WorldWideScience

Sample records for positive temperature reactivity

  1. Isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient measurement in TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, T.; Ravnik, M.; Trkov, A.

    2002-01-01

    Direct measurement of an isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient at room temperatures in TRIGA Mark II research reactor at Jozef Stefan Institute in Ljubljana is presented. Temperature reactivity coefficient was measured in the temperature range between 15 o C and 25 o C. All reactivity measurements were performed at almost zero reactor power to reduce or completely eliminate nuclear heating. Slow and steady temperature decrease was controlled using the reactor tank cooling system. In this way the temperatures of fuel, of moderator and of coolant were kept in equilibrium throughout the measurements. It was found out that TRIGA reactor core loaded with standard fuel elements with stainless steel cladding has small positive isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient in this temperature range.(author)

  2. Temperature reactivity coefficient of the RA reactor; Temperaturni koeficijenat reaktivnosti reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N; Strugar, P; Dobrosavljevic, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Temperature reactivity coefficient of the RA reactor was determined as follows. Stabilization of moderator temperature and graphite reflector was achieved in the reactor operated at power levels of 20, 100, 500, 1000, 3000 and 5000 kW. Temperature change of the moderator was achieved by changing the water flow rate in the secondary cooling system. The fuel temperature was changed simultaneously. During the measurement at each power level the temperature change was between 30 - 50 deg C. Changing the position of the automated regulator is registered during moderator temperature change, and these changes were used for determining the total reactivity change by using the calibration curves for the automated regulator. In the measured temperature range the the reactivity change was linear and it was possible to determine the total temperature coefficient.

  3. Measurements of fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity on a commercial AGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telford, A.; Bridge, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    Tests have been carried out on the commercial AGR at Hikley Point to determine the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity, an important safety related parameter. Reactor neutron flux was measured during transients induced by movement of a bank of control rods from one steady position to another. An inverse kinetics analysis was applied to the measured flux to determine the change which occured in core reactivity as the fuel temperature changed. The variation of mean fuel temperature was deduced from the flux transient by means of a nine-plane thermal hydraulics representation of the AGR fuel channel. Results so far obtained confirm the predicted variation of fuel temperature coefficient with butn-up. (author)

  4. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  5. Measurement and analysis of reactivity temperature coefficient of CEFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yiyu; Hu Yun; Yang Xiaoyan; Fan Zhendong; Zhang Qiang; Zhao Jinkun; Li Zehua

    2013-01-01

    The reactivity temperature coefficient of CEFR was calculated by CITATION program and compared with the results calculated by correlative programs and measured from experiments for temperature effects. It is indicated that the calculation results from CITATION agree well with measured values. The reactivity temperature coefficient of CEFR is about -4 pcm/℃. The deviation of the measured values between the temperature increasing and decreasing processes is about 11%, which satisfies the experiment acceptance criteria. The measured results can validate the calculation ones by program and can provide important reference data for the safety operation of CEFR and the analysis of the reactivity balance in the reactor refueling situation. (authors)

  6. Calculation of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity considering non-uniform radial temperature distribution in the fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazirandeh, Ali [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Science and Research Branch; Hooshyar Mobaraki, Almas

    2017-07-15

    The safe operation of a reactor is based on feedback models. In this paper we attempted to discuss the influence of a non-uniform radial temperature distribution on the fuel rod temperature coefficient of reactivity. The paper demonstrates that the neutron properties of a reactor core is based on effective temperature of the fuel to obtain the correct fuel temperature feedback. The value of volume-averaged temperature being used in the calculations of neutron physics with feedbacks would result in underestimating the probable event. In the calculation it is necessary to use the effective temperature of the fuel in order to provide correct accounting of the fuel temperature feedback. Fuel temperature changes in different zones of the core and consequently reactivity coefficient change are an important parameter for analysis of transient conditions. The restricting factor that compensates the inserted reactivity is the temperature reactivity coefficient and effective delayed neutron fraction.

  7. Application of noise analysis technique for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, D.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Sweeney, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique, based on the noise analysis of neutron detector and core-exit coolant temperature signals, is developed for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). A detailed multinodal model is developed and evaluated for the reactor core subsystem of the loss-of-fluid test (LOFT) reactor. This model is used to study the effect of changing the sign of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity on the low-frequency phase angle relationship between the neutron detector and the core-exit temperature noise signals. Results show that the phase angle near zero frequency approaches - 180 deg for negative coefficients and 0 deg for positive coefficients when the perturbation source for the noise signals is core coolant flow, inlet coolant temperature, or random heat transfer

  8. No praise, please: Depressive symptoms, reactivity to positive social interaction, and fear of positive evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenberger, Julia; Wiggert, Nicole; Agroskin, Dmitrij; Wilhelm, Frank H; Blechert, Jens

    2017-03-01

    Depression is characterized by depressed mood and loss of interest or pleasure. Resulting alterations in emotional reactivity have been explained by three different accounts: 'positive attenuation', 'negative potentiation', and 'emotion context insensitivity'. Despite the importance of depression-related emotional alteration in social interactions, research with naturalistic interpersonal stimuli is scarce and underlying mechanisms largely unknown. Hence, the present study examined subjective emotional reactivity to brief negative, positive, and neutral social-evaluative videos as a function of depressive symptoms in an adult sample (N = 84). Fear of positive evaluation (FPE) and fear of negative evaluation (FNE), often conceptualized as cognitive components of social anxiety, were examined as possible mediators. Results revealed that more depression symptoms were related to diminished pleasantness responses to both positive and neutral videos. When considering all three video conditions simultaneously, only responses to positive videos remained significantly related to depression scores, supporting the 'positive attenuation' account. Moreover, FPE was found to uniquely mediate the relationship between depressive symptoms and pleasantness responses to positive videos. Results indicate that emotional reactivity to positive interpersonal stimuli is relevant for theoretical and clinical considerations of depression. This research underlines the importance of FPE not only for understanding social anxiety but also depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis Of Temperature Effects On Reactivity Of The Rsg-Gas Core Using Silicide Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surbakti, Tukiran; Pinem, Surian

    2001-01-01

    RSG-GAS has been operating using new silicide fuels so that it is necessary to estimate and to measure the effect of temperature on reactivity of the core. The parameters to be determined due to temperature effect are reactivity coefficient of moderator temperature, temperature coefficient of fuel element and power reactivity coefficient. By doing a couple compensation method, determination of reactivity coefficient as well as the reactivity coefficient of moderator temperature can be obtained. Furthermore, coefficient of the reactivity was successfully estimated using the combination of WIMS-D4 and Batan-2DIFF. The cell calculation was done by using WIMS-D4 code to get macroscopic cross section and Batan-2DIFF code is used for core calculation. The calculation and experimental results of reactivity coefficient do not show any deviation from RSG-GAS safety margin. The results are -2,84 sen/ o C, -1,29 sen/MW and -0,64 sen/ o C for reactivity coefficients of temperature, power, fuel element and moderator temperature, respectively. All of 3 parameters are absolutely met with safety criteria

