatively good concentration of (+)-pinitol from S. asoca bark has been developed and its in vitro anti TNF-α and anti-inflammatory activities against carragenan-induced edema confirmed. While conducting experiments on the possible agonistic activity, it was found that (+)-pinitol showed up to eight fold reduction in the doses of β-lactam antibiotics. The mechanism of its agonistic activity was studied by docking experiments which showed that different conformations of (+)-pinitol and antibiotics were actually in the same binding site with no significant change in the binding energy. These docking simulations, thus predict the possible binding mode of studied compounds and probable reason behind the synergistic effect of (+)-pinitol along with β-lactam antibiotics.

  19. Possible mechanisms of retinal function recovery with the use of cell therapy with bone marrow-derived stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Camargo Siqueira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow has been proposed as a potential source of stem cells for regenerative medicine. In the eye, degeneration of neural cells in the retina is a hallmark of such widespread ocular diseases as age-related macular degeneration (AMD and retinitis pigmentosa. Bone marrow is an ideal tissue for studying stem cells mainly because of its accessibility. Furthermore, there are a number of well-defined mouse models and cell surface markers that allow effective study of hematopoiesis in healthy and injured mice. Because of these characteristics and the experience of bone marrow transplantation in the treatment of hematological disease such as leukemia, bone marrow-derived stem cells have also become a major tool in regenerative medicine. Those cells may be able to restore the retina function through different mechanisms: A cellular differentiation, B paracrine effect, and C retinal pigment epithelium repair. In this review, we described these possible mechanisms of recovery of retinal function with the use of cell therapy with bone marrow-derived stem cells.

  20. Investigations into the Mechanisms of Cell Death: The Common Link between Anticancer Nanotherapeutics and Nanotoxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minocha, Shalini

    Nanotoxicology and anticancer nanotherapeutics are essentially two sides of the same coin. The nanotoxicology discipline deals with the nanoparticle (NP)-induced toxicity and mechanisms of cell death in healthy cells, whereas anticancer agents delivered via nano-based approaches aim to induce cell death in abnormally proliferating cancer cells. The objectives of the studies presented herein were two-fold; to (a) systematically study the physico-chemical properties and cell death mechanisms of model NPs and (b) utilize the knowledge gained from cell death-nanotoxicity studies in developing a potentially novel anticancer nanotherapeutic agent. For the first objective, the effect of a distinguishing characteristic, i.e., surface carbon coating on the matched pairs of carbon-coated and non-coated copper and nickel NPs (Cu, C-Cu, Ni and C-Ni) on the physico-chemical properties and toxicity in A549 alveolar epithelial cells were evaluated. The effect of carbon coating on particle size, zeta potential, oxidation state, cellular uptake, release of soluble metal and concentration dependent toxicity of Cu and Ni NPs was systematically evaluated. A significant effect of carbon coating was observed on the physico-chemical properties, interaction with cellular membranes, and overall toxicity of the NPs. C-Cu NPs, compared to Cu NPs, showed four-fold lower release of soluble copper, ten-fold higher cellular uptake and protection against surface oxidation. In toxicity assays, C-Cu NPs induced higher mitochondrial damage than Cu NPs whereas Cu NPs were associated with a significant damage to plasma membrane integrity. Nickel and carbon coated nickel NPs were less toxic compared to Cu and C-Cu NPs. Thus, by studying the effect of carbon coating, correlations between physico-chemical properties and toxicity of NPs were established. The second objective was focused on utilizing nano-based approaches for the intracellular delivery of an anticancer agent, Cytochrome c (Cyt c), to

  1. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M., E-mail: Frans.leermakers@wur.nl [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Colloid Science, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 6, 6307 HB Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2014-02-14

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus k{sub c} and k{sup ¯} and the preferred monolayer curvature J{sub 0}{sup m}, and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of k{sub c} and the area compression modulus k{sub A} are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k{sup ¯}<0, membranes can form stable cubic phases when the Gaussian bending modulus becomes positive, which occurs with membranes composed of PC lipids with long tails. Similarly, negative monolayer curvatures appear when a small head group such as PE is combined with long lipid tails, which hints towards the stability of inverse hexagonal phases at the cost of the bilayer topology. To prevent the destabilisation of bilayers, PG lipids can be mixed into these PC or PE lipid membranes. Progressive loading of bilayers with PG lipids lead to highly charged membranes, resulting in J{sub 0}{sup m}≫0, especially at low ionic

  2. Molecular mechanism of the relation of monoamine oxidase B and its inhibitors to Parkinson's disease: possible implications of glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatsu, T; Sawada, M

    2006-01-01

    Monoamine oxidases A and B (MAO A and MAO B) are the major enzymes that catalyze the oxidative deamination of monoamine neurotaransmitters such as dopamine (DA), noradrenaline, and serotonin in the central and peripheral nervous systems. MAO B is mainly localized in glial cells. MAO B also oxidizes the xenobiotic 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) to a parkinsonism-producing neurotoxin, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium (MPP+). MAO B may be closely related to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), in which neuromelanin-containing DA neurons in the substantia nigra projecting to the striatum in the brain selectively degenerate. MAO B degrades the neurotransmitter DA that is deficient in the nigro-striatal region in PD, and forms H2O2 and toxic aldehyde metabolites of DA. H2O2 produces highly toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) by Fenton reaction that is catalyzed by iron and neuromelanin. MAO B inhibitors such as L-(-)-deprenyl (selegiline) and rasagiline are effective for the treatment of PD. Concerning the mechanism of the clinical efficacy of MAO B inhibitors in PD, the inhibition of DA degradation (a symptomatic effect) and also the prevention of the formation of neurotoxic DA metabolites, i.e., ROS and dopamine derived aldehydes have been speculated. As another mechanism of clinical efficacy, MAO B inhibitors such as selegiline are speculated to have neuroprotective effects to prevent progress of PD. The possible mechanism of neuroprotection of MAO B inhibitors may be related not only to MAO B inhibition but also to induction and activation of multiple factors for anti-oxidative stress and anti-apoptosis: i.e., catalase, superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, thioredoxin, Bcl-2, the cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, and binding to glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Furthermore, it should be noted that selegiline increases production of neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and glial

  3. Mechanical transfer of Theileria orientalis: possible roles of biting arthropods, colostrum and husbandry practices in disease transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Jade Frederick; Jenkins, Cheryl; Bogema, Daniel; Emery, David

    2016-01-22

    The intracellular protozoal parasite Theileria orientalis has rapidly spread across South-eastern Australia, substantially impacting local cattle industries since 2006. Haemaphysalis longicornis appears to be a biological vector in the endemic regions. Mechanical transfer of blood by biting arthropods, in colostrum or iatrogenic transmission though husbandry procedures is another possible mode of transmission. This study assesses the risk of these mechanical modes of transmission. Blood was collected from a T. orientalis Ikeda positive Angus steer, and was inoculated into the jugular vein of 9 calves in 3 treatment groups, each with 3 animals. Calves in Group 1 received 10 ml of cryopreserved blood, while those in Groups 2 and 3 received 1 ml (fresh blood) and 0.1 ml (cryopreserved), respectively. An additional three animals remained as negative controls and the donor calf was also followed as a positive control. Blood was collected over 3 months, and analysed via qPCR for the presence of the parasite. Samples of the sucking louse Linognathus vituli were collected opportunistically from calves 5 months after inoculation and tested for T. orientalis. For the colostral transmission study, 30 samples of blood and colostrum were collected from cows at calving in an endemic herd. These samples along with blood from their calves were tested by qPCR for T. orientalis and for antibodies to the major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP). Eight of the nine inoculated calves became positive for T. orientalis. The prepatent period of these infections was inversely correlated with inoculation dose. All negative control calves remained negative and the positive control calf remained positive. Samples of L. vituli tested positive for T. orientalis Ikeda, while some samples of colostrum were also shown to be qPCR and anti-MPSP positive. All calves in the colostral study tested qPCR negative although one was antibody-positive. T. orientalis is capable of being mechanically transferred

