WorldWideScience

Sample records for possess sub-grid resolution

  1. Chandra ACIS Sub-pixel Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Woo; Anderson, C. S.; Mossman, A. E.; Allen, G. E.; Fabbiano, G.; Glotfelty, K. J.; Karovska, M.; Kashyap, V. L.; McDowell, J. C.

    2011-05-01

    We investigate how to achieve the best possible ACIS spatial resolution by binning in ACIS sub-pixel and applying an event repositioning algorithm after removing pixel-randomization from the pipeline data. We quantitatively assess the improvement in spatial resolution by (1) measuring point source sizes and (2) detecting faint point sources. The size of a bright (but no pile-up), on-axis point source can be reduced by about 20-30%. With the improve resolution, we detect 20% more faint sources when embedded on the extended, diffuse emission in a crowded field. We further discuss the false source rate of about 10% among the newly detected sources, using a few ultra-deep observations. We also find that the new algorithm does not introduce a grid structure by an aliasing effect for dithered observations and does not worsen the positional accuracy

  2. A Virtual Study of Grid Resolution on Experiments of a Highly-Resolved Turbulent Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisto, Pietro M. F.; Marshall, Andre W.; Gollner, Michael J.; Fire Protection Engineering Department Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    An accurate representation of sub-grid scale turbulent mixing is critical for modeling fire plumes and smoke transport. In this study, PLIF and PIV diagnostics are used with the saltwater modeling technique to provide highly-resolved instantaneous field measurements in unconfined turbulent plumes useful for statistical analysis, physical insight, and model validation. The effect of resolution was investigated employing a virtual interrogation window (of varying size) applied to the high-resolution field measurements. Motivated by LES low-pass filtering concepts, the high-resolution experimental data in this study can be analyzed within the interrogation windows (i.e. statistics at the sub-grid scale) and on interrogation windows (i.e. statistics at the resolved scale). A dimensionless resolution threshold (L/D*) criterion was determined to achieve converged statistics on the filtered measurements. Such a criterion was then used to establish the relative importance between large and small-scale turbulence phenomena while investigating specific scales for the turbulent flow. First order data sets start to collapse at a resolution of 0.3D*, while for second and higher order statistical moments the interrogation window size drops down to 0.2D*.

  3. Evaluation of sub grid scale and local wall models in Large-eddy simulations of separated flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Ali Al

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the Sub Grid Scale models is studied by simulating a separated flow over a wavy channel. The first and second order statistical moments of the resolved velocities obtained by using Large-Eddy simulations at different mesh resolutions are compared with Direct Numerical Simulations data. The effectiveness of modeling the wall stresses by using local log-law is then tested on a relatively coarse grid. The results exhibit a good agreement between highly-resolved Large Eddy Simulations and Direct Numerical Simulations data regardless the Sub Grid Scale models. However, the agreement is less satisfactory with relatively coarse grid without using any wall models and the differences between Sub Grid Scale models are distinguishable. Using local wall model retuned the basic flow topology and reduced significantly the differences between the coarse meshed Large-Eddy Simulations and Direct Numerical Simulations data. The results show that the ability of local wall model to predict the separation zone depends strongly on its implementation way.

  4. Evaluation of sub grid scale and local wall models in Large-eddy simulations of separated flow

    OpenAIRE

    Sam Ali Al; Szasz Robert; Revstedt Johan

    2015-01-01

    The performance of the Sub Grid Scale models is studied by simulating a separated flow over a wavy channel. The first and second order statistical moments of the resolved velocities obtained by using Large-Eddy simulations at different mesh resolutions are compared with Direct Numerical Simulations data. The effectiveness of modeling the wall stresses by using local log-law is then tested on a relatively coarse grid. The results exhibit a good agreement between highly-resolved Large Eddy Simu...

  5. A variable resolution right TIN approach for gridded oceanographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, David; Elmore, Paul; Blain, Cheryl Ann; Bourgeois, Brian; Petry, Frederick; Ferrini, Vicki

    2017-12-01

    Many oceanographic applications require multi resolution representation of gridded data such as for bathymetric data. Although triangular irregular networks (TINs) allow for variable resolution, they do not provide a gridded structure. Right TINs (RTINs) are compatible with a gridded structure. We explored the use of two approaches for RTINs termed top-down and bottom-up implementations. We illustrate why the latter is most appropriate for gridded data and describe for this technique how the data can be thinned. While both the top-down and bottom-up approaches accurately preserve the surface morphology of any given region, the top-down method of vertex placement can fail to match the actual vertex locations of the underlying grid in many instances, resulting in obscured topology/bathymetry. Finally we describe the use of the bottom-up approach and data thinning in two applications. The first is to provide thinned, variable resolution bathymetry data for tests of storm surge and inundation modeling, in particular hurricane Katrina. Secondly we consider the use of the approach for an application to an oceanographic data grid of 3-D ocean temperature.

  6. Preparation and characterization of micro-grid modified In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:W films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Dongmei; Wang, Wenwen, E-mail: 08569@buaa.edu.cn; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Jiaojiao

    2016-08-01

    Tungsten doped indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:W, IWO) thin films with IWO micro-grid covered surface were prepared at room temperature using techniques of radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering and polystyrene (PS) microsphere template. The composition, crystallization structures, surface morphologies, and optical and electrical properties of the films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, spectrophotometer from visible to near infrared (NIR) range and Hall effect measurement, respectively. Periodic micro-grid modified surface was obtained to improve light trapping properties. The effects of the PS micro-spheres diameters and the sputtering time on the surface morphology, transmittance in NIR range, diffuse reflection and conductive properties of the IWO films are investigated. Experiments show that surface modification of the IWO film with micro-grid under the optimized condition can improve the conductivity of the films by 15%, and the diffuse reflectance by 150%, with less than 8% decrease of the transmittance in the visible region. The study would be beneficial to the light trapping effect of solar cells using IWO films as transparent electrodes. - Highlights: • In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:W (IWO) films were obtained by reactive frequency magnetron sputtering. • IWO micro-grids were prepared on the surface of IWO films. • Influences of micro-grid size and sputtering time on IWO films were analyzed. • Both high conductivity and transparency are acquired in near-infrared region.

  7. A global data set of soil hydraulic properties and sub-grid variability of soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montzka, Carsten; Herbst, Michael; Weihermüller, Lutz; Verhoef, Anne; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-07-01

    Agroecosystem models, regional and global climate models, and numerical weather prediction models require adequate parameterization of soil hydraulic properties. These properties are fundamental for describing and predicting water and energy exchange processes at the transition zone between solid earth and atmosphere, and regulate evapotranspiration, infiltration and runoff generation. Hydraulic parameters describing the soil water retention (WRC) and hydraulic conductivity (HCC) curves are typically derived from soil texture via pedotransfer functions (PTFs). Resampling of those parameters for specific model grids is typically performed by different aggregation approaches such a spatial averaging and the use of dominant textural properties or soil classes. These aggregation approaches introduce uncertainty, bias and parameter inconsistencies throughout spatial scales due to nonlinear relationships between hydraulic parameters and soil texture. Therefore, we present a method to scale hydraulic parameters to individual model grids and provide a global data set that overcomes the mentioned problems. The approach is based on Miller-Miller scaling in the relaxed form by Warrick, that fits the parameters of the WRC through all sub-grid WRCs to provide an effective parameterization for the grid cell at model resolution; at the same time it preserves the information of sub-grid variability of the water retention curve by deriving local scaling parameters. Based on the Mualem-van Genuchten approach we also derive the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity from the water retention functions, thereby assuming that the local parameters are also valid for this function. In addition, via the Warrick scaling parameter λ, information on global sub-grid scaling variance is given that enables modellers to improve dynamical downscaling of (regional) climate models or to perturb hydraulic parameters for model ensemble output generation. The present analysis is based on the ROSETTA PTF

  8. Application of a Steady Meandering River with Piers Using a Lattice Boltzmann Sub-Grid Model in Curvilinear Coordinate Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Chen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A sub-grid multiple relaxation time (MRT lattice Boltzmann model with curvilinear coordinates is applied to simulate an artificial meandering river. The method is based on the D2Q9 model and standard Smagorinsky sub-grid scale (SGS model is introduced to simulate meandering flows. The interpolation supplemented lattice Boltzmann method (ISLBM and the non-equilibrium extrapolation method are used for second-order accuracy and boundary conditions. The proposed model was validated by a meandering channel with a 180° bend and applied to a steady curved river with piers. Excellent agreement between the simulated results and previous computational and experimental data was found, showing that MRT-LBM (MRT lattice Boltzmann method coupled with a Smagorinsky sub-grid scale (SGS model in a curvilinear coordinates grid is capable of simulating practical meandering flows.

  9. A high resolution gridded ionization chamber for nuclear spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitale, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes some techniques used in the design of high resolution gridded ionisation chambers for measurements of absolute activity of radionuclides. Details of the geometry of the system and its electrodes are presented; their shape and the spacing between the grid wire was studied with the help of an electrolytic tank. The experimental spectra obtained with an Am 241 source using Ar + 10% methane as a flow gas show a total resolution of 39,07 KeV in very good agreement with the best results available in the literature. An application of the methods developed was used in the design ans construction of a proportional counter provided with three sequential grids disposed in such a way that the pulses from the first stage had their amplitude multiplied by the two further stages. Multiplication factors of the order of 10 sup(3) were obtained but higher values are expected. (author)

  10. High resolution T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla using PROPELLER-EPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, Martin; Reichenbach, Juergen R. [Jena University Hospital (Germany). Medical Physics Group

    2014-09-01

    We report the application of PROPELLER-EPI for high resolution T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted imaging with sub-millimeter in-plane resolution on a clinical 3 Tesla scanner. Periodically rotated blades of a long-axis PROPELLER-EPI sequence were acquired with fast gradient echo readout and acquisition matrix of 320 x 50 per blade. Images were reconstructed by using 2D-gridding, phase and geometric distortion correction and compensation of resonance frequency drifts that occurred during extended measurements. To characterize these resonance frequency offsets, short FID calibration measurements were added to the PROPELLER-EPI sequence. Functional PROPELLER-EPI was performed with volunteers using a simple block design of right handed finger tapping. Results indicate that PROPELLER-EPI can be employed for fast, high resolution T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted imaging provided geometric distortions and possible resonance frequency drifts are properly corrected. Even small resonance frequency drifts below 10 Hz as well as non-corrected geometric distortions degraded image quality substantially. In the initial fMRI experiment image quality and signal-to-noise ratio was sufficient for obtaining high resolution functional activation maps. (orig.)

  11. Resolution No. 96/03 About possession of ionic smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The resolution states that: first: all the entities of the country having Ionic smoke detectors in use are to be communicated to the National Center for Nuclear safety in correspondence with the format that is shown in the annex to the present. This formation must be updated every three years. Second: Entities possessing Ionic smoke detectors in use, must be corresponding management as radioactive waste of such detectors in the term of one year from the entry into force of this resolution with the center of protection and of radiation hygiene purposes ensure safe and proper management as radioactive material into disuse. Third: Importing entities, distributors, and that made the Assembly of ionic smoke detectors, continue to be governed by the provisions of the resolution No.. 25/98 of this Ministry, R ules for the authorization of practices associated the employment of las radiation ionizing . Fourth: Entities in which ionic smoke detectors are installed must complete information according to the annex to the present format and send it to the National Center for Nuclear safety within a period of 30 days from the installation of such detectors. Fifth: Entities that possess Ionic smoke detectors and decide to continue using them should not be the evacuation of the same with the center of protection and hygiene of radiation, for the purpose of ensuring a safe and proper management as radioactive material in disuse, notifying this Act to the National Center for Nuclear safety.

  12. An investigation of the sub-grid variability of trace gases and aerosols for global climate modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Qian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available One fundamental property and limitation of grid based models is their inability to identify spatial details smaller than the grid cell size. While decades of work have gone into developing sub-grid treatments for clouds and land surface processes in climate models, the quantitative understanding of sub-grid processes and variability for aerosols and their precursors is much poorer. In this study, WRF-Chem is used to simulate the trace gases and aerosols over central Mexico during the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign, with multiple spatial resolutions and emission/terrain scenarios. Our analysis focuses on quantifying the sub-grid variability (SGV of trace gases and aerosols within a typical global climate model grid cell, i.e. 75×75 km2.

    Our results suggest that a simulation with 3-km horizontal grid spacing adequately reproduces the overall transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols downwind of Mexico City, while 75-km horizontal grid spacing is insufficient to represent local emission and terrain-induced flows along the mountain ridge, subsequently affecting the transport and mixing of plumes from nearby sources. Therefore, the coarse model grid cell average may not correctly represent aerosol properties measured over polluted areas. Probability density functions (PDFs for trace gases and aerosols show that secondary trace gases and aerosols, such as O<sub>3sub>, sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate, are more likely to have a relatively uniform probability distribution (i.e. smaller SGV over a narrow range of concentration values. Mostly inert and long-lived trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC, are more likely to have broad and skewed distributions (i.e. larger SGV over polluted regions. Over remote areas, all trace gases and aerosols are more uniformly distributed compared to polluted areas. Both CO and O<sub>3sub> SGV vertical profiles are nearly constant within the PBL during daytime, indicating that trace gases

  13. Evaluating the Impact of Localized GCM Grid Refinement on Regional Tropical Cyclone Climatology and Synoptic Variability using Variable-Resolution CAM-SE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzycki, C.; Jablonowski, C.

    2013-12-01

    Using General Circulation Models (GCMs) to resolve sub-synoptic features in climate simulations has traditionally been difficult due to a multitude of atmospheric processes operating at subgrid scales requiring significant parameterization. For example, at traditional GCM horizontal grid resolutions of 50-300 km, tropical cyclones are generally under-resolved. This paper explores a novel variable-resolution global modeling approach that allows for high spatial resolutions in areas of interest, such as low-latitude ocean basins where tropical cyclogenesis occurs. Such multi-resolution GCM designs allow for targeted use of computing resources at the regional level while maintaining a globally-continuous model domain and may serve to bridge the gap between GCMs with uniform grids and boundary-forced limited area models. A statically-nested, variable-resolution option has recently been introduced into the Community Atmosphere Model's (CAM) Spectral Element (SE) dynamical core. A 110 km CAM-SE grid with a 28 km nest over the Atlantic Ocean has been coupled to land, ocean, and ice components within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We present the results of a multi-decadal climate simulation using Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) protocols, which force the model with historical sea surface temperatures and airborne chemical species. To investigate whether refinement improves the representation of tropical cyclones, we compare Atlantic storm statistics to observations with specific focus paid to intensity profiles and track densities. The resolution dependance of both cyclone structure and objective detection between refined and unrefined basins is explored. In addition, we discuss the potential impact of using variable-resolution grids on the large-scale synoptic interannual variability by comparing refined grid simulations to reanalysis data as well as an unrefined, globally-uniform CAM-SE simulation with identical forcing. We also evaluate the

  14. An Optimized, Grid Independent, Narrow Band Data Structure for High Resolution Level Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Bang; Museth, Ken

    2004-01-01

    enforced by the convex boundaries of an underlying cartesian computational grid. Here we present a novel very memory efficient narrow band data structure, dubbed the Sparse Grid, that enables the representation of grid independent high resolution level sets. The key features our new data structure are...

  15. Reporting emissions on EMEP grid. Methods and principles; Rapportering af luftemissioner paa grid. Metoder og principper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranekjaer Jensen, M.; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Hjorth Mikkelsen, M.; Winther, M.; Gyldenkaerne, S.; Viuf OErby, P.; Boll Illerup, J.

    2008-03-15

    This report explains methods for reporting emissions on EMEP grid with a resolution of 50km x 50km for the reporting years 1990, 1995, 2000 an 2005. The applied and geographical distributed emission data on grid represents the latest delivery (per March 2007) to UNECE LRTAP (United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution). Thus data represents the latest recalculation of historical values. The reporting of emissions on EMEP grid with a resolution of 50km x 50km is a part of the Danish submission under the above mentioned convention (UNECE LRTAP). Emission inventories on grid are reported every fifth year and involves all sectors under UNECE LRTAP. The reporting of emissions on grid includes 14 mandatory emission components, which are: SO{sub 2}, NOx NH{sub 3}, NMVOC, CO, TSP, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5}, Pb, Cd, Hg, Dioxin, PAH and HCB. It is furthermore possible to make additional reporting for a range of components. The report summarizes the most crucial principles and considerations according to work with distributing air emissions on grid within predefined categories for gridding defined by the United Nations (UN 2003). For each of the reported categories, the report gives a detailed explanation of the specific level for distributing emissions spatially. For most reporting categories the process of distributing emissions has been carried out at the highly detailed SNAP level, whereas for others it has been a necessity to make aggregates of several SNAP categories for spatial distribution. The report present final maps for selected air pollutants (SOx, NOx and NH{sub 3}) and discuss shortly possible reasons for variations within time and space. Based on current experience, the report finally gives some recommendations for improving future reporting of gridded emission data. The recommendations pin point, that the EMEP program should provide harmonized and well-documented basic spatial data sets for gridding, to encourage each

  16. Comparison of Two Grid Refinement Approaches for High Resolution Regional Climate Modeling: MPAS vs WRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, L.; Hagos, S. M.; Rauscher, S.; Ringler, T.

    2012-12-01

    This study compares two grid refinement approaches using global variable resolution model and nesting for high-resolution regional climate modeling. The global variable resolution model, Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS), and the limited area model, Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are compared in an idealized aqua-planet context with a focus on the spatial and temporal characteristics of tropical precipitation simulated by the models using the same physics package from the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4). For MPAS, simulations have been performed with a quasi-uniform resolution global domain at coarse (1 degree) and high (0.25 degree) resolution, and a variable resolution domain with a high-resolution region at 0.25 degree configured inside a coarse resolution global domain at 1 degree resolution. Similarly, WRF has been configured to run on a coarse (1 degree) and high (0.25 degree) resolution tropical channel domain as well as a nested domain with a high-resolution region at 0.25 degree nested two-way inside the coarse resolution (1 degree) tropical channel. The variable resolution or nested simulations are compared against the high-resolution simulations that serve as virtual reality. Both MPAS and WRF simulate 20-day Kelvin waves propagating through the high-resolution domains fairly unaffected by the change in resolution. In addition, both models respond to increased resolution with enhanced precipitation. Grid refinement induces zonal asymmetry in precipitation (heating), accompanied by zonal anomalous Walker like circulations and standing Rossby wave signals. However, there are important differences between the anomalous patterns in MPAS and WRF due to differences in the grid refinement approaches and sensitivity of model physics to grid resolution. This study highlights the need for "scale aware" parameterizations in variable resolution and nested regional models.

  17. Enhancing GIS Capabilities for High Resolution Earth Science Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, B. W.; Oehmke, R.; Li, P.; O'Kuinghttons, R.; Theurich, G.; DeLuca, C.

    2017-12-01

    Applications for high performance GIS will continue to increase as Earth system models pursue more realistic representations of Earth system processes. Finer spatial resolution model input and output, unstructured or irregular modeling grids, data assimilation, and regional coordinate systems present novel challenges for GIS frameworks operating in the Earth system modeling domain. This presentation provides an overview of two GIS-driven applications that combine high performance software with big geospatial datasets to produce value-added tools for the modeling and geoscientific community. First, a large-scale interpolation experiment using National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) catchments, a high resolution rectilinear CONUS grid, and the Earth System Modeling Framework's (ESMF) conservative interpolation capability will be described. ESMF is a parallel, high-performance software toolkit that provides capabilities (e.g. interpolation) for building and coupling Earth science applications. ESMF is developed primarily by the NOAA Environmental Software Infrastructure and Interoperability (NESII) group. The purpose of this experiment was to test and demonstrate the utility of high performance scientific software in traditional GIS domains. Special attention will be paid to the nuanced requirements for dealing with high resolution, unstructured grids in scientific data formats. Second, a chunked interpolation application using ESMF and OpenClimateGIS (OCGIS) will demonstrate how spatial subsetting can virtually remove computing resource ceilings for very high spatial resolution interpolation operations. OCGIS is a NESII-developed Python software package designed for the geospatial manipulation of high-dimensional scientific datasets. An overview of the data processing workflow, why a chunked approach is required, and how the application could be adapted to meet operational requirements will be discussed here. In addition, we'll provide a general overview of OCGIS

  18. Deep learning for classification of islanding and grid disturbance based on multi-resolution singular spectrum entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tie; He, Xiaoyang; Tang, Junci; Zeng, Hui; Zhou, Chunying; Zhang, Nan; Liu, Hui; Lu, Zhuoxin; Kong, Xiangrui; Yan, Zheng

    2018-02-01

    Forasmuch as the distinguishment of islanding is easy to be interfered by grid disturbance, island detection device may make misjudgment thus causing the consequence of photovoltaic out of service. The detection device must provide with the ability to differ islanding from grid disturbance. In this paper, the concept of deep learning is introduced into classification of islanding and grid disturbance for the first time. A novel deep learning framework is proposed to detect and classify islanding or grid disturbance. The framework is a hybrid of wavelet transformation, multi-resolution singular spectrum entropy, and deep learning architecture. As a signal processing method after wavelet transformation, multi-resolution singular spectrum entropy combines multi-resolution analysis and spectrum analysis with entropy as output, from which we can extract the intrinsic different features between islanding and grid disturbance. With the features extracted, deep learning is utilized to classify islanding and grid disturbance. Simulation results indicate that the method can achieve its goal while being highly accurate, so the photovoltaic system mistakenly withdrawing from power grids can be avoided.

  19. Global tropospheric ozone modeling: Quantifying errors due to grid resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Wild, Oliver; Prather, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    Ozone production in global chemical models is dependent on model resolution because ozone chemistry is inherently nonlinear, the timescales for chemical production are short, and precursors are artificially distributed over the spatial scale of the model grid. In this study we examine the sensitivity of ozone, its precursors, and its production to resolution by running a global chemical transport model at four different resolutions between T21 (5.6° × 5.6°) and T106 (1.1° × 1.1°) and by quant...

  20. Challenges of Representing Sub-Grid Physics in an Adaptive Mesh Refinement Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, T. A.; Johansen, H.; Johnson, J. N.; Rosa, D.; Benedict, J. J.; Keen, N. D.; Collins, W.; Goodfriend, E.

    2015-12-01

    Some of the greatest potential impacts from future climate change are tied to extreme atmospheric phenomena that are inherently multiscale, including tropical cyclones and atmospheric rivers. Extremes are challenging to simulate in conventional climate models due to existing models' coarse resolutions relative to the native length-scales of these phenomena. Studying the weather systems of interest requires an atmospheric model with sufficient local resolution, and sufficient performance for long-duration climate-change simulations. To this end, we have developed a new global climate code with adaptive spatial and temporal resolution. The dynamics are formulated using a block-structured conservative finite volume approach suitable for moist non-hydrostatic atmospheric dynamics. By using both space- and time-adaptive mesh refinement, the solver focuses computational resources only where greater accuracy is needed to resolve critical phenomena. We explore different methods for parameterizing sub-grid physics, such as microphysics, macrophysics, turbulence, and radiative transfer. In particular, we contrast the simplified physics representation of Reed and Jablonowski (2012) with the more complex physics representation used in the System for Atmospheric Modeling of Khairoutdinov and Randall (2003). We also explore the use of a novel macrophysics parameterization that is designed to be explicitly scale-aware.

  1. Scanning SQUID susceptometers with sub-micron spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirtley, John R., E-mail: jkirtley@stanford.edu; Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Holland, Connor M.; Moler, Kathryn A. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4045 (United States); Paulius, Lisa [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008-5252 (United States); Spanton, Eric M. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4045 (United States); Schiessl, Daniel [Attocube Systems AG, Königinstraße 11A, 80539 Munich (Germany); Jermain, Colin L.; Gibbons, Jonathan [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Cornell, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Fung, Y.-K.K.; Gibson, Gerald W. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Huber, Martin E. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, Colorado 80217-3364 (United States); Ralph, Daniel C. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Cornell, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Ketchen, Mark B. [OcteVue, Hadley, Massachusetts 01035 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) microscopy has excellent magnetic field sensitivity, but suffers from modest spatial resolution when compared with other scanning probes. This spatial resolution is determined by both the size of the field sensitive area and the spacing between this area and the sample surface. In this paper we describe scanning SQUID susceptometers that achieve sub-micron spatial resolution while retaining a white noise floor flux sensitivity of ≈2μΦ{sub 0}/Hz{sup 1/2}. This high spatial resolution is accomplished by deep sub-micron feature sizes, well shielded pickup loops fabricated using a planarized process, and a deep etch step that minimizes the spacing between the sample surface and the SQUID pickup loop. We describe the design, modeling, fabrication, and testing of these sensors. Although sub-micron spatial resolution has been achieved previously in scanning SQUID sensors, our sensors not only achieve high spatial resolution but also have integrated modulation coils for flux feedback, integrated field coils for susceptibility measurements, and batch processing. They are therefore a generally applicable tool for imaging sample magnetization, currents, and susceptibilities with higher spatial resolution than previous susceptometers.

  2. Model atmospheres for M (sub)dwarf stars. 1: The base model grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, France; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    1995-01-01

    We have calculated a grid of more than 700 model atmospheres valid for a wide range of parameters encompassing the coolest known M dwarfs, M subdwarfs, and brown dwarf candidates: 1500 less than or equal to T(sub eff) less than or equal to 4000 K, 3.5 less than or equal to log g less than or equal to 5.5, and -4.0 less than or equal to (M/H) less than or equal to +0.5. Our equation of state includes 105 molecules and up to 27 ionization stages of 39 elements. In the calculations of the base grid of model atmospheres presented here, we include over 300 molecular bands of four molecules (TiO, VO, CaH, FeH) in the JOLA approximation, the water opacity of Ludwig (1971), collision-induced opacities, b-f and f-f atomic processes, as well as about 2 million spectral lines selected from a list with more than 42 million atomic and 24 million molecular (H2, CH, NH, OH, MgH, SiH, C2, CN, CO, SiO) lines. High-resolution synthetic spectra are obtained using an opacity sampling method. The model atmospheres and spectra are calculated with the generalized stellar atmosphere code PHOENIX, assuming LTE, plane-parallel geometry, energy (radiative plus convective) conservation, and hydrostatic equilibrium. The model spectra give close agreement with observations of M dwarfs across a wide spectral range from the blue to the near-IR, with one notable exception: the fit to the water bands. We discuss several practical applications of our model grid, e.g., broadband colors derived from the synthetic spectra. In light of current efforts to identify genuine brown dwarfs, we also show how low-resolution spectra of cool dwarfs vary with surface gravity, and how the high-regulation line profile of the Li I resonance doublet depends on the Li abundance.

  3. Imaging Lithium Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2005-01-03

    John Cowley and his group at ASU were pioneers in the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for high-resolution imaging. Three decades ago they achieved images showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4A resolution. Over the years, this achievement has inspired improvements in resolution that have enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the cell. More recently, this ability has been extended to light atoms as resolution has improved. Sub-Angstrom resolution has enabled researchers to image the columns of light atoms (carbon, oxygen and nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures. By using sub-Angstrom focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave to image columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in a transition metal oxide structure commonly used as positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries, we show that the range of detectable light atoms extends to lithium. HRTEM at sub-Angstrom resolution will provide the essential role of experimental verification for the emergent nanotech revolution. Our results foreshadow those to be expected from next-generation TEMs with CS-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams.

  4. Recommended aquifer grid resolution for E-Area PA revision transport simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2018-01-03

    This memorandum addresses portions of Section 3.5.2 of SRNL (2016) by recommending horizontal and vertical grid resolution for aquifer transport, in preparation for the next E-Area Performance Assessment (WSRC 2008) revision.

  5. Autonomous Operation of Hybrid Microgrid with AC and DC Sub-Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poh Chiang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2011-01-01

    the power flow among all the sources distributed throughout the two types of sub-grids, which certainly is tougher than previous efforts developed for only either ac or dc microgrid. This wider scope of control has not yet been investigated, and would certainly rely on the coordinated operation of dc...... sources, ac sources and interlinking converters. Suitable control and normalization schemes are therefore developed for controlling them with results presented for showing the overall performance of the hybrid microgrid.......This paper investigates on the active and reactive power sharing of an autonomous hybrid microgrid. Unlike existing microgrids which are purely ac, the hybrid microgrid studied here comprises dc and ac sub-grids, interconnected by power electronic interfaces. The main challenge here is to manage...

  6. Research of Smart Payment System of Power Grid Using Strongly Sub-feasible SQP Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Fang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the continuous development and perfection of “Internet + Electricity”, the regional grid operation has gradually realized the Internet-based automation. In order to improve the smart level of regional grid operation, this paper analyzes the status quo of power grid terminal in Fujian local power (group company, and introduces the strongly sub-feasible sequence quadratic programming (SQP. The smart payment system based on strongly sub-feasible SQP algorithm is described by its structure, function and implementation process. Through the information technology to improve the efficiency of the service, so that payment staff and smart terminal of self-service payment system has been information between the interactive mode, the actual operation effect is good.

  7. The functional micro-organization of grid cells revealed by cellular-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heys, James G; Rangarajan, Krsna V; Dombeck, Daniel A

    2014-12-03

    Establishing how grid cells are anatomically arranged, on a microscopic scale, in relation to their firing patterns in the environment would facilitate a greater microcircuit-level understanding of the brain's representation of space. However, all previous grid cell recordings used electrode techniques that provide limited descriptions of fine-scale organization. We therefore developed a technique for cellular-resolution functional imaging of medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) neurons in mice navigating a virtual linear track, enabling a new experimental approach to study MEC. Using these methods, we show that grid cells are physically clustered in MEC compared to nongrid cells. Additionally, we demonstrate that grid cells are functionally micro-organized: the similarity between the environment firing locations of grid cell pairs varies as a function of the distance between them according to a "Mexican hat"-shaped profile. This suggests that, on average, nearby grid cells have more similar spatial firing phases than those further apart. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Scanning SQUID susceptometers with sub-micron spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirtley, John R.; Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Holland, Connor M.; Moler, Kathryn A.; Paulius, Lisa; Spanton, Eric M.; Schiessl, Daniel; Jermain, Colin L.; Gibbons, Jonathan; Fung, Y.-K.K.; Gibson, Gerald W.; Huber, Martin E.; Ralph, Daniel C.; Ketchen, Mark B.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) microscopy has excellent magnetic field sensitivity, but suffers from modest spatial resolution when compared with other scanning probes. This spatial resolution is determined by both the size of the field sensitive area and the spacing between this area and the sample surface. In this paper we describe scanning SQUID susceptometers that achieve sub-micron spatial resolution while retaining a white noise floor flux sensitivity of ≈2μΦ_0/Hz"1"/"2. This high spatial resolution is accomplished by deep sub-micron feature sizes, well shielded pickup loops fabricated using a planarized process, and a deep etch step that minimizes the spacing between the sample surface and the SQUID pickup loop. We describe the design, modeling, fabrication, and testing of these sensors. Although sub-micron spatial resolution has been achieved previously in scanning SQUID sensors, our sensors not only achieve high spatial resolution but also have integrated modulation coils for flux feedback, integrated field coils for susceptibility measurements, and batch processing. They are therefore a generally applicable tool for imaging sample magnetization, currents, and susceptibilities with higher spatial resolution than previous susceptometers.

  9. The R package 'icosa' for coarse resolution global triangular and penta-hexagonal gridding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, Adam T.

    2017-04-01

    With the development of the internet and the computational power of personal computers, open source programming environments have become indispensable for science in the past decade. This includes the increase of the GIS capacity of the free R environment, which was originally developed for statistical analyses. The flexibility of R made it a preferred programming tool in a multitude of disciplines from the area of the biological and geological sciences. Many of these subdisciplines operate with incidence (occurrence) data that are in a large number of cases to be grained before further analyses can be conducted. This graining is executed mostly by gridding data to cells of a Gaussian grid of various resolutions to increase the density of data in a single unit of the analyses. This method has obvious shortcomings despite the ease of its application: well-known systematic biases are induced to cell sizes and shapes that can interfere with the results of statistical procedures, especially if the number of incidence points influences the metrics in question. The 'icosa' package employs a common method to overcome this obstacle by implementing grids with roughly equal cell sizes and shapes that are based on tessellated icosahedra. These grid objects are essentially polyhedra with xyz Cartesian vertex data that are linked to tables of faces and edges. At its current developmental stage, the package uses a single method of tessellation which balances grid cell size and shape distortions, but its structure allows the implementation of various other types of tessellation algorithms. The resolution of the grids can be set by the number of breakpoints inserted into a segment forming an edge of the original icosahedron. Both the triangular and their inverted penta-hexagonal grids are available for creation with the package. The package also incorporates functions to look up coordinates in the grid very effectively and data containers to link data to the grid structure. The

  10. Matching soil grid unit resolutions with polygon unit scales for DNDC modelling of regional SOC pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. D.; Yu, D. S.; Ni, Y. L.; Zhang, L. M.; Shi, X. Z.

    2015-03-01

    Matching soil grid unit resolution with polygon unit map scale is important to minimize uncertainty of regional soil organic carbon (SOC) pool simulation as their strong influences on the uncertainty. A series of soil grid units at varying cell sizes were derived from soil polygon units at the six map scales of 1:50 000 (C5), 1:200 000 (D2), 1:500 000 (P5), 1:1 000 000 (N1), 1:4 000 000 (N4) and 1:14 000 000 (N14), respectively, in the Tai lake region of China. Both format soil units were used for regional SOC pool simulation with DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) process-based model, which runs span the time period 1982 to 2000 at the six map scales, respectively. Four indices, soil type number (STN) and area (AREA), average SOC density (ASOCD) and total SOC stocks (SOCS) of surface paddy soils simulated with the DNDC, were attributed from all these soil polygon and grid units, respectively. Subjecting to the four index values (IV) from the parent polygon units, the variation of an index value (VIV, %) from the grid units was used to assess its dataset accuracy and redundancy, which reflects uncertainty in the simulation of SOC. Optimal soil grid unit resolutions were generated and suggested for the DNDC simulation of regional SOC pool, matching with soil polygon units map scales, respectively. With the optimal raster resolution the soil grid units dataset can hold the same accuracy as its parent polygon units dataset without any redundancy, when VIV indices was assumed as criteria to the assessment. An quadratic curve regression model y = -8.0 × 10-6x2 + 0.228x + 0.211 (R2 = 0.9994, p < 0.05) was revealed, which describes the relationship between optimal soil grid unit resolution (y, km) and soil polygon unit map scale (1:x). The knowledge may serve for grid partitioning of regions focused on the investigation and simulation of SOC pool dynamics at certain map scale.

  11. Large Eddy Simulation of Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flows with the Lattice Boltzmann Method: Effect of Collision Model, SGS Model and Grid Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Aniruddhe; Akhavan, Rayhaneh

    2017-11-01

    Effect of collision model, subgrid-scale model and grid resolution in Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of wall-bounded turbulent flows with the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is investigated in turbulent channel flow. The Single Relaxation Time (SRT) collision model is found to be more accurate than Multi-Relaxation Time (MRT) collision model in well-resolved LES. Accurate LES requires grid resolutions of Δ+ LBM requires either grid-embedding in the near-wall region, with grid resolutions comparable to DNS, or a wall model. Results of LES with grid-embedding and wall models will be discussed.

  12. Sub-Grid Modeling of Electrokinetic Effects in Micro Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    Advances in micro-fabrication processes have generated tremendous interests in miniaturizing chemical and biomedical analyses into integrated microsystems (Lab-on-Chip devices). To successfully design and operate the micro fluidics system, it is essential to understand the fundamental fluid flow phenomena when channel sizes are shrink to micron or even nano dimensions. One important phenomenon is the electro kinetic effect in micro/nano channels due to the existence of the electrical double layer (EDL) near a solid-liquid interface. Not only EDL is responsible for electro-osmosis pumping when an electric field parallel to the surface is imposed, EDL also causes extra flow resistance (the electro-viscous effect) and flow anomaly (such as early transition from laminar to turbulent flow) observed in pressure-driven microchannel flows. Modeling and simulation of electro-kinetic effects on micro flows poses significant numerical challenge due to the fact that the sizes of the double layer (10 nm up to microns) are very thin compared to channel width (can be up to 100 s of m). Since the typical thickness of the double layer is extremely small compared to the channel width, it would be computationally very costly to capture the velocity profile inside the double layer by placing sufficient number of grid cells in the layer to resolve the velocity changes, especially in complex, 3-d geometries. Existing approaches using "slip" wall velocity and augmented double layer are difficult to use when the flow geometry is complicated, e.g. flow in a T-junction, X-junction, etc. In order to overcome the difficulties arising from those two approaches, we have developed a sub-grid integration method to properly account for the physics of the double layer. The integration approach can be used on simple or complicated flow geometries. Resolution of the double layer is not needed in this approach, and the effects of the double layer can be accounted for at the same time. With this

  13. A graphene oxide-carbon nanotube grid for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lina; Zhang Haoxu; Zhou Ruifeng; Chen Zhuo; Li Qunqing; Fan Shoushan; Jiang Kaili; Ge Guanglu; Liu Renxiao

    2011-01-01

    A novel grid for use in transmission electron microscopy is developed. The supporting film of the grid is composed of thin graphene oxide films overlying a super-aligned carbon nanotube network. The composite film combines the advantages of graphene oxide and carbon nanotube networks and has the following properties: it is ultra-thin, it has a large flat and smooth effective supporting area with a homogeneous amorphous appearance, high stability, and good conductivity. The graphene oxide-carbon nanotube grid has a distinct advantage when characterizing the fine structure of a mass of nanomaterials over conventional amorphous carbon grids. Clear high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images of various nanomaterials are obtained easily using the new grids.

  14. High-resolution grids of hourly meteorological variables for Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krähenmann, S.; Walter, A.; Brienen, S.; Imbery, F.; Matzarakis, A.

    2018-02-01

    We present a 1-km2 gridded German dataset of hourly surface climate variables covering the period 1995 to 2012. The dataset comprises 12 variables including temperature, dew point, cloud cover, wind speed and direction, global and direct shortwave radiation, down- and up-welling longwave radiation, sea level pressure, relative humidity and vapour pressure. This dataset was constructed statistically from station data, satellite observations and model data. It is outstanding in terms of spatial and temporal resolution and in the number of climate variables. For each variable, we employed the most suitable gridding method and combined the best of several information sources, including station records, satellite-derived data and data from a regional climate model. A module to estimate urban heat island intensity was integrated for air and dew point temperature. Owing to the low density of available synop stations, the gridded dataset does not capture all variations that may occur at a resolution of 1 km2. This applies to areas of complex terrain (all the variables), and in particular to wind speed and the radiation parameters. To achieve maximum precision, we used all observational information when it was available. This, however, leads to inhomogeneities in station network density and affects the long-term consistency of the dataset. A first climate analysis for Germany was conducted. The Rhine River Valley, for example, exhibited more than 100 summer days in 2003, whereas in 1996, the number was low everywhere in Germany. The dataset is useful for applications in various climate-related studies, hazard management and for solar or wind energy applications and it is available via doi: 10.5676/DWD_CDC/TRY_Basis_v001.

  15. BiI<sub>3sub> Crystals for High Energy Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nino, Juan C. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Baciak, James [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Johns, Paul [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sulekar, Soumitra [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Totten, James [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Nimmagadda, Jyothir [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-04-12

    BiI<sub>3sub> had been investigated for its unique properties as a layered compound semiconductor for many decades. However, despite the exceptional atomic, physical, and electronic properties of this material, good resolution gamma ray spectra had never been reported for BiI<sub>3sub>. The shortcomings that previously prevented BiI<sub>3sub> from reaching success as a gamma ray sensor were, through this project, identified and suppressed to unlock the performance of this promising compound. Included in this work were studies on a number of methods which have, for the first time, enabled BiI<sub>3sub> to exhibit spectral performance rivaling many other candidate semiconductors for room temperature gamma ray sensors. New approaches to crystal growth were explored that allow BiI<sub>3sub> spectrometers to be fabricated with up to 2.2% spectral resolution at 662 keV. Fundamental studies on trap states, dopant incorporation, and polarization were performed to enhance performance of this compound. Additionally, advanced detection techniques were applied to display the capabilities of high quality BiI<sub>3sub> spectrometers. Overall, through this work, BiI<sub>3sub> has been revealed as a potentially transformative material for nuclear security and radiation detection sciences.

  16. High-resolution subgrid models: background, grid generation, and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehili, Aissa; Lang, Günther; Lippert, Christoph

    2014-04-01

    The basic idea of subgrid models is the use of available high-resolution bathymetric data at subgrid level in computations that are performed on relatively coarse grids allowing large time steps. For that purpose, an algorithm that correctly represents the precise mass balance in regions where wetting and drying occur was derived by Casulli (Int J Numer Method Fluids 60:391-408, 2009) and Casulli and Stelling (Int J Numer Method Fluids 67:441-449, 2010). Computational grid cells are permitted to be wet, partially wet, or dry, and no drying threshold is needed. Based on the subgrid technique, practical applications involving various scenarios were implemented including an operational forecast model for water level, salinity, and temperature of the Elbe Estuary in Germany. The grid generation procedure allows a detailed boundary fitting at subgrid level. The computational grid is made of flow-aligned quadrilaterals including few triangles where necessary. User-defined grid subdivision at subgrid level allows a correct representation of the volume up to measurement accuracy. Bottom friction requires a particular treatment. Based on the conveyance approach, an appropriate empirical correction was worked out. The aforementioned features make the subgrid technique very efficient, robust, and accurate. Comparison of predicted water levels with the comparatively highly resolved classical unstructured grid model shows very good agreement. The speedup in computational performance due to the use of the subgrid technique is about a factor of 20. A typical daily forecast can be carried out in less than 10 min on a standard PC-like hardware. The subgrid technique is therefore a promising framework to perform accurate temporal and spatial large-scale simulations of coastal and estuarine flow and transport processes at low computational cost.

  17. STAMMEX high resolution gridded daily precipitation dataset over Germany: a new potential for regional precipitation climate research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolina, Olga; Simmer, Clemens; Kapala, Alice; Mächel, Hermann; Gulev, Sergey; Groisman, Pavel

    2014-05-01

    We present new high resolution precipitation daily grids developed at Meteorological Institute, University of Bonn and German Weather Service (DWD) under the STAMMEX project (Spatial and Temporal Scales and Mechanisms of Extreme Precipitation Events over Central Europe). Daily precipitation grids have been developed from the daily-observing precipitation network of DWD, which runs one of the World's densest rain gauge networks comprising more than 7500 stations. Several quality-controlled daily gridded products with homogenized sampling were developed covering the periods 1931-onwards (with 0.5 degree resolution), 1951-onwards (0.25 degree and 0.5 degree), and 1971-2000 (0.1 degree). Different methods were tested to select the best gridding methodology that minimizes errors of integral grid estimates over hilly terrain. Besides daily precipitation values with uncertainty estimates (which include standard estimates of the kriging uncertainty as well as error estimates derived by a bootstrapping algorithm), the STAMMEX data sets include a variety of statistics that characterize temporal and spatial dynamics of the precipitation distribution (quantiles, extremes, wet/dry spells, etc.). Comparisons with existing continental-scale daily precipitation grids (e.g., CRU, ECA E-OBS, GCOS) which include considerably less observations compared to those used in STAMMEX, demonstrate the added value of high-resolution grids for extreme rainfall analyses. These data exhibit spatial variability pattern and trends in precipitation extremes, which are missed or incorrectly reproduced over Central Europe from coarser resolution grids based on sparser networks. The STAMMEX dataset can be used for high-quality climate diagnostics of precipitation variability, as a reference for reanalyses and remotely-sensed precipitation products (including the upcoming Global Precipitation Mission products), and for input into regional climate and operational weather forecast models. We will present

  18. Effect of grid resolution on large eddy simulation of wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeiravesh, S.; Liefvendahl, M.

    2018-05-01

    The effect of grid resolution on a large eddy simulation (LES) of a wall-bounded turbulent flow is investigated. A channel flow simulation campaign involving a systematic variation of the streamwise (Δx) and spanwise (Δz) grid resolution is used for this purpose. The main friction-velocity-based Reynolds number investigated is 300. Near the walls, the grid cell size is determined by the frictional scaling, Δx+ and Δz+, and strongly anisotropic cells, with first Δy+ ˜ 1, thus aiming for the wall-resolving LES. Results are compared to direct numerical simulations, and several quality measures are investigated, including the error in the predicted mean friction velocity and the error in cross-channel profiles of flow statistics. To reduce the total number of channel flow simulations, techniques from the framework of uncertainty quantification are employed. In particular, a generalized polynomial chaos expansion (gPCE) is used to create metamodels for the errors over the allowed parameter ranges. The differing behavior of the different quality measures is demonstrated and analyzed. It is shown that friction velocity and profiles of the velocity and Reynolds stress tensor are most sensitive to Δz+, while the error in the turbulent kinetic energy is mostly influenced by Δx+. Recommendations for grid resolution requirements are given, together with the quantification of the resulting predictive accuracy. The sensitivity of the results to the subgrid-scale (SGS) model and varying Reynolds number is also investigated. All simulations are carried out with second-order accurate finite-volume-based solver OpenFOAM. It is shown that the choice of numerical scheme for the convective term significantly influences the error portraits. It is emphasized that the proposed methodology, involving the gPCE, can be applied to other modeling approaches, i.e., other numerical methods and the choice of SGS model.

  19. Design and study of a coplanar grid array CdZnTe detector for improved spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Yuedong; Xiao, Shali; Yang, Guoqiang; Zhang, Liuqiang

    2014-01-01

    Coplanar grid (CPG) CdZnTe detectors have been used as gamma-ray spectrometers for years. Comparing with pixelated CdZnTe detectors, CPG CdZnTe detectors have either no or poor spatial resolution, which directly limits its use in imaging applications. To address the issue, a 2×2 CPG array CdZnTe detector with dimensions of 7×7×5 mm 3 was fabricated. Each of the CPG pairs in the detector was moderately shrunk in size and precisely designed to improve the spatial resolution while maintaining good energy resolution, considering the charge loss at the surface between the strips of each CPG pairs. Preliminary measurements were demonstrated at an energy resolution of 2.7–3.9% for the four CPG pairs using 662 keV gamma rays and with a spatial resolution of 3.3 mm, which is the best spatial resolution ever achieved for CPG CdZnTe detectors. The results reveal that the CPG CdZnTe detector can also be applied to imaging applications at a substantially higher spatial resolution. - Highlights: • A novel structure of coplanar grid CdZnTe detector was designed to evaluate the possibility of applying the detector to gamma-ray imaging applications. • The best spatial resolution of coplanar grid CdZnTe detectors ever reported has been achieved, along with good spectroscopic performance. • Depth correction of the energy spectra using a new algorithm is presented

  20. Calibrated, Enhanced-Resolution Brightness Temperature Earth System Data Record: A New Era for Gridded Passive Microwave Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, M.; Brodzik, M. J.; Long, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    Since 1978, the satellite passive microwave data record has been a mainstay of remote sensing of the cryosphere, providing twice-daily, near-global spatial coverage for monitoring changes in hydrologic and cryospheric parameters that include precipitation, soil moisture, surface water, vegetation, snow water equivalent, sea ice concentration and sea ice motion. Up until recently, the available global gridded passive microwave data sets have not been produced consistently. Various projections (equal-area, polar stereographic), a number of different gridding techniques were used, along with various temporal sampling as well as a mix of Level 2 source data versions. In addition, not all data from all sensors have been processed completely and they have not been processed in any one consistent way. Furthermore, the original gridding techniques were relatively primitive and were produced on 25 km grids using the original EASE-Grid definition that is not easily accommodated in modern software packages. As part of NASA MEaSUREs, we have re-processed all data from SMMR, all SSM/I-SSMIS and AMSR-E instruments, using the most mature Level 2 data. The Calibrated, Enhanced-Resolution Brightness Temperature (CETB) Earth System Data Record (ESDR) gridded data are now available from the NSIDC DAAC. The data are distributed as netCDF files that comply with CF-1.6 and ACDD-1.3 conventions. The data have been produced on EASE 2.0 projections at smoothed, 25 kilometer resolution and spatially-enhanced resolutions, up to 3.125 km depending on channel frequency, using the radiometer version of the Scatterometer Image Reconstruction (rSIR) method. We expect this newly produced data set to enable scientists to better analyze trends in coastal regions, marginal ice zones and in mountainous terrain that were not possible with the previous gridded passive microwave data. The use of the EASE-Grid 2.0 definition and netCDF-CF formatting allows users to extract compliant geotiff images and

  1. A European daily high-resolution gridded dataset of surface temperature and precipitation for 1950-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haylock, M.; Hofstra, N.; Klein Tank, A.; Klok, L.; Jones, P.; New, M.

    2008-01-01

    We present a European land-only daily high-resolution gridded data set for precipitation and minimum, maximum, and mean surface temperature for the period 1950–2006. This data set improves on previous products in its spatial resolution and extent, time period, number of contributing stations, and

  2. HRTEM imaging of atoms at sub-Angstroem resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    John Cowley and his group at Arizona State University pioneered the use of transmission electron microscopy for high-resolution imaging. Images were achieved three decades ago showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4 A resolution. This achievement enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the unit cell. Lighter atoms appear as resolution is improved to sub-Angstroem levels. Currently, advanced microscopes can image the columns of the light atoms (carbon, oxygen, nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures, and even the lithium atoms present in some battery materials. Sub-Angstroem imaging, initially achieved by focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave, will become commonplace for next-generation electron microscopes with C s -corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams. Resolution can be quantified in terms of peak separation and inter-peak minimum, but the limits imposed on the attainable resolution by the properties of the microscope specimen need to be considered. At extreme resolution the 'size' of atoms can mean that they will not be resolved even when spaced farther apart than the resolution of the microscope. (author)

  3. HRTEM Imaging of Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.

    2005-04-06

    John Cowley and his group at Arizona State University pioneered the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for high-resolution imaging. Images were achieved three decades ago showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4 Angstrom resolution. This achievement enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the unit cell. Lighter atoms appear as resolution is improved to sub-Angstrom levels. Currently, advanced microscopes can image the columns of the light atoms (carbon, oxygen, nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures, and even the lithium atoms present in some battery materials. Sub-Angstrom imaging, initially achieved by focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave, will become common place for next-generation electron microscopes with CS-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams. Resolution can be quantified in terms of peak separation and inter-peak minimum, but the limits imposed on the attainable resolution by the properties of the micro-scope specimen need to be considered. At extreme resolution the ''size'' of atoms can mean that they will not be resolved even when spaced farther apart than the resolution of the microscope.

  4. A grid-enabled web service for low-resolution crystal structure refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, Daniel J; Stokes-Rees, Ian; Nam, Yunsun; Blacklow, Stephen C; Schröder, Gunnar F; Brunger, Axel T; Sliz, Piotr

    2012-03-01

    Deformable elastic network (DEN) restraints have proved to be a powerful tool for refining structures from low-resolution X-ray crystallographic data sets. Unfortunately, optimal refinement using DEN restraints requires extensive calculations and is often hindered by a lack of access to sufficient computational resources. The DEN web service presented here intends to provide structural biologists with access to resources for running computationally intensive DEN refinements in parallel on the Open Science Grid, the US cyberinfrastructure. Access to the grid is provided through a simple and intuitive web interface integrated into the SBGrid Science Portal. Using this portal, refinements combined with full parameter optimization that would take many thousands of hours on standard computational resources can now be completed in several hours. An example of the successful application of DEN restraints to the human Notch1 transcriptional complex using the grid resource, and summaries of all submitted refinements, are presented as justification.

  5. Investigation on ultracold RbCs molecules in (2)0{sup +} long-range state below the Rb(5S{sub 1/2}) + Cs(6P{sub 1/2}) asymptote by high resolution photoassociation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Jinpeng; Ji, Zhonghua; Li, Zhonghao; Zhao, Yanting, E-mail: zhaoyt@sxu.edu.cn; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Laser Spectroscopy, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)

    2015-07-28

    We present high resolution photoassociation spectroscopy of RbCs molecules in (2)0{sup +} long-range state below the Rb(5S{sub 1/2}) + Cs(6P{sub 1/2}) asymptote and derive the corresponding C{sub 6} coefficient, which is used to revise the potential energy curves. The excited state molecules are produced in a dual-species dark spontaneous force optical trap and detected by ionizing ground state molecules after spontaneous decay, using a high sensitive time-of-flight mass spectrum. With the help of resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization technique, we obtain considerable high resolution photoassociation spectrum with rovibrational states, some of which have never been observed before. By applying the LeRoy-Bernstein method, we assign the vibrational quantum numbers and deduce C{sub 6} coefficient, which agrees with the theoretical value of A{sup 1}Σ{sup +} state correlated to Rb(5S{sub 1/2}) + Cs(6P{sub 1/2}) asymptote. The obtained C{sub 6} coefficient is used to revise the long-range potential energy curve for (2)0{sup +} state, which possesses unique A − b mixing characteristic and can be a good candidate for the production of absolutely ground state molecule.

  6. Horizontal Residual Mean Circulation: Evaluation of Spatial Correlations in Coarse Resolution Ocean Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; McDougall, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    Coarse resolution ocean models lack knowledge of spatial correlations between variables on scales smaller than the grid scale. Some researchers have shown that these spatial correlations play a role in the poleward heat flux. In order to evaluate the poleward transport induced by the spatial correlations at a fixed horizontal position, an equation is obtained to calculate the approximate transport from velocity gradients. The equation involves two terms that can be added to the quasi-Stokes streamfunction (based on temporal correlations) to incorporate the contribution of spatial correlations. Moreover, these new terms do not need to be parameterized and is ready to be evaluated by using model data directly. In this study, data from a high resolution ocean model have been used to estimate the accuracy of this HRM approach for improving the horizontal property fluxes in coarse-resolution ocean models. A coarse grid is formed by sub-sampling and box-car averaging the fine grid scale. The transport calculated on the coarse grid is then compared to the transport on original high resolution grid scale accumulated over a corresponding number of grid boxes. The preliminary results have shown that the estimate on coarse resolution grids roughly match the corresponding transports on high resolution grids.

  7. Prospects for realizing a sub-A sub-eV resolution EFTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, H.

    1999-01-01

    The arrangement of a sub-Angstrom and sub-eV resolution energy filtering transmission electron microscope (EFTEM) is outlined. This ideal future analytical microscope is a combination of a scanning transmission (STEM) and a corrected fixed-beam transmission electron microscope (TEM) and operates at voltages between 150 and 300 kV. The ultra resolution EFTEM will consist of a field emission gun followed by a monochromator yielding an energy width below 0.2 eV. The condenser system provides Koehler illumination for the TEM mode and a spot size of about 0.2 nm for the STEM mode. The spherically corrected aplanatic objective lens consists of a coma-free round lens and an integrated hexapole corrector. The formation of the energy loss spectrum is performed by the ultradispersive aberration-free MANDOLINE filter. The filtered intermediate image or the energy loss spectrum, respectively, are imaged onto a Charged-Coupled Device (CCD) array with variable magnification by means of a distortion-free projector system consisting of several quadrupoles and octupoles. For obtaining sub-Angstrom resolution the parasitic mechanical and electromagnetic instabilities must be reduced to such an extent that the information limit is pushed below 0.06 nm. All requirements can be met at the present state of technology. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  8. MICROARRAY IMAGE GRIDDING USING GRID LINE REFINEMENT TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Biju

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An important stage in microarray image analysis is gridding. Microarray image gridding is done to locate sub arrays in a microarray image and find co-ordinates of spots within each sub array. For accurate identification of spots, most of the proposed gridding methods require human intervention. In this paper a fully automatic gridding method which enhances spot intensity in the preprocessing step as per a histogram based threshold method is used. The gridding step finds co-ordinates of spots from horizontal and vertical profile of the image. To correct errors due to the grid line placement, a grid line refinement technique is proposed. The algorithm is applied on different image databases and results are compared based on spot detection accuracy and time. An average spot detection accuracy of 95.06% depicts the proposed method’s flexibility and accuracy in finding the spot co-ordinates for different database images.

  9. Satellite constraint for emissions of nitrogen oxides from anthropogenic, lightning and soil sources over East China on a high-resolution grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-T. Lin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertical column densities (VCDs of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO<sub>2sub> retrieved from space provide valuable information to estimate emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO<sub>x> inversely. Accurate emission attribution to individual sources, important both for understanding the global biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen and for emission control, remains difficult. This study presents a regression-based multi-step inversion approach to estimate emissions of NO<sub>x> from anthropogenic, lightning and soil sources individually for 2006 over East China on a 0.25° long × 0.25° lat grid, employing the DOMINO product version 2 retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument. The inversion is done gridbox by gridbox to derive the respective emissions, taking advantage of differences in seasonality between anthropogenic and natural sources. Lightning and soil emissions are combined together for any given gridbox due to their similar seasonality; and their different spatial distributions are used implicitly for source separation to some extent. The nested GEOS-Chem model for East Asia is used to simulate the seasonal variations of different emission sources and impacts on VCDs of NO<sub>2sub> for the inversion purpose. Sensitivity tests are conducted to evaluate key assumptions embedded in the inversion process. The inverse estimate suggests annual budgets of about 7.1 TgN (±39%, 0.21 TgN (±61%, and 0.38 TgN (±65% for the a posteriori anthropogenic, lightning and soil emissions, respectively, about 18–23% higher than the respective a priori values. The enhancements in anthropogenic emissions are largest in cities and areas with extensive use of coal, particularly in the north in winter, as evident on the high-resolution grid. Derived soil emissions are consistent with recent bottom-up estimates. They are less than 6% of anthropogenic emissions annually, increasing to about 13% for July. Derived lightning emissions are about 3% of

  10. Sub-grid-scale effects on short-wave instability in magnetized hall-MHD plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, H.; Nakajima, N.

    2010-11-01

    Aiming to clarify effects of short-wave modes on nonlinear evolution/saturation of the ballooning instability in the Large Helical Device, fully three-dimensional simulations of the single-fluid MHD and the Hall MHD equations are carried out. A moderate parallel heat conductivity plays an important role both in the two kinds of simulations. In the single-fluid MHD simulations, the parallel heat conduction effectively suppresses short-wave ballooning modes but it turns out that the suppression is insufficient in comparison to an experimental result. In the Hall MHD simulations, the parallel heat conduction triggers a rapid growth of the parallel flow and enhance nonlinear couplings. A comparison between single-fluid and the Hall MHD simulations reveals that the Hall MHD model does not necessarily improve the saturated pressure profile, and that we may need a further extension of the model. We also find by a comparison between two Hall MHD simulations with different numerical resolutions that sub-grid-scales of the Hall term should be modeled to mimic an inverse energy transfer in the wave number space. (author)

  11. Use of fundamental condensation heat transfer experiments for the development of a sub-grid liquid jet condensation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buschman, Francis X., E-mail: Francis.Buschman@unnpp.gov; Aumiller, David L.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Direct contact condensation data on liquid jets up to 1.7 MPa in pure steam and in the presence of noncondensable gas. • Identified a pressure effect on the impact of noncondensables to suppress condensation heat transfer not captured in existing data or correlations. • Pure steam data is used to develop a new correlation for condensation heat transfer on subcooled liquid jets. • Noncondensable data used to develop a modification to the renewal time estimate used in the Young and Bajorek correlation for condensation suppression in the presence of noncondensables. • A jet injection boundary condition, using a sub-grid jet condensation model, is developed for COBRA-IE which provides a more detailed estimate of the condensation rate on the liquid jet and allows the use of jet specific closure relationships. - Abstract: Condensation on liquid jets is an important phenomenon for many different facets of nuclear power plant transients and analyses such as containment spray cooling. An experimental facility constructed at the Pennsylvania State University, the High Pressure Liquid Jet Condensation Heat Transfer facility (HPLJCHT), has been used to perform steady-state condensation heat transfer experiments in which the temperature of the liquid jet is measured at different axial locations allowing the condensation rate to be determined over the jet length. Test data have been obtained in a pure steam environment and with varying concentrations of noncondensable gas. This data extends the available jet condensation data from near atmospheric pressure up to a pressure of 1.7 MPa. An empirical correlation for the liquid side condensation heat transfer coefficient has been developed based on the data obtained in pure steam. The data obtained with noncondensable gas were used to develop a correlation for the renewal time as used in the condensation suppression model developed by Young and Bajorek. This paper describes a new sub-grid liquid jet

  12. Use of fundamental condensation heat transfer experiments for the development of a sub-grid liquid jet condensation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buschman, Francis X.; Aumiller, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Direct contact condensation data on liquid jets up to 1.7 MPa in pure steam and in the presence of noncondensable gas. • Identified a pressure effect on the impact of noncondensables to suppress condensation heat transfer not captured in existing data or correlations. • Pure steam data is used to develop a new correlation for condensation heat transfer on subcooled liquid jets. • Noncondensable data used to develop a modification to the renewal time estimate used in the Young and Bajorek correlation for condensation suppression in the presence of noncondensables. • A jet injection boundary condition, using a sub-grid jet condensation model, is developed for COBRA-IE which provides a more detailed estimate of the condensation rate on the liquid jet and allows the use of jet specific closure relationships. - Abstract: Condensation on liquid jets is an important phenomenon for many different facets of nuclear power plant transients and analyses such as containment spray cooling. An experimental facility constructed at the Pennsylvania State University, the High Pressure Liquid Jet Condensation Heat Transfer facility (HPLJCHT), has been used to perform steady-state condensation heat transfer experiments in which the temperature of the liquid jet is measured at different axial locations allowing the condensation rate to be determined over the jet length. Test data have been obtained in a pure steam environment and with varying concentrations of noncondensable gas. This data extends the available jet condensation data from near atmospheric pressure up to a pressure of 1.7 MPa. An empirical correlation for the liquid side condensation heat transfer coefficient has been developed based on the data obtained in pure steam. The data obtained with noncondensable gas were used to develop a correlation for the renewal time as used in the condensation suppression model developed by Young and Bajorek. This paper describes a new sub-grid liquid jet

  13. Air quality impact of two power plants using a sub-grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drevet, Jerome; Musson-Genon, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Modeling point source emissions of air pollutants with regional Eulerian models is likely to lead to errors because a 3D Eulerian model is not able to correctly reproduce the evolution of a plume near its source. To overcome these difficulties, we applied a Gaussian puff model - imbedded within a 3D Eulerian model - for an impact assessment of EDF fossil fuel-fired power plants of Porcheville and Vitry, Ile-de-France. We simulated an entire year of atmospheric processes for an area covering the Paris region with the Polyphemus platform with which we conducted various scenarios with or without a Gaussian puff model, referred as Plume-in-grid, to independently handle 'with major point source emissions in Ile-de-France. Our study focuses on four chemical compounds (NO, NO 2 , SO 2 and O 3 ). The use of a Gaussian model is important, particularly for primary compounds with low reactivity such as SO, especially as industrial stacks are the major source of its emissions. SO 2 concentrations simulated using Plume-in-grid tare closer to the concentrations measured by the stations of the air quality agencies (Associations Agreees de Surveillance de la Qualite de l'Air, AASQA), although they remain largely overestimated. The use of a Gaussian model increases the concentrations near the source and lowers background levels of various chemical species (except O 3 ). The simulated concentrations may vary by over 30 % depending on whether we consider the Gaussian model for primary compounds such as SO 2 and NO, and around 2 % for secondary compounds such as NO 2 and O 3 . Regarding the impact of fossil fuel-fired power plants, simulated concentrations are increased by about 1 μg/m 3 approximately for SO 2 annual averages close to the Porcheville stack and are lowered by about 0.5 μg/m 3 far from the sources, highlighting the less diffusive character of the Gaussian model by comparison with the Eulerian model. The integration of a sub-grid Gaussian model offers the advantage of

  14. SPREAD: a high-resolution daily gridded precipitation dataset for Spain – an extreme events frequency and intensity overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Serrano-Notivoli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution daily gridded precipitation dataset was built from raw data of 12 858 observatories covering a period from 1950 to 2012 in peninsular Spain and 1971 to 2012 in Balearic and Canary islands. The original data were quality-controlled and gaps were filled on each day and location independently. Using the serially complete dataset, a grid with a 5 × 5 km spatial resolution was constructed by estimating daily precipitation amounts and their corresponding uncertainty at each grid node. Daily precipitation estimations were compared to original observations to assess the quality of the gridded dataset. Four daily precipitation indices were computed to characterise the spatial distribution of daily precipitation and nine extreme precipitation indices were used to describe the frequency and intensity of extreme precipitation events. The Mediterranean coast and the Central Range showed the highest frequency and intensity of extreme events, while the number of wet days and dry and wet spells followed a north-west to south-east gradient in peninsular Spain, from high to low values in the number of wet days and wet spells and reverse in dry spells. The use of the total available data in Spain, the independent estimation of precipitation for each day and the high spatial resolution of the grid allowed for a precise spatial and temporal assessment of daily precipitation that is difficult to achieve when using other methods, pre-selected long-term stations or global gridded datasets. SPREAD dataset is publicly available at https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/7393.