  10. Reactivation of viral replication in anti-HBe positive chronic HBsAg carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, K; Aldershvile, J; Kryger, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Reactivation of hepatitis B virus replication was investigated in an unselected group of 44 HBV DNA negative, anti-HBe positive chronic HBsAg carriers. Twenty-five patients (54%) were intravenous drug addicts and 7 (16%) were male homosexuals. Sixteen patients had evidence of delta infection...... to an annual reactivation rate of 5%. Reactivation in four patients was detected by reversion to HBV DNA positivity only, whereas HBeAg/anti-HBe status remained unchanged. Two patients became both HBV DNA and HBeAg positive. None of the patients developed hepatitis-like symptoms and transaminase elevation...

  11. Positive void reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, D.J.

    1992-09-01

    This report is a review of some of the important aspects of the analysis of large loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). One important aspect is the calculation of positive void reactivity. To study this subject the lattice physics codes used for void worth calculations and the coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic codes used for the transient analysis are reviewed. Also reviewed are the measurements used to help validate the codes. The application of these codes to large LOCAs is studied with attention focused on the uncertainty factor for the void worth used to bias the results. Another aspect of the subject dealt with in the report is the acceptance criteria that are applied. This includes the criterion for peak fuel enthalpy and the question of whether prompt criticality should also be a criterion. To study the former, fuel behavior measurements and calculations are reviewed. (Author) (49 refs., 2 figs., tab.)

  12. Influence of the temperature distribution on the reactivity of the reactor channel; Uticaj aksijalne raspodele temperature na reaktivnost kanala

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojadinovic, A; Pop-Jordanov, J; Zivkovic, Z [The Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1964-07-01

    For calculating the reactivity in the reactor channel, it was estimated that there is a linear increase of the neutron temperature along the channel. The channel is divide into 5 regions. Reactivity of the channel was calculated by using the reactivity curves for each region. it has been compared to the reactivity values obtained for different mean temperature values. The calculations were done on the digital computer Zuse-Z-23.

  13. Enhanced Positive Emotional Reactivity Undermines Empathy in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Y. Hua

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by profound changes in emotions and empathy. Although most patients with bvFTD become less sensitive to negative emotional cues, some patients become more sensitive to positive emotional stimuli. We investigated whether dysregulated positive emotions in bvFTD undermine empathy by making it difficult for patients to share (emotional empathy, recognize (cognitive empathy, and respond (real-world empathy to emotions in others. Fifty-one participants (26 patients with bvFTD and 25 healthy controls viewed photographs of neutral, positive, negative, and self-conscious emotional faces and then identified the emotions displayed in the photographs. We used facial electromyography to measure automatic, sub-visible activity in two facial muscles during the task: Zygomaticus major (ZM, which is active during positive emotional reactions (i.e., smiling, and Corrugator supercilii (CS, which is active during negative emotional reactions (i.e., frowning. Participants rated their baseline positive and negative emotional experience before the task, and informants rated participants' real-world empathic behavior on the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. The majority of participants also underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging. A mixed effects model found a significant diagnosis X trial interaction: patients with bvFTD showed greater ZM reactivity to neutral, negative (disgust and surprise, self-conscious (proud, and positive (happy faces than healthy controls. There was no main effect of diagnosis or diagnosis X trial interaction on CS reactivity. Compared to healthy controls, patients with bvFTD had impaired emotion recognition. Multiple regression analyses revealed that greater ZM reactivity predicted worse negative emotion recognition and worse real-world empathy. At baseline, positive emotional experience was higher in bvFTD than healthy controls and also

  14. The effect of core configuration on temperature coefficient of reactivity in IRR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettan, M.; Silverman, I.; Shapira, M.; Nagler, A. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne (Israel)

    1997-08-01

    Experiments designed to measure the effect of coolant moderator temperature on core reactivity in an HEU swimming pool type reactor were performed. The moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity ({alpha}{sub {omega}}) was obtained and found to be different in two core loadings. The measured {alpha}{sub {omega}} of one core loading was {minus}13 pcm/{degrees}C at the temperature range of 23-30{degrees}C. This value of {alpha}{sub {omega}} is comparable to the data published by the IAEA. The {alpha}{sub {omega}} measured in the second core loading was found to be {minus}8 pcm/{degrees}C at the same temperature range. Another phenomenon considered in this study is core behavior during reactivity insertion transient. The results were compared to a core simulation using the Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power Plants. It was found that in the second core loading factors other than the moderator temperature influence the core reactivity more than expected. These effects proved to be extremely dependent on core configuration and may in certain core loadings render the reactor`s reactivity coefficient undesirable.

  15. Study on Characteristic of Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity for Plutonium Core of Pebbled Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhair; Suwoto; Setiadipura, T.; Bakhri, S.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    As a part of the solution searching for possibility to control the plutonium, a current effort is focused on mechanisms to maximize consumption of plutonium. Plutonium core solution is a unique case in the high temperature reactor which is intended to reduce the accumulation of plutonium. However, the safety performance of the plutonium core which tends to produce a positive temperature coefficient of reactivity should be examined. The pebble bed inherent safety features which are characterized by a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity must be maintained under any circumstances. The purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristic of temperature coefficient of reactivity for plutonium core of pebble bed reactor. A series of calculations with plutonium loading varied from 0.5 g to 1.5 g per fuel pebble were performed by the MCNPX code and ENDF/B-VII library. The calculation results show that the k eff curve of 0.5 g Pu/pebble declines sharply with the increase in fuel burnup while the greater Pu loading per pebble yields k eff curve declines slighter. The fuel with high Pu content per pebble may reach long burnup cycle. From the temperature coefficient point of view, it is concluded that the reactor containing 0.5 g-1.25 g Pu/pebble at high burnup has less favorable safety features if it is operated at high temperature. The use of fuel with Pu content of 1.5 g/pebble at high burnup should be considered carefully from core safety aspect because it could affect transient behavior into a fatal accident situation.