  4. A Summary of Pathways or Mechanisms Linking Preconception Maternal Nutrition with Birth Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Janet C

    2016-07-01

    Population, human, animal, tissue, and molecular studies show collectively and consistently that maternal nutrition in the pre- or periconception period influences fetal growth and development, which subsequently affects the individual's long-term health. It is known that nutrition during pregnancy is an important determinant of the offspring's growth and health. However, now there is evidence that the mother's nutritional status at conception also influences pregnancy outcome and long-term health. For example, the mother's nutritional status at conception influences the way energy is partitioned between maternal and fetal needs. Furthermore, placental development during the first weeks of gestation reflects maternal nutrition and establishes mechanisms for balancing maternal and fetal nutritional needs. Also, maternal nutritional signals at fertilization influence epigenetic remodeling of fetal genes. These findings all indicate that maternal parenting begins before conception. The following papers from a symposium on preconception nutrition presented at the 2015 Scientific Sessions and Annual Meeting of the ASN emphasize the importance of maternal nutrition at conception on the growth and long-term health of the child. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. Broken English, broken bones? Mechanisms linking language proficiency and occupational health in a Montreal garment factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premji, Stéphanie; Messing, Karen; Lippel, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Language barriers are often cited as a factor contributing to ethnic inequalities in occupational health; however, little information is available about the mechanisms at play. The authors describe the multiple ways in which language influences occupational health in a large garment factory employing many immigrants in Montreal. Between 2004 and 2006, individual, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 women and 10 men from 14 countries of birth. Interviews were conducted in French and English, Canada's official languages, as well as in non-official languages with the help of colleague-interpreters. Observation within the workplace was also carried out at various times during the project. The authors describe how proficiency in the official languages influences occupational health by affecting workers' ability to understand and communicate information, and supporting relationships that can affect work-related health. They also describe workers' strategies to address communication barriers and discuss the implications of these strategies from an occupational health standpoint. Along with the longer-term objectives of integrating immigrants into the linguistic majority and addressing structural conditions that can affect health, policies and practices need to be put in place to protect the health and well-being of those who face language barriers in the short term.

  6. Potential Mechanisms Linking Atherosclerosis and Increased Cardiovascular Risk in COPD: Focus On Sirtuins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbi, Graziamaria; Bianco, Andrea; Turchiarelli, Viviana; Cellurale, Michele; Fatica, Federica; Daniele, Aurora; Mazzarella, Gennaro; Ferrara, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    The development of atherosclerosis is a multi-step process, at least in part controlled by the vascular endothelium function. Observations in humans and experimental models of atherosclerosis have identified monocyte recruitment as an early event in atherogenesis. Chronic inflammation is associated with ageing and its related diseases (e.g., atherosclerosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Recently it has been discovered that Sirtuins (NAD+-dependent deacetylases) represent a pivotal regulator of longevity and health. They appear to have a prominent role in vascular biology and regulate aspects of age-dependent atherosclerosis. Many studies demonstrate that SIRT1 exhibits anti-inflammatory properties in vitro (e.g., fatty acid-induced inflammation), in vivo (e.g., atherosclerosis, sustainment of normal immune function in knock-out mice) and in clinical studies (e.g., patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Because of a significant reduction of SIRT1 in rodent lungs exposed to cigarette smoke and in lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), activation of SIRT1 may be a potential target for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy. We review the inflammatory mechanisms involved in COPD-CVD coexistence and the potential role of SIRT1 in the regulation of these systems. PMID:23774840

  7. The East Australian, Tasmantid, and Lord Howe Volcanic Chains: Possible mechanisms behind a trio of hotspot trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnins, L. M.; Cohen, B. E.; Fitton, J. G.; Mark, D. F.; Richards, F. D.; Barfod, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    The east Australian and Tasman Sea region is home to a unique example of intraplate volcanism: three long-lived, sub-parallel volcanic chains spaced only about 500 km apart. Here we present new 40Ar/39Ar results from the centre chain, the Tasmantid Seamounts, and show that the chain is strongly age-progressive, with an excellent correspondence to the age of the continental East Australian Volcanic Chain to the west and to the more limited ages available for the Lord Howe Seamount Chain to the east. Results from the Louisiade Plateau at the northern end of the Tasmantid chain suggest that it is composed of basalts of the correct age to be a large igneous province formed by the impact of the Tasmantid plume head reaching the lithosphere. This record of relative movement between the plate and the magma source over the last 55 Ma shows two clear deflections from the overall linear trend, one at 26--23 Ma, also observed in the continental chain and linked with the Ontong-Java Plateau jamming the South Melanesian subduction zone, and another at 50--43 Ma, beyond the end of the continental record and contemporaneous with the Hawaiian-Emperor bend. How does such a unique trio of volcanic chains form? The clear age progression, long lifespan, and tie to the Louisiade Plateau are classic indicators of deep-seated plumes, but it is difficult to explain how three separate plumes could remain stable for over 30 Ma when separated by little more than the radii of the plume conduits. Here we examine alternative possible explanations for this volcanic pattern, including small plumes rising from a single deep-seated plume pooling at the 660 km discontinuity, a single plume splitting around a subducting slab fragment, and small-scale convection triggered by topography on the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary.

  8. Increased fibulin-1 plasma levels in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients: possible contribution to the link between PCOS and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarinci, E; Tropea, A; Russo, G; Notaristefano, G; Messana, C; Alesiani, O; Fabozzi, S M; Lanzone, A; Apa, R

    2018-04-21

    To investigate a possible relation between fibulin-1 plasma levels and PCOS. ELISA quantitative determination of human fibulin-1. 50 women with PCOS and 40 control patients who attended the Unit of Human Reproductive Pathophysiology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, were enrolled. Ultrasonographic pelvic examinations, hormonal profile assays, oral tolerance test OGTT, lipid profile and ELISA quantitative determination of human fibulin-1 were performed. Fibulin-1 levels were found to be statistically significantly higher in PCOS patients than in matched control women. No statistically significant positive correlation was found between fibulin-1 and AUCi, HOMA-IR, total cholesterol, LDL, AMH, androstenedione and FAI, whereas a statistically significant positive correlation was found between fibulin-1 and 17OHP (p = 0.016) in the PCOS group. However, multivariable linear regression analysis showed that 17 OH P did not independently predict fibulin-1 levels (p = 0.089). Our data could contribute to explain the hypothesized increased cardiovascular risk and vascular damage in patients with PCOS. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in cardiometabolic disorders associated with PCOS is mandatory to identify new therapeutic strategies to eventually prevent the progression of cardiovascular diseases in these patients.