  15. Fabrication of phosphor micro-grids using proton beam lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Paolo; Antolak, Arlyn J.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Doyle, Barney Lee; Malmqvist, Klas; Hearne, Sean Joseph; Nilsson, Christer; Kristiansson, Per; Wegden, Marie; Elfman, Mikael; Pallon, Jan; Auzelyte, Vaida

    2005-01-01

    A new nuclear microscopy technique called ion photon emission microscopy or IPEM was recently invented. IPEM allows analysis involving single ions, such as ion beam induced charge (IBIC) or single event upset (SEU) imaging using a slightly modified optical microscope. The spatial resolution of IPEM is currently limited to more than 10 (micro)m by the scattering and reflection of ion-induced photons, i.e. light blooming or spreading, in the ionoluminescent phosphor layer. We are developing a 'Microscopic Gridded Phosphor' (also called Black Matrix) where the phosphor nanocrystals are confined within the gaps of a micrometer scale opaque grid, which limits the amount of detrimental light blooming. MeV-energy proton beam lithography is ideally suited to lithographically form masks for the grid because of high aspect ratio, pattern density and sub-micron resolution of this technique. In brief, the fabrication of the grids was made in the following manner: (1) a MeV proton beam focused to 1.5-2 (micro)m directly fabricated a matrix of pillars in a 15 (micro)m thick SU-8 lithographic resist; (2) 7:1 aspect ratio pillars were then formed by developing the proton exposed area; (3) Ni (Au) was electrochemically deposited onto Cu-coated Si from a sulfamate bath (or buffered CN bath); (4) the SU-8 pillars were removed by chemical etching; finally (5) the metal micro-grid was freed from its substrate by etching the underlying Cu layer. Our proposed metal micro-grids promise an order-of-magnitude improvement in the resolution of IPEM.

  16. Sub-Angstrom Atomic-Resolution Imaging of Heavy Atoms to Light Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2003-05-23

    Three decades ago John Cowley and his group at ASU achieved high-resolution electron microscope images showing the crystal unit cell contents at better than 4Angstrom resolution. Over the years, this achievement has inspired improvements in resolution that have enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the cell. More recently, this ability has been extended to light atoms as resolution has improved. Sub-Angstrom resolution has enabled researchers to image the columns of light atoms (carbon, oxygen and nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures. By using sub-Angstrom focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave to image columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in a transition metal oxide structure commonly used as positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries, we show that the range of detectable light atoms extends to lithium. HRTEM at sub-Angstrom resolution will provide the essential role of experimental verification for the emergent nanotech revolution. Our results foreshadow those to be expected from next-generation TEMs with Cs-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams.

  17. A study of energy resolution in a gridded ionization chamber filled with tetramethylsilane and tetramethylgermanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, H.; Ohnuma, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Yuta, H.; Abe, K.; Suekane, F.; Neichi, M.; Nakajima, T.; Masuda, K.

    1998-01-01

    The energy resolutions of 976 keV conversion electrons from a 207 Bi source are measured in a gridded ionization chamber filled with tetramethylsilane (TMS) and tetramethylgermanium (TMG), and are found to be about 5.7 and 5.5% (rms) for TMS and TMG, respectively. We also deduce a simple method of estimating the electron lifetime using a gridded ionization chamber. The electron lifetime, free ion yield and thermalization length for these liquids are measured by this simple method

  18. Global tropospheric ozone modeling: Quantifying errors due to grid resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Oliver; Prather, Michael J.

    2006-06-01

    Ozone production in global chemical models is dependent on model resolution because ozone chemistry is inherently nonlinear, the timescales for chemical production are short, and precursors are artificially distributed over the spatial scale of the model grid. In this study we examine the sensitivity of ozone, its precursors, and its production to resolution by running a global chemical transport model at four different resolutions between T21 (5.6° × 5.6°) and T106 (1.1° × 1.1°) and by quantifying the errors in regional and global budgets. The sensitivity to vertical mixing through the parameterization of boundary layer turbulence is also examined. We find less ozone production in the boundary layer at higher resolution, consistent with slower chemical production in polluted emission regions and greater export of precursors. Agreement with ozonesonde and aircraft measurements made during the NASA TRACE-P campaign over the western Pacific in spring 2001 is consistently better at higher resolution. We demonstrate that the numerical errors in transport processes on a given resolution converge geometrically for a tracer at successively higher resolutions. The convergence in ozone production on progressing from T21 to T42, T63, and T106 resolution is likewise monotonic but indicates that there are still large errors at 120 km scales, suggesting that T106 resolution is too coarse to resolve regional ozone production. Diagnosing the ozone production and precursor transport that follow a short pulse of emissions over east Asia in springtime allows us to quantify the impacts of resolution on both regional and global ozone. Production close to continental emission regions is overestimated by 27% at T21 resolution, by 13% at T42 resolution, and by 5% at T106 resolution. However, subsequent ozone production in the free troposphere is not greatly affected. We find that the export of short-lived precursors such as NOx by convection is overestimated at coarse resolution.

  19. Au-coated X-ray Anti-scattering Grid Performance Test by MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, JunWoo; Yoo, Dong Han; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    It is required to protect individual against the dangers of ionizing radiation from medical exposure. And increasing of resolution for x-ray radiography tools can give radiation protectoral benefits. Because the image device has higher resolution in same energy source, it requires low energy level source and it can reduce individual dose. The anti-scattering grid is sub-device that is attached in front of detector (direction of source). It is square lattice shape generally. It is composed of penetration parts and shielding parts. Penetration part is generally air (the void) and in some studies it uses wood or aluminum. Shielding part is composed of various materials such as lead or copper. In this study, it is focused on the gold as one of X-ray grid materials, where gold is generally known as excellent shielding material and the performance test on the gold coated anti-scattering grid is carried out by MCNP simulation. X-ray grid was simulated by using MCNP code and its performance was investigated. It was understood that glass based and Au-coated grid could lessen the scattered photons more where the reduction was about two third. In further study, geometry optimization or material selection will be conducted by MCNP simulation for giving benefits to design proper grid for various instruments.

  20. Desktop grid computing

    CERN Document Server

    Cerin, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Desktop Grid Computing presents common techniques used in numerous models, algorithms, and tools developed during the last decade to implement desktop grid computing. These techniques enable the solution of many important sub-problems for middleware design, including scheduling, data management, security, load balancing, result certification, and fault tolerance. The book's first part covers the initial ideas and basic concepts of desktop grid computing. The second part explores challenging current and future problems. Each chapter presents the sub-problems, discusses theoretical and practical

  1. Assessing the Resolution Adaptability of the Zhang-McFarlane Cumulus Parameterization With Spatial and Temporal Averaging: RESOLUTION ADAPTABILITY OF ZM SCHEME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Yuxing [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; State Key Laboratory of Severe Weather, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing China; Fan, Jiwen [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Xiao, Heng [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Zhang, Guang J. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego CA USA; Ghan, Steven J. [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Xu, Kuan-Man [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton VA USA; Ma, Po-Lun [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Gustafson, William I. [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA

    2017-11-01

    Realistic modeling of cumulus convection at fine model resolutions (a few to a few tens of km) is problematic since it requires the cumulus scheme to adapt to higher resolution than they were originally designed for (~100 km). To solve this problem, we implement the spatial averaging method proposed in Xiao et al. (2015) and also propose a temporal averaging method for the large-scale convective available potential energy (CAPE) tendency in the Zhang-McFarlane (ZM) cumulus parameterization. The resolution adaptability of the original ZM scheme, the scheme with spatial averaging, and the scheme with both spatial and temporal averaging at 4-32 km resolution is assessed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, by comparing with Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) results. We find that the original ZM scheme has very poor resolution adaptability, with sub-grid convective transport and precipitation increasing significantly as the resolution increases. The spatial averaging method improves the resolution adaptability of the ZM scheme and better conserves the total transport of moist static energy and total precipitation. With the temporal averaging method, the resolution adaptability of the scheme is further improved, with sub-grid convective precipitation becoming smaller than resolved precipitation for resolution higher than 8 km, which is consistent with the results from the CRM simulation. Both the spatial distribution and time series of precipitation are improved with the spatial and temporal averaging methods. The results may be helpful for developing resolution adaptability for other cumulus parameterizations that are based on quasi-equilibrium assumption.

  2. High resolution spectroscopy of jet cooled phenyl radical: The ν{sub 1} and ν{sub 2} a{sub 1} symmetry C–H stretching modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Nesbitt, David J. [JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    A series of CH stretch modes in phenyl radical (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) has been investigated via high resolution infrared spectroscopy at sub-Doppler resolution (∼60 MHz) in a supersonic discharge slit jet expansion. Two fundamental vibrations of a{sub 1} symmetry, ν{sub 1} and ν{sub 2}, are observed and rotationally analyzed for the first time, corresponding to in-phase and out-of-phase symmetric CH stretch excitation at the ortho/meta/para and ortho/para C atoms with respect to the radical center. The ν{sub 1} and ν{sub 2} band origins are determined to be 3073.968 50(8) cm{sup −1} and 3062.264 80(7) cm{sup −1}, respectively, which both agree within 5 cm{sup −1} with theoretical anharmonic scaling predictions based on density functional B3LYP/6-311g++(3df,3dp) calculations. Integrated band strengths for each of the CH stretch bands are analyzed, with the relative intensities agreeing remarkably well with theoretical predictions. Frequency comparison with previous low resolution Ar-matrix spectroscopy [A. V. Friderichsen et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 123, 1977 (2001)] reveals a nearly uniform Δν ≈ + 10-12 cm{sup −1} blue shift between gas phase and Ar matrix values for ν{sub 1} and ν{sub 2}. This differs substantially from the much smaller red shift (Δν ≈ − 1 cm{sup −1}) reported for the ν{sub 19} mode, and suggests a simple physical model in terms of vibrational mode symmetry and crowding due to the matrix environment. Finally, the infrared phenyl spectra are well described by a simple asymmetric rigid rotor Hamiltonian and show no evidence for spectral congestion due to intramolecular vibrational coupling, which bodes well for high resolution studies of other ring radicals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In summary, the combination of slit jet discharge methods with high resolution infrared lasers enables spectroscopic investigation of even highly reactive combustion and interstellar radical intermediates under gas phase, jet

  3. High resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakow, W.; Shaw, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental high resolution electron micrographs and computer simulation experiments have been used to evaluate the visibility of the atomic constituents of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/. In practice, the detection of oxygen has not been possible in contradiction to that predicted by modelling of perfect crystalline material. Preliminary computer experiments of the electron diffraction patterns when oxygen vacancies are introduced on the Cu-O sheets separating Ba layers show the diffuse streaks characteristic of short range ordering

  4. Effects of horizontal grid resolution on evapotranspiration partitioning using TerrSysMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, P.; Sulis, M.; Simmer, C.; Kollet, S.

    2018-02-01

    Biotic leaf transpiration (T) and abiotic evaporation (E) are the two major pathways by which water is transferred from land surfaces to the atmosphere. Earth system models simulating the terrestrial water, carbon and energy cycle are required to reliably embed the role of soil and vegetation processes in order to realistically reproduce both fluxes including their relative contributions to total evapotranspiration (ET). Earth system models are also being used with increasing spatial resolutions to better simulate the effects of surface heterogeneity on the regional water and energy cycle and to realistically include effects of subsurface lateral flow paths, which are expected to feed back on the exchange fluxes and their partitioning in the model. Using the hydrological component of the Terrestrial Systems Modeling Platform (TerrSysMP), we examine the uncertainty in the estimates of T/ET ratio due to horizontal model grid resolution for a dry and wet year in the Inde catchment (western Germany). The aggregation of topography results in smoothing of slope magnitudes and the filtering of small-scale convergence and divergence zones, which directly impacts the surface-subsurface flow. Coarsening of the grid resolution from 120 m to 960 m increased the available soil moisture for ground evaporation, and decreased T/ET ratio by about 5% and 8% for dry and wet year respectively. The change in T/ET ratio was more pronounced for agricultural crops compared to forested areas, indicating a strong local control of vegetation on the ground evaporation, affecting the domain average statistics.

  5. Sensitivity to grid resolution in the ability of a chemical transport model to simulate observed oxidant chemistry under high-isoprene conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Formation of ozone and organic aerosol in continental atmospheres depends on whether isoprene emitted by vegetation is oxidized by the high-NOx pathway (where peroxy radicals react with NO or by low-NOx pathways (where peroxy radicals react by alternate channels, mostly with HO2. We used mixed layer observations from the SEAC4RS aircraft campaign over the Southeast US to test the ability of the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model at different grid resolutions (0.25°  ×  0.3125°, 2°  ×  2.5°, 4°  ×  5° to simulate this chemistry under high-isoprene, variable-NOx conditions. Observations of isoprene and NOx over the Southeast US show a negative correlation, reflecting the spatial segregation of emissions; this negative correlation is captured in the model at 0.25°  ×  0.3125° resolution but not at coarser resolutions. As a result, less isoprene oxidation takes place by the high-NOx pathway in the model at 0.25°  ×  0.3125° resolution (54 % than at coarser resolution (59 %. The cumulative probability distribution functions (CDFs of NOx, isoprene, and ozone concentrations show little difference across model resolutions and good agreement with observations, while formaldehyde is overestimated at coarse resolution because excessive isoprene oxidation takes place by the high-NOx pathway with high formaldehyde yield. The good agreement of simulated and observed concentration variances implies that smaller-scale non-linearities (urban and power plant plumes are not important on the regional scale. Correlations of simulated vs. observed concentrations do not improve with grid resolution because finer modes of variability are intrinsically more difficult to capture. Higher model resolution leads to decreased conversion of NOx to organic nitrates and increased conversion to nitric acid, with total reactive nitrogen oxides (NOy changing little across model resolutions. Model concentrations in the

  6. Drainage network extraction from a high-resolution DEM using parallel programming in the .NET Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chao; Ye, Aizhong; Gan, Yanjun; You, Jinjun; Duan, Qinyun; Ma, Feng; Hou, Jingwen

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) can be used to extract high-accuracy prerequisite drainage networks. A higher resolution represents a larger number of grids. With an increase in the number of grids, the flow direction determination will require substantial computer resources and computing time. Parallel computing is a feasible method with which to resolve this problem. In this paper, we proposed a parallel programming method within the .NET Framework with a C# Compiler in a Windows environment. The basin is divided into sub-basins, and subsequently the different sub-basins operate on multiple threads concurrently to calculate flow directions. The method was applied to calculate the flow direction of the Yellow River basin from 3 arc-second resolution SRTM DEM. Drainage networks were extracted and compared with HydroSHEDS river network to assess their accuracy. The results demonstrate that this method can calculate the flow direction from high-resolution DEMs efficiently and extract high-precision continuous drainage networks.

  7. High-resolution two-dimensional and three-dimensional modeling of wire grid polarizers and micropolarizer arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobiev, Dmitry; Ninkov, Zoran

    2017-11-01

    Recent advances in photolithography allowed the fabrication of high-quality wire grid polarizers for the visible and near-infrared regimes. In turn, micropolarizer arrays (MPAs) based on wire grid polarizers have been developed and used to construct compact, versatile imaging polarimeters. However, the contrast and throughput of these polarimeters are significantly worse than one might expect based on the performance of large area wire grid polarizers or MPAs, alone. We investigate the parameters that affect the performance of wire grid polarizers and MPAs, using high-resolution two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3-D) finite-difference time-domain simulations. We pay special attention to numerical errors and other challenges that arise in models of these and other subwavelength optical devices. Our tests show that simulations of these structures in the visible and near-IR begin to converge numerically when the mesh size is smaller than ˜4 nm. The performance of wire grid polarizers is very sensitive to the shape, spacing, and conductivity of the metal wires. Using 3-D simulations of micropolarizer "superpixels," we directly study the cross talk due to diffraction at the edges of each micropolarizer, which decreases the contrast of MPAs to ˜200∶1.

  8. Comparison of Large eddy dynamo simulation using dynamic sub-grid scale (SGS) model with a fully resolved direct simulation in a rotating spherical shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, H.; Buffett, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    The flow in the Earth's outer core is expected to have vast length scale from the geometry of the outer core to the thickness of the boundary layer. Because of the limitation of the spatial resolution in the numerical simulations, sub-grid scale (SGS) modeling is required to model the effects of the unresolved field on the large-scale fields. We model the effects of sub-grid scale flow and magnetic field using a dynamic scale similarity model. Four terms are introduced for the momentum flux, heat flux, Lorentz force and magnetic induction. The model was previously used in the convection-driven dynamo in a rotating plane layer and spherical shell using the Finite Element Methods. In the present study, we perform large eddy simulations (LES) using the dynamic scale similarity model. The scale similarity model is implement in Calypso, which is a numerical dynamo model using spherical harmonics expansion. To obtain the SGS terms, the spatial filtering in the horizontal directions is done by taking the convolution of a Gaussian filter expressed in terms of a spherical harmonic expansion, following Jekeli (1981). A Gaussian field is also applied in the radial direction. To verify the present model, we perform a fully resolved direct numerical simulation (DNS) with the truncation of the spherical harmonics L = 255 as a reference. And, we perform unresolved DNS and LES with SGS model on coarser resolution (L= 127, 84, and 63) using the same control parameter as the resolved DNS. We will discuss the verification results by comparison among these simulations and role of small scale fields to large scale fields through the role of the SGS terms in LES.

  9. Impact of Sub-grid Soil Textural Properties on Simulations of Hydrological Fluxes at the Continental Scale Mississippi River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R.; Samaniego, L. E.; Livneh, B.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of soil hydraulic properties such as porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity is required to accurately model the dynamics of near-surface hydrological processes (e.g. evapotranspiration and root-zone soil moisture dynamics) and provide reliable estimates of regional water and energy budgets. Soil hydraulic properties are commonly derived from pedo-transfer functions using soil textural information recorded during surveys, such as the fractions of sand and clay, bulk density, and organic matter content. Typically large scale land-surface models are parameterized using a relatively coarse soil map with little or no information on parametric sub-grid variability. In this study we analyze the impact of sub-grid soil variability on simulated hydrological fluxes over the Mississippi River Basin (≈3,240,000 km2) at multiple spatio-temporal resolutions. A set of numerical experiments were conducted with the distributed mesoscale hydrologic model (mHM) using two soil datasets: (a) the Digital General Soil Map of the United States or STATSGO2 (1:250 000) and (b) the recently collated Harmonized World Soil Database based on the FAO-UNESCO Soil Map of the World (1:5 000 000). mHM was parameterized with the multi-scale regionalization technique that derives distributed soil hydraulic properties via pedo-transfer functions and regional coefficients. Within the experimental framework, the 3-hourly model simulations were conducted at four spatial resolutions ranging from 0.125° to 1°, using meteorological datasets from the NLDAS-2 project for the time period 1980-2012. Preliminary results indicate that the model was able to capture observed streamflow behavior reasonably well with both soil datasets, in the major sub-basins (i.e. the Missouri, the Upper Mississippi, the Ohio, the Red, and the Arkansas). However, the spatio-temporal patterns of simulated water fluxes and states (e.g. soil moisture, evapotranspiration) from both simulations, showed marked

  10. Investigating the Effects of Grid Resolution of WRF Model for Simulating the Atmosphere for use in the Study of Wake Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Alyssa; Trout, Joseph; di Mercurio, Alexis

    2017-01-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model is a nested-grid, mesoscale numerical weather prediction system maintained by the Developmental Testbed Center. The model simulates the atmosphere by integrating partial differential equations, which use the conservation of horizontal momentum, conservation of thermal energy, and conservation of mass along with the ideal gas law. This research investigated the possible use of WRF in investigating the effects of weather on wing tip wake turbulence. This poster shows the results of an investigation into the accuracy of WRF using different grid resolutions. Several atmospheric conditions were modeled using different grid resolutions. In general, the higher the grid resolution, the better the simulation, but the longer the model run time. This research was supported by Dr. Manuel A. Rios, Ph.D. (FAA) and the grant ``A Pilot Project to Investigate Wake Vortex Patterns and Weather Patterns at the Atlantic City Airport by the Richard Stockton College of NJ and the FAA'' (13-G-006). Dr. Manuel A. Rios, Ph.D. (FAA), and the grant ``A Pilot Project to Investigate Wake Vortex Patterns and Weather Patterns at the Atlantic City Airport by the Richard Stockton College of NJ and the FAA''

  11. Ozone Production in Global Tropospheric Models: Quantifying Errors due to Grid Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, O.; Prather, M. J.

    2005-12-01

    Ozone production in global chemical models is dependent on model resolution because ozone chemistry is inherently nonlinear, the timescales for chemical production are short, and precursors are artificially distributed over the spatial scale of the model grid. In this study we examine the sensitivity of ozone, its precursors, and its production to resolution by running a global chemical transport model at four different resolutions between T21 (5.6° × 5.6°) and T106 (1.1° × 1.1°) and by quantifying the errors in regional and global budgets. The sensitivity to vertical mixing through the parameterization of boundary layer turbulence is also examined. We find less ozone production in the boundary layer at higher resolution, consistent with slower chemical production in polluted emission regions and greater export of precursors. Agreement with ozonesonde and aircraft measurements made during the NASA TRACE-P campaign over the Western Pacific in spring 2001 is consistently better at higher resolution. We demonstrate that the numerical errors in transport processes at a given resolution converge geometrically for a tracer at successively higher resolutions. The convergence in ozone production on progressing from T21 to T42, T63 and T106 resolution is likewise monotonic but still indicates large errors at 120~km scales, suggesting that T106 resolution is still too coarse to resolve regional ozone production. Diagnosing the ozone production and precursor transport that follow a short pulse of emissions over East Asia in springtime allows us to quantify the impacts of resolution on both regional and global ozone. Production close to continental emission regions is overestimated by 27% at T21 resolution, by 13% at T42 resolution, and by 5% at T106 resolution, but subsequent ozone production in the free troposphere is less significantly affected.

  12. An integrated palaeoenvironmental investigation of a 6200 year old peat sequence from Ile de la Possession, Iles Crozet, sub-Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Putten, N.; Hébrard, J. P.; Verbruggen, C.; Van de Vijver, B.; Disnar, J. R.; Spassov, S.; de Beaulieu, J. L.; De Dapper, M.; Keravis, D.; Hus, J.; Thouveny, N.; Frenot, Y.

    2008-01-01

    A 6200 year old peat sequence, cored in a volcanic crater on the sub-Antarctic Ile de la Possession (Iles Crozet), has been investigated, based on a multi-proxy approach. The methods applied are macrobotanical (mosses, seeds and fruits) and diatom analyses, complemented by geochemical (Rock-Eval6)

  13. The development of a sub-daily gridded rainfall product to improve hydrological predictions in Great Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Niall; Freer, Jim; Coxon, Gemma; O'Loughlin, Fiachra; Woods, Ross; Liguori, Sara

    2015-04-01

    scale gridded rainfall product. Finally, radar rainfall data provided by the UK Met Office was assimilated, where available, to provide an optimal hourly estimate of rainfall, given the error variance associated with both datasets. This research introduces a sub-daily rainfall product that will be of particular value to hydrological modellers requiring rainfall inputs at higher temporal resolutions than those currently available nationally. Further research will aim to quantify the uncertainties in the rainfall product in order to improve our ability to diagnose and identify structural errors in hydrological modelling of extreme events. Here we present our initial findings.

  14. Influence of grid resolution in fluid-model simulation of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Weizhuo; Fukagata, Koji

    2018-04-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulation of a surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuator, driven by a nanosecond voltage pulse, is conducted. A special focus is laid upon the influence of grid resolution on the computational result. It is found that the computational result is not very sensitive to the streamwise grid spacing, whereas the wall-normal grid spacing has a critical influence. In particular, the computed propagation velocity changes discontinuously around the wall-normal grid spacing about 2 μm due to a qualitative change of discharge structure. The present result suggests that a computational grid finer than that was used in most of previous studies is required to correctly capture the structure and dynamics of streamer: when a positive nanosecond voltage pulse is applied to the upper electrode, a streamer forms in the vicinity of upper electrode and propagates along the dielectric surface with a maximum propagation velocity of 2 × 108 cm/s, and a gap with low electron and ion density (i.e., plasma sheath) exists between the streamer and dielectric surface. Difference between the results obtained using the finer and the coarser grid is discussed in detail in terms of the electron transport at a position near the surface. When the finer grid is used, the low electron density near the surface is caused by the absence of ionization avalanche: in that region, the electrons generated by ionization is compensated by drift-diffusion flux. In contrast, when the coarser grid is used, underestimated drift-diffusion flux cannot compensate the electrons generated by ionization, and it leads to an incorrect increase of electron density.

  15. The protection of possession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Danica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protection in disputes for the protection of possession can be attained through the following actions a for dispossession (interdictum recuperande possessionis and b with an action for the disturbance of possession (interdictum retinendae possessionis. The general feature of these disputes is that there is only discussion on the facts and not a legal matters. Subject matter jurisdiction for the resolution of such disputes belongs to the court of general jurisdiction, while the dispute itself is a litigation. The special rule of proceedings of action for disturbance are: provisionality of the protection of possession; urgency in proceedings; initiation of the proceedings; limiting of objection; prescribing temporary measures; rendering a ruling in the form of order; appeals which may be filed within a short deadline and which does not have suspensive effect (do not delay the execution of the order; revision is not allowed etc.

  16. Toward an estimation of daily european CO{sub 2} fluxes at high spatial resolution by inversion of atmospheric transport; Vers une estimation des flux de CO{sub 2} journaliers europeens a haute resolution par inversion du transport atmospherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carouge, C

    2006-04-15

    Since the end of the 1980's, measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide have been used to estimate global and regional fluxes of CO{sub 2}. This is possible because CO{sub 2} concentration variation is directly linked to flux variation by atmospheric transport. We can find the spatial and temporal distribution of fluxes from concentration measurements by 'inverting' the atmospheric transport. Until recently, most CO{sub 2} inversions have used monthly mean CO{sub 2} atmospheric concentration measurements to infer monthly fluxes. Considering the sparseness of the global CO{sub 2} measurement network, fluxes were a priori aggregated on sub-continental regions and distributed on a fixed spatial pattern within these regions. Only one flux coefficient per month for each region was optimized. With this strong constraint, estimated fluxes can be biased by non-perfect distribution of fluxes within each region (aggregation error). Therefore, flux estimation at model resolution is being developed where the hard constraint of a fixed distribution within a region is replaced by a soft constraint of covariances between flux uncertainties. The use of continuous observations from an increasing number of measurement sites offers a new challenge for inverse modelers. We investigate the use of daily averaged observations to infer daily CO{sub 2} fluxes at model resolution over Europe. We have developed a global synthesis Bayesian inversion to invert daily fluxes at model resolution (50 x 50 km over Europe) from daily averaged CO{sub 2} concentrations. We have obtained estimated fluxes for the year 2001 over Europe using the 10 European continuous sites from the AEROCARB network. The global atmospheric model LMDZt is used with a nested grid over Europe. It is necessary to add a priori spatial and temporal correlations between flux errors to constrain the Bayesian inversion. We present the impact on estimated fluxes of three different spatial correlations based on

  17. High-resolution spectroscopy of jet-cooled CH{sub 5}{sup +}: Progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, C.; Dong, F.; Nesbitt, D. J. [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (United States)

    2015-01-22

    Protonated methane (CH{sub 5}{sup +}) is thought to be a highly abundant molecular ion in interstellar medium, as well as a potentially bright μwave- mm wave emitter that could serve as a tracer for methane. This paper describes progress and first successful efforts to obtain a high resolution, supersonically cooled spectrum of CH{sub 5}{sup +} in the 2900-3100 cm{sup −1} region, formed in a slit supersonic discharge at low jet temperatures and with sub-Doppler resolution. Short term precision in frequency measurement (< 5 MHz on an hour time scale) is obtained from a thermally controlled optical transfer cavity servoloop locked onto a frequency stabilized HeNe laser. Long term precision (< 20 MHz day-to-day) due to pressure, temperature and humidity dependent index of refraction effects in the optical transfer cavity is also present and discussed.

  18. Complex temperature evolution of the electronic structure of CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikary, Ganesh; Biswas, Deepnarayan; Sahadev, Nishaina; Bindu, R.; Kumar, Neeraj; Dhar, S. K.; Thamizhavel, A.; Maiti, Kalobaran, E-mail: kbmaiti@tifr.res.in [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2014-03-28

    Employing high resolution photoemission spectroscopy, we investigate the temperature evolution of the electronic structure of CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, which is a parent compound of high temperature superconductors—CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} exhibits superconductivity under pressure as well as doping of charge carriers. Photoemission results of CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} in this study reveal a gradual shift of an energy band, α away from the chemical potential with decreasing temperature in addition to the spin density wave (SDW) transition induced Fermi surface reconstruction across SDW transition temperature. The corresponding hole pocket eventually disappears at lower temperatures, while the hole Fermi surface of the β band possessing finite p orbital character survives till the lowest temperature studied. These results, thus, reveal signature of complex charge redistribution among various energy bands as a function of temperature.

  19. Structure and mechanical properties of swift heavy ion irradiated tungsten-bearing delta-phase oxides Y{sub 6}W{sub 1}O{sub 12} and Yb{sub 6}W{sub 1}O{sub 12}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, M., E-mail: mtang@lanl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Mail-Stop G755, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wynn, T.A. [Materials Physics and Application Division, Mail-Stop K771, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Patel, M.K.; Won, J. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Mail-Stop G755, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Monnet, I. [CIMAP, CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-Universite de Caen Normandie, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070, Caen Cedex 5 (France); Pivin, J.C. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris Sud, UMR 8609, Bat. 108, 91405 Orsay (France); Mara, N.A. [Materials Physics and Application Division, Mail-Stop K771, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Sickafus, K.E. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Mail-Stop G755, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    We report on the relationship between structure and mechanical properties of complex oxides whose structures are derivatives of fluorite, following irradiation with swift heavy ion (92 MeV Xe) which approximately simulates fission product irradiation, where the electronic energy loss dominates. The two compounds of interest in this paper are Y{sub 6}W{sub 1}O{sub 12} and Yb{sub 6}W{sub 1}O{sub 12}. These compounds possess an ordered, fluorite derivative crystal structure known as the delta ({delta}) phase, a rhombohedral structure belonging to space group R3{sup Macron}. Structural changes induced by irradiation were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD investigations indicated an irradiation-induced amorphization in these compounds. This result is consistent with our previous study on Y{sub 6}W{sub 1}O{sub 12} under displacive radiation environment in which the nuclear energy loss is dominant. High resolution TEM also revealed that individual ion tracks was amorphized. The mechanical properties of both irradiated compounds, were determined by cross-sectional nano-indentation measurements as a function of ion penetration depth. The decreases in Young's modulus, E, and hardness, H (both by about 40% at the irradiated surface) suggest amorphization beyond simple defect accumulation occurs under this irradiation condition.

  20. Power grid control in retreat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morch, Stein

    2000-01-01

    Bilateral grid control that obstructs free trade of electricity is in retreat. Negotiations on opening the Skagerrak cables are in progress. The EU, national authorities, network companies with system responsibility, market actors, electricity exchanges all push for quick opening of the grid. At present, free trade of electricity is hindered not so much by physical bottlenecks in the grid as by market actors possessing control and bilateral agreements. The article discusses current bilateral agreements and how they might affect the possibility of a free trade of electricity in Europe

  1. Estimation of effective elastic constants for grid plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibanuma, Kiyoshi; Kuriyama, Masaaki; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    1980-07-01

    This article contains a method of estimation for the effective elastic constants of a grid plate, which is a flat perforated plate with pipes for cooling. The elastic constants of the grid plate are formulated for two symmetric axes. In the case of using OFCu(E 0 = 12500 kg/mm 2 , ν 0 = 0.34) as the material of the grid, the results are given as follows. E sub(L) = 3180 kg/mm 2 , E sub(T) = 3860 kg/mm 2 upsilon sub(LT) = 0.12, upsilon sub(TL) = 0.15 (author)

  2. Grid for the calculation of log g and T/sub eff/ from Stroemgren four-color indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philip, A.G.D.; Relyea, L.J.

    1979-01-01

    Large scale grids of the four-color indices (c 1 ) 0 , (b-y) 0 and log g, T/sub eff/ are presented for use in computing log g and T/sub eff/ values derived from the dereddened Stroemgren four-color indices of Population I and II stars in the range 10,000>T/sub eff/>5,500, 4.5>log g>2.0 and -2.0 0 . Log g values have a rms error of +- 0.2. Relative to the latest Kurucz (1979) models the zero point of the log g values for F-type stars now agree with the models. Colors predicted from temperatures are within 0/sup m/.01 of those predicted by the older models

  3. Fractal Characteristics Analysis of Blackouts in Interconnected Power Grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Feng; Li, Lijuan; Li, Canbing

    2018-01-01

    The power failure models are a key to understand the mechanism of large scale blackouts. In this letter, the similarity of blackouts in interconnected power grids (IPGs) and their sub-grids is discovered by the fractal characteristics analysis to simplify the failure models of the IPG. The distri......The power failure models are a key to understand the mechanism of large scale blackouts. In this letter, the similarity of blackouts in interconnected power grids (IPGs) and their sub-grids is discovered by the fractal characteristics analysis to simplify the failure models of the IPG....... The distribution characteristics of blackouts in various sub-grids are demonstrated based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test. The fractal dimensions (FDs) of the IPG and its sub-grids are then obtained by using the KS test and the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE). The blackouts data in China were used...

  4. Structural changes of Bi sub 1. 8 Sr sub 2 (Ca sub 1 minus x Y sub x )Cu sub 2. 2 O sub z ceramics with yttrium content studied by electron diffraction and high-resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, T.; Iwabuchi, Y.; Fukase, T. (Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980, Japan (JP)); Sato, H. (School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (USA)); Mitchell, T.E. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (USA))

    1991-06-01

    The mode of the incommensurate modulation in the {ital b} direction of the Bi{sub 1.8}Sr{sub 2}(Ca{sub 1{minus}{ital x}}Y{sub {ital x}})Cu{sub 2.2}O{sub {ital z}} (0.05{lt}{ital x}{lt}0.75) system is investigated by means of electron diffraction and high-resolution lattice imaging. The change of period of the long-period structure with {ital x} is found to be basically due to the mixing ratio of domains of two modulation periods with {ital b}=4.5{ital b}{sub 0} and 5{ital b}{sub 0} or 4.5{ital b}{sub 0} and 4{ital b}{sub 0}, thus creating periods of {ital b}=4.75{ital b}{sub 0--}4.0{ital b}{sub 0}. The fundamental orthorhombic lattice has dimensions of {ital a}{congruent}{ital b}{congruent}{ital b}{sub 0} (0.54 nm) and {ital c}{congruent}{ital c}{sub 0} (3.1 nm). The change of the mixing mode from one to the other mentioned above occurs just in the yttrium concentration range, 0.45{lt}{ital x}{lt}0.65, which also corresponds to the superconductor (metallic)-to-semiconductor transition boundary. The mixing modes of the domains are directly recorded as a contrast modulation with half periods, 4.5{ital b}{sub 0}/2 and 5{ital b}{sub 0}/2 or 4.5{ital b}{sub 0}/2 and 4{ital b}{sub 0}/2 in high-resolution lattice images. These images are reproduced well by a multislice computer-simulation technique.

  5. An analysis of off grid electrical systems in rural Sub-Saharan Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebitosi, A.B.; Pillay, P.; Khan, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    The decade leading up to the end of the last millennium saw systematic unbundling and privatisation of power utility companies in Sub-Saharan Africa. The new profit driven entrepreneurs have swiftly moved to consolidate in urban enclaves and put paid to any remote hope for future rural electrification. Consequently, rural communities have resorted to fending for themselves by adapting to off grid electrification. Most of these emerging installations are individual isolated units. This paper looks at various off gird electric system configurations in rural Kenya and suggests ways in which they could be reconfigured to be more energy efficient

  6. Modeled Full-Flight Aircraft Emissions Impacts on Air Quality and Their Sensitivity to Grid Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennam, L. P.; Vizuete, W.; Talgo, K.; Omary, M.; Binkowski, F. S.; Xing, J.; Mathur, R.; Arunachalam, S.

    2018-01-01

    Aviation is a unique anthropogenic source with four-dimensional varying emissions, peaking at cruise altitudes (9–12 km). Aircraft emission budgets in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere region and their potential impacts on upper troposphere and surface air quality are not well understood. Our key objective is to use chemical transport models (with prescribed meteorology) to predict aircraft emissions impacts on the troposphere and surface air quality. We quantified the importance of including full-flight intercontinental emissions and increased horizontal grid resolution. The full-flight aviation emissions in the Northern Hemisphere contributed ~1.3% (mean, min–max: 0.46, 0.3–0.5 ppbv) and 0.2% (0.013, 0.004–0.02 μg/m3) of total O3 and PM2.5 concentrations at the surface, with Europe showing slightly higher impacts (1.9% (O3 0.69, 0.5–0.85 ppbv) and 0.5% (PM2.5 0.03, 0.01–0.05 μg/m3)) than North America (NA) and East Asia. We computed seasonal aviation-attributable mass flux vertical profiles and aviation perturbations along isentropic surfaces to quantify the transport of cruise altitude emissions at the hemispheric scale. The comparison of coarse (108 × 108 km2) and fine (36 × 36 km2) grid resolutions in NA showed ~70 times and ~13 times higher aviation impacts for O3 and PM2.5 in coarser domain. These differences are mainly due to the inability of the coarse resolution simulation to capture nonlinearities in chemical processes near airport locations and other urban areas. Future global studies quantifying aircraft contributions should consider model resolution and perhaps use finer scales near major aviation source regions. PMID:29707471

  7. Modeled Full-Flight Aircraft Emissions Impacts on Air Quality and Their Sensitivity to Grid Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennam, L. P.; Vizuete, W.; Talgo, K.; Omary, M.; Binkowski, F. S.; Xing, J.; Mathur, R.; Arunachalam, S.

    2017-12-01

    Aviation is a unique anthropogenic source with four-dimensional varying emissions, peaking at cruise altitudes (9-12 km). Aircraft emission budgets in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere region and their potential impacts on upper troposphere and surface air quality are not well understood. Our key objective is to use chemical transport models (with prescribed meteorology) to predict aircraft emissions impacts on the troposphere and surface air quality. We quantified the importance of including full-flight intercontinental emissions and increased horizontal grid resolution. The full-flight aviation emissions in the Northern Hemisphere contributed 1.3% (mean, min-max: 0.46, 0.3-0.5 ppbv) and 0.2% (0.013, 0.004-0.02 μg/m3) of total O3 and PM2.5 concentrations at the surface, with Europe showing slightly higher impacts (1.9% (O3 0.69, 0.5-0.85 ppbv) and 0.5% (PM2.5 0.03, 0.01-0.05 μg/m3)) than North America (NA) and East Asia. We computed seasonal aviation-attributable mass flux vertical profiles and aviation perturbations along isentropic surfaces to quantify the transport of cruise altitude emissions at the hemispheric scale. The comparison of coarse (108 × 108 km2) and fine (36 × 36 km2) grid resolutions in NA showed 70 times and 13 times higher aviation impacts for O3 and PM2.5 in coarser domain. These differences are mainly due to the inability of the coarse resolution simulation to capture nonlinearities in chemical processes near airport locations and other urban areas. Future global studies quantifying aircraft contributions should consider model resolution and perhaps use finer scales near major aviation source regions.

  8. α spectrometer of parallel plate grid ionization chamber of high energy resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Boting; Wang Jianqing; Dong Mingli; Tang Peijia; Wang Xiaorong; Lin Cansheng

    2000-01-01

    Parallel plate grid ionization chamber with cathode area of 300 cm 2 was developed and applied to detect minimum α-emitters. It consist of a vacuum system, a gas cycle system of the parallel plate grid ionization chamber, electronics (a high voltage supply, a pre-amplifier and a main amplifier) and a computer-multichannel analyzer. The energy resolution is 23 keV FWHM for the 244 Cm electrostatic precipitated source. The integral background is typically 10 counts/h between 4 and 6 MeV. The detector efficiency is 50%. The minimum detecting activity is 3 x 10 -4 Bq (3σ, 30 hours). This spectrometer is suitable for detecting various samples, such as samples of the soil, water, air, bion, food, structural material, geology, archaeology, α-emitters of after processing and measuring α activity of accounting for and control of nuclear material and monitoring the artificial radioactivity nuclides of environment samples around nuclear facilities. The spectrometer is equipped with apparatus for preparing large area α source by using vacuum deposition or ultrasonic pulverization. The operating program of preparing source is simple. The source thickness can be kept in 40-60 μm/cm 2

  9. Neutron radiography with sub-15 {mu}m resolution through event centroiding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremsin, Anton S., E-mail: ast@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McPhate, Jason B.; Vallerga, John V.; Siegmund, Oswald H.W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bruce Feller, W. [NOVA Scientific, Inc. 10 Picker Road, Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States); Lehmann, Eberhard; Kaestner, Anders; Boillat, Pierre; Panzner, Tobias; Filges, Uwe [Spallation Neutron Source Division, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2012-10-01

    Conversion of thermal and cold neutrons into a strong {approx}1 ns electron pulse with an absolute neutron detection efficiency as high as 50-70% makes detectors with {sup 10}B-doped Microchannel Plates (MCPs) very attractive for neutron radiography and microtomography applications. The subsequent signal amplification preserves the location of the event within the MCP pore (typically 6-10 {mu}m in diameter), providing the possibility to perform neutron counting with high spatial resolution. Different event centroiding techniques of the charge landing on a patterned anode enable accurate reconstruction of the neutron position, provided the charge footprints do not overlap within the time required for event processing. The new fast 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Timepix readout with >1.2 kHz frame rates provides the unique possibility to detect neutrons with sub-15 {mu}m resolution at several MHz/cm{sup 2} counting rates. The results of high resolution neutron radiography experiments presented in this paper, demonstrate the sub-15 {mu}m resolution capability of our detection system. The high degree of collimation and cold spectrum of ICON and BOA beamlines combined with the high spatial resolution and detection efficiency of MCP-Timepix detectors are crucial for high contrast neutron radiography and microtomography with high spatial resolution. The next generation of Timepix electronics with sparsified readout should enable counting rates in excess of 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}/s taking full advantage of high beam intensity of present brightest neutron imaging facilities.

  10. Permafrost sub-grid heterogeneity of soil properties key for 3-D soil processes and future climate projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Beer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There are massive carbon stocks stored in permafrost-affected soils due to the 3-D soil movement process called cryoturbation. For a reliable projection of the past, recent and future Arctic carbon balance, and hence climate, a reliable concept for representing cryoturbation in a land surface model (LSM is required. The basis of the underlying transport processes is pedon-scale heterogeneity of soil hydrological and thermal properties as well as insulating layers, such as snow and vegetation. Today we still lack a concept of how to reliably represent pedon-scale properties and processes in a LSM. One possibility could be a statistical approach. This perspective paper demonstrates the importance of sub-grid heterogeneity in permafrost soils as a pre-requisite to implement any lateral transport parametrization. Representing such heterogeneity at the sub-pixel size of a LSM is the next logical step of model advancements. As a result of a theoretical experiment, heterogeneity of thermal and hydrological soil properties alone lead to a remarkable initial sub-grid range of subsoil temperature of 2 deg C, and active-layer thickness of 150 cm in East Siberia. These results show the way forward in representing combined lateral and vertical transport of water and soil in LSMs.

  11. Smaller global and regional carbon emissions from gross land use change when considering sub-grid secondary land cohorts in a global dynamic vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Chao; Ciais, Philippe; Li, Wei

    2018-02-01

    Several modelling studies reported elevated carbon emissions from historical land use change (ELUC) by including bidirectional transitions on the sub-grid scale (termed gross land use change), dominated by shifting cultivation and other land turnover processes. However, most dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) that have implemented gross land use change either do not account for sub-grid secondary lands, or often have only one single secondary land tile over a model grid cell and thus cannot account for various rotation lengths in shifting cultivation and associated secondary forest age dynamics. Therefore, it remains uncertain how realistic the past ELUC estimations are and how estimated ELUC will differ between the two modelling approaches with and without multiple sub-grid secondary land cohorts - in particular secondary forest cohorts. Here we investigated historical ELUC over 1501-2005 by including sub-grid forest age dynamics in a DGVM. We run two simulations, one with no secondary forests (Sageless) and the other with sub-grid secondary forests of six age classes whose demography is driven by historical land use change (Sage). Estimated global ELUC for 1501-2005 is 176 Pg C in Sage compared to 197 Pg C in Sageless. The lower ELUC values in Sage arise mainly from shifting cultivation in the tropics under an assumed constant rotation length of 15 years, being 27 Pg C in Sage in contrast to 46 Pg C in Sageless. Estimated cumulative ELUC values from wood harvest in the Sage simulation (31 Pg C) are however slightly higher than Sageless (27 Pg C) when the model is forced by reconstructed harvested areas because secondary forests targeted in Sage for harvest priority are insufficient to meet the prescribed harvest area, leading to wood harvest being dominated by old primary forests. An alternative approach to quantify wood harvest ELUC, i.e. always harvesting the close-to-mature forests in both Sageless and Sage, yields similar values of 33 Pg C by both

  12. Reference crop evapotranspiration estimate using high-resolution meteorological network's data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lussana

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Water management authorities need detailed information about each component of the hydrological balance. This document presents a method to estimate the evapotranspiration rate, initialized in order to obtain the reference crop evapotranspiration rate (ET<sub>0sub>. By using an Optimal Interpolation (OI scheme, the hourly observations of several meteorological variables, measured by a high-resolution local meteorological network, are interpolated over a regular grid. The analysed meteorological fields, containing detailed meteorological information, enter a model for turbulent heat fluxes estimation based on Monin-Obukhov surface layer similarity theory. The obtained ET<sub>0sub> fields are then post-processed and disseminated to the users.

  13. Resolution of TBP-H/sub 2/MBP-HDBP-H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/. Application to UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/-TBP, Th(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/-TBP, and ZrO(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/-TBP systems. [Separation of dibutyl phosphoric acid, monobutylphosphoric acid and orthophosphoric acid from tri-butylphosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, M A.F.; Abrao, A

    1981-04-01

    Several schemes for the separation of dibutylphosphoric acid (HDBP), monobutylphosphoric acid (H/sub 2/MBP) and orthophosphoric acid (H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/) as hydrolytic and radiolytic degradation products from tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) were studied. For the resolution of a HDBP, H/sub 2/MPB and H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ mixture in TBP-diluent, or in TBP-diluent-heavy metal nitrate (U-VI, Th-IV or Zr-IV), techniques such as ion exchange chromatography, ion chromatography and separation onto a chromatographic alumina column were investigated. For the identification, determination and analytical resolution following up for the several systems studied, techniques such as refraction index measurement, electrical conductivity measurement, molecular spectrophotometry and gas chromatography were applied. Special emphasis was given to the separation using alumina column where the HDBP acid was retained and eluted selectively for its separation from TBP-varsol-uranyl nitrate mixtures. This analytical procedure was applied to the samples coming from the Uranium Purification Pilot Plant in operation at the Centro de Engenharia Quimica (IPEN).

  14. Sub-micron resolution selected area electron channeling patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyon, J; Mansour, H; Gey, N; Crimp, M A; Chalal, S; Maloufi, N

    2015-02-01

    Collection of selected area channeling patterns (SACPs) on a high resolution FEG-SEM is essential to carry out quantitative electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) studies, as it facilitates accurate determination of the crystal plane normal with respect to the incident beam direction and thus allows control the electron channeling conditions. Unfortunately commercial SACP modes developed in the past were limited in spatial resolution and are often no longer offered. In this contribution we present a novel approach for collecting high resolution SACPs (HR-SACPs) developed on a Gemini column. This HR-SACP technique combines the first demonstrated sub-micron spatial resolution with high angular accuracy of about 0.1°, at a convenient working distance of 10mm. This innovative approach integrates the use of aperture alignment coils to rock the beam with a digitally calibrated beam shift procedure to ensure the rocking beam is maintained on a point of interest. Moreover a new methodology to accurately measure SACP spatial resolution is proposed. While column considerations limit the rocking angle to 4°, this range is adequate to index the HR-SACP in conjunction with the pattern simulated from the approximate orientation deduced by EBSD. This new technique facilitates Accurate ECCI (A-ECCI) studies from very fine grained and/or highly strained materials. It offers also new insights for developing HR-SACP modes on new generation high-resolution electron columns. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Tapping mode SPM local oxidation nanolithography with sub-10 nm resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, S; Ogino, T; Shirakashi, J; Takemura, Y

    2008-01-01

    Tapping mode SPM local oxidation nanolithography with sub-10 nm resolution is investigated by optimizing the applied bias voltage (V), scanning speed (S) and the oscillation amplitude of the cantilever (A). We fabricated Si oxide wires with an average width of 9.8 nm (V = 17.5 V, S 250 nm/s, A = 292 nm). In SPM local oxidation with tapping mode operation, it is possible to decrease the size of the water meniscus by enhancing the oscillation amplitude of cantilever. Hence, it seems that the water meniscus with sub-10 nm dimensions could be formed by precisely optimizing the oxidation conditions. Moreover, we quantitatively explain the size (width and height) of Si oxide wires with a model based on the oxidation ratio, which is defined as the oxidation time divided by the period of the cantilever oscillation. The model allows us to understand the mechanism of local oxidation in tapping mode operation with amplitude modulation. The results imply that the sub-10 nm resolution could be achieved using tapping mode SPM local oxidation technique with the optimization of the cantilever dynamics

  16. Distributed photovoltaic grid transformers

    CERN Document Server

    Shertukde, Hemchandra Madhusudan

    2014-01-01

    The demand for alternative energy sources fuels the need for electric power and controls engineers to possess a practical understanding of transformers suitable for solar energy. Meeting that need, Distributed Photovoltaic Grid Transformers begins by explaining the basic theory behind transformers in the solar power arena, and then progresses to describe the development, manufacture, and sale of distributed photovoltaic (PV) grid transformers, which help boost the electric DC voltage (generally at 30 volts) harnessed by a PV panel to a higher level (generally at 115 volts or higher) once it is

  17. Real-time deep-tissue thermal sensing with sub-degree resolution by thermally improved Nd{sup 3+}:LaF{sub 3} multifunctional nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Uéslen, E-mail: ueslen.silva@fis.ufal.br [Fluorescence Imaging Group, Departamento de Física de Materiales C-04, Instituto Nicolás Cabrera, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain); Jacinto, Carlos; Kumar, Kagola Upendra [Grupo de Fotônica e Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-970 Maceió, Alagoas (Brazil); López, Fernando J.; Bravo, David; Solé, José García [Fluorescence Imaging Group, Departamento de Física de Materiales C-04, Instituto Nicolás Cabrera, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain); Jaque, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.jaque@uam.es [Fluorescence Imaging Group, Departamento de Física de Materiales C-04, Instituto Nicolás Cabrera, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain); Instituto Ramón y Cajal de Investigación Sanitaria, Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid 28034 (Spain)

    2016-07-15

    Nd{sup 3+} ion doped LaF{sub 3} dielectric nanoparticles have recently emerged as very attractive multifunctional nanoparticles capable of simultaneous sub-tissue heating and thermal sensing. Although they have been already used for selective photothermal treatment of cancer tumors in animal models, their real application as self-monitored photothermal agents require further optimization and development. Dynamic adjustment of the therapy parameters is mandatory for non-selective damage minimization. It would require real-time (sub-second) thermal sensing with a sub-degree thermal resolution. In this work we demonstrate that meeting this challenge is, indeed, possible by performing controlled thermal treatment on as-synthesized Nd{sup 3+} doped LaF{sub 3} nanoparticles. Temperature induced lattice ordering and defect re-combination have been concluded to induce, simultaneously, a line fluorescence narrowing, fluorescence brightness enhancement and a remarkable increment in thermal sensitivity. Ex-vivo experiments have demonstrated that, thanks to this multi-parameter optimization, Neodymium doped LaF{sub 3} nanoparticles are capable of real time sub-tissue thermal reading with a temperature resolution as low as 0.7 °C.

  18. Towards sub-{Angstrom} resolution through incoherent imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, S.J.; Chisholm, M.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Nellist, P.D. [Cavendish Lab., Cambridge, (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    As first pointed out by Lord Rayleigh a century ago, incoherent imaging offers a substantial resolution enhancement compared to coherent imaging, together with freedom from phase contrast interference effects and contrast oscillations. In the STEM configuration, with a high angle annular detector to provide the transverse incoherence, the image also shows strong Z-contrast, sufficient in the case of a 300 kV STEM to image single Pt and Rh atoms on a {gamma}-alumina support. The annular detector provides complementarity to a bright field detector of the same size. For weakly scattering specimens, it shows greater contrast than the incoherent bright field image, and also facilitates EELS analysis at atomic resolution, using the Z-contrast image to locate the probe with sub-{angstrom} precision. The inner radius of the annular detector can be chosen to reduce the transverse coherence length to well below the spacings needed to resolve the object, a significant advantage compared to light microscopy.

  19. High resolution x-ray diffraction analyses of GaN/LiGaO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyi, R.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Doolittle, W.A.; Brown, A.S. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1999-05-21

    Lithium gallate (LiGaO{sub 2}) is gaining increasing attention as a potential substrate for the growth of the important semiconductor GaN. In order to better understand this material we have performed high-resolution double- and triple-axis x-ray diffraction analyses of both the starting LiGaO{sub 2} and GaN/LiGaO{sub 2} following epitaxial growth. A high-resolution triple-axis reciprocal space map of the substrate showed a sharp, well-defined crystal truncation rod and a symmetric streak of intensity perpendicular to q{sub 002}, suggesting high structural quality with mosaic spread. Triple-axis scans following GaN growth showed (1) the development of isotropic diffuse scatter around the LiGaO{sub 2} (002) reflection, (2) the presence of a semi-continuous intensity streak between the LiGaO{sub 2} (002) and GaN (0002) reflections, and (3) a compact pattern of diffuse scatter around the GaN (0002) reflection that becomes increasingly anisotropic as the growth temperature is increased. These results suggest that LiGaO{sub 2} permits the epitaxial growth of GaN with structural quality that may be superior to that observed when growth is performed on SiC or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. (author)

  20. An approach for generating synthetic fine temporal resolution solar radiation time series from hourly gridded datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Perry

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A tool has been developed to statistically increase the temporal resolution of solar irradiance time series. Fine temporal resolution time series are an important input into the planning process for solar power plants, and lead to increased understanding of the likely short-term variability of solar energy. The approach makes use of the spatial variability of hourly gridded datasets around a location of interest to make inferences about the temporal variability within the hour. The unique characteristics of solar irradiance data are modelled by classifying each hour into a typical weather situation. Low variability situations are modelled using an autoregressive process which is applied to ramps of clear-sky index. High variability situations are modelled as a transition between states of clear sky conditions and different levels of cloud opacity. The methods have been calibrated to Australian conditions using 1 min data from four ground stations for a 10 year period. These stations, together with an independent dataset, have also been used to verify the quality of the results using a number of relevant metrics. The results show that the method generates realistic fine resolution synthetic time series. The synthetic time series correlate well with observed data on monthly and annual timescales as they are constrained to the nearest grid-point value on each hour. The probability distributions of the synthetic and observed global irradiance data are similar, with Kolmogorov-Smirnov test statistic less than 0.04 at each station. The tool could be useful for the estimation of solar power output for integration studies.

  1. Trends and Potentials of the Smart Grid Infrastructure: From ICT Sub-System to SDN-Enabled Smart Grid Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaebeom Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Context and situational awareness are key features and trends of the smart grid and enable adaptable, flexible and extendable smart grid services. However, the traditional hardware-dependent communication infrastructure is not designed to identify the flow and context of data, and it focuses only on packet forwarding using a pre-defined network configuration profile. Thus, the current network infrastructure may not dynamically adapt the various business models and services of the smart grid system. To solve this problem, software-defined networking (SDN is being considered in the smart grid, but the design, architecture and system model need to be optimized for the smart grid environment. In this paper, we investigate the state-of-the-art smart grid information subsystem, communication infrastructure and its emerging trends and potentials, called an SDN-enabled smart grid. We present an abstract business model, candidate SDN applications and common architecture of the SDN-enabled smart grid. Further, we compare recent studies into the SDN-enabled smart grid depending on its service functionalities, and we describe further challenges of the SDN-enabled smart grid network infrastructure.

  2. A space-based, high-resolution view of notable changes in urban NO <sub>x> pollution around the world (2005-2014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, Bryan N. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Lamsal, Lok N. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Goddard Earth Sciences Technology and Research, Universities Space Research Association, Columbia Maryland USA; Thompson, Anne M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Yoshida, Yasuko [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Greenbelt Maryland USA; Lu, Zifeng [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois USA; Streets, David G. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois USA; Hurwitz, Margaret M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; GESTAR, Morgan State University, Baltimore Maryland USA; Pickering, Kenneth E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA

    2016-01-20

    Nitrogen oxides (NO<sub>x> = NO + NO<sub>2sub>) are produced during combustion processes and, thus may serve as a proxy for fossil fuel-based energy usage and coemitted greenhouse gases and other pollutants. We use high-resolution nitrogen dioxide (NO<sub>2sub>) data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) to analyze changes in urban NO<sub>2sub> levels around the world from 2005 to 2014, finding complex heterogeneity in the changes. We discuss several potential factors that seem to determine these NO<sub>x> changes. First, environmental regulations resulted in large decreases. The only large increases in the United States may be associated with three areas of intensive energy activity. Second, elevated NO<sub>2sub> levels were observed over many Asian, tropical, and subtropical cities that experienced rapid economic growth. Two of the largest increases occurred over recently expanded petrochemical complexes in Jamnagar (India) and Daesan (Korea). Third, pollution transport from China possibly influenced the Republic of Korea and Japan, diminishing the impact of local pollution controls. However, in China, there were large decreases over Beijing, Shanghai, and the Pearl River Delta, which were likely associated with local emission control efforts. Fourth, civil unrest and its effect on energy usage may have resulted in lower NO<sub>2sub> levels in Libya, Iraq, and Syria. Fifth, spatial heterogeneity within several megacities may reflect mixed efforts to cope with air quality degradation. We also show the potential of high-resolution data for identifying NO<sub>x> emission sources in regions with a complex mix of sources. Finally, intensive monitoring of the world's tropical/subtropical megacities will remain a priority, as their populations and emissions of pollutants and greenhouse gases are expected to increase significantly.

  3. IMPROVED DETERMINATION OF THE 1{sub 0}-0{sub 0} ROTATIONAL FREQUENCY OF NH{sub 3}D{sup +} FROM THE HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTRUM OF THE {nu}{sub 4} INFRARED BAND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domenech, J. L.; Cueto, M.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I. [Molecular Physics Department, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (IEM-CSIC), Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J. [Department of Astrophysics, CAB, INTA-CSIC, Crta Torrejon-Ajalvir Km 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Fuente, A., E-mail: jl.domenech@csic.es [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, Apdo. 112, E-28803 Alcala de Henares (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    The high-resolution spectrum of the {nu}{sub 4} band of NH{sub 3}D{sup +} has been measured by difference frequency IR laser spectroscopy in a multipass hollow cathode discharge cell. From the set of molecular constants obtained from the analysis of the spectrum, a value of 262817 {+-} 6 MHz ({+-}3{sigma}) has been derived for the frequency of the 1{sub 0}-0{sub 0} rotational transition. This value supports the assignment to NH{sub 3}D{sup +} of lines at 262816.7 MHz recorded in radio astronomy observations in Orion-IRc2 and the cold prestellar core B1-bS.

  4. High resolution tsunami inversion for 2010 Chile earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.-R. Wu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the feasibility of inverting high-resolution vertical seafloor displacement from tsunami waveforms. An inversion method named "SUTIM" (small unit tsunami inversion method is developed to meet this goal. In addition to utilizing the conventional least-square inversion, this paper also enhances the inversion resolution by Grid-Shifting method. A smooth constraint is adopted to gain stability. After a series of validation and performance tests, SUTIM is used to study the 2010 Chile earthquake. Based upon data quality and azimuthal distribution, we select tsunami waveforms from 6 GLOSS stations and 1 DART buoy record. In total, 157 sub-faults are utilized for the high-resolution inversion. The resolution reaches 10 sub-faults per wavelength. The result is compared with the distribution of the aftershocks and waveforms at each gauge location with very good agreement. The inversion result shows that the source profile features a non-uniform distribution of the seafloor displacement. The highly elevated vertical seafloor is mainly concentrated in two areas: one is located in the northern part of the epicentre, between 34° S and 36° S; the other is in the southern part, between 37° S and 38° S.

  5. High resolution tsunami inversion for 2010 Chile earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T.-R.; Ho, T.-C.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the feasibility of inverting high-resolution vertical seafloor displacement from tsunami waveforms. An inversion method named "SUTIM" (small unit tsunami inversion method) is developed to meet this goal. In addition to utilizing the conventional least-square inversion, this paper also enhances the inversion resolution by Grid-Shifting method. A smooth constraint is adopted to gain stability. After a series of validation and performance tests, SUTIM is used to study the 2010 Chile earthquake. Based upon data quality and azimuthal distribution, we select tsunami waveforms from 6 GLOSS stations and 1 DART buoy record. In total, 157 sub-faults are utilized for the high-resolution inversion. The resolution reaches 10 sub-faults per wavelength. The result is compared with the distribution of the aftershocks and waveforms at each gauge location with very good agreement. The inversion result shows that the source profile features a non-uniform distribution of the seafloor displacement. The highly elevated vertical seafloor is mainly concentrated in two areas: one is located in the northern part of the epicentre, between 34° S and 36° S; the other is in the southern part, between 37° S and 38° S.

  6. Numerical modeling to assess the sensitivity and resolution of long-electrode electrical resistance tomography (LEERT) surveys to monitor CO<sub>2sub> migration, Phase 1B area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Abelardo L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-05-18

    This document describes the results of a numerical modeling study that evaluated whether LEERT could be used successfully to monitor CO<sub>2sub> distribution in the Weyburn- Midale reservoir, Phase 1B area. The magnitude of electrical resistivity changes and the technique’s resolution depend on many site-specific factors including well separation distances, casing lengths, reservoir depth, thickness, and composition, and the effect of CO<sub>2sub> on the electrical properties of the reservoir. Phase 1B-specific numerical modeling of the electrical response to CO<sub>2sub> injection has been performed to assess sensitivity and resolution of the electrical surveys.

  7. Numerical aspects of drift kinetic turbulence: Ill-posedness, regularization and a priori estimates of sub-grid-scale terms

    KAUST Repository

    Samtaney, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    We present a numerical method based on an Eulerian approach to solve the Vlasov-Poisson system for 4D drift kinetic turbulence. Our numerical approach uses a conservative formulation with high-order (fourth and higher) evaluation of the numerical fluxes coupled with a fourth-order accurate Poisson solver. The fluxes are computed using a low-dissipation high-order upwind differencing method or a tuned high-resolution finite difference method with no numerical dissipation. Numerical results are presented for the case of imposed ion temperature and density gradients. Different forms of controlled regularization to achieve a well-posed system are used to obtain convergent resolved simulations. The regularization of the equations is achieved by means of a simple collisional model, by inclusion of an ad-hoc hyperviscosity or artificial viscosity term or by implicit dissipation in upwind schemes. Comparisons between the various methods and regularizations are presented. We apply a filtering formalism to the Vlasov equation and derive sub-grid-scale (SGS) terms analogous to the Reynolds stress terms in hydrodynamic turbulence. We present a priori quantifications of these SGS terms in resolved simulations of drift-kinetic turbulence by applying a sharp filter. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  8. Numerical aspects of drift kinetic turbulence: ill-posedness, regularization and a priori estimates of sub-grid-scale terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samtaney, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    We present a numerical method based on an Eulerian approach to solve the Vlasov-Poisson system for 4D drift kinetic turbulence. Our numerical approach uses a conservative formulation with high-order (fourth and higher) evaluation of the numerical fluxes coupled with a fourth-order accurate Poisson solver. The fluxes are computed using a low-dissipation high-order upwind differencing method or a tuned high-resolution finite difference method with no numerical dissipation. Numerical results are presented for the case of imposed ion temperature and density gradients. Different forms of controlled regularization to achieve a well-posed system are used to obtain convergent resolved simulations. The regularization of the equations is achieved by means of a simple collisional model, by inclusion of an ad-hoc hyperviscosity or artificial viscosity term or by implicit dissipation in upwind schemes. Comparisons between the various methods and regularizations are presented. We apply a filtering formalism to the Vlasov equation and derive sub-grid-scale (SGS) terms analogous to the Reynolds stress terms in hydrodynamic turbulence. We present a priori quantifications of these SGS terms in resolved simulations of drift-kinetic turbulence by applying a sharp filter.