  16. Association of C-reactive protein positivity among groups of patients with knee osteoarthritis in Erbil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Ahmed Pirdawood

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease and a leading cause of disability. Increased circulating levels of C-reactive protein have been associated with prevalent knee osteoarthritis. This study aimed to assess the association between C- reactive protein positivity in patients with knee osteoarthritis in Erbil Methods: Data from100 participants in this case-control study were enrolled from May 1st to December 1st, 2015 in Rizgary Teaching Hospital in Erbil city. Data were divided into two groups. The cases included 50 patients (17 male and 33 female with a mean age of 58.9 ±3.8 years and diagnosed with primary knee osteoarthritis of one or both knee joints. Controls included 50 persons (17 male and 33 female with a mean age of 58.1 ±3.9 years without knee osteoarthritis and matched for age, sex, and body mass index. C-reactive protein qualitatively measured. Patients were radiologically assessed by Kellgren and Lawrence grading scale (grade 0-4. Results: C-reactive protein was positive in 41 out of 50 (82% of knee osteoarthritis patients compared to 3 out of 50 (6% of healthy controls (P = 0.001. C- reactive protein positivity among knee osteoarthritis patients were significantly associated with body mass index, positive family history of knee osteoarthritis, duration of diseases, and Kellgren and Lawrence grade (P 0.05. Conclusion: C-reactive protein positivity was significantly associated with knee osteoarthritis compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, body mass index, positive family history of knee osteoarthritis, early osteoarthritis, and Kellgren and Lawrence grade II, were significantly associated with positive C-reactive protein in knee osteoarthritis.

  17. Effective neutron temperature measurements in well moderated reactor by the reactivity coefficient method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisic, N.; Klinc, T.

    1968-11-01

    The ratio of the reactivity changes of a nuclear reactor produced by successive introduction of two different neutron absorbers in the reactor core, has been measured and information on effective neutron temperature at a particular point obtained. Boron was used as a l/v absorber and cadmium as an absorber sensiti ve to neutron temperature. Effective neutron temperature distribution has been deduced by moving absorbers across the reactor core and observing the corresponding reactivity changes. (author)

  18. Sleep deprivation affects reactivity to positive but not negative stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, June J; Callan, Christina; Posey, J Laura

    2015-12-01

    The current study examined the effects of partial and total sleep deprivation on emotional reactivity. Twenty-eight partially sleep-deprived participants and 31 totally sleep-deprived participants rated their valence and arousal responses to positive and negative pictures across four testing sessions during the day following partial sleep deprivation or during the night under total sleep deprivation. The results suggest that valence and arousal ratings decreased under both sleep deprivation conditions. In addition, partial and total sleep deprivation had a greater negative effect on positive events than negative events. These results suggest that sleep-deprived persons are more likely to respond less to positive events than negative events. One explanation for the current findings is that negative events could elicit more attentive behavior and thus stable responding under sleep deprivation conditions. As such, sleep deprivation could impact reactivity to emotional stimuli through automated attentional and self-regulatory processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The impact of fuel temperature reactivity coefficient on loss of reactivity control accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. H.; Ryu, E. H.; Song, Y. M.; Jung, J. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear reactors experience small power fluctuations or anticipated operational transients during even normal power operation. During normal operation, the reactivity is mainly controlled by liquid zone controllers, adjuster rods, mechanical control absorbers, and moderator poison. Even when the reactor power is increased abruptly and largely from an accident and when reactor control systems cannot be actuated quickly due to a fast transient, the reactor should be controlled and stabilized by its inherent safety parameter, such as a negative PCR (Power Coefficient of Reactivity) feedback. A PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor), it is well designed for the reactor to have a negative PCR so that the reactor can be safely shut down or stabilized whenever an abrupt reactivity insertion into the reactor core occurs or the reactor power is abruptly increased. However, it is known that a CANDU reactor has a small amount of PCR, as either negative or positive, because of the different design basis and safety concepts from a PWR. CNSC's regulatory and safety regime has stated that; The PCR of CANDU reactors does not pose a significant risk. Consistent with Canadian nuclear safety requirements, nuclear power plants must have an appropriate combination of inherent and engineered safety features incorporated into the design of the reactor safety and control systems. A reactor design that has a PCR is quite acceptable provided that the reactor is stable against power fluctuations, and that the probability and consequences of any potential accidents that would be aggravated by a positive reactivity feedback are maintained within CNSCprescribed limits. Recently, it was issued licensing the refurbished Wolsong unit 1 in Korea to be operated continuously after its design lifetime in which the calculated PCR was shown to have a small positive value by applying the recent physics code systems, which are composed of WIMS IST, DRAGON IST, and RFSP IST. These code systems were transferred

  20. Reactivity anomalies in the FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, B.J.; Harris, R.A.

    1987-04-01

    Experience using an automated core reactivity monitoring technique at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) through eight operating cycles is described. This technique relies on comparing predicted to measured rod positions to detect any anomalous (or unpredicted) core reactivity changes. Reactivity worth predictions of core state changes (e.g., temperature and irradiation changes) and compensating control rod movements are required for the rod position comparison. A substantial data base now exists to evaluate changes in temperature reactivity feedback effects operational in the FFTF, rod worth changes due to core loading, temperature and irradiation effects and burnup effects associated with transmutation of fuel materials. This report summarizes preliminary work of correlating zero power and at-power rod worth measurement data, calculated burnup rates and rod worths using the latest ENDF/B-V cross section set for each cycle to evaluate the prediction models and attempt to resolve observed reactivity anomalies. 2 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Effect of processing temperature on the bitumen/MDI-PEG reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Alfonso, M.J.; Partal, P.; Navarro, F.J.; Garcia-Morales, M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Campus de ' El Carmen' , Universidad de Huelva, 21071, Huelva (Spain); Bordado, J.C.M. [Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, IBB, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Diogo, A.C. [Materials Engineering Department, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2009-04-15

    Reactive polymers are lately gaining acceptance to give added value to a residue of the crude oil refining process such as bitumen. The resulting material should display enhanced mechanical properties to be considered for advanced applications in construction. In the present paper, we report the effect of processing temperature on the reaction between bitumen compounds and an isocyanate-based reactive polymer, synthesized by reaction of polymeric MDI (4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate) with a low molecular weight polyethylene-glycol (PEG). Rheokinetics experiments, viscosity measurements at 60 C, atomic force microscopy (AFM) characterization, thin layer chromatography (TLC-FID) analysis and thermogravimetric studies (TGA) were performed on the reactive polymer and on samples of MDI-PEG modified bitumen containing 2 wt.% of the polymer. Results showed the existence of an optimum processing temperature arisen as a consequence of opposite effects: microstructural availability for the formation of a polymer-bitumen network, reaction ability and polymer thermal degradation. Consequently, this study aims to serve as a guideline for the refining and asphalt industries facing the stage of selecting the optimum processing parameters. (author)