  9. Mechanisms of Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion to model biomaterial surfaces: Establising a link between thrombosis and infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Julie Miyo

    Infections involving Staphylococcus epidermidis remain a life threatening complication associated with the use of polymer based cardiovascular devices. One of the critical steps in infection pathogenesis is the adhesion of the bacteria to the device surface. Currently, mechanisms of S. epidermidis adhesion are incompletely understood, but are thought to involve interactions between bacteria, device surface, and host blood elements in the form of adsorbed plasma proteins and surface adherent platelets. Our central hypothesis is that elements participating in thrombosis also promote S. epidermidis adhesion by specifically binding to the bacterial surface. The adhesion kinetics of S. epidermidis RP62A to host modified model biomaterial surface octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) under hydrodynamic shear conditions were characterized. Steady state adhesion to adsorbed proteins and surface adherent platelets was achieved at 90-120 minutes and 60-90 minutes, respectively. A dose response curve of S. epidermidis adhesion in the concentration range of 10sp7{-}10sp9 bac/mL resembled a multilayer adsorption isotherm. Increasing shear stress was found to LTA, and other LTA blocking agents significantly decreased S. epidermidis adhesion to the fibrin-platelet clots, suggesting that this interaction between S. epidermidis and fibrin-platelet clots is specific. Studies evaluated the adhesion of S. epidermidis to polymer immobilized heparin report conflicting results. Paulsson et al., showed that coagulase negative staphylococci adhered in comparable numbers to both immobilized heparin and nonheparinized surfaces, while exhibiting significantly greater adhesion to both surfaces than S. aureus. Preadsorption of the surfaces with specific heparin binding plasma proteins vitronectin, fibronectin, laminin, and collagen significantly increased adhesion. It was postulated that immobilized heparin contained binding sites for the plasma proteins, exposing bacteria binding domains of the

  10. Linking rapid magma reservoir assembly and eruption trigger mechanisms at evolved Yellowstone-type supervolcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotzlaw, J.F.; Bindeman, I.N.; Watts, Kathryn E.; Schmitt, A.K.; Caricchi, L.; Schaltegger, U.

    2014-01-01

    reservoir configurations inferred from seismic data at active supervolcanoes. The connection of magma batches vertically distributed over several kilometers in the upper crust would cause a substantial increase of buoyancy overpressure, providing an eruption trigger mechanism that is the direct consequence of the reservoir assembly process.

  11. Aging Mechanisms and Nondestructive Aging Indicator of Filled Cross-linked Polyethylene (XLPE) Exposed to Simultaneous Thermal and Gamma Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shuaishuai; Fifield, Leonard S.; Bowler, Nicola

    2018-04-11

    Aging mechanisms and a nondestructive aging indicator of filled cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) cable insulation material used in nuclear power plants (NPPs) are studied. Using various material characterization techniques, likely candidates and functions for the main additives in a commercial filled-XLPE insulation material have been identified. These include decabromodiphenyl ether and Sb2O3 as flame retardants, ZnS as white pigment and polymerized 1,2-dihydro-2,2,4-trimethylquinoline as antioxidant. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, differential scanning calorimetry, oxidation induction time and measurements of dielectric loss tangent are utilized to monitor property changes as a function of thermal and radiation exposure of the cable material. Small-molecular-weight hydrocarbons are evolve with gamma radiation aging at 90 °C. The level of antioxidant decreases with aging by volatilization and chemical reaction with free radicals. Thermal aging at 90 °C for 25 days or less causes no observable change to the cross-linked polymer structure. Gamma radiation causes damage to crystalline polymer regions and introduces defects. Dielectric loss tangent is shown to be an effective and reliable nondestructive indicator of the aging severity of the filled-XLPE insulation material.

  12. Theory of the multiphoton cascade transitions with two photon links: comparison of quantum electrodynamical and quantum mechanical approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalialiutdinov, T; Baukina, Yu; Solovyev, D; Labzowsky, L

    2014-01-01

    The theory of multiphoton cascade transitions with two-photon links is considered within two different approaches: quantum electrodynamical (QED) and phenomenological quantum mechanical (QM). A problem of regularization of the cascade contributions is investigated in detail. It is argued that the correct regularization should include both initial and intermediate level widths in the singular energy denominators. This result follows both from the QED and from the QM approach. Particular transitions nl → 1s + 2γ with nl = 3s, 4s, 3d, 4d and nl → 1s + 3γ with nl = 3p, 4p are considered as examples. The importance of the proper cascade regularization is also demonstrated. (paper)

  13. Does the concept of "sensitization" provide a plausible mechanism for the putative link between the environment and schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collip, Dina; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Van Os, Jim

    2008-03-01

    Previous evidence reviewed in Schizophrenia Bulletin suggests the importance of a range of different environmental factors in the development of psychotic illness. It is unlikely, however, that the diversity of environmental influences associated with schizophrenia can be linked to as many different underlying mechanisms. There is evidence that environmental exposures may induce, in interaction with (epi)genetic factors, psychological or physiological alterations that can be traced to a final common pathway of cognitive biases and/or altered dopamine neurotransmission, broadly referred to as "sensitization," facilitating the onset and persistence of psychotic symptoms. At the population level, the behavioral phenotype for sensitization may be examined by quantifying, in populations exposed to environmental risk factors associated with stress or dopamine-agonist drugs, (1) the increased rate of persistence (indicating lasting sensitization) of normally transient developmental expressions of subclinical psychotic experiences and (2) the subsequent increased rate of transition to clinical psychotic disorder.

  14. Effect of modified starch and nanoclay particles on biodegradability and mechanical properties of cross-linked poly lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayan, M; Azizi, H; Ghasemi, I; Karrabi, M

    2015-06-25

    Mechanical properties and biodegradation of cross-linked poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/maleated thermoplastic starch (MTPS)/montmorillonite (MMT) nanocomposite were studied. Crosslinking was carried out by adding di-cumyl peroxide (DCP) in the presence of triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) as coagent. At first, MTPS was prepared by grafting maleic anhydride (MA) to thermoplastic starch in internal mixer. Experimental design was performed by using Box-Behnken method at three variables: MTPS, nanoclay and TAIC at three levels. Results showed that increasing TAIC amount substantially increased the gel fraction, enhanced tensile strength, and caused a decrease in elongation at break. Biodegradation was prevented by increasing TAIC amount in nanocomposite. Increasing MTPS amount caused a slight increase in gel fraction and decreased the tensile strength of nanocomposite. Also, MTPS could increase the elongation at break of nanocomposite and improve the biodegradation. Nanoclay had no effect on the gel fraction, but it improved tensile strength. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Warfarin resistance associated with genetic polymorphism of VKORC1: linking clinical response to molecular mechanism using computational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Benjamin C; Nair, Pramod C; Heran, Subash S; Somogyi, Andrew A; Bowden, Jeffrey J; Doogue, Matthew P; Miners, John O

    2016-01-01

    The variable response to warfarin treatment often has a genetic basis. A protein homology model of human vitamin K epoxide reductase, subunit 1 (VKORC1), was generated to elucidate the mechanism of warfarin resistance observed in a patient with the Val66Met mutation. The VKORC1 homology model comprises four transmembrane (TM) helical domains and a half helical lid domain. Cys132 and Cys135, located in the N-terminal end of TM-4, are linked through a disulfide bond. Two distinct binding sites for warfarin were identified. Site-1, which binds vitamin K epoxide (KO) in a catalytically favorable orientation, shows higher affinity for S-warfarin compared with R-warfarin. Site-2, positioned in the domain occupied by the hydrophobic tail of KO, binds both warfarin enantiomers with similar affinity. Displacement of Arg37 occurs in the Val66Met mutant, blocking access of warfarin (but not KO) to Site-1, consistent with clinical observation of warfarin resistance.