  9. On the influence of cloud fraction diurnal cycle and sub-grid cloud optical thickness variability on all-sky direct aerosol radiative forcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Min; Zhang, Zhibo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand how cloud fraction diurnal cycle and sub-grid cloud optical thickness variability influence the all-sky direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF). We focus on the southeast Atlantic region where transported smoke is often observed above low-level water clouds during burning seasons. We use the CALIOP observations to derive the optical properties of aerosols. We developed two diurnal cloud fraction variation models. One is based on sinusoidal fitting of MODIS observations from Terra and Aqua satellites. The other is based on high-temporal frequency diurnal cloud fraction observations from SEVIRI on board of geostationary satellite. Both models indicate a strong cloud fraction diurnal cycle over the southeast Atlantic region. Sensitivity studies indicate that using a constant cloud fraction corresponding to Aqua local equatorial crossing time (1:30 PM) generally leads to an underestimated (less positive) diurnal mean DARF even if solar diurnal variation is considered. Using cloud fraction corresponding to Terra local equatorial crossing time (10:30 AM) generally leads overestimation. The biases are a typically around 10–20%, but up to more than 50%. The influence of sub-grid cloud optical thickness variability on DARF is studied utilizing the cloud optical thickness histogram available in MODIS Level-3 daily data. Similar to previous studies, we found the above-cloud smoke in the southeast Atlantic region has a strong warming effect at the top of the atmosphere. However, because of the plane-parallel albedo bias the warming effect of above-cloud smoke could be significantly overestimated if the grid-mean, instead of the full histogram, of cloud optical thickness is used in the computation. This bias generally increases with increasing above-cloud aerosol optical thickness and sub-grid cloud optical thickness inhomogeneity. Our results suggest that the cloud diurnal cycle and sub-grid cloud variability are important factors

  10. Toward sub-femtosecond pump-probe experiments: a dispersionless autocorrelator with attosecond resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constant, E.; Mevel, E.; Zair, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Salin, F. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., Talence (FR). Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (CELIA)

    2001-07-01

    We designed a dispersionless autocorrelator with a sub-femtosecond resolution suitable for the characterization of ultrashort X-UV pulses. We present a proof of feasibility experiment with 11 fs infrared pulses. (orig.)

  11. 2 minute Southcentral Alaska Elevation Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 2-minute Southcentral Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 2-minute resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  12. Fine-scale application of WRF-CAM5 during a dust storm episode over East Asia: Sensitivity to grid resolutions and aerosol activation parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Xin; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, L. Ruby; Zheng, Bo; Zhang, Qiang; He, Kebin

    2018-03-01

    An advanced online-coupled meteorology and chemistry model WRF-CAM5 has been applied to East Asia using triple-nested domains at different grid resolutions (i.e., 36-, 12-, and 4-km) to simulate a severe dust storm period in spring 2010. Analyses are performed to evaluate the model performance and investigate model sensitivity to different horizontal grid sizes and aerosol activation parameterizations and to examine aerosol-cloud interactions and their impacts on the air quality. A comprehensive model evaluation of the baseline simulations using the default Abdul-Razzak and Ghan (AG) aerosol activation scheme shows that the model can well predict major meteorological variables such as 2-m temperature (T2), water vapor mixing ratio (Q2), 10-m wind speed (WS10) and wind direction (WD10), and shortwave and longwave radiation across different resolutions with domain-average normalized mean biases typically within ±15%. The baseline simulations also show moderate biases for precipitation and moderate-to-large underpredictions for other major variables associated with aerosol-cloud interactions such as cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), cloud optical thickness (COT), and cloud liquid water path (LWP) due to uncertainties or limitations in the aerosol-cloud treatments. The model performance is sensitive to grid resolutions, especially for surface meteorological variables such as T2, Q2, WS10, and WD10, with the performance generally improving at finer grid resolutions for those variables. Comparison of the sensitivity simulations with an alternative (i.e., the Fountoukis and Nenes (FN) series scheme) and the default (i.e., AG scheme) aerosol activation scheme shows that the former predicts larger values for cloud variables such as CDNC and COT across all grid resolutions and improves the overall domain-average model performance for many cloud/radiation variables and precipitation. Sensitivity simulations using the FN series scheme also have large impacts on

  13. Effect of grid resolution and subgrid assumptions on the model prediction of a reactive buoyant plume under convective conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chock, D.P.; Winkler, S.L.; Pu Sun

    2002-01-01

    We have introduced a new and elaborate approach to understand the impact of grid resolution and subgrid chemistry assumption on the grid-model prediction of species concentrations for a system with highly non-homogeneous chemistry - a reactive buoyant plume immediately downwind of the stack in a convective boundary layer. The Parcel-Grid approach plume was used to describe both the air parcel turbulent transport and chemistry. This approach allows an identical transport process for all simulations. It also allows a description of subgrid chemistry. The ambient and plume parcel transport follows the description of Luhar and Britter (Atmos. Environ, 23 (1989) 1911, 26A (1992) 1283). The chemistry follows that of the Carbon-Bond mechanism. Three different grid sizes were considered: fine, medium and coarse, together with three different subgrid chemistry assumptions: micro-scale or individual parcel, tagged-parcel (plume and ambient parcels treated separately), and untagged-parcel (plume and ambient parcels treated indiscriminately). Reducing the subgrid information is not necessarily similar to increasing the model grid size. In our example, increasing the grid size leads to a reduction in the suppression of ozone in the presence of a high-NO x stack plume, and a reduction in the effectiveness of the NO x -inhibition effect. On the other hand, reducing the subgrid information (by using the untagged-parcel assumption) leads to an increase in ozone reduction and an enhancement of the NO x -inhibition effect insofar as the ozone extremum is concerned. (author)

  14. Derivation and Error Analysis of the Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid at 2 arc min Resolution Version 3 (EMAG2v3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, B.; Chulliat, A.; Saltus, R.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid at 2 arc min resolution version 3, EMAG2v3, combines marine and airborne trackline observations, satellite data, and magnetic observatory data to map the location, intensity, and extent of lithospheric magnetic anomalies. EMAG2v3 includes over 50 million new data points added to NCEI's Geophysical Database System (GEODAS) in recent years. The new grid relies only on observed data, and does not utilize a priori geologic structure or ocean-age information. Comparing this grid to other global magnetic anomaly compilations (e.g., EMAG2 and WDMAM), we can see that the inclusion of a priori ocean-age patterns forces an artificial linear pattern to the grid; the data-only approach allows for greater complexity in representing the evolution along oceanic spreading ridges and continental margins. EMAG2v3 also makes use of the satellite-derived lithospheric field model MF7 in order to accurately represent anomalies with wavelengths greater than 300 km and to create smooth grid merging boundaries. The heterogeneous distribution of errors in the observations used in compiling the EMAG2v3 was explored, and is reported in the final distributed grid. This grid is delivered at both 4 km continuous altitude above WGS84, as well as at sea level for all oceanic and coastal regions.

  15. The Effect of Model Grid Resolution on the Distributed Hydrologic Simulations for Forecasting Stream Flows and Reservoir Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, S. J.

    2017-12-01

    Within the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), reservoirs are typically operated according to a rule curve that specifies target water levels based on the time of year. The rule curve is intended to maximize flood protection by specifying releases of water before the dominant rainfall period for a region. While some operating allowances are permissible, generally the rule curve elevations must be maintained. While this operational approach provides for the required flood control purpose, it may not result in optimal reservoir operations for multi-use impoundments. In the Russian River Valley of California a multi-agency research effort called Forecast-Informed Reservoir Operations (FIRO) is assessing the application of forecast weather and streamflow predictions to potentially enhance the operation of reservoirs in the watershed. The focus of the study has been on Lake Mendocino, a USACE project important for flood control, water supply, power generation and ecological flows. As part of this effort the Engineer Research and Development Center is assessing the ability of utilizing the physics based, distributed watershed model Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA) model to simulate stream flows, reservoir stages, and discharges while being driven by weather forecast products. A key question in this application is the effect of watershed model resolution on forecasted stream flows. To help resolve this question, GSSHA models of multiple grid resolutions, 30, 50, and 270m, were developed for the upper Russian River, which includes Lake Mendocino. The models were derived from common inputs: DEM, soils, land use, stream network, reservoir characteristics, and specified inflows and discharges. All the models were calibrated in both event and continuous simulation mode using measured precipitation gages and then driven with the West-WRF atmospheric model in prediction mode to assess the ability of the model to function in short term, less than one week

  16. Stimulated Emission Pumping Enablling Sub-Diffraction-Limited Spatial Resolution in CARS Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleff, C.; Gross, P.; Fallnich, C.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Kruse, K.; Beeker, W.P; Beeker, W.P.; Lee, Christopher James; Boller, Klaus J.; Dobner, S.

    2012-01-01

    Suppression of CARS signal generation is demonstrated by equalization of the ground and Raman states via a control state in a theoretical investigation. Using donut-shaped control light fields for population transfer results in sub-diffraction-limited spatial resolution CARS microscopy.

  17. High Resolution Simulations of Future Climate in West Africa Using a Variable-Resolution Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, J. O.; Engelbrecht, F.; Vezhapparambu, S.

    2013-12-01

    In previous work demonstrated the application of a var¬iable-resolution global atmospheric model, the conformal-cubic atmospheric model (CCAM), across a wide range of spatial and time scales to investigate the ability of the model to provide realistic simulations of present-day climate and plausible projections of future climate change over sub-Saharan Africa. By applying the model in stretched-grid mode the versatility of the model dynamics, numerical formulation and physical parameterizations to function across a range of length scales over the region of interest, was also explored. We primarily used CCAM to illustrate the capability of the model to function as a flexible downscaling tool at the climate-change time scale. Here we report on additional long term climate projection studies performed by downscaling at much higher resolutions (8 Km) over an area that stretches from just south of Sahara desert to the southern coast of the Niger Delta and into the Gulf of Guinea. To perform these simulations, CCAM was provided with synoptic-scale forcing of atmospheric circulation from 2.5 deg resolution NCEP reanalysis at 6-hourly interval and SSTs from NCEP reanalysis data uses as lower boundary forcing. CCAM 60 Km resolution downscaled to 8 Km (Schmidt factor 24.75) then 8 Km resolution simulation downscaled to 1 Km (Schmidt factor 200) over an area approximately 50 Km x 50 Km in the southern Lake Chad Basin (LCB). Our intent in conducting these high resolution model runs was to obtain a deeper understanding of linkages between the projected future climate and the hydrological processes that control the surface water regime in this part of sub-Saharan Africa.

  18. Influence of grid aspect ratio on planetary boundary layer turbulence in large-eddy simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nishizawa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We examine the influence of the grid aspect ratio of horizontal to vertical grid spacing on turbulence in the planetary boundary layer (PBL in a large-eddy simulation (LES. In order to clarify and distinguish them from other artificial effects caused by numerical schemes, we used a fully compressible meteorological LES model with a fully explicit scheme of temporal integration. The influences are investigated with a series of sensitivity tests with parameter sweeps of spatial resolution and grid aspect ratio. We confirmed that the mixing length of the eddy viscosity and diffusion due to sub-grid-scale turbulence plays an essential role in reproducing the theoretical −5/3 slope of the energy spectrum. If we define the filter length in LES modeling based on consideration of the numerical scheme, and introduce a corrective factor for the grid aspect ratio into the mixing length, the theoretical slope of the energy spectrum can be obtained; otherwise, spurious energy piling appears at high wave numbers. We also found that the grid aspect ratio has influence on the turbulent statistics, especially the skewness of the vertical velocity near the top of the PBL, which becomes spuriously large with large aspect ratio, even if a reasonable spectrum is obtained.

  19. The use and abuse of radiographic grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brough, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    It is generally accepted that scattered radiation degrades the quality of the radiographic image. When this problem occurs, a radiographic grid may be applied which necessitates an increase in exposure. Investigations are reported in the following areas: reasons for the introduction of a radiographic grid; the ratio between kilovoltage and grid ratio; techniques resulting in higher contrast and resolution at low patient dose and the abuse of grids

  20. High Quality Data for Grid Integration Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, Andrew; Draxl, Caroline; Sengupta, Manajit; Hodge, Bri-Mathias

    2017-01-22

    As variable renewable power penetration levels increase in power systems worldwide, renewable integration studies are crucial to ensure continued economic and reliable operation of the power grid. The existing electric grid infrastructure in the US in particular poses significant limitations on wind power expansion. In this presentation we will shed light on requirements for grid integration studies as far as wind and solar energy are concerned. Because wind and solar plants are strongly impacted by weather, high-resolution and high-quality weather data are required to drive power system simulations. Future data sets will have to push limits of numerical weather prediction to yield these high-resolution data sets, and wind data will have to be time-synchronized with solar data. Current wind and solar integration data sets are presented. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit is the largest and most complete grid integration data set publicly available to date. A meteorological data set, wind power production time series, and simulated forecasts created using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model run on a 2-km grid over the continental United States at a 5-min resolution is now publicly available for more than 126,000 land-based and offshore wind power production sites. The National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB) is a similar high temporal- and spatial resolution database of 18 years of solar resource data for North America and India. The need for high-resolution weather data pushes modeling towards finer scales and closer synchronization. We also present how we anticipate such datasets developing in the future, their benefits, and the challenges with using and disseminating such large amounts of data.

  1. Measurement of neutron dose equivalent outside and inside of the treatment vault of GRID therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xudong; Charlton, Michael A.; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony Y.; Li, Ying; Papanikolaou, Nikos [University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the neutron and photon dose equivalent rates at the treatment vault entrance (H{sub n,D} and H{sub G}), and to study the secondary radiation to the patient in GRID therapy. The radiation activation on the grid was studied.Methods: A Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator was working at 18 MV mode with a grid manufactured by .decimal, Inc. The H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} were measured using an Andersson–Braun neutron REM meter, and a Geiger Müller counter. The radiation activation on the grid was measured after the irradiation with an ion chamber γ-ray survey meter. The secondary radiation dose equivalent to patient was evaluated by etched track detectors and OSL detectors on a RANDO{sup ®} phantom.Results: Within the measurement uncertainty, there is no significant difference between the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} with and without a grid. However, the neutron dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 35.3% lower than that without the grid when using the same field size and the same amount of monitor unit. The photon dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 44.9% lower. The measured average half-life of the radiation activation in the grid is 12.0 (±0.9) min. The activation can be categorized into a fast decay component and a slow decay component with half-lives of 3.4 (±1.6) min and 15.3 (±4.0) min, respectively. There was no detectable radioactive contamination found on the surface of the grid through a wipe test.Conclusions: This work indicates that there is no significant change of the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} in GRID therapy, compared with a conventional external beam therapy. However, the neutron and scattered photon dose equivalent to the patient decrease dramatically with the grid and can be clinical irrelevant. Meanwhile, the users of a grid should be aware of the possible high dose to the radiation worker from the radiation activation on the surface of the grid. A delay in handling the grid after the beam

  2. Cloud computing for energy management in smart grid - an application survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naveen, P; Ing, Wong Kiing; Danquah, Michael Kobina; Sidhu, Amandeep S; Abu-Siada, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The smart grid is the emerging energy system wherein the application of information technology, tools and techniques that make the grid run more efficiently. It possesses demand response capacity to help balance electrical consumption with supply. The challenges and opportunities of emerging and future smart grids can be addressed by cloud computing. To focus on these requirements, we provide an in-depth survey on different cloud computing applications for energy management in the smart grid architecture. In this survey, we present an outline of the current state of research on smart grid development. We also propose a model of cloud based economic power dispatch for smart grid. (paper)

  3. Sub-atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography: promise, challenges and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeley, Matthew P; Hasnain, Samar S; Antonyuk, Svetlana V

    2015-07-01

    The International Year of Crystallography saw the number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank cross the 100000 mark, with more than 90000 of these provided by X-ray crystallography. The number of X-ray structures determined to sub-atomic resolution (i.e. ≤1 Å) has passed 600 and this is likely to continue to grow rapidly with diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation sources such as MAX-IV (Sweden) and Sirius (Brazil) under construction. A dozen X-ray structures have been deposited to ultra-high resolution (i.e. ≤0.7 Å), for which precise electron density can be exploited to obtain charge density and provide information on the bonding character of catalytic or electron transfer sites. Although the development of neutron macromolecular crystallography over the years has been far less pronounced, and its application much less widespread, the availability of new and improved instrumentation, combined with dedicated deuteration facilities, are beginning to transform the field. Of the 83 macromolecular structures deposited with neutron diffraction data, more than half (49/83, 59%) were released since 2010. Sub-mm(3) crystals are now regularly being used for data collection, structures have been determined to atomic resolution for a few small proteins, and much larger unit-cell systems (cell edges >100 Å) are being successfully studied. While some details relating to H-atom positions are tractable with X-ray crystallography at sub-atomic resolution, the mobility of certain H atoms precludes them from being located. In addition, highly polarized H atoms and protons (H(+)) remain invisible with X-rays. Moreover, the majority of X-ray structures are determined from cryo-cooled crystals at 100 K, and, although radiation damage can be strongly controlled, especially since the advent of shutterless fast detectors, and by using limited doses and crystal translation at micro-focus beams, radiation damage can still take place. Neutron

  4. Sub-atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography: promise, challenges and potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Blakeley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The International Year of Crystallography saw the number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank cross the 100000 mark, with more than 90000 of these provided by X-ray crystallography. The number of X-ray structures determined to sub-atomic resolution (i.e. ≤1 Å has passed 600 and this is likely to continue to grow rapidly with diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation sources such as MAX-IV (Sweden and Sirius (Brazil under construction. A dozen X-ray structures have been deposited to ultra-high resolution (i.e. ≤0.7 Å, for which precise electron density can be exploited to obtain charge density and provide information on the bonding character of catalytic or electron transfer sites. Although the development of neutron macromolecular crystallography over the years has been far less pronounced, and its application much less widespread, the availability of new and improved instrumentation, combined with dedicated deuteration facilities, are beginning to transform the field. Of the 83 macromolecular structures deposited with neutron diffraction data, more than half (49/83, 59% were released since 2010. Sub-mm3 crystals are now regularly being used for data collection, structures have been determined to atomic resolution for a few small proteins, and much larger unit-cell systems (cell edges >100 Å are being successfully studied. While some details relating to H-atom positions are tractable with X-ray crystallography at sub-atomic resolution, the mobility of certain H atoms precludes them from being located. In addition, highly polarized H atoms and protons (H+ remain invisible with X-rays. Moreover, the majority of X-ray structures are determined from cryo-cooled crystals at 100 K, and, although radiation damage can be strongly controlled, especially since the advent of shutterless fast detectors, and by using limited doses and crystal translation at micro-focus beams, radiation damage can still take place

  5. Estimation of Global 1km-grid Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Part II: Evaluations and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, K.; Sasai, T.; Kato, S.; Niwa, Y.; Saito, M.; Takagi, H.; Matsunaga, T.; Hiraki, K.; Maksyutov, S. S.; Yokota, T.

    2015-12-01

    Global terrestrial carbon cycle largely depends on a spatial pattern in land cover type, which is heterogeneously-distributed over regional and global scales. Many studies have been trying to reveal distribution of carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere for understanding global carbon cycle dynamics by using terrestrial biosphere models, satellite data, inventory data, and so on. However, most studies remained within several tens of kilometers grid spatial resolution, and the results have not been enough to understand the detailed pattern of carbon exchanges based on ecological community and to evaluate the carbon stocks by forest ecosystems in each countries. Improving the sophistication of spatial resolution is obviously necessary to enhance the accuracy of carbon exchanges. Moreover, the improvement may contribute to global warming awareness, policy makers and other social activities. We show global terrestrial carbon exchanges (net ecosystem production, net primary production, and gross primary production) with 1km-grid resolution. The methodology for these estimations are shown in the 2015 AGU FM poster "Estimation of Global 1km-grid Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Part I: Developing Inputs and Modelling". In this study, we evaluated the carbon exchanges in various regions with other approaches. We used the satellite-driven biosphere model (BEAMS) as our estimations, GOSAT L4A CO2 flux data, NEP retrieved by NICAM and CarbonTracer2013 flux data, for period from Jun 2001 to Dec 2012. The temporal patterns for this period were indicated similar trends between BEAMS, GOSAT, NICAM, and CT2013 in many sub-continental regions. Then, we estimated the terrestrial carbon exchanges in each countries, and could indicated the temporal patterns of the exchanges in large carbon stock regions.Global terrestrial carbon cycle largely depends on a spatial pattern of land cover type, which is heterogeneously-distributed over regional and global scales. Many

  6. Effects of thermal oxidation duration on the structural and electrical properties of Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetherin, Karuppiah; Ramesh, S.; Wong, Yew Hoong [University of Malaya, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2017-08-15

    A study on the growth, structure and electrical properties of Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} was carried out experimentally on RF sputtered thin film on Si followed by thermal oxidation at 700 C at different oxidation durations (5, 10, 15 and 20 min). The structural and chemical properties were studied by X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infrared analysis, Raman analysis and high resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis. The formation of cubic-Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, orthorhombic-Nd{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}, monoclinic-SiO{sub 2}, tetragonal-SiO{sub 2} and hexagonal-SiO{sub 2} was detected. A single interfacial layer was detected for the sample oxidized at 15 min and double interfacial layers were detected for the samples oxidized at 5, 10 and 20 min. The sample oxidized at 15 min possessed the best electrical properties which were attributed by the highest Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} intensity, largest SiO{sub 2} crystallite structure, thinnest interfacial and oxide layer, highest barrier height, lowest effective oxide charges, slow trap density and average interface trap density. (orig.)

  7. Tariff Considerations for Micro-Grids in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reber, Timothy J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Booth, Samuel S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cutler, Dylan S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Li, Xiangkun [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Salasovich, James A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-16

    This report examines some of the key drivers and considerations policymakers and decision makers face when deciding if and how to regulate electricity tariffs for micro-grids. Presenting a range of tariff options, from mandating some variety of national (uniform) tariff to allowing micro-grid developers and operators to set fully cost-reflective tariffs, it examines various benefits and drawbacks of each. In addition, the report and explores various types of cross-subsidies and other transitional forms of regulation that may offer a regulatory middle ground that can help balance the often competing goals of providing price control on electricity service in the name of social good while still providing a means for investors to ensure high enough returns on their investment to attract the necessary capital financing to the market. Using the REopt tool developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to inform their study, the authors modeled a few representative micro-grid systems and the resultant levelized cost of electricity, lending context and scale to the consideration of these tariff questions. This simple analysis provides an estimate of the gap between current tariff regimes and the tariffs that would be necessary for developers to recover costs and attract investment, offering further insight into the potential scale of subsidies or other grants that may be required to enable micro-grid development under current regulatory structures. It explores potential options for addressing this gap while trying to balance This report examines some of the key drivers and considerations policymakers and decision makers face when deciding if and how to regulate electricity tariffs for micro-grids. Presenting a range of tariff options, from mandating some variety of national (uniform) tariff to allowing micro-grid developers and operators to set fully cost-reflective tariffs, it examines various benefits and drawbacks of each. In

  8. Atomic-resolution studies of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO compounds on aberration-corrected electron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wentao

    2009-10-23

    In this work, the characteristic inversion domain microstructures of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub m} (m=30) compounds were investigated by TEM methods. At bright-atom contrast condition, atomically resolved HR-TEM images of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub 30} were successfully acquired in [1 anti 100] zone axis of ZnO, with projected metal columns of {proportional_to}1.6 A well resolved. From contrast maxima in the TEM images, local lattice distortions at the pyramidal inversion domain boundaries were observed for the first time. Lattice displacements and the strain field in two-dimensions were visualized and measured using the 'DALI' algorithm. Atomically resolved single shot and focal series images of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub 30} were achieved in both zone axes of ZnO, [1 anti 100] and [2 anti 1 anti 10], respectively. The electron waves at the exit-plane were successfully reconstructed using the software package 'TrueImage'. Finally, a three dimensional atomic structure model for the pyramidal IDB was proposed, with an In distribution of 10%, 20%, 40%, 20% and 10% of In contents over 5 atom columns along basal planes, respectively. Through a detailed structural study of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(ZnO){sub m} compounds by using phase-contrast and Z-contrast imaging at atomic resolution, In{sup 3+} atoms are determined with trigonal bi-pyramidal co-ordination and are distributed at the pyramidal IDBs. (orig.)

  9. Fluidized bed catalytic cracking regenerator model: grid effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errazu, A.F. (Universidad Nacional del Sur, Conicet, Argentina); De Lasa, H.I.; Sarti, F.

    1979-04-01

    A grid model including thermal effects is proposed. The aim is the simulation of a fluidized catalytic cracking regenerator similar to the industrial unit of Destileria La Palta, YPF, Argentina. It is demonstrated that a simple C.S.T.R. model without bypass of gas feed entering the bed provides a good approach for representing the fluidized bed including the grid region. In addition, by means of the C.S.T.R. model, it is shown that there exist two characteristic operating regions: a zone where (C/sub 0//sup 0/ to C/sub c/) depends on the initial coke concentration and a zone where (C/sub c//sub 0/ to C/sub c/) is controlled by oxygen supply. 40 references, 6 figures, 5 tables.

  10. Preliminary thermal analysis of grids for twin source extraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Ravi; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Chakraborty, Arun K.

    2017-01-01

    The TWIN (Two driver based Indigenously built Negative ion source) source provides a bridge between the operational single driver based negative ion source test facility, ROBIN in IPR and an ITER-type multi driver based ion source. The source is designed to be operated in CW mode with 180kW, 1MHz, 5s ON/600s OFF duty cycle and also in 5Hz modulation mode with 3s ON/20s OFF duty cycle for 3 such cycle. TWIN source comprises of ion source sub-assembly (consist of driver and plasma box) and extraction system sub-assembly. Extraction system consists of Plasma grid (PG), extraction grid (EG) and Ground grid (GG) sub assembly. Negative ion beams produced at plasma grid seeing the plasma side of ion source will receive moderate heat flux whereas the extraction grid and ground grid would be receiving majority of heat flux from extracted negative ion and co-extracted electron beams. Entire Co-extracted electron beam would be dumped at extraction grid via electron deflection magnetic field making the requirement of thermal and hydraulic design for extraction grid to be critical. All the three grids are made of OFHC Copper and would be actively water cooled keeping the peak temperature rise of grid surface within allowable limit with optimum uniformity. All the grids are to be made by vacuum brazing process where joint strength becomes crucial at elevated temperature. Hydraulic design must maintain the peak temperature at the brazing joint within acceptable limit

  11. Hydrography-driven coarsening of grid digital elevation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, G.; Orlandini, S.

    2017-12-01

    A new grid coarsening strategy, denoted as hydrography-driven (HD) coarsening, is developed in the present study. The HD coarsening strategy is designed to retain the essential hydrographic features of surface flow paths observed in high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs): (1) depressions are filled in the considered high-resolution DEM, (2) the obtained topographic data are used to extract a reference grid network composed of all surface flow paths, (3) the Horton order is assigned to each link of the reference grid network, and (4) within each coarse grid cell, the elevation of the point lying along the highest-order path of the reference grid network and displaying the minimum distance to the cell center is assigned to this coarse grid cell center. The capabilities of the HD coarsening strategy to provide consistent surface flow paths with respect to those observed in high-resolution DEMs are evaluated over a synthetic valley and two real drainage basins located in the Italian Alps and in the Italian Apennines. The HD coarsening is found to yield significantly more accurate surface flow path profiles than the standard nearest neighbor (NN) coarsening. In addition, the proposed strategy is found to reduce drastically the impact of depression-filling procedures in coarsened topographic data. The HD coarsening strategy is therefore advocated for all those cases in which the relief of the extracted drainage network is an important hydrographic feature. The figure below reports DEMs of a synthetic valley and extracted surface flow paths. (a) 10-m grid DEM displaying no depressions and extracted surface flow path (gray line). (b) 1-km grid DEM obtained from NN coarsening. (c) 1-km grid DEM obtained from NN coarsening plus depression-filling and extracted surface flow path (light blue line). (d) 1-km grid DEM obtained from HD coarsening and extracted surface flow path (magenta line).

  12. Structure of the P{sub II} signal transduction protein of Neisseria meningitidis at 1.85 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Charles E. [Division of Structural Biology, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Sainsbury, Sarah; Berrow, Nick S.; Alderton, David [The Oxford Protein Production Facility, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Saunders, Nigel J. [The Bacterial Pathogenesis and Functional Genomics Group, The Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RE (United Kingdom); Stammers, David K. [Division of Structural Biology, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); The Oxford Protein Production Facility, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Owens, Raymond J., E-mail: ray@strubi.ox.ac.uk [The Oxford Protein Production Facility, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Division of Structural Biology, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-01

    The structure of the P{sub II} signal transduction protein of N. meningitidis at 1.85 Å resolution is described. The P{sub II} signal transduction proteins GlnB and GlnK are implicated in the regulation of nitrogen assimilation in Escherichia coli and other enteric bacteria. P{sub II}-like proteins are widely distributed in bacteria, archaea and plants. In contrast to other bacteria, Neisseria are limited to a single P{sub II} protein (NMB 1995), which shows a high level of sequence identity to GlnB and GlnK from Escherichia coli (73 and 62%, respectively). The structure of the P{sub II} protein from N. meningitidis (serotype B) has been solved by molecular replacement to a resolution of 1.85 Å. Comparison of the structure with those of other P{sub II} proteins shows that the overall fold is tightly conserved across the whole population of related proteins, in particular the positions of the residues implicated in ATP binding. It is proposed that the Neisseria P{sub II} protein shares functions with GlnB/GlnK of enteric bacteria.

  13. Triple-layer smart grid business model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Zheng; Lundgaard, Morten; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2016-01-01

    Viewing the smart grid with the theory of business models may open opportunities in understanding and capturing values in new markets. This study tries to discover and map the smart grid ecosystem-based business model framework with two different environments (sub-Saharan Africa and Denmark......), and identifies the parameters for the smart grid solutions to the emerging markets. This study develops a triple-layer business model including the organizational (Niche), environmental (Intermediate), and global (Dominators) factors. The result uncovers an interface of market factors and stakeholders...... in a generic smart grid constellation. The findings contribute the transferability potential of the smart grid solutions between countries, and indicate the potential to export and import smart grid solutions based on the business modeling....

  14. Gridded Data in the Arctic; Benefits and Perils of Publicly Available Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, B.; Forsberg, R.; Gabbert, R.; Beale, J.; Kenyon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of the Arctic Ocean has been hugely advanced by release of gridded bathymetry and potential field anomaly grids. The Arctic Gravity Project grid achieves excellent, near-isotropic coverage of the earth north of 64˚N by combining land, satellite, airborne, submarine, surface ship and ice set-out measurements of gravity anomalies. Since the release of the V 2.0 grid in 2008, there has been extensive icebreaker activity across the Amerasia Basin due to mapping of the Arctic coastal nation's Extended Continental Shelves (ECS). While grid resolution has been steadily improving over time, addition of higher resolution and better navigated data highlights some distortions in the grid that may influence interpretation. In addition to the new ECS data sets, gravity anomaly data has been collected from other vessels; notably the Korean Icebreaker Araon, the Japanese icebreaker Mirai and the German icebreaker Polarstern. Also the GRAV-D project of the US National Geodetic Survey has flown airborne surveys over much of Alaska. These data will be Included in the new AGP grid, which will result in a much improved product when version 3.0 is released in 2015. To make use of these measurements, it is necessary to compile them into a continuous spatial representation. Compilation is complicated by differences in survey parameters, gravimeter sensitivity and reduction methods. Cross-over errors are the classic means to assess repeatability of track measurements. Prior to the introduction of near-universal GPS positioning, positional uncertainty was evaluated by cross-over analysis. GPS positions can be treated as more or less true, enabling evaluation of differences due to contrasting sensitivity, reference and reduction techniques. For the most part, cross-over errors for racks of gravity anomaly data collected since 2008 are less than 0.5 mGals, supporting the compilation of these data with only slight adjustments. Given the different platforms used for various

  15. Regional Data Assimilation Using a Stretched-Grid Approach and Ensemble Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, M. S.; Takacs, L. L.; Govindaraju, R. C.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The global variable resolution stretched grid (SG) version of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation System (DAS) incorporating the GEOS SG-GCM (Fox-Rabinovitz 2000, Fox-Rabinovitz et al. 2001a,b), has been developed and tested as an efficient tool for producing regional analyses and diagnostics with enhanced mesoscale resolution. The major area of interest with enhanced regional resolution used in different SG-DAS experiments includes a rectangle over the U.S. with 50 or 60 km horizontal resolution. The analyses and diagnostics are produced for all mandatory levels from the surface to 0.2 hPa. The assimilated regional mesoscale products are consistent with global scale circulation characteristics due to using the SG-approach. Both the stretched grid and basic uniform grid DASs use the same amount of global grid-points and are compared in terms of regional product quality.

  16. Intensive structural investigation of R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17-x}M{sub x} intermetallic compounds using high resolution powder neutron diffractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujamilah,; Ridwan, [Materials Science Research Center, National Atomic Energy Agency of Indonesia, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    1998-10-01

    The crystallographic and magnetic structure of R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17-x}M{sub x} intermetallic compounds system were refined by Rietveld analyses of the high resolution neutron powder diffraction data. The analyses results show that the substituent atoms were not distributed randomly over the Fe sites, but preferentially occupied some Fe sites. More further, it was also found that the substituent atoms which atomic radius smaller than Fe tend to avoid the 6c site at low concentration while the larger substituent atom tend to replace the Fe atom at this 6c site corresponding to their concentration. From these crystallographic data, it was suggested that the change of magnetic ordering temperature Tc, is not mainly determined by the change of short bond distance between this `dumb-bell` atoms, but it was also influenced by the nearest coordinated atoms to this site. (author)

  17. Microwave-assisted synthesis of Zn{sub x}Cd{sub 1-x}S-MWCNT heterostructures and their photocatalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Huaqiang, E-mail: wuhuaq@mail.ahnu.edu.cn; Yao Youzhi; Li Wenting; Zhu Lulu; Ni Na; Zhang Xiaojun [Anhui Normal University, Anhui Key Laboratory of Molecule-based Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science (China)

    2011-05-15

    The multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) wrapped with hexagonal wurtzite Zn{sub x}Cd{sub 1-x}S nanoparticles with a uniform and small diameter have been prepared to form Zn{sub x}Cd{sub 1-x}S-MWCNT heterostructures by microwave-assisted route using Zn(Ac){sub 2}, Cd(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, and thioacetamide as the reactants{sub .} The heterostructures have been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence (PL) and PL excited lifetime. Despite the analogous size and configuration, the Zn{sub x}Cd{sub 1-x}S-MWCNT (x = 0, 0.2, 0.5, 0.8, 1) with different Zn concentration exhibit composition-dependent absorption properties in the visible zone. The PL peak positions of Zn{sub x}Cd{sub 1-x}S-MWCNT change gradually from ZnS-MWCNT to CdS-MWCNT. The Zn{sub x}Cd{sub 1-x}S-MWCNT shows different photocatalytic activity towards the photodegradation of fuchsin acid under visible light illumination, photocatalytic activity of the Zn{sub x}Cd{sub 1-x}S-MWCNT decreases gradually with the increase in the Zn concentration, the Zn{sub 0.2}Cd{sub 0.8}S-MWCNT possessed the best photocatalytic activity. After recycling thrice, the photocatalysts still have about 85% efficiency.

  18. Surface Ocean CO<sub>2sub> Atlas (SOCAT) gridded data products

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sabine, C.L.; Hankin, S.; Koyuk, H.; Bakker, D.C.E.; Pfeil, B.; Olsen, A; Metzl, N.; Kozyr, A; Fassbender, A; Manke, A; Malczyk, J.; Akl, J.; Alin, S.R.; Bellerby, R.G.J.; Borges, A; Boutin, J.; Brown, P.J.; Cai, W.-J.; Chavez, F.P.; Chen, A.; Cosca, C.; Feely, R.A.; Gonzalez-Davila, M.; Goyet, C.; Hardman-Mountford, N.; Heinze, C.; Hoppema, M.; Hunt, C.W.; Hydes, D.; Ishii, M.; Johannessen, T.; Key, R.M.; Kortzinger, A.; Landschutzer, P.; Lauvset, S.K.; Lefevre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lourantou, A.; Merlivat, L.; Midorikawa, T.; Mintrop, L.; Miyazaki, C.; Murata, A.; Nakadate, A.; Nakano, Y.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; Omar, A.M.; Padin, X.A.; Park, G.-H.; Paterson, K.; Perez, F.F.; Pierrot, D.; Poisson, A.; Rios, A.F.; Salisbury, J.; Santana-Casiano, J.M.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.; et al.

    As a response to public demand for a well-documented, quality controlled, publically available, global surface ocean carbon dioxide (CO<sub>2sub>) data set, the international marine carbon science community developed the Surface Ocean CO<sub>2...

  19. Nuclear fuel sub-assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, J.A.; Butterfield, C.E.; Waite, E.

    1979-01-01

    A fast reactor fuel sub-assembly has honeycomb grids for laterally supporting the fuel pins. The grids are of two series and are arranged alternately along the bundle. The grids of a first series provide a discrete cell for each pin but the grids of the second series have a peripheral group of cells only. The grids of the second series provide intermediate support of the edge pins to restrain bow. (author)

  20. 5-minute Gridded Global Relief Data (ETOPO5)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Earth topography five minute grid (ETOPO5) is a gridded data base of worldwide elevations derived from several sources at a resolution of 5 minutes of latitude and...

  1. Simulations of mixing in Inertial Confinement Fusion with front tracking and sub-grid scale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Verinder; Lim, Hyunkyung; Melvin, Jeremy; Cheng, Baolian; Glimm, James; Sharp, David

    2015-11-01

    We present two related results. The first discusses the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RMI) and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) and their evolution in Inertial Confinement Fusion simulations. We show the evolution of the RMI to the late time RTI under transport effects and tracking. The role of the sub-grid scales helps capture the interaction of turbulence with diffusive processes. The second assesses the effects of concentration on the physics model and examines the mixing properties in the low Reynolds number hot spot. We discuss the effect of concentration on the Schmidt number. The simulation results are produced using the University of Chicago code FLASH and Stony Brook University's front tracking algorithm.

  2. Calculation of the energy-dependent efficiency of gridded 3He fast-neutron ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prussin, S.G.

    1982-01-01

    Research and development activities under this contract proceeded along several lines, including development of a gas jet facility for the transport and isolation of fission product activities with half lives in the range T/sub 1/2/ less than or equal to 2 sec, studies on the factors affecting the energy and timing resolution of gridded 3 He ionization detectors for delayed neutron spectroscopy and the development of simple models for calculation of the beta-decay characteristics of short-lived fission products near A = 90. Brief outlines of the activities in the areas are given

  3. C60 and U ion irradiation of Gd<sub>2sub>TixZr>2-xsub>O>7sub> pyrochlore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jiaming; Toulemonde, Marcel; Lang, Maik; Costantini, Jean Marc; Della-Negra, Serge; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2015-08-01

    Gd<sub>2sub>TixZr>2-xsub>O>7sub> (x = 0 to 2) pyrochlore was irradiated by 30 MeV C<sub>60sub> clusters, which provide an extremely high ionizing energy density. Here, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed a complex ion-track structure in Gd<sub>2sub>Ti>2sub>O>7sub> and Gd<sub>2sub>TiZrO>7sub>, consisting of an amorphous core and a shell of a disordered, defect-fluorite structure.

  4. Bulk superconducting gap of V{sub 3}Si studied by low-energy ultrahigh-resolution photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, T., E-mail: t-sato@arpes.phys.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Souma, S. [WPI Research Center, Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Nakayama, K. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Sugawara, K. [WPI Research Center, Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Toyota, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Takahashi, T. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); WPI Research Center, Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • We report ultrahigh-resolution photoemission spectroscopy of A15 compound V{sub 3}Si. • We found a sharp quasiparticle peak due to superconducting-gap opening. • The surface metallic component is negligibly small in the bulk-sensitive measurement. • We show that V{sub 3}Si is a single-gap s-wave superconductor. - Abstract: We have performed low-energy ultrahigh-resolution photoemission spectroscopy (PES) of A15 compound V{sub 3}Si with a xenon-plasma discharge lamp to elucidate the bulk superconducting gap. Below the superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c} = 15.9 K), we found a sharp quasiparticle peak at the Fermi level in the PES spectrum. The gap spectrum is well fitted by a single s-wave superconducting-gap function together with a dip structure at ∼30 meV suggestive of a strong electron-phonon coupling. The anomalous in-gap state previously observed in the PES measurement with high-energy photons is absent or negligibly small in the present bulk-sensitive measurement. The present PES result shows that V{sub 3}Si is a single-gap s-wave superconductor.

  5. Phase structure, dielectric, and piezoelectric properties of (K{sub 0.94-x}Na{sub x}Li{sub 0.06})(Nb{sub 0.94}Sb{sub 0.06})O{sub 3} lead-free ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Lingling; Lin, Dunmin; Zheng, Qiaoji; Wu, Xiaochun; Xu, Chenggang [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, and Visual Computing and Virtual Reality Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Normal University, Chengdu 610066 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Lead-free piezoelectric ceramics (K{sub 0.94-x}Na{sub x}Li{sub 0.06})(Nb{sub 0.94}Sb{sub 0.06})O{sub 3} have been fabricated by a conventional ceramic technique and the effects of K{sup +}/Na{sup +} ratio on the structure and piezoelectric properties of the ceramics have been studied. All the ceramics possess a pure perovskite structure. The coexistence of tetragonal and orthorhombic phases is formed at room temperature in the ceramics with 0.45 {<=} x {<=} 0.55. The tetragonal-orthorhombic phase-transition temperature T{sub O-T} decreases from 110 to 54 C with x increasing from 0.35 to 0.55 and then increases from 84 to 144 C with x further increasing from 0.6 to 0.7, while the Curie temperature T{sub C} deceases from 388 to 348 C with x increasing from 0.35 to 0.70. Because of the coexistence of the two phases near room temperature, the ceramics with x = 0.50 exhibit the optimum piezoelectric properties: d{sub 33} = 230 pC/N and k{sub p} = 49%. The ceramics possess good time stability of piezoelectric properties. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Memory effect, resolution, and efficiency measurements of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coated plastic scintillator used for radioxenon detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bläckberg, L., E-mail: lisa.blackberg@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Fritioff, T.; Mårtensson, L.; Nielsen, F.; Ringbom, A. [Division of Defence and Security Systems, Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), SE-17290 Stockholm (Sweden); Sjöstrand, H.; Klintenberg, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-06-21

    A cylindrical plastic scintillator cell, used for radioxenon monitoring within the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, has been coated with 425 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using low temperature Atomic Layer Deposition, and its performance has been evaluated. The motivation is to reduce the memory effect caused by radioxenon diffusing into the plastic scintillator material during measurements, resulting in an elevated detection limit. Measurements with the coated detector show both energy resolution and efficiency comparable to uncoated detectors, and a memory effect reduction of a factor of 1000. Provided that the quality of the detector is maintained for a longer period of time, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings are believed to be a viable solution to the memory effect problem in question.

  7. High-resolution integration of water, energy, and climate models to assess electricity grid vulnerabilities to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, M.; Macknick, J.; Tidwell, V. C.; Zagona, E. A.; Magee, T. M.; Bennett, K.; Middleton, R. S.

    2017-12-01

    The U.S. electricity sector depends on large amounts of water for hydropower generation and cooling thermoelectric power plants. Variability in water quantity and temperature due to climate change could reduce the performance and reliability of individual power plants and of the electric grid as a system. While studies have modeled water usage in power systems planning, few have linked grid operations with physical water constraints or with climate-induced changes in water resources to capture the role of the energy-water nexus in power systems flexibility and adequacy. In addition, many hydrologic and hydropower models have a limited representation of power sector water demands and grid interaction opportunities of demand response and ancillary services. A multi-model framework was developed to integrate and harmonize electricity, water, and climate models, allowing for high-resolution simulation of the spatial, temporal, and physical dynamics of these interacting systems. The San Juan River basin in the Southwestern U.S., which contains thermoelectric power plants, hydropower facilities, and multiple non-energy water demands, was chosen as a case study. Downscaled data from three global climate models and predicted regional water demand changes were implemented in the simulations. The Variable Infiltration Capacity hydrologic model was used to project inflows, ambient air temperature, and humidity in the San Juan River Basin. Resulting river operations, water deliveries, water shortage sharing agreements, new water demands, and hydroelectricity generation at the basin-scale were estimated with RiverWare. The impacts of water availability and temperature on electric grid dispatch, curtailment, cooling water usage, and electricity generation cost were modeled in PLEXOS. Lack of water availability resulting from climate, new water demands, and shortage sharing agreements will require thermoelectric generators to drastically decrease power production, as much as 50

  8. The eGo grid model: An open-source and open-data based synthetic medium-voltage grid model for distribution power supply systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amme, J.; Pleßmann, G.; Bühler, J.; Hülk, L.; Kötter, E.; Schwaegerl, P.

    2018-02-01

    The increasing integration of renewable energy into the electricity supply system creates new challenges for distribution grids. The planning and operation of distribution systems requires appropriate grid models that consider the heterogeneity of existing grids. In this paper, we describe a novel method to generate synthetic medium-voltage (MV) grids, which we applied in our DIstribution Network GeneratOr (DINGO). DINGO is open-source software and uses freely available data. Medium-voltage grid topologies are synthesized based on location and electricity demand in defined demand areas. For this purpose, we use GIS data containing demand areas with high-resolution spatial data on physical properties, land use, energy, and demography. The grid topology is treated as a capacitated vehicle routing problem (CVRP) combined with a local search metaheuristics. We also consider the current planning principles for MV distribution networks, paying special attention to line congestion and voltage limit violations. In the modelling process, we included power flow calculations for validation. The resulting grid model datasets contain 3608 synthetic MV grids in high resolution, covering all of Germany and taking local characteristics into account. We compared the modelled networks with real network data. In terms of number of transformers and total cable length, we conclude that the method presented in this paper generates realistic grids that could be used to implement a cost-optimised electrical energy system.

  9. Superparamagnetic behavior of nanosized Co{sub 0.2}Zn{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} synthesized by a flow rate controlled chemical coprecipitation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, S. [Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Dey, S.K. [Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Department of Physics, NITMAS, 24 Pargana(s) 743368 (India); Majumder, S. [Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Poddar, A.; Dasgupta, P.; Banerjee, S. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Kumar, S., E-mail: kumars@phys.jdvu.ac.in [Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2014-09-01

    We have studied the structural, microstructural and magnetic properties of nanosized (∼20 nm) Co{sub 0.2}Zn{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} synthesized by a flow rate controlled coprecipitation method. The phase purity and crystallinity of the sample have been confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopic studies. According to the results of dc magnetic measurements the sample exhibits superparamagnetic behavior above 70 K due to its nanometric size. This has been corroborated by Mössbauer spectroscopic study at 300 K. The infield Mössbauer spectroscopic study indicates that the sample behaves ferrimagnetically at 10 K and it possesses equilibrium cation distribution. The saturation magnetization of the sample (M{sub SAT}∼32 emu g{sup −1} at 300 K) is substantially lower than its bulk counterpart (M{sub SAT}=80 emu g{sup −1}) but higher than those having same composition synthesized by the conventional coprecipitation method. This has been attributed to finite size and spin canting effects as well as good crystalline character and bulk like equilibrium cation distribution of the sample. We have shown that the flow rate controlled coprecipitation method can produce nanosized ferrites with very good crystalline order and equilibrium cation distribution but they exhibit reduction of magnetization, magnetic order and ordering temperature compared to their bulk counterparts due to spin canting effect and finite size effect.

  10. Schwarz-Christoffel Conformal Mapping based Grid Generation for Global Oceanic Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shiming

    2015-04-01

    We propose new grid generation algorithms for global ocean general circulation models (OGCMs). Contrary to conventional, analytical forms based dipolar or tripolar grids, the new algorithm are based on Schwarz-Christoffel (SC) conformal mapping with prescribed boundary information. While dealing with the conventional grid design problem of pole relocation, it also addresses more advanced issues of computational efficiency and the new requirements on OGCM grids arisen from the recent trend of high-resolution and multi-scale modeling. The proposed grid generation algorithm could potentially achieve the alignment of grid lines to coastlines, enhanced spatial resolution in coastal regions, and easier computational load balance. Since the generated grids are still orthogonal curvilinear, they can be readily 10 utilized in existing Bryan-Cox-Semtner type ocean models. The proposed methodology can also be applied to the grid generation task for regional ocean modeling when complex land-ocean distribution is present.

  11. Bondi or not Bondi: the impact of resolution on accretion and drag force modelling for Supermassive Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, R. S.; Slyz, A.; Devriendt, J.

    2018-04-01

    Whilst in galaxy-size simulations, supermassive black holes (SMBH) are entirely handled by sub-grid algorithms, computational power now allows the accretion radius of such objects to be resolved in smaller scale simulations. In this paper, we investigate the impact of resolution on two commonly used SMBH sub-grid algorithms; the Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton (BHL) formula for accretion onto a point mass, and the related estimate of the drag force exerted onto a point mass by a gaseous medium. We find that when the accretion region around the black hole scales with resolution, and the BHL formula is evaluated using local mass-averaged quantities, the accretion algorithm smoothly transitions from the analytic BHL formula (at low resolution) to a supply limited accretion (SLA) scheme (at high resolution). However, when a similar procedure is employed to estimate the drag force it can lead to significant errors in its magnitude, and/or apply this force in the wrong direction in highly resolved simulations. At high Mach numbers and for small accretors, we also find evidence of the advective-acoustic instability operating in the adiabatic case, and of an instability developing around the wake's stagnation point in the quasi-isothermal case. Moreover, at very high resolution, and Mach numbers above M_∞ ≥ 3, the flow behind the accretion bow shock becomes entirely dominated by these instabilities. As a result, accretion rates onto the black hole drop by about an order of magnitude in the adiabatic case, compared to the analytic BHL formula.

  12. Characterization of Slosh Damping for Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid Internal Tank Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Douglas G.; Sansone, Marco D.; Eberhart, Chad J.; West, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Grid stiffened tank structures such as Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid are widely used in cryogenic tanks for providing stiffening to the tank while reducing mass, compared to tank walls of constant cross-section. If the structure is internal to the tank, it will positively affect the fluid dynamic behavior of the liquid propellant, in regard to fluid slosh damping. As NASA and commercial companies endeavor to explore the solar system, vehicles will by necessity become more mass efficient, and design margin will be reduced where possible. Therefore, if the damping characteristics of the Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid structure is understood, their positive damping effect can be taken into account in the systems design process. Historically, damping by internal structures has been characterized by rules of thumb and for Ortho-Grid, empirical design tools intended for slosh baffles of much larger cross-section have been used. There is little or no information available to characterize the slosh behavior of Iso-Grid internal structure. Therefore, to take advantage of these structures for their positive damping effects, there is much need for obtaining additional data and tools to characterize them. Recently, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center conducted both sub-scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of slosh damping for Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid tanks for cylindrical tanks containing water. Enhanced grid meshing techniques were applied to the geometrically detailed and complex Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid structures. The Loci-STREAM CFD program with the Volume of Fluid Method module for tracking and locating the water-air fluid interface was used to conduct the simulations. The CFD simulations were validated with the test data and new empirical models for predicting damping and frequency of Ortho-Grid and Iso-Grid structures were generated.

  13. GRID-BASED EXPLORATION OF COSMOLOGICAL PARAMETER SPACE WITH SNAKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, K.; Næss, S. K.; Eriksen, H. K., E-mail: kristin.mikkelsen@astro.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2013-11-10

    We present a fully parallelized grid-based parameter estimation algorithm for investigating multidimensional likelihoods called Snake, and apply it to cosmological parameter estimation. The basic idea is to map out the likelihood grid-cell by grid-cell according to decreasing likelihood, and stop when a certain threshold has been reached. This approach improves vastly on the 'curse of dimensionality' problem plaguing standard grid-based parameter estimation simply by disregarding grid cells with negligible likelihood. The main advantages of this method compared to standard Metropolis-Hastings Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods include (1) trivial extraction of arbitrary conditional distributions; (2) direct access to Bayesian evidences; (3) better sampling of the tails of the distribution; and (4) nearly perfect parallelization scaling. The main disadvantage is, as in the case of brute-force grid-based evaluation, a dependency on the number of parameters, N{sub par}. One of the main goals of the present paper is to determine how large N{sub par} can be, while still maintaining reasonable computational efficiency; we find that N{sub par} = 12 is well within the capabilities of the method. The performance of the code is tested by comparing cosmological parameters estimated using Snake and the WMAP-7 data with those obtained using CosmoMC, the current standard code in the field. We find fully consistent results, with similar computational expenses, but shorter wall time due to the perfect parallelization scheme.

  14. A high resolution WRF model for wind energy forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Claire Louise; Liu, Yubao

    2010-05-01

    The increasing penetration of wind energy into national electricity markets has increased the demand for accurate surface layer wind forecasts. There has recently been a focus on forecasting the wind at wind farm sites using both statistical models and numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. Recent advances in computing capacity and non-hydrostatic NWP models means that it is possible to nest mesoscale models down to Large Eddy Simulation (LES) scales over the spatial area of a typical wind farm. For example, the WRF model (Skamarock 2008) has been run at a resolution of 123 m over a wind farm site in complex terrain in Colorado (Liu et al. 2009). Although these modelling attempts indicate a great hope for applying such models for detailed wind forecasts over wind farms, one of the obvious challenges of running the model at this resolution is that while some boundary layer structures are expected to be modelled explicitly, boundary layer eddies into the inertial sub-range can only be partly captured. Therefore, the amount and nature of sub-grid-scale mixing that is required is uncertain. Analysis of Liu et al. (2009) modelling results in comparison to wind farm observations indicates that unrealistic wind speed fluctuations with a period of around 1 hour occasionally occurred during the two day modelling period. The problem was addressed by re-running the same modelling system with a) a modified diffusion constant and b) two-way nesting between the high resolution model and its parent domain. The model, which was run with horizontal grid spacing of 370 m, had dimensions of 505 grid points in the east-west direction and 490 points in the north-south direction. It received boundary conditions from a mesoscale model of resolution 1111 m. Both models had 37 levels in the vertical. The mesoscale model was run with a non-local-mixing planetary boundary layer scheme, while the 370 m model was run with no planetary boundary layer scheme. It was found that increasing the

  15. DESIGN OF DYADIC-INTEGER-COEFFICIENTS BASED BI-ORTHOGONAL WAVELET FILTERS FOR IMAGE SUPER-RESOLUTION USING SUB-PIXEL IMAGE REGISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.B. Chopade

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents image super-resolution scheme based on sub-pixel image registration by the design of a specific class of dyadic-integer-coefficient based wavelet filters derived from the construction of a half-band polynomial. First, the integer-coefficient based half-band polynomial is designed by the splitting approach. Next, this designed half-band polynomial is factorized and assigned specific number of vanishing moments and roots to obtain the dyadic-integer coefficients low-pass analysis and synthesis filters. The possibility of these dyadic-integer coefficients based wavelet filters is explored in the field of image super-resolution using sub-pixel image registration. The two-resolution frames are registered at a specific shift from one another to restore the resolution lost by CCD array of camera. The discrete wavelet transform (DWT obtained from the designed coefficients is applied on these two low-resolution images to obtain the high resolution image. The developed approach is validated by comparing the quality metrics with existing filter banks.

  16. Growth and characterization of Pb(Lu{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} ternary piezo-/ferroelectric crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); College of Physics and Energy, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350117 (China); He, Chao [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Yang, Xiaoming [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); College of Physics and Energy, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350117 (China); Li, Xiuzhi; Wang, Zujian [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Huang, Zhigao; Lai, Fachun [College of Physics and Energy, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350117 (China); Long, Xifa, E-mail: lxf@fjirsm.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Piezo-/ferroelectric crystals of Pb(Lu{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} ternary solid solution system with high Curie temperature, in the vicinity of morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) region, are grown by the top-seeded solution growth (TSSG) method for the first time. The compositions and structures of the crystals are analyzed, all the structures are found to have pure perovskite structure using X-ray diffraction analysis. Di-/piezo-/ferroelectric properties of the crystals are also characterized systematically. The Curie temperature T{sub c} and coercive field E{sub c}, increase gradually with increasing PbTiO{sub 3} content. In particular, the crystal with composition 0.34PLN-0.31PMN-0.35PT possesses excellent electric properties including the Curie temperature, the rhombohedral–tetragonal phase transition temperature, the piezoelectric coefficient, the remnant polarization and the coercive field, which are T{sub c} = 228 °C, T{sub RT} = 156 °C, d{sub 33} = 2092 pC N{sup −1}, Pr = 35.5 μC cm{sup −2} and E{sub c} = 8.1 kV cm{sup −1}, respectively, making it a promising material for transducers or detectors in a wide temperature range. - Highlights: • PLN-PMN-PT Piezo-/ferroelectric crystals are grown by TSSG method. • The Curie temperature and coercive field increase gradually with increasing PT. • The crystal of 0.34PLN-0.31PMN-0.35PT possesses excellent electric properties.

  17. High resolution krypton M/sub 4,5/ x-ray emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Hettrick, M.C.; Lindle, D.W.

    1987-10-01

    High resolution M/sub 4,5/ (3d → 4p) x-ray emission spectra from a krypton plasma were measured using a recently developed grazing-incidence reflection-grating monochromator/spectrometer with very high flux rates at extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray wave lengths. The nominal resolving power of the instrument, E/ΔE, is about 300 in this energy range (∼80 eV). Three dipole-allowed 3d → 4p emission lines were observed at 80.98 eV, 80.35 eV and 79.73 eV. A broad peak at about 82.3 eV is tentatively assigned to transitions resulting from Kr 2+ , and effects of excitation energy on M/sub 4,5/ x-ray emission were observed. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  18. Introducing Enabling Computational Tools to the Climate Sciences: Multi-Resolution Climate Modeling with Adaptive Cubed-Sphere Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonowski, Christiane [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-07-14

    The research investigates and advances strategies how to bridge the scale discrepancies between local, regional and global phenomena in climate models without the prohibitive computational costs of global cloud-resolving simulations. In particular, the research explores new frontiers in computational geoscience by introducing high-order Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) techniques into climate research. AMR and statically-adapted variable-resolution approaches represent an emerging trend for atmospheric models and are likely to become the new norm in future-generation weather and climate models. The research advances the understanding of multi-scale interactions in the climate system and showcases a pathway how to model these interactions effectively with advanced computational tools, like the Chombo AMR library developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The research is interdisciplinary and combines applied mathematics, scientific computing and the atmospheric sciences. In this research project, a hierarchy of high-order atmospheric models on cubed-sphere computational grids have been developed that serve as an algorithmic prototype for the finite-volume solution-adaptive Chombo-AMR approach. The foci of the investigations have lied on the characteristics of both static mesh adaptations and dynamically-adaptive grids that can capture flow fields of interest like tropical cyclones. Six research themes have been chosen. These are (1) the introduction of adaptive mesh refinement techniques into the climate sciences, (2) advanced algorithms for nonhydrostatic atmospheric dynamical cores, (3) an assessment of the interplay between resolved-scale dynamical motions and subgrid-scale physical parameterizations, (4) evaluation techniques for atmospheric model hierarchies, (5) the comparison of AMR refinement strategies and (6) tropical cyclone studies with a focus on multi-scale interactions and variable-resolution modeling. The results of this research project

  19. Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM) for the imaging of biological samples at sub-nanometer resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joens, Matthew S.; Huynh, Chuong; Kasuboski, James M.; Ferranti, David; Sigal, Yury J.; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Obst, Martin; Burkhardt, Claus J.; Curran, Kevin P.; Chalasani, Sreekanth H.; Stern, Lewis A.; Goetze, Bernhard; Fitzpatrick, James A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) has long been the standard in imaging the sub-micrometer surface ultrastructure of both hard and soft materials. In the case of biological samples, it has provided great insights into their physical architecture. However, three of the fundamental challenges in the SEM imaging of soft materials are that of limited imaging resolution at high magnification, charging caused by the insulating properties of most biological samples and the loss of subtle surface features by heavy metal coating. These challenges have recently been overcome with the development of the Helium Ion Microscope (HIM), which boasts advances in charge reduction, minimized sample damage, high surface contrast without the need for metal coating, increased depth of field, and 5 angstrom imaging resolution. We demonstrate the advantages of HIM for imaging biological surfaces as well as compare and contrast the effects of sample preparation techniques and their consequences on sub-nanometer ultrastructure.

  20. High Spatio-Temporal Resolution Bathymetry Estimation and Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsma, E. W. J.; Conley, D. C.; Davidson, M. A.; O'Hare, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, bathymetry estimates using video images have become increasingly accurate. With the cBathy code (Holman et al., 2013) fully operational, bathymetry results with 0.5 metres accuracy have been regularly obtained at Duck, USA. cBathy is based on observations of the dominant frequencies and wavelengths of surface wave motions and estimates the depth (and hence allows inference of bathymetry profiles) based on linear wave theory. Despite the good performance at Duck, large discrepancies were found related to tidal elevation and camera height (Bergsma et al., 2014) and on the camera boundaries. A tide dependent floating pixel and camera boundary solution have been proposed to overcome these issues (Bergsma et al., under review). The video-data collection is set estimate depths hourly on a grid with resolution in the order of 10x25 meters. Here, the application of the cBathy at Porthtowan in the South-West of England is presented. Hourly depth estimates are combined and analysed over a period of 1.5 years (2013-2014). In this work the focus is on the sub-tidal region, where the best cBathy results are achieved. The morphology of the sub-tidal bar is tracked with high spatio-temporal resolution on short and longer time scales. Furthermore, the impact of the storm and reset (sudden and large changes in bathymetry) of the sub-tidal area is clearly captured with the depth estimations. This application shows that the high spatio-temporal resolution of cBathy makes it a powerful tool for coastal research and coastal zone management.

  1. Landform classification using a sub-pixel spatial attraction model to increase spatial resolution of digital elevation model (DEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Mokarrama

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is preparing a landform classification by using digital elevation model (DEM which has a high spatial resolution. To reach the mentioned aim, a sub-pixel spatial attraction model was used as a novel method for preparing DEM with a high spatial resolution in the north of Darab, Fars province, Iran. The sub-pixel attraction models convert the pixel into sub-pixels based on the neighboring pixels fraction values, which can only be attracted by a central pixel. Based on this approach, a mere maximum of eight neighboring pixels can be selected for calculating of the attraction value. In the mentioned model, other pixels are supposed to be far from the central pixel to receive any attraction. In the present study by using a sub-pixel attraction model, the spatial resolution of a DEM was increased. The design of the algorithm is accomplished by using a DEM with a spatial resolution of 30 m (the Advanced Space borne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer; (ASTER and a 90 m (the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission; (SRTM. In the attraction model, scale factors of (S = 2, S = 3, and S = 4 with two neighboring methods of touching (T = 1 and quadrant (T = 2 are applied to the DEMs by using MATLAB software. The algorithm is evaluated by taking the best advantages of 487 sample points, which are measured by surveyors. The spatial attraction model with scale factor of (S = 2 gives better results compared to those scale factors which are greater than 2. Besides, the touching neighborhood method is turned to be more accurate than the quadrant method. In fact, dividing each pixel into more than two sub-pixels decreases the accuracy of the resulted DEM. On the other hand, in these cases DEM, is itself in charge of increasing the value of root-mean-square error (RMSE and shows that attraction models could not be used for S which is greater than 2. Thus considering results, the proposed model is highly capable of

  2. Fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy: Achieving sub-cycle time resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karatay, Durmus U.; Harrison, Jeffrey S.; Glaz, Micah S.; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Ginger, David S., E-mail: ginger@chem.washington.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The ability to measure microsecond- and nanosecond-scale local dynamics below the diffraction limit with widely available atomic force microscopy hardware would enable new scientific studies in fields ranging from biology to semiconductor physics. However, commercially available scanning-probe instruments typically offer the ability to measure dynamics only on time scales of milliseconds to seconds. Here, we describe in detail the implementation of fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy using an oscillating cantilever as a means to measure fast local dynamics following a perturbation to a sample. We show how the phase of the oscillating cantilever relative to the perturbation event is critical to achieving reliable sub-cycle time resolution. We explore how noise affects the achievable time resolution and present empirical guidelines for reducing noise and optimizing experimental parameters. Specifically, we show that reducing the noise on the cantilever by using photothermal excitation instead of piezoacoustic excitation further improves time resolution. We demonstrate the discrimination of signal rise times with time constants as fast as 10 ns, and simultaneous data acquisition and analysis for dramatically improved image acquisition times.

  3. Grid-free compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter

    2015-01-01

    sparsity on a continuous optimization variable. The DOA estimation problem with infinitely many unknowns, i.e., source locations and amplitudes, is solved over a few optimization variables with semidefinite programming. The grid-free CS reconstruction provides high-resolution imaging even with non...

  4. Camera Coverage Estimation Based on Multistage Grid Subdivision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meizhen Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Visual coverage is one of the most important quality indexes for depicting the usability of an individual camera or camera network. It is the basis for camera network deployment, placement, coverage-enhancement, planning, etc. Precision and efficiency are critical influences on applications, especially those involving several cameras. This paper proposes a new method to efficiently estimate superior camera coverage. First, the geographic area that is covered by the camera and its minimum bounding rectangle (MBR without considering obstacles is computed using the camera parameters. Second, the MBR is divided into grids using the initial grid size. The status of the four corners of each grid is estimated by a line of sight (LOS algorithm. If the camera, considering obstacles, covers a corner, the status is represented by 1, otherwise by 0. Consequently, the status of a grid can be represented by a code that is a combination of 0s or 1s. If the code is not homogeneous (not four 0s or four 1s, the grid will be divided into four sub-grids until the sub-grids are divided into a specific maximum level or their codes are homogeneous. Finally, after performing the process above, total camera coverage is estimated according to the size and status of all grids. Experimental results illustrate that the proposed method’s accuracy is determined by the method that divided the coverage area into the smallest grids at the maximum level, while its efficacy is closer to the method that divided the coverage area into the initial grids. It considers both efficiency and accuracy. The initial grid size and maximum level are two critical influences on the proposed method, which can be determined by weighing efficiency and accuracy.