  2. Reactivity effect of spent fuel due to spatial distributions for coolant temperature and burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, T.; Yamane, Y. [Nagoya Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Suyama, K. [OECD/NEA, Paris (France); Mochizuki, H. [Japan Research Institute, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    We investigated the reactivity effect of spent fuel caused by the spatial distributions of coolant temperature and burnup by using the integrated burnup calculation code system SWAT. The reactivity effect which arises from taking account of the spatial coolant temperature distribution increases as the average burnup increases, and reaches the maximum value of 0.69%{delta}k/k at 50 GWd/tU when the burnup distribution is concurrently considered. When the burnup distribution is ignored, the reactivity effect decreases by approximately one-third. (author)

  3. Psilocybin-Induced Decrease in Amygdala Reactivity Correlates with Enhanced Positive Mood in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraehenmann, Rainer; Preller, Katrin H; Scheidegger, Milan; Pokorny, Thomas; Bosch, Oliver G; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2015-10-15

    The amygdala is a key structure in serotonergic emotion-processing circuits. In healthy volunteers, acute administration of the serotonin 1A/2A/2C receptor agonist psilocybin reduces neural responses to negative stimuli and induces mood changes toward positive states. However, it is little-known whether psilocybin reduces amygdala reactivity to negative stimuli and whether any change in amygdala reactivity is related to mood change. This study assessed the effects of acute administration of the hallucinogen psilocybin (.16 mg/kg) versus placebo on amygdala reactivity to negative stimuli in 25 healthy volunteers using blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging. Mood changes were assessed using the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule and the state portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. A double-blind, randomized, cross-over design was used with volunteers counterbalanced to receive psilocybin and placebo in two separate sessions at least 14 days apart. Amygdala reactivity to negative and neutral stimuli was lower after psilocybin administration than after placebo administration. The psilocybin-induced attenuation of right amygdala reactivity in response to negative stimuli was related to the psilocybin-induced increase in positive mood state. These results demonstrate that acute treatment with psilocybin decreased amygdala reactivity during emotion processing and that this was associated with an increase of positive mood in healthy volunteers. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of amygdala hyperactivity and negative mood states in patients with major depression. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Moderator temperature effects on reactivity of HEU core of MNSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Siraj-ul-Islam; Sahibzada, Tasveer Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The MNSR core was analyzed to see the cross section effects on moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity. ► WIMS-D code was used for cell calculations. ► The 3D diffusion theory code PRIDE was first validated using IAEA benchmark problem and then used for analysis of MNSR. ► The differences among results for various libraries were discussed. -- Abstract: In this article we report on analyses that were performed to investigate the influence of cross section differences among libraries released by various centers on reactivity of Miniature Neutron Source Reactors. The 3D model of the core was developed with WIMS-D and PRIDE codes and six cross section libraries were used including JENDL-3.2, JEF-2.2, JEFF-3.3, ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/B-VII, and IAEA library. It was observed that all the libraries predict the reactivity within 10%, with IAEA library giving minimum reactivity worth, and JEF-2.2 data library resulted in highest worth.

  5. Development of a non-intrusive method for the determination of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity (MTC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaziere, C.

    2000-01-01

    The Moderator Temperature Coefficient of reactivity (MTC) plays an important role in the feedback mechanism and thus in the inherent stability of Pressurised Water Reactors (PWRs). Due to the inaccuracy of the traditional at-power MTC measurement techniques, many power utilities nowadays only measure the zero-power MTC since its determination is relatively straightforward and accurate. For the at-power MTC determination during the remaining fuel cycle, core calculations are assumed to be reliable enough. Nevertheless, these calculations were never benchmarked and most importantly, the use of high burnup fuel might induce a slightly positive MTC at Beginning Of Cycle (BOC) due to the high initial boron concentration. Even if in such a case the Doppler effect would still insure a negative reactivity feedback, monitoring the MTC throughout the cycle could become crucial. In this respect, not only the sign of the MTC is of importance, but also its magnitude. Consequently, developing a method that would permit monitoring the MTC during the fuel cycle is of great interest. One of the main disadvantages of the traditional at-power MTC measurement techniques is that the reactor has to be perturbed in order to induce a change of the moderator temperature. The modification of other parameters that can only be estimated by core calculation represents also a severe drawback of these methods, both for their precision and their reliability. A measurement performed at Ringhals-4 by using the so-called boron dilution method revealed that the uncertainty associated to the MTC estimation could even be much larger than previously expected due to the calculated reactivity corrections. These corrections are very sensitive to the input parameters chosen for the core simulation, and slight mis-estimations of these have large reactivity effects. It is known that if the reactivity noise and the moderator temperature noise could be measured, the MTC could be determined without disturbing

  6. Development of a non-intrusive method for the determination of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity (MTC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaziere, C

    2000-07-01

    The Moderator Temperature Coefficient of reactivity (MTC) plays an important role in the feedback mechanism and thus in the inherent stability of Pressurised Water Reactors (PWRs). Due to the inaccuracy of the traditional at-power MTC measurement techniques, many power utilities nowadays only measure the zero-power MTC since its determination is relatively straightforward and accurate. For the at-power MTC determination during the remaining fuel cycle, core calculations are assumed to be reliable enough. Nevertheless, these calculations were never benchmarked and most importantly, the use of high burnup fuel might induce a slightly positive MTC at Beginning Of Cycle (BOC) due to the high initial boron concentration. Even if in such a case the Doppler effect would still insure a negative reactivity feedback, monitoring the MTC throughout the cycle could become crucial. In this respect, not only the sign of the MTC is of importance, but also its magnitude. Consequently, developing a method that would permit monitoring the MTC during the fuel cycle is of great interest. One of the main disadvantages of the traditional at-power MTC measurement techniques is that the reactor has to be perturbed in order to induce a change of the moderator temperature. The modification of other parameters that can only be estimated by core calculation represents also a severe drawback of these methods, both for their precision and their reliability. A measurement performed at Ringhals-4 by using the so-called boron dilution method revealed that the uncertainty associated to the MTC estimation could even be much larger than previously expected due to the calculated reactivity corrections. These corrections are very sensitive to the input parameters chosen for the core simulation, and slight mis-estimations of these have large reactivity effects. It is known that if the reactivity noise and the moderator temperature noise could be measured, the MTC could be determined without disturbing

  7. Computational simulation of reactive species production by methane-air DBD at high pressure and high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takana, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Nishiyama, H.

    2012-01-01

    Computational simulations of a single streamer in DBD in lean methane-air mixture at pressure of 1 and 3 atm and temperature of 300 and 500 K were conducted for plasma-enhanced chemical reactions in a closed system. The effects of surrounding pressure and temperature are characterized for reactive species production by a DBD discharge. The results show that the production characteristics of reactive species are strongly influenced by the total gas number density and the higher concentration of reactive species are produced at higher pressure and lower gas temperature for a given initial reduced electric field.