  16. Inhibition of insulin-dependent glucose uptake by trivalent arsenicals: possible mechanism of arsenic-induced diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, Felecia S.; Harmon, Anne W.; Paul, David S.; Drobna, Zuzana; Patel, Yashomati M.; Styblo, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    Chronic exposures to inorganic arsenic (iAs) have been associated with increased incidence of noninsulin (type-2)-dependent diabetes mellitus. Although mechanisms by which iAs induces diabetes have not been identified, the clinical symptoms of the disease indicate that iAs or its metabolites interfere with insulin-stimulated signal transduction pathway or with critical steps in glucose metabolism. We have examined effects of iAs and methylated arsenicals that contain trivalent or pentavalent arsenic on glucose uptake by 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Treatment with inorganic and methylated pentavalent arsenicals (up to 1 mM) had little or no effect on either basal or insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. In contrast, trivalent arsenicals, arsenite (iAs III ), methylarsine oxide (MAs III O), and iododimethylarsine (DMAs III O) inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. Subtoxic concentrations of iAs III (20 μM), MAs III O (1 μM), or DMAs III I (2 μM) decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by 35-45%. Basal glucose uptake was significantly inhibited only by cytotoxic concentrations of iAs III or MAs III O. Examination of the components of the insulin-stimulated signal transduction pathway showed that all trivalent arsenicals suppressed expression and possibly phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt). The concentration of an insulin-responsive glucose transporter (GLUT4) was significantly lower in the membrane region of 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with trivalent arsenicals as compared with untreated cells. These results suggest that trivalent arsenicals inhibit insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by interfering with the PKB/Akt-dependent mobilization of GLUT4 transporters in adipocytes. This mechanism may be, in part, responsible for the development of type-2 diabetes in individuals chronically exposed to iAs

  17. Attenuation of Morphine Withdrawal Syndrome by Various Dosages of Curcumin in Comparison with Clonidine in Mouse: Possible Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Motaghinejad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Herbal medical compounds and their major constituent have been used in the management and treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome and pain. This study was carried out to clarify the effect of curcumin, the major compound of turmeric, on morphine withdrawal syndrome in mouse model and its possible mechanisms of pain relieving activity by assessing in writhing test as a model of visceral pain. Methods: Due to two separate protocols (withdrawal syndrome and pain, 144 male albino mice were divided in two major groups. In withdrawal syndrome group, test effect of various dosages of curcumin (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg was assessed on withdrawal signs and compared with positive and negative control and standard treatment (clonidine 0.4 mg/kg groups. In pain groups, to determine the mechanism of pain relieving activity of curcumin, various dosages of curcumin (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg in three separated groups, were used against acetic acid induced writhing (which is a constriction test. The most effective dose (40 mg/kg was used in writhing test and compared with groups pretreated with antagonist of major neurotransmitters involved in pain; and compared with group pretreated with vehicle (DMSO, 0.05% as control. Results: Curcumin attenuates withdrawal syndrome in a dose dependent manner in comparison with the dependent positive control group (P<0.05. It also indicated that pretreatment with naloxone and cyproheptadine significantly attenuate antinociception effect of curcumin (P<0.05. Conclusion: This study advocate that antinociception of curcumin was mediated by opioidergic and adrenergic system.

  18. A possible mechanism behind autoimmune disorders discovered by genome-wide linkage and association analysis in celiac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Östensson

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is a common autoimmune disorder characterized by an intestinal inflammation triggered by gluten, a storage protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Similar to other autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease is the result of an immune response to self-antigens leading to tissue destruction and production of autoantibodies. Common diseases like celiac disease have a complex pattern of inheritance with inputs from both environmental as well as additive and non-additive genetic factors. In the past few years, Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS have been successful in finding genetic risk variants behind many common diseases and traits. To complement and add to the previous findings, we performed a GWAS including 206 trios from 97 nuclear Swedish and Norwegian families affected with celiac disease. By stratifying for HLA-DQ, we identified a new genome-wide significant risk locus covering the DUSP10 gene. To further investigate the associations from the GWAS we performed pathway analyses and two-locus interaction analyses. These analyses showed an over-representation of genes involved in type 2 diabetes and identified a set of candidate mechanisms and genes of which some were selected for mRNA expression analysis using small intestinal biopsies from 98 patients. Several genes were expressed differently in the small intestinal mucosa from patients with celiac autoimmunity compared to intestinal mucosa from control patients. From top-scoring regions we identified susceptibility genes in several categories: 1 polarity and epithelial cell functionality; 2 intestinal smooth muscle; 3 growth and energy homeostasis, including proline and glutamine metabolism; and finally 4 innate and adaptive immune system. These genes and pathways, including specific functions of DUSP10, together reveal a new potential biological mechanism that could influence the genesis of celiac disease, and possibly

  19. Effect of different materials of all-ceramic crowns on viability of fibroblasts and preliminary exploration of possible molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of different materials of all-ceramic crowns on viability of fibroblasts and the possible molecular mechanisms. Methods: Fibroblast cell lines L929 were cultured, extracting solution of diatomite ceramic, casting ceramic, heat-pressed ceramic, infiltrated ceramic and Ni-Cr alloy porcelain was prepared and used to process L929 cells, and then cell apoptosis, percentages of cell cycle as well as expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Caspase-9 were detected. Results: Cell apoptosis indexes, number of early apoptosis, number of aponecrosis, percentages of G1 phase, S phase and G2 phase cells as well as expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Caspase-9 of diatomite ceramic group, casting ceramic group, heat-pressed ceramic group and infiltrated ceramic group had no differences from those of control group; cell apoptosis indexes, number of early apoptosis, number of aponecrosis, percentages of G2 phase cells as well as expression levels of Bax, Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Caspase-9 of diatomite ceramic group, casting ceramic group, heat-pressed ceramic group and infiltrated ceramic group were lower than those of Ni-Cr alloy porcelain group, and percentages of G1 phase and S phase cells as well as expression levels of Bcl-2 were significantly higher than those of Ni-Cr alloy porcelain group. Conclusion: The effect of different materials of all-ceramic crowns on viability of fibroblasts has no differences and is weaker than that of Ni-Cr alloy porcelain crown, and biocompatibility of diatomite ceramic is equivalent to that of casting ceramic, heat-pressed ceramic, infiltrated ceramic and Ni-Cr alloy porcelain; mechanisms of different materials of all-ceramic crowns to regulate cell viability include Bcl-2/Bax pathway and Caspase pathway.

  20. Study of a Car Body Tilting System Using a Variable Link Mechanism: Fundamental Characteristics of Pendulum Motion and Strategy for Perfect Tilting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hidehisa; Nagai, Masao

    This paper analyzes the fundamental dynamic characteristics of a tilting railway vehicle using a variable link mechanism for compensating both the lateral acceleration experienced by passengers and the wheel load imbalance between the inner and outer rails. The geometric relations between the center of rotation, the center of gravity, and the positions of all four links of the tilting system are analyzed. Then, equations of the pendulum motions of the railway vehicle body with a four-link mechanism are derived. A theoretically discussion is given on the geometrical shapes employed in the link mechanism that can simultaneously provide zero lateral acceleration and zero wheel load fluctuation. Then, the perfect tilting condition, which is the control target of the feedforward tilting control, is derived from the linear equation of tilting motion.

  1. Possible gasoline-induced chronic liver injury due to occupational malpractice in a motor mechanic: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunathilaka, Mahesh Lakmal; Niriella, Madunil Anuk; Luke, Nathasha Vihangi; Piyarathna, Chathura Lakmal; Siriwardena, Rohan Chaminda; De Silva, Arjuna Priyadarshin; de Silva, Hithanadura Janaka

    2017-07-03

    Hydrocarbon-induced occupational liver injury is a well-known clinical entity among petroleum industry workers. There are many types of hydrocarbon exposure, with inhalation being the most common. Hydrocarbon-induced occupational liver injury is a rarely suspected and commonly missed etiological agent for liver injury. We report a case of a non-petroleum industry worker with chronic liver disease secondary to hydrocarbon-induced occupational liver injury caused by chronic low-grade hydrocarbon ingestion due to occupational malpractice. A 23-year-old Sri Lankan man who was a motor mechanic presented to our hospital with decompensated cirrhosis. He had been chronically exposed to gasoline via inadvertent ingestion due to occupational malpractice. He used to remove gasoline from carburetors by sucking and failed to practice mouth washing thereafter. On evaluation, he had histologically proven established cirrhosis. A comprehensive history and workup ruled out other nonoccupational etiologies for cirrhosis. The patient's long-term occupational gasoline exposure and clinical course led us to a diagnosis of hydrocarbon-induced occupational liver injury leading to decompensated cirrhosis. Hydrocarbon-induced occupational liver injury should be considered as a cause when evaluating a patient with liver injury with possible exposure in relevant occupations.