  5. A novel ToF-SIMS operation mode for sub 100 nm lateral resolution: Application and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubicek, Markus; Holzlechner, Gerald; Opitz, Alexander K.; Larisegger, Silvia; Hutter, Herbert; Fleig, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    A novel operation mode for time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is described for a TOF.SIMS 5 instrument with a Bi-ion gun. It features sub 100 nm lateral resolution, adjustable primary ion currents and the possibility to measure with high lateral resolution as well as high mass resolution. The adjustment and performance of the novel operation mode are described and compared to established ToF-SIMS operation modes. Several examples of application featuring novel scientific results show the capabilities of the operation mode in terms of lateral resolution, accuracy of isotope analysis of oxygen, and combination of high lateral and mass resolution. The relationship between high lateral resolution and operation of SIMS in static mode is discussed.

  6. Diverse assemblies of the (4,4) grid layers exemplified in Zn(II)/Co(II) coordination polymers with dual linear ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guang-Zhen; Li, Xiao-Dong; Xin, Ling-Yun; Li, Xiao-Ling [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang, Henan 471022 (China); Wang, Li-Ya, E-mail: wlya@lynu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang, Henan 471022 (China); College of Chemistry and Pharmacy Engineering, Nanyang Normal University, Nanyang, Henan 473061 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Diverse (4,4) grid layers are exemplified in five two-dimensional coordination polymers with dual µ{sub 2}-bridged ligands, namely, ([Zn(cbaa)(bpp)]·H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1), [Zn{sub 2}(cbaa){sub 2}(bpy)]{sub n} (2), [Co{sub 2}(cbaa){sub 2}(bpp){sub 2}]{sub n} (3), [Co(cbaa)(bpp)]{sub n} (4), and [Co(bdaa)(bpp)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (5) (H{sub 2}cbaa=4-carboxybenzeneacetic acid, bpp=1,3-di(4-pyridyl)propane, bpy=4,4′-bipyridyl, and H{sub 2}bdaa=1,4-benzenediacrylic acid). For 1, two (4,4) grid layers with [ZnN{sub 2}O{sub 2}] tetrahedron as the node are held together by lattice water forming a H-bonding bilayer. Individual (4,4) grid layer in 2 is based on (Zn{sub 2}(OCO){sub 4}) paddlewheel unit as the node. Two (4,4) grid layers with (Co{sub 2}O(OCO){sub 2}) dimer as the node are covalently interconnected by organic ligands affording a thick bilayer of 3 with new framework topology. The different entanglements between two coincident (4,4) grid layers with [CoN{sub 2}O{sub 4}] octahedron as the node leads to two 2D→2D interpenetrated structures for 4 and 5. Furthermore, fluorescent properties of 1 and 2 as well as magnetic properties of 3 are investigated. - Graphical abstract: Diverse assemblies of the (4,4) grid layers with different network nodes forms five coordination polymers that are well characterized by IR, TGA, element analysis, fluorescent and magnetic measurement. - Highlights: • Diverse assemblies of the (4,4) grid layers with different structural units as the nodes. • A new topology type with the uninodal 6-connected net of (4{sup 12}.5{sup 2}.6) is found. • Intense fluorescence emissions with a rare blue-shift of 55 nm compared to free carboxylate ligand.

  7. Luminescence and luminescence quenching of Sr{sub 3}Lu{sub 2}(Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}){sub 2}:Ce{sup 3+} phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikalauskaite, I.; Raudonyte-Svirbutaviciene, E. [Institute of Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry and Geosciences, Vilnius University, Naugarduko 24, LT-03225 Vilnius (Lithuania); Linkeviciute, A. [State Research Institute, Centre for Physical Sciences and Technology, Sauletekio Avenue 3, LT-10257 Vilnius (Lithuania); Urbonas, M. [Institute of Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry and Geosciences, Vilnius University, Naugarduko 24, LT-03225 Vilnius (Lithuania); Katelnikovas, A., E-mail: arturas.katelnikovas@chf.vu.lt [Institute of Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry and Geosciences, Vilnius University, Naugarduko 24, LT-03225 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2017-04-15

    A series of near-UV to blue emitting Sr{sub 3}Lu{sub 2}(Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}){sub 2}:Ce{sup 3+} phosphors were prepared by a solid state reaction. The optical properties of synthesized phosphors were investigated as a function of Ce{sup 3+} concentration and temperature. These luminescent materials strongly absorb UV radiation shorter than 360 nm. The optimal Ce{sup 3+} concentration was 0.1% (external quantum efficiency ca. 45%). Temperature dependent measurements showed that Sr{sub 3}Lu{sub 2}(Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}){sub 2}:Ce{sup 3+} phosphors possess good thermal stability and loses only about 40% to 50% of initial intensity in the temperature range of 77–500 K depending on activator concentration.

  8. A framework for WRF to WRF-IBM grid nesting to enable multiscale simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersema, David John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lundquist, Katherine A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chow, Fotini Katapodes [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-09-29

    With advances in computational power, mesoscale models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are often pushed to higher resolutions. As the model’s horizontal resolution is refined, the maximum resolved terrain slope will increase. Because WRF uses a terrain-following coordinate, this increase in resolved terrain slopes introduces additional grid skewness. At high resolutions and over complex terrain, this grid skewness can introduce large numerical errors that require methods, such as the immersed boundary method, to keep the model accurate and stable. Our implementation of the immersed boundary method in the WRF model, WRF-IBM, has proven effective at microscale simulations over complex terrain. WRF-IBM uses a non-conforming grid that extends beneath the model’s terrain. Boundary conditions at the immersed boundary, the terrain, are enforced by introducing a body force term to the governing equations at points directly beneath the immersed boundary. Nesting between a WRF parent grid and a WRF-IBM child grid requires a new framework for initialization and forcing of the child WRF-IBM grid. This framework will enable concurrent multi-scale simulations within the WRF model, improving the accuracy of high-resolution simulations and enabling simulations across a wide range of scales.

  9. Development of a low cost integrated 15 kW A.C. solar tracking sub-array for grid connected PV power system applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, M.; West, R.; Fourer, G.; Whalen, W.; Van Loo, M.; Duran, G.

    1997-02-01

    Utility Power Group has achieved a significant reduction in the installed cost of grid-connected PV systems. The two part technical approach focused on 1) The utilization of a large area factory assembled PV panel, and 2) The integration and packaging of all sub-array power conversion and control functions within a single factory produced enclosure. Eight engineering prototype 15kW ac single axis solar tracking sub-arrays were designed, fabricated, and installed at the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's Hedge Substation site in 1996 and are being evaluated for performance and reliability. A number of design enhancements will be implemented in 1997 and demonstrated by the field deployment and operation of over twenty advanced sub-array PV power systems.

  10. Visualization of big SPH simulations via compressed octree grids

    KAUST Repository

    Reichl, Florian

    2013-10-01

    Interactive and high-quality visualization of spatially continuous 3D fields represented by scattered distributions of billions of particles is challenging. One common approach is to resample the quantities carried by the particles to a regular grid and to render the grid via volume ray-casting. In large-scale applications such as astrophysics, however, the required grid resolution can easily exceed 10K samples per spatial dimension, letting resampling approaches appear unfeasible. In this paper we demonstrate that even in these extreme cases such approaches perform surprisingly well, both in terms of memory requirement and rendering performance. We resample the particle data to a multiresolution multiblock grid, where the resolution of the blocks is dictated by the particle distribution. From this structure we build an octree grid, and we then compress each block in the hierarchy at no visual loss using wavelet-based compression. Since decompression can be performed on the GPU, it can be integrated effectively into GPU-based out-of-core volume ray-casting. We compare our approach to the perspective grid approach which resamples at run-time into a view-aligned grid. We demonstrate considerably faster rendering times at high quality, at only a moderate memory increase compared to the raw particle set. © 2013 IEEE.

  11. OpenMP parallelization of a gridded SWAT (SWATG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Hou, Jinliang; Cao, Yongpan; Gu, Juan; Huang, Chunlin

    2017-12-01

    Large-scale, long-term and high spatial resolution simulation is a common issue in environmental modeling. A Gridded Hydrologic Response Unit (HRU)-based Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWATG) that integrates grid modeling scheme with different spatial representations also presents such problems. The time-consuming problem affects applications of very high resolution large-scale watershed modeling. The OpenMP (Open Multi-Processing) parallel application interface is integrated with SWATG (called SWATGP) to accelerate grid modeling based on the HRU level. Such parallel implementation takes better advantage of the computational power of a shared memory computer system. We conducted two experiments at multiple temporal and spatial scales of hydrological modeling using SWATG and SWATGP on a high-end server. At 500-m resolution, SWATGP was found to be up to nine times faster than SWATG in modeling over a roughly 2000 km2 watershed with 1 CPU and a 15 thread configuration. The study results demonstrate that parallel models save considerable time relative to traditional sequential simulation runs. Parallel computations of environmental models are beneficial for model applications, especially at large spatial and temporal scales and at high resolutions. The proposed SWATGP model is thus a promising tool for large-scale and high-resolution water resources research and management in addition to offering data fusion and model coupling ability.

  12. Gridded National Inventory of U.S. Methane Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasakkers, Joannes D.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Sulprizio, Melissa P.; Turner, Alexander J.; Weitz, Melissa; Wirth, Tom; Hight, Cate; DeFigueiredo, Mark; Desai, Mausami; Schmeltz, Rachel; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present a gridded inventory of US anthropogenic methane emissions with 0.1 deg x 0.1 deg spatial resolution, monthly temporal resolution, and detailed scale dependent error characterization. The inventory is designed to be onsistent with the 2016 US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Inventory of US Greenhouse Gas Emissionsand Sinks (GHGI) for 2012. The EPA inventory is available only as national totals for different source types. We use a widerange of databases at the state, county, local, and point source level to disaggregate the inventory and allocate the spatial and temporal distribution of emissions for individual source types. Results show large differences with the EDGAR v4.2 global gridded inventory commonly used as a priori estimate in inversions of atmospheric methane observations. We derive grid-dependent error statistics for individual source types from comparison with the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) regional inventory for Northeast Texas. These error statistics are independently verified by comparison with the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) grid-resolved emission inventory. Our gridded, time-resolved inventory provides an improved basis for inversion of atmospheric methane observations to estimate US methane emissions and interpret the results in terms of the underlying processes.

  13. A Subdivision Method to Unify the Existing Latitude and Longitude Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengqi Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available As research on large regions of earth progresses, many geographical subdivision grids have been established for various spatial applications by different industries and disciplines. However, there is no clear relationship between the different grids and no consistent spatial reference grid that allows for information exchange and comprehensive application. Sharing and exchange of data across departments and applications are still at a bottleneck. It would represent a significant step forward to build a new grid model that is inclusive of or compatible with most of the existing geodesic grids and that could support consolidation and exchange within existing data services. This study designs a new geographical coordinate global subdividing grid with one dimension integer coding on a 2n tree (GeoSOT that has 2n coordinate subdivision characteristics (global longitude and latitude subdivision and can form integer hierarchies at degree, minute, and second levels. This grid has the multi-dimensional quadtree hierarchical characteristics of a digital earth grid, but also provides good consistency with applied grids, such as those used in mapping, meteorology, oceanography and national geographical, and three-dimensional digital earth grids. No other existing grid codes possess these characteristics.

  14. Modelin the Transport and Chemical Evolution of Onshore and Offshore Emissions and Their Impact on Local and Regional Air Quality Using a Variable-Grid-Resolution Air Quality Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adel Hanna

    2008-10-16

    The overall objective of this research project was to develop an innovative modeling technique to adequately model the offshore/onshore transport of pollutants. The variable-grid modeling approach that was developed alleviates many of the shortcomings of the traditionally used nested regular-grid modeling approach, in particular related to biases near boundaries and the excessive computational requirements when using nested grids. The Gulf of Mexico region contiguous to the Houston-Galveston area and southern Louisiana was chosen as a test bed for the variable-grid modeling approach. In addition to the onshore high pollution emissions from various sources in those areas, emissions from on-shore and off-shore oil and gas exploration and production are additional sources of air pollution. We identified case studies for which to perform meteorological and air quality model simulations. Our approach included developing and evaluating the meteorological, emissions, and chemistry-transport modeling components for the variable-grid applications, with special focus on the geographic areas where the finest grid resolution was used. We evaluated the performance of two atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) schemes, and identified the best-performing scheme for simulating mesoscale circulations for different grid resolutions. Use of a newly developed surface data assimilation scheme resulted in improved meteorological model simulations. We also successfully ingested satellite-derived sea surface temperatures (SSTs) into the meteorological model simulations, leading to further improvements in simulated wind, temperature, and moisture fields. These improved meteorological fields were important for variable-grid simulations, especially related to capturing the land-sea breeze circulations that are critical for modeling offshore/onshore transport of pollutants in the Gulf region. We developed SMOKE-VGR, the variable-grid version of the SMOKE emissions processing model, and tested and

  15. Sub-nanometer resolution XPS depth profiling: Sensing of atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szklarczyk, Marek, E-mail: szklarcz@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Shim-Pol, ul. Lubomirskiego 5, 05-080 Izabelin (Poland); Macak, Karol; Roberts, Adam J. [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Takahashi, Kazuhiro [Kratos XPS Section, Shimadzu Corp., 380-1 Horiyamashita, Hadano, Kanagawa 259-1304 (Japan); Hutton, Simon [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Głaszczka, Rafał [Shim-Pol, ul. Lubomirskiego 5, 05-080 Izabelin (Poland); Blomfield, Christopher [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Wharfside, Trafford Wharf Road, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Angle resolved photoelectron depth profiling of nano thin films. • Sensing atomic position in SAM films. • Detection of direction position of adsorbed molecules. - Abstract: The development of a method capable of distinguishing a single atom in a single molecule is important in many fields. The results reported herein demonstrate sub-nanometer resolution for angularly resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). This is made possible by the incorporation of a Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) model, which utilize density corrected electronic emission factors to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experimental results. In this paper we report on the comparison between experimental ARXPS results and reconstructed for both inorganic and organic thin film samples. Unexpected deviations between experimental data and calculated points are explained by the inaccuracy of the constants and standards used for the calculation, e.g. emission factors, scattering intensity and atomic density through the studied thickness. The positions of iron, nitrogen and fluorine atoms were determined in the molecules of the studied self-assembled monolayers. It has been shown that reconstruction of real spectroscopic data with 0.2 nm resolution is possible.

  16. Snow and Ice Products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Salomonson, Vincent V.; Riggs, George A.; Klein, Andrew G.

    2003-01-01

    Snow and sea ice products, derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, flown on the Terra and Aqua satellites, are or will be available through the National Snow and Ice Data Center Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The algorithms that produce the products are automated, thus providing a consistent global data set that is suitable for climate studies. The suite of MODIS snow products begins with a 500-m resolution, 2330-km swath snow-cover map that is then projected onto a sinusoidal grid to produce daily and 8-day composite tile products. The sequence proceeds to daily and 8-day composite climate-modeling grid (CMG) products at 0.05 resolution. A daily snow albedo product will be available in early 2003 as a beta test product. The sequence of sea ice products begins with a swath product at 1-km resolution that provides sea ice extent and ice-surface temperature (IST). The sea ice swath products are then mapped onto the Lambert azimuthal equal area or EASE-Grid projection to create a daily and 8-day composite sea ice tile product, also at 1 -km resolution. Climate-Modeling Grid (CMG) sea ice products in the EASE-Grid projection at 4-km resolution are planned for early 2003.

  17. A variable resolution nonhydrostatic global atmospheric semi-implicit semi-Lagrangian model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, George Antoine

    2000-10-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a variable-resolution finite difference adiabatic global nonhydrostatic semi-implicit semi-Lagrangian (SISL) model based on the fully compressible nonhydrostatic atmospheric equations. To achieve this goal, a three-dimensional variable resolution dynamical core was developed and tested. The main characteristics of the dynamical core can be summarized as follows: Spherical coordinates were used in a global domain. A hydrostatic/nonhydrostatic switch was incorporated into the dynamical equations to use the fully compressible atmospheric equations. A generalized horizontal variable resolution grid was developed and incorporated into the model. For a variable resolution grid, in contrast to a uniform resolution grid, the order of accuracy of finite difference approximations is formally lost but remains close to the order of accuracy associated with the uniform resolution grid provided the grid stretching is not too significant. The SISL numerical scheme was implemented for the fully compressible set of equations. In addition, the generalized minimum residual (GMRES) method with restart and preconditioner was used to solve the three-dimensional elliptic equation derived from the discretized system of equations. The three-dimensional momentum equation was integrated in vector-form to incorporate the metric terms in the calculations of the trajectories. Using global re-analysis data for a specific test case, the model was compared to similar SISL models previously developed. Reasonable agreement between the model and the other independently developed models was obtained. The Held-Suarez test for dynamical cores was used for a long integration and the model was successfully integrated for up to 1200 days. Idealized topography was used to test the variable resolution component of the model. Nonhydrostatic effects were simulated at grid spacings of 400 meters with idealized topography and uniform flow. Using a high-resolution

  18. LOW-MASS GALAXY FORMATION IN COSMOLOGICAL ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT SIMULATIONS: THE EFFECTS OF VARYING THE SUB-GRID PHYSICS PARAMETERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ColIn, Pedro; Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Valenzuela, Octavio; Ceverino, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We present numerical simulations aimed at exploring the effects of varying the sub-grid physics parameters on the evolution and the properties of the galaxy formed in a low-mass dark matter halo (∼7 x 10 10 h -1 M sun at redshift z = 0). The simulations are run within a cosmological setting with a nominal resolution of 218 pc comoving and are stopped at z = 0.43. For simulations that cannot resolve individual molecular clouds, we propose the criterion that the threshold density for star formation, n SF , should be chosen such that the column density of the star-forming cells equals the threshold value for molecule formation, N ∼ 10 21 cm -2 , or ∼8 M sun pc -2 . In all of our simulations, an extended old/intermediate-age stellar halo and a more compact younger stellar disk are formed, and in most cases, the halo's specific angular momentum is slightly larger than that of the galaxy, and sensitive to the SF/feedback parameters. We found that a non-negligible fraction of the halo stars are formed in situ in a spheroidal distribution. Changes in the sub-grid physics parameters affect significantly and in a complex way the evolution and properties of the galaxy: (1) lower threshold densities n SF produce larger stellar effective radii R e , less peaked circular velocity curves V c (R), and greater amounts of low-density and hot gas in the disk mid-plane; (2) when stellar feedback is modeled by temporarily switching off radiative cooling in the star-forming regions, R e increases (by a factor of ∼2 in our particular model), the circular velocity curve becomes flatter, and a complex multi-phase gaseous disk structure develops; (3) a more efficient local conversion of gas mass to stars, measured by a stellar particle mass distribution biased toward larger values, increases the strength of the feedback energy injection-driving outflows and inducing burstier SF histories; (4) if feedback is too strong, gas loss by galactic outflows-which are easier to produce in low

  19. THE HIGH-RESOLUTION EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM OF N{sub 2} BY ELECTRON IMPACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heays, A. N. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ajello, J. M.; Aguilar, A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Lewis, B. R.; Gibson, S. T., E-mail: heays@strw.leidenuniv.nl [Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-04-01

    We have analyzed high-resolution (FWHM = 0.2 Å) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV, 800-1350 Å) laboratory emission spectra of molecular nitrogen excited by an electron impact at 20 and 100 eV under (mostly) optically thin, single-scattering experimental conditions. A total of 491 emission features were observed from N{sub 2} electronic-vibrational transitions and atomic N I and N II multiplets and their emission cross sections were measured. Molecular emission was observed at vibrationally excited ground-state levels as high as v'' = 17, from the a {sup 1}Π {sub g} , b {sup 1}Π {sub u} , and b'{sup 1}Σ {sub u} {sup +} excited valence states and the Rydberg series c'{sub n} {sub +1} {sup 1}Σ {sub u} {sup +}, c{sub n} {sup 1}Π {sub u} , and o{sub n} {sup 1}Π {sub u} for n between 3 and 9. The frequently blended molecular emission bands were disentangled with the aid of a sophisticated and predictive quantum-mechanical model of excited states that includes the strong coupling between valence and Rydberg electronic states and the effects of predissociation. Improved model parameters describing electronic transition moments were obtained from the experiment and allowed for a reliable prediction of the vibrationally summed electronic emission cross section, including an extrapolation to unobserved emission bands and those that are optically thick in the experimental spectra. Vibrationally dependent electronic excitation functions were inferred from a comparison of emission features following 20 and 100 eV electron-impact collisional excitation. The electron-impact-induced fluorescence measurements are compared with Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph observations of emissions from Titan's upper atmosphere.

  20. Benefits Analysis of Smart Grid Projects. White paper, 2014-2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnay, Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Liu, Liping [China Southern Grid (China); Yu, JianCheng [State Grid of China (China); Zhang, Dong [State Grid of China (China); Mauzy, Josh [Southern California Edison, CA (United States); Shaffer, Brendan [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Dong, XuZhu [China Southern Grid (China); Agate, Will [Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Vitiello, Silvia [European Commission, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre; Karali, Nihan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Liu, Angela Xu [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); He, Gang [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Zhao, Li [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Zhu, Aimee Limingming [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Smart grids are rolling out internationally, with the United States (U.S.) nearing completion of a significant USD4-plus-billion federal program funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA-2009). The emergence of smart grids is widespread across developed countries. Multiple approaches to analyzing the benefits of smart grids have emerged. The goals of this white paper are to review these approaches and analyze examples of each to highlight their differences, advantages, and disadvantages. This work was conducted under the auspices of a joint U.S.-China research effort, the Climate Change Working Group (CCWG) Implementation Plan, Smart Grid. We present comparative benefits assessments (BAs) of smart grid demonstrations in the U.S. and China along with a BA of a pilot project in Europe. In the U.S., we assess projects at two sites: (1) the University of California, Irvine campus (UCI), which consists of two distinct demonstrations: Southern California Edison’s (SCE) Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration Project (ISGD) and the UCI campus itself; and (2) the Navy Yard (TNY) area in Philadelphia, which has been repurposed as a mixed commercial-industrial, and possibly residential, development. In China, we cover several smart-grid aspects of the Sino-Singapore Tianjin Eco-city (TEC) and the Shenzhen Bay Technology and Ecology City (B-TEC). In Europe, we look at a BA of a pilot smart grid project in the Malagrotta area west of Rome, Italy, contributed by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission. The Irvine sub-project BAs use the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Smart Grid Computational Tool (SGCT), which is built on methods developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The TEC sub-project BAs apply Smart Grid Multi-Criteria Analysis (SG-MCA) developed by the State Grid Corporation of China (SGCC) based on the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) with fuzzy logic. The B-TEC and TNY sub-project BAs are evaluated using new

  1. High Resolution Sub-MM Fiberoptic Endoscope Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1447-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Gary F. [Univ. of California, Livermore, CA (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, John [CML Fiberoptics, Inc., Auburn, NY (United States)

    2018-01-22

    At the time of the CRADA, LLNL needed to develop a sub-mm outer diameter fiberoptic endoscope with 25pm or better resolution at 3-lOmm working distance to support the Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP) and the Core Surveillance Program for DOE. The commercially available systems did not meet the image resolution requirements and development work was needed to reach three goals. We also needed to perform preliminary investigations into the production of such an endoscope with a steerable-articulated distal end. The goal of such an endoscope was to allow for a 45 degree inspection cone including the lens field of view.

  2. Analysis of aggregation and disaggregation effects for grid-based hydrological models and the development of improved precipitation disaggregation procedures for GCMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Wheater

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate representation of hydrological processes within atmospheric General Circulation Models (GCMs is important with respect to internal model dynamics (e.g. surface feedback effects on atmospheric fluxes, continental runoff production and to simulation of terrestrial impacts of climate change. However, at the scale of a GCM grid-square, several methodological problems arise. Spatial disaggregation of grid-square average climatological parameters is required in particular to produce appropriate point intensities from average precipitation. Conversely, aggregation of land surface heterogeneity is necessary for grid-scale or catchment scale application. The performance of grid-based hydrological models is evaluated for two large (104km2 UK catchments. Simple schemes, using sub-grid average of individual land use at 40 km scale and with no calibration, perform well at the annual time-scale and, with the addition of a (calibrated routing component, at the daily and monthly time-scale. Decoupling of hillslope and channel routing does not necessarily improve performance or identifiability. Scale dependence is investigated through application of distribution functions for rainfall and soil moisture at 100 km scale. The results depend on climate, but show interdependence of the representation of sub-grid rainfall and soil moisture distribution. Rainfall distribution is analysed directly using radar rainfall data from the UK and the Arkansas Red River, USA. Among other properties, the scale dependence of spatial coverage upon radar pixel resolution and GCM grid-scale, as well as the serial correlation of coverages are investigated. This leads to a revised methodology for GCM application, as a simple extension of current procedures. A new location-based approach using an image processing technique is then presented, to allow for the preservation of the spatial memory of the process.

  3. Fast Grid Frequency Support from Distributed Inverter-Based Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoke, Anderson F [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-05-04

    This presentation summarizes power hardware-in-the-loop testing performed to evaluate the ability of distributed inverter-coupled generation to support grid frequency on the fastest time scales. The research found that distributed PV inverters and other DERs can effectively support the grid on sub-second time scales.

  4. A study of spatial resolution in pollution exposure modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustafsson Susanna

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study is part of several ongoing projects concerning epidemiological research into the effects on health of exposure to air pollutants in the region of Scania, southern Sweden. The aim is to investigate the optimal spatial resolution, with respect to temporal resolution, for a pollutant database of NOx-values which will be used mainly for epidemiological studies with durations of days, weeks or longer periods. The fact that a pollutant database has a fixed spatial resolution makes the choice critical for the future use of the database. Results The results from the study showed that the accuracy between the modelled concentrations of the reference grid with high spatial resolution (100 m, denoted the fine grid, and the coarser grids (200, 400, 800 and 1600 meters improved with increasing spatial resolution. When the pollutant values were aggregated in time (from hours to days and weeks the disagreement between the fine grid and the coarser grids were significantly reduced. The results also illustrate a considerable difference in optimal spatial resolution depending on the characteristic of the study area (rural or urban areas. To estimate the accuracy of the modelled values comparison were made with measured NOx values. The mean difference between the modelled and the measured value were 0.6 μg/m3 and the standard deviation 5.9 μg/m3 for the daily difference. Conclusion The choice of spatial resolution should not considerably deteriorate the accuracy of the modelled NOx values. Considering the comparison between modelled and measured values we estimate that an error due to coarse resolution greater than 1 μg/m3 is inadvisable if a time resolution of one day is used. Based on the study of different spatial resolutions we conclude that for urban areas a spatial resolution of 200–400 m is suitable; and for rural areas the spatial resolution could be coarser (about 1600 m. This implies that we should develop a pollutant

  5. Fuel sub-assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolly, R.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel sub-assembly for a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor is described in which the bundle of fuel pins are braced apart by a series of spaced grids. The grids at the lower end are capable of yielding, thus allowing pins swollen by irradiation to be withdrawn with a reduced risk of damage. (U.K.)

  6. Sub-GHz-resolution C-band Nyquist-filtering interleaver on a high-index-contrast photonic integrated circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Leimeng; Zhu, Chen; Corcoran, Bill; Burla, Maurizio; Roeloffzen, Chris G H; Leinse, Arne; Schröder, Jochen; Lowery, Arthur J

    2016-03-21

    Modern optical communications rely on high-resolution, high-bandwidth filtering to maximize the data-carrying capacity of fiber-optic networks. Such filtering typically requires high-speed, power-hungry digital processes in the electrical domain. Passive optical filters currently provide high bandwidths with low power consumption, but at the expense of resolution. Here, we present a passive filter chip that functions as an optical Nyquist-filtering interleaver featuring sub-GHz resolution and a near-rectangular passband with 8% roll-off. This performance is highly promising for high-spectral-efficiency Nyquist wavelength division multiplexed (N-WDM) optical super-channels. The chip provides a simple two-ring-resonator-assisted Mach-Zehnder interferometer, which has a sub-cm2 footprint owing to the high-index-contrast Si3N4/SiO2 waveguide, while manifests low wavelength-dependency enabling C-band (> 4 THz) coverage with more than 160 effective free spectral ranges of 25 GHz. This device is anticipated to be a critical building block for spectrally-efficient, chip-scale transceivers and ROADMs for N-WDM super-channels in next-generation optical communication networks.

  7. OGC and Grid Interoperability in enviroGRIDS Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgan, Dorian; Rodila, Denisa; Bacu, Victor; Giuliani, Gregory; Ray, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    the OGC Web service protocols, the advantages offered by the Grid technology - such as providing a secure interoperability between the distributed geospatial resource -and the issues introduced by the integration of distributed geospatial data in a secure environment: data and service discovery, management, access and computation. enviroGRIDS project proposes a new architecture which allows a flexible and scalable approach for integrating the geospatial domain represented by the OGC Web services with the Grid domain represented by the gLite middleware. The parallelism offered by the Grid technology is discussed and explored at the data level, management level and computation level. The analysis is carried out for OGC Web service interoperability in general but specific details are emphasized for Web Map Service (WMS), Web Feature Service (WFS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), Web Processing Service (WPS) and Catalog Service for Web (CSW). Issues regarding the mapping and the interoperability between the OGC and the Grid standards and protocols are analyzed as they are the base in solving the communication problems between the two environments: grid and geospatial. The presetation mainly highlights how the Grid environment and Grid applications capabilities can be extended and utilized in geospatial interoperability. Interoperability between geospatial and Grid infrastructures provides features such as the specific geospatial complex functionality and the high power computation and security of the Grid, high spatial model resolution and geographical area covering, flexible combination and interoperability of the geographical models. According with the Service Oriented Architecture concepts and requirements of interoperability between geospatial and Grid infrastructures each of the main functionality is visible from enviroGRIDS Portal and consequently, by the end user applications such as Decision Maker/Citizen oriented Applications. The enviroGRIDS portal is the single way

  8. A novel ToF-SIMS operation mode for sub 100 nm lateral resolution: Application and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicek, Markus; Holzlechner, Gerald; Opitz, Alexander K; Larisegger, Silvia; Hutter, Herbert; Fleig, Jürgen

    2014-01-15

    A novel operation mode for time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is described for a TOF.SIMS 5 instrument with a Bi-ion gun. It features sub 100 nm lateral resolution, adjustable primary ion currents and the possibility to measure with high lateral resolution as well as high mass resolution. The adjustment and performance of the novel operation mode are described and compared to established ToF-SIMS operation modes. Several examples of application featuring novel scientific results show the capabilities of the operation mode in terms of lateral resolution, accuracy of isotope analysis of oxygen, and combination of high lateral and mass resolution. The relationship between high lateral resolution and operation of SIMS in static mode is discussed.

  9. A SUB-GRID VOLUME-OF-FLUIDS (VOF) MODEL FOR MIXING IN RESOLVED SCALE AND IN UNRESOLVED SCALE COMPUTATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vold, Erik L.; Scannapieco, Tony J.

    2007-01-01

    A sub-grid mix model based on a volume-of-fluids (VOF) representation is described for computational simulations of the transient mixing between reactive fluids, in which the atomically mixed components enter into the reactivity. The multi-fluid model allows each fluid species to have independent values for density, energy, pressure and temperature, as well as independent velocities and volume fractions. Fluid volume fractions are further divided into mix components to represent their 'mixedness' for more accurate prediction of reactivity. Time dependent conversion from unmixed volume fractions (denoted cf) to atomically mixed (af) fluids by diffusive processes is represented in resolved scale simulations with the volume fractions (cf, af mix). In unresolved scale simulations, the transition to atomically mixed materials begins with a conversion from unmixed material to a sub-grid volume fraction (pf). This fraction represents the unresolved small scales in the fluids, heterogeneously mixed by turbulent or multi-phase mixing processes, and this fraction then proceeds in a second step to the atomically mixed fraction by diffusion (cf, pf, af mix). Species velocities are evaluated with a species drift flux, ρ i u di = ρ i (u i -u), used to describe the fluid mixing sources in several closure options. A simple example of mixing fluids during 'interfacial deceleration mixing with a small amount of diffusion illustrates the generation of atomically mixed fluids in two cases, for resolved scale simulations and for unresolved scale simulations. Application to reactive mixing, including Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), is planned for future work.

  10. Microstructural studies of La{sub 10.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} (LCMO) films on different (110) substrates deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tse, Y Y; Jones, I P [School of Engineering, Department of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Chakalov, R I; Muirhead, C M; Palai, R [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Huhtinen, H [Department of Physics, University of Turku, Turku (Finland)], E-mail: y.y.tse@bham.ac.uk

    2008-08-15

    La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} (LCMO) films grown on (110) surfaces of various (pseudo-) cubic substrates, SrTiO{sub 3} (STO), LaAlO{sub 3} (LAO) and La{sub 0.3}Sr{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.5}Ta{sub 0.35}O{sub 3} (LSAT), were studied by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). (110) LSAT substrate and LCMO film have the smallest lattice mismatch. (110) LAO substrate induces compressive strain while (110) STO induces tensile strain in the LCMO film. In all cases, the (010){sub 0} plane (long axis) of LCMO is parallel to the substrate surface. In the case of LSAT, the [001]{sub 0} is parallel to [011] LSAT while the films on the other 2 substrates have [100]{sub 0}// to the [011] substrates. Films grown on STO and LAO show an easy magnetisation when the applied magnetic field is in plane along the long-axis of the LCMO. In the case of LSAT, there is no in-plane anisotropy. The films on STO and LAO have twins as the dominant defects. The film on LSAT has less twining. High resolution TEM shows that LCMO on (110) LSAT (the least lattice mismatch) possesses a perfect interface with no misfit dislocations in the area of examination. The LCMO films on (110) LAO and (110) STO have nearly perfect interfaces with atomic sharpness but with misfit dislocations. The different in-plane crystal directions and strain distributions in the films may account for the different magnetisation behaviours of the LCMO films on the different (011) substrates.

  11. One-pot synthesis of porphyrin functionalized γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites as peroxidase mimics for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and glucose detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qingyun, E-mail: qyliu@sdust.edu.cn; Zhang, Leyou; Li, Hui; Jia, Qingyan; Jiang, Yanling; Yang, Yanting; Zhu, Renren

    2015-10-01

    Meso-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)-porphyrin-functionalized γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles (H{sub 2}TCPP-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were successfully prepared by one-pot method under hydrothermal conditions and were found to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. The H{sub 2}TCPP-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites can catalytically oxidize peroxidase substrate 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to produce a blue color reaction, which can be easily observed by the naked eye. Furthermore, kinetic studies indicate that the H{sub 2}TCPP-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites have an even higher affinity to TMB than that of the natural enzyme, horseradish peroxidase (HRP). On the basis of the high activity, the reaction provides a simple, sensitive and selective method for colorimetric detection of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} over a range of 10–100 μM with a minimum detection limit of 1.73 μM. Moreover, H{sub 2}TCPP-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/glucose oxidase (GOx)/TMB system provides a novel colorimetric sensor for glucose and shows good response toward glucose detection over a range of 5–25 μM with a minimum detection limit of 2.54 μM. The results indicated that it is a simple, cheap, convenient, highly selective, sensitive and easy handling colorimetric assay. Results of a fluorescent probe suggest that the catalase-mimic activity of the H{sub 2}TCPP-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites effectively catalyze the decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} into H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: 5,10,15,20-Tetrakis(4-carboxyl phenyl)-porphyrin (H{sub 2}TCPP)-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites were demonstrated to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and showed a higher catalytic activity, compared to that of γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles alone. - Highlights: • Porphyrin-functionalized γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were prepared by one-pot method. • The porphyrin-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites were found to possess

  12. An Off-Grid Turbo Channel Estimation Algorithm for Millimeter Wave Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyi Han

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The bandwidth shortage has motivated the exploration of the millimeter wave (mmWave frequency spectrum for future communication networks. To compensate for the severe propagation attenuation in the mmWave band, massive antenna arrays can be adopted at both the transmitter and receiver to provide large array gains via directional beamforming. To achieve such array gains, channel estimation (CE with high resolution and low latency is of great importance for mmWave communications. However, classic super-resolution subspace CE methods such as multiple signal classification (MUSIC and estimation of signal parameters via rotation invariant technique (ESPRIT cannot be applied here due to RF chain constraints. In this paper, an enhanced CE algorithm is developed for the off-grid problem when quantizing the angles of mmWave channel in the spatial domain where off-grid problem refers to the scenario that angles do not lie on the quantization grids with high probability, and it results in power leakage and severe reduction of the CE performance. A new model is first proposed to formulate the off-grid problem. The new model divides the continuously-distributed angle into a quantized discrete grid part, referred to as the integral grid angle, and an offset part, termed fractional off-grid angle. Accordingly, an iterative off-grid turbo CE (IOTCE algorithm is proposed to renew and upgrade the CE between the integral grid part and the fractional off-grid part under the Turbo principle. By fully exploiting the sparse structure of mmWave channels, the integral grid part is estimated by a soft-decoding based compressed sensing (CS method called improved turbo compressed channel sensing (ITCCS. It iteratively updates the soft information between the linear minimum mean square error (LMMSE estimator and the sparsity combiner. Monte Carlo simulations are presented to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, and the results show that it enhances the angle

  13. Simulation of synoptic and sub-synoptic phenomena over East Africa and Arabian Peninsula for current and future climate using a high resolution AGCM

    KAUST Repository

    Raj, Jerry

    2015-04-01

    Climate regimes of East Africa and Arabia are complex and are poorly understood. East Africa has large-scale tropical controls like major convergence zones and air streams. The region is in the proximity of two monsoons, north-east and south-west, and the humid and thermally unstable Congo air stream. The domain comprises regions with one, two, and three rainfall maxima, and the rainfall pattern over this region has high spatial variability. To explore the synoptic and sub-synoptic phenomena that drive the climate of the region we conducted climate simulations using a high resolution Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM), GFDL\\'s High Resolution Atmospheric Model (HiRAM). Historic simulations (1975-2004) and future projections (2007-2050), with both RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 pathways, were performed according to CORDEX standard. The sea surface temperature (SST) was prescribed from the 2°x2.5° latitude-longitude resolution GFDL Earth System Model runs of IPCC AR5, as bottom boundary condition over the ocean. Our simulations were conducted at a horizontal grid spacing of 25 km, which is an ample resolution for regional climate simulation. In comparison with the regional models, global HiRAM has the advantage of accounting for two-way interaction between regional and global scale processes. Our initial results show that HiRAM simulations for historic period well reproduce the regional climate in East Africa and the Arabian Peninsula with their complex interplay of regional and global processes. Our future projections indicate warming and increased precipitation over the Ethiopian highlands and the Greater Horn of Africa. We found significant regional differences between RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 projections, e.g., west coast of the Arabian Peninsula, show anomalies of opposite signs in these two simulations.

  14. A unidirectional approach for d-dimensional finite element methods for higher order on sparse grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bungartz, H.J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    In the last years, sparse grids have turned out to be a very interesting approach for the efficient iterative numerical solution of elliptic boundary value problems. In comparison to standard (full grid) discretization schemes, the number of grid points can be reduced significantly from O(N{sup d}) to O(N(log{sub 2}(N)){sup d-1}) in the d-dimensional case, whereas the accuracy of the approximation to the finite element solution is only slightly deteriorated: For piecewise d-linear basis functions, e. g., an accuracy of the order O(N{sup - 2}(log{sub 2}(N)){sup d-1}) with respect to the L{sub 2}-norm and of the order O(N{sup -1}) with respect to the energy norm has been shown. Furthermore, regular sparse grids can be extended in a very simple and natural manner to adaptive ones, which makes the hierarchical sparse grid concept applicable to problems that require adaptive grid refinement, too. An approach is presented for the Laplacian on a uinit domain in this paper.

  15. Five hundred years of gridded high-resolution precipitation reconstructions over Europe and the connection to large-scale circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauling, Andreas [University of Bern, Institute of Geography, Bern (Switzerland); Luterbacher, Juerg; Wanner, Heinz [University of Bern, Institute of Geography, Bern (Switzerland); National Center of Competence in Research (NCCR) in Climate, Bern (Switzerland); Casty, Carlo [University of Bern, Climate and Environmental Physics Institute, Bern (Switzerland)

    2006-03-15

    We present seasonal precipitation reconstructions for European land areas (30 W to 40 E/30-71 N; given on a 0.5 x 0.5 resolved grid) covering the period 1500-1900 together with gridded reanalysis from 1901 to 2000 (Mitchell and Jones 2005). Principal component regression techniques were applied to develop this dataset. A large variety of long instrumental precipitation series, precipitation indices based on documentary evidence and natural proxies (tree-ring chronologies, ice cores, corals and a speleothem) that are sensitive to precipitation signals were used as predictors. Transfer functions were derived over the 1901-1983 calibration period and applied to 1500-1900 in order to reconstruct the large-scale precipitation fields over Europe. The performance (quality estimation based on unresolved variance within the calibration period) of the reconstructions varies over centuries, seasons and space. Highest reconstructive skill was found for winter over central Europe and the Iberian Peninsula. Precipitation variability over the last half millennium reveals both large interannual and decadal fluctuations. Applying running correlations, we found major non-stationarities in the relation between large-scale circulation and regional precipitation. For several periods during the last 500 years, we identified key atmospheric modes for southern Spain/northern Morocco and central Europe as representations of two precipitation regimes. Using scaled composite analysis, we show that precipitation extremes over central Europe and southern Spain are linked to distinct pressure patterns. Due to its high spatial and temporal resolution, this dataset allows detailed studies of regional precipitation variability for all seasons, impact studies on different time and space scales, comparisons with high-resolution climate models as well as analysis of connections with regional temperature reconstructions. (orig.)

  16. Full-Coverage High-Resolution Daily PM(sub 2.5) Estimation using MAIAC AOD in the Yangtze River Delta of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qingyang; Wang, Yujie; Chang, Howard H.; Meng, Xia; Geng, Guannan; Lyapustin, Alexei Ivanovich; Liu, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been used to assess population exposure to fine particulate matter (PM (sub 2.5)). The emerging high-resolution satellite aerosol product, Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction(MAIAC), provides a valuable opportunity to characterize local-scale PM(sub 2.5) at 1-km resolution. However, non-random missing AOD due to cloud snow cover or high surface reflectance makes this task challenging. Previous studies filled the data gap by spatially interpolating neighboring PM(sub 2.5) measurements or predictions. This strategy ignored the effect of cloud cover on aerosol loadings and has been shown to exhibit poor performance when monitoring stations are sparse or when there is seasonal large-scale missngness. Using the Yangtze River Delta of China as an example, we present a Multiple Imputation (MI) method that combines the MAIAC high-resolution satellite retrievals with chemical transport model (CTM) simulations to fill missing AOD. A two-stage statistical model driven by gap-filled AOD, meteorology and land use information was then fitted to estimate daily ground PM(sub 2.5) concentrations in 2013 and 2014 at 1 km resolution with complete coverage in space and time. The daily MI models have an average R(exp 2) of 0.77, with an inter-quartile range of 0.71 to 0.82 across days. The overall Ml model 10-fold cross-validation R(exp 2) (root mean square error) were 0.81 (25 gm(exp 3)) and 0.73 (18 gm(exp 3)) for year 2013 and 2014, respectively. Predictions with only observational AOD or only imputed AOD showed similar accuracy.Comparing with previous gap-filling methods, our MI method presented in this study performed bette rwith higher coverage, higher accuracy, and the ability to fill missing PM(sub 2.5) predictions without ground PM(sub 2.5) measurements. This method can provide reliable PM(sub 2.5)predictions with complete coverage that can reduce biasin exposure assessment in air pollution and health studies.

  17. Proposal for grid computing for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faridah Mohamad Idris; Wan Ahmad Tajuddin Wan Abdullah; Zainol Abidin Ibrahim; Zukhaimira Zolkapli

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: The use of computer clusters for computational sciences including computational physics is vital as it provides computing power to crunch big numbers at a faster rate. In compute intensive applications that requires high resolution such as Monte Carlo simulation, the use of computer clusters in a grid form that supplies computational power to any nodes within the grid that needs computing power, has now become a necessity. In this paper, we described how the clusters running on a specific application could use resources within the grid, to run the applications to speed up the computing process. (author)

  18. Preparation and characterization of La{sub 0,60S}r{sub 0},{sub 40}Co{sub 0},{sub 20}Fe{sub 0},{sub 80}O{sub 3-{delta}} powders for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (ITSOFC) cathode; Preparacao e carcacterizacao de particulados de La{sub 0,60S}r{sub 0},{sub 40}Co{sub 0},{sub 20}Fe{sub 0},{sub 80}O{sub 3-{delta}} para catodos de IT-SOFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, R A; Chiba, R; Bonturim, E; Andreoli, M; Seo, E S.M., [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CCTM/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Materiais. Lab. de Insumos e Componentes

    2009-07-01

    Nowadays a material that is studied as cathode in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (ITSOFC) is the mixing oxide La{sub 0,60S}r{sub 0},{sub 40}Co{sub 0},{sub 20}Fe{sub 0},{sub 80}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF), that possess pseudo-perovskite structure. The objective of this work is to present the physical, chemical and microstructural of LSCF powders characteristics, prepared by the citrate technique. The main analyses utilized were: X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, laser scattering granulometry, and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the elimination of organic precursors is important for desired structure formation and that amount of this phase depends on cobalt content. Moreover, the chemical composition is next to stoichiometric calculated (x=0.40 and y=0.80) and the average sizes of particles are adjusted for ceramic suspensions preparation, contributing for the wet powder spraying step conformation. (author)

  19. Hierarchical Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@MoS{sub 2}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} magnetic nanocomposites: Enhanced and stable photocatalytic performance for water purification under visible light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Na [Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Environment, Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130102 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Li, Haiyan; Xu, Xingjian [Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Environment, Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130102 (China); Yu, Hongwen, E-mail: yuhw@neigae.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Environment, Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130102 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • The FM/A-6% possesses a large specific surface area: 76.56 m{sup 2}/g. • The FM/A-6% displays high photocatalytic stability. • The FM/A-6% can be collected easily from the water by magnetic field. - Abstract: Novel hierarchical Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@MoS{sub 2}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} magnetic nanophotocatalyst with remarkable photocatalytic capability were prepared by simply depositing the Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} onto the surface of crumpled Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@MoS{sub 2} nanosphere. The nanocomposites were characterized by XRD, TEM, HRTEM, XPS, BET, and UV–vis DRS. The outcome of the photocatalytic experiments demonstrated that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@MoS{sub 2}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with 6 wt% content of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} (FM/A-6%) showed the highest photocatalytic activity upon the degradation Congo red (CR) and Rhodamine B (RhB) under both visible light and simulated sunlight irradiation. In addition, FM/A-6% possessed larger specific surface area (76.56 m{sup 2}/g) and excellent optical property. The possible Z-scheme charge carriers transfer mechanism for the enhanced photocatalytic properties of the FM/A-6% was also discussed. The Z-scheme charge carriers transfer mechanism established between MoS{sub 2} and Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} facilitate the charge separation efficiency. Moreover, FM/A-6% can be separated and collected easily by external magnetic field and maintain high activity after five times photoreaction cycles. Given the remarkable photocatalytic performance and high stability of FM/A-6% nanocomposite, it is looking forward to exhibit great potential for applications in water purification.

  20. A Wireless Monitoring Sub-nA Resolution Test Platform for Nanostructure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Chi Woong; Byun, Young Tae; Lee, Taikjin; Woo, Deok Ha; Lee, Seok; Jhon, Young Min

    2013-01-01

    We have constructed a wireless monitoring test platform with a sub-nA resolution signal amplification/processing circuit (SAPC) and a wireless communication network to test the real-time remote monitoring of the signals from carbon nanotube (CNT) sensors. The operation characteristics of the CNT sensors can also be measured by the ISD-VSD curve with the SAPC. The SAPC signals are transmitted to a personal computer by Bluetooth communication and the signals from the computer are transmitted to smart phones by Wi-Fi communication, in such a way that the signals from the sensors can be remotely monitored through a web browser. Successful remote monitoring of signals from a CNT sensor was achieved with the wireless monitoring test platform for detection of 0.15% methanol vapor with 0.5 nA resolution and 7 Hz sampling rate. PMID:23783735

  1. A Wireless Monitoring Sub-nA Resolution Test Platform for Nanostructure Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Min Jhon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We have constructed a wireless monitoring test platform with a sub-nA resolution signal amplification/processing circuit (SAPC and a wireless communication network to test the real-time remote monitoring of the signals from carbon nanotube (CNT sensors. The operation characteristics of the CNT sensors can also be measured by the ISD-VSD curve with the SAPC. The SAPC signals are transmitted to a personal computer by Bluetooth communication and the signals from the computer are transmitted to smart phones by Wi-Fi communication, in such a way that the signals from the sensors can be remotely monitored through a web browser. Successful remote monitoring of signals from a CNT sensor was achieved with the wireless monitoring test platform for detection of 0.15% methanol vapor with 0.5 nA resolution and 7 Hz sampling rate.

  2. Spatial resolution limits for the isotropic-3D PET detector X’tal cube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp; Tashima, Hideaki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Inadama, Naoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2013-11-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a popular imaging method in metabolism, neuroscience, and molecular imaging. For dedicated human brain and small animal PET scanners, high spatial resolution is needed to visualize small objects. To improve the spatial resolution, we are developing the X’tal cube, which is our new PET detector to achieve isotropic 3D positioning detectability. We have shown that the X’tal cube can achieve 1 mm{sup 3} uniform crystal identification performance with the Anger-type calculation even at the block edges. We plan to develop the X’tal cube with even smaller 3D grids for sub-millimeter crystal identification. In this work, we investigate spatial resolution of a PET scanner based on the X’tal cube using Monte Carlo simulations for predicting resolution performance in smaller 3D grids. For spatial resolution evaluation, a point source emitting 511 keV photons was simulated by GATE for all physical processes involved in emission and interaction of positrons. We simulated two types of animal PET scanners. The first PET scanner had a detector ring 14.6 cm in diameter composed of 18 detectors. The second PET scanner had a detector ring 7.8 cm in diameter composed of 12 detectors. After the GATE simulations, we converted the interacting 3D position information to digitalized positions for realistic segmented crystals. We simulated several X’tal cubes with cubic crystals from (0.5 mm){sup 3} to (2 mm){sup 3} in size. Also, for evaluating the effect of DOI resolution, we simulated several X’tal cubes with crystal thickness from (0.5 mm){sup 3} to (9 mm){sup 3}. We showed that sub-millimeter spatial resolution was possible using cubic crystals smaller than (1.0 mm){sup 3} even with the assumed physical processes. Also, the weighted average spatial resolutions of both PET scanners with (0.5 mm){sup 3} cubic crystals were 0.53 mm (14.6 cm ring diameter) and 0.48 mm (7.8 cm ring diameter). For the 7.8 cm ring diameter, spatial

  3. Low Complexity Parameter Estimation For Off-the-Grid Targets

    KAUST Repository

    Jardak, Seifallah

    2015-10-05

    In multiple-input multiple-output radar, to estimate the reflection coefficient, spatial location, and Doppler shift of a target, a derived cost function is usually evaluated and optimized over a grid of points. The performance of such algorithms is directly affected by the size of the grid: increasing the number of points will enhance the resolution of the algorithm but exponentially increase its complexity. In this work, to estimate the parameters of a target, a reduced complexity super resolution algorithm is proposed. For off-the-grid targets, it uses a low order two dimensional fast Fourier transform to determine a suboptimal solution and then an iterative algorithm to jointly estimate the spatial location and Doppler shift. Simulation results show that the mean square estimation error of the proposed estimators achieve the Cram\\'er-Rao lower bound. © 2015 IEEE.

  4. Investigations of the R<sub>5sub>(SixGe>1-xsub>)>4sub> Intermetallic Compounds by X-Ray Resonant Magnetic Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhi [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-08-18

    The XRMS experiment on the Gd<sub>5sub>Ge>4sub> system has shown that, below the Neel temperature, T<sub>N> = 127 K, the magnetic unit cells is the same as the chemical unit cell. From azimuth scans and the Q dependence of the magnetic scattering, all three Gd sites in the structure were determined to be in the same magnetic space group Pnma. The magnetic moments are aligned along the c-axis and the c-components of the magnetic moments at the three different sites are equal. The ferromagnetic slabs are stacked antiferromagnetically along the b-direction. They found an unusual order parameter curve in Gd<sub>5sub>Ge>4sub>. A spin-reorientation transition is a possibility in Gd<sub>5sub>Ge>4sub>, which is similar to the Tb<sub>5sub>Ge>4sub> case. Tb<sub>5sub>Ge>4sub> possesses the same Sm<sub>5sub>Ge>4sub>-type crystallographic structure and the same magnetic space group as Gd<sub>5sub>Ge>4sub> does. The difference in magnetic structure is that Tb<sub>5sub>Ge>4sub> has a canted one but Gd<sub>5sub>Ge>4sub> has nearly a collinear one in the low temperature antiferromagnetic phase. The competition between the magneto-crystalline anisotropy and the nearest-neighbor magnetic exchange interactions may allow a 3-dimensional canted antiferromagnetic structure in Tb<sub>5sub>Ge>4sub>. The spin-reorientation transition in both Gd<sub>5sub>Ge>4sub> and Tb<sub>5sub>Ge>4sub> may arise from the competition between the magnetic anisotropy from the spin-orbit coupling of the conduction electrons and the dipolar interactions anisotropy.

  5. EMAG2: Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (2-arc-minute resolution)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — EMAG2 is a global Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid compiled from satellite, ship, and airborne magnetic measurements. It is a significant update of our previous candidate...

  6. A Storm Surge and Inundation Model of the Back River Watershed at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftis, Jon Derek; Wang, Harry V.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    This report on a Virginia Institute for Marine Science project demonstrates that the sub-grid modeling technology (now as part of Chesapeake Bay Inundation Prediction System, CIPS) can incorporate high-resolution Lidar measurements provided by NASA Langley Research Center into the sub-grid model framework to resolve detailed topographic features for use as a hydrological transport model for run-off simulations within NASA Langley and Langley Air Force Base. The rainfall over land accumulates in the ditches/channels resolved via the model sub-grid was tested to simulate the run-off induced by heavy precipitation. Possessing both the capabilities for storm surge and run-off simulations, the CIPS model was then applied to simulate real storm events starting with Hurricane Isabel in 2003. It will be shown that the model can generate highly accurate on-land inundation maps as demonstrated by excellent comparison of the Langley tidal gauge time series data (CAPABLE.larc.nasa.gov) and spatial patterns of real storm wrack line measurements with the model results simulated during Hurricanes Isabel (2003), Irene (2011), and a 2009 Nor'easter. With confidence built upon the model's performance, sea level rise scenarios from the ICCP (International Climate Change Partnership) were also included in the model scenario runs to simulate future inundation cases.

  7. The seasonal cycle of mixed layer dynamics and phytoplankton biomass in the Sub-Antarctic Zone: A high-resolution glider experiment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Swart, S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available -resolution glider data (3 hourly, 2 km horizontal resolution), from~6 months of sampling (spring through summer) in the Sub-Antarctic Zone, is used to assess 1) the different forcing mechanisms driving variability in upper ocean physics and 2) how thesemay...

  8. Gridded Ionization Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manero Amoros, F.

    1962-01-01

    In the present paper the working principles of a gridded ionization chamber are given, and all the different factors that determine its resolution power are analyzed in detail. One of these devices, built in the Physics Division of the JEN and designed specially for use in measurements of alpha spectroscopy, is described. finally the main applications, in which the chamber can be used, are shown. (Author) 17 refs

  9. Apatite layer growth on glassy Zr{sub 48}Cu{sub 36}Al{sub 8}Ag{sub 8} sputtered titanium for potential biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanka Rajan, S.; Karthika, M. [Electrochemical Materials Science Division, CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630003 (India); Bendavid, Avi [Plasma Processing & Deposition Team, CSIRO Manufacturing Flagship, LindField, 2070, Sydney (Australia); Subramanian, B., E-mail: subramanianb3@gmail.com [Plasma Processing & Deposition Team, CSIRO Manufacturing Flagship, LindField, 2070, Sydney (Australia); Electrochemical Materials Science Division, CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630003 (India)

    2016-04-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Metallic biomaterials are surface modified by Zr based TFMGs. • A bone-like apatite layer was grown on a Ni-free Zr-based TFMG in vitro. • Apatite layer growth confirmed by XRD and XPS analysis indicates its bioactivity. • Electrochemical response of the TFMGs in SBF possesses good corrosion resistance. - Abstract: The bioactivity of magnetron sputtered thin film metallic glasses (TFMGs) of Zr{sub 48}Cu{sub 36}Al{sub 8}Ag{sub 8} (at.%) on titanium substrates was tested for bio implant applications. The structural and elemental compositions of TFMGs were analyzed by XRD, XPS and EDAX. X-ray diffraction analysis displayed a broad hump around the incident angle of 30–50°, suggesting that the coatings possess a glassy structure. An in situ crystal growth of hydroxyapatite was observed by soaking the sputtered specimen in simulated body fluid (SBF). The nucleation and growth of a calcium phosphate (Ca–P) bone-like hydroxyapatite on Zr{sub 48}Cu{sub 36}Al{sub 8}Ag{sub 8} (at.%) TFMG from SBF was investigated by using XRD, AFM and SEM. The presence of calcium and phosphorus elements was confirmed by EDAX and XPS. In vitro electrochemical corrosion studies indicated that the Zr-based TFMG coating sustain in the stimulated body-fluid (SBF), exhibiting superior corrosion resistance with a lower corrosion penetration rate and electrochemical stability than the bare crystalline titanium substrate.

  10. Growth of highly oriented La{sub 0.84}Sr{sub 0.16}MnO{sub 3} perovskite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, B.W.; Brosha, E.L.; Garzon, F.H.; Raistrick, I.D.; Houlton, R.J.; Hawley, M.E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1995-10-01

    We have grown thin films of La{sub 0.84}Sr{sub 0.16}MnO{sub 3} on SrTiO{sub 3} (100), MgO (100), CeO{sub 2} (100)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and (100) oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates by using a 90{degree} off-axis RF magnetron sputtering deposition. X-ray diffraction analysis and ion beam channeling experiments reveal that the deposited films grow epitaxially on SrTiO{sub 3}, biaxially textured on MgO, and highly textured on YSZ. Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals that the thin films possess extremely smooth surfaces. {copyright} 1995 Materials Research Society

  11. On the use of Schwarz-Christoffel conformal mappings to the grid generation for global ocean models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S.; Wang, B.; Liu, J.

    2015-10-01

    In this article we propose two grid generation methods for global ocean general circulation models. Contrary to conventional dipolar or tripolar grids, the proposed methods are based on Schwarz-Christoffel conformal mappings that map areas with user-prescribed, irregular boundaries to those with regular boundaries (i.e., disks, slits, etc.). The first method aims at improving existing dipolar grids. Compared with existing grids, the sample grid achieves a better trade-off between the enlargement of the latitudinal-longitudinal portion and the overall smooth grid cell size transition. The second method addresses more modern and advanced grid design requirements arising from high-resolution and multi-scale ocean modeling. The generated grids could potentially achieve the alignment of grid lines to the large-scale coastlines, enhanced spatial resolution in coastal regions, and easier computational load balance. Since the grids are orthogonal curvilinear, they can be easily utilized by the majority of ocean general circulation models that are based on finite difference and require grid orthogonality. The proposed grid generation algorithms can also be applied to the grid generation for regional ocean modeling where complex land-sea distribution is present.

  12. The eGo grid model: An open source approach towards a model of German high and extra-high voltage power grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Ulf Philipp; Wienholt, Lukas; Kleinhans, David; Cussmann, Ilka; Bunke, Wolf-Dieter; Pleßmann, Guido; Wendiggensen, Jochen

    2018-02-01

    There are several power grid modelling approaches suitable for simulations in the field of power grid planning. The restrictive policies of grid operators, regulators and research institutes concerning their original data and models lead to an increased interest in open source approaches of grid models based on open data. By including all voltage levels between 60 kV (high voltage) and 380kV (extra high voltage), we dissolve the common distinction between transmission and distribution grid in energy system models and utilize a single, integrated model instead. An open data set for primarily Germany, which can be used for non-linear, linear and linear-optimal power flow methods, was developed. This data set consists of an electrically parameterised grid topology as well as allocated generation and demand characteristics for present and future scenarios at high spatial and temporal resolution. The usability of the grid model was demonstrated by the performance of exemplary power flow optimizations. Based on a marginal cost driven power plant dispatch, being subject to grid restrictions, congested power lines were identified. Continuous validation of the model is nescessary in order to reliably model storage and grid expansion in progressing research.

  13. Stimulated-emission pumping enabling sub-diffraction-limited spatial resolution in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleff, C.; Gross, P.; Fallnich, C.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Kruse, K.; Beeker, W.P.; Lee, Christopher James; Boller, Klaus J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of stimulated emission pumping to achieve sub-diffraction-limited spatial resolution in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. A pair of control light fields is used to prepopulate the Raman state involved in the CARS process prior to the CARS

  14. Recent development of the Multi-Grid detector for large area neutron scattering instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerard, Bruno [ILL-ESS-LiU collaboration, CRISP project, Institut Laue Langevin - ILL, Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-01

    equipment. Prototypes of different configurations and sizes have been developed and tested. A demonstrator, with a sensitive area of 0.8 m x 3 m, has been studied during the CRISP European project; it contains 1024 grids, and a surface of isotopically enriched B{sub 4}C film close to 80 m{sup 2}. Its size represented a challenge in terms of fabrication and mounting of the detection elements. Another challenge was to make the gas chamber mechanically compatible with operation in a vacuum TOF chamber. Optimal working condition of this detector was achieved by flushing Ar-CO{sub 2} at a pressure of 50 mbar, and by applying 400 Volts on the anodes. This unusual gas pressure allows to greatly simplifying the mechanics of the gas vessel in vacuum. The detection efficiency has been measured with high precision for different film thicknesses. 52% has been measured at 2.5 Angstrom, in good agreement with the MC simulation. A high position resolution has been achieved by centre of gravity measurement of the TOT (Time-Over-Threshold) signals between neighbouring grids. These results, as well as other detection parameters, including gamma sensitivity and spatial uniformity, will be presented. (author)

  15. Scaling between reanalyses and high-resolution land-surface modelling in mountainous areas - enabling better application and testing of reanalyses in heterogeneous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, S.; Fiddes, J.

    2013-12-01

    In mountainous topography, the difference in scale between atmospheric reanalyses (typically tens of kilometres) and relevant processes and phenomena near the Earth surface, such as permafrost or snow cover (meters to tens of meters) is most obvious. This contrast of scales is one of the major obstacles to using reanalysis data for the simulation of surface phenomena and to confronting reanalyses with independent observation. At the example of modelling permafrost in mountain areas (but simple to generalise to other phenomena and heterogeneous environments), we present and test methods against measurements for (A) scaling atmospheric data from the reanalysis to the ground level and (B) smart sampling of the heterogeneous landscape in order to set up a lumped model simulation that represents the high-resolution land surface. TopoSCALE (Part A, see http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/gmdd-6-3381-2013) is a scheme, which scales coarse-grid climate fields to fine-grid topography using pressure level data. In addition, it applies necessary topographic corrections e.g. those variables required for computation of radiation fields. This provides the necessary driving fields to the LSM. Tested against independent ground data, this scheme has been shown to improve the scaling and distribution of meteorological parameters in complex terrain, as compared to conventional methods, e.g. lapse rate based approaches. TopoSUB (Part B, see http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/gmd-5-1245-2012) is a surface pre-processor designed to sample a fine-grid domain (defined by a digital elevation model) along important topographical (or other) dimensions through a clustering scheme. This allows constructing a lumped model representing the main sources of fine-grid variability and applying a 1D LSM efficiently over large areas. Results can processed to derive (i) summary statistics at coarse-scale re-analysis grid resolution, (ii) high-resolution data fields spatialized to e.g., the fine-scale digital elevation

  16. Para-hydrogen raser delivers sub-millihertz resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suefke, Martin; Lehmkuhl, Sören; Liebisch, Alexander; Blümich, Bernhard; Appelt, Stephan

    2017-06-01

    The precision of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) is limited by the signal-to-noise ratio, the measurement time Tm and the linewidth Δν = 1/(πT2). Overcoming the T 2 limit is possible if the nuclear spins of a molecule emit continuous radio waves. Lasers and masers are self-organized systems which emit coherent radiation in the optical and micro-wave regime. Both are based on creating a population inversion of specific energy states. Here we show continuous oscillations of proton spins of organic molecules in the radiofrequency regime (raser). We achieve this by coupling a population inversion created through signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) to a high-quality-factor resonator. For the case of 15N labelled molecules, we observe multi-mode raser activity, which reports different spin quantum states. The corresponding 1H-15N J-coupled NMR spectra exhibit unprecedented sub-millihertz resolution and can be explained assuming two-spin ordered quantum states. Our findings demonstrate a substantial improvement in the frequency resolution of NMR.