  8. Reactivity control system of the high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Yukio; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Nakazawa, Toshio

    2004-01-01

    The reactivity control system of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) consists of a control rod system and a reserve shutdown system. During normal operation, reactivity is controlled by the control rod system, which consists of 32 control rods (16 pairs) and 16 control rod drive mechanisms except for the case when the center control rods are removed to perform an irradiation test. In an unlikely event that the control rods fail to be inserted, reserve shutdown system is provided to insert pellets of neutron-absorbing material into the core. Alloy 800H is chosen for the metallic parts of the control rods. Because the maximum temperature of the control rods reaches about 900 deg. C at reactor scrams, structural design guideline and design material data on Alloy 800H are needed for the high temperature design. The design guideline for the HTTR control rod is based on ASME Code Case N-47-21. Design material data is also determined and shown in this paper. Observing the guideline, temperature and stress analysis were conducted; it can be confirmed that the target life of the control rods of 5 years can be achieved. Various tests conducted for the control rod system and the reserve shutdown system are also described

  9. WWER safety analysis in case of simultaneous positive reactivity introduction by control rods withdrawal and pure condensate injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchin, A.; Ovdiienko, I.; Khalimonchuk, V.

    2011-01-01

    Results of calculation assessment of positive reactivity insertion rate are presented under condition of simultaneous effect on reactivity of two provided by WWER project reactivity operation systems - extract of regulation group and decrease of boron acid concentration. Showed that maximal positive reactivity insertion rate is achieved at hot zero power and it's too less than limit value 0.07β eff /sec defined by normative document 'Nuclear safety regulation of NPP with pressurized water reactors'. For given reasons concluded that necessity of application of the extended protection PZ-2 actuation time is absent on interval of pure condensate transportation for full exclusion of possibility of positive reactivity insertion simultaneously by two different operation systems. (Authors)

  10. Temperature coefficients of reactivity in the fourth loading of ZENITH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro Manso, R; Freemantle, R G; Rogers, J D [Graphite Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1962-10-15

    Measurements have been made of the temperature coefficients of reactivity associated with the core plus end reflectors and the side reflector of the fourth core loading of ZENITH, which had a carbon/U235 atomic ratio of 7788 and no other absorber. (author)

  11. Temperature coefficients of reactivity in the fourth loading of ZENITH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caro Manso, R.; Freemantle, R.G.; Rogers, J.D.

    1962-10-01

    Measurements have been made of the temperature coefficients of reactivity associated with the core plus end reflectors and the side reflector of the fourth core loading of ZENITH, which had a carbon/U235 atomic ratio of 7788 and no other absorber. (author)

  12. Experimental estimation of moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Rubens C. da; Bitelli, Ulysses D.; Mura, Luiz Ernesto C.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the procedure for the experimental estimation of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor, a parameter that has an important role in the physics and the control operations of any reactor facility. At the experiment, the IPEN/MB-01 reactor went critical at the power of 1W (1% of its total power), and whose core configuration was 28 x 26 rectangular array of UO_2 fuel rods, inside a light water (moderator) tank. In addition, there was a heavy water (D_2O) reflector installed in the West side of the core to obtain an adequate neutron reflection along the experiment. The moderator temperature was increased in steps of 4 °C, and the measurement of the mean moderator temperature was acquired using twelve calibrated thermocouples, placed around the reactor core. As a result, the mean value of -4.81 pcm/°C was obtained for such coefficient. The curves of ρ(T) (Reactivity x Temperature) and α"M_T(T)(Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity x Temperature) were developed using data from an experimental measurement of the integral reactivity curves through the Stable Period and Inverse Kinetics Methods, that was carried out at the reactor with the same core configuration. Such curves were compared and showed a very similar behavior between them. (author)

  13. Evaluation of false positivity and cross reactivity in the investigation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the causes of false positive Human Immunodeficiency Virus test results (F+HIV), cross reactivity of HIV antibodies with other non HIV antibodies, and efficiency of the serial and parallel testing algorithms. 100 blood samples randomly collected from clients attending the Heart to Heart HIV counseling and ...

  14. The Influence of Sintering Temperature of Reactive Sintered (Ti, MoC-Ni Cermets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Jõeleht

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Titanium-molybdenum carbide nickel cermets ((Ti, MoC-Ni were produced using high energy milling and reactive sintering process. Compared to conventional TiC-NiMo cermet sintering the parameters for reactive sintered cermets vary since additional processes are present such as carbide synthesis. Therefore, it is essential to acquire information about the suitable sintering regime for reactive sintered cermets. One of the key parameters is the final sintering temperature when the liquid binder Ni forms the final matrix and vacancies inside the material are removed. The influence of the final sintering temperature is analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties of the material are characterized by transverse rupture strength, hardness and fracture toughness.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7179

  15. Monitoring of the temperature reactivity coefficient at the PWR nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostic, Lj.

    1996-01-01

    For monitoring temperature coefficient of reactivity of pressurized water reactor a method based on the correction of fluctuation in signals of i-core neutron detectors and core-exit thermocouples and neural network paradigm is used it is shown that the moderator temperature coefficient of relativity can be predicted with the aid of the back propagation neural network technique by measuring the frequency response function between the in-core neutron flux and the core-exit coolant temperature

  16. Temperature derivatives for fusion reactivity of D-D and D-T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenbrunner, James R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Makaruk, Hanna Ewa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-29

    Deuterium-tritium (D-T) and deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction rates are observable using leakage gamma flux. A direct measurement of γ-rays with equipment that exhibits fast temporal response could be used to infer temperature, if the detector signal is amenable for taking the logarithmic time-derivative, alpha. We consider the temperature dependence for fusion cross section reactivity.

  17. Anti-M antibodies: Biphasic (reactive at room temperature and at 37°C: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhi P Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-M antibody, which is not reactive at 37°C, is not clinically significant. Reports of clinically significant anti-M antibodies causing hemolytic disease of the fetus and the newborn (HDFN and delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR are available. We report 13 cases of anti-M antibodies reactive at room temperature (RT and at 37°C. These were found in patients of varied age groups (11 months to 85 years with varied clinical diagnosis. All the female patients were multigravida. In all cases, antibody screening was positive at RT as well as at the indirect antiglobulin test (IAT phase. Providing “M”-antigen negative transfusions is the best therapy in this situation. Provision of red blood cell (RBC antigen phenotyped donor registry shall ensure quick provision of antigen-negative blood for transfusion in emergency situations.