  2. Gene expression analysis reveals new possible mechanisms of vancomycin-induced nephrotoxicity and identifies gene markers candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Christine; Puey, Angela; Lin, Sylvia; Lyn, Sylvia; Swezey, Robert; Furimsky, Anna; Fairchild, David; Mirsalis, Jon C; Ng, Hanna H

    2009-01-01

    Vancomycin, one of few effective treatments against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, is nephrotoxic. The goals of this study were to (1) gain insights into molecular mechanisms of nephrotoxicity at the genomic level, (2) evaluate gene markers of vancomycin-induced kidney injury, and (3) compare gene expression responses after iv and ip administration. Groups of six female BALB/c mice were treated with seven daily iv or ip doses of vancomycin (50, 200, and 400 mg/kg) or saline, and sacrificed on day 8. Clinical chemistry and histopathology demonstrated kidney injury at 400 mg/kg only. Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed that kidney gene expression profiles of all mice treated at 400 mg/kg clustered with those of mice administered 200 mg/kg iv. Transcriptional profiling might thus be more sensitive than current clinical markers for detecting kidney damage, though the profiles can differ with the route of administration. Analysis of transcripts whose expression was changed by at least twofold compared with vehicle saline after high iv and ip doses of vancomycin suggested the possibility of oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in vancomycin-induced toxicity. In addition, our data showed changes in expression of several transcripts from the complement and inflammatory pathways. Such expression changes were confirmed by relative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Finally, our results further substantiate the use of gene markers of kidney toxicity such as KIM-1/Havcr1, as indicators of renal injury.

  3. Laminae type and possible mechanisms for the formation of laminated sediments in the Shaban Deep, northern Red Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Seeberg-Elverfeldt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Laminated sediments in the Shaban Deep, a brine-filled basin in the northern Red Sea, were analyzed with backscattered electron imagery. Here we present possible mechanisms involved in the formation of laminae of various types and homogenous intervals arising from the detailed investigation of multicore GeoB 7805-1 (26°13.9' N and 35°22.6' E; water depth 1447 m and gravity core GeoB 5836-2 (26°12.61' N, 35°21.56' E; water depth 1475 m. Sediment makeup includes six types: a a laminated structure with alternating light (mainly coccoliths and dark (diatom frustules layers, where the diatom component is indicative of the intra-annual variability between stratification and mixing events; b a pocket-like structure attributed to the sinking of particles within fecal pellets and aggregates; c a matrix of tightly packed diatoms that relates to extended stratification/mixing periods of the water column; d homogenous intervals that result from turbidity deposition; e silt accumulations which origin may lie in agglutinated foraminifers; and f pyrite layers with pyrite formation initiated at the seawater-brine interface.

  4. A new type of headache, headache associated with airplane travel: preliminary diagnostic criteria and possible mechanisms of aetiopathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berilgen, M Said; Müngen, Bulent

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in the reports indicating a form of headache that occurs during commercial aircraft travel. This headache, called airplane headache by some authors, is believed to be a new type of headache. The headache has very specific characteristics and all of the cases exhibited very stereotypical symptoms. The headache starts suddenly during the ascent and/or descent of the commercial aircraft. It has a mean duration of 20 minutes, which is usually unilateral and commonly localized to periorbital region. The headache is described to be severe, and has a stabbing or jabbing nature, and generally subsides in a short time. In some cases, an organic cause can be identified whereas in others no organic pathology could be found. We described the clinical features of 22 cases who suffered from a headache that occurred during airplane travel. We examined other cases with similar features reported in the literature and proposed preliminary diagnostic criteria for this new form of headache. We also discussed the possible patholophysiological mechanisms that may cause this headache.

  5. Neuron-specific chromatin remodeling: a missing link in epigenetic mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity, memory, and intellectual disability disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel-Ciernia, Annie; Wood, Marcelo A

    2014-05-01

    Long-term memory formation requires the coordinated regulation of gene expression. Until recently nucleosome remodeling, one of the major epigenetic mechanisms for controlling gene expression, had been largely unexplored in the field of neuroscience. Nucleosome remodeling is carried out by chromatin remodeling complexes (CRCs) that interact with DNA and histones to physically alter chromatin structure and ultimately regulate gene expression. Human exome sequencing and gene wide association studies have linked mutations in CRC subunits to intellectual disability disorders, autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. However, how mutations in CRC subunits were related to human cognitive disorders was unknown. There appears to be both developmental and adult specific roles for the neuron specific CRC nBAF (neuronal Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor). nBAF regulates gene expression required for dendritic arborization during development, and in the adult, contributes to long-term potentiation, a form of synaptic plasticity, and long-term memory. We propose that the nBAF complex is a novel epigenetic mechanism for regulating transcription required for long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity and memory processes and that impaired nBAF function may result in human cognitive disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultra-high mechanical properties of porous composites based on regenerated cellulose and cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Jian; Yang, Biao; Zhang, Liang-Qing; Lin, Sheng-Qiang; Xu, Ling; Zhong, Gan-Ji; Tang, Jian-Hua; Li, Zhong-Ming

    2018-01-01

    The ultra-high mechanical, biocompatible and biodegradable porous regenerated cellulose/poly(ethylene glycol) (RC/PEG) composites with double network structure were fabricated via an simple method to dissolve cellulose followed by UV irradiation. The porous structure of RC/PEG was sensitively altered by PEG contents, which led to the porous structure morphology transition from 3D fibrillar network to close-grained sheet-like-network with the loading of cross-linked PEG. The porous RC/PEG showed excellent mechanical properties, i.e., the compressive strength can reach 33 times higher than that of neat RC (0.07MPa) at the compressive strain of 30%. Porous RC/PEG also displayed outstanding properties with openly porous structure and structural stabilization. Besides, porous RC/PEG exhibited good water absorbency, which the water absorbency ratio at equilibrium state was 83% higher than that of porous RC. This work provides an environmentally friendly and simple pathway to prepare non-toxic and biocompatible porous regenerated cellulose-based composites with high strength, structural stabilization and good water absorbency, which could be useful for packaging, biomedical applications, sewage purification, etc. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Theoretical study on mechanical and electron-transport properties of conjugated molecular junctions with carboxylic or methyl sulfide links

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, De-Liang; Liu, Ran [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Leng, Jian-Cai [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); School of Science, Qilu University of Technology, Jinan 250353 (China); Zuo, Xi; Jiao, Yang [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Li, Zong-Liang, E-mail: lizongliang@sdnu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Wang, Chuan-Kui [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China)

    2014-03-01

    The mechanical and electronic transport properties of 4-(methylthio)benzoic acid (M1), 1,4-bis(methylthio) benzene (M2) and methyl 4-(methylthio)benzoate (M3) molecular junctions are studied employing density functional theory and elastic scattering Green's function method. The numerical results show that the rupture force of M1 and M2 junctions are both about 0.6±0.1 nN as experiment probed, which is much smaller than the force to break COO{sup −}–Au bond. The COO{sup −} group strongly influenced on M1 molecular junction and further strengthened SMe–Au bond at the other end of the junction. The M3 junction is less stable because the CH{sub 3} group linked to COO group destroyed the mechanical stability of COO–Au connection. The conductance of M2 junction is about an order larger than that of M1 junction as the experiment probed. The less stable feature of M3 junction leads the absence of conductive peak.