  17. Enhanced rate capability and cycling stability of core/shell structured CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/onion-like C nanocapsules for lithium-ion battery anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xianguo, E-mail: liuxianguohugh@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan 243002 (China); Wu, Niandu; Cui, Caiyun; Zhou, Pingping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan 243002 (China); Sun, Yuping [Center for Engineering Practice and Innovation Education, Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan 243032 (China)

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • Core/shell-structured CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/onion-like carbon nanocapsules have been prepared. • CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/C nanocapsules possess good reversibility even when the current density is up to 4C. • CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/C nanocapsules obtain a discharge capacity of 914.2 mA h g{sup −1} after 500 cycles at 0.1C. - Abstract: In this work, core/shell structured CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/onion-like C nanocapsules have been successfully fabricated by the arc discharge method and air-annealing process and confirmed by X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The core/shell structure effectively withstands the volume change of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles during the cycling process. Moreover, the onion-like C shells reduce the charge transfer resistance and facilitate electron and ion transport throughout the electrode. As a result, CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/onion-like C nanocapsules exhibit excellent performance as a potential anode material for lithium ion batteries and deliver a reversible capacity of 914.2 mA h g{sup −1} at 0.1C, even after 500 cycles and recover its original capacity when the rate returns from 4C to the initial 0.1C after 120 cycles.

  18. Global Multi-Resolution Topography (GMRT) Synthesis - Recent Updates and Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrini, V. L.; Morton, J. J.; Celnick, M.; McLain, K.; Nitsche, F. O.; Carbotte, S. M.; O'hara, S. H.

    2017-12-01

    The Global Multi-Resolution Topography (GMRT, http://gmrt.marine-geo.org) synthesis is a multi-resolution compilation of elevation data that is maintained in Mercator, South Polar, and North Polar Projections. GMRT consists of four independently curated elevation components: (1) quality controlled multibeam data ( 100m res.), (2) contributed high-resolution gridded bathymetric data (0.5-200 m res.), (3) ocean basemap data ( 500 m res.), and (4) variable resolution land elevation data (to 10-30 m res. in places). Each component is managed and updated as new content becomes available, with two scheduled releases each year. The ocean basemap content for GMRT includes the International Bathymetric Chart of the Arctic Ocean (IBCAO), the International Bathymetric Chart of the Southern Ocean (IBCSO), and the GEBCO 2014. Most curatorial effort for GMRT is focused on the swath bathymetry component, with an emphasis on data from the US Academic Research Fleet. As of July 2017, GMRT includes data processed and curated by the GMRT Team from 974 research cruises, covering over 29 million square kilometers ( 8%) of the seafloor at 100m resolution. The curated swath bathymetry data from GMRT is routinely contributed to international data synthesis efforts including GEBCO and IBCSO. Additional curatorial effort is associated with gridded data contributions from the international community and ensures that these data are well blended in the synthesis. Significant new additions to the gridded data component this year include the recently released data from the search for MH370 (Geoscience Australia) as well as a large high-resolution grid from the Gulf of Mexico derived from 3D seismic data (US Bureau of Ocean Energy Management). Recent developments in functionality include the deployment of a new Polar GMRT MapTool which enables users to export custom grids and map images in polar projection for their selected area of interest at the resolution of their choosing. Available for both

  19. Vertical grid of retrieved atmospheric profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceccherini, Simone; Carli, Bruno; Raspollini, Piera

    2016-01-01

    The choice of the vertical grid of atmospheric profiles retrieved from remote sensing observations is discussed considering the two cases of profiles used to represent the results of individual measurements and of profiles used for subsequent data fusion applications. An ozone measurement of the MIPAS instrument is used to assess, for different vertical grids, the quality of the retrieved profiles in terms of profile values, retrieval errors, vertical resolutions and number of degrees of freedom. In the case of individual retrievals no evident advantage is obtained with the use of a grid finer than the one with a reduced number of grid points, which are optimized according to the information content of the observations. Nevertheless, this instrument dependent vertical grid, which seems to extract all the available information, provides very poor results when used for data fusion applications. A loss of about a quarter of the degrees of freedom is observed when the data fusion is made using the instrument dependent vertical grid relative to the data fusion made using a vertical grid optimized for the data fusion product. This result is explained by the analysis of the eigenvalues of the Fisher information matrix and leads to the conclusion that different vertical grids must be adopted when data fusion is the expected application. - Highlights: • Data fusion application is taken into account for the choice of the vertical grid. • The study is performed using ozone profiles retrieved from MIPAS measurements. • A very fine vertical grid is not needed for the analysis of a single instrument. • The instrument dependent vertical grid is not the best choice for data fusion. • A data fusion dependent vertical grid must be used for profiles that will be fused.

  20. A review on high-resolution CMOS delay lines: towards sub-picosecond jitter performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrazzaq, Bilal I; Abdul Halin, Izhal; Kawahito, Shoji; Sidek, Roslina M; Shafie, Suhaidi; Yunus, Nurul Amziah Md

    2016-01-01

    A review on CMOS delay lines with a focus on the most frequently used techniques for high-resolution delay step is presented. The primary types, specifications, delay circuits, and operating principles are presented. The delay circuits reported in this paper are used for delaying digital inputs and clock signals. The most common analog and digitally-controlled delay elements topologies are presented, focusing on the main delay-tuning strategies. IC variables, namely, process, supply voltage, temperature, and noise sources that affect delay resolution through timing jitter are discussed. The design specifications of these delay elements are also discussed and compared for the common delay line circuits. As a result, the main findings of this paper are highlighting and discussing the followings: the most efficient high-resolution delay line techniques, the trade-off challenge found between CMOS delay lines designed using either analog or digitally-controlled delay elements, the trade-off challenge between delay resolution and delay range and the proposed solutions for this challenge, and how CMOS technology scaling can affect the performance of CMOS delay lines. Moreover, the current trends and efforts used in order to generate output delayed signal with low jitter in the sub-picosecond range are presented.

  1. Sensitivity of U.S. summer precipitation to model resolution and convective parameterizations across gray zone resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Leung, L. Ruby; Zhao, Chun; Hagos, Samson

    2017-03-01

    Simulating summer precipitation is a significant challenge for climate models that rely on cumulus parameterizations to represent moist convection processes. Motivated by recent advances in computing that support very high-resolution modeling, this study aims to systematically evaluate the effects of model resolution and convective parameterizations across the gray zone resolutions. Simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting model were conducted at grid spacings of 36 km, 12 km, and 4 km for two summers over the conterminous U.S. The convection-permitting simulations at 4 km grid spacing are most skillful in reproducing the observed precipitation spatial distributions and diurnal variability. Notable differences are found between simulations with the traditional Kain-Fritsch (KF) and the scale-aware Grell-Freitas (GF) convection schemes, with the latter more skillful in capturing the nocturnal timing in the Great Plains and North American monsoon regions. The GF scheme also simulates a smoother transition from convective to large-scale precipitation as resolution increases, resulting in reduced sensitivity to model resolution compared to the KF scheme. Nonhydrostatic dynamics has a positive impact on precipitation over complex terrain even at 12 km and 36 km grid spacings. With nudging of the winds toward observations, we show that the conspicuous warm biases in the Southern Great Plains are related to precipitation biases induced by large-scale circulation biases, which are insensitive to model resolution. Overall, notable improvements in simulating summer rainfall and its diurnal variability through convection-permitting modeling and scale-aware parameterizations suggest promising venues for improving climate simulations of water cycle processes.

  2. Grist: Grid-based Data Mining for Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, J. C.; Katz, D. S.; Miller, C. D.; Walia, H.; Williams, R. D.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Graham, M. J.; Mahabal, A. A.; Babu, G. J.; vanden Berk, D. E.; Nichol, R.

    2005-12-01

    The Grist project is developing a grid-technology based system as a research environment for astronomy with massive and complex datasets. This knowledge extraction system will consist of a library of distributed grid services controlled by a workflow system, compliant with standards emerging from the grid computing, web services, and virtual observatory communities. This new technology is being used to find high redshift quasars, study peculiar variable objects, search for transients in real time, and fit SDSS QSO spectra to measure black hole masses. Grist services are also a component of the ``hyperatlas'' project to serve high-resolution multi-wavelength imagery over the Internet. In support of these science and outreach objectives, the Grist framework will provide the enabling fabric to tie together distributed grid services in the areas of data access, federation, mining, subsetting, source extraction, image mosaicking, statistics, and visualization.

  3. Grist : grid-based data mining for astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Joseph C.; Katz, Daniel S.; Miller, Craig D.; Walia, Harshpreet; Williams, Roy; Djorgovski, S. George; Graham, Matthew J.; Mahabal, Ashish; Babu, Jogesh; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; hide

    2004-01-01

    The Grist project is developing a grid-technology based system as a research environment for astronomy with massive and complex datasets. This knowledge extraction system will consist of a library of distributed grid services controlled by a workflow system, compliant with standards emerging from the grid computing, web services, and virtual observatory communities. This new technology is being used to find high redshift quasars, study peculiar variable objects, search for transients in real time, and fit SDSS QSO spectra to measure black hole masses. Grist services are also a component of the 'hyperatlas' project to serve high-resolution multi-wavelength imagery over the Internet. In support of these science and outreach objectives, the Grist framework will provide the enabling fabric to tie together distributed grid services in the areas of data access, federation, mining, subsetting, source extraction, image mosaicking, statistics, and visualization.

  4. Toward a Unified Representation of Atmospheric Convection in Variable-Resolution Climate Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walko, Robert [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States)

    2016-11-07

    The purpose of this project was to improve the representation of convection in atmospheric weather and climate models that employ computational grids with spatially-variable resolution. Specifically, our work targeted models whose grids are fine enough over selected regions that convection is resolved explicitly, while over other regions the grid is coarser and convection is represented as a subgrid-scale process. The working criterion for a successful scheme for representing convection over this range of grid resolution was that identical convective environments must produce very similar convective responses (i.e., the same precipitation amount, rate, and timing, and the same modification of the atmospheric profile) regardless of grid scale. The need for such a convective scheme has increased in recent years as more global weather and climate models have adopted variable resolution meshes that are often extended into the range of resolving convection in selected locations.

  5. Final Progress Report: Collaborative Research: Decadal-to-Centennial Climate & Climate Change Studies with Enhanced Variable and Uniform Resolution GCMs Using Advanced Numerical Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, M; Cote, J

    2009-06-05

    The joint U.S-Canadian project has been devoted to: (a) decadal climate studies using developed state-of-the-art GCMs (General Circulation Models) with enhanced variable and uniform resolution; (b) development and implementation of advanced numerical techniques; (c) research in parallel computing and associated numerical methods; (d) atmospheric chemistry experiments related to climate issues; (e) validation of regional climate modeling strategies for nested- and stretched-grid models. The variable-resolution stretched-grid (SG) GCMs produce accurate and cost-efficient regional climate simulations with mesoscale resolution. The advantage of the stretched grid approach is that it allows us to preserve the high quality of both global and regional circulations while providing consistent interactions between global and regional scales and phenomena. The major accomplishment for the project has been the successful international SGMIP-1 and SGMIP-2 (Stretched-Grid Model Intercomparison Project, phase-1 and phase-2) based on this research developments and activities. The SGMIP provides unique high-resolution regional and global multi-model ensembles beneficial for regional climate modeling and broader modeling community. The U.S SGMIP simulations have been produced using SciDAC ORNL supercomputers. Collaborations with other international participants M. Deque (Meteo-France) and J. McGregor (CSIRO, Australia) and their centers and groups have been beneficial for the strong joint effort, especially for the SGMIP activities. The WMO/WCRP/WGNE endorsed the SGMIP activities in 2004-2008. This project reflects a trend in the modeling and broader communities to move towards regional and sub-regional assessments and applications important for the U.S. and Canadian public, business and policy decision makers, as well as for international collaborations on regional, and especially climate related issues.

  6. A priori tests of combustion models based on a CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} Triple Flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dombard, J.; Naud, B.; Jimenez Sanchez, C.

    2008-07-01

    This document reproduces the final project of Jerome Dombard, presented on June 25, 2008, for the obtention of the Master degree MIMSE (Master Ingenierie Mathematique, Statistique et Economique) of Bordeaux University (Universite Bordeaux 1). We make an a priori study of FPI/FGM-type turbulent combustion models using a 2D DNS of a triple flame. A reduced chemical scheme of 16 species and 12 reactions is used (ARM1, proposed by J.-Y. Chen at Berkeley University). The fuel (CH4/H2 mixture) and oxidizer (air) correspond to the inlet composition of the Sydney bluff-body stabilised flame experiments (flames HM1-3). First, we compute 1D laminar premixed flames. The purpose of those calculations is twofold: 1. check the differences between different computer programs and different treatments of molecular diffusion, and 2. calibrate the 2D-DNS of the laminar triple flame (mainly decide on the grid resolution). Then, the solution of the 2D laminar triple flame is used to test a priori FPI/FGM tables. Finally, preliminary considerations on sub-grid scale modelling in the context of Large Eddy Simulation are made. (Author) 14 refs.

  7. Controllable solvothermal synthesis and photocatalytic properties of complex (oxy)fluorides K{sub 2}TiOF{sub 4}, K{sub 3}TiOF{sub 5}, K{sub 7}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 4}F{sub 7} and K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng Jie [Division of Nanomaterials and Nanochemistry, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Tang Kaibin, E-mail: kbtang@ustc.edu.cn [Division of Nanomaterials and Nanochemistry, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Cheng Wei; Wang Junli; Nie Yanxiang; Yang Qing [Division of Nanomaterials and Nanochemistry, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2009-11-15

    Complex (oxy)fluorides K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}, K{sub 2}TiOF{sub 4}, K{sub 3}TiOF{sub 5} and K{sub 7}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 4}F{sub 7} have been successfully synthesized for the first time through a controllable solvothermal route involving different solvents, for example, methanol, methanol-H{sub 2}O and methanol-H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, N{sub 2} surface area adsorption, scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectra and X-ray fluorescence. The influences of reaction conditions such as the ratio of methanol to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or methanol to H{sub 2}O, reaction temperature on the phase, crystallizability and purity of the (oxy)fluorides products were discussed in detail. Meanwhile, the photocatalytic behaviors of the as-prepared K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}, K{sub 2}TiOF{sub 4}, K{sub 3}TiOF{sub 5} and K{sub 7}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 4}F{sub 7} were evaluated by degradation of rhodamine B molecules, and the results showed that all of the products possessed photocatalytic activities in the order of K{sub 2}TiOF{sub 4} > K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6} > K{sub 7}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 4}F{sub 7} > K{sub 3}TiOF{sub 5} at room temperature under the UV light.

  8. The Storm Surge and Sub-Grid Inundation Modeling in New York City during Hurricane Sandy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry V. Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hurricane Sandy inflicted heavy damage in New York City and the New Jersey coast as the second costliest storm in history. A large-scale, unstructured grid storm tide model, Semi-implicit Eulerian Lagrangian Finite Element (SELFE, was used to hindcast water level variation during Hurricane Sandy in the mid-Atlantic portion of the U.S. East Coast. The model was forced by eight tidal constituents at the model’s open boundary, 1500 km away from the coast, and the wind and pressure fields from atmospheric model Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS provided by Weatherflow Inc. The comparisons of the modeled storm tide with the NOAA gauge stations from Montauk, NY, Long Island Sound, encompassing New York Harbor, Atlantic City, NJ, to Duck, NC, were in good agreement, with an overall root mean square error and relative error in the order of 15–20 cm and 5%–7%, respectively. Furthermore, using large-scale model outputs as the boundary conditions, a separate sub-grid model that incorporates LIDAR data for the major portion of the New York City was also set up to investigate the detailed inundation process. The model results compared favorably with USGS’ Hurricane Sandy Mapper database in terms of its timing, local inundation area, and the depth of the flooding water. The street-level inundation with water bypassing the city building was created and the maximum extent of horizontal inundation was calculated, which was within 30 m of the data-derived estimate by USGS.

  9. The catalytic activity of Ag{sub 2}S-montmorillonites as peroxidase mimetic toward colorimetric detection of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qingyun, E-mail: qyliu@sdust.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266510 (China); Jiang, Yanling; Zhang, Leyou; Zhou, Xinpei [School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266510 (China); Lv, Xintian [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Ding, Yanyuan; Sun, Lifang; Chen, Pengpeng [School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266510 (China); Yin, Hailiang [Academy of Science & Technology, China University of Petroleum, Dongying 257061 (China)

    2016-08-01

    Nanocomposites based on silver sulfide (Ag{sub 2}S) and Ca-montmorillonite (Ca{sup 2+}-MMT) were synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method. The nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR). The as-prepared Ag{sub 2}S-MMT nanocomposites were firstly demonstrated to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and could rapidly catalytically oxidize the substrate 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to produce a blue product which can be seen by the naked eye in only one minute. The experimental results revealed that the Ag{sub 2}S-MMT nanocomposites exhibit higher thermal durance. Based on the TMB–H{sub 2}O{sub 2} catalyzed color reaction, the Ag{sub 2}S-MMT nanocomposites were exploited as a new type of biosensor for detection and estimation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} through a simple, cheap and selective colorimetric method. - Highlights: • Ag{sub 2}S – montmorillonites (MMT) was synthesized by a facile one step method. • The as-prepared Ag{sub 2}S-MMT nanocomposites firstly demonstrate to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. • Ag{sub 2}S-MMT nanocomposites showed highly catalytic activity. • Ag{sub 2}S-MMT could rapidly catalytically oxidize substrates TMB in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in 1 min. • The catalytic mechanism is from the generation of hydroxyl radical (·OH) decomposed from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  10. Development of a gridded meteorological dataset over Java island, Indonesia 1985-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanto; Livneh, Ben; Rajagopalan, Balaji

    2017-05-23

    We describe a gridded daily meteorology dataset consisting of precipitation, minimum and maximum temperature over Java Island, Indonesia at 0.125°×0.125° (~14 km) resolution spanning 30 years from 1985-2014. Importantly, this data set represents a marked improvement from existing gridded data sets over Java with higher spatial resolution, derived exclusively from ground-based observations unlike existing satellite or reanalysis-based products. Gap-infilling and gridding were performed via the Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) interpolation method (radius, r, of 25 km and power of influence, α, of 3 as optimal parameters) restricted to only those stations including at least 3,650 days (~10 years) of valid data. We employed MSWEP and CHIRPS rainfall products in the cross-validation. It shows that the gridded rainfall presented here produces the most reasonable performance. Visual inspection reveals an increasing performance of gridded precipitation from grid, watershed to island scale. The data set, stored in a network common data form (NetCDF), is intended to support watershed-scale and island-scale studies of short-term and long-term climate, hydrology and ecology.

  11. Coplanar-grid CdZnTe detector with three-dimensional position sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, P.N.; Amman, M.; Lee, J.S.; Yaver, H.

    1998-06-01

    A 3-dimensional position-sensitive coplanar-grid detector design for use with compound semiconductors is described. This detector design maintains the advantage of a coplanar-grid detector in which good energy resolution can be obtained from materials with poor charge transport. Position readout in two dimensions is accomplished using proximity-sensing electrodes adjacent to the electron-collecting grid electrode of the detector. Additionally, depth information is obtained by taking the ratio of the amplitudes of the collecting grid signal and the cathode signal. Experimental results from a prototype CdZnTe detector are presented

  12. Moving grids for magnetic reconnection via Newton-Krylov methods

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Xuefei

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a set of computationally efficient, adaptive grids for magnetic reconnection phenomenon where the current density can develop large gradients in the reconnection region. Four-field extended MagnetoHydroDynamics (MHD) equations with hyperviscosity terms are transformed so that the curvilinear coordinates replace the Cartesian coordinates as the independent variables, and moving grids\\' velocities are also considered in this transformed system as a part of interpolating the physical solutions from the old grid to the new grid as time advances. The curvilinear coordinates derived from the current density through the Monge-Kantorovich (MK) optimization approach help to reduce the resolution requirements during the computation. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel carbon nanosheets as support for ultrahigh-resolution structural analysis of nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottbohm, Christoph T.; Beyer, Andre; Sologubenko, Alla S.; Ennen, Inga; Huetten, Andreas; Roesner, Harald; Eck, Wolfgang; Mayer, Joachim; Goelzhaeuser, Armin

    2008-01-01

    The resolution in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has reached values as low as 0.08 nm. However, these values are not accessible for very small objects in the size range of a few nanometers or lower, as they have to be placed on some support, which contributes to the overall electron-scattering signal, thereby blurring the contrast. Here, we report on the use of nanosheets made from cross-linked aromatic self-assembled monolayers as TEM sample supports. When transferred onto a copper grid, a single 1.6-nm-thick nanosheet can cover the grid and is free standing within the micron-sized openings. Despite its thinness, the sheet is stable under the impact of the electron beam. Micrographs taken from nanoclusters onto these nanosheets show highly increased contrast in comparison to the images taken from amorphous carbon supports. In scanning transmission electron microscopy with nanosheet support, a size analysis of sub-nanometer Au clusters was performed and single Au atoms were resolved

  14. A dual communicator and dual grid-resolution algorithm for petascale simulations of turbulent mixing at high Schmidt number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, M. P.; Buaria, D.; Gotoh, T.; Yeung, P. K.

    2017-10-01

    A new dual-communicator algorithm with very favorable performance characteristics has been developed for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent mixing of a passive scalar governed by an advection-diffusion equation. We focus on the regime of high Schmidt number (S c), where because of low molecular diffusivity the grid-resolution requirements for the scalar field are stricter than those for the velocity field by a factor √{ S c }. Computational throughput is improved by simulating the velocity field on a coarse grid of Nv3 points with a Fourier pseudo-spectral (FPS) method, while the passive scalar is simulated on a fine grid of Nθ3 points with a combined compact finite difference (CCD) scheme which computes first and second derivatives at eighth-order accuracy. A static three-dimensional domain decomposition and a parallel solution algorithm for the CCD scheme are used to avoid the heavy communication cost of memory transposes. A kernel is used to evaluate several approaches to optimize the performance of the CCD routines, which account for 60% of the overall simulation cost. On the petascale supercomputer Blue Waters at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, scalability is improved substantially with a hybrid MPI-OpenMP approach in which a dedicated thread per NUMA domain overlaps communication calls with computational tasks performed by a separate team of threads spawned using OpenMP nested parallelism. At a target production problem size of 81923 (0.5 trillion) grid points on 262,144 cores, CCD timings are reduced by 34% compared to a pure-MPI implementation. Timings for 163843 (4 trillion) grid points on 524,288 cores encouragingly maintain scalability greater than 90%, although the wall clock time is too high for production runs at this size. Performance monitoring with CrayPat for problem sizes up to 40963 shows that the CCD routines can achieve nearly 6% of the peak flop rate. The new DNS code is built upon two existing FPS and CCD codes

  15. The influence of model resolution on ozone in industrial volatile organic compound plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Barron H; Jeffries, Harvey E; Kim, Byeong-Uk; Vizuete, William G

    2010-09-01

    Regions with concentrated petrochemical industrial activity (e.g., Houston or Baton Rouge) frequently experience large, localized releases of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Aircraft measurements suggest these released VOCs create plumes with ozone (O3) production rates 2-5 times higher than typical urban conditions. Modeling studies found that simulating high O3 productions requires superfine (1-km) horizontal grid cell size. Compared with fine modeling (4-kmin), the superfine resolution increases the peak O3 concentration by as much as 46%. To understand this drastic O3 change, this study quantifies model processes for O3 and "odd oxygen" (Ox) in both resolutions. For the entire plume, the superfine resolution increases the maximum O3 concentration 3% but only decreases the maximum Ox concentration 0.2%. The two grid sizes produce approximately equal Ox mass but by different reaction pathways. Derived sensitivity to oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and VOC emissions suggests resolution-specific sensitivity to NOx and VOC emissions. Different sensitivity to emissions will result in different O3 responses to subsequently encountered emissions (within the city or downwind). Sensitivity of O3 to emission changes also results in different simulated O3 responses to the same control strategies. Sensitivity of O3 to NOx and VOC emission changes is attributed to finer resolved Eulerian grid and finer resolved NOx emissions. Urban NOx concentration gradients are often caused by roadway mobile sources that would not typically be addressed with Plume-in-Grid models. This study shows that grid cell size (an artifact of modeling) influences simulated control strategies and could bias regulatory decisions. Understanding the dynamics of VOC plume dependence on grid size is the first step toward providing more detailed guidance for resolution. These results underscore VOC and NOx resolution interdependencies best addressed by finer resolution. On the basis of these results, the

  16. X-ray imaging with sub-micron resolution using large-area photon counting detectors Timepix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudak, J.; Karch, J.; Holcova, K.; Zemlicka, J.

    2017-12-01

    As X-ray micro-CT became a popular tool for scientific purposes a number of commercially available CT systems have emerged on the market. Micro-CT systems have, therefore, become widely accessible and the number of research laboratories using them constantly increases. However, even when CT scans with spatial resolution of several micrometers can be performed routinely, data acquisition with sub-micron precision remains a complicated task. Issues come mostly from prolongation of the scan time inevitably connected with the use of nano-focus X-ray sources. Long exposure time increases the noise level in the CT projections. Furthermore, considering the sub-micron resolution even effects like source-spot drift, rotation stage wobble or thermal expansion become significant and can negatively affect the data. The use of dark-current free photon counting detectors as X-ray cameras for such applications can limit the issue of increased image noise in the data, however the mechanical stability of the whole system still remains a problem and has to be considered. In this work we evaluate the performance of a micro-CT system equipped with nano-focus X-ray tube and a large area photon counting detector Timepix for scans with effective pixel size bellow one micrometer.

  17. Preparation and oxidation resistance of single crystalline β-Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hong-xia; Deng, Shu-ping [Education Ministry Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650500 (China); Li, De-cong [Photoelectric Engineering College, Yunnan Open University, Kunming 650500 (China); Shen, Lan-xian; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Jin-song [Education Ministry Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650500 (China); Deng, Shu-kang, E-mail: skdeng@126.com [Education Ministry Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650500 (China)

    2016-11-01

    This study prepared a Zn-rich single crystal β-Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} using a Sn flux method based on the stoichiometric ratios of Zn{sub 4.4}Sb{sub 3}Sn{sub 3}. The oxidation resistance of the sample was determined by exploring the effects of heat treatment in air on electrical transport properties and thermal stability, which is of practical importance in the application of the material at high temperatures. Results showed that the prepared sample possessed high electrical transport properties, with a high power factor of 1.67×10{sup −3} W m{sup −1} K{sup −2} at 563 K. The heat treatment in air weakened the electrical conductivity of the single crystalline β-Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3}, whereas the Seebeck coefficients were rarely independent of the annealing condition. Eventually, the power factor obtained after the first heating at 523 K for 4 h became comparable to that of the as-prepared sample, although it decreased after the second heating at 573 K for 5 h. Nevertheless, the single crystalline β-Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} still possessed a good thermal stability after the heat treatment process.

  18. Solar Measurement and Modeling | Grid Modernization | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurement and Modeling Solar Measurement and Modeling NREL supports grid integration studies , industry, government, and academia by disseminating solar resource measurements, models, and best practices have continuously gathered basic solar radiation information, and they now gather high-resolution data

  19. LES of Internal Combustion Engine Flows Using Cartesian Overset Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falkenstein Tobias

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurate computations of turbulent flows using the Large-Eddy Simulation (LES technique with an appropriate SubFilter Scale (SFS model require low artificial dissipation such that the physical energy cascade process is not perturbed by numerical artifacts. To realize this in practical simulations, energy-conserving numerical schemes and high-quality computational grids are needed. If unstructured meshes are used, the latter requirement often makes grid generation for complex geometries very difficult. Structured Cartesian grids offer the advantage that uncertainties in mesh quality are reduced to choosing appropriate resolution. However, two intrinsic challenges of the structured approach are local mesh refinement and representation of complex geometries. In this work, the effectiveness of numerical methods which can be expected to reduce both drawbacks is assessed in engine flows, using a multi-physics inhouse code. The overset grid approach is utilized to arbitrarily combine grid patches of different spacing to a flow domain of complex shape during mesh generation. Walls are handled by an Immersed Boundary (IB method, which is combined with a wall function to treat underresolved boundary layers. A statistically stationary Spark Ignition (SI engine port flow is simulated at Reynolds numbers typical for engine operation. Good agreement of computed and measured integral flow quantities like overall pressure loss and tumble number is found. A comparison of simulated velocity fields to Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV measurement data concludes the validation of the enhanced numerical framework for both mean velocity and turbulent fluctuations. The performance of two SFS models, the dynamic Smagorinsky model with Lagrangian averaging along pathlines and the coherent structure model, is tested on different grids. Sensitivity of pressure loss and tumble ratio to the wall treatment and mesh refinement is presented. It is shown that increased wall

  20. One-pot synthesis of CoNiO{sub 2} single-crystalline nanoparticles as high-performance electrode materials of asymmetric supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Weimin, E-mail: dwmchem@163.com; Gao, Yanping; Tian, Qingqing; Li, Dan; Zhang, Zhenhu; Guo, Jiaojiao [Anyang Normal University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Qian, Xuefeng [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Chemistry and Chemical Technology (China)

    2015-09-15

    A facile one-pot solvothermal method has been developed to synthesize CoNiO{sub 2} single-crystalline nanoparticles. Crystal phase, morphology, crystal lattice, and composition of the obtained products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, respectively. Results revealed that the as-synthesized CoNiO{sub 2} nanoparticles belong to cubic structure with narrow size-distribution (8–10 nm). Subsequently, new asymmetric supercapacitors were successfully assembled with CoNiO{sub 2} nanoparticles as positive electrode and activated carbon as negative electrode. The electrochemical results show that asymmetric supercapacitors based on CoNiO{sub 2} nanoparticles possess excellent supercapacitor properties, i.e., a stable electrochemical window of 0–1.7 V, higher energy density of 24.0 Wh/kg at a power density of 415.4 W/kg, and excellent cycling stability (96.8 % capacitance retention after 5000 charge–discharge cycles). Meanwhile, both a light-emitting diode and a mini fan can be powered by two series connection asymmetric supercapacitors. These results imply that the present asymmetric supercapacitors based on CoNiO{sub 2} nanoparticles possess the promising potential application in the field of high-performance energy storage.

  1. Research and design of smart grid monitoring control via terminal based on iOS system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei; Gong, Li; Chen, Heli; Pan, Guangji

    2017-06-01

    Aiming at a series of problems existing in current smart grid monitoring Control Terminal, such as high costs, poor portability, simple monitoring system, poor software extensions, low system reliability when transmitting information, single man-machine interface, poor security, etc., smart grid remote monitoring system based on the iOS system has been designed. The system interacts with smart grid server so that it can acquire grid data through WiFi/3G/4G networks, and monitor each grid line running status, as well as power plant equipment operating conditions. When it occurs an exception in the power plant, incident information can be sent to the user iOS terminal equipment timely, which will provide troubleshooting information to help the grid staff to make the right decisions in a timely manner, to avoid further accidents. Field tests have shown the system realizes the integrated grid monitoring functions, low maintenance cost, friendly interface, high security and reliability, and it possesses certain applicable value.

  2. The qualified possession turn into ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Danica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Possession is prima facie evidence of ownership. Possession is ninetents of the law, means that possession is good against all other, except the true owner. The possession ripens into ownership if it is qualified and by effluxion of time. In Serbian law there are two kinds of adverse possession ripens into ownership. The first one is named ordinary and second one extraordinary adverse possession. Ordinary possession need to be legal, conscientious and genuine. Extraordinary possession is only conscientious, but in a wide sense. Adverse possession destroys the title of the owner and vests it in possessor. An occupation of land inconsistent with the right of the true owner: the possession of those against whom a right action has accured to the true owner. It is actual possession in the absence of possession by the rightful owner and without lawful title. If the adverse possession continues, the effect at the expiration of the prescribed period is that not only the remedy but the title of former owner is extinguished. The person in adverse possession gains a new possessory title which cannot, normally exceed in extent of duration the interest of the former owner.

  3. Orbital evolution of colliding star and pulsar winds in 2D and 3D: effects of dimensionality, EoS, resolution, and grid size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch-Ramon, V.; Barkov, M. V.; Perucho, M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The structure formed by the shocked winds of a massive star and a non-accreting pulsar in a binary system suffers periodic and random variations of orbital and non-linear dynamical origins. The characterization of the evolution of the wind interaction region is necessary for understanding the rich phenomenology of these sources. Aims: For the first time, we simulate in 3 dimensions the interaction of isotropic stellar and relativistic pulsar winds along one full orbit, on scales well beyond the binary size. We also investigate the impact of grid resolution and size, and of different state equations: a γ̂-constant ideal gas, and an ideal gas with γ̂ dependent on temperature. Methods: We used the code PLUTO to carry out relativistic hydrodynamical simulations in 2 and 3 dimensions of the interaction between a slow dense wind and a mildly relativistic wind with Lorentz factor 2, along one full orbit in a region up to ~100 times the binary size. The different 2-dimensional simulations were carried out with equal and larger grid resolution and size, and one was done with a more realistic equation of state than in 3 dimensions. Results: The simulations in 3 dimensions confirm previous results in 2 dimensions, showing: a strong shock induced by Coriolis forces that terminates the pulsar wind also in the opposite direction to the star; strong bending of the shocked-wind structure against the pulsar motion; and the generation of turbulence. The shocked flows are also subject to a faster development of instabilities in 3 dimensions, which enhances shocks, two-wind mixing, and large-scale disruption of the shocked structure. In 2 dimensions, higher resolution simulations confirm lower resolution results, simulations with larger grid sizes strengthen the case for the loss of the general coherence of the shocked structure, and simulations with two different equations of state yield very similar results. In addition to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, discussed in

  4. High charge-discharge performance of Pb{sub 0.98}La{sub 0.02}(Zr{sub 0.35}Sn{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.10}){sub 0.995}O{sub 3} antiferroelectric ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Chenhong [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Functional Materials and Devices, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Zhen; Chen, Xuefeng; Yan, Shiguang; Cao, Fei; Dong, Xianlin; Wang, Genshui, E-mail: genshuiwang@mail.sic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Functional Materials and Devices, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2016-08-21

    The energy storage performance and charge-discharge properties of Pb{sub 0.98}La{sub 0.02}(Zr{sub 0.35}Sn{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.10}){sub 0.995}O{sub 3} (PLZST) antiferroelectric ceramics were investigated through directly measuring the hysteresis loops and pulse discharge current-time curves. The energy density only varies 0.2% per degree from 25 °C to 85 °C, and the energy efficiency maintains at about 90%. Furthermore, an approximate calculating model of maximum power density p{sub max} was established for the discharge process. Under a relatively high working electric field (8.2 kV/mm), this ceramics possess a greatly enhanced power density of 18 MW/cm{sup 3}. Moreover, the pulse power properties did not show degradation until 1500 times of charge-discharge cycling. The large released energy density, high energy efficiency, good temperature stability, greatly enhanced power density, and excellent fatigue endurance combined together make this PLZST ceramics an ideal candidate for pulse power applications.

  5. Wave Resource Characterization Using an Unstructured Grid Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Cheng Wu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a modeling study conducted on the central Oregon coast for wave resource characterization, using the unstructured grid Simulating WAve Nearshore (SWAN model coupled with a nested grid WAVEWATCH III® (WWIII model. The flexibility of models with various spatial resolutions and the effects of open boundary conditions simulated by a nested grid WWIII model with different physics packages were evaluated. The model results demonstrate the advantage of the unstructured grid-modeling approach for flexible model resolution and good model skills in simulating the six wave resource parameters recommended by the International Electrotechnical Commission in comparison to the observed data in Year 2009 at National Data Buoy Center Buoy 46050. Notably, spectral analysis indicates that the ST4 physics package improves upon the ST2 physics package’s ability to predict wave power density for large waves, which is important for wave resource assessment, load calculation of devices, and risk management. In addition, bivariate distributions show that the simulated sea state of maximum occurrence with the ST4 physics package matched the observed data better than with the ST2 physics package. This study demonstrated that the unstructured grid wave modeling approach, driven by regional nested grid WWIII outputs along with the ST4 physics package, can efficiently provide accurate wave hindcasts to support wave resource characterization. Our study also suggests that wind effects need to be considered if the dimension of the model domain is greater than approximately 100 km, or O (102 km.

  6. Epitaxial ferromagnetic Fe{sub 3}Si on GaAs(111)A with atomically smooth surface and interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y. C.; Hung, H. Y.; Kwo, J., E-mail: chsu@nsrrc.org.tw, E-mail: raynien@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: mhong@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y. W.; Lin, Y. H.; Cheng, C. K.; Hong, M., E-mail: chsu@nsrrc.org.tw, E-mail: raynien@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: mhong@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Applied Physics and Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tseng, S. C.; Hsu, C. H., E-mail: chsu@nsrrc.org.tw, E-mail: raynien@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: mhong@phys.ntu.edu.tw [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Chang, M. T.; Lo, S. C. [Material and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan (China)

    2015-09-21

    Single crystal ferromagnetic Fe{sub 3}Si(111) films were grown epitaxially on GaAs(111)A by molecular beam epitaxy. These hetero-structures possess extremely low surface roughness of 1.3 Å and interfacial roughness of 1.9 Å, measured by in-situ scanning tunneling microscope and X-ray reflectivity analyses, respectively, showing superior film quality, comparing to those attained on GaAs(001) in previous publications. The atomically smooth interface was revealed by the atomic-resolution Z (atomic number)-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images using the correction of spherical aberration (Cs)-corrected electron probe. Excellent crystallinity and perfect lattice match were both confirmed by high resolution x-ray diffraction. Measurements of magnetic property for the Fe{sub 3}Si/GaAs(111) yielded a saturation moment of 990 emu/cm{sup 3} with a small coercive field ≤1 Oe at room temperature.

  7. Concentration distribution of NO{sub 2}, PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2,5} in severe pollution episodes in Oslo, Drammen, Bergen and Trondheim; Konsentrasjonsfordelingen av NO{sub 2}, PM{sub 10} og PM{sub 2,5} i sterke forurensningsepisoder i Oslo, Drammen, Bergen og Trondheim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloerdal, Leiv Haavard; Toennesen, Dag

    1999-04-01

    Based on hourly model calculations of NO{sub 2}, PM{sub 1}0 and PM{sub 2},5 through a 6 months winter season in the cities of Oslo, Drammen, Bergen and Trondheim, the 10 most severe pollution episodes have been analysed. Concentration distributions, calculated as the average of these episodes have been combined with the population distribution in order to reveal the exposure levels in such episodes. The model calculations have only been performed for the city background, i.e. on a km{sub 2} grid system. (author)

  8. Structural studies of CaAl{sub 12}O{sub 19}, SrAl{sub 12}O{sub 19}, La{sub 2/3+δ}Al{sub 12-δ}O{sub 19}, and CaAl{sub 10}NiTiO{sub 19} with the hibonite structure; indications of an unusual type of ferroelectricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jun; Medina, Elena A.; Sleight, Arthur W.; Subramanian, M.A. [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Stalick, Judith K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Center for Neutron Research

    2016-08-01

    Various oxides with the hibonite structure were synthesized and structurally analyzed using powder neutron diffraction. The structure of CaAl{sub 12}O{sub 19} at 298 and 11 K shows dipoles that are apparently too dilute to order unless subjected to a suitable electric field. Magnetoplumbites, such as BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}, are isostructural with hibonite. These compounds possess ferromagnetic properties, which combined with the electric dipoles may influence multiferroic behavior. Our SrAl{sub 12}O{sub 19} sample showed two distinct hexagonal phases, a major phase with the normal hibonite structure and a minor phase having a closely related structure. Our sample of the defect hibonite phase La{sub 2/3+δ}Al{sub 12-δ}O{sub 19} shows a distinctly higher δ value (0.25) vs. that reported (∝ 0.15) for samples made from the melt. Finally, we used to advantage the negative scattering length of Ti to determine the site occupancies of Ni and Ti in CaAl{sub 10}NiTiO{sub 19}.

  9. "Planar" Tautologies Hard for Resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantchev, Stefan; Riis, Søren

    2001-01-01

    We prove exponential lower bounds on the resolution proofs of some tautologies, based on rectangular grid graphs. More specifically, we show a 2Ω(n) lower bound for any resolution proof of the mutilated chessboard problem on a 2n×2n chessboard as well as for the Tseitin tautology (G. Tseitin, 196...

  10. New 2D adaptive mesh refinement algorithm based on conservative finite-differences with staggered grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerya, T.; Duretz, T.; May, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    We present new 2D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm based on stress-conservative finite-differences formulated for non-uniform rectangular staggered grid. The refinement approach is based on a repetitive cell splitting organized via a quad-tree construction (every parent cell is split into 4 daughter cells of equal size). Irrespective of the level of resolution every cell has 5 staggered nodes (2 horizontal velocities, 2 vertical velocities and 1 pressure) for which respective governing equations, boundary conditions and interpolation equations are formulated. The connectivity of the grid is achieved via cross-indexing of grid cells and basic nodal points located in their corners: four corner nodes are indexed for every cell and up to 4 surrounding cells are indexed for every node. The accuracy of the approach depends critically on the formulation of the stencil used at the "hanging" velocity nodes located at the boundaries between different levels of resolution. Most accurate results are obtained for the scheme based on the volume flux balance across the resolution boundary combined with stress-based interpolation of velocity orthogonal to the boundary. We tested this new approach with a number of 2D variable viscosity analytical solutions. Our tests demonstrate that the adaptive staggered grid formulation has convergence properties similar to those obtained in case of a standard, non-adaptive staggered grid formulation. This convergence is also achieved when resolution boundary crosses sharp viscosity contrast interfaces. The convergence rates measured are found to be insensitive to scenarios when the transition in grid resolution crosses sharp viscosity contrast interfaces. We compared various grid refinement strategies based on distribution of different field variables such as viscosity, density and velocity. According to these tests the refinement allows for significant (0.5-1 order of magnitude) increase in the computational accuracy at the same

  11. GridPix detectors: Production and beam test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppert, W.J.C.; Bakel, N. van; Bilevych, Y.; Colas, P.; Desch, K.; Fransen, M.; Graaf, H. van der; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N.P.; Kaminski, J.; Schmitz, J.; Schön, R.; Zappon, F.

    2013-01-01

    The innovative GridPix detector is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) that is read out with a Timepix-1 pixel chip. By using wafer post-processing techniques an aluminium grid is placed on top of the chip. When operated, the electric field between the grid and the chip is sufficient to create electron induced avalanches which are detected by the pixels. The time-to-digital converter (TDC) records the drift time enabling the reconstruction of high precision 3D track segments. Recently GridPixes were produced on full wafer scale, to meet the demand for more reliable and cheaper devices in large quantities. In a recent beam test the contribution of both diffusion and time walk to the spatial and angular resolutions of a GridPix detector with a 1.2 mm drift gap are studied in detail. In addition long term tests show that in a significant fraction of the chips the protection layer successfully quenches discharges, preventing harm to the chip

  12. GridPix detectors: Production and beam test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppert, W. J. C.; van Bakel, N.; Bilevych, Y.; Colas, P.; Desch, K.; Fransen, M.; van der Graaf, H.; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N. P.; Kaminski, J.; Schmitz, J.; Schön, R.; Zappon, F.

    2013-12-01

    The innovative GridPix detector is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) that is read out with a Timepix-1 pixel chip. By using wafer post-processing techniques an aluminium grid is placed on top of the chip. When operated, the electric field between the grid and the chip is sufficient to create electron induced avalanches which are detected by the pixels. The time-to-digital converter (TDC) records the drift time enabling the reconstruction of high precision 3D track segments. Recently GridPixes were produced on full wafer scale, to meet the demand for more reliable and cheaper devices in large quantities. In a recent beam test the contribution of both diffusion and time walk to the spatial and angular resolutions of a GridPix detector with a 1.2 mm drift gap are studied in detail. In addition long term tests show that in a significant fraction of the chips the protection layer successfully quenches discharges, preventing harm to the chip.

  13. Investigation of various synthetic conditions for large-scale synthesis and electrochemical properties of Li{sub 3.98}Al{sub 0.06}Ti{sub 4.96}O{sub 12}/C as anode material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Guo-Hui, E-mail: dgh1516@gmail.com [Shanghai Shanshan Tech Co., Ltd., 3158 Jinhai Road, Shanghai 201209 (China); Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Hua-Jing; Zhou, Liang [Shanghai Shanshan Tech Co., Ltd., 3158 Jinhai Road, Shanghai 201209 (China); Shanghai Second Polytechnic University, 2360 Jinhai Road, Shanghai 201209 (China); Chong, Lina; Yang, Jun [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Qiao, Yong-Min; Zhang, Dian-Hao [Shanghai Shanshan Tech Co., Ltd., 3158 Jinhai Road, Shanghai 201209 (China)

    2014-12-05

    Graphical abstract: A gel and spray-drying method is demonstrated for large-scale preparation of Li{sub 3.98}Al{sub 0.06}Ti{sub 4.96}O{sub 12}/C secondary microspheres via optimizing various synthetic conditions. The electrochemical performances of the Li{sub 3.98}Al{sub 0.06}Ti{sub 4.96}O{sub 12}/C microspheres are investigated. - Highlights: • Various synthetic conditions are investigated. • Materials can be produced at ∼1 kg scale by using our demonstrated synthesis method. • Li{sub 3.98}Al{sub 0.06}Ti{sub 4.96}O{sub 12}/C sample possesses high electronic conductivity and rate property, and excellent cycling performance. • Secondary micro-spherical Li{sub 3.98}Al{sub 0.06}Ti{sub 4.96}O{sub 12}/C sample has high tap density et al. - Abstract: Poor electronic conductivity is one of the biggest obstacles for practical application of lithium titanate as lithium-ion battery anode material. Utilizing the advantages of coating and doping techniques to optimize the conductive and rate performances of lithium titanate was reported in this work. Herein, the effects of various synthetic conditions including calcination temperatures and holding times, lithium overdoses, carbon contents, doping contents and doping elements on phase, primary particles’ size and electrochemical performance were comprehensively investigated. The optimal Li{sub 3.98}Al{sub 0.06}Ti{sub 4.96}O{sub 12}/C secondary microspheres were synthesized, which possessed high electronic conductivity, tap density, reversible capacity and first columbic efficiency, and excellent rate performances. Furthermore, the synthesized samples were characterized by various techniques.

  14. Trends in life science grid: from computing grid to knowledge grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konagaya Akihiko

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grid computing has great potential to become a standard cyberinfrastructure for life sciences which often require high-performance computing and large data handling which exceeds the computing capacity of a single institution. Results This survey reviews the latest grid technologies from the viewpoints of computing grid, data grid and knowledge grid. Computing grid technologies have been matured enough to solve high-throughput real-world life scientific problems. Data grid technologies are strong candidates for realizing "resourceome" for bioinformatics. Knowledge grids should be designed not only from sharing explicit knowledge on computers but also from community formulation for sharing tacit knowledge among a community. Conclusion Extending the concept of grid from computing grid to knowledge grid, it is possible to make use of a grid as not only sharable computing resources, but also as time and place in which people work together, create knowledge, and share knowledge and experiences in a community.

  15. Implementation of a dosimetric system based on detectors of to AL{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and its use in radiation therapy; Implementacion de un sistema dosimetrico basdo en detectores de Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: C y su uso en radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez, P. J. F.; Guzman, C. C. S.; Pico, C. C.; Aymar, A. J. A.

    2013-07-01

    In this work is proposed to implement an alternative dosimetric system, based on OSL technology of crystals of oxide doped aluminum with carbon, to the AL{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C which do not possess the drawbacks of traditional detectors and possess the advantage for re-reading processes, allowing the storage of the detector as a record of delivered adsorbed dose which may be retested if required. (Author)

  16. Achieving selective interrogation and sub-wavelength resolution in thin plates with embedded metamaterial acoustic lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semperlotti, F., E-mail: fsemperl@nd.edu; Zhu, H. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    In this study, we present an approach to ultrasonic beam-forming and high resolution identification of acoustic sources having critical implications for applications such as structural health monitoring. The proposed concept is based on the design of dynamically tailored structural elements via embedded acoustic metamaterial lenses. This approach provides a completely new alternative to conventional phased-array technology enabling the formation of steerable and collimated (or focused) ultrasonic beams by exploiting a single transducer. Numerical results show that the ultrasonic beam can be steered by simply tuning the frequency of the excitation. Also, the embedded lens can be designed to achieve sub-wavelength resolution to clustered acoustic sources, which is a typical scenario encountered in incipient structural damage.

  17. High-resolution computer-aided moire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Cesar A.; Bhat, Gopalakrishna K.

    1991-12-01

    This paper presents a high resolution computer assisted moire technique for the measurement of displacements and strains at the microscopic level. The detection of micro-displacements using a moire grid and the problem associated with the recovery of displacement field from the sampled values of the grid intensity are discussed. A two dimensional Fourier transform method for the extraction of displacements from the image of the moire grid is outlined. An example of application of the technique to the measurement of strains and stresses in the vicinity of the crack tip in a compact tension specimen is given.

  18. A New Hybrid Spatio-temporal Model for Estimating Daily Multi-year PM2.5 Concentrations Across Northeastern USA Using High Resolution Aerosol Optical Depth Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloog, Itai; Chudnovsky, Alexandra A.; Just, Allan C.; Nordio, Francesco; Koutrakis, Petros; Coull, Brent A.; Lyapustin, Alexei; Wang, Yujie; Schwartz, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The use of satellite-based aerosol optical depth (AOD) to estimate fine particulate matter PM(sub 2.5) for epidemiology studies has increased substantially over the past few years. These recent studies often report moderate predictive power, which can generate downward bias in effect estimates. In addition, AOD measurements have only moderate spatial resolution, and have substantial missing data. We make use of recent advances in MODIS satellite data processing algorithms (Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC), which allow us to use 1 km (versus currently available 10 km) resolution AOD data.We developed and cross validated models to predict daily PM(sub 2.5) at a 1X 1 km resolution across the northeastern USA (New England, New York and New Jersey) for the years 2003-2011, allowing us to better differentiate daily and long term exposure between urban, suburban, and rural areas. Additionally, we developed an approach that allows us to generate daily high-resolution 200 m localized predictions representing deviations from the area 1 X 1 km grid predictions. We used mixed models regressing PM(sub 2.5) measurements against day-specific random intercepts, and fixed and random AOD and temperature slopes. We then use generalized additive mixed models with spatial smoothing to generate grid cell predictions when AOD was missing. Finally, to get 200 m localized predictions, we regressed the residuals from the final model for each monitor against the local spatial and temporal variables at each monitoring site. Our model performance was excellent (mean out-of-sample R(sup 2) = 0.88). The spatial and temporal components of the out-of-sample results also presented very good fits to the withheld data (R(sup 2) = 0.87, R(sup)2 = 0.87). In addition, our results revealed very little bias in the predicted concentrations (Slope of predictions versus withheld observations = 0.99). Our daily model results show high predictive accuracy at high spatial resolutions

  19. Grid Data Management and Customer Demands at MeteoSwiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, G.; Lukasczyk, Ch.

    2010-09-01

    Data grids constitute the required input form for a variety of applications. Therefore, customers increasingly expect climate services to not only provide measured data, but also grids of these with the required configurations on an operational basis. Currently, MeteoSwiss is establishing a production chain for delivering data grids by subscription directly from the data warehouse in order to meet the demand for precipitation data grids by governmental, business and science customers. The MeteoSwiss data warehouse runs on an Oracle database linked with an ArcGIS Standard edition geodatabase. The grids are produced by Unix-based software written in R called GRIDMCH which extracts the station data from the data warehouse and stores the files in the file system. By scripts, the netcdf-v4 files are imported via an FME interface into the database. Currently daily and monthly deliveries of daily precipitation grids are available from MeteoSwiss with a spatial resolution of 2.2km x 2.2km. These daily delivered grids are a preliminary based on 100 measuring sites whilst the grid of the monthly delivery of daily sums is calculated out of about 430 stations. Crucial for the absorption by the customers is the understanding of and the trust into the new grid product. Clearly stating needs which can be covered by grid products, the customers require a certain lead time to develop applications making use of the particular grid. Therefore, early contacts and a continuous attendance as well as flexibility in adjusting the production process to fulfill emerging customer needs are important during the introduction period. Gridding over complex terrain can lead to temporally elevated uncertainties in certain areas depending on the weather situation and coverage of measurements. Therefore, careful instructions on the quality and use and the possibility to communicate the uncertainties of gridded data proofed to be essential especially to the business and science customers who require

  20. Experimental investigation of turbulent flow through spacer grids in fuel rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caraghiaur, Diana; Anglart, Henryk; Frid, Wiktor

    2009-01-01

    This paper contains experimental data of pressure, velocity and turbulence intensity in a 24-rod fuel bundle with spacer grids. Detailed pressure measurements inside the spacer grid have been obtained by use of a sliding pressure-sensing rod. Laser Doppler Velocimetry technique was used to measure the local axial velocity and its fluctuating component upstream and downstream of the spacer grid in sub-channels with different blockage ratios. The measurements show a changing pattern in function of radial position in the cross-section of the fuel bundle. For sub-channels close to the box wall, the turbulence intensity suddenly increases just downstream of the spacer and then gradually decays. In inner sub-channels, however, the turbulence intensity downstream of the spacer decreases below its upstream value and then gradually increases until it reaches the maximum value at approximately two spacer heights. The present study reveals that spacer effects, such as local pressure distribution and turbulence intensity enhancement, not only depend exclusively on the local geometry details, but also on the location in the cross-section of the rod bundle.

  1. Experimental investigation of turbulent flow through spacer grids in fuel rod bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caraghiaur, Diana [Royal Institute of Technology, Division of Nuclear Reactor Technology, Department of Physics, School of Engineering Sciences, AlbaNova University Center, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: dianac@kth.se; Anglart, Henryk [Royal Institute of Technology, Division of Nuclear Reactor Technology, Department of Physics, School of Engineering Sciences, AlbaNova University Center, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Frid, Wiktor [Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Reactor Technology and Structural Integrity, SE-171 16 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-10-15

    This paper contains experimental data of pressure, velocity and turbulence intensity in a 24-rod fuel bundle with spacer grids. Detailed pressure measurements inside the spacer grid have been obtained by use of a sliding pressure-sensing rod. Laser Doppler Velocimetry technique was used to measure the local axial velocity and its fluctuating component upstream and downstream of the spacer grid in sub-channels with different blockage ratios. The measurements show a changing pattern in function of radial position in the cross-section of the fuel bundle. For sub-channels close to the box wall, the turbulence intensity suddenly increases just downstream of the spacer and then gradually decays. In inner sub-channels, however, the turbulence intensity downstream of the spacer decreases below its upstream value and then gradually increases until it reaches the maximum value at approximately two spacer heights. The present study reveals that spacer effects, such as local pressure distribution and turbulence intensity enhancement, not only depend exclusively on the local geometry details, but also on the location in the cross-section of the rod bundle.

  2. Design, testing, and economics of a 430 W sub p photovoltaic concentrator array for non grid-connected applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maish, A. B.; Rios, M., Jr.; Togami, H.

    A stand-alone 430 W/sub p/ photovoltaic (PV) concentrating system for low power, non grid-connected applications has been designed, fabricated, and tested at Sandia National Laboratories. The array consists of four passively cooled Fresnel lens concentrating modules on a newly developed polar axis tracking structure. Two axis tracking is provided using a self powered clock drive unit mounted on a single post foundation. Test results of tracking accuracy, array output power, parasitic power, performance in winds and array reliability are discussed. using a range of estimated production costs for small production volumes, the life-cycle energy costs have been calculated and compared to the equivalent energy costs of a 3 kW diesel electric generator set and of an equivalent flat panel PV system.

  3. Mapping Sub-Saharan African Agriculture in High-Resolution Satellite Imagery with Computer Vision & Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debats, Stephanie Renee

    Smallholder farms dominate in many parts of the world, including Sub-Saharan Africa. These systems are characterized by small, heterogeneous, and often indistinct field patterns, requiring a specialized methodology to map agricultural landcover. In this thesis, we developed a benchmark labeled data set of high-resolution satellite imagery of agricultural fields in South Africa. We presented a new approach to mapping agricultural fields, based on efficient extraction of a vast set of simple, highly correlated, and interdependent features, followed by a random forest classifier. The algorithm achieved similar high performance across agricultural types, including spectrally indistinct smallholder fields, and demonstrated the ability to generalize across large geographic areas. In sensitivity analyses, we determined multi-temporal images provided greater performance gains than the addition of multi-spectral bands. We also demonstrated how active learning can be incorporated in the algorithm to create smaller, more efficient training data sets, which reduced computational resources, minimized the need for humans to hand-label data, and boosted performance. We designed a patch-based uncertainty metric to drive the active learning framework, based on the regular grid of a crowdsourcing platform, and demonstrated how subject matter experts can be replaced with fleets of crowdsourcing workers. Our active learning algorithm achieved similar performance as an algorithm trained with randomly selected data, but with 62% less data samples. This thesis furthers the goal of providing accurate agricultural landcover maps, at a scale that is relevant for the dominant smallholder class. Accurate maps are crucial for monitoring and promoting agricultural production. Furthermore, improved agricultural landcover maps will aid a host of other applications, including landcover change assessments, cadastral surveys to strengthen smallholder land rights, and constraints for crop modeling

  4. Grid interoperability: joining grid information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechl, M; Field, L

    2008-01-01

    A grid is defined as being 'coordinated resource sharing and problem solving in dynamic, multi-institutional virtual organizations'. Over recent years a number of grid projects, many of which have a strong regional presence, have emerged to help coordinate institutions and enable grids. Today, we face a situation where a number of grid projects exist, most of which are using slightly different middleware. Grid interoperation is trying to bridge these differences and enable Virtual Organizations to access resources at the institutions independent of their grid project affiliation. Grid interoperation is usually a bilateral activity between two grid infrastructures. Recently within the Open Grid Forum, the Grid Interoperability Now (GIN) Community Group is trying to build upon these bilateral activities. The GIN group is a focal point where all the infrastructures can come together to share ideas and experiences on grid interoperation. It is hoped that each bilateral activity will bring us one step closer to the overall goal of a uniform grid landscape. A fundamental aspect of a grid is the information system, which is used to find available grid services. As different grids use different information systems, interoperation between these systems is crucial for grid interoperability. This paper describes the work carried out to overcome these differences between a number of grid projects and the experiences gained. It focuses on the different techniques used and highlights the important areas for future standardization

  5. Synthesis and characterization of new fluoride-containing manganese vanadates A{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2} (A=Rb, Cs) and Mn{sub 2}VO{sub 4}F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjeewa, Liurukara D. [Department of Chemistry and Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States); McGuire, Michael A. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Smith Pellizzeri, Tiffany M.; McMillen, Colin D. [Department of Chemistry and Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States); Ovidiu Garlea, V. [Quantum Condensed Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Willett, Daniel; Chumanov, George [Department of Chemistry and Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States); Kolis, Joseph W., E-mail: kjoseph@clemson.edu [Department of Chemistry and Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Large single crystals of A{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2} (A=Rb, Cs) and Mn{sub 2}VO{sub 4}F were grown using a high-temperature (~600 °C) hydrothermal technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction and powder X-ray diffraction were utilized to characterize the structures, which both possess MnO{sub 4}F{sub 2} building blocks. The A{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2} series crystallizes as a new structure type in space group Pbcn (No. 60), Z=4 (Rb{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2}: a=7.4389(17) Å, b=11.574(3) Å, c=10.914(2) Å; Cs{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2}: a=7.5615(15) Å, b=11.745(2) Å, c=11.127(2) Å). The structure is composed of zigzag chains of edge-sharing MnO{sub 4}F{sub 2} units running along the a-axis, and interconnected through V{sub 2}O{sub 7} pyrovanadate groups. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements on this interesting one-dimensional structural feature based on Mn{sup 2+} indicated that Cs{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2} is antiferromagnetic with a Neél temperature, T{sub N}=~3 K and a Weiss constant, θ, of −11.7(1) K. Raman and infrared spectra were also analyzed to identify the fundamental V–O vibrational modes in Cs{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2}. Mn{sub 2}(VO{sub 4})F crystalizes in the monoclinic space group of C2/c (no. 15), Z=8 with unit cell parameters of a=13.559(2) Å, b=6.8036(7) Å, c=10.1408(13) Å and β=116.16(3)°. The structure is associated with those of triplite and wagnerite. Dynamic fluorine disorder gives rise to complex alternating chains of five-and six-coordinate Mn{sup 2+}. These interpenetrating chains are additionally connected through isolated VO{sub 4} tetrahedra to form the condensed structure. - Graphical abstract: New vanadate fluorides A{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2} (A=Rb, Cs) and Mn{sub 2}(VO{sub 4})F have been synthesized hydrothermally. Upon cooling, the one-dimensional Mn(II) substructure results in antiferromagnetic

  6. Service Oriented Gridded Atmospheric Radiances (SOAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halem, M.; Goldberg, M. D.; Tilmes, C.; Zhou, L.; Shen, S.; Yesha, Y.

    2005-12-01

    We are developing a scalable web service tool that can provide complex griding services on-demand for atmospheric radiance data sets from multiple temperature and moisture sounding sensors on the NASA and NOAA polar orbiting satellites collected over the past three decades. This server-to-server middle ware tool will provide the framework for transforming user requests for an arbitrary spatial/temporal/spectral gridded radiance data set from one or more instruments into an action to invoke a griding process from a set of scientifically validated application programs that have been developed to perform such functions. The invoked web service agents will access, subset, concatenate, convolve, perform statistical and physically based griding operations and present the data as specified level 3 gridded fields for analysis and visualization in multiple formats. Examples of the griding operations consist of spatial-temporal radiance averaging accounting for the field of view instrument response function, first footprint in grid bin, selecting min/max brightness temperatures within a grid element, ratios of channels, filtering, convolving high resolution spectral radiances to match broader band spectral radiances, limb adjustments, calculating variances of radiances falling in grid box and creating visual displays of these fields. The gridded web services tool will support both human input through a WWW GUI as well as a direct computer request through a W3C SOAP/XML web service interface. It will generate regional and global gridded data sets on demand. A second effort will demonstrate the ability to locate, access, subset and grid radiance data for any time period and resolution from remote archives of NOAA and NASA data. The system will queue the work flow requests, stage processing and delivery of arbitrary gridded data sets in a data base and notify the users when the request is completed. This tool will greatly expand satellite sounding data utilization by

  7. Finite Volume Methods for Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations on Collocated Grids with Nonconformal Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmogorov, Dmitry

    turbine computations, collocated grid-based SIMPLE-like algorithms are developed for computations on block-structured grids with nonconformal interfaces. A technique to enhance both the convergence speed and the solution accuracy of the SIMPLE-like algorithms is presented. The erroneous behavior, which...... versions of the SIMPLE algorithm. The new technique is implemented in an existing conservative 2nd order finite-volume scheme flow solver (EllipSys), which is extended to cope with grids with nonconformal interfaces. The behavior of the discrete Navier-Stokes equations is discussed in detail...... Block LU relaxation scheme is shown to possess several optimal conditions, which enables to preserve high efficiency of the multigrid solver on both conformal and nonconformal grids. The developments are done using a parallel MPI algorithm, which can handle multiple numbers of interfaces with multiple...

  8. Synthesis and characterization of Mn{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle ferrofluids for thermo-electric conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansom, C.L., E-mail: c.l.sansom@cranfield.ac.uk [Cranfield University, Cranfield MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Jones, P.; Dorey, R.A.; Beck, C.; Stanhope-Bosumpim, A. [Cranfield University, Cranfield MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Peterson, J. [Peterson Dynamics Ltd., 9 Nant y Gamar Road, Craig y Don LL30 1YE (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15

    Ferrofluids containing nanoparticles of Mn{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (MZ5) and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite) have been examined as potential thermal transport media and energy harvesting materials. The ferrofluids were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation and characterized by EDX to determine composition and by TEM to determine particle size and agglomeration. A range of particle coatings and carrier fluids were used to complete the fluid preparation. Commercially available ferrofluids were tested in custom built rigs to demonstrate both thermal pumping (for waste heat removal applications) and power induction (for power conversion and energy harvesting applications). The results indicate that simple ferrofluids possess the necessary properties to remove waste heat, either into thermal storage or for conversion to electrical power. - Highlights: ► The synthesis of nanoparticle ferrofluids based on Mn{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} is reported. ► The thermal properties of the ferrofluids creates a novel pump with no moving parts. ► Thermal energy harvesting for conversion into electrical power is demonstrated.

  9. Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinds, J.

    2001-01-01

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) describes the methods used to develop numerical grids of the unsaturated hydrogeologic system beneath Yucca Mountain. Numerical grid generation is an integral part of the development of a complex, three-dimensional (3-D) model, such as the Unsaturated-Zone Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model) of Yucca Mountain. The resulting numerical grids, developed using current geologic, hydrogeologic, and mineralogic data, provide the necessary framework to: (1) develop calibrated hydrogeologic property sets and flow fields, (2) test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport, and (3) predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal loading conditions. Revision 00 of the work described herein follows the planning and work direction outlined in the ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (CRWMS M and O 1999c). The technical scope, content, and management of ICN 01 of this AMR is currently controlled by the planning document, ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (BSC 2001a). The scope for the TBV resolution actions in this ICN is described in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department'' (BSC 2001 b, Addendum B, Section 4.1). The steps involved in numerical grid development include: (1) defining the location of important calibration features, (2) determining model grid layers and fault geometry based on the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), the Integrated Site Model (ISM), and definition of hydrogeologic units (HGUs), (3) analyzing and extracting GFM and ISM data pertaining to layer contacts and property distributions, (4) discretizing and refining the two-dimensional (2-D), plan-view numerical grid, (5) generating the 3-D grid with finer resolution at the repository horizon and within the Calico Hills nonwelded (CHn) hydrogeologic unit, and (6) formulating the dual-permeability mesh. The

  10. Evaluation of high grid strip densities based on the moiré artifact analysis for quality assurance: Simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, U. K.; Park, C. K.; Lim, H. W.; Cho, H. S.; Lee, D. Y.; Lee, H. W.; Kim, K. S.; Park, S. Y.; Kim, G. A.; Kang, S. Y.; Park, J. E.; Kim, W. S.; Jeon, D. H.; Woo, T. H.