  18. Experimental estimation of moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Rubens C. da; Bitelli, Ulysses D.; Mura, Luiz Ernesto C., E-mail: rubensrcs@usp.br, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br, E-mail: credidiomura@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (PNV/POLI/USP), SP (Brazil). Arquitetura Naval e Departamento de Engenharia Oceanica; Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this article is to present the procedure for the experimental estimation of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity of the IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor, a parameter that has an important role in the physics and the control operations of any reactor facility. At the experiment, the IPEN/MB-01 reactor went critical at the power of 1W (1% of its total power), and whose core configuration was 28 x 26 rectangular array of UO{sub 2} fuel rods, inside a light water (moderator) tank. In addition, there was a heavy water (D{sub 2}O) reflector installed in the West side of the core to obtain an adequate neutron reflection along the experiment. The moderator temperature was increased in steps of 4 °C, and the measurement of the mean moderator temperature was acquired using twelve calibrated thermocouples, placed around the reactor core. As a result, the mean value of -4.81 pcm/°C was obtained for such coefficient. The curves of ρ(T) (Reactivity x Temperature) and α{sup M}{sub T}(T)(Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity x Temperature) were developed using data from an experimental measurement of the integral reactivity curves through the Stable Period and Inverse Kinetics Methods, that was carried out at the reactor with the same core configuration. Such curves were compared and showed a very similar behavior between them. (author)

  19. Analysis of the reactivity coefficients of the advanced high-temperature reactor for plutonium and uranium fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakova, Jitka [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691, Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: jitka.zakova@neutron.kth.se; Talamo, Alberto [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, ANL, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: alby@anl.gov

    2008-05-15

    The conceptual design of the advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) has recently been proposed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the intention to provide and alternative energy source for very high temperature applications. In the present study, we focused on the analyses of the reactivity coefficients of the AHTR core fueled with two types of fuel: enriched uranium and plutonium from the reprocessing of light water reactors irradiated fuel. More precisely, we investigated the influence of the outer graphite reflectors on the multiplication factor of the core, the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients and the void reactivity coefficient for five different molten salts: NaF, BeF{sub 2}, LiF, ZrF{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} eutectic. In order to better illustrate the behavior of the previous parameters for different core configurations, we evaluated the moderating ratio of the molten salts and the absorption rate of the key fuel nuclides, which, of course, are driven by the neutron spectrum. The results show that the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients are always negative, whereas the void reactivity coefficient can be set negative provided that the fuel to moderator ratio is optimized (the core is undermoderated) and the moderating ratio of the coolant is large.

  20. Analysis of the reactivity coefficients of the advanced high-temperature reactor for plutonium and uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakova, Jitka; Talamo, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The conceptual design of the advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) has recently been proposed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the intention to provide and alternative energy source for very high temperature applications. In the present study, we focused on the analyses of the reactivity coefficients of the AHTR core fueled with two types of fuel: enriched uranium and plutonium from the reprocessing of light water reactors irradiated fuel. More precisely, we investigated the influence of the outer graphite reflectors on the multiplication factor of the core, the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients and the void reactivity coefficient for five different molten salts: NaF, BeF 2 , LiF, ZrF 4 and Li 2 BeF 4 eutectic. In order to better illustrate the behavior of the previous parameters for different core configurations, we evaluated the moderating ratio of the molten salts and the absorption rate of the key fuel nuclides, which, of course, are driven by the neutron spectrum. The results show that the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients are always negative, whereas the void reactivity coefficient can be set negative provided that the fuel to moderator ratio is optimized (the core is undermoderated) and the moderating ratio of the coolant is large

  1. A study of temperature coefficients of reactivity for a Savannah River Site tritium-producing charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, D.L.; Frost, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Temperature coefficients of reactivity have been calculated for the Mark 22 assembly in the K-14 charge at the Savannah River Site. Temperature coefficients are the most important reactivity feedback mechanism in SRS reactors; they are used in all safety analyses performed in support of the Safety Analysis Report, and in operations to predict reactivity changes with control rod moves. The effects of the radial location of the assembly in the reactor, isotope depletion, and thermal expansion of the metal components on the temperature coefficients have also been investigated. With the exception of the dead space coefficient, all of the regional temperature coefficients were found to be negative or zero. All of the temperature coefficients become more negative with isotopic depletion over the fuel cycle. Coefficients also become more negative with increasing radial distance of the assembly from the center of the core; this is proven from first principles and confirmed by calculations. It was found that axial and radial thermal expansion effects on the metal fuel and target tubes counteract one another, indicating these effects do not need to be considered in future temperature coefficient calculations for the Mark 22 assembly. The moderator coefficient was found to be nonlinear with temperature; thus, the values derived for accidents involving increases in moderator temperature are significantly different than those for decreases in moderator temperature, although the moderator coefficient is always negative

  2. The effects of zinc bath temperature on the coating growth behavior of reactive steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jianhua, E-mail: super_wang111@hotmail.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, 411105 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Design and Preparation Technology of Hunan Province, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, 411105 (China); Tu Hao; Peng Bicao; Wang Xinming; Yin, Fucheng [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, 411105 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Design and Preparation Technology of Hunan Province, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, 411105 (China); Su Xuping, E-mail: xuping@xtu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, 411105 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Design and Preparation Technology of Hunan Province, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, 411105 (China)

    2009-11-15

    The purpose of this work is to identify the influence of zinc bath temperature on the morphology and the thickness of reactive steel (Fe-0.1 wt.%Si alloy) coatings. The Fe-0.1 wt.%Si samples were galvanized for 3 min at temperatures in the range of 450-530 deg. C in steps of 10 deg. C. The coatings were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-rays analysis. It was found that the coating thickness reaches the maximum at 470 deg. C and the minimum at 500 deg. C, respectively. When the reactive steel is galvanized at temperatures in the range of 450-490 deg. C, the coatings have a loose {zeta} layer on the top of a compact {delta} layer. With the increase of the galvanizing temperature, the {zeta} layer becomes looser. When the temperature is at 500 deg. C, the {zeta} phase disappears. With the increase of temperature, the coatings change to be a diffuse-{Delta} layer ({delta}+ liquid zinc).

  3. Regarding KUR Reactivity Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamori, Akira; Hasegawa, Kei; Tsuchiyama, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Okumura, Ryo; Sano, Tadafumi

    2012-01-01

    This article reported: (1) the outline of the reactivity measurement system of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), (2) the calibration data of control rod, (3) the problems and the countermeasures for range switching of linear output meter. For the laptop PC for the reactivity measurement system, there are four input signals: (1) linear output meter, (2) logarithmic output meter, (3) core temperature gauge, and (4) control rod position. The hardware of reactivity measurement system is controlled with Labview installed on the laptop. Output, reactivity, reactor period, and the change in reactivity due to temperature effect or Xenon effect are internally calculated and displayed in real-time with Labview based on the four signals above. Calculation results are recorded in the form of a spreadsheet. At KUR, the reactor core arrangement was changed, so the control rod was re-calibrated. At this time, calculated and experimental values of reactivity based on the reactivity measurement system were compared, and it was confirmed that the reactivity calculation by Labview was accurate. The range switching of linear output meter in the nuclear instrumentation should automatically change within the laptop, however sometimes this did not function properly in the early stage. It was speculated that undefined percent values during the transition of percent value were included in the calculation and caused calculation errors. The range switching started working properly after fixing this issue. (S.K.)