  8. Social thermoregulation as a potential mechanism linking sociality and fitness: Barbary macaques with more social partners form larger huddles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Liz A D; Tkaczynski, Patrick J; Lehmann, Julia; Mouna, Mohamed; Majolo, Bonaventura

    2018-04-17

    Individuals with more or stronger social bonds experience enhanced survival and reproduction in various species, though the mechanisms mediating these effects are unclear. Social thermoregulation is a common behaviour across many species which reduces cold stress exposure, body heat loss, and homeostatic energy costs, allowing greater energetic investment in growth, reproduction, and survival, with larger aggregations providing greater benefits. If more social individuals form larger thermoregulation aggregations due to having more potential partners, this would provide a direct link between sociality and fitness. We conducted the first test of this hypothesis by studying social relationships and winter sleeping huddles in wild Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus), wherein individuals with more social partners experience greater probability of winter survival. Precipitation and low temperature increased huddle sizes, supporting previous research that huddle size influences thermoregulation and energetics. Huddling relationships were predicted by social (grooming) relationships. Individuals with more social partners therefore formed larger huddles, suggesting reduced energy expenditure and exposure to environmental stressors than less social individuals, potentially explaining how sociality affects survival in this population. This is the first evidence that social thermoregulation may be a direct proximate mechanism by which increased sociality enhances fitness, which may be widely applicable across taxa.

  9. In and out of control: brain mechanisms linking fluency of action selection to self-agency in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Martin; Chambon, Valérian; Wenke, Dorit; Kühn, Simone; Haggard, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Sense of agency refers to the feeling of control over one's actions, and their consequences. It involves both predictive processes linked to action control, and retrospective 'sense-making' causal inferences. Schizophrenia has been associated with impaired predictive processing, but the underlying mechanisms that impair patients' sense of agency remain unclear. We introduce a new 'prospective' aspect of agency and show that subliminally priming an action not only influences response times, but also influences reported sense of agency over subsequent action outcomes. This effect of priming was associated with altered connectivity between frontal areas and the angular gyrus. The effects on response times and on frontal action selection mechanisms were similar in patients with schizophrenia and in healthy volunteers. However, patients showed no effects of priming on sense of agency, no priming-related activation of angular gyrus, and no priming-related changes in fronto-parietal connectivity. We suggest angular gyrus activation reflects the experiences of agency, or non-agency, in part by processing action selection signals generated in the frontal lobes. The altered action awareness that characterizes schizophrenia may be due to impaired communication between these areas. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The cytotoxicity of the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin is linked to an endocytotic mechanism equivalent to transport-P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Robert; Stracke, Anika; Ebner, Nadine; Zeller, Christian Wolfgang; Raninger, Anna Maria; Schittmayer, Matthias; Kueznik, Tatjana; Absenger-Novak, Markus; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Since the α1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin (PRZ) was introduced into medicine as a treatment for hypertension and benign prostate hyperplasia, several studies have shown that PRZ induces apoptosis in various cell types and interferes with endocytotic trafficking. Because PRZ is also able to induce apoptosis in malignant cells, its cytotoxicity is a focus of interest in cancer research. Besides inducing apoptosis, PRZ was shown to serve as a substrate for an amine uptake mechanism originally discovered in neurones called transport-P. In line with our hypothesis that transport-P is an endocytotic mechanism also present in non-neuronal tissue and linked to the cytotoxicity of PRZ, we tested the uptake of QAPB, a fluorescent derivative of PRZ, in cancer cell lines in the presence of inhibitors of transport-P and endocytosis. Early endosomes and lysosomes were visualised by expression of RAB5-RFP and LAMP1-RFP, respectively; growth and viability of cells in the presence of PRZ and uptake inhibitors were also tested. Cancer cells showed co-localisation of QAPB with RAB5 and LAMP1 positive vesicles as well as tubulation of lysosomes. The uptake of QAPB was sensitive to transport-P inhibitors bafilomycin A1 (inhibits v-ATPase) and the antidepressant desipramine. Endocytosis inhibitors pitstop ® 2 (general inhibitor of endocytosis), dynasore (dynamin inhibitor) and methyl-β-cyclodextrin (cholesterol chelator) inhibited the uptake of QAPB. Bafilomycin A1 and methyl-β-cyclodextrin but not desipramine were able to preserve growth and viability of cells in the presence of PRZ. In summary, we confirmed the hypothesis that the cellular uptake of QAPB/PRZ represents an endocytotic mechanism equivalent to transport-P. Endocytosis of QAPB/PRZ depends on a proton gradient, dynamin and cholesterol, and results in reorganisation of the LAMP1 positive endolysosomal system. Finally, the link seen between the cellular uptake of PRZ and cell death implies a still unknown pro

  11. Production dynamics of fine roots in beech forests: possible mechanism of resource allocation between above- and below-ground production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahata, R.; Osawa, A.; Naramoto, M.; Mizunaga, H.; Sato, M.

    2017-12-01

    The masting phenomenon that seed production has large annual variation with spatial synchrony appears generally in beeches. Therefore, net primary production and carbon allocation mechanism in beech forests may differ among several years in relation to annual variation of seed production. On the other hand, fine roots play key roles in carbon dynamics and nutrient and water acquisition of an ecosystem. Evaluation of fine root dynamics is essential to understand long-term dynamics of production in forest ecosystems. Moreover, the influence of mast seeding on resource allocation should be clarified in such beech forests. The aim of this study is to clarify possible relationships between the patterns of above- and below-ground production in relation to the masting events using observation data of litter fall and fine root dynamics. We applied the litter trap method and a minirhizotron method in a cool-temperate natural forest dominated by beech (Fagus crenata Blume). Ten litter traps were set from 2008 to 2016, then annual leaf and seed production were estimated. Four minirhizotron tubes were buried in Aug. 2008 and soil profiles were scanned monthly until Nov. 2016 during the periods of no snow covering. The scanned soil profiles were analyzed for calculating fine root production using the WinRHIZO Tron software. In the present study site, rich production of mast seeding occurred biennially and fine root production showed various seasonal patterns. There was no significant correlation between seed production and annual fine root production in the same year. However, seed production had a positive correlation with fine root production in autumn in the previous year and indicated a negative correlation with that in autumn in the current year. These results indicate that higher fine root production has led to increased nutrient acquisition, which resulted in rich seed production in the next year. It is also suppressed after the masting events due to shortage in

  12. Supramolecular Cross-Links in Poly(alkyl methacrylate) Copolymers and Their Impact on the Mechanical and Reversible Adhesive Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzmann, Christian; Salz, Ulrich; Moszner, Norbert; Fiore, Gina L; Weder, Christoph

    2015-06-24

    Hydrogen-bonded, side-chain-functionalized supramolecular poly(alkyl methacrylate)s were investigated as light- and temperature-responsive reversible adhesives that are useful for bonding and debonding on demand applications. Here, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) was functionalized with 2-ureido-4[1H]pyrimidinone (UPy) via a hexamethylenediisocyanate (HMDI) linker, to create a monomer (UPy-HMDI-HEMA) that serves to form supramolecular cross-links by way of forming quadruple hydrogen bonded dimers. UPy-HMDI-HEMA was copolymerized with either hexyl methacrylate or butyl methacrylate to create copolymers comprising 2.5, 5, or 10 mol % of the cross-linker. The mechanical properties of all (co)polymers were investigated with stress-strain experiments and dynamic mechanical analysis. Furthermore, the adhesive properties were studied at temperatures between 20 and 60 °C by testing single lap joints formed with stainless steel substrates. It was found that increasing the concentration of the UPy-HMDI-HEMA cross-linker leads to improved mechanical and adhesive properties at elevated temperatures. Concurrently, the reversibility of the bond formation remained unaffected, where rebonded samples displayed the same adhesive strength as regularly bonded samples. Debonding on demand abilities were also tested exemplarily for one copolymer, which for light-induced debonding experiments was blended with a UV-absorber that served as light-heat converter. Single lap joints were subjected to a constant force and heated or irradiated with UV light until debonding occurred. The necessary debonding temperature was comparable for direct heating and UV irradiation and varied between 28 and 82 °C, depending on the applied force. The latter also influenced the debonding time, which under the chosen conditions ranged from 30 s to 12 min.