    2017-09-01

    We have recently developed precise x-ray grids having strip densities in the range of 100 - 250 lines/inch by adopting the precision sawing process and carbon interspace material for the demands of specific x-ray imaging techniques. However, quality assurance in the grid manufacturing has not yet satisfactorily conducted because grid strips of a high strip density are often invisible through an x-ray nondestructive testing with a flat-panel detector of an ordinary pixel resolution (>100 μm). In this work, we propose a useful method to evaluate actual grid strip densities over the Nyquist sampling rate based on the moiré artifact analysis. We performed a systematic simulation and experiment with several sample grids and a detector having a 143- μm pixel resolution to verify the proposed quality assurance method. According to our results, the relative differences between the nominal and the evaluated grid strip densities were within 0.2% and 1.8% in the simulation and experiment, respectively, which demonstrates that the proposed method is viable with an ordinary detector having a moderate pixel resolution for quality assurance in grid manufacturing.

  11. Performance evaluation of a sub-millimeter spatial resolution PET detector module using a digital silicon photomultiplier coupled LGSO array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leem, Hyun Tae [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong, E-mail: ychoi@sogang.ac.kr [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyu Bom; Lee, Sangwon [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yamamoto, Seiichi [Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Yeom, Jung-Yeol, E-mail: jungyeol@korea.ac.kr [School of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-21

    In positron emission tomography (PET) for breast, brain and small animal imaging, the spatial resolution of a PET detector is crucial to obtain high quality PET images. In this study, a PET detector for sub-millimeter spatial resolution imaging purpose was assembled using 4×4 pixels of a digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM, DPC-3200-22-44, Philips) coupled with a 15×15 LGSO array with BaSO{sub 4} reflector, and a 1 mm thick acrylic light guide for light distribution between the dSiPM pixels. The active area of each dSiPM pixel was 3.2×3.9 mm{sup 2} and the size of each LGSO scintillator element was 0.7×0.7×6 mm{sup 3}. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrated the performance of the PET detector by measuring the energy resolution, 2D flood map, peak to valley (P/V) ratio, and coincidence resolving time (CRT). All measurements were performed at a temperature of 10±1 ℃. The average energy resolution was 15.6% (without correcting for saturation effects) at 511 keV and the best CRT was 242±5 ps. The 2D flood map obtained with an energy window of 400–600 keV demonstrated clear identification of all pixels, and the average P/V ratio of the X- and Y-directions were 7.31 and 7.81, respectively. This study demonstrated that the PET detector could be suitable for application in high resolution PET while achieving good timing resolution.

  12. Modeling and Grid Generation of Iced Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickerman, Mary B.; Baez, Marivell; Braun, Donald C.; Hackenberg, Anthony W.; Pennline, James A.; Schilling, Herbert W.

    2007-01-01

    SmaggIce Version 2.0 is a software toolkit for geometric modeling and grid generation for two-dimensional, singleand multi-element, clean and iced airfoils. A previous version of SmaggIce was described in Preparing and Analyzing Iced Airfoils, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 8 (August 2004), page 32. To recapitulate: Ice shapes make it difficult to generate quality grids around airfoils, yet these grids are essential for predicting ice-induced complex flow. This software efficiently creates high-quality structured grids with tools that are uniquely tailored for various ice shapes. SmaggIce Version 2.0 significantly enhances the previous version primarily by adding the capability to generate grids for multi-element airfoils. This version of the software is an important step in streamlining the aeronautical analysis of ice airfoils using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. The user may prepare the ice shape, define the flow domain, decompose it into blocks, generate grids, modify/divide/merge blocks, and control grid density and smoothness. All these steps may be performed efficiently even for the difficult glaze and rime ice shapes. Providing the means to generate highly controlled grids near rough ice, the software includes the creation of a wrap-around block (called the "viscous sublayer block"), which is a thin, C-type block around the wake line and iced airfoil. For multi-element airfoils, the software makes use of grids that wrap around and fill in the areas between the viscous sub-layer blocks for all elements that make up the airfoil. A scripting feature records the history of interactive steps, which can be edited and replayed later to produce other grids. Using this version of SmaggIce, ice shape handling and grid generation can become a practical engineering process, rather than a laborious research effort.

  13. Imaging of hard X-rays with sub-millimetre spatial resolution by means of a xenon filled MWPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.

    1979-11-01

    Results are presented showing that a beam of Eu K X-rays (41.5 keV) can be imaged in a xenon filled (NTP) MWPC with sub-millimetre spatial resolution. In the best case (at low data rates) the predicted physical limit of 0.5 mm fwhm is observed. (author)

  14. Influence of Terraced area DEM Resolution on RUSLE LS Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongming; Baartman, Jantiene E. M.; Yang, Xiaomei; Gai, Lingtong; Geissen, Viollette

    2017-04-01

    Topography has a large impact on the erosion of soil by water. Slope steepness and slope length are combined (the LS factor) in the universal soil-loss equation (USLE) and its revised version (RUSLE) for predicting soil erosion. The LS factor is usually extracted from a digital elevation model (DEM). The grid size of the DEM will thus influence the LS factor and the subsequent calculation of soil loss. Terracing is considered as a support practice factor (P) in the USLE/RUSLE equations, which is multiplied with the other USLE/RUSLE factors. However, as terraces change the slope length and steepness, they also affect the LS factor. The effect of DEM grid size on the LS factor has not been investigated for a terraced area. We obtained a high-resolution DEM by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) photogrammetry, from which the slope steepness, slope length, and LS factor were extracted. The changes in these parameters at various DEM resolutions were then analysed. The DEM produced detailed LS-factor maps, particularly for low LS factors. High (small valleys, gullies, and terrace ridges) and low (flats and terrace fields) spatial frequencies were both sensitive to changes in resolution, so the areas of higher and lower slope steepness both decreased with increasing grid size. Average slope steepness decreased and average slope length increased with grid size. Slope length, however, had a larger effect than slope steepness on the LS factor as the grid size varied. The LS factor increased when the grid size increased from 0.5 to 30-m and increased significantly at grid sizes >5-m. The LS factor was increasingly overestimated as grid size decreased. The LS factor decreased from grid sizes of 30 to 100-m, because the details of the terraced terrain were gradually lost, but the factor was still overestimated.

  15. Effect of structure on nonlinear optical properties in CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning, Tingyin [School of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Zhou, Yueliang, E-mail: ylzhou@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-12-21

    We report the third-order nonlinear optical properties of CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} films with different preferred growth orientations on MgO and fused silica substrates. The films have (310)- and (220)-orientation on MgO and fused silica, respectively, due to the lattice-mismatch. Raman spectra further indicate different atom-bonding states in the films. The nonlinear optical measurements show the films possess the same self-defocusing behavior but with different values of nonlinear refraction, and changed signs of nonlinear absorption. The difference of optical nonlinearity in CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} films is ascribed to different lattice parameters and intermediate levels induced by structure.

  16. Films of brookite TiO{sub 2} nanorods/nanoparticles deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation as NO{sub 2} gas-sensing layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caricato, A.P.; Cesaria, M.; Luches, A.; Martino, M. [University of Salento, Department of Physics, Lecce (Italy); Buonsanti, R. [Istituto di Nanoscienze del CNR, National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), Lecce (Italy); Catalano, M.; Manera, M.G.; Taurino, A.; Rella, R. [IMM-CNR, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, Lecce (Italy); Cozzoli, P.D. [Istituto di Nanoscienze del CNR, National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), Lecce (Italy); University of Salento, Department of Innovation Engineering, Lecce (Italy)

    2011-09-15

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanorods in the brookite phase, with average dimensions of 3-4 nm x 20-50 nm, were synthesized by a wet-chemical aminolysis route and used as precursors for thin films that were deposited by the matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique. A nanorod solution in toluene (0.016 wt% TiO{sub 2}) was frozen at the liquid-nitrogen temperature and irradiated with a KrF excimer laser at a fluence of 350 mJ/cm{sup 2} and repetition rate of 10 Hz. Single-crystal Si wafers, silica slides, carbon-coated Cu grids and alumina interdigitated slabs were used as substrates to allow performing different characterizations. Films fabricated with 6000 laser pulses had an average thickness of {proportional_to}150 nm, and a complete coverage of the selected substrate as achieved. High-resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigations evidenced the formation of quite rough films incorporating individually distinguishable TiO{sub 2} nanorods and crystalline spherical nanoparticles with an average diameter of {proportional_to}13 nm. Spectrophotometric analysis showed high transparency through the UV-Vis spectral range. Promising resistive sensing responses to 1 ppm of NO{sub 2} mixed in dry air were obtained. (orig.)

  17. Phase evolution and its effect on magnetic properties of Nd sub 6 sub 0 Al sub 1 sub 0 Fe sub 2 sub 0 Co sub 1 sub 0 bulk metallic glass

    CERN Document Server

    Lei Xia; Pan, M X; Zhao, D Q; Wang, W H; Dong, Y D

    2003-01-01

    The thermal stability of nanocrystalline clusters, the phase evolution, and their effects on magnetic properties were studied for as-cast Nd sub 6 sub 0 Al sub 1 sub 0 Fe sub 2 sub 0 Co sub 1 sub 0 alloy using differential scanning calorimetry curves, x-ray diffraction patterns, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transition electron microscopy. Thermomagnetic curves and hysteresis loops of the bulk metallic glass were measured during the annealing process. The high thermostability of the hard magnetic properties of the samples observed is attributed to the stability of the nanocrystalline clusters upon annealing, while the slight enhancement in the magnetization is due to the precipitation of some Nd-rich metastable phases. The mechanism of thermostability of the nanocrystalline clusters and the formation of the metastable phases are discussed.

  18. System modelling and online optimal management of MicroGrid using Mesh Adaptive Direct Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Faisal A. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Omar Al-Mukhtar University, P.O. Box 919, El-Bieda (Libya); Koivo, Heikki N. [Department of Automation and Systems Technology, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 5500, FIN-02015 HUT (Finland)

    2010-06-15

    This paper presents a generalized formulation to determine the optimal operating strategy and cost optimization scheme for a MicroGrid. Prior to the optimization of the MicroGrid itself, models for the system components are determined using real data. The proposed cost function takes into consideration the costs of the emissions, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}, start-up costs, as well as the operation and maintenance costs. A daily income and outgo from sold or purchased power is also added. The MicroGrid considered in this paper consists of a wind turbine, a micro turbine, a diesel generator, a photovoltaic array, a fuel cell, and a battery storage. In this work, the Mesh Adaptive Direct Search (MADS) algorithm is used to minimize the cost function of the system while constraining it to meet the customer demand and safety of the system. In comparison with previously proposed techniques, a significant reduction is obtained. (author)

  19. Effects of additive Pd on the structures and electrochemical hydrogen storage properties of Mg{sub 67}Co{sub 33}-based composites or alloys with BCC phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yao; Zhuang, Xiangyang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Zhu, Yunfeng [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, 5 Xinmofan Road, Nanjing 210009 (China); Zhan, Leyu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Pu, Zhenggan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, 5 Xinmofan Road, Nanjing 210009 (China); Wan, Neng [SEU-FEI Nano Pico Center, Key Laboratory of MEMS of Ministry of Education, School of Electronics Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Li, Liquan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, 5 Xinmofan Road, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Additive Pd in Mg{sub 67}Co{sub 33} benefits to form a ternary BCC alloy. • Introducing 5.0 at.% Pd in Mg{sub 67}Co{sub 33} lifts the initial discharge capacity from 10 mAh/g to maximum 530 mAh/g. • Exchange current density was increased due to the homogeneously dispersed Pd. • Additive Pd slightly enhances the hydrogen diffusion coefficient of Mg-Co-Pd composites or alloys. - Abstract: Mg{sub 67}Co{sub 33} and Mg{sub 67}Co{sub 33}-Pd composites/alloys prepared by ball milling for 120 h possess nano-crystalline with body-centered cubic (BCC) structure, which was verified by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) analyses. The introduced 5.0 at.% Pd significantly lifts the initial discharge capacity from 10 mAh g{sup -1} of Mg{sub 67}Co{sub 33} to maximum 530 mAh g{sup -1}. Pd also drives the Mg{sub 67}Co{sub 33}-Pd composite forming a full BCC alloy during ball milling. The distribution of Pd gradually becomes homogeneous with the augmentation of the ball milling time according to the analyses by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS). Exchange current density increased with the milling time and can be ascribed to the homogeneously dispersion of Pd over the surface. The introduced Pd also enhances the hydrogen diffusion coefficient of the Mg{sub 67}Co{sub 33}-Pd composites/alloys.

  20. Microstructural and magnetic studies on BaMg{sub x}Zn{sub x}X{sub 2x}Fe{sub 12−4x}O{sub 19} (X=Zr,Ce,Sn) prepared via mechanical activation method to act as a microwave absorber in X-band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afghahi, Seyyed Salman Seyyed [Department of Engineering, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafarian, Mojtaba, E-mail: m.jafarian@iau-shahrood.ac.ir [Department of Material Engineering, South Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Atassi, Yomen [Department of Applied Physics, Higher Institute for Applied Sciences and Technology, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, doped barium hexaferrite with the composition of BaMg{sub x}Zn{sub x}X{sub 2x}Fe{sub 12−4x}O{sub 19} (where x= 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9 and X= Zr, Ce, Sn) was prepared via mechanical activation. X-ray diffractometer (XRD), FTIR spectrophotometer, Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and vector network analyzer (VNA) were used to analyze its phases, structure, electromagnetic and microwave absorption properties respectively. Based on the results, single phase barium hexaferrite was obtained in all cases after milling the mixed powders for 20 h plus calcination at 1000 °C for 5 h. Morphology of the particles in all of the doped samples was completely hexagonal shape and they had an appropriate distribution. It was found that the sample of BaMg{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.9}Zr{sub 1.8}Fe{sub 8.4}O{sub 19} with saturation magnetization and coercive force of 37.3 emu/g and 94 Oe respectively possessed the maximum reflection loss of −19.3 dB at 12.3 GHz with 1.7 GHz bandwidth. - Highlights: • The mechanical activation method was used to prepare: BaMg{sub x}Zn{sub x}X{sub 2x}Fe{sub 12−4x}O{sub 19}(X=Zr, Ce, and Sn) with values of xequal to 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 0.9. • Morphology of the particles in all of the doped samples was completely hexagonal shape and they had an appropriate distribution. • BaMg{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.9}Zr{sub 1.8}Fe{sub 8.4}O{sub 19} possesses the maximum reflection loss of −19.3 dB at 12.3 GHz with 1.7 GHz bandwidth.

  1. Super-resolution imaging and tracking of protein-protein interactions in sub-diffraction cellular space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Xing, Dong; Su, Qian Peter; Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Jiamei; Kong, Xinyu; Xue, Boxin; Wang, Sheng; Sun, Hao; Tao, Yile; Sun, Yujie

    2014-07-01

    Imaging the location and dynamics of individual interacting protein pairs is essential but often difficult because of the fluorescent background from other paired and non-paired molecules, particularly in the sub-diffraction cellular space. Here we develop a new method combining bimolecular fluorescence complementation and photoactivated localization microscopy for super-resolution imaging and single-molecule tracking of specific protein-protein interactions. The method is used to study the interaction of two abundant proteins, MreB and EF-Tu, in Escherichia coli cells. The super-resolution imaging shows interesting distribution and domain sizes of interacting MreB-EF-Tu pairs as a subpopulation of total EF-Tu. The single-molecule tracking of MreB, EF-Tu and MreB-EF-Tu pairs reveals intriguing localization-dependent heterogonous dynamics and provides valuable insights to understanding the roles of MreB-EF-Tu interactions.

  2. Super-resolution imaging and tracking of protein–protein interactions in sub-diffraction cellular space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Xing, Dong; Su, Qian Peter; Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Jiamei; Kong, Xinyu; Xue, Boxin; Wang, Sheng; Sun, Hao; Tao, Yile; Sun, Yujie

    2014-01-01

    Imaging the location and dynamics of individual interacting protein pairs is essential but often difficult because of the fluorescent background from other paired and non-paired molecules, particularly in the sub-diffraction cellular space. Here we develop a new method combining bimolecular fluorescence complementation and photoactivated localization microscopy for super-resolution imaging and single-molecule tracking of specific protein–protein interactions. The method is used to study the interaction of two abundant proteins, MreB and EF-Tu, in Escherichia coli cells. The super-resolution imaging shows interesting distribution and domain sizes of interacting MreB–EF-Tu pairs as a subpopulation of total EF-Tu. The single-molecule tracking of MreB, EF-Tu and MreB–EF-Tu pairs reveals intriguing localization-dependent heterogonous dynamics and provides valuable insights to understanding the roles of MreB–EF-Tu interactions. PMID:25030837

  3. 24 arc-second Kenai Peninsula Bororugh Alaska Elevation Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 24 arc-second Kenai Peninsula Bororugh Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 24 second resolution in geographic coordinates....

  4. Electronic structure of Ti/sub 2/O/sub 3/, V/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarenko, T N; Zhurakovskii, E A; Dzeganovskii, V P [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Problem Materialovedeniya

    1975-11-01

    Electronic structure of oxides Ti/sub 2/O/sub 3/, V/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was elucidated by means of X-ray and ESCA methods and the results were compared with the data obtained by other methods and with the available models of electronic structures. Energy diagram of V/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and common energy scale of X-ray spectra of Ti and Cr in Ti/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ are presented. X-ray spectra show that these oxides possess the states which are related genetically to the M4p-states i.e. the X-ray data complement essentially to the result of optical and electrophysical measurements. MO and M/sub 2/O/sub 3/ compounds in the region of Fermi level have overlapping emission and absorption spectra which is specific to the matters with the metallic type of bonding. Actually TiO, VO, Ti/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and V/sub 2/O/sub 3/ have metallic type of bonding. However such overlap was observed in Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ as well whose forbidden zone according to photoconductivity measurments is about 3 eV. Absence of energy gap between emission and absorption spectra in Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ may be explained by traces of impurities which convert dielectrics conductors - impurities act as agents caus:ng filling or generation of vacancies rather than independent allowing additives. On the other hand this may be due to the defects in Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ lattice which may cause appearance of excited states in forbidden zone. These investigations enable to draw energy diagram of V/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and to combine the spectra of M in Ti/sub 2/O/sub 3/ into common energy scheme. Analysis of the diagram and combined spectra revealed great similarity in the electronic structures of M/sub 2/O/sub 3/ oxides (M - Ti, V, Cr) .

  5. High resolution X-ray spectromicroscopy of laser produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faenov, A.Ya. [Multi-charged Ions Spectra Data Center of VNIIFTRI (MISDC), Mendeleevo, Moscow region, (Russian Federation)

    2000-01-01

    In recent years new classes of X-ray spectroscopic instruments possessing both dispersive and focusing properties have been manufactured. Their principal advantage over more traditional instruments is that they combine very high luminosity with high spatial resolution, while preserving the highest possible spectral resolution of their dispersive elements. These instruments opened up the registration of plasmas in new regimes and surroundings. The measurements delivered new information about the properties of even previously studied traditional plasma objects (e.g. ns-laser produced plasmas). Also the detailed investigation of relatively new plasma laboratory sources with very small dimensions and low energy content (e.g. mJ fs-laser pulses) became possible. The purpose of this report is to give a short review of the experimental and theoretical results obtained in the past few years by MISDC (Multi-charged Ions Spectra Data Center) research team in the field of X-ray spectroscopy of a laser-produced plasma. Experimental spectra have been obtained at various laser installations with nanosecond, sub-nanosecond, picosecond and sub-picosecond pulses interacting with solid, gaseous or cluster targets in collaborations with research teams from Russia, USA, Germany, France, Poland, Belgium, Italy, China and Israel. Practically all results have been obtained with the help of spectrographs with spherically bent mica crystals operating in FSSR-1D, 2D schemes. (author)

  6. In situ loading of Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4} on ultrathin g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanosheets with highly enhanced photocatalytic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yunfeng; Jin, Renxi; Fang, Xu; Yang, Yang; Yang, Man; Liu, Xianchun [Jilin Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials, Department of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Xing, Yan, E-mail: xingy202@nenu.edu.cn [Jilin Provincial Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials, Department of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Song, Shuyan [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Graphical abstract: Ultrathin g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanosheets (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}−NS) with improved electron transport ability and large number of active sites are employed instead of bulk g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} to prepare the Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}−NS heterostructured photocatalysts, which exhibit remarkable photocatalytic activity for wastewater treatment. - Highlights: • Ag2WO4/g-C3N4-NS photocatalysts were obtained by a deposition-precipitation method. • Ag2WO4/g-C3N4-NS possess large surface areas and increased lifetime of charges. • Ag2WO4/g-C3N4-NS exhibit enhanced activity on degradation of RhB and MO. • The photocatalytic mechanism of the Ag2WO4/g-C3N4-NS system were investigated. - Abstract: The g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanosheets (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}−NS) exhibit more excellent property than common bulk g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}-B) due to their large surface areas, improved electron transport ability and well dispersion in water. In this work, ultrathin g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}−NS with a thickness of about 2.7 nm have been synthesized by a simple thermal exfoliation of bulk g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and then Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4} nanoparticles are in situ loaded on their surface to construct the Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}−NS heterostructured photocatalysts. Due to their unique physicochemical properties, the as-prepared heterostructures possess a fast interfacial charge transfer and increased lifetime of photo-excited charge carriers, and exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity. Under visible light irradiation, the optimum photocatalytic activity of Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}−NS composites is almost 53.6 and 26.5 times higher than that of pure g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}-B and Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}-B heterostructures towards the degradation of rhodamine B, respectively, and is almost 30.6 and 9.8 times higher towards the degradation of methyl orange, respectively. In addition, the natural sunlight

  7. Accounting for sub-resolution pores in models of water and solute transport in soils based on computed tomography images: Are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baveye, Philippe C.; Pot, Valérie; Garnier, Patricia

    2017-12-01

    In the last decade, X-ray computed tomography (CT) has become widely used to characterize the geometry and topology of the pore space of soils and natural porous media. Regardless of the resolution of CT images, a fundamental problem associated with their use, for example as a starting point in simulation efforts, is that sub-resolution pores are not detected. Over the last few years, a particular type of modeling method, known as ;Grey; or ;Partial Bounce Back; Lattice-Boltzmann (LB), has been adopted by increasing numbers of researchers to try to account for sub-resolution pores in the modeling of water and solute transport in natural porous media. In this short paper, we assess the extent to which Grey LB methods indeed offer a workable solution to the problem at hand. We conclude that, in spite of significant computational advances, a major experimental hurdle related to the evaluation of the penetrability of sub-resolution pores, is blocking the way ahead. This hurdle will need to be cleared before Grey LB can become a credible option in the microscale modeling of soils and sediments. A necessarily interdisciplinary effort, involving both modelers and experimentalists, is needed to clear the path forward.

  8. HYSOGs250m, global gridded hydrologic soil groups for curve-number-based runoff modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, C Wade; Prihodko, Lara; Anchang, Julius; Kumar, Sanath; Ji, Wenjie; Hanan, Niall P

    2018-05-15

    Hydrologic soil groups (HSGs) are a fundamental component of the USDA curve-number (CN) method for estimation of rainfall runoff; yet these data are not readily available in a format or spatial-resolution suitable for regional- and global-scale modeling applications. We developed a globally consistent, gridded dataset defining HSGs from soil texture, bedrock depth, and groundwater. The resulting data product-HYSOGs250m-represents runoff potential at 250 m spatial resolution. Our analysis indicates that the global distribution of soil is dominated by moderately high runoff potential, followed by moderately low, high, and low runoff potential. Low runoff potential, sandy soils are found primarily in parts of the Sahara and Arabian Deserts. High runoff potential soils occur predominantly within tropical and sub-tropical regions. No clear pattern could be discerned for moderately low runoff potential soils, as they occur in arid and humid environments and at both high and low elevations. Potential applications of this data include CN-based runoff modeling, flood risk assessment, and as a covariate for biogeographical analysis of vegetation distributions.

  9. Considerations on modelling grid-integrated PV

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter-Brown, Clinton G

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available , transmission and sub- transmission)Customer voltages Must be between 90% and 110% 10 Peak load Grid A uto transform er F eeder Load 11 kV 132 kV OLTC 5% voltage drop 105% 5MW 100kW 5% boost 5% voltage drop 100% 100% 10% voltage drop 90% 105 100 90 90 92... 105 104.5 109 108 90 92.5 95 97.5 100 102.5 105 107.5 110 0 5 V o lt a g e ( % ) Distance (km) 12 Voltage profiles with no generation Low load 1% rise limit Peak load 15% drop limit 13 Peak load with generation Grid A uto transform er Feeder Load 11...

  10. Luminescence rise time in self-activated PbWO{sub 4} and Ce-doped Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12} scintillation crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auffray, E. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Augulis, R. [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanorių av. 231, Vilnius (Lithuania); Borisevich, A. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Bobruiskaya str. 11, Minsk (Belarus); Gulbinas, V. [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanorių av. 231, Vilnius (Lithuania); Fedorov, A.; Korjik, M. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Bobruiskaya str. 11, Minsk (Belarus); Lucchini, M.T. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Mechinsky, V. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Bobruiskaya str. 11, Minsk (Belarus); Nargelas, S. [Vilnius University, Universiteto str. 3, Vilnius (Lithuania); Songaila, E. [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanorių av. 231, Vilnius (Lithuania); Tamulaitis, G. [Vilnius University, Universiteto str. 3, Vilnius (Lithuania); Vaitkevičius, A., E-mail: augustas.vaitkevicius@ff.vu.lt [Vilnius University, Universiteto str. 3, Vilnius (Lithuania); Zazubovich, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi Str. 1, Tartu (Estonia)

    2016-10-15

    The time resolution of scintillation detectors of ionizing radiation is one of the key parameters sought for in the current and future high-energy physics experiments. This study is encouraged by the necessity to find novel detection methods enabling a sub-10-ps time resolution in scintillation detectors and is focused on the exploitation of fast luminescence rise front. Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques have been used to study two promising scintillators: self-activated lead tungstate (PWO, PbWO{sub 4}) and Ce-doped gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (GAGG, Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12}). A sub-picosecond PL rise time is observed in PWO, while longer processes in the PL response in GAGG:Ce are detected and studied. The mechanisms responsible for the PL rise time in self-activated and doped scintillators are under discussion. - Highlights: • Photoluminescence rise time is studied in two scintillators: PWO and GAGG:Ce. • Sub-picosecond photoluminescence rise time in PWO is observed for the first time. • A multicomponent luminescence rise edge is observed in GAGG:Ce. • The mechanisms behind luminescence kinetics in the crystals are under discussion.

  11. Resolution convergence in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations using adaptive mesh refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snaith, Owain N.; Park, Changbom; Kim, Juhan; Rosdahl, Joakim

    2018-06-01

    We have explored the evolution of gas distributions from cosmological simulations carried out using the RAMSES adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code, to explore the effects of resolution on cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. It is vital to understand the effect of both the resolution of initial conditions (ICs) and the final resolution of the simulation. Lower initial resolution simulations tend to produce smaller numbers of low-mass structures. This will strongly affect the assembly history of objects, and has the same effect of simulating different cosmologies. The resolution of ICs is an important factor in simulations, even with a fixed maximum spatial resolution. The power spectrum of gas in simulations using AMR diverges strongly from the fixed grid approach - with more power on small scales in the AMR simulations - even at fixed physical resolution and also produces offsets in the star formation at specific epochs. This is because before certain times the upper grid levels are held back to maintain approximately fixed physical resolution, and to mimic the natural evolution of dark matter only simulations. Although the impact of hold-back falls with increasing spatial and IC resolutions, the offsets in the star formation remain down to a spatial resolution of 1 kpc. These offsets are of the order of 10-20 per cent, which is below the uncertainty in the implemented physics but are expected to affect the detailed properties of galaxies. We have implemented a new grid-hold-back approach to minimize the impact of hold-back on the star formation rate.

  12. Reinforcement Learning Based Novel Adaptive Learning Framework for Smart Grid Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Smart grid is a potential infrastructure to supply electricity demand for end users in a safe and reliable manner. With the rapid increase of the share of renewable energy and controllable loads in smart grid, the operation uncertainty of smart grid has increased briskly during recent years. The forecast is responsible for the safety and economic operation of the smart grid. However, most existing forecast methods cannot account for the smart grid due to the disabilities to adapt to the varying operational conditions. In this paper, reinforcement learning is firstly exploited to develop an online learning framework for the smart grid. With the capability of multitime scale resolution, wavelet neural network has been adopted in the online learning framework to yield reinforcement learning and wavelet neural network (RLWNN based adaptive learning scheme. The simulations on two typical prediction problems in smart grid, including wind power prediction and load forecast, validate the effectiveness and the scalability of the proposed RLWNN based learning framework and algorithm.

  13. Investigation of grid performance using simple image quality tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogan Bor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiscatter grids improve the X-ray image contrast at a cost of patient radiation doses. The choice of appropriate grid or its removal requires a good knowledge of grid characteristics, especially for pediatric digital imaging. The aim of this work is to understand the relation between grid performance parameters and some numerical image quality metrics for digital radiological examinations. The grid parameters such as bucky factor (BF, selectivity (Σ, Contrast improvement factor (CIF, and signal-to-noise improvement factor (SIF were determined following the measurements of primary, scatter, and total radiations with a digital fluoroscopic system for the thicknesses of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm polymethyl methacrylate blocks at the tube voltages of 70, 90, and 120 kVp. Image contrast for low- and high-contrast objects and high-contrast spatial resolution were measured with simple phantoms using the same scatter thicknesses and tube voltages. BF and SIF values were also calculated from the images obtained with and without grids. The correlation coefficients between BF values obtained using two approaches (grid parameters and image quality metrics were in good agreement. Proposed approach provides a quick and practical way of estimating grid performance for different digital fluoroscopic examinations.

  14. Design and Implement a Digital H{sub {infinity}}Robust Controller for a MW-Class PMSG-Based Grid-Interactive Wind Energy Conversion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howlander, Abdul Motin [Faculty of Engineering, Univ. of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Urasaki, Naomitsu [Faculty of Engineering, Univ. of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Yona, Atsushi [Faculty of Engineering, Univ. of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Senjyu, Tomonobu [Faculty of Engineering, Univ. of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Saber, Ahmed Yousuf [Operation Technology, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2013-04-15

    A digital H{sub {infinity}}controller for a permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG) based wind energy conversion system (WECS) is presented. Wind energy is an uncertain fluctuating resource which requires a tight control management. So, it is still an exigent task for the control design engineers. The conventional proportional-integral (PI) control is not ideal during high turbulence wind velocities, and the nonlinear behavior of the power converters. These are raising interest towards the robust control concepts. The robust design is to find a controller, for a given system, such that the closed-loop system becomes robust that assurance high-integrity and fault tolerant control system, robust H{sub {infinity}}control theory has befallen a standard design method of choice over the past two decades in industrial control applications. The robust H{sub {infinity}}control theory is also gaining eminence in the WECS. Due to the implementation complexity for the continuous H{sub {infinity}}controller, and availability of the high speedy micro-controllers, the design of a sample-data or a digital H{sub {infinity}}controller is very important for the realistic implementation. But there isn’t a single research to evaluate the performance of the digital H{sub {infinity}}controller for the WECS. In this paper, the proposed digital H{sub {infinity}}controller schemes comprise for the both generator and grid interactive power converters, and the control performances are compared with the conventional PI controller and the fuzzy controller. Simulation results confirm the efficacy of the proposed method Energies 2013, 6 2085 which are ensured the WECS stabilities, mitigate shaft stress, and improving the DC-link voltage and output power qualities.

  15. Evaluation of load flow and grid expansion in a unit-commitment and expansion optimization model SciGRID International Conference on Power Grid Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkpiel, Charlotte; Biener, Wolfgang; Shammugam, Shivenes; Längle, Sven

    2018-02-01

    Energy system models serve as a basis for long term system planning. Joint optimization of electricity generating technologies, storage systems and the electricity grid leads to lower total system cost compared to an approach in which the grid expansion follows a given technology portfolio and their distribution. Modelers often face the problem of finding a good tradeoff between computational time and the level of detail that can be modeled. This paper analyses the differences between a transport model and a DC load flow model to evaluate the validity of using a simple but faster transport model within the system optimization model in terms of system reliability. The main findings in this paper are that a higher regional resolution of a system leads to better results compared to an approach in which regions are clustered as more overloads can be detected. An aggregation of lines between two model regions compared to a line sharp representation has little influence on grid expansion within a system optimizer. In a DC load flow model overloads can be detected in a line sharp case, which is therefore preferred. Overall the regions that need to reinforce the grid are identified within the system optimizer. Finally the paper recommends the usage of a load-flow model to test the validity of the model results.

  16. A HYBRID SOLAR WIND MODEL OF THE CESE+HLL METHOD WITH A YIN-YANG OVERSET GRID AND AN AMR GRID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xueshang; Zhang Shaohua; Xiang Changqing; Yang Liping; Jiang Chaowei; Wu, S. T.

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid three-dimensional (3D) MHD model for solar wind study is proposed in the present paper with combined grid systems and solvers. The computational domain from the Sun to Earth space is decomposed into the near-Sun and off-Sun domains, which are respectively constructed with a Yin-Yang overset grid system and a Cartesian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) grid system and coupled with a domain connection interface in the overlapping region between the near-Sun and off-Sun domains. The space-time conservation element and solution element method is used in the near-Sun domain, while the Harten-Lax-Leer method is employed in the off-Sun domain. The Yin-Yang overset grid can avoid well-known singularity and polar grid convergence problems and its body-fitting property helps achieve high-quality resolution near the solar surface. The block structured AMR Cartesian grid can automatically capture far-field plasma flow features, such as heliospheric current sheets and shock waves, and at the same time, it can save significant computational resources compared to the uniformly structured Cartesian grid. A numerical study of the solar wind structure for Carrington rotation 2069 shows that the newly developed hybrid MHD solar wind model successfully produces many realistic features of the background solar wind, in both the solar corona and interplanetary space, by comparisons with multiple solar and interplanetary observations.

  17. Power Measurement and Data Logger Device with High-Resolution for Industrial DC-Grid Application

    OpenAIRE

    Apse-Apsitis, Peteris; Senfelds, Armands; Avotins, Ansis; Paugurs, Arturs; Prieditis, Marcis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract – power and energy measurement and monitoring is a key leading factor for many industries in terms of energy and cost efficiency evaluation. Due to trends of Smart Grid concept application in industrial environment, including decentralized DC-Grid implementation, for precise evaluation - faster and lower cost measurement equipment is needed. Manufacturing industry use lot of industrial robots that have dynamic load characteristics, and to know their consumption faster measurement equ...

  18. Sub-picosecond Resolution Time-to-Digital Converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratov, Vladimir [Advanced Science and Novel Technology Company, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA (United States); Katzman, Vladimir [Advanced Science and Novel Technology Company, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA (United States); Binkley, Jeb [Advanced Science and Novel Technology Company, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA (United States)

    2006-03-30

    Time-to-digital converters with sub-picosecond resolutions are needed to satisfy the requirements of time-on-flight measurements of the next generation of high energy and nuclear physics experiments. The converters must be highly integrated, power effective, low cost, and feature plug-and-play capabilities to handle the increasing number of channels (up to hundreds of millions) in future Department of Energy experiments. Current state-off-the-art time-to-digital converter integrated circuits do not have the sufficient degree of integration and flexibility to fulfill all the described requirements. During Phase I, the Advanced Science and Novel Technology Company in cooperation with the nuclear physics division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed the architecture of a novel time-to-digital converter with multiple channels connected to an external processor through a special interfacing block and synchronized by clock signals generated by an internal phase-locked loop. The critical blocks of the system including signal delay lines and delay-locked loops with proprietary differential delay cells, as well as the required digital code converter and the clock period counter have been designed and simulated using the advanced SiGe120 BiCMOS technological process. The results of investigations demonstrate a possibility to achieve the digitization accuracy within 1ps. ADSANTEC has demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed concept in computer simulations. The proposed system will be a critical component for the next generation of NEP experiments.

  19. FitEM2EM--tools for low resolution study of macromolecular assembly and dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziv Frankenstein

    Full Text Available Studies of the structure and dynamics of macromolecular assemblies often involve comparison of low resolution models obtained using different techniques such as electron microscopy or atomic force microscopy. We present new computational tools for comparing (matching and docking of low resolution structures, based on shape complementarity. The matched or docked objects are represented by three dimensional grids where the value of each grid point depends on its position with regard to the interior, surface or exterior of the object. The grids are correlated using fast Fourier transformations producing either matches of related objects or docking models depending on the details of the grid representations. The procedures incorporate thickening and smoothing of the surfaces of the objects which effectively compensates for differences in the resolution of the matched/docked objects, circumventing the need for resolution modification. The presented matching tool FitEM2EMin successfully fitted electron microscopy structures obtained at different resolutions, different conformers of the same structure and partial structures, ranking correct matches at the top in every case. The differences between the grid representations of the matched objects can be used to study conformation differences or to characterize the size and shape of substructures. The presented low-to-low docking tool FitEM2EMout ranked the expected models at the top.

  20. Effects of MnO{sub 2} doping on structure, dielectric and piezoelectric properties of 0.825NaNbO{sub 3}-0.175Ba{sub 0.6}(Bi{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}){sub 0.4}TiO{sub 3} lead-free ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Ximing; Lin, Dunmin; Zheng, Qiaoji; Sun, Hailing; Wan, Yang; Wu, Xiaochun [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, and Visual Computing and Virtual Reality Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Normal University, Chengdu 610066 (China); Wu, Lang [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Lead-free ceramics 0.825NaNbO{sub 3}-0.175Ba{sub 0.6}(Bi{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}){sub 0.4}TiO{sub 3} + xmol% MnO{sub 2} were prepared by an ordinary sintering technique and the effects of MnO{sub 2} doping on the structure, dielectric, and piezoelectric properties of the ceramics were studied. The ceramics with perovskite structure are transformed from tetragonal to pseudocubic phases by increasing the doping level of MnO{sub 2}. After the addition of MnO{sub 2}, the Curie temperature T{sub C} of the ceramics decreases and the ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition at T{sub C} becomes more diffusive. Because of the donor and acceptor doping effects of Mn ions simultaneously, the piezoelectric constant d{sub 33}, electromechanical coupling coefficient k{sub p}, relative permittivity {epsilon}{sub r}, and mechanical quality factor Q{sub m} are enhanced considerably after the addition of 1 mol% MnO{sub 2}. The ceramic with 1 mol% MnO{sub 2} doping possesses the optimum piezoelectricity (d{sub 33} = 131 pC/N and k{sub p} = 21.8%) and relatively high Q{sub m} = 627. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. A deployable telescope for sub-meter resolutions from microsatellite platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolkens, D.; Kuiper, J. M.

    2017-11-01

    Sub-meter resolution imagery has become increasingly important for disaster response, defence and security applications. Earth Observation (EO) at these resolutions has long been the realm of large and heavy telescopes, which results in high image costs, limited availability and long revisit times. Using synthetic aperture technology, instruments can now be developed that can reach these resolutions using a substantially smaller launch volume and mass. To obtain a competitive MicroSatellite telescope design, a concept study was performed to develop a deployable instrument that can reach a ground resolution of 25 cm from an orbital altitude of 500 km. Two classes of instruments were analysed: the Fizeau synthetic aperture, a telescope that uses a segmented primary mirror, and a Michelson synthetic aperture, an instrument concept that combines the light of a distributed array of afocal telescopes into a final image. In a trade-off the Fizeau synthetic aperture was selected as the most promising concept for obtaining high resolution imagery from a Low Earth Orbit. The optical design of the Fizeau synthetic aperture is based on a full-field Korsch telescope that has been optimized for compactness and an excellent wavefront quality. It uses three aperture segments in a tri-arm configuration that can be folded alongside the instrument during launch. The secondary mirror is mounted on a deployable boom, further decreasing the launch volume. To maintain a high image quality while operating in the harsh and dynamic space environment, one of the most challenging obstacles that must be addressed is the very tight tolerance on the positioning of the three primary mirror segments and the secondary mirror. Following a sensitivity analysis, systems engineering budgets have been defined. The instrument concept features a robust thermo-mechanical design, aimed at reducing the mechanical uncertainties to a minimum. Silicon Carbide mirror segments, the use of Invar for the deployable

  2. Sub-nanometre resolution imaging of polymer-fullerene photovoltaic blends using energy-filtered scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Robert C; Pearson, Andrew J; Glen, Tom S; Sasam, Fabian-Cyril; Li, Letian; Dapor, Maurizio; Donald, Athene M; Lidzey, David G; Rodenburg, Cornelia

    2015-04-24

    The resolution capability of the scanning electron microscope has increased immensely in recent years, and is now within the sub-nanometre range, at least for inorganic materials. An equivalent advance has not yet been achieved for imaging the morphologies of nanostructured organic materials, such as organic photovoltaic blends. Here we show that energy-selective secondary electron detection can be used to obtain high-contrast, material-specific images of an organic photovoltaic blend. We also find that we can differentiate mixed phases from pure material phases in our data. The lateral resolution demonstrated is twice that previously reported from secondary electron imaging. Our results suggest that our energy-filtered scanning electron microscopy approach will be able to make major inroads into the understanding of complex, nano-structured organic materials.

  3. Sub-nanometre resolution imaging of polymer–fullerene photovoltaic blends using energy-filtered scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Robert C.; Pearson, Andrew J.; Glen, Tom S.; Sasam, Fabian-Cyril; Li, Letian; Dapor, Maurizio; Donald, Athene M.; Lidzey, David G.; Rodenburg, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    The resolution capability of the scanning electron microscope has increased immensely in recent years, and is now within the sub-nanometre range, at least for inorganic materials. An equivalent advance has not yet been achieved for imaging the morphologies of nanostructured organic materials, such as organic photovoltaic blends. Here we show that energy-selective secondary electron detection can be used to obtain high-contrast, material-specific images of an organic photovoltaic blend. We also find that we can differentiate mixed phases from pure material phases in our data. The lateral resolution demonstrated is twice that previously reported from secondary electron imaging. Our results suggest that our energy-filtered scanning electron microscopy approach will be able to make major inroads into the understanding of complex, nano-structured organic materials. PMID:25906738

  4. PV-hybrid and mini-grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    ) Optimization of a wind/diesel hybrid configuration in a remote grid with battery implementation: Case study of Melinka Island; (23) Provisional acceptance of installations and online data submission of PV and hybrid kits in remote areas of Latin-America under the EC's EURO-SOLAR programme; (24) Experience of the Canary Islands in the development of insular 100 % RES systems and micro-grids; (25) Assessment of photovoltaic hybrid power systems in the United States; (26) Solar hybrid school project in East Malaysia; (27) Eigg Island - Electrification of a British Island by a unique PV wind hydro diesel hybrid system; (28) A pragmatic performance reporting approach for describing PV hybrid systems within mini-grids: Work in progress from IEA's PVPS Task 11 Act. 31; (29) Hybrid renewable energy systems for the supply of services in rural settlements of Mediterranean partner countries. The HYRESS project - The case study of the hybrid system - Micro grid in Egypt. Beside these lectures, the following poster contributions were presented: (1) Performance of conventional MPPT techniques in the presence of partial shielding; (2) Photovoltaic and thermal collector (PV/T) hybrid system's performance analysis under the mild climate conditions of Izmir City; (3) Influential parameters on a building integrated hybrid PVT concentrator; (4) The solution to combine and manage renewable energies in hybrid applications and mini-grids; (5) Stabilization of distribution networks with PV and vanadium redox-battery backup systems - Simulation and first experiences; (6) Control, monitoring and data acquisition architecture design for clean production of hydrogen from mini-wind energy; (7) Remote Telecom System including photovoltaic energy and H{sub 2} production by electrolysis; (8) Effective combination of solar and wind energy systems; (9) Standardisation of distributed grid support - An analogous approach for the smart grid; (10) Optimizing energy management of decentralized

  5. A facile approach to fabricate of photothermal functional Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@CuS microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Baolong; Shan, Yan, E-mail: shanyan@qust.edu.cn; Chen, Kezheng, E-mail: kchen@qust.edu.cn

    2017-06-01

    Photothermal functional Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@CuS microspheres have been prepared successfully by a simple chemical deposition method. The adsorption of cetyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB) on the magnetic microspheres plays an important role in forming the structure of the composites. The present materials are characterized with XRD, TEM, SEM, FTIR, and UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer. The results show that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} microspheres are coated by CuS layer with thickness of 10 nm. The saturation magnetization value of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@CuS core-shell microspheres is 27 emu/g at room temperature and the sample possesses excellent magnetic response in the presence of applied magnetic field. Moreover, these microspheres exhibit good dispersion, suitable size and significant photothermal conversion efficiency up to 20.7% at 808 nm laser irradiation. Fluctuation value of the highest temperature of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@CuS dispersion over four times LASER ON/OFF indicates that photothermal stability of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@CuS microspheres is good. - Highlights: • The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} microspheres have been coated with CuS and the thickness of CuS layer is about 10 nm. • The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@CuS microspheres are ferromagnetism, and possess good photothermal conversion efficiency and photostability. • The materials have great potential application for photothermal therapy.

  6. Electronic and elastic properties of new semiconducting oP{sub 12}-type RuB{sub 2} and OsB{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao Xianfeng; Xu Yuanhui; Gao Faming, E-mail: xfhao1980@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2011-03-30

    Using first-principles total energy calculations we investigate the structural, elastic and electronic properties of new hypothetical oP{sub 12}-type phase RuB{sub 2} and OsB{sub 2}. The calculations indicate that the oP{sub 12}-type phase RuB{sub 2} and OsB{sub 2} are thermodynamically and mechanically stable. Remarkably, the new phases RuB{sub 2} and OsB{sub 2} are predicted to be semiconductors, and the appearance of band gaps is ascribed to the enhanced B-B covalent hybridization. Compared to metallic oP{sub 6}-type RuB{sub 2} and OsB{sub 2} phases, the new phases possess similar mechanical properties and hardness. The combination of the probability of tunable electronic properties, strong stiffness and high hardness make RuB{sub 2} and OsB{sub 2} attractive and interesting for advanced applications.

  7. Syntheses, crystal Structures and electronic Structures of new metal chalcoiodides Bi{sub 2}CuSe{sub 3}I and Bi{sub 6}Cu{sub 3}S{sub 10}I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, I-Chu [Department of Chemistry, and Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Bilc, Daniel I. [Department of Molecular & Biomolecular Physics, National Institute for Research & Development of Isotopic & Molecular Technologies, Cluj-Napoca 400293 (Romania); Manoli, Maria [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Chang, Wei-Yun; Lin, Wen-Fu [Department of Chemistry, and Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Kyratsi, Theodora [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Hsu, Kuei-Fang [Department of Chemistry, and Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2016-02-15

    Two new metal chalcoiodides were synthesized by solid-state reactions at 400 °C. Crystal Data: Bi{sub 2}CuSe{sub 3}I, 1, monoclinic, C2/m, a=14.243(2) Å, b=4.1937(7) Å, c=14.647(2) Å, β=116.095(2)°, V=785.7(2) Å{sup 3}, and Z=4; Bi{sub 6}Cu{sub 3}S{sub 10}I, 2, orthorhombic, Pnma, a=17.476(2) Å, b=4.0078(4) Å, c=27.391(2) Å, V=1918.5(3) Å{sup 3}, and Z=4. Compound 1 adopts a three-dimensional structure formed by two alternative layers, which consist of BiSe{sub 5} square pyramids, BiSe{sub 4}I{sub 2} octahedra, CuSe{sub 4} tetrahedra, and CuSe{sub 2}I{sub 2} tetrahedra. Compound 2 possesses a new open framework built up of BiS{sub 5} square pyramides, BiS{sub 6} octahedra, BiS{sub 8} polyhedra, and CuS{sub 4} tetrahedra where I{sup −} anions are uniquely trapped within the tunnels. Both electronic structures reveal that bismuth and chalcogenide orbitals dominate the bandgaps. The Cu d and I p states contribute to the top of valence bands, in which the distribution of I orbitals may correspond to the relative bonding interactions in 1 and 2. The optical bandgaps determined by the diffuse reflectance spectra are 0.68 eV and 0.72 eV for 1 and 2, respectively. 1 is a p-type semiconductor with high Seebeck coefficients of 460–575 μV/K in the temperature range of 300–425 K. The electrical conductivity is 0.02 S/cm at 425 K for the undoped sample. The thermal conductivity is 0.22 W/mK at 425 K. - Graphical abstract: The hybridization of chalcogenides and iodides produces two new solids Bi2CuSe3I and Bi6Cu3S10I. The I{sup −} anions participate in distinct bonding interactions within the two structures and that is consistent with the analyses of density of states. 1 is a p-type semiconductor with an optical bandgap of 0.68 eV, which possesses high Seebeck coefficient and low lattice thermal conductivity in 300–425 K.

  8. A decision modeling for phasor measurement unit location selection in smart grid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Yup

    As a key technology for enhancing the smart grid system, Phasor Measurement Unit (PMU) provides synchronized phasor measurements of voltages and currents of wide-area electric power grid. With various benefits from its application, one of the critical issues in utilizing PMUs is the optimal site selection of units. The main aim of this research is to develop a decision support system, which can be used in resource allocation task for smart grid system analysis. As an effort to suggest a robust decision model and standardize the decision modeling process, a harmonized modeling framework, which considers operational circumstances of component, is proposed in connection with a deterministic approach utilizing integer programming. With the results obtained from the optimal PMU placement problem, the advantages and potential that the harmonized modeling process possesses are assessed and discussed.

  9. Segmentation of arterial vessel wall motion to sub-pixel resolution using M-mode ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancourt, Craig; Azer, Karim; Ramcharan, Sharmilee L; Bunzel, Michelle; Cambell, Barry R; Sachs, Jeffrey R; Walker, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method for segmenting arterial vessel wall motion to sub-pixel resolution, using the returns from M-mode ultrasound. The technique involves measuring the spatial offset between all pairs of scans from their cross-correlation, converting the spatial offsets to relative wall motion through a global optimization, and finally translating from relative to absolute wall motion by interpolation over the M-mode image. The resulting detailed wall distension waveform has the potential to enhance existing vascular biomarkers, such as strain and compliance, as well as enable new ones.

  10. 3D Staggered-Grid Finite-Difference Simulation of Acoustic Waves in Turbulent Moving Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, N. P.; Aldridge, D. F.; Marlin, D.; Wilson, D. K.; Sullivan, P.; Ostashev, V.

    2003-12-01

    Acoustic wave propagation in a three-dimensional heterogeneous moving atmosphere is accurately simulated with a numerical algorithm recently developed under the DOD Common High Performance Computing Software Support Initiative (CHSSI). Sound waves within such a dynamic environment are mathematically described by a set of four, coupled, first-order partial differential equations governing small-amplitude fluctuations in pressure and particle velocity. The system is rigorously derived from fundamental principles of continuum mechanics, ideal-fluid constitutive relations, and reasonable assumptions that the ambient atmospheric motion is adiabatic and divergence-free. An explicit, time-domain, finite-difference (FD) numerical scheme is used to solve the system for both pressure and particle velocity wavefields. The atmosphere is characterized by 3D gridded models of sound speed, mass density, and the three components of the wind velocity vector. Dependent variables are stored on staggered spatial and temporal grids, and centered FD operators possess 2nd-order and 4th-order space/time accuracy. Accurate sound wave simulation is achieved provided grid intervals are chosen appropriately. The gridding must be fine enough to reduce numerical dispersion artifacts to an acceptable level and maintain stability. The algorithm is designed to execute on parallel computational platforms by utilizing a spatial domain-decomposition strategy. Currently, the algorithm has been validated on four different computational platforms, and parallel scalability of approximately 85% has been demonstrated. Comparisons with analytic solutions for uniform and vertically stratified wind models indicate that the FD algorithm generates accurate results with either a vanishing pressure or vanishing vertical-particle velocity boundary condition. Simulations are performed using a kinematic turbulence wind profile developed with the quasi-wavelet method. In addition, preliminary results are presented

  11. Near-Body Grid Adaption for Overset Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    A solution adaption capability for curvilinear near-body grids has been implemented in the OVERFLOW overset grid computational fluid dynamics code. The approach follows closely that used for the Cartesian off-body grids, but inserts refined grids in the computational space of original near-body grids. Refined curvilinear grids are generated using parametric cubic interpolation, with one-sided biasing based on curvature and stretching ratio of the original grid. Sensor functions, grid marking, and solution interpolation tasks are implemented in the same fashion as for off-body grids. A goal-oriented procedure, based on largest error first, is included for controlling growth rate and maximum size of the adapted grid system. The adaption process is almost entirely parallelized using MPI, resulting in a capability suitable for viscous, moving body simulations. Two- and three-dimensional examples are presented.

  12. Expanding access to off-grid rural electrification in Africa: An analysis of community-based micro-grids in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirubi, Charles Gathu

    Community micro-grids have played a central role in increasing access to off-grid rural electrification (RE) in many regions of the developing world, notably South Asia. However, the promise of community micro-grids in sub-Sahara Africa remains largely unexplored. My study explores the potential and limits of community micro-grids as options for increasing access to off-grid RE in sub-Sahara Africa. Contextualized in five community micro-grids in rural Kenya, my study is framed through theories of collective action and combines qualitative and quantitative methods, including household surveys, electronic data logging and regression analysis. The main contribution of my research is demonstrating the circumstances under which community micro-grids can contribute to rural development and the conditions under which individuals are likely to initiate and participate in such projects collectively. With regard to rural development, I demonstrate that access to electricity enables the use of electric equipment and tools by small and micro-enterprises, resulting in significant improvement in productivity per worker (100--200% depending on the task at hand) and a corresponding growth in income levels in the order of 20--70%, depending on the product made. Access to electricity simultaneously enables and improves delivery of social and business services from a wide range of village-level infrastructure (e.g. schools, markets, water pumps) while improving the productivity of agricultural activities. Moreover, when local electricity users have an ability to charge and enforce cost-reflective tariffs and electricity consumption is closely linked to productive uses that generate incomes, cost recovery is feasible. By their nature---a new technology delivering highly valued services by the elites and other members, limited local experience and expertise, high capital costs---community micro-grids are good candidates for elite-domination. Even so, elite control does not necessarily

  13. Luminescence and scintillation timing characteristics of (Lu{sub x}Gd{sub 2−x})SiO{sub 5}:Ce single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yawai, Nattasuda; Chewpraditkul, Warut; Sakthong, Ongsa [Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok10140 (Thailand); Chewpraditkul, Weerapong, E-mail: weerapong.che@kmutt.ac.th [Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok10140 (Thailand); Wantong, Kriangkrai [Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok10140 (Thailand); Szczesniak, Tomasz; Swiderski, Lukasz; Moszynski, Marek [National Centre for Nuclear Research, A. Soltana 7, PL 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Sidletskiy, Oleg [Institute for Scintillation Materials NAS of Ukraine, 60 Nauky Avenue, 61001 Kharkiv (Ukraine)

    2017-02-01

    The luminescence and scintillation characteristics of cerium-doped lutetium-gadolinium orthosilicate (Lu{sub x}Gd{sub 2−x}SiO{sub 5}:Ce; x=0, 0.8, 1.8) single crystals were investigated. At 662 keV γ-rays, the light yield of 29,800±3000 ph MeV{sup −1} obtained for Lu{sub 1.8}Gd{sub 0.2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce is higher than that of 20,200±2000 and 11,800±1200 ph MeV{sup −1} obtained for Lu{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 1.2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce and Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce, respectively. The fast component decay time of 32, 18 and 17 ns was measured in the scintillation decay of Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce, Lu{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 1.2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce and Lu{sub 1.8}Gd{sub 0.2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce, respectively. The coincidence time spectra for 511 keV annihilation quanta were measured in reference to a fast BaF{sub 2} detector and time resolution was discussed in terms of a number of photoelectrons and decay time of the fast component. The mass attenuation coefficient for studied crystals at 60 and 662 keV γ-rays was also evaluated and discussed. - Highlights: • Scintillation timing characteristics of Lu{sub x}Gd{sub 2−x}SiO{sub 5}:Ce crystals are studied. • Lu{sub 1.8}Gd{sub 0.2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce exhibits excellent light yield and timing response. • Energy resolution of 6% @662 keV is obtained for Lu{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 1.2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce. • Coincidence time resolution of 368 ps is obtained for Lu{sub 1.8}Gd{sub 0.2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce.

  14. TopoSCALE v.1.0: downscaling gridded climate data in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiddes, J.; Gruber, S.

    2014-02-01

    Simulation of land surface processes is problematic in heterogeneous terrain due to the the high resolution required of model grids to capture strong lateral variability caused by, for example, topography, and the lack of accurate meteorological forcing data at the site or scale it is required. Gridded data products produced by atmospheric models can fill this gap, however, often not at an appropriate spatial resolution to drive land-surface simulations. In this study we describe a method that uses the well-resolved description of the atmospheric column provided by climate models, together with high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs), to downscale coarse-grid climate variables to a fine-scale subgrid. The main aim of this approach is to provide high-resolution driving data for a land-surface model (LSM). The method makes use of an interpolation of pressure-level data according to topographic height of the subgrid. An elevation and topography correction is used to downscale short-wave radiation. Long-wave radiation is downscaled by deriving a cloud-component of all-sky emissivity at grid level and using downscaled temperature and relative humidity fields to describe variability with elevation. Precipitation is downscaled with a simple non-linear lapse and optionally disaggregated using a climatology approach. We test the method in comparison with unscaled grid-level data and a set of reference methods, against a large evaluation dataset (up to 210 stations per variable) in the Swiss Alps. We demonstrate that the method can be used to derive meteorological inputs in complex terrain, with most significant improvements (with respect to reference methods) seen in variables derived from pressure levels: air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and incoming long-wave radiation. This method may be of use in improving inputs to numerical simulations in heterogeneous and/or remote terrain, especially when statistical methods are not possible, due to lack of

  15. Charge protection characterisation and drift time resolution improvement for GridPix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppert, W.J.C.; Fransen, M.; van Bakel, N.; van der Graaf, H.; Hartjes, F.; Timmermans, J.; Visser, J.; Kluit, R.; Gromov, V.; Zappon, F.; Blanco Carballo, V.M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Bilevych, Y.; Bilevych, Y.

    2011-01-01

    A GridPix detector is a gaseous detector capable of detecting single primary electrons from ionising particles. Such a detector consists of a pixel chip as active anode covered with a thin layer of silicon rich silicon nitride (SiRN) for protection against discharges. A layer of 8 JlIl1 SiRN, and

  16. The MammoGrid Project Grids Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    McClatchey, Richard; Hauer, Tamas; Estrella, Florida; Saiz, Pablo; Rogulin, Dmitri; Buncic, Predrag; Clatchey, Richard Mc; Buncic, Predrag; Manset, David; Hauer, Tamas; Estrella, Florida; Saiz, Pablo; Rogulin, Dmitri

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the recently EU-funded MammoGrid project is, in the light of emerging Grid technology, to develop a European-wide database of mammograms that will be used to develop a set of important healthcare applications and investigate the potential of this Grid to support effective co-working between healthcare professionals throughout the EU. The MammoGrid consortium intends to use a Grid model to enable distributed computing that spans national borders. This Grid infrastructure will be used for deploying novel algorithms as software directly developed or enhanced within the project. Using the MammoGrid clinicians will be able to harness the use of massive amounts of medical image data to perform epidemiological studies, advanced image processing, radiographic education and ultimately, tele-diagnosis over communities of medical "virtual organisations". This is achieved through the use of Grid-compliant services [1] for managing (versions of) massively distributed files of mammograms, for handling the distri...

  17. SU-C-206-01: Impact of Charge Sharing Effect On Sub-Pitch Resolution for CZT-Based Photon Counting CT Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, X; Cheng, Z; Deen, J; Peng, H [McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purposes: Photon counting CT is a new imaging technology that can provide tissue composition information such as calcium/iodine content quantification. Cadmium zinc telluride CZT is considered a good candidate the photon counting CT due to its relatively high atomic number and band gap. One potential challenge is the degradation of both spatial and energy resolution as the fine electrode pitch is deployed (<50 µm). We investigated the extent of charge sharing effect as functions of gap width, bias voltage and depth-of-interaction (DOI). Methods: The initial electron cloud size and diffusion process were modeled analytically. The valid range of charge sharing effect refers to the range over which both signals of adjacent electrodes are above the triggering threshold (10% of the amplitude of 60keV X-ray photons). The intensity ratios of output in three regions (I1/I2/I3: left pixel, gap area and right pixel) were calculated. With Gaussian white noises modeled (a SNR of 5 based upon the preliminary experiments), the sub-pitch resolution as a function of the spatial position in-between two pixels was studied. Results: The valid range of charge sharing increases linearly with depth-of-interaction (DOI) but decreases with gap width and bias voltage. For a 1.5mm thickness CZT detector (pitch: 50µm, bias: 400 V), the range increase from ∼90µm up to ∼110µm. Such an increase can be attributed to a longer travel distance and the associated electron cloud broadening. The achievable sub-pitch resolution is in the range of ∼10–30µm. Conclusion: The preliminary results demonstrate that sub-pixel spatial resolution can be achieved using the ratio of amplitudes of two neighboring pixels. Such ratio may also be used to correct charge loss and help improve energy resolution of a CZT detector. The impact of characteristic X-rays hitting adjacent pixels (i.e., multiple interaction) on charge sharing is currently being investigated.

  18. EMAG2v3: Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (2-arc-minute resolution)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — EMAG2v3 is a global Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid compiled from satellite, ship, and airborne magnetic measurements. It is a significant update of the previous release...

  19. Dynamic grid refinement for partial differential equations on parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mccormick, S.; Quinlan, D.

    1989-01-01

    The fast adaptive composite grid method (FAC) is an algorithm that uses various levels of uniform grids to provide adaptive resolution and fast solution of PDEs. An asynchronous version of FAC, called AFAC, that completely eliminates the bottleneck to parallelism is presented. This paper describes the advantage that this algorithm has in adaptive refinement for moving singularities on multiprocessor computers. This work is applicable to the parallel solution of two- and three-dimensional shock tracking problems. 6 refs

  20. Production of the excited charm mesons D{sub 1} and D{sup *}{sub 2} at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbytskyi, Andrii

    2013-02-15

    The production of the excited charm mesons D{sub 1}, D{sup *}{sub 2} and D{sup +}{sub s1} in ep collisions has been measured with the ZEUS detector at Hera. The data sample taken by the ZEUS detector in the years 2003-2007, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 373 pb{sup -1} has been used. The masses of the neutral, charged and strange states, the widths of the neutral states, the helicity parameters of D{sup 0}{sub 1} and D{sup +}{sub s1} were determined and compared with other measurements and with theoretical expectations. The measured helicity parameters of the D{sup 0}{sub 1} and D{sup +}{sub s1} allows for some mixing of S- and D-waves in their decays to D{sup *{+-}}{pi}{sup -+} and D{sup *{+-}}K{sup 0} respectively. The measured value of the D{sup 0}{sub 1} helicity parameter is also consistent with a pure D-wave decay. Ratios of branching fractions of the two decay modes of the D{sup *0}{sub 2}, D{sup *{+-}}{sub 2} and D{sup +}{sub s1} states were measured and compared with previous measurements. The fractions of charm quarks hadronising into D{sub 1}, D{sup *}{sub 2} and D{sup +}{sub s1} were measured and are consistent with those obtained in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations. The Grid computing technology has a high importance for modern High Energy Physics. This technology has been successfully used in Zeus experiment for the MC simulations and data analysis. The dedicated infrastructure has been maintained by the author since 2010. In addition to continuous support, the author has upgraded and improved the performance of the Grid MC simulations and contributed to the Zeus data preservation project.

  1. Sub-microsecond-resolution probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginger, David; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Moore, David; Rayermann, Glennis; Reid, Obadiah

    2014-04-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided herein for time-resolved analysis of the effect of a perturbation (e.g., a light or voltage pulse) on a sample. By operating in the time domain, the provided method enables sub-microsecond time-resolved measurement of transient, or time-varying, forces acting on a cantilever.