  4. Measurements of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity at Hinkley Point 'B': 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, T.A.

    1982-03-01

    Measurements of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity made at Hinkley Point 'B' AGR in 1981 are described. These measurements follow earlier tests reported in e.g. RD/B/N4846 and are part of a series of measurements designed to support theoretical estimates of the change of fuel temperature coefficient as a function of core irradiation. Low and high power measurements were made at a mean core irradiation of 1170GWD. As previously, the measurements at both power levels show agreement with theoretical predictions to within the estimated experimental errors. Recent measurements (mean core irradiation >500GWD) show evidence of a small systematic difference between measured and theoretical values with the experimental values being approximately equal to 0.1mN/ 0 C more positive than the theoretical ones. The measured value of αsub(U) at high power was -0.64+-0.10mN/ 0 C and the low power value, corrected theoretically to normal operating conditions, was also -0.64+-0.10mN/ 0 C. (author)

  5. Positional differences in reactive hyperemia provide insight into initial phase of exercise hyperemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jasperse, Jeffrey L.; Shoemaker, J. Kevin; Gray, Eric J.; Clifford, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have reported a greater blood flow response to muscle contractions when the limb is below the heart compared with above the heart, and these results have been interpreted as evidence for a skeletal muscle pump contribution to exercise hyperemia. If limb position affects the blood flow response to other vascular challenges such as reactive hyperemia, this interpretation may not be correct. We hypothesized that the magnitude of reactive hyperemia would be greater with the limb below the...

  6. Reactivity Coefficient Calculation for AP1000 Reactor Using the NODAL3 Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinem, Surian; Malem Sembiring, Tagor; Tukiran; Deswandri; Sunaryo, Geni Rina

    2018-02-01

    The reactivity coefficient is a very important parameter for inherent safety and stability of nuclear reactors operation. To provide the safety analysis of the reactor, the calculation of changes in reactivity caused by temperature is necessary because it is related to the reactor operation. In this paper, the temperature reactivity coefficients of fuel and moderator of the AP1000 core are calculated, as well as the moderator density and boron concentration. All of these coefficients are calculated at the hot full power condition (HFP). All neutron diffusion constant as a function of temperature, water density and boron concentration were generated by the SRAC2006 code. The core calculations for determination of the reactivity coefficient parameter are done by using NODAL3 code. The calculation results show that the fuel temperature, moderator temperature and boron reactivity coefficients are in the range between -2.613 pcm/°C to -4.657pcm/°C, -1.00518 pcm/°C to 1.00649 pcm/°C and -9.11361 pcm/ppm to -8.0751 pcm/ppm, respectively. For the water density reactivity coefficients, the positive reactivity occurs at the water temperature less than 190 °C. The calculation results show that the reactivity coefficients are accurate because the results have a very good agreement with the design value.

  7. Trends in low-temperature water–gas shift reactivity on transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, Nana Maria Pii; Boisen, Astrid; Dahl, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Low-temperature water–gas shift reactivity trends on transition metals were investigated with the use of a microkinetic model based on a redox mechanism. It is established that the adsorption energies for carbon monoxide and oxygen can describe to a large extent changes in the remaining activation...

  8. Estimating temperature reactivity coefficients by experimental procedures combined with isothermal temperature coefficient measurements and dynamic identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Masashi; Aoki, Yukinori; Shimazu, Yoichiro; Yamasaki, Masatoshi; Hanayama, Yasushi

    2006-01-01

    A method to evaluate the moderator coefficient (MTC) and the Doppler coefficient through experimental procedures performed during reactor physics tests of PWR power plants is proposed. This method combines isothermal temperature coefficient (ITC) measurement experiments and reactor power transient experiments at low power conditions for dynamic identification. In the dynamic identification, either one of temperature coefficients can be determined in such a way that frequency response characteristics of the reactivity change observed by a digital reactivity meter is reproduced from measured data of neutron count rate and the average coolant temperature. The other unknown coefficient can also be determined by subtracting the coefficient obtained from the dynamic identification from ITC. As the proposed method can directly estimate the Doppler coefficient, the applicability of the conventional core design codes to predict the Doppler coefficient can be verified for new types of fuels such as mixed oxide fuels. The digital simulation study was carried out to show the feasibility of the proposed method. The numerical analysis showed that the MTC and the Doppler coefficient can be estimated accurately and even if there are uncertainties in the parameters of the reactor kinetics model, the accuracies of the estimated values are not seriously impaired. (author)

  9. Positional differences in reactive hyperemia provide insight into initial phase of exercise hyperemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasperse, Jeffrey L; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Gray, Eric J; Clifford, Philip S

    2015-09-01

    Studies have reported a greater blood flow response to muscle contractions when the limb is below the heart compared with above the heart, and these results have been interpreted as evidence for a skeletal muscle pump contribution to exercise hyperemia. If limb position affects the blood flow response to other vascular challenges such as reactive hyperemia, this interpretation may not be correct. We hypothesized that the magnitude of reactive hyperemia would be greater with the limb below the heart. Brachial artery blood flow (Doppler ultrasound) and blood pressure (finger-cuff plethysmography) were measured in 10 healthy volunteers. Subjects lay supine with one arm supported in two different positions: above or below the heart. Reactive hyperemia was produced by occlusion of arterial inflow for varying durations: 0.5 min, 1 min, 2 min, or 5 min in randomized order. Peak increases in blood flow were 77 ± 11, 178 ± 24, 291 ± 25, and 398 ± 33 ml/min above the heart and 96 ± 19, 279 ± 62, 550 ± 60, and 711 ± 69 ml/min below the heart (P different responses depending on limb position. To determine whether these differences were due to mechanisms intrinsic to the arterial wall, a second set of experiments was performed in which acute intraluminal pressure reduction for 0.5 min, 1 min, 2 min, or 5 min was performed in isolated rat soleus feed arteries (n = 12). The magnitude of dilation upon pressure restoration was greater when acute pressure reduction occurred from 85 mmHg (mimicking pressure in the arm below the heart; 28.3 ± 7.9, 37.5 ± 5.9, 55.1 ± 9.9, and 68.9 ± 8.6% dilation) than from 48 mmHg (mimicking pressure in the arm above the heart; 20.8 ± 4.8, 22.6 ± 4.4, 31.2 ± 5.8, and 49.2 ± 7.1% dilation). These data support the hypothesis that arm position differences in reactive hyperemia are at least partially mediated by mechanisms intrinsic to the arterial wall. Overall, these results suggest the need to reevaluate studies employing positional

  10. Evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity for 233U--thorium fueled HTGR lattices. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.F.; Leonard, B.R. Jr.; Trapp, T.J.; Gore, B.F.; Kottwitz, D.A.; Thompson, J.K.; Purcell, W.L.; Stewart, K.B.