  13. Saw palmetto alters nuclear measurements reflecting DNA content in men with symptomatic BPH: evidence for a possible molecular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Robert W; Marks, Leonard S; Miller, M Craig; Bales, Wes D; Fan, John; Macairan, Maria Luz; Epstein, Jonathan I; Partin, Alan W

    2002-10-01

    To examine the nuclear chromatin characteristics of epithelial cells, looking for an SPHB-mediated effect on nuclear DNA structure and organization. Saw palmetto herbal blend (SPHB) causes contraction of prostate epithelial cells and suppression of tissue dihydrotestosterone levels in men with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia, but a fundamental mechanism remains unknown. A 6-month randomized trial, comparing prostatic tissue of men treated with SPHB (n = 20) or placebo (n = 20), was performed. At baseline, the two groups were similar in age (65 versus 64 years), symptoms (International Prostate Symptom Score 18 versus 17), uroflow (maximal urinary flow rate 10 versus 11 mL/s), prostate volume (59 versus 58 cm(3)), prostate-specific antigen (4.2 versus 2.7 ng/mL), and percentage of epithelium (17% versus 16%). Prostatic tissue was obtained by sextant biopsy before and after treatment. Five-micron sections were Feulgen stained and quantitatively analyzed using the AutoCyte QUIC-DNA imaging system. Images were captured from 200 randomly selected epithelial cell nuclei, and 60 nuclear morphometric descriptors (NMDs) (eg, size, shape, DNA content, and textural features) were determined for each nucleus. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the differences in the variances of the NMDs between the treated and untreated prostate epithelial cells. At baseline, the SPHB and placebo groups had similar NMD values. After 6 months of placebo, no significant change from baseline was found in the NMDs. However, after 6 months of SPHB, 25 of the 60 NMDs were significantly different compared with baseline, and a multivariate model for predicting treatment effect using 4 of the 25 was created (P <0.001). The multivariate model had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 94% and an accuracy of 85%. Six months of SPHB treatment appears to alter the DNA chromatin structure and organization in prostate epithelial cells. Thus, a possible molecular

  14. Short-term social memory deficits in adult female mice exposed to tannery effluent and possible mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Fernanda Neves; Rabelo, Letícia Martins; Vaz, Boniek Gontijo; de Oliveira Costa, Denys Ribeiro; Pereira, Igor; de Lima Rodrigues, Aline Sueli; Malafaia, Guilherme

    2017-10-01

    The accumulated organic residues in tannery-plant courtyards are an eating attraction to small rodents; however, the contact of these animals with these residues may change their social behavior. Thus, the aim of the present study is to investigate whether the exposure to tannery effluent (TE) can damage the social recognition memory of female Swiss mice, as well as to assess whether vitamin C supplementation could provide information about how TE constituents can damage these animals' memory. We have observed that resident females exposed to TE (without vitamin supplementation) did not explore the anogenital region, their body or chased intruding females for shorter time or with lower frequency during the retest session of the social recognition test, fact that indicates social recognition memory deficit in these animals. Such finding is reinforced by the confirmation that there was no change in the animals' olfactory function during the buried food test, or locomotor changes in females exposed to the pollutant. Since no behavioral change was observed in the females exposed to TE and treated with vitamin C (before or after the exposure), it is possible saying that these social cognitive impairments seem to be directly related to the imbalance between the cellular production of reactive oxygen species and the counteracting antioxidant mechanisms (oxidative stress) in female mice exposed to the pollutant (without vitamin supplementation). Therefore, the present study evidences that the direct contact with tannery effluent, even for a short period-of-time, may cause short-term social memory deficits in adult female Swiss mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanisms of plastic deformation in highly cross-linked UHMWPE for total hip components--the molecular physics viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yasuhito; Shishido, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Kengo; Masaoka, Toshinori; Kubo, Kosuke; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    Plastic deformation is an unavoidable event in biomedical polymeric implants for load-bearing application during long-term in-vivo service life, which involves a mass transfer process, irreversible chain motion, and molecular reorganization. Deformation-induced microstructural alterations greatly affect mechanical properties and durability of implant devices. The present research focused on evaluating, from a molecular physics viewpoint, the impact of externally applied strain (or stress) in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) prostheses, subjected to radiation cross-linking and subsequent remelting for application in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Two different types of commercial acetabular liners, which belong to the first-generation highly cross-linked UHMWPE (HXLPE), were investigated by means of confocal/polarized Raman microprobe spectroscopy. The amount of crystalline region and the spatial distribution of molecular chain orientation were quantitatively analyzed according to a combined theory including Raman selection rules for the polyethylene orthorhombic structure and the orientation distribution function (ODF) statistical approach. The structurally important finding was that pronounced recrystallization and molecular reorientation increasingly appeared in the near-surface regions of HXLPE liners with increasing the amount of plastic (compressive) deformation stored in the microstructure. Such molecular rearrangements, occurred in response to external strains, locally increase surface cross-shear (CS) stresses, which in turn trigger microscopic wear processes in HXLPE acetabular liners. Thus, on the basis of the results obtained at the molecular scale, we emphasize here the importance of minimizing the development of irrecoverable deformation strain in order to retain the pristine and intrinsically high wear performance of HXLPE components. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. SO2 photoexcitation mechanism links mass-independent sulfur isotopic fractionation in cryospheric sulfate to climate impacting volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan A.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Danielache, Sebastian O.; Yamada, Akinori; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-01-01

    Natural climate variation, such as that caused by volcanoes, is the basis for identifying anthropogenic climate change. However, knowledge of the history of volcanic activity is inadequate, particularly concerning the explosivity of specific events. Some material is deposited in ice cores, but the concentration of glacial sulfate does not distinguish between tropospheric and stratospheric eruptions. Stable sulfur isotope abundances contain additional information, and recent studies show a correlation between volcanic plumes that reach the stratosphere and mass-independent anomalies in sulfur isotopes in glacial sulfate. We describe a mechanism, photoexcitation of SO2, that links the two, yielding a useful metric of the explosivity of historic volcanic events. A plume model of S(IV) to S(VI) conversion was constructed including photochemistry, entrainment of background air, and sulfate deposition. Isotopologue-specific photoexcitation rates were calculated based on the UV absorption cross-sections of 32SO2, 33SO2, 34SO2, and 36SO2 from 250 to 320 nm. The model shows that UV photoexcitation is enhanced with altitude, whereas mass-dependent oxidation, such as SO2 + OH, is suppressed by in situ plume chemistry, allowing the production and preservation of a mass-independent sulfur isotope anomaly in the sulfate product. The model accounts for the amplitude, phases, and time development of Δ33S/δ34S and Δ36S/Δ33S found in glacial samples. We are able to identify the process controlling mass-independent sulfur isotope anomalies in the modern atmosphere. This mechanism is the basis of identifying the magnitude of historic volcanic events. PMID:23417298

  17. Gastroprotective effect of Byrsonima sericea DC leaf extract against ethanol-induced gastric injury and its possible mechanisms of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia A. Rodrigues