  2. A Gridded Daily Min/Max Temperature Dataset With 0.1° Resolution for the Yangtze River Valley and its Error Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qiufen; Hu, Jianglin

    2013-05-01

    The minimum/maximum (Min/Max) temperature in the Yangtze River valley is decomposed into the climatic mean and anomaly component. A spatial interpolation is developed which combines the 3D thin-plate spline scheme for climatological mean and the 2D Barnes scheme for the anomaly component to create a daily Min/Max temperature dataset. The climatic mean field is obtained by the 3D thin-plate spline scheme because the relationship between the decreases in Min/Max temperature with elevation is robust and reliable on a long time-scale. The characteristics of the anomaly field tend to be related to elevation variation weakly, and the anomaly component is adequately analyzed by the 2D Barnes procedure, which is computationally efficient and readily tunable. With this hybridized interpolation method, a daily Min/Max temperature dataset that covers the domain from 99°E to 123°E and from 24°N to 36°N with 0.1° longitudinal and latitudinal resolution is obtained by utilizing daily Min/Max temperature data from three kinds of station observations, which are national reference climatological stations, the basic meteorological observing stations and the ordinary meteorological observing stations in 15 provinces and municipalities in the Yangtze River valley from 1971 to 2005. The error estimation of the gridded dataset is assessed by examining cross-validation statistics. The results show that the statistics of daily Min/Max temperature interpolation not only have high correlation coefficient (0.99) and interpolation efficiency (0.98), but also the mean bias error is 0.00 °C. For the maximum temperature, the root mean square error is 1.1 °C and the mean absolute error is 0.85 °C. For the minimum temperature, the root mean square error is 0.89 °C and the mean absolute error is 0.67 °C. Thus, the new dataset provides the distribution of Min/Max temperature over the Yangtze River valley with realistic, successive gridded data with 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution and

  3. Synthesis and characterization of the lead borate Pb{sub 6}B{sub 12}O{sub 21}(OH){sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenegger, Sandra; Ortner, Teresa S.; Wurst, Klaus; Heymann, Gunter; Huppertz, Hubert [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie

    2016-11-01

    A lead borate with the composition Pb{sub 6}B{sub 12}O{sub 21}(OH){sub 6} was synthesized through a hydrothermal synthesis, using lead metaborate in combination with sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. The compound crystallizes in the trigonal, non-centrosymmetric space group P3{sub 2} (no. 145) with the lattice parameters a = 1176.0(4), c = 1333.0(4) pm, and V = 0.1596(2) nm{sup 3}. Interestingly, the data of Pb{sub 6}B{sub 12}O{sub 21}(OH){sub 6} correct the structure of a literature known lead borate with the composition ''Pb{sub 6}B{sub 11}O{sub 18}(OH){sub 9}''. For the latter compound, nearly identical lattice parameters of a = 1176.91(7) and c = 1333.62(12) pm were reported, possessing a crystal structure, in which the localization and refinement of one boron atom was obviously overlooked. The structure of Pb{sub 6}B{sub 12}O{sub 21}(OH){sub 6} is built up from trigonal planar BO{sub 3} and tetrahedral BO{sub 4} groups forming complex chains. The Pb{sup 2+} cations are located between neighboring polyborate chains. The here reported compound Pb{sub 6}B{sub 12}O{sub 21}(OH){sub 6} and ''Pb{sub 6}B{sub 11}O{sub 18}(OH){sub 9}'' were, however, produced under different synthesis conditions. While ''Pb{sub 6}B{sub 11}O{sub 18}(OH){sub 9}'' was synthesized via a hydrothermal synthesis including ethylenediamine and acetic acid, the here reported lead borate Pb{sub 6}B{sub 12}O{sub 21}(OH){sub 6} could be obtained under moderate hydrothermal conditions (240 C) without the addition of organic reagents.

  4. Main report for the task of the Smart Grid Network; Denmark; Hovedrapport for Smart Grid Netvaerkets arbejde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidegaard, M.

    2011-07-01

    The Smart Grid Network was established in 2010 by the Danish climate and energy minister tasked with developing recommendations for future actions and initiatives that make it possible to handle up to 50% electricity from wind energy in the power system in 2020. Smart Grid will not be realized without ensuring reasonable conditions for actors in the system. It is essential to establish a clear market model with clear roles and responsibilities. Additionally there is a need for development and implementation of a future communication and control concept, which makes it possible to achieve the best possible interaction between the management of power system, power generation and electricity consumption. The future demands that both the commercial and technical data communications paths and systems will be expanded and supplemented with connections for significantly more renewable energy production at all levels in the grid. And most importantly there must be established entirely new interoperable communication structures for both commercial and technical utilization of the consumption part of the power system. In order to realize an effective deployment of Smart Grid in 2020 with up to 50 % of renewable energy production there is a need to implement a number of initiatives. The present report presents the network's nine main recommendations and 35 specific sub-recommendations. (LN)

  5. Vegetation cover in relation to socioeconomic factors in a tropical city assessed from sub-meter resolution imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinuzzi, Sebastián; Ramos-González, Olga M; Muñoz-Erickson, Tischa A; Locke, Dexter H; Lugo, Ariel E; Radeloff, Volker C

    2018-04-01

    Fine-scale information about urban vegetation and social-ecological relationships is crucial to inform both urban planning and ecological research, and high spatial resolution imagery is a valuable tool for assessing urban areas. However, urban ecology and remote sensing have largely focused on cities in temperate zones. Our goal was to characterize urban vegetation cover with sub-meter (urban vegetation patterns in a tropical city, the San Juan Metropolitan Area, Puerto Rico. Our specific objectives were to (1) map vegetation cover using sub-meter spatial resolution (0.3-m) imagery, (2) quantify the amount of residential and non-residential vegetation, and (3) investigate the relationship between patterns of urban vegetation vs. socioeconomic and environmental factors. We found that 61% of the San Juan Metropolitan Area was green and that our combination of high spatial resolution imagery and object-based classification was highly successful for extracting vegetation cover in a moist tropical city (97% accuracy). In addition, simple spatial pattern analysis allowed us to separate residential from non-residential vegetation with 76% accuracy, and patterns of residential and non-residential vegetation varied greatly across the city. Both socioeconomic (e.g., population density, building age, detached homes) and environmental variables (e.g., topography) were important in explaining variations in vegetation cover in our spatial regression models. However, important socioeconomic drivers found in cities in temperate zones, such as income and home value, were not important in San Juan. Climatic and cultural differences between tropical and temperate cities may result in different social-ecological relationships. Our study provides novel information for local land use planners, highlights the value of high spatial resolution remote sensing data to advance ecological research and urban planning in tropical cities, and emphasizes the need for more studies in tropical

  6. Evaluation of the Monotonic Lagrangian Grid and Lat-Long Grid for Air Traffic Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Carolyn; Dahm, Johann; Oran, Elaine; Alexandrov, Natalia; Boris, Jay

    2011-01-01

    The Air Traffic Monotonic Lagrangian Grid (ATMLG) is used to simulate a 24 hour period of air traffic flow in the National Airspace System (NAS). During this time period, there are 41,594 flights over the United States, and the flight plan information (departure and arrival airports and times, and waypoints along the way) are obtained from an Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Enhanced Traffic Management System (ETMS) dataset. Two simulation procedures are tested and compared: one based on the Monotonic Lagrangian Grid (MLG), and the other based on the stationary Latitude-Longitude (Lat- Long) grid. Simulating one full day of air traffic over the United States required the following amounts of CPU time on a single processor of an SGI Altix: 88 s for the MLG method, and 163 s for the Lat-Long grid method. We present a discussion of the amount of CPU time required for each of the simulation processes (updating aircraft trajectories, sorting, conflict detection and resolution, etc.), and show that the main advantage of the MLG method is that it is a general sorting algorithm that can sort on multiple properties. We discuss how many MLG neighbors must be considered in the separation assurance procedure in order to ensure a five-mile separation buffer between aircraft, and we investigate the effect of removing waypoints from aircraft trajectories. When aircraft choose their own trajectory, there are more flights with shorter duration times and fewer CD&R maneuvers, resulting in significant fuel savings.

  7. Towards improved parameterization of a macroscale hydrologic model in a discontinuous permafrost boreal forest ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Endalamaw

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Modeling hydrological processes in the Alaskan sub-arctic is challenging because of the extreme spatial heterogeneity in soil properties and vegetation communities. Nevertheless, modeling and predicting hydrological processes is critical in this region due to its vulnerability to the effects of climate change. Coarse-spatial-resolution datasets used in land surface modeling pose a new challenge in simulating the spatially distributed and basin-integrated processes since these datasets do not adequately represent the small-scale hydrological, thermal, and ecological heterogeneity. The goal of this study is to improve the prediction capacity of mesoscale to large-scale hydrological models by introducing a small-scale parameterization scheme, which better represents the spatial heterogeneity of soil properties and vegetation cover in the Alaskan sub-arctic. The small-scale parameterization schemes are derived from observations and a sub-grid parameterization method in the two contrasting sub-basins of the Caribou Poker Creek Research Watershed (CPCRW in Interior Alaska: one nearly permafrost-free (LowP sub-basin and one permafrost-dominated (HighP sub-basin. The sub-grid parameterization method used in the small-scale parameterization scheme is derived from the watershed topography. We found that observed soil thermal and hydraulic properties – including the distribution of permafrost and vegetation cover heterogeneity – are better represented in the sub-grid parameterization method than the coarse-resolution datasets. Parameters derived from the coarse-resolution datasets and from the sub-grid parameterization method are implemented into the variable infiltration capacity (VIC mesoscale hydrological model to simulate runoff, evapotranspiration (ET, and soil moisture in the two sub-basins of the CPCRW. Simulated hydrographs based on the small-scale parameterization capture most of the peak and low flows, with similar accuracy in both sub

  8. Magneto-transport properties of La{sub 0.75}Ca{sub 0.15}Sr{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} with YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7–δ} addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zghal, E. [Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux, Université de Sfax, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, B. P. 1171, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Koubaa, M., E-mail: mohamedkoubaa@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux, Université de Sfax, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, B. P. 1171, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Berthet, P. [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire et Matériaux d’Orsay, Bâtiment 410 Université Paris-Sud XI, 15 rue Georges Clémenceau, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Sicard, L. [ITODYS, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS UMR 7086, 15 rue Jean Antoine de Baïf, 75205 Paris (France); Cheikhrouhou-Koubaa, W. [Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux, Université de Sfax, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, B. P. 1171, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Decorse-Pascanut, C. [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire et Matériaux d’Orsay, Bâtiment 410 Université Paris-Sud XI, 15 rue Georges Clémenceau, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Cheikhrouhou, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux, Université de Sfax, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, B. P. 1171, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); and others

    2016-09-15

    We report the structural, magnetic, electrical and magentoresistance properties of (La{sub 0.75}Ca{sub 0.15}Sr{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3}){sub 1−x}(YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ}){sub x} (with x=0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.075, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3) composites synthesized through sol–gel method. The powder X-ray diffraction patterns indicate no evidence of reaction between La{sub 0.75}Ca{sub 0.15}Sr{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} (LCSMO) and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} (YBCO). The addition of YBCO induces a reduction of the total magnetization while the Curie temperature remains almost constant (∼312 K). The behavior of the electrical resistivity evolves differently depending on the doping level. Above the paramagnetic–insulating transition temperature the resistivity data were best-fitted by using the adiabatic small polaron and variable range hopping models. Ferromagnetic–metallic regime in the composites seems to emanate from the electron–phonon or/and electron–magnon scattering processes. With increasing the YBCO doping content (until x=0.1), the positive magnetoresistance (MR) of YBCO phase dominates the negative MR of LCSMO one, which gives rise to the decreasing of MR of the composites. - Highlights: • LCSMO compound possess an orthorhombic-distorted structure (Pbnm space group). • YBCO crystallizes in orthorhombic structure (Pmmm space group). • Resistivity increases with increasing YBCO content in LCSMO/YBCO composites. • A detailed analysis of the transport mechanisms. • Coexistence of positive and negative MR in the composites.

  9. A novel algorithm for incompressible flow using only a coarse grid projection

    KAUST Repository

    Lentine, Michael

    2010-07-26

    Large scale fluid simulation can be difficult using existing techniques due to the high computational cost of using large grids. We present a novel technique for simulating detailed fluids quickly. Our technique coarsens the Eulerian fluid grid during the pressure solve, allowing for a fast implicit update but still maintaining the resolution obtained with a large grid. This allows our simulations to run at a fraction of the cost of existing techniques while still providing the fine scale structure and details obtained with a full projection. Our algorithm scales well to very large grids and large numbers of processors, allowing for high fidelity simulations that would otherwise be intractable. © 2010 ACM.

  10. The cosmic web in CosmoGrid void regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieder, Steven; van de Weygaert, Rien; Cautun, Marius; Beygu, Burcu; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2016-01-01

    We study the formation and evolution of the cosmic web, using the high-resolution CosmoGrid ΛCDM simulation. In particular, we investigate the evolution of the large-scale structure around void halo groups, and compare this to observations of the VGS-31 galaxy group, which consists of three

  11. Numerical investigation on practicability of reducing MCST by using grid spacer in a tight rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xiaojing; Morooka, Shinichi; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Standard grid spacer design causes decreased heat transfer in a tight rod bundle. • Heat transfer is greatly enhanced by flow-enhancing features. • Swirling flow adversely affects the heat transfer downstream of grid spacer. • Enhanced heat transfer by existing grid spacer is limited in a short region. • Improved grid spacer can effectively reduce MCST. - Abstract: The numerical investigation was carried out to reveal the practicability of reducing the maximum cladding surface temperature (MCST) within the inner sub-channel of a tight, hexagon rod bundle using commercial CFD code STAR CCM+ 6.04. The special heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics caused by four existing grid spacer designs were discussed in detail by analyzing the effects of grid strap length, different flow enhancing features and different Reynolds numbers. It was found that the local heat transfer within the grid strap is greatly enhanced due to the raised flow velocity. Both the standard grid spacer and the grid spacer with split-vanes cause decreased heat transfer in the downstream region. The friction drag is very influential in the tight rod bundle and can eliminate the positive effect of flow blockage on the heat transfer performance. The grid spacer with flow blockage discs induces relatively good heat transfer performance and higher pressure drop within sub-channels, indicating a tradeoff between the heat transfer augmentation and the pressure drop. The combination of multiple existing grid spacers can reduce the MCST to a certain level, but the corresponding disadvantages cannot be ignored. The improved grid spacer design was proposed based on the overall considerations of heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics and has been proved more suitable to widely reduce MCST for SCWR than any other grid spacer designs involved in present study

  12. A study of the effects of grid non-orthogonality on the solution of shallow water equations in boundary-fitted coordinate systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sankaranarayanan, S

    2003-01-01

    In the present study, an existing two-dimensional boundary-fitted model [J. Hydraul. Eng.-ASCE 122 (9) (1996) 512] is used to study the effect of grid non-orthogonality on the solution of shallow water equations using boundary-fitted grids. The linearized two-dimensional shallow water equations are expressed in terms of the grid angle and aspect ratio. The truncation errors of the finite difference approximations used in the solution of the governing equations are shown to be dependent on the grid angle and the aspect ratio. The coefficient of the truncation error was shown to increase, with the decrease in the grid angle. The RMS errors in model predicted surface elevations and velocities for the case of seiching in a rectangular basin are found to increase gradually, as the grid resolution decreases from 174 to 80 gridpoints per wavelength or as the grid angle decreases from 90 deg. to 50 deg. and increases rather sharply for a grid angle of 30 deg. at grid resolutions less than 80 gridpoints per wavelength...

  13. Verification of the three-dimensional tetrahedral grid S{sub N} code THOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunert, S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University (United States); Ferrer, R. [Studsvik Scandpower, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Azmy, Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In this work current capabilities implemented in the novel, arbitrary-order, tetrahedral-grid short characteristics S{sub N} radiation transport code THOR are verified based on four benchmark problems: (1) A one-group Method of Manufactured Solution (MMS) problem on a cuboidal domain, (2) an infinite medium eigenvalue problem with up-scattering, (3) a homogeneous torus and (4) a bare cube eigenvalue problem with anisotropic scattering up to order three. The first benchmark problem exercises the various spatial discretization options available in THOR: The short characteristics method in conjunction with polynomial expansions of the source and face fluxes either using the complete or Lagrange family of arbitrary orders. Using the numerical solution's order of convergence test in the framework of a mesh refinement study, correct implementation of a selection of spatial expansion orders is demonstrated for two meshes with tetrahedral aspect ratios close to unity and 50. The second benchmark problem exercises the implementation of angular fluxes on reflective boundary faces that are implicit within a mesh sweep, and up-scattering. The third benchmark problem comprises cyclic dependencies within the mesh sweep thus exercising the algorithm devised for 'breaking' the cyclic dependencies. Finally, the fourth benchmark problem, a simple bare cube, is used to test correct implementation of the anisotropic scattering capability. For all test problems THOR obtains solutions that converge to the reference/exact solution with the expected rate thereby contributing to our confidence in the correctness of its tested features in the present implementation. (authors)

  14. Gridded precipitation dataset for the Rhine basin made with the genRE interpolation method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osnabrugge, van B.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2017-01-01

    A high resolution (1.2x1.2km) gridded precipitation dataset with hourly time step that covers the whole Rhine basin for the period 1997-2015. Made from gauge data with the genRE interpolation scheme. See "genRE: A method to extend gridded precipitation climatology datasets in near real-time for

  15. GridPix detectors – introduction and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, J., E-mail: kaminski@physik.uni-bonn.de; Bilevych, Y.; Desch, K.; Krieger, C.; Lupberger, M.

    2017-02-11

    GridPix detectors are a new kind of detectors combining a high density pixelized readout ASIC with a Micromegas gas amplification stage. Because of the alignment of mesh holes and pixels, a high efficiency for detecting and separating single primary electrons is reached. This feature leads to excellent spatial and energy resolutions as demonstrated by several different setups.

  16. Use of upscaled elevation and surface roughness data in two-dimensional surface water models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J.D.; Decker, J.D.; Langevin, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present an approach that uses a combination of cell-block- and cell-face-averaging of high-resolution cell elevation and roughness data to upscale hydraulic parameters and accurately simulate surface water flow in relatively low-resolution numerical models. The method developed allows channelized features that preferentially connect large-scale grid cells at cell interfaces to be represented in models where these features are significantly smaller than the selected grid size. The developed upscaling approach has been implemented in a two-dimensional finite difference model that solves a diffusive wave approximation of the depth-integrated shallow surface water equations using preconditioned Newton–Krylov methods. Computational results are presented to show the effectiveness of the mixed cell-block and cell-face averaging upscaling approach in maintaining model accuracy, reducing model run-times, and how decreased grid resolution affects errors. Application examples demonstrate that sub-grid roughness coefficient variations have a larger effect on simulated error than sub-grid elevation variations.

  17. Thermal behavior of GeO{sub 2} doped PbO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Yin [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Xiao Hanning [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)]. E-mail: hnxiao@hnu.cn; Guo Weiming [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Guo Wenming [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2006-05-15

    PbO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass is a representative system for vacuum and electronic sealing. Effects of GeO{sub 2} on thermal properties of the glass have been investigated in this paper. Activation energy for crystallization, glass structure, the type of crystals were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy. Results indicate that the addition of GeO{sub 2} (0.4-2 wt.%) to PbO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass can suppress crystallization of the glass and decrease the sealing temperature. With the increase of GeO{sub 2} content, germanate crystals were revealed, resulting in a slight increase of sealing temperature. When the content of GeO{sub 2} is 0.7 wt.%, the glass possesses the highest stability and lowest sealing temperature (400 deg. C), which is desirable for low-temperature sealing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of PbO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass was measured by dilatometry. The result shows that the coefficient of thermal expansion of the glass increases with the content of GeO{sub 2}. The adjustability of the coefficient of thermal expansion would expand the applications of PbO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass. A flexural strength of 28.3 MPa was obtained at the GeO{sub 2} content of 0.7 wt.%, showing good mechanical property for sealing process.

  18. Sub-kilometer Simulation of Equatorial Plasma Bubble and Comparison with Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, T.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Stolle, C.; Su, S. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) is a well-known phenomenon in the equatorial ionospheric F region. As it causes severe scintillation in the amplitude and phase of radio signals, it is important to understand and forecast the occurrence of EPB from a space weather point of view. The development of EPB is presently believed as an evolution of the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We have already developed a 3D high-resolution bubble (HIRB) model with a grid spacing of as small as 1 km and presented nonlinear growth of EPB which shows very turbulent internal structures such as bifurcation and pinching. Recent upgrade of the HIRB model has made it possible to conduct the simulation with sub-kilometer grid spacing. The simulation results can be compared with various in situ satellite observations such as plasma drift velocity, plasma density, magnetic field, and their structures and power spectra, e.g. from the C/NOFS, ROCSAT, CHAMP, or Swarm missions. Our initial results show encouraging agreement between model results and observational data.

  19. Description of Pseudingolfiella possessionis n. sp. (Crustacea, Amphipoda) from sub-Antarctic Île de La Possession, Crozet archipelago: the second freshwater amphipod known from the Antarctic biome, a human introduction of Gondwanan ancestry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smet, Willem H De

    2015-03-31

    A new species of freshwater amphipod, Pseudingolfiella possessionis n. sp. (Senticaudata, Pseudingolfiellidae), is described from the submerged moss vegetation of small brooklets at sub-Antarctic Île de La Possession, Crozet archipelago. It constitutes the second freshwater amphipod species known for the sub-Antarctic and Antarctic region, and the fourth member of the genus. The main characters distinguishing it from all congeners are: the spine on the posterior margin of the dactylus, incisor and lamina mobilis of mandible each with 5 teeth, the setation of the maxilliped, the vestigial second article of pleopod 3 in the female, the undulate and laterally notched posterolateral margin of the external ramus of uropods 1 and 2 in the male, the spinulate dorsomedian projection of the telson.

  20. A grid-independent EMMS/bubbling drag model for bubbling and turbulent fluidization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Hao; Lu, Bona; Zhang, Jingyuan

    2017-01-01

    The EMMS/bubbling drag model takes the effects of meso-scale structures (i.e. bubbles) into modeling of drag coefficient and thus improves coarse-grid simulation of bubbling and turbulent fluidized beds. However, its dependence on grid size has not been fully investigated. In this article, we adopt...... a two-step scheme to extend the EMMS/bubbling model to the sub-grid level. Thus the heterogeneity index, HD, which accounts for the hydrodynamic disparity between homogeneous and heterogeneous fluidization, can be correlated as a function of both local voidage and slip velocity. Simulations over...... a periodic domain show the new drag model is less sensitive to grid size because of the additional dependence on local slip velocity. When applying the new drag model to simulations of realistic bubbling and turbulent fluidized beds, we find grid-independent results are easier to obtain for high...

  1. Implementation of grid-connected to/from off-grid transference for micro-grid inverters

    OpenAIRE

    Heredero Peris, Daniel; Chillón Antón, Cristian; Pages Gimenez, Marc; Gross, Gabriel Igor; Montesinos Miracle, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the transfer of a microgrid converter from/to on-grid to/from off-grid when the converter is working in two different modes. In the first transfer presented method, the converter operates as a Current Source Inverter (CSI) when on-grid and as a Voltage Source Inverter (VSI) when off-grid. In the second transfer method, the converter is operated as a VSI both, when operated on-grid and off-grid. The two methods are implemented successfully in a real pla...

  2. A Meteorological Distribution System for High Resolution Terrestrial Modeling (MicroMet)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liston, G. E.; Elder, K.

    2004-12-01

    Spatially distributed terrestrial models generally require atmospheric forcing data on horizontal grids that are of higher resolution than available meteorological data. Furthermore, the meteorological data collected may not necessarily represent the area of interest's meteorological variability. To address these deficiencies, computationally efficient and physically realistic methods must be developed to take available meteorological data sets (e.g., meteorological tower observations) and generate high-resolution atmospheric-forcing distributions. This poster describes MicroMet, a quasi-physically-based, but simple meteorological distribution model designed to produce high-resolution (e.g., 5-m to 1-km horizontal grid increments) meteorological data distributions required to run spatially distributed terrestrial models over a wide variety of landscapes. The model produces distributions of the seven fundamental atmospheric forcing variables required to run most terrestrial models: air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction, incoming solar radiation, incoming longwave radiation, and precipitation. MicroMet includes a preprocessor that analyzes meteorological station data and identifies and repairs potential data deficiencies. The model uses known relationships between meteorological variables and the surrounding area (primarily topography) to distribute those variables over any given landscape. MicroMet performs two kinds of adjustments to available meteorological data: 1) when there are data at more than one location, at a given time, the data are spatially interpolated over the domain using a Barnes objective analysis scheme, and 2) physical sub-models are applied to each MicroMet variable to improve its realism at a given point in space and time with respect to the terrain. The three, 25-km by 25-km, Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) mesoscale study areas (MSAs: Fraser, North Park, and Rabbit Ears) will be used as example Micro

  3. 2011 Population Grid for Spain. Methodological assessment of different construction possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Goerlich Gisbert

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an evaluation, from the user point of view, of the regular population grid, with 1 km2 resolution, that the Spanish National Statistical Institute (INE, has released as a product from the last Population and Dwellings Census 2011. This way of disseminating population data is novel, and has a lot of analytical potential uses, since population is no longer linked to administrative divisions. For the first time this information about the population distribution has been generated using a bottom-up approach for the whole of Spain, this is, by georeferencing the population at its place of residence. The availability of another grid at the same spatial resolution, but generated using a top-down approach, this is, by spatial disaggregation methods from administrative population data and other auxiliary land cover information, allow us to explore the benefits associated to georeferencing the population in the context of the methodological changes introduced by the Population and Dwellings Census 2011. At the same time, we are able to evaluate the merits of the census grid .

  4. Characteristic length scale of input data in distributed models: implications for modeling grid size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artan, G. A.; Neale, C. M. U.; Tarboton, D. G.

    2000-01-01

    The appropriate spatial scale for a distributed energy balance model was investigated by: (a) determining the scale of variability associated with the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data; and (b) examining the effects of input data spatial aggregation on model response. The semi-variogram and the characteristic length calculated from the spatial autocorrelation were used to determine the scale of variability of the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data. The data were collected from two hillsides at Upper Sheep Creek, a sub-basin of the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, in southwest Idaho. The data were analyzed in terms of the semivariance and the integral of the autocorrelation. The minimum characteristic length associated with the variability of the data used in the analysis was 15 m. Simulated and observed radiometric surface temperature fields at different spatial resolutions were compared. The correlation between agreement simulated and observed fields sharply declined after a 10×10 m2 modeling grid size. A modeling grid size of about 10×10 m2 was deemed to be the best compromise to achieve: (a) reduction of computation time and the size of the support data; and (b) a reproduction of the observed radiometric surface temperature.

  5. Querying Large Physics Data Sets Over an Information Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, N; Kovács, Z; Le Goff, J M; McClatchey, R

    2001-01-01

    Optimising use of the Web (WWW) for LHC data analysis is a complex problem and illustrates the challenges arising from the integration of and computation across massive amounts of information distributed worldwide. Finding the right piece of information can, at times, be extremely time-consuming, if not impossible. So-called Grids have been proposed to facilitate LHC computing and many groups have embarked on studies of data replication, data migration and networking philosophies. Other aspects such as the role of 'middleware' for Grids are emerging as requiring research. This paper positions the need for appropriate middleware that enables users to resolve physics queries across massive data sets. It identifies the role of meta-data for query resolution and the importance of Information Grids for high-energy physics analysis rather than just Computational or Data Grids. This paper identifies software that is being implemented at CERN to enable the querying of very large collaborating HEP data-sets, initially...

  6. Evaluation of downscaled, gridded climate data for the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert J. Behnke,; Stephen J. Vavrus,; Andrew Allstadt,; Thomas P. Albright,; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Volker C. Radeloff,

    2016-01-01

    Weather and climate affect many ecological processes, making spatially continuous yet fine-resolution weather data desirable for ecological research and predictions. Numerous downscaled weather data sets exist, but little attempt has been made to evaluate them systematically. Here we address this shortcoming by focusing on four major questions: (1) How accurate are downscaled, gridded climate data sets in terms of temperature and precipitation estimates?, (2) Are there significant regional differences in accuracy among data sets?, (3) How accurate are their mean values compared with extremes?, and (4) Does their accuracy depend on spatial resolution? We compared eight widely used downscaled data sets that provide gridded daily weather data for recent decades across the United States. We found considerable differences among data sets and between downscaled and weather station data. Temperature is represented more accurately than precipitation, and climate averages are more accurate than weather extremes. The data set exhibiting the best agreement with station data varies among ecoregions. Surprisingly, the accuracy of the data sets does not depend on spatial resolution. Although some inherent differences among data sets and weather station data are to be expected, our findings highlight how much different interpolation methods affect downscaled weather data, even for local comparisons with nearby weather stations located inside a grid cell. More broadly, our results highlight the need for careful consideration among different available data sets in terms of which variables they describe best, where they perform best, and their resolution, when selecting a downscaled weather data set for a given ecological application.

  7. Pseudo-spectral method using rotated staggered grid for elastic wave propagation in 3D arbitrary anisotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Zou, Peng

    2017-05-10

    Staggering grid is a very effective way to reduce the Nyquist errors and to suppress the non-causal ringing artefacts in the pseudo-spectral solution of first-order elastic wave equations. However, the straightforward use of a staggered-grid pseudo-spectral method is problematic for simulating wave propagation when the anisotropy level is greater than orthorhombic or when the anisotropic symmetries are not aligned with the computational grids. Inspired by the idea of rotated staggered-grid finite-difference method, we propose a modified pseudo-spectral method for wave propagation in arbitrary anisotropic media. Compared with an existing remedy of staggered-grid pseudo-spectral method based on stiffness matrix decomposition and a possible alternative using the Lebedev grids, the rotated staggered-grid-based pseudo-spectral method possesses the best balance between the mitigation of artefacts and efficiency. A 2D example on a transversely isotropic model with tilted symmetry axis verifies its effectiveness to suppress the ringing artefacts. Two 3D examples of increasing anisotropy levels demonstrate that the rotated staggered-grid-based pseudo-spectral method can successfully simulate complex wavefields in such anisotropic formations.

  8. A novel optical microscope for imaging large embryos and tissue volumes with sub-cellular resolution throughout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Gail; Trägårdh, Johanna; Amor, Rumelo; Dempster, John; Reid, Es; Amos, William Bradshaw

    2016-09-23

    Current optical microscope objectives of low magnification have low numerical aperture and therefore have too little depth resolution and discrimination to perform well in confocal and nonlinear microscopy. This is a serious limitation in important areas, including the phenotypic screening of human genes in transgenic mice by study of embryos undergoing advanced organogenesis. We have built an optical lens system for 3D imaging of objects up to 6 mm wide and 3 mm thick with depth resolution of only a few microns instead of the tens of microns currently attained, allowing sub-cellular detail to be resolved throughout the volume. We present this lens, called the Mesolens, with performance data and images from biological specimens including confocal images of whole fixed and intact fluorescently-stained 12.5-day old mouse embryos.

  9. Seeing atoms with aberration-corrected sub-Angstroem electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A. [Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, National Center for Electron Microscopy, 2R0200, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720-8197 (United States)], E-mail: sub-Angstrom@comcast.net

    2008-02-15

    High-resolution electron microscopy is able to provide atomic-level characterization of many materials in low-index orientations. To achieve the same level of characterization in more complex orientations requires that instrumental resolution be improved to values corresponding to the sub-Angstroem separations of atom positions projected into these orientations. Sub-Angstroem resolution in the high-resolution transmission electron microscope has been achieved in the last few years by software aberration correction, electron holography, and hardware aberration correction; the so-called 'one-Angstroem barrier' has been left behind. Aberration correction of the objective lens currently allows atomic-resolution imaging at the sub-0.8 A level and is advancing towards resolutions in the deep sub-Angstroem range (near 0.5 A). At current resolution levels, images with sub-Rayleigh resolution require calibration in order to pinpoint atom positions correctly. As resolution levels approach the 'sizes' of atoms, the atoms themselves will produce a limit to resolution, no matter how much the instrumental resolution is improved. By arranging imaging conditions suitably, each atom peak in the image can be narrower, so atoms are imaged smaller and may be resolved at finer separations.

  10. The signature of atmospheric tides in sub-daily variations of Earth rotation as unveiled by globally-gridded atmospheric angular momentum functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindelegger, M.; Böhm, J.; Salstein, D. A.; Schuh, H.

    2012-12-01

    Thermally-driven atmospheric tides provide a small but distinct contribution to shortperiod variations of Earth rotation parameters (ERP). The effect of diurnal and semi-diurnal tides, commonly denoted as S1 and S2, respectively, is in the range of 2 - 10 uas for polar motion and 2 - 10 uas for changes in length-of-day (LOD). Even though ocean tides represent a much more dominant driving agent for ERP fluctuations at short time scales, high-frequency atmospheric effects are non-negligible, particularly given the prospective measurement accuracy of space geodetic techniques. However, previous studies, such as Brzezinski et al. (2002), de Viron et al. (2005) or Schindelegger et al. (2011), have been noticeably inconclusive on the exact amplitude and phase values of S1 and S2 atmospheric excitation signals. This study aims at shedding light on the origin of these uncertainties with respect to the axial component of Earth's rotation vector by investigating times series of atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) functions that are given on global grids and computed from three-hourly meteorological data of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The signature of diurnal and semi-diurnal atmospheric tides is clearly visible in the gridded axial AAM functions, revealing a distinct spatial and temporal phase difference between pressure and wind tidal constituents of about ± π. It is shown that due to this counterbalance and the explicit axisymmetric spatial structure of S1 and S2, the net effect in sub-diurnal AAM (which is calculated from the global sum of gridded AAM functions) is always a small quantity, particularly sensitive to minor differences between the analysis fields of numerical weather models.

  11. Porosity and biocompatibility study of ceramic implants based on ZrO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinova, Larisa, E-mail: larisalitvinova@yandex.ru, E-mail: vshupletsova@mail.ru, E-mail: leitsin@mail.ru; Shupletsova, Valeria, E-mail: larisalitvinova@yandex.ru, E-mail: vshupletsova@mail.ru, E-mail: leitsin@mail.ru; Leitsin, Vladimir, E-mail: larisalitvinova@yandex.ru, E-mail: vshupletsova@mail.ru, E-mail: leitsin@mail.ru [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Vasyliev, Roman, E-mail: rvasiliev@ukr.net, E-mail: zoubov77@yahoo.com; Zubov, Dmitry, E-mail: rvasiliev@ukr.net, E-mail: zoubov77@yahoo.com [State Institute of Genetic and Regenerative Medicine, National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine); Buyakov, Ales, E-mail: kulkov@ms.tsc.ru, E-mail: kulkov@ms.tsc.ru; Kulkov, Sergey, E-mail: kulkov@ms.tsc.ru, E-mail: kulkov@ms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    The work studies ZrO{sub 2}(Me{sub x}O{sub y})-based porous ceramics produced from the powders consisting of hollow spherical particles. It was shown that the structure is represented by a cellular framework with bimodal porosity consisting of sphere-like large pores and pores that were not filled with the powder particles during the compaction. For such ceramics, the increase of pore volume is accompanied by the increased strain in an elastic area. It was also shown that the porous ZrO{sub 2} ceramics had no acute or chronic cytotoxicity. At the same time, ceramics possess the following osteoconductive properties: adhesion support, spreading, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs.

  12. Smart grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dong Bae

    2001-11-01

    This book describes press smart grid from basics to recent trend. It is divided into ten chapters, which deals with smart grid as green revolution in energy with introduction, history, the fields, application and needed technique for smart grid, Trend of smart grid in foreign such as a model business of smart grid in foreign, policy for smart grid in U.S.A, Trend of smart grid in domestic with international standard of smart grid and strategy and rood map, smart power grid as infrastructure of smart business with EMS development, SAS, SCADA, DAS and PQMS, smart grid for smart consumer, smart renewable like Desertec project, convergence IT with network and PLC, application of an electric car, smart electro service for realtime of electrical pricing system, arrangement of smart grid.

  13. 3D inversion based on multi-grid approach of magnetotelluric data from Northern Scandinavia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherevatova, M.; Smirnov, M.; Korja, T. J.; Egbert, G. D.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we investigate the geoelectrical structure of the cratonic margin of Fennoscandian Shield by means of magnetotelluric (MT) measurements carried out in Northern Norway and Sweden during summer 2011-2012. The project Magnetotellurics in the Scandes (MaSca) focuses on the investigation of the crust, upper mantle and lithospheric structure in a transition zone from a stable Precambrian cratonic interior to a passive continental margin beneath the Caledonian Orogen and the Scandes Mountains in western Fennoscandia. Recent MT profiles in the central and southern Scandes indicated a large contrast in resistivity between Caledonides and Precambrian basement. The alum shales as a highly conductive layers between the resistive Precambrian basement and the overlying Caledonian nappes are revealed from this profiles. Additional measurements in the Northern Scandes were required. All together data from 60 synchronous long period (LMT) and about 200 broad band (BMT) sites were acquired. The array stretches from Lofoten and Bodo (Norway) in the west to Kiruna and Skeleftea (Sweden) in the east covering an area of 500x500 square kilometers. LMT sites were occupied for about two months, while most of the BMT sites were measured during one day. We have used new multi-grid approach for 3D electromagnetic (EM) inversion and modelling. Our approach is based on the OcTree discretization where the spatial domain is represented by rectangular cells, each of which might be subdivided (recursively) into eight sub-cells. In this simplified implementation the grid is refined only in the horizontal direction, uniformly in each vertical layer. Using multi-grid we manage to have a high grid resolution near the surface (for instance, to tackle with galvanic distortions) and lower resolution at greater depth as the EM fields decay in the Earth according to the diffusion equation. We also have a benefit in computational costs as number of unknowns decrease. The multi-grid forward

  14. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of Ni-doped ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} nanostructured film photoelectrodes with enhanced photoelectrochemical performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Bing; Chen, Zhihong; Liu, Qiong; Zhang, Zhengguo; Fang, Xiaoming, E-mail: cexmfang@scut.edu.cn

    2016-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ni-doped ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} photoelectrodes were synthesized by one-pot hydrothermal method. • Enhanced PEC performances are achieved by Ni-doped ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} film photoelectrodes. • Ni-doped ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} photoelectrodes possess superior photocarriers transfer abilities. • The optimal Ni content of ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} photoelectrode is 2 wt%. - Abstract: Nanostructured Ni-doped ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} films were prepared on the FTO conductive glass substrates by a one-pot hydrothermal method. The obtained films consist of nanosheets perpendicular to the FTO glass substrate, exhibiting a net-like porous microstructure. The doping of Ni into the lattice of ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} is revealed by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) characterizations. The results from the energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) confirm the existence of Ni in the doped sample. The optical absorption of the Ni-doped samples is slightly stronger than that of the undoped one. Compared with the undoped sample, the Ni-doped ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} photoelectrodes show enhanced photocurrent response and reach a maximum at the Ni content of 2 wt%. The carrier concentration and mobility of all the samples were estimated by using Hall measurements. The carrier concentration decreases with the increase of Ni content, and 2 wt% Ni-doped ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} photoelectrode has the highest mobility, which is up to 840 cm{sup 2}/Vs. The results from the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements indicate that the lowest charge transfer resistance is achieved by the 2 wt% Ni-doped ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} photoelectrode, agreeing with its best PEC performance. The photocurrent densities vs. time curves demonstrate that the stability of the 2 wt% Ni-doped ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} photoelectrode is better than that of the undoped one. The enhanced PEC performance

  15. Order parameter in CeCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieyra, Hugo A.; Brando, Manuel; Oeschler, Niels; Seiro, Silvia; Geibel, Christoph; Steglich, Frank [Max-Planck-Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (Germany); Jeevan, Hirale S. [I. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen (Germany); Parker, David [US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Understanding the interplay between magnetism and unconventional superconductivity remains a key challenge in solid-state physics. A clear example is the archetypical heavy-fermion compound CeCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} which exhibits superconductivity (T{sub c}=600 mK) in the vicinity of a magnetic quantum critical point. It is believed that magnetic fluctuations mediate superconductivity and its order parameter possesses d-wave symmetry, both ideas still under debate. In this work, a high-quality single crystal with a purely superconducting ground state (S type) has been chosen to investigate the low-temperature thermal- and electric-transport characteristics of the superconducting state. Non-vanishing contributions of low-energy quasiparticle excitations to the thermal transport ({kappa}{sub 0}/T>0) suggest the presence of nodal structure in CeCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}. In turn, angle-dependent resistivity measurements of the upper critical field H{sub c2} point towards unconventional superconductivity with d-wave symmetry of the order parameter. Theoretical calculations reveal the strong influence of Pauli paramagnetic effects and a d{sub xy} symmetry of the gap function.

  16. GridCom, Grid Commander: graphical interface for Grid jobs and data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaktionov, V.V.

    2011-01-01

    GridCom - the software package for maintenance of automation of access to means of distributed system Grid (jobs and data). The client part, executed in the form of Java-applets, realises the Web-interface access to Grid through standard browsers. The executive part Lexor (LCG Executor) is started by the user in UI (User Interface) machine providing performance of Grid operations

  17. Constraining earthquake source inversions with GPS data: 1. Resolution-based removal of artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, M.T.; Custodio, S.; Archuleta, R.J.; Carlson, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a resolution analysis of an inversion of GPS data from the 2004 Mw 6.0 Parkfield earthquake. This earthquake was recorded at thirteen 1-Hz GPS receivers, which provides for a truly coseismic data set that can be used to infer the static slip field. We find that the resolution of our inverted slip model is poor at depth and near the edges of the modeled fault plane that are far from GPS receivers. The spatial heterogeneity of the model resolution in the static field inversion leads to artifacts in poorly resolved areas of the fault plane. These artifacts look qualitatively similar to asperities commonly seen in the final slip models of earthquake source inversions, but in this inversion they are caused by a surplus of free parameters. The location of the artifacts depends on the station geometry and the assumed velocity structure. We demonstrate that a nonuniform gridding of model parameters on the fault can remove these artifacts from the inversion. We generate a nonuniform grid with a grid spacing that matches the local resolution length on the fault and show that it outperforms uniform grids, which either generate spurious structure in poorly resolved regions or lose recoverable information in well-resolved areas of the fault. In a synthetic test, the nonuniform grid correctly averages slip in poorly resolved areas of the fault while recovering small-scale structure near the surface. Finally, we present an inversion of the Parkfield GPS data set on the nonuniform grid and analyze the errors in the final model. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Characterization of the intrinsic scintillator Cs<sub>2sub>LiCeCl>6sub>

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-10-02

    In this work, we report on the scintillation properties of the intrinsic scintillator Cs<sub>2sub>LiCeCl>6sub> (CLCC), which is potentially useful for dual gamma-ray and neutron detection. CLCC is from the elpasolite family with a cubic structure. We grew the crystals at BNL by the vertical Bridgman growth technique. The luminescence spectrum of CLCC showed a doublet with peak maxima at 384 nm and 402 nm. The light yield of CLCC was approximately 20,000 photons/MeV, and the energy resolution was about 6% for 662-keV gamma radiation. A scintillation decay of ~81% of the total light was observed to be ~ 90 nanoseconds.

  19. Synthesis, characterisation and study of thermal, electrical and photocatalytic activity of nanocomposite of PANI with [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4} (C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2})] Cl{sub 3}·5H{sub 2}O photoadduct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqash, Waseem; Majid, Kowsar, E-mail: Kowsarmajid@rediffmail.com

    2016-10-20

    Highlights: • Synthesis of new polyaniline nanocomposite with [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4} (C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2})] Cl{sub 3}·5H{sub 2}O photoadduct. • Characterisation of the photoadduct and nanocomposite by FTIR, XRD and UV–Vis analysis. • Thermal study shows improved thermal stability of PANI nanocomposite over PANI. • Electrical study reveals modified non-linear I–V characteristic of nanocomposite. • The nanocomposite possesses photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: A new polyaniline (PANI) nanocomposite with [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4} (C{sub 12}H{sub 8}N{sub 2})] Cl{sub 3}·5H{sub 2}O photoadduct as filler was synthesised via in-situ oxidative polymerisation by ammonium persulphate in non-aqueous DMSO medium. The photoadduct has been synthesised through photo substitution by 1,10-phenenthroline (phen) ligand on irradiation. The as synthesised photoadduct was reduced in size prior to its incorporation in the PANI matrix. The synthesised photoadduct and PANI nanocomposite were characterised by FTIR, XRD, UV–Vis, SEM and elemental analysis. The results showed successful synthesis of photoadduct and PANI nanocomposite. The thermal and electrical measurement of PANI nanocomposite was carried out by thermal gravimetric technique (TGA) and four probe conductivity metre respectively. The results showed improvement in the thermal stability and conductance of nanocomposite over PANI. Besides, the nanocomposite was investigated for photocatalytic activity in the photochemical degradation of methyl orange (MO) dye.

  20. Assessment of post-Fukushima renewable energy policy in Japan's nation-wide power grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiyama, Ryoichi; Fujii, Yasumasa

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript analyzes an optimal power generation mix in Japan's nation-wide power grid by considering the post-Fukushima energy policy which puts a high priority on expanding renewable energy. The study is performed, employing an optimal power generation mix model which is characterized by detailed geographical resolution derived from 135 nodes and 166 high-voltage power transmission lines with 10-min temporal resolution. Simulated results reveal that renewable energy promotion policy underlies the necessity for capacity expansion of inter- or intra-regional power transmission lines in Japan in order to realize economical power system operation. In addition, the results show that the integration of massive variable renewable (VR) such as PV and wind decreases the capacity factor of power plant including ramp generator and possibly affects that profitability, which implies the challenge to ensure power system adequacy enough to control VR variability. - Highlights: • Authors analyze installable potential of renewable by Japan's power grid model. • Power grid of the model includes 135 nodes and 166 power transmission lines. • Renewable promotion underlies the necessity for capacity expansion of power lines. • Unremunerated power plants affect power grid adequacy under extensive renewable.

  1. Intrinsic radioactivity of KSr{sub 2}I{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rust, M.; Melcher, C.; Lukosi, E., E-mail: elukosi@utk.edu

    2016-10-11

    A current need in nuclear security is an economical, yet high energy resolution (near 2%), scintillation detector suitable for gamma-ray spectroscopy. For current scintillators on the market, there is an inverse relationship between scintillator energy resolution and cost of production. A new promising scintillator, KSr{sub 2}I{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+}, under development at the University of Tennessee, has achieved an energy resolution of 2.4% at 662 keV at room temperature, with potential growth rates exceeding several millimeters per hour. However, the internal background due to the {sup 40}K content could present a hurdle for effective source detection/identification in nuclear security applications. As a first step in addressing this question, this paper reports on a computational investigation of the intrinsic differential pulse height spectrum (DPHS) generated by {sup 40}K within the KSr{sub 2}I{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} scintillator as a function of crystal geometry. It was found that the DPHS remains relatively equal to a constant multiplicative factor of the negatron emission spectrum with a direct increase of the 1.46 MeV photopeak relative height to the negatron spectrum with volume. Further, peak pileup does not readily manifest itself for practical KSr{sub 2}I{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} volumes.

  2. Radar Coincidence Imaging for Off-Grid Target Using Frequency-Hopping Waveforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radar coincidence imaging (RCI is a high-resolution staring imaging technique without the limitation of the target relative motion. To achieve better imaging performance, sparse reconstruction is commonly used. While its performance is based on the assumption that the scatterers are located at the prediscretized grid-cell centers, otherwise, off-grid emerges and the performance of RCI degrades significantly. In this paper, RCI using frequency-hopping (FH waveforms is considered. The off-grid effects are analyzed, and the corresponding constrained Cramér-Rao bound (CCRB is derived based on the mean square error (MSE of the “oracle” estimator. For off-grid RCI, the process is composed of two stages: grid matching and off-grid error (OGE calibration, where two-dimension (2D band-excluded locally optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (BLOOMP and alternating iteration minimization (AIM algorithms are proposed, respectively. Unlike traditional sparse recovery methods, BLOOMP realizes the recovery in the refinement grids by overwhelming the shortages of coherent dictionary and is robust to noise and OGE. AIM calibration algorithm adaptively adjusts the OGE and, meanwhile, seeks the optimal target reconstruction result.

  3. Impact of earthquake source complexity and land elevation data resolution on tsunami hazard assessment and fatality estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Ario; Goda, Katsuichiro

    2018-03-01

    This study investigates the impact of model complexity in source characterization and digital elevation model (DEM) resolution on the accuracy of tsunami hazard assessment and fatality estimation through a case study in Padang, Indonesia. Two types of earthquake source models, i.e. complex and uniform slip models, are adopted by considering three resolutions of DEMs, i.e. 150 m, 50 m, and 10 m. For each of the three grid resolutions, 300 complex source models are generated using new statistical prediction models of earthquake source parameters developed from extensive finite-fault models of past subduction earthquakes, whilst 100 uniform slip models are constructed with variable fault geometry without slip heterogeneity. The results highlight that significant changes to tsunami hazard and fatality estimates are observed with regard to earthquake source complexity and grid resolution. Coarse resolution (i.e. 150 m) leads to inaccurate tsunami hazard prediction and fatality estimation, whilst 50-m and 10-m resolutions produce similar results. However, velocity and momentum flux are sensitive to the grid resolution and hence, at least 10-m grid resolution needs to be implemented when considering flow-based parameters for tsunami hazard and risk assessments. In addition, the results indicate that the tsunami hazard parameters and fatality number are more sensitive to the complexity of earthquake source characterization than the grid resolution. Thus, the uniform models are not recommended for probabilistic tsunami hazard and risk assessments. Finally, the findings confirm that uncertainties of tsunami hazard level and fatality in terms of depth, velocity and momentum flux can be captured and visualized through the complex source modeling approach. From tsunami risk management perspectives, this indeed creates big data, which are useful for making effective and robust decisions.

  4. Mapping Sub-Antarctic Cushion Plants Using Random Forests to Combine Very High Resolution Satellite Imagery and Terrain Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricher, Phillippa K.; Lucieer, Arko; Shaw, Justine; Terauds, Aleks; Bergstrom, Dana M.

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring changes in the distribution and density of plant species often requires accurate and high-resolution baseline maps of those species. Detecting such change at the landscape scale is often problematic, particularly in remote areas. We examine a new technique to improve accuracy and objectivity in mapping vegetation, combining species distribution modelling and satellite image classification on a remote sub-Antarctic island. In this study, we combine spectral data from very high resolution WorldView-2 satellite imagery and terrain variables from a high resolution digital elevation model to improve mapping accuracy, in both pixel- and object-based classifications. Random forest classification was used to explore the effectiveness of these approaches on mapping the distribution of the critically endangered cushion plant Azorella macquariensis Orchard (Apiaceae) on sub-Antarctic Macquarie Island. Both pixel- and object-based classifications of the distribution of Azorella achieved very high overall validation accuracies (91.6–96.3%, κ = 0.849–0.924). Both two-class and three-class classifications were able to accurately and consistently identify the areas where Azorella was absent, indicating that these maps provide a suitable baseline for monitoring expected change in the distribution of the cushion plants. Detecting such change is critical given the threats this species is currently facing under altering environmental conditions. The method presented here has applications to monitoring a range of species, particularly in remote and isolated environments. PMID:23940805

  5. A large-area grid ionisation chamber with high resolution for the measurement of alpha sources in samples with low specific activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoetzl, H.; Winkler, R.

    1978-06-01

    Construction and properties of a gridded ionization chamber for α-paricle spectrometry of low-level large-area samples are presented. Great importance was attached to high spectrometric resolution, low background, long-term stability, simple construction and operation, and easy decontamination if necessary. Using modern charge-sensitive preamplifiers spectrometric resolution is 20,6 keV FWHM (0,4%) at 5,30 MeV over the total effective area of 300 m 2 . Counting gas is an argon-methane mixture (P-10 gas) at atmospheric pressure. Background is 13 cph in the energy interval from 4 to 6 MeV and minimum detectable activity is 0.01 pCi Pu-239 at 1000 min measuring time. Ionization chambers of this type are used for direct α-spectrometric surveillance of long-lived α-emitting nuclides in the atmosphere after electrostatic deposition of the aerosols and for the determination of α-emitting nuclides in the emissions of nuclear power plants. After plasma ashing of the aerosols on filters from the stack monitoring system the minimum detectable concentration of e.g. Pu-239/240 in the gaseous effluent of a nuclear power plant is about 0.1 fCi per m 3 . (orig.) [de

  6. New Antarctic Gravity Anomaly Grid for Enhanced Geodetic and Geophysical Studies in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinert, M; Ferraccioli, F; Schwabe, J; Bell, R; Studinger, M; Damaske, D; Jokat, W; Aleshkova, N; Jordan, T; Leitchenkov, G; Blankenship, D D; Damiani, T M; Young, D; Cochran, J R; Richter, T D

    2016-01-28

    Gravity surveying is challenging in Antarctica because of its hostile environment and inaccessibility. Nevertheless, many ground-based, airborne and shipborne gravity campaigns have been completed by the geophysical and geodetic communities since the 1980s. We present the first modern Antarctic-wide gravity data compilation derived from 13 million data points covering an area of 10 million km 2 , which corresponds to 73% coverage of the continent. The remove-compute-restore technique was applied for gridding, which facilitated levelling of the different gravity datasets with respect to an Earth Gravity Model derived from satellite data alone. The resulting free-air and Bouguer gravity anomaly grids of 10 km resolution are publicly available. These grids will enable new high-resolution combined Earth Gravity Models to be derived and represent a major step forward towards solving the geodetic polar data gap problem. They provide a new tool to investigate continental-scale lithospheric structure and geological evolution of Antarctica.

  7. New Antarctic Gravity Anomaly Grid for Enhanced Geodetic and Geophysical Studies in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinert, M.; Ferraccioli, F.; Schwabe, J.; Bell, R.; Studinger, M.; Damaske, D.; Jokat, W.; Aleshkova, N.; Jordan, T.; Leitchenkov, G.; Blankenship, D. D.; Damiani, T. M.; Young, D.; Cochran, J. R.; Richter, T. D.

    2018-01-01

    Gravity surveying is challenging in Antarctica because of its hostile environment and inaccessibility. Nevertheless, many ground-based, airborne and shipborne gravity campaigns have been completed by the geophysical and geodetic communities since the 1980s. We present the first modern Antarctic-wide gravity data compilation derived from 13 million data points covering an area of 10 million km2, which corresponds to 73% coverage of the continent. The remove-compute-restore technique was applied for gridding, which facilitated levelling of the different gravity datasets with respect to an Earth Gravity Model derived from satellite data alone. The resulting free-air and Bouguer gravity anomaly grids of 10 km resolution are publicly available. These grids will enable new high-resolution combined Earth Gravity Models to be derived and represent a major step forward towards solving the geodetic polar data gap problem. They provide a new tool to investigate continental-scale lithospheric structure and geological evolution of Antarctica. PMID:29326484

  8. REAuAl{sub 4}Ge{sub 2} and REAuAl{sub 4}(Au{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 2} (RE=rare earth element): Quaternary intermetallics grown in liquid aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiuni, Wu [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Kanatzidis, Mercouri G [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2005-11-15

    The two families of intermetallic phases REAuAl{sub 4}Ge{sub 2} (1) (RE=Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Er, Tm and Yb) and REAuAl{sub 4}(Au{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 2} (2) (x=0.4) (RE=Ce and Eu) were obtained by the reactive combination of RE, Au and Ge in liquid aluminum. The structure of (1) adopts the space group R-3m (CeAuAl{sub 4}Ge{sub 2}, a=4.2384(7)A, c=31.613(7)A; NdAuAl{sub 4}Ge{sub 2}, a=4.2258(4)A, c=31.359(5)A; GdAuAl{sub 4}Ge{sub 2}, a=4.2123(6)A, c=30.994(6)A; ErAuAl{sub 4}Ge{sub 2}, a=4.2074(4)A, c=30.717(5)A). The structure of (2) adopts the tetragonal space group P4/mmm with lattice parameters: a=4.3134(8)A, c=8.371(3)A for EuAuAl{sub 4}(Au{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 2} (x=0.4). Both structure types present slabs of ''AuAl{sub 4}Ge{sub 2}'' or ''AuAl{sub 4}(Au{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 2}'' stacking along the c-axis with layers of RE atoms in between. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that the RE atoms (except for Ce and Eu) possess magnetic moments consistent with +3 species. The Ce atoms in CeAuAl{sub 4}Ge{sub 2} and CeAuAl{sub 4}(Au{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 2} (x=0.4) appear to be in a mixed +3/+4 valence state; DyAuAl{sub 4}Ge{sub 2} undergoes an antiferromagnetic transition at 11K and below this temperature exhibits metamagnetic behavior. The Eu atoms in EuAuAl{sub 4}(Au{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 2} (x=0.4) appear to be in a 2+ oxidation state.

  9. The effect of structural vacancies on the thermoelectric properties of (Cu₂Te){sub 1–x}(Ga₂Te₃)<sub>x>

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Zuxin; Young Cho, Jung; Tessema, Misle M. [Optimal Inc., Plymouth Township, MI 48170 (United States); Salvador, James R., E-mail: james.salvador@gm.com [GM Global R and D, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Waldo, Richard A. [GM Global R and D, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Wang, Hsin; Cai, Wei [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    We have studied the effects of structural vacancies on the thermoelectric properties of the ternary compounds (Cu₂Te)<sub>1–xsub>(Ga₂Te₃)x> (x=0.5, 0.55, 0.571, 0.6, 0.625, 0.667 and 0.75), which are solid solutions found in the pseudo-binary phase diagram for Cu₂Te and Ga₂Te₃, and possesses tunable structural vacancy concentrations. This materials system is not suitable due to the cost and scarcity of the constituent elements, but the vacancy behavior is well understood and will provide a valuable test case for other systems more suitable from the standpoint of cost and abundance of raw materials, which also possesses these vacancy features, but whose structural characterization is lacking at this stage. We find that the nominally defect free phase CuGaTe₂ possess the highest ZT (ZT=S²T/ρκ, where S is the Seebeck coefficient and ρ is the electrical resistivity κ is the thermal conductivity and T is the absolute temperature) which approaches 1 at 840 K and seems to continuously increase above this temperature. This result is due to the unexpectedly low thermal conductivity found for this material at high temperature. The low thermal conductivity was caused by strong Umklapp (thermally resistive scattering processes involving three phonons) phonon scattering. We find that due to the coincidentally strong scattering of carriers by the structural defects that higher concentrations of these features lead to poor electrical transport properties and decreased ZT. - Graphical abstract: Thermal conductivity and zT as a function of temperature for a series of compounds of the type (Cu₂Te)<sub>1–xsub>(Ga₂Te₃)x (x=0.5, 0.55, 0.571, 0.6, 0.625, 0.667 and 0.75). Highlights: • All the samples show p-type semiconducting behavior in the temperature dependence of the Seebeck and Hall coefficients. • The increased carrier concentration and the introduction of vacancies diminish the carrier mobility and power factor. • The low

  10. Growth and properties of La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ}/La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} epitaxial trilayer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Minaxi, E-mail: meenanith@gmail.com; Kumar, Arvind; Sharma, K. K. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur -177005 (India); Kumar, Ravi [Centre for Materials Science and Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur -177005 (India); Beant College of Engineering and Technology, Gurdaspur Punjab-143521 (India); Choudhary, R. J. [UGC-DAE-Consortium for Scientific Research, Khandwa Road, Indore-452001 (India)

    2015-08-28

    We report the growth and properties of La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ}/La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} LSMO/YBCO/LSMO epitaxial trilayer films, fabricated on SrTiO{sub 3} substrate using pulsed laser deposition technique. From x-ray diffraction and high resolution x-ray diffraction measurements, it is confirmed that the grown trilayered films are single phase and epitaxial in nature. Magneto-transport and magnetic properties are found to be dependent on the thickness of YBCO spacer layer. We infer that for fixed thickness of top and bottom LSMO layers, superconductivity is completely suppressed. At 100 K, the hysteresis loops reveal the ferromagnetic signature of trilayered film. At room temperature, we obtain a butterfly type scenario, signifies the co-existence of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interaction. In addition, at room temperature, the YBCO spacer layer allowing the top and bottom LSMO layers to interact antiferromagnetically.

  11. MnO{sub 2}-wrapped hollow graphitized carbon nanosphere electrode for supercapacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Jing; Yang, Xing; Zhou, Haiyan; Kang, Liping; Lei, Zhibin [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry (Shaanxi Normal University), Ministry of Education, Xi’an 710062 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Liu, Zong-Huai, E-mail: zhliu@snnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry (Shaanxi Normal University), Ministry of Education, Xi’an 710062 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • MnO{sub 2}/HGC nanospheres are prepared by a cooperative template wrapping method. • MnO{sub 2}/HGC nanospheres possess large specific surface area. • MnO{sub 2}/HGC nanospheres are benefit for transmission of ions and electrons. • MnO{sub 2}/HGC electrodes exhibit a high specific capacitance. - Abstract: MnO{sub 2}-wrapped hollow graphitized carbon nanospheres (MnO{sub 2}/HGC) electrodes are prepared by a cooperative template wrapping method. hollow Graphitized carbon nanospheres (HGC) are firstly obtained by carbonizing phenolic resin followed by etching the SiO{sub 2} template, then the MnO{sub 2} ultrathin nanoplates are coated on the surfaces of the HGC nanospheres through a redox reaction between KMnO{sub 4} and HGC nanospheres. The as-prepared MnO{sub 2}/HGC hollow nanospheres possess porous structure and large specific surface area (∼230 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}). The specific capacitances of MnO{sub 2}/HGC nanosphere electrodes with different mass ratios of MnO{sub 2} to HGC are about 340–380 F g{sup −1} at a scan rate of 5 mV s{sup −1} in Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution, and shows relative good cycling performance of the initial capacitance after 1000 cycles. The good specific capacitance is ascribed to the novel hollow nanosphere structure, which possesses high surface-to-volume ratio, and makes it easy for the mass diffusion of electrolyte and transmission of ions and electrons and also maintains the mechanical integrality.

  12. Development of a large scale Chimera grid system for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Daniel G.; Stanley, Scott A.; Martin, Fred W., Jr.; Gomez, Ray J.; Le Beau, Gerald J.; Buning, Pieter G.; Chan, William M.; Chiu, Ing-Tsau; Wulf, Armin; Akdag, Vedat

    1993-01-01

    The application of CFD techniques to large problems has dictated the need for large team efforts. This paper offers an opportunity to examine the motivations, goals, needs, problems, as well as the methods, tools, and constraints that defined NASA's development of a 111 grid/16 million point grid system model for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle. The Chimera approach used for domain decomposition encouraged separation of the complex geometry into several major components each of which was modeled by an autonomous team. ICEM-CFD, a CAD based grid generation package, simplified the geometry and grid topology definition by provoding mature CAD tools and patch independent meshing. The resulting grid system has, on average, a four inch resolution along the surface.

  13. Enabling Campus Grids with Open Science Grid Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzel, Derek; Fraser, Dan; Pordes, Ruth; Bockelman, Brian; Swanson, David

    2011-01-01

    The Open Science Grid is a recognized key component of the US national cyber-infrastructure enabling scientific discovery through advanced high throughput computing. The principles and techniques that underlie the Open Science Grid can also be applied to Campus Grids since many of the requirements are the same, even if the implementation technologies differ. We find five requirements for a campus grid: trust relationships, job submission, resource independence, accounting, and data management. The Holland Computing Center's campus grid at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln was designed to fulfill the requirements of a campus grid. A bridging daemon was designed to bring non-Condor clusters into a grid managed by Condor. Condor features which make it possible to bridge Condor sites into a multi-campus grid have been exploited at the Holland Computing Center as well.

  14. The magnetic, structure and mechanical properties of rapidly solidified (Nd{sub 7}Y{sub 2.5})-(Fe{sub 64.5}Nb{sub 3})-B{sub 23} nanocomposite permanent magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Zubair; Tao Shan; Ma Tianyu; Zhao Guoliang [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 312007 (China); Yan Mi, E-mail: mse_yanmi@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 312007 (China)

    2011-09-08

    The Nd{sub 7}Y{sub 2.5}Fe{sub 64.5}Nb{sub 3}B{sub 23} nanocomposite permanent magnets in the form of rods with 2 mm in diameter have been developed by annealing the amorphous precursors produced by copper mold casting technique. The phase evolution, structure, magnetic and mechanical properties were investigated with X-ray diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry, electron microscopy, magnetometry and universal uniaxial compression strength techniques. The heat treatment conditions under which the magnets attained maximum magnetic and mechanical properties have been established. The results indicate that magnet properties are sensitive to grain size and volume content of the magnetic phases present in the microstructure. The composite microstructure was mainly composed of soft {alpha}-Fe (20-30 nm) and hard Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (45-65 nm) magnetic phase grains. The maximum coercivity of 959.18 kA/m was achieved with the magnets annealed at 760 deg. C whereas the highest remanence of 0.57 T was obtained with the magnets treated at 710 deg. C. The optimally annealed magnets possessed promising magnetic properties such as {sub j}H{sub c} of 891.52 kA/m, B{sub r} of 0.57 T, M{sub r}/M{sub s} = 0.68, (BH){sub max} of 56.8 kJ/m{sup 3} as well as the micro-Vickers hardness (H{sub v}) of 1138 {+-} 20 and compressive stress ({sigma}{sub f}) of 239 {+-} 10 MPa.

  15. Two actinide-organic frameworks constructed by a tripodal flexible ligand: Occurrence of infinite ((UO{sub 2})O{sub 2}(OH){sub 3}){sub 4n} and hexanuclear (Th{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}) motifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Lingling; Zhang, Ronglan [College of Chemistry and Materials, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Physico-Inorganic Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of education, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Zhao, Jianshe, E-mail: jszhao@nwu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Materials, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Physico-Inorganic Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of education, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Liu, Chiyang, E-mail: lcy@nwu.edu.cn [Department of Geology, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Weng, Ng Seik [The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, 43500 Semenyih, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2016-11-15

    Two new actinide metal-organic frameworks were constructed by using a tripodal flexible ligand tris (2-carboxyethyl) isocyanurate (H{sub 3}tci) under hydrothermal condition. The combination of H{sub 3}tci and uranyl nitrate hexahydrate in aqueous solution leads to the isolation of [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{sub 0.5}(tci){sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(OH){sub 4}·18H{sub 2}O (1), which contains two distinct UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} coordination environments. Four uranyl cations, linked through μ{sub 3}-OH respectively, result in the edge-sharing ribbons. Then, the layer structure is constructed by U-O clusters linked through other eight-coordinated uranyl unions, giving rise to a porous structure in the space. Topological analysis reveals that complex 1 belongs to a (4, 8)-connected net with a schläfli symbol of (3{sup 4.}2{sup 6.}3){sub 2}(3{sup 4.}4{sup 6.}5{sup 6.}6{sup 8.}7{sup 3.}8). Th{sub 3}(tci){sub 2}O{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}·12H{sub 2}O (2) generated by the reaction of H{sub 3}tci and thorium nitrate tetrahydrate, possesses nine-fold coodinated Th(IV) centers with a monocapped square antiprismatic geometry. The hexamers “Th{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}” motifs are connected together by the carboxylate groups, showing a three-dimensional structures. Complex 2 takes on an 8-connected architecture and the point symbol is (4{sup 24.}6{sup 4}). - Graphical abstract: Two new 3D actinide metal-organic frameworks were constructed by using a tripodal flexible ligand tris (2-carboxyethyl) isocyanurate (H3tci) and their topological structures were displayed. The infinite ((UO{sub 2})O{sub 2}(OH){sub 3}){sub 4n} and hexanuclear (Th{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}) motifs were found in the title actinides networks.

  16. Predicative possession in Medieval Slavic Bible translations Predicative Possession in Early Biblical Slavic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia McAnallen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Late Proto-Slavic (LPS had an inventory of three constructions for expressing predicative possession. Using the earliest Slavic Bible translations from Old Church Slavic (OCS, and to a lesser degree Old Czech, a number of conclusions can be drawn about the status of predicative possession for LPS. The verb iměti ‘have’ was the most frequent and least syntactically and semantically restricted predicative possessive construction (PPC. Existential PPCs with a dative possessor appear primarily with kinship relations, abstract possessums, and in a number of other fixed construction types; existential PPCs with the possessor in an u + genitive prepositional phrase primarily appear with concrete and countable possessums. Both existential PPCs call for an animate, most often pronominal, possessor. The u + genitive was the rarest type of PPC in LPS, though it had undoubtedly grammaticalized as a PPC.

  17. Donut-shaped Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoflakes grown on nickel foam with enhanced supercapacitive performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Zhicheng; Zheng, Xin; Yao, Shunyu; Xiao, Huanhao; Qu, Fengyu; Wu, Xiang, E-mail: wuxiang05@163.com

    2016-03-01

    Graphical abstract: The as-synthesized product exhibits a high initial discharge capacitance of 518 mF/cm{sup 2} at a current density of 1 mA cm{sup −2} and can maintain 75% capacitance retention even after 6000 charge–discharge cycles. Electrochemical results revealed that the prepared Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoflakes possess a remarkable performance in supercapacitor applications. - Highlights: • Donut-shaped Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoflakes were first fabricated by a solution approach. • The tests show high discharge areal capacitance and long cycle life stability. • Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoflakes might be promising supercapacitor electrode materials. - Abstract: Donut-shaped Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoflakes grown on nickel foam were successfully fabricated by a simple one-pot hydrothermal approach. The prepared products were functionalized as the supercapacitors electrodes. Electrochemical performance of the as-prepared products demonstrated high specific capacitance (518 mF cm{sup −2}) and excellent cycling stability (∼25% loss) after 6000 repetitive cycles at a charge–discharge current density of 1 mA cm{sup −2}. The superior electrochemical performance may be ascribed into two reasons: one is the unique spatial structures which possess many active sites and provide enhanced combination between the electrode and nickel foam to support fast ion and electron transfer, the other is that donut-shaped Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoflakes electrodes show relatively lower resistances. It is expected that the as-obtained donut-shaped Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoflakes could have potential applications in portable electronics and electrical vehicles.

  18. Assessment of grid optimisation measures for the German transmission grid using open source grid data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böing, F.; Murmann, A.; Pellinger, C.; Bruckmeier, A.; Kern, T.; Mongin, T.

    2018-02-01

    The expansion of capacities in the German transmission grid is a necessity for further integration of renewable energy sources into the electricity sector. In this paper, the grid optimisation measures ‘Overhead Line Monitoring’, ‘Power-to-Heat’ and ‘Demand Response in the Industry’ are evaluated and compared against conventional grid expansion for the year 2030. Initially, the methodical approach of the simulation model is presented and detailed descriptions of the grid model and the used grid data, which partly originates from open-source platforms, are provided. Further, this paper explains how ‘Curtailment’ and ‘Redispatch’ can be reduced by implementing grid optimisation measures and how the depreciation of economic costs can be determined considering construction costs. The developed simulations show that the conventional grid expansion is more efficient and implies more grid relieving effects than the evaluated grid optimisation measures.

  19. Geometrically weighted semiconductor Frisch grid radiation spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, D.S. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States); Rojeski, R.A. [Etec Systems, Inc., 26460 Corporate Ave., Hayward, CA 94545 (United States); He, Z. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States); Wehe, D.K. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States); Driver, M. [eV Products, 375 Saxonburg Blvd., Saxonburg, PA 16056 (United States); Blakely, M. [eV Products, 375 Saxonburg Blvd., Saxonburg, PA 16056 (United States)

    1999-02-11

    A new detector geometry is described with relatively high gamma ray energy resolution at room temperature. The device uses the geometric weighting effect, the small pixel effect and the Frisch grid effect to produce high gamma ray energy resolution. The design is simple and easy to construct. The device performs as a gamma ray spectrometer without the need for pulse shape rejection or correction, and it requires only one signal output to any commercially available charge sensitive preamplifier. The device operates very well with conventional NIM electronic systems. Presently, room temperature (23 deg. C) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM at 662 keV and 2.45% FWHM at 1.332 MeV have been measured with a 1 cm{sup 3} prism shaped CdZnTe device.

  20. Degenerate Quadtree Latitude/Longitude Grid Based on WGS-84 Ellipsoidal Facet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HU Bailin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For the needs of digital earth development and solving many global problems, a new discrete global grid system-DQLLG (degenerate quadtree latitude/longitude grid was put forward, which was based on WGS-84 ellipsoidal facet. The hierarchical subdivision method, characteristics and grid column/row coordinate system were detailed. The Latitude/Longitude coordinate, area and side length of multi-resolution meshes on different subdivision levels were calculated. Then the changes of mesh areas and side lengths were analyzed and compared that with spherical DQLLG. The research indicates that the DQLLG had many excellent features:uniformity, hierarchy, consistency of direction, extensive data compatibility and so on. It has certain practicality for Global GIS in the future.

  1. Growth, thermal and spectral characteristics of Yb{sup 3+}:Sr{sub 6}YSc(BO{sub 3}){sub 6} crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Feifei [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Lizhen; Huang, Yisheng; Sun, Shijia [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Lin, Zhoubin, E-mail: lzb@fjirsm.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Wang, Guofu [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • A new crystal of Yb{sup 3+}:Sr{sub 6}YSc(BO{sub 3}){sub 6} was grown successfully from a Li{sub 6}B{sub 4}O{sub 9} flux. • Yb{sup 3+}:Sr{sub 6}YSc(BO{sub 3}){sub 6} crystal has good thermal, mechanical and spectral properties. • Yb{sup 3+}:Sr{sub 6}YSc(BO{sub 3}){sub 6} has long fluorescence lifetime, broad absorption and emission bands. - Abstract: A crystal of Yb{sup 3+}:Sr{sub 6}YSc(BO{sub 3}){sub 6} was grown successfully from Li{sub 6}B{sub 4}O{sub 9} flux by the top-seeded solution growth method. The crystal's thermal, mechanical and spectral characteristics were investigated in detail. It possesses small thermal expansion coefficients, moderate thermal conductivities, and large hardness. The crystal has a strong absorption band at 967 nm with a full width at half-maximum of about 3.4 nm. The crystal has a broad emission band at 1016 nm with the full width at half-maximum of about 64 nm. The emission cross sections were calculated by reciprocity method and Füchtbauer-Ladenburg formula. The fluorescence lifetime is 5.98 ms. The results reveal that Yb{sup 3+}:Sr{sub 6}YSc(BO{sub 3}){sub 6} crystal is a new promising tunable and ultrashort pulse laser crystal.

  2. Enabling campus grids with open science grid technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitzel, Derek [Nebraska U.; Bockelman, Brian [Nebraska U.; Swanson, David [Nebraska U.; Fraser, Dan [Argonne; Pordes, Ruth [Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The Open Science Grid is a recognized key component of the US national cyber-infrastructure enabling scientific discovery through advanced high throughput computing. The principles and techniques that underlie the Open Science Grid can also be applied to Campus Grids since many of the requirements are the same, even if the implementation technologies differ. We find five requirements for a campus grid: trust relationships, job submission, resource independence, accounting, and data management. The Holland Computing Center's campus grid at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln was designed to fulfill the requirements of a campus grid. A bridging daemon was designed to bring non-Condor clusters into a grid managed by Condor. Condor features which make it possible to bridge Condor sites into a multi-campus grid have been exploited at the Holland Computing Center as well.

  3. A Statistical Framework for Automatic Leakage Detection in Smart Water and Gas Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Fagiani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, due to the technological improvement of advanced metering infrastructures, water and natural gas grids can be regarded as smart-grids, similarly to power ones. However, considering the number of studies related to the application of computational intelligence to distribution grids, the gap between power grids and water/gas grids is notably wide. For this purpose, in this paper, a framework for leakage identification is presented. The framework is composed of three sections aimed at the extraction and the selection of features and at the detection of leakages. A variation of the Sequential Feature Selection (SFS algorithm is used to select the best performing features within a set, including, also, innovative temporal ones. The leakage identification is based on novelty detection and exploits the characterization of a normality model. Three statistical approaches, The Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM, Hidden Markov Model (HMM and One-Class Support Vector Machine (OC-SVM, are adopted, under a comparative perspective. Both residential and office building environments are investigated by means of two datasets. One is the Almanac of Minutely Power dataset (AMPds, and it provides water and gas data consumption at 1, 10 and 30 min of time resolution; the other is the Department of International Development (DFID dataset, and it provides water and gas data consumption at 30 min of time resolution. The achieved performance, computed by means of the Area Under the Curve (AUC, reaches 90 % in the office building case study, thus confirming the suitability of the proposed approach for applications in smart water and gas grids.

  4. Effects of lead-foam grids on performance of VRLA battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Changsong; Yi, Tingfeng; Wang, Dianlong; Hu, Xinguo [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 411, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2006-08-25

    Lead-foam grids have been prepared by electrodepositing lead on a copper-foam substrate that has good conductibility and a symmetrically three-dimensional reticulated structure. VRLA batteries with lead foam as the negative electrode current collector material have been fabricated; the effects of the lead foam on the specific capacity, the active material utilization efficiency and the negative active material transformation process of the VRLA batteries have been studied. The results show that a lead-foam grid has a bigger specific surface area than a cast grid. The charge voltage of a VRLA battery with a lead-foam negative electrode is significantly lower than that of a VRLA battery with a cast grid electrode during a charge process. The discharge capacity, the mass specific capacity, and the active material utilization efficiency of a VRLA battery with a lead-foam electrode can be greatly improved at different states of discharge. The EIS research revealed that a lead-foam negative electrode has higher electrochemical reactivity. Observed by means of a scanning electron microscope, it was found that the spongy Pb crystals at a lead-foam grid negative electrode are smaller than that of a cast grid negative electrode at a state of charge; while the PbSO{sub 4} crystals are smaller than that of a cast grid negative electrode at a state of discharge. (author)

  5. The enhanced catalytic degradation of SiO{sub 2}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C@TiO{sub 2} photo-Fenton system on p-nitrophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Yanhui; Wang, Yechen; Yuan, Huili; Chen, Hang; Chen, Guowei; Shen, Junhai; Li, Liangchao, E-mail: sky52@zjnu.cn [Zhejiang Normal University, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Advanced Catalysis Materials, Department of Chemistry (China)

    2016-11-15

    Heterogeneous photo-Fenton SiO{sub 2}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C@TiO{sub 2} (SFCT) catalyst with a core-multishell structure and a diameter of about 550 nm was successfully prepared and was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), TEM, XRD, Raman, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR). The results illustrated that anatase TiO{sub 2} coexisted with rutile TiO{sub 2}, in which the anatase phase was the main crystal phase. In addition, the catalytic activity of SFCT catalyst had been evaluated in the catalytic degradation on p-nitrophenol (PNP). The influence factors on the PNP degradation, including SFCT component ratio (m{sub SFC}/ m{sub TiO2}), H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dosage, solution pH, and PNP concentration, had been investigated. And the contrast experiments about the photo-Fenton catalytic mechanism revealed that the SFCT-2 catalyst possessed a superior activity in the neutral environment due to the optimal activity matching between Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and TiO{sub 2}, and it exhibited the stable catalytic performance after five successive recycles. Therefore, the SFCT-2 catalyst had a promising application for the photo-Fenton degradation of organic contaminant.

  6. Gridded multibeam bathymetry of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry at 40m resolution surrounding Howland Island, within the Pacific Remote Island Areas - Central Pacific Ocean. Bottom coverage was achieved in...

  7. Variable-Resolution Ensemble Climatology Modeling of Sierra Nevada Snowpack within the Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, A.; Ullrich, P. A.; Zarzycki, C. M.; Levy, M.; Taylor, M.

    2014-12-01

    Snowpack is crucial for the western USA, providing around 75% of the total fresh water supply (Cayan et al., 1996) and buffering against seasonal aridity impacts on agricultural, ecosystem, and urban water demands. The resilience of the California water system is largely dependent on natural stores provided by snowpack. This resilience has shown vulnerabilities due to anthropogenic global climate change. Historically, the northern Sierras showed a net decline of 50-75% in snow water equivalent (SWE) while the southern Sierras showed a net accumulation of 30% (Mote et al., 2005). Future trends of SWE highlight that western USA SWE may decline by 40-70% (Pierce and Cayan, 2013), snowfall may decrease by 25-40% (Pierce and Cayan, 2013), and more winter storms may tend towards rain rather than snow (Bales et al., 2006). The volatility of Sierran snowpack presents a need for scientific tools to help water managers and policy makers assess current and future trends. A burgeoning tool to analyze these trends comes in the form of variable-resolution global climate modeling (VRGCM). VRGCMs serve as a bridge between regional and global models and provide added resolution in areas of need, eliminate lateral boundary forcings, provide model runtime speed up, and utilize a common dynamical core, physics scheme and sub-grid scale parameterization package. A cubed-sphere variable-resolution grid with 25 km horizontal resolution over the western USA was developed for use in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). A 25-year three-member ensemble climatology (1980-2005) is presented and major snowpack metrics such as SWE, snow depth, snow cover, and two-meter surface temperature are assessed. The ensemble simulation is also compared to observational, reanalysis, and WRF model datasets. The variable-resolution model provides a mechanism for reaching towards non-hydrostatic scales and simulations are currently being developed with refined

  8. Is there a single spot size and grid for intensity modulated proton therapy? Simulation of head and neck, prostate and mesothelioma cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widesott, Lamberto; Lomax, Antony J.; Schwarz, Marco [AtreP, Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia, 38122 Trento (Italy); Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); AtreP, Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia, 38122 Trento (Italy)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the quality of dose distributions in real clinical cases for different dimensions of scanned proton pencil beams. The distance between spots (i.e., the grid of delivery) is optimized for each dimension of the pencil beam. Methods: The authors vary the {sigma} of the initial Gaussian size of the spot, from {sigma}{sub x} = {sigma}{sub y} = 3 mm to {sigma}{sub x} = {sigma}{sub y} = 8 mm, to evaluate the impact of the proton beam size on the quality of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans. The distance between spots, {Delta}x and {Delta}y, is optimized on the spot plane, ranging from 4 to 12 mm (i.e., each spot size is coupled with the best spot grid resolution). In our Hyperion treatment planning system (TPS), constrained optimization is applied with respect to the organs at risk (OARs), i.e., the optimization tries to satisfy the dose objectives in the planning target volume (PTV) as long as all planning objectives for the OARs are met. Three-field plans for a nasopharynx case, two-field plans for a prostate case, and two-field plans for a malignant pleural mesothelioma case are considered in our analysis. Results: For the head and neck tumor, the best grids (i.e., distance between spots) are 5, 4, 6, 6, and 8 mm for {sigma} = 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 mm, respectively. {sigma} {<=} 5 mm is required for tumor volumes with low dose and {sigma}{<=} 4 mm for tumor volumes with high dose. For the prostate patient, the best grid is 4, 4, 5, 5, and 5 mm for {sigma} = 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 mm, respectively. Beams with {sigma} > 3 mm did not satisfy our first clinical requirement that 95% of the prescribed dose is delivered to more than 95% of prostate and proximal seminal vesicles PTV. Our second clinical requirement, to cover the distal seminal vesicles PTV, is satisfied for beams as wide as {sigma} = 6 mm. For the mesothelioma case, the low dose PTV prescription is well respected for all values of {sigma}, while there is loss of high dose PTV coverage

  9. The research of SSR which can be restrained by photovoltaic grid connected

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kuan; Liu, Meng; Zheng, Wei; Li, Yudun; Wang, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Utilization of photovoltaic power generation has attracted considerable attention, and it is growing rapidly due to its environmental benefits. The series capacitive compensation is needed to be introduced into the lines which could improve the transmission capacity. However, the series capacitive compensation may lead to sub-synchronous resonance(SSR). This paper proposes a method to restrain the SSR based on photovoltaic grid connected which is caused by series capacitive compensation. Sub-synchronous oscillation damping controller (SSDC) is designed based on complex torque coefficient approach, and the SSDC is added to the PV power station’s main controller to damp SSR. IEEE Second benchmark model is used as simulation model based on PSCAD/EMTDC. The results show that the designed SSDC could restrain SSR and improve stability in PV grid connected effectively.

  10. High-Resolution Hydrological Sub-Seasonal Forecasting for Water Resources Management Over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, E. F.; Wanders, N.; Pan, M.; Sheffield, J.; Samaniego, L. E.; Thober, S.; Kumar, R.; Prudhomme, C.; Houghton-Carr, H.

    2017-12-01

    For decision-making at the sub-seasonal and seasonal time scale, hydrological forecasts with a high temporal and spatial resolution are required by water managers. So far such forecasts have been unavailable due to 1) lack of availability of meteorological seasonal forecasts, 2) coarse temporal resolution of meteorological seasonal forecasts, requiring temporal downscaling, 3) lack of consistency between observations and seasonal forecasts, requiring bias-correction. The EDgE (End-to-end Demonstrator for improved decision making in the water sector in Europe) project commissioned by the ECMWF (C3S) created a unique dataset of hydrological seasonal forecasts derived from four global climate models (CanCM4, FLOR-B01, ECMF, LFPW) in combination with four global hydrological models (PCR-GLOBWB, VIC, mHM, Noah-MP), resulting in 208 forecasts for any given day. The forecasts provide a daily temporal and 5-km spatial resolution, and are bias corrected against E-OBS meteorological observations. The forecasts are communicated to stakeholders via Sectoral Climate Impact Indicators (SCIIs), created in collaboration with the end-user community of the EDgE project (e.g. the percentage of ensemble realizations above the 10th percentile of monthly river flow, or below the 90th). Results show skillful forecasts for discharge from 3 months to 6 months (latter for N Europe due to snow); for soil moisture up to three months due precipitation forecast skill and short initial condition memory; and for groundwater greater than 6 months (lowest skill in western Europe.) The SCIIs are effective in communicating both forecast skill and uncertainty. Overall the new system provides an unprecedented ensemble for seasonal forecasts with significant skill over Europe to support water management. The consistency in both the GCM forecasts and the LSM parameterization ensures a stable and reliable forecast framework and methodology, even if additional GCMs or LSMs are added in the future.

  11. High resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy based on frequency upconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Hu, Qi; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    signals can be analyzed. The obtainable frequency resolution is usually in the nm range where sub nm resolution is preferred in many applications, like gas spectroscopy. In this work we demonstrate how to obtain sub nm resolution when using upconversion. In the presented realization one object point...... high resolution spectral performance by observing emission from hot water vapor in a butane gas burner....

  12. Synthesis, characterization and adsorptive performance of MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres for SO{sub 2} removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Ling [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li Xinyong, E-mail: xyli@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Zhao Qidong; Qu Zhenping; Yuan Deling [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu Shaomin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Hu Xijun; Chen Guohua [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-12-15

    A type of uniform Mg ferrite nanospheres with excellent SO{sub 2} adsorption capacity could be selectively synthesized via a facile solvothermal method. The size of the MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres was controlled to be 300-400 nm in diameter. The structural, textural, and surface properties of the adsorbent have been fully characterized by a variety of techniques (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, BET; X-ray diffraction analysis, XRD; scanning electron microscopy, SEM; and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, EDS). The valence states and the surface chemical compositions of MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres were further identified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The behaviors of SO{sub 2} oxidative adsorption on MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres were studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Both the sulfite and sulfate species could be formed on the surface of MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The adsorption equilibrium isotherm of SO{sub 2} was analyzed using a volumetric method at 298 K and 473 K. The results indicate that MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanospheres possess a good potential as the solid-state SO{sub 2} adsorbent for applications in hot fuel gas desulfurization.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, and comparative gas-sensing properties of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} prepared from Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-chitosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuong, Nguyen Duc [Faculty of Hospitality and Tourism, Hue University, 22 Lam Hoang, Vy Da Ward, Hue City (Viet Nam); College of Sciences, Hue University, 77 Nguyen Hue, Phu Nhuan Ward, Hue City (Viet Nam); International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), Hanoi (Viet Nam); Hoa, Tran Thai; Khieu, Dinh Quang [College of Sciences, Hue University, 77 Nguyen Hue, Phu Nhuan Ward, Hue City (Viet Nam); Lam, Tran Dai [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Hoa, Nguyen Duc [International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), Hanoi (Viet Nam); Van Hieu, Nguyen, E-mail: hieu@itims.edu.vn [International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have demonstrated a facile method to prepare Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and chitosan-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} sensors prepared from those Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} materials have been investigated and compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results show potential application of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} for CO sensors in environmental monitoring. - Abstract: In this paper, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and chitosan (CS)-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized via co-precipitation method and subsequent covalent binding of CS onto the surface for functionalization, respectively. Characterization of the crystal structures and morphologies of as-synthesized nanoparticles by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} had a cubic spinal structure with irregular shapes and average diameters of 10-20 nm. The surface states and magnetic properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-CS nanoparticles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra and vibrating sample magnetometry. Results showed that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-CS nanoparticles possessed super-paramagnetic properties, with saturated magnetization up to 60 emu/g. In addition, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and CS-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were used in the fabrication of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} based gas sensors. Gas sensing measurements revealed that the {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} gas sensor prepared from Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-CS had a better response to H{sub 2}, CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH, and NH{sub 3} compared with the device prepared from pristine Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. Furthermore, the {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} sensor prepared from Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-CS nanoparticles exhibited the highest response to CO among the test gases, suggesting that it has great potential for practical applications in environmental monitoring.

  14. Effect of iron content on the structure and mechanical properties of Al{sub 25}Ti{sub 25}Ni{sub 25}Cu{sub 25} and (AlTi){sub 60-x}Ni{sub 20}Cu{sub 20}Fe{sub x} (x=15, 20) high-entropy alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazakas, É., E-mail: eva.fazakas@bayzoltan.hu [WPI-Advaced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-Ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Wigner Research Center for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525, P.O.B. 49 (Hungary); Bay Zoltán Nonprofit Ltd., For Applied Research H-1116 Budapest, Fehérvári út 130 (Hungary); Zadorozhnyy, V. [National University of Science and Technology «MISIS», Leninsky prosp., 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Louzguine-Luzgin, D.V. [WPI-Advaced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-Ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Three new refractory alloys namely: Al{sub 25}Ti{sub 25}Ni{sub 25}Cu{sub 25}, Al{sub 22.5}Ti{sub 22.5}Ni{sub 20}Cu{sub 20}Fe{sub 15} and Al{sub 20}Ti{sub 20}Ni{sub 20}Cu{sub 20}Fe{sub 20}, were produced by induction-melting and casting. • This kind of alloys exhibits high resistance to annealing softening. • Most the alloys in the annealed state possess even higher Vickers microhardness than the as-cast alloys. • The Al{sub 22.5}Ti{sub 22.5}Ni{sub 20}Cu{sub 20}Fe{sub 15} and Al{sub 20}Ti{sub 20}Ni{sub 20}Cu{sub 20}Fe{sub 20} alloys annealed at 973 K show the highest compressive stress and ductility values. - Abstract: In this work, we investigated the microstructure and mechanical properties of Al{sub 25}Ti{sub 25}Ni{sub 25}C{sub u25} Al{sub 22.5}Ti{sub 22.5}Ni{sub 20}Cu{sub 20}Fe{sub 15} and Al{sub 20}Ti{sub 20}Ni{sub 20}Cu{sub 20}Fe{sub 20} high entropy alloys, produced by arc melting and casting in an inert atmosphere. The structure of these alloys was studied by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. The as-cast alloys were heat treated at 773, 973 and 1173 K for 1800 s to investigate the effects of aging on the plasticity, hardness and elastic properties. Compared to the conventional high-entropy alloys the Al{sub 25}Ti{sub 25}Ni{sub 25}Cu{sub 25}, Al{sub 22.5}Ti{sub 22.5}Ni{sub 20}Cu{sub 20}Fe{sub 15} and Al{sub 20}Ti{sub 20}Ni{sub 20}Cu{sub 20}Fe{sub 20} alloys are relatively hard and ductile. Being heat treated at 973 K the Al{sub 22.5}Ti{sub 22.5}Ni{sub 20}Cu{sub 20}Fe{sub 15} alloy shows considerably high strength and relatively homogeneous deformation under compression. The plasticity, hardness and elastic properties of the studied alloys depend on the fraction and intrinsic properties of the constituent phases. Significant hardening effect by the annealing is found.

  15. Gridded multibeam bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry at 40m resolution surrounding Baker Island, within the Pacific Remote Island Areas - Central Pacific Ocean. Bottom coverage was achieved in depths...

  16. Scintillation properties of Ce:(La,Gd){sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosawa, Shunsuke, E-mail: kurosawa@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Miyagi (Japan); New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Miyagi (Japan); Shishido, Toetsu; Sugawara, Takamasa; Nomura, Akiko; Yubuta, Kunio; Suzuki, Akira; Murakami, Rikito [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Miyagi (Japan); Pejchal, Jan [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Miyagi (Japan); Institute of Physics, AS CR, Cukrovarnická 10, 162 53 Prague (Czech Republic); Yokota, Yuui; Kamada, Kei [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Miyagi (Japan); Yoshikawa, Akira [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Miyagi (Japan); New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Miyagi (Japan); C and A Corporation, 6-6-40 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    Temperature dependence of scintillation properties was investigated for (Ce{sub 0.01}, Gd{sub 0.90}, La{sub 0.09}){sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} grown by floating zone method. The light output over 35,000 photons/MeV was found constant in the temperature range from 0 °C to 150 °C. In addition, FWHM energy resolution of Ce:La-GPS (roughly 7–8%) at 662 keV remained constant up to 100 °C. Thus, this crystal can be applied to oil well logging or other radiation detection application at high temperature conditions.

  17. MODELING THE TRANSPORT AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF ONSHORE AND OFFSHORE EMISSIONS AND THEIR IMPACT ON LOCAL AND REGIONAL AIR QUALITY USING A VARIABLE-GRID-RESOLUTION AIR QUALITY MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran Alapaty

    2003-12-01

    This document, the project's first semiannual report, summarizes the research performed from 04/17/2003 through 10/16/2003. Portions of the research in several of the project's eight tasks were completed, and results obtained are briefly presented. We have tested the applicability of two different atmospheric boundary layer schemes for use in air quality model simulations. Preliminary analysis indicates that a scheme that uses sophisticated atmospheric boundary physics resulted in better simulation of atmospheric circulations. We have further developed and tested a new surface data assimilation technique to improve meteorological simulations, which will also result in improved air quality model simulations. Preliminary analysis of results indicates that using the new data assimilation technique results in reduced modeling errors in temperature and moisture. Ingestion of satellite-derived sea surface temperatures into the mesoscale meteorological model led to significant improvements in simulated clouds and precipitation compared to that obtained using traditional analyzed sea surface temperatures. To enhance the capabilities of an emissions processing system so that it can be used with our variable-grid-resolution air quality model, we have identified potential areas for improvements. Also for use in the variable-grid-resolution air quality model, we have tested a cloud module offline for its functionality, and have implemented and tested an efficient horizontal diffusion algorithm within the model.

  18. Exploration of R<sub>2sub>XM>2sub> (R=Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, rare earth; X=main group element; M=transition metal, Si, Ge): Structural Motifs, the novel Compound Gd<sub>2sub>AlGe>2sub> and Analysis of the U<sub>3sub>Si>2sub> and Zr<sub>3sub>Al>2 sub>Structure Types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWhorter, Sean William [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    In the process of exploring and understanding the influence of crystal structure on the system of compounds with the composition Gd<sub>5sub>(SixGe>1-xsub>)>4sub> several new compounds were synthesized with different crystal structures, but similar structural features. In Gd<sub>5sub>(SixGe>1-xsub>)>4sub>, the main feature of interest is the magnetocaloric effect (MCE), which allows the material to be useful in magnetic refrigeration applications. The MCE is based on the magnetic interactions of the Gd atoms in the crystal structure, which varies with x (the amount of Si in the compound). The crystal structure of Gd<sub>5sub>(SixGe>1-xsub>)>4sub> can be thought of as being formed from two 32434 nets of Gd atoms, with additional Gd atoms in the cubic voids and Si/Ge atoms in the trigonal prismatic voids. Attempts were made to substitute nonmagnetic atoms for magnetic Gd using In, Mg and Al. Gd<sub>2sub>MgGe>2sub> and Gd<sub>2sub>InGe>2sub> both possess the same 32434 nets of Gd atoms as Gd<sub>5sub>(SixGe>1-xsub>)>4sub>, but these nets are connected differently, forming the Mo<sub>2sub>FeB>2sub> crystal structure. A search of the literature revealed that compounds with the composition R<sub>2sub>XM>2sub> (R=Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, rare earth; X=main group element; M=transition metal, Si, Ge) crystallize in one of four crystal structures: the Mo<sub>2sub>FeB>2sub>, Zr<sub>3sub>Al>2sub>, Mn<sub>2sub>AlB>2sub> and W<sub>2sub>CoB>2sub> crystal structures. These crystal structures are described, and the relationships between them are highlighted. Gd<sub>2sub>AlGe>2sub> forms an entirely new crystal structure, and the details of its synthesis and characterization are given. Electronic structure calculations are performed to understand the nature of bonding in this compound and how

  19. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 5} as new cathode for rechargeable sodium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xu-Yong; Chien, Po-Hsiu; Rose, Alyssa M.; Zheng, Jin [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong [Centre of Interdisciplinary Magnetic Resonance, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, 1800 East Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Hu, Yan-Yan, E-mail: hu@chem.fsu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Centre of Interdisciplinary Magnetic Resonance, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, 1800 East Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Chromium oxide, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 5}, was synthesized by pyrolyzing CrO{sub 3} at 350 °C and employed as a new cathode in rechargeable sodium ion batteries. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Na rechargeable batteries delivered high specific capacities up to 310 mAh/g at a current density of C/16 (or 20 mA/g). High-resolution solid-state {sup 23}Na NMR both qualitatively and quantitatively revealed the reversible intercalation of Na ions into the bulk electrode and participation of Na ions in the formation of the solid-electrolyte interphase largely at low potentials. Amorphization of the electrode structure occurred during the first discharge revealed by both NMR and X-ray diffraction data. CrO{sub 3}-catalyzed electrolyte degradation and loss in electronic conductivity led to gradual capacity fading. The specific capacity stabilized at >120 mAh/g after 50 charge-discharge cycles. Further improvement in electrochemical performance is possible via electrode surface modification, polymer binder incorporation, or designs of new morphologies. - Graphical abstract: Electrochemical profile of a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Na battery cell and high-resolution solid-state {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectrum of a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 5} electrode discharged to 2 V. - Highlights: • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 5} was synthesized and used as a new cathode in rechargeable Na ion batteries. • A high capacity of 310 mAh/g and an energy density of 564 Wh/kg were achieved. • High-resolution solid-state {sup 23}Na NMR was employed to follow the reaction mechanisms.

  20. High resolution X-ray scattering techniques for studying the sliding CDWS distortions, in NbSe sub 3

    CERN Document Server

    Rideau, D; Currat, R; Requardt, H; Nad, F Y; Lorenzo, J E; Brazovskii, S; Detlefs, C; Grübel, G

    2001-01-01

    The phase gradient in a sliding-charge density wave (CDW), which is observable as a longitudinal shift, q propor to partial deriv phi/partial deriv x, of the CDW satellite peak position, is due to the conversion free-electrons CDW-condensate, at the current electrodes. Using high resolution X-ray scattering techniques and time-resolved techniques, we monitor, on thin NbSe sub 3 whiskers, the shift, q(x), and its relaxation, q(t), upon switching off the current.

  1. On Resolution Complexity of Matching Principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantchev, Stefan S.

    proof system. The results in the thesis fall in this category. We study the Resolution complexity of some Matching Principles. The three major contributions of the thesis are as follows. Firstly, we develop a general technique of proving resolution lower bounds for the perfect matchingprinciples based...... Chessboard as well as for Tseitin tautologies based on rectangular grid graph. We reduce these problems to Tiling games, a concept introduced by us, which may be of interest on its own. Secondly, we find the exact Tree-Resolution complexity of the Weak Pigeon-Hole Principle. It is the most studied...

  2. Coarse-grid-CFD. An advantageous alternative to subchannel analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Class, A.G.; Himmel, S.R.; Viellieber, M.O.

    2011-01-01

    In the 1960 th to 80 th when current GEN II reactor technology was developed, the only possible approach was to use one-dimensional subchannel analysis to compute the flow inside a fuel bundle so that the subchannel scale could be resolved. For simulations of the whole reactor core either system codes or homogenization were employed. In system codes resolution of individual assemblies was the state of the art. Homogenization used porous media equations simulations and averaged the thermohydraulics on reactor core scale. Current potent computing power allows using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to simulate individual fuel assemblies. Yet the large number of fuel assemblies within the core forbids exploiting CFD for core wide simulation. We propose to combine ideas of subchannel analysis and CFD to develop a new methodology which takes advantage of the fast development of commercial CFD software and the efficiency of subchannel analysis. In this methodology was first applied to simulate a wire-wrap fuel bundle of the High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR). Computations using an inviscid Euler solver on an extremely coarse grid were tuned to predict the true thermohydraulics by adding volumetric forces. These forces represent the non-resolved sub-grid physics. The volumetric forces cannot be measured directly. However, they can be accessed from detailed CFD simulations resolving all relevant physics. Parameterization of these subgrid forces can be realized analogous to models in subchannel codes. In the present work we extend the methodology to the open source solver OpenFOAM and a specific hexagonal fuel assembly which is studied in the framework of liquid metal cooled GEN IV reactor concepts. (orig.)

  3. Development of a multi-grid FDTD code for three-dimensional simulation of large microwave sintering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, M.J.; Iskander, M.F. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Electrical Engineering Dept.; Kimrey, H.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) code available at the University of Utah has been used to simulate sintering of ceramics in single and multimode cavities, and many useful results have been reported in literature. More detailed and accurate results, specifically around and including the ceramic sample, are often desired to help evaluate the adequacy of the heating procedure. In electrically large multimode cavities, however, computer memory requirements limit the number of the mathematical cells, and the desired resolution is impractical to achieve due to limited computer resources. Therefore, an FDTD algorithm which incorporates multiple-grid regions with variable-grid sizes is required to adequately perform the desired simulations. In this paper the authors describe the development of a three-dimensional multi-grid FDTD code to help focus a large number of cells around the desired region. Test geometries were solved using a uniform-grid and the developed multi-grid code to help validate the results from the developed code. Results from these comparisons, as well as the results of comparisons between the developed FDTD code and other available variable-grid codes are presented. In addition, results from the simulation of realistic microwave sintering experiments showed improved resolution in critical sites inside the three-dimensional sintering cavity. With the validation of the FDTD code, simulations were performed for electrically large, multimode, microwave sintering cavities to fully demonstrate the advantages of the developed multi-grid FDTD code.

  4. High-resolution field shaping utilizing a masked multileaf collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P C; Cooper, P

    2000-08-01

    Multileaf collimators (MLCs) have become an important tool in the modern radiotherapy department. However, the current limit of resolution (1 cm at isocentre) can be too coarse for acceptable shielding of all fields. A number of mini- and micro-MLCs have been developed, with thinner leaves to achieve approved resolution. Currently however, such devices are limited to modest field sizes and stereotactic applications. This paper proposes a new method of high-resolution beam collimation by use of a tertiary grid collimator situated below the conventional MLC. The width of each slit in the grid is a submultiple of the MLC width. A composite shaped field is thus built up from a series of subfields, with the main MLC defining the length of each strip within each subfield. Presented here are initial findings using a prototype device. The beam uniformity achievable with such a device was examined by measuring transmission profiles through the grid using a diode. Profiles thus measured were then copied and superposed to generate composite beams, from which the uniformity achievable could be assessed. With the average dose across the profile normalized to 100%, hot spots up to 5.0% and troughs of 3% were identified for a composite beam of 2 x 5.0 mm grids, as measured at Dmax for a 6 MV beam. For a beam composed from 4 x 2.5 mm grids, the maximum across the profile was 3.0% above the average, and the minimum 2.5% below. Actual composite profiles were also formed using the integrating properties of film, with the subfield indexing performed using an engineering positioning stage. The beam uniformity for these fields compared well with that achieved in theory using the diode measurements. Finally sine wave patterns were generated to demonstrate the potential improvements in field shaping and conformity using this device as opposed to the conventional MLC alone. The scalloping effect on the field edge commonly seen on MLC fields was appreciably reduced by use of 2 x 5.0 mm

  5. Wildfire spread, hazard and exposure metric raster grids for central Catalonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermín J. Alcasena

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We provide 40 m resolution wildfire spread, hazard and exposure metric raster grids for the 0.13 million ha fire-prone Bages County in central Catalonia (northeastern Spain corresponding to node influence grid (NIG, crown fraction burned (CFB and fire transmission to residential houses (TR. Fire spread and behavior data (NIG, CFB and fire perimeters were generated with fire simulation modeling considering wildfire season extreme fire weather conditions (97th percentile. Moreover, CFB was also generated for prescribed fire (Rx mild weather conditions. The TR smoothed grid was obtained with a geospatial analysis considering large fire perimeters and individual residential structures located within the study area. We made these raster grids available to assist in the optimization of wildfire risk management plans within the study area and to help mitigate potential losses from catastrophic events. Keywords: Catalonia, Wildfire exposure, Fire transmission, Crown fire activity, Prescribed fires

  6. GridCom, Grid Commander: graphical interface for Grid jobs and data management; GridCom, Grid Commander: graficheskij interfejs dlya raboty s zadachami i dannymi v gride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galaktionov, V V

    2011-07-01

    GridCom - the software package for maintenance of automation of access to means of distributed system Grid (jobs and data). The client part, executed in the form of Java-applets, realises the Web-interface access to Grid through standard browsers. The executive part Lexor (LCG Executor) is started by the user in UI (User Interface) machine providing performance of Grid operations

  7. Controlled hydrothermal synthesis of BiO{sub x}Cl{sub y}/BiO{sub m}I{sub n} composites exhibiting visible-light photocatalytic degradation of crystal violet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yu-Rou; Lin, Ho-Pan [Department of Science Application and Dissemination, National Taichung University of Education, Taichung 403, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chung, Wen-Hsin [Department of Plant Pathology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Dai, Yong-Ming [Department of Science Application and Dissemination, National Taichung University of Education, Taichung 403, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Wan-Yu [Department of Plant Pathology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Chiing-Chang, E-mail: ccchen@ms3.ntcu.edu.tw [Department of Science Application and Dissemination, National Taichung University of Education, Taichung 403, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • This is the first report on a series of BiO{sub x}Cl{sub y}/BiO{sub m}I{sub n} heterojunctions. • The BiO{sub x}Cl{sub y}/BiO{sub m}I{sub n} composition was controlled by adjusting the growth parameters. • The BiO{sub x}Cl{sub y}/BiO{sub m}I{sub n} were indirect semiconductors with a 1.78–2.95-eV bandgap. • The new photocatalysts removed CV at a much faster rate than TiO{sub 2}. • Mechanisms were determined by separating the intermediates using HPLC-MS. - Abstract: A series of BiO{sub x}Cl{sub y}/BiO{sub m}I{sub n} composites were prepared using autoclave hydrothermal methods. The composition and morphologies of the BiO{sub x}Cl{sub y}/BiO{sub m}I{sub n} composites were controlled by adjusting the experimental conditions: the reaction pH value, temperature, and KCl/KI molar ratio. The products were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller specific surface areas, cathodoluminescence, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photocatalytic efficiencies of composite powder suspensions were evaluated by monitoring the crystal violet (CV) concentrations. In addition, the quenching effects of various scavengers indicated that the reactive O{sub 2}·{sup −} played a major role, and OH· or h{sup +} played a minor role in CV degradation. The intermediates formed during the decomposition process were isolated, identified, and characterized using high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry to elucidate the CV decomposition mechanism.

  8. High-resolution T{sub 2}-weighted cervical cancer imaging: a feasibility study on ultra-high-field 7.0-T MRI with an endorectal monopole antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogendam, Jacob P.; Verheijen, Rene H.M.; Zweemer, Ronald P. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Gynaecological Oncology, UMC Utrecht Cancer Centre, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kalleveen, Irene M.L.; Castro, Catalina S.A. de; Raaijmakers, Alexander J.E.; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den; Klomp, Dennis W.J.; Veldhuis, Wouter B. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2017-03-15

    We studied the feasibility of high-resolution T{sub 2}-weighted cervical cancer imaging on an ultra-high-field 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system using an endorectal antenna of 4.7-mm thickness. A feasibility study on 20 stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer patients was conducted. All underwent pre-treatment 1.5-T MRI. At 7.0-T MRI, an external transmit/receive array with seven dipole antennae and a single endorectal monopole receive antenna were used. Discomfort levels were assessed. Following individualised phase-based B{sub 1} {sup +} shimming, T{sub 2}-weighted turbo spin echo sequences were completed. Patients had stage IB1 (n = 9), IB2 (n = 4), IIA1 (n = 1) or IIB (n = 6) cervical cancer. Discomfort (ten-point scale) was minimal at placement and removal of the endorectal antenna with a median score of 1 (range, 0-5) and 0 (range, 0-2) respectively. Its use did not result in adverse events or pre-term session discontinuation. To demonstrate feasibility, T{sub 2}-weighted acquisitions from 7.0-T MRI are presented in comparison to 1.5-T MRI. Artefacts on 7.0-T MRI were due to motion, locally destructive B{sub 1} interference, excessive B{sub 1} under the external antennae and SENSE reconstruction. High-resolution T{sub 2}-weighted 7.0-T MRI of stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer is feasible. The addition of an endorectal antenna is well tolerated by patients. (orig.)

  9. Diviner lunar radiometer gridded brightness temperatures from geodesic binning of modeled fields of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefton-Nash, E.; Williams, J.-P.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Aye, K.-M.; Paige, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    An approach is presented to efficiently produce high quality gridded data records from the large, global point-based dataset returned by the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment aboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. The need to minimize data volume and processing time in production of science-ready map products is increasingly important with the growth in data volume of planetary datasets. Diviner makes on average >1400 observations per second of radiance that is reflected and emitted from the lunar surface, using 189 detectors divided into 9 spectral channels. Data management and processing bottlenecks are amplified by modeling every observation as a probability distribution function over the field of view, which can increase the required processing time by 2-3 orders of magnitude. Geometric corrections, such as projection of data points onto a digital elevation model, are numerically intensive and therefore it is desirable to perform them only once. Our approach reduces bottlenecks through parallel binning and efficient storage of a pre-processed database of observations. Database construction is via subdivision of a geodesic icosahedral grid, with a spatial resolution that can be tailored to suit the field of view of the observing instrument. Global geodesic grids with high spatial resolution are normally impractically memory intensive. We therefore demonstrate a minimum storage and highly parallel method to bin very large numbers of data points onto such a grid. A database of the pre-processed and binned points is then used for production of mapped data products that is significantly faster than if unprocessed points were used. We explore quality controls in the production of gridded data records by conditional interpolation, allowed only where data density is sufficient. The resultant effects on the spatial continuity and uncertainty in maps of lunar brightness temperatures is illustrated. We identify four binning regimes based on trades between the

  10. Preparation and catalytic activities for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition of Rh/Au bimetallic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haijun, E-mail: zhanghaijun@wust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Integrated Exploitation of Bayan Obo Multi-Metal Resources, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 014010 (China); The State Key Laboratory of Refractory and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Deng, Xiangong; Jiao, Chengpeng; Lu, Lilin; Zhang, Shaowei [The State Key Laboratory of Refractory and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Graphical abstract: PVP-protected Rh/Au bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs) were prepared by using hydrogen sacrificial reduction method, the activity of Rh80Au20 BNPs were about 3.6 times higher than that of Rh NPs. - Highlights: • Rh/Au bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs) of 3∼5 nm in diameter were prepared. • Activity for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition of BNPs is 3.6 times higher than that of Rh NPs. • The high activity of BNPs was caused by the existence of charged Rh atoms. • The apparent activation energy for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition over the BNPs was calculated. - Abstract: PVP-protected Rh/Au bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs) were prepared by using hydrogen sacrificial reduction method and characterized by UV–vis, XRD, FT-IR, XPS, TEM, HR-TEM and DF-STEM, the effects of composition on their particle sizes and catalytic activities for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition were also studied. The as-prepared Rh/Au BNPs possessed a high catalytic activity for the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition, and the activity of the Rh{sub 80}Au{sub 20} BNPs with average size of 2.7 nm were about 3.6 times higher than that of Rh monometallic nanoparticles (MNPs) even the Rh MNPs possess a smaller particle size of 1.7 nm. In contrast, Au MNPs with size of 2.7 nm show no any activity. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation as well as XPS results showed that charged Rh and Au atoms formed via electronic charge transfer effects could be responsible for the high catalytic activity of the BNPs.

  11. Progress in Grid Generation: From Chimera to DRAGON Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Kao, Kai-Hsiung

    1994-01-01

    Hybrid grids, composed of structured and unstructured grids, combines the best features of both. The chimera method is a major stepstone toward a hybrid grid from which the present approach is evolved. The chimera grid composes a set of overlapped structured grids which are independently generated and body-fitted, yielding a high quality grid readily accessible for efficient solution schemes. The chimera method has been shown to be efficient to generate a grid about complex geometries and has been demonstrated to deliver accurate aerodynamic prediction of complex flows. While its geometrical flexibility is attractive, interpolation of data in the overlapped regions - which in today's practice in 3D is done in a nonconservative fashion, is not. In the present paper we propose a hybrid grid scheme that maximizes the advantages of the chimera scheme and adapts the strengths of the unstructured grid while at the same time keeps its weaknesses minimal. Like the chimera method, we first divide up the physical domain by a set of structured body-fitted grids which are separately generated and overlaid throughout a complex configuration. To eliminate any pure data manipulation which does not necessarily follow governing equations, we use non-structured grids only to directly replace the region of the arbitrarily overlapped grids. This new adaptation to the chimera thinking is coined the DRAGON grid. The nonstructured grid region sandwiched between the structured grids is limited in size, resulting in only a small increase in memory and computational effort. The DRAGON method has three important advantages: (1) preserving strengths of the chimera grid; (2) eliminating difficulties sometimes encountered in the chimera scheme, such as the orphan points and bad quality of interpolation stencils; and (3) making grid communication in a fully conservative and consistent manner insofar as the governing equations are concerned. To demonstrate its use, the governing equations are

  12. Characterization and microwave dielectric properties of Mg{sub 2}YVO{sub 6} ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chia-Hui; Wang, Yi-Sheng; Huang, Cheng-Liang, E-mail: huangcl@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2015-08-25

    Highlights: • Study the microwave dielectric properties and microstructure of Mg{sub 2}YVO{sub 6}. • Mg{sub 2}YVO{sub 6} possesses excellent dielectric properties. • Both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have effects on Q × f of specimens. - Abstract: Tetragonal-structured Mg{sub 2}YVO{sub 6} ceramics were prepared by conventional solid-state method, and their physical and microwave dielectric properties were investigated for the first time. The forming of Mg{sub 2}YVO{sub 6} main phase was confirmed by XRD diffraction pattern. XPS and Raman spectrum were recorded to clarify the chemical states of elements and vibration and rotation modes of the specimen, respectively. In addition, the relationships between sintering temperature, packing fraction, and microwave dielectric properties in Mg{sub 2}YVO{sub 6} ceramics were also studied. The new microwave dielectric material Mg{sub 2}YVO{sub 6} ceramics sintered at 1290 °C for 4 h has a dielectric constant (ε{sub r}) of ∼10.88, a Q × f of ∼68,300 GHz (f = 10.389 GHz), and a τ{sub f} ∼ −53.9 ppm/°C, demonstrating a candidate for microwave application.

  13. Spin-strain effects in the frustrated magnet Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritsenko, Y.; Wosnitza, J. [HZDR/HLD, Dresden (Germany); TUD/IFP, Dresden (Germany); Zherlitsyn, S. [HZDR/HLD, Dresden (Germany); Ruminy, M.; Fennell, T. [PSI/LNS, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kenzelmann, M. [PSI/LDM, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    Geometrically frustrated magnets have attracted much attention, due to their tendency to build unconventional ground states with exotic excitations. Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} possesses a pyrochlore lattice as building block of the crystallographic structure, providing a basis for geometric frustration. This cubic material features Curie-Weiss temperature of Θ{sub CW} = -19 K, but no long-range magnetic order has been detected down to 50 mK indicating a large frustration. The existence of a spin-liquid state has been suggested for Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Here, we present results of ultrasonic investigations of this material. The magnetic field was applied along the [110] direction at temperatures of 20, 150 and 300 mK. Clear anomalies were found for different acoustic modes. The temperature dependence of the sound velocity shows a softening at about 500 mK and step-like features at about 150 mK suggesting a low-temperature phase transformation. This investigation sheds new light on the role of lattice degrees of freedom and magneto-elastic interactions in this material.

  14. Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tb,Hf storage phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulesza, Dagmara; Trojan-Piegza, Joanna [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, 14 F. Joliot-Curie Street, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Zych, Eugeniusz, E-mail: zych@wchuwr.p [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, 14 F. Joliot-Curie Street, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2010-03-15

    Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tb,Hf ceramics containing 0.1% of Tb and 0-1.5% of Hf were prepared in reducing atmosphere at 1700 {sup o}C and their thermoluminescence properties were systematically studied. For comparison Tb,Ca co-doped specimen was also fabricated and investigated. The Tb,Hf ceramics shows basically a single TL band located around 180 {sup o}C as found with heating rate of 15 {sup o}C/min. Ceramics singly doped with Tb show complex TL glow curves indicating the presence of traps of very different depths. On the other hand Tb,Ca co-doping is beneficial for the development of shallow traps with the main TL band around 70 {sup o}C. Hence, the aliovalent impurities, Ca{sup 2+} and Hf{sup 4+}, strongly influenced the traps structure in Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tb ceramics, each of them in its own specific way. Isothermal decay of Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tb,Hf at 185 {sup o}C was recorded and its shape suggest that multiple hole trapping occurs in the Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tb,Hf ceramics. Due to the different traps depths the Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tb,Hf ceramics possess properties typical for storage phosphors, while Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tb,Ca is a persistent luminescent material rather.

  15. Calculation of exposure to NO{sub 2} and PM{sub 10} for Oslo, Drammen, Bergen and Trondheim; Beregning av NO{sub 2} og PM{sub 10} eksponering for Oslo, Drammen, Bergen og Trondheim. Vinteren 1994-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloerdal, L H

    1998-12-31

    This report presents calculations of the human exposure to the air pollutants NO{sub 2} and PM{sub 10} in four Norwegian cities. The calculations are done for the winter 1994/1995. Data on the distribution of residences in a 1 km x 1 km model grid are used to calculate various measures of exposure. It is calculated that large parts of the population are at times subjected to exposures greater than the officially recommended limits. This is particularly the case with NO{sub 2} and for the cities Oslo and Trondheim. 2 refs., 9 tabs.

  16. Numerical simulation of supersonic over/under expanded jets using adaptive grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talebi, S.; Shirani, E.

    2001-05-01

    Numerical simulation of supersonic under and over expanded jet was simulated. In order to achieve the solution efficiently and with high resolution, adaptive grid is used. The axisymmetric compressible, time dependent Navier-Stokes equations in body fitted curvilinear coordinate were solved numerically. The equations were discretized by using control volume, and the Van Leer flux splitting approach. The equations were solved implicitly. The obtained computer code was used to simulate four different cases of moderate and strong under and over expanded jet flows. The results show that with the adaptation of the grid, the various features of this complicated flow can be observed. It was shown that the adaptation method is very efficient and has the ability to make fine grids near the high gradient regions. (author)

  17. Study of SiO{sub 2} surface sputtering by a 250-550 keV He{sup +} ion beam during high-resolution Rutherford backscattering measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusanagi, Susumu [Materials Analysis Laboratory, Advanced Design Technology Center, Sony Corporation, 4-16-1 Okata Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0021 (Japan)]. E-mail: susumu.kusanagi@jp.sony.com; Kobayashi, Hajime [Materials Analysis Laboratory, Advanced Design Technology Center, Sony Corporation, 4-16-1 Okata Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0021 (Japan)

    2006-08-15

    Decreases in oxygen signal intensities in spectra of high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (HRBS) were observed during measurements on a 5-nm thick SiO{sub 2} layer on a Si substrate when irradiated by 250-550 keV He{sup +} ions. Shifts in an implanted arsenic profile in a 5-nm thick SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate were also observed as a result of He{sup +} ion irradiation. These results lead to the conclusion that the SiO{sub 2} surface was sputtered by He{sup +} ions in this energy range.

  18. Dielectric enhancement of PbZr{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 0.7}O{sub 3}/LaNiO{sub 3} multilayer thick film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yasong; Chen, Xiaoyang; Habibul, Arzigul; Zhang, Danyang; Yu, Ping [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610064 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Multilayer thick films (∝4 μm) with compositional PbZr{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 0.7}O{sub 3}/LaNiO{sub 3} layers and one-layer PZT thick films were prepared on the silicon substrate by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. PbZr{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 0.7}O{sub 3}/LaNiO{sub 3} multilayer thick film are characterized by highly preferential (100)-oriented growth and columnar microstructure due to alternately introducing LaNiO{sub 3} seeding layers. The effects of LaNiO{sub 3} layers on microstructure and electrical properties of PbZr{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 0.7}O{sub 3} thick films were investigated in detail. The results show that both PZT and PbZr{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 0.7}O{sub 3}/LaNiO{sub 3} multilayer thick film were pure perovskite crystalline phase. The PbZr{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 0.7}O{sub 3} film texture was dense and well adhered on the LaNiO{sub 3} layer. PbZr{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 0.7}O{sub 3}/LaNiO{sub 3} multilayer thick film possessed obvious enhanced dielectric properties compared with PZT thick film: ε{sub r} ∝2450 (10 kHz) and tanδ ∝0.02 (10 kHz). Rayleigh law was used to analysis the behavior of the enhanced dielectric properties and the pinched-shaped polarization-electric field hysteresis loops. The larger Rayleigh parameter, α ∝51.1408 cm kV{sup -1} (1 kHz) indicates the larger extrinsic contribution to permittivity and strong domain-wall-defect charge interaction. The leakage current behaviors of the multilayer thick film were also investigated in detail. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Land use and demographic grids in Cosyma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, C.A.; Hasemann, I.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the population, agricultural production, economic activity, and the position of land and sea, are important elements of accident consequence codes. These data are necessary in evaluating the health effects within the population arising from the external dose, inhalation and ingestion pathways. These distributions are also essential in calculating the economic impact of implementing countermeasures, such as relocation and food bans. This paper includes a discussion of the agricultural production and population distribution information available for EC countries, their resolution, availability and sources. The gridded data included in the COSYMA system are described. Particular aspects, such as the difficulties involved with using economic land use information, are also explained. Future developments, and their effect on the requirements for land use and demographic grids, are outlined

  20. Global significance of a sub-Moho boundary layer (SMBL) deduced from high-resolution seismic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, K.; Tittgemeyer, M.; Ryberg, T.; Wenzel, F.; Mooney, W.

    2002-01-01

    We infer the fine structure of a sub-Moho boundary layer (SMBL) at the top of the lithospheric mantle from high-resolution seismic observations of Peaceful Nuclear Explosions (PNE) on superlong-range profiles in Russia. Densely recorded seismograms permit recognition of previously unknown features of teleseismic propagation of the well known Pn and Sn phases, such as a band of incoherent, scattered, high-frequency seismic energy, developing consistently from station to station, apparent velocities of sub-Moho material, and high-frequency energy to distances of more than 3000 km with a coda band, incoherent at 10 km spacing and yet consistently observed to the end of the profiles. Estimates of the other key elements of the SMBL were obtained by finite difference calculations of wave propagation in elastic 2D models from a systematic grid search through parameter space. The SMBL consists of randomly distributed, mild velocity fluctuations of 2% or schlieren of high aspect ratios (???40) with long horizontal extent (???20 km) and therefore as thin as 0.5 km only; SMBL thickness is 60-100 km. It is suggested that the SMBL is of global significance as the physical base of the platewide observed high-frequency phases Pn and Sn. It is shown that wave propagation in the SMBL waveguide is insensitive to the background velocity distribution on which its schlieren are superimposed. This explains why the Pn and Sn phases traverse geological provinces of various age, heat flow, crustal thickness, and tectonic regimes. Their propagation appears to be independent of age. temperature, pressure, and stress. Dynamic stretching of mantle material during subduction or flow, possibly combined with chemical differentiation have to be considered as scale-forming processes in the upper mantle. However, it is difficult to distinguish with the present sets of Pn/Sn array data whether (and also where) the boundary layer is a frozen-in feature of paleo-processes or whether it is a response to

  1. CheckDen, a program to compute quantum molecular properties on spatial grids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacios, Luis F; Fernandez, Alberto

    2009-09-01

    CheckDen, a program to compute quantum molecular properties on a variety of spatial grids is presented. The program reads as unique input wavefunction files written by standard quantum packages and calculates the electron density rho(r), promolecule and density difference function, gradient of rho(r), Laplacian of rho(r), information entropy, electrostatic potential, kinetic energy densities G(r) and K(r), electron localization function (ELF), and localized orbital locator (LOL) function. These properties can be calculated on a wide range of one-, two-, and three-dimensional grids that can be processed by widely used graphics programs to render high-resolution images. CheckDen offers also other options as extracting separate atom contributions to the property computed, converting grid output data into CUBE and OpenDX volumetric data formats, and perform arithmetic combinations with grid files in all the recognized formats.

  2. Grid3: An Application Grid Laboratory for Science

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    level services required by the participating experiments. The deployed infrastructure has been operating since November 2003 with 27 sites, a peak of 2800 processors, work loads from 10 different applications exceeding 1300 simultaneous jobs, and data transfers among sites of greater than 2 TB/day. The Grid3 infrastructure was deployed from grid level services provided by groups and applications within the collaboration. The services were organized into four distinct "grid level services" including: Grid3 Packaging, Monitoring and Information systems, User Authentication and the iGOC Grid Operatio...

  3. The Nature of the Distinctive Microscopic Features in R<sub>5sub>(SixGe>1-xsub>)>4sub> Magnetic Refrigeration Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ugurlu, Ozan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic refrigeration is a promising technology that offers a potential for high energy efficiency. The giant magnetocaloric effect of the R<sub>5sub>(Six>, Ge<sub>1-xsub>)>4sub> alloys (where R=rare-earth and O ≤ x ≤ 1), which was discovered in 1997, make them perfect candidates for magnetic refrigeration applications. In this study the microstructures of Gd<sub>5sub>(Six>, Ge<sub>1-xsub>)>4sub> alloys have been characterized using electron microscopy techniques, with the focus being on distinctive linear features first examined in 1999. These linear features have been observed in R<sub>5sub>(Six>, Ge<sub>1-xsub>)>4sub> alloys prepared from different rare-earths (Gd, Tb, Dy and Er) with different crystal structures (Gd<sub>5sub>Si>4sub>-type orthorhombic, monoclinic and Gd<sub>5sub>Ge>4sub>-type orthorhombic). Systematic scanning electron microscope studies revealed that these linear features are actually thin-plates, which grow along specific directions in the matrix material. The crystal structure of the thin-plates has been determined as hexagonal with lattice parameters a=b=8.53 Å and c=6.40 Å using selected area diffraction (SAD). Energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis, carried out in both scanning and transmission electron microscopes, showed that the features have a composition approximating to R<sub>5sub>Six,Ge>1-xsub>)>3sub>.phase. Orientation relationship between the matrix and the thin-plates has been calculated as [- 1010](1-211)<sub>p>//[010](10-2)<sub>m>. The growth direction of the thin plates are calculated as (22 0 19) and (-22 0 19) by applying the Ag approach of Zhang and Purdy to the SAD patterns of this system. High Resolution TEM images of the Gd<sub>5sub>Ge>4sub> were used to study the crystallographic relationship. A terrace-ledge structure was observed at the interface and a 7° rotation of the reciprocal lattices

  4. Grid-connected to/from off-grid transference for micro-grid inverters

    OpenAIRE

    Heredero Peris, Daniel; Chillón Antón, Cristian; Pages Gimenez, Marc; Gross, Gabriel Igor; Montesinos Miracle, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares two methods for controlling the on-line transference from connected to stand-alone mode and vice versa in converters for micro-grids. The first proposes a method where the converter changes from CSI (Current Source Inverter) in grid-connected mode to VSI (Voltage Source Inverter) in off-grid. In the second method, the inverter always works as a non-ideal voltage source, acting as VSI, using AC droop control strategy.

  5. Intrinsic spatial resolution evaluation of the X'tal cube PET detector based on a 3D crystal block segmented by laser processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Inadama, Naoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Moriya, Takahiro; Omura, Tomohide; Watanabe, Mitsuo; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2013-01-01

    The X'tal cube is a depth-of-interaction (DOI)-PET detector which is aimed at obtaining isotropic resolution by effective readout of scintillation photons from the six sides of a crystal block. The X'tal cube is composed of the 3D crystal block with isotropic resolution and arrays of multi-pixel photon counters (MPPCs). In this study, to fabricate the 3D crystal block efficiently and precisely, we applied a sub-surface laser engraving (SSLE) technique to a monolithic crystal block instead of gluing segmented small crystals. The SSLE technique provided micro-crack walls which carve a groove into a monolithic scintillator block. Using the fabricated X'tal cube, we evaluated its intrinsic spatial resolution to show a proof of concept of isotropic resolution. The 3D grids of 2 mm pitch were fabricated into an 18 × 18 × 18 mm(3) monolithic lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) crystal by the SSLE technique. 4 × 4 MPPCs were optically coupled to each surface of the crystal block. The X'tal cube was uniformly irradiated by (22)Na gamma rays, and all of the 3D grids on the 3D position histogram were separated clearly by an Anger-type calculation from the 96-channel MPPC signals. Response functions of the X'tal cube were measured by scanning with a (22)Na point source. The gamma-ray beam with a 1.0 mm slit was scanned in 0.25 mm steps by positioning of the X'tal cube at vertical and 45° incident angles. The average FWHM resolution at both incident angles was 2.1 mm. Therefore, we confirmed the isotropic spatial resolution performance of the X'tal cube.

  6. POSSESSION, REVIEW FROM CULTURAL AND PSYCHIATRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Ketut Sri Diniari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Possession is a culture related syndrome, commonly found in Indonesia including Bali. We can see this event in religion and cultural ceremony and at other times at school, home, and in society. This syndrome consist of temporary loss of self identification and environment awareness; in several events a person acts as if he/she was controlled by other being, magic force, spirit or ‘other forces’. There are still several different opinions about trance-possession, whether it is related to certain culture or is a part of mental disorder. DSM-IV-TR and PPDGJ-III defined trance-possession as mental disorder (dissociative for involuntary possession, if it is not a common activity, and if it is not a part of religion or cultural event. (MEDICINA 2012;43:37-40.

  7. Operation Performance Evaluation of Power Grid Enterprise Using a Hybrid BWM-TOPSIS Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peipei You

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Electricity market reform is in progress in China, and the operational performance of power grid enterprises are vital for its healthy and sustainable development in the current electricity market environment. In this paper, a hybrid multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM framework for operational performance evaluation of a power grid enterprise is proposed from the perspective of sustai