    1977-05-01

    A comparison of calculated and measured neutron multiplication factors as a function of temperature was made for three graphite-moderated lattices in the High Temperature Lattice Test Reactor (HTLTR) using 233 UO 2 --ThO 2 fuels in varying amounts and configurations. Correlation of neutronic analysis methods and cross section data with the experimental measurements forms the basis for assessing the accuracy of the methods and data and developing confidence in the ability to predict the temperature coefficient of reactivity for various High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) conditions in which 233 U and thorium are present in the fuel. The calculated values of k/sub infinity/(T) were correlated with measured values using two least-squares-fitted correlation coefficients: (1) a normalization factor, and (2) a temperature coefficient bias factor. These correlations indicate the existence of a negative (nonconservative) bias in temperature coefficients of reactivity calculated using ENDF/B-IV cross section data

  11. Analytic, empirical and delta method temperature derivatives of D-D and D-T fusion reactivity formulations, as a means of verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenbrunner, James R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Booker, Jane M. [Booker Scientific, Fredericksburg, TX (United States)

    2017-07-21

    We examine the derivatives with respect to temperature, for various deuterium-tritium (DT) and deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion-reactivity formulations. Langenbrunner and Makaruk [1] had studied this as a means of understanding the time and temperature domain of reaction history measured in dynamic fusion experiments. Presently, we consider the temperature derivative dependence of fusion reactivity as a means of exercising and verifying the consistency of the various reactivity formulations.

  12. Monitoring temperature reactivity coefficient by noise method in a NPP at full power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, O.; Por, G.

    1987-04-01

    A new method based on noise measurement was used to estimate the temperature reactivity coefficient of the PAKS-2 reactor during the entire fuel cycle. Based on the measurements it is possible to measure the dependence of reactivity coefficient on boron concentration. Good agreement was found between the results obtained by the new method and by the conventional ones. Based on this method a new equipment can be develop which assures permanent measurements during operation. (author)

  13. Effects of drying methods on the low temperature reactivity of Victorian brown coal to oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unal, S.; Wood, D.G.; Harris, I.J. (University of Marmara, Istanbul (Turkey). Ataturk Faculty of Education, Division of Science Education)

    1992-02-01

    The effects of air drying and thermal dewatering on the low temperature oxygen reactivity of Victorian brown coal have been investigated in the temperature range 35-55{degree}C and at 100 kPa oxygen pressure using coal samples ground to {lt} 100 mesh. An attempt has also been made to relate the low temperature oxygen reactivity of the coal to its free radical concentration as measured prior to oxidation. Two rate models, the Schmidt and Winmill models, have been adapted to include the initial free radical concentration of the coal samples as the drying method sensitivity parameter in lieu of the concentration of oxygen-reactive sites in the coal material. The experimental results show that air drying, which reduces the free radical concentration of the coal, causes a decline in its oxygen reactivity whereas thermal dewatering, which causes an increase in the free radical concentration of the coal, enhances its oxygen reactivity. Air drying does not affect the distribution of the consumed oxygen in the oxidation products. A difference is observed in the case of the thermally dewatered coal samples. The correlation of the two rate models adopted is considered equally satisfactory. However, only the values obtained for the two activation energies in the Winmill model reflect the changes caused by thermal dewatering in the oxidation pattern of the coal. The activation energy values obtained from the two models are within the range of those quoted in the literature for the abstraction of hydrogen from various arene structures by free radicals. 35 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. True positivity of anti-Hepatitis C Virus Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay reactive blood donors: A prospective study done in western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Tulsiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A significant number of safe donations are removed from the blood supply, because of the reactive anti-HCV screening test results. This study aimed to assess if the HCV (Hepatitis C Virus seropositive donors were confirmed positive or not. Materials and Methods: More than 68,000 blood donors′ samples were routinely screened and 140 samples were found to be anti-HCV ELISA reactive. These 140 samples were tested by NAT. The NAT negative samples were tested by RIBA. Analysis of samples reactive in single ELISA kit vs. two ELISA kits was done. Results: Out of 140 anti-HCV ELISA reactive samples, a total of 16 (11.43% were positive by NAT. The results of 124 RIBA showed 6 (4.84% positive, 92 (74.19% negative, and 26 (20.97% indeterminate results. None of the sample which was reactive in only single ELISA kit was positive by NAT or RIBA. Conclusion: Only a minority of blood donors with repeatedly reactive anti-HCV screening test is positive by confirmatory testing, but all these blood units are discarded as per existing legal provisions in India. Efforts should be made to retain these donors and also donor units.

  15. Cr(III) reactivity and foot dermatitis in Cr(VI) positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Barré; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2006-01-01

    Chromium allergy has become synonymous with Cr(VI) allergy. However, real exposure to chromium from leather products may include both Cr(III) and Cr(VI). In this study, we investigate the reactivity to both Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in consecutive patients to analyse the relation between foot eczema/leather...... to Cr(III). The increased risk was not due to a higher degree of sensitivity to Cr(VI). Leather was reported most frequently as the suspected cause of chromium dermatitis (54%). However, Cr(VI) allergics having foot eczema and positive or doubtful Cr(III) reactions often had positive reactions to other...

  16. Research of fuel temperature control in fuel pipeline of diesel engine using positive temperature coefficient material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As fuel temperature increases, both its viscosity and surface tension decrease, and this is helpful to improve fuel atomization and then better combustion and emission performances of engine. Based on the self-regulated temperature property of positive temperature coefficient material, this article used a positive temperature coefficient material as electric heating element to heat diesel fuel in fuel pipeline of diesel engine. A kind of BaTiO3-based positive temperature coefficient material, with the Curie temperature of 230°C and rated voltage of 24 V, was developed, and its micrograph and element compositions were also analyzed. By the fuel pipeline wrapped in six positive temperature coefficient ceramics, its resistivity–temperature and heating characteristics were tested on a fuel pump bench. The experiments showed that in this installation, the surface temperature of six positive temperature coefficient ceramics rose to the equilibrium temperature only for 100 s at rated voltage. In rated power supply for