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Byrsonima sericea leaves are extensively used in folk medicine in Brazil against gastric disorders. This study investigated the chemical constituents of B. sericea leaf ethanolic extract (BSLE and its potential gastroprotective activity, with its possible mechanism of the action using ethanol to induce gastric mucosal damage in mice. The phytochemical analysis was carried out to identify the active constituents present in the extract, and the HPLC analysis was performed for the identification of flavonoids. BSLE at oral doses of 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg markedly attenuated the ethanol-evoked gastric lesions by 53.2, 84.9 and 87.6 %, respectively. The BSLE (250 mg/kg prevented the depletion of gastric mucus and gastric mucosal nonproteic-sulfhydryl groups, SOD and CAT, as well as the increase in the MDA content promoted by absolute ethanol. Moreover, the effect of BSLE against ethanol damage was found to be significantly reduced in mice pretreated with Capsazepine (i.p., L-NAME (i.p. or glibenclamide (i.p., the respective blockers/inhibitors of TRPV1, NO synthase and K+ATP channel. The phytochemical investigation on BSLE revealed the presence of flavonoids rutin, isoquercitrin, kaempferol 3-O-rutinoside and quercetin, which are compounds well known for their antioxidant and gastroprotective properties. These results suggest that BSLE affords gastroprotection through multiple mechanisms, which may be helpful in the treatment of pathologies associated with gastric dysfunctions.Folhas de Byrsonima sericea são amplamente utilizadas na medicina popular no Brasil no tratamento de distúrbios gástricos. Este estudo investigou os constituintes químicos do extrato etanólico das folhas de B. sericea (BSLE e sua atividade gastroprotetora com seus possíveis mecanismos de ação utilizando o modelo de lesão gástrica induzida por etanol em camundongos. A análise fitoquímica foi realizada para identificar os componentes ativos presentes no extrato e an

  18. Methylferulate from Tamarix aucheriana inhibits growth and enhances chemosensitivity of human colorectal cancer cells: possible mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaza, Mohamed Salah I; Afzal, Mohammad; Al-Attiyah, Raja'a J; Guleri, Radhika

    2016-10-01

    Natural products are valuable sources for anticancer agents. In the present study, methylferulate (MF) was identified for the first time from Tamarix aucheriana. Spectral data were used for identification of MF. The potential of MF to control cell growth, cell cycle, apoptosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), cancer cell invasion, nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) DNA-binding activity and proteasomal activities, as well as the enhancement of chemosensitivity in human colorectal cancer cells, were evaluated. The possible molecular mechanism of MF's therapeutic efficacy was also assessed. Column chromatography and spectral data were used for isolation and identification of MF. MTT, immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, in vitro invasion, fluoremetry, EIA and Real time qPCR were used to measure antiproliferative, chemo-sensitizing effects and other biochemical parameters. MF showed a dose-dependent anti-proliferative effect on colorectal cancer cells (IC 50  = 1.73 - 1.9 mM) with a nonsignificant cytotoxicity toward normal human fibroblast. Colony formation inhibition (P ≤ 0.001, 0.0001) confirmed the growth inhibition by MF. MF arrested cell cycle progression in the S and G2/M phases; induced apoptosis and ROS generation; and inhibited NF-kB DNA-binding activity, proteasomal activities and cell invasion in colorectal cancer cells. MF up-regulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (p19 INK4D , p21 WAF1/CIP1 , p27 KIP1 ), pro-apoptotic gene expression (Bax, Bad, Apaf1, Bid, Bim, Smac) and caspases (caspase 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9). Moreover, MF down-regulated cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk1, Cdk2) and anti-apoptotic gene expression (c-IAP-1, c-IAP-2, Bcl2,FLIP). In addition, MF differentially potentiated the sensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to standard chemotherapeutic drugs. MF showed a multifaceted anti-proliferative and chemosensitizing effects. These results suggest the chemotherapeutic and co-adjuvant potential of MF.

  19. Effect and possible mechanism of monocyte-derived VEGF on monocyte-endothelial cellular adhesion after electrical burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Qiongfang; Zhao, Chaoli; Ye, Ziqing; Ruan, Jingjing; Xie, Qionghui; Xie, Weiguo

    2015-06-01

    One of the major obstacles in the treatment of severe electrical burns is properly handling the resulting uncontrolled inflammation. Such inflammation often causes secondary injury and necrosis, thus complicating patient outcomes. Vascular endothelial grow factor (VEGF) has emerged as an important mediator for the recruitment of monocytes to the site inflammation. This study was designed to explore the effects and possible mechanism of VEGF on monocyte-endothelial cellular adhesion. To do so, we used a cultured human monocytic cell line (THP-1) that was stimulated with serum derived from rats that had received electrical burns. Serum was obtained from rats that had received electrical burns. Both the VEGF and soluble flt-1 (sflt-1) concentrations of the serum were determined by double-antibody sandwich ELISA. The concentrations of VEGF, sflt-1, and TNF-α obtained from the cell-free cultured supernatant of THP-1 cells that had been exposed to the serum were then determined by double-antibody sandwich ELISA. Serum-stimulated THP-1 cells were added to wells with a monolayer of endothelial cells to detect the level of monocyte-endothelial cells adhesion. Finally, the state of phosphorylation of AKT was determined by Western blotting. Both in vivo and in vitro studies showed that compared to controls, the levels of VEGF were significantly increased after electrical burns. This increased was accompanied by a reduction of sflt-1 levels. Furthermore, the serum of rats that had received electrical burns was able to both activate monocytes to secrete TNF-α and enhance monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. Treatment with the serum also resulted in an up-regulation of the phosphorylation of AKT, but had no effect on the total levels of AKT. Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) inhibition decreased the number of THP-1 cells that were adhered to endothelial cells. Finally, sequestering VEGF with sflt-1 was able to reduce the effect on monocyte-endothelial cells adhesion by

  20. Characterization of Mechanical Properties of MgB$_2$ Conductor for the Superconducting Link Project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Sugano, M; Bartova, B; Bjoerstad, R; Scheuerlein, C; Grasso, G

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of high luminosity upgrade of Large Hadron Collider at CERN, superconducting links are being developed. MgB2 wire is a candidate conductor for use in high-current cables. Mechanical properties of this material are of key importance for the definition of the cable design and operating conditions. In this study, we evaluated the Young's modulus of MgB2 filaments extracted from ex situ processed composite wires. The wires were produced in unit lengths of about 1 km and used in high-current cables. Single fiber tensile test was carried out on filaments composed of MgB2, Nb barrier, and Nb-Ni reaction layer. From the unloading modulus of filament specimens measured with different gauge lengths, the Young's modulus of composite filaments extracted from two different strands was determined to be 114 and 122 GPa at room temperature, respectively. By using the rule-of-mixture, the Young's modulus of MgB2 was estimated to be lower than that reported for highly dense MgB2 bulks. The reason for such diff...

  1. EFFECT OF ADIPOSITY ON PLASMA-LIPID TRANSFER PROTEIN ACTIVITIES - A POSSIBLE LINK BETWEEN INSULIN-RESISTANCE AND HIGH-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN METABOLISM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DULLAART, RPF; SLUITER, WJ; DIKKESCHEI, LD; HOOGENBERG, K; VANTOL, A

    The mechanisms responsible for the decreased high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels associated with obesity and insulin resistance are not well understood. Lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) are key factors in the esterification of

  2. Possibilities for modelling the effect of compression on mechanical and physical properties of various Dutch soil types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdok, U.D.; Kroesbergen, B.; Hoogmoed, W.B.

    2002-01-01

    The state of compactness of the arable soil layer changes during the growing season as a result of tillage and traction. The aim of this study was to assess and predict some soil mechanical and physical properties governing machine performance and crop response. The following mechanical properties

  3. Potential climatic mechanisms associated with the mega drought at 4200 cal yr BP: linking proxy data with modern climate analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, V.; Shinker, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    Roughly 4200 years ago, a 150-year long mega drought occurred in the central Rocky Mountains, as indicated by pollen evidence from lake sediments from Long Lake, south-eastern Wyoming. However, pollen evidence does not record the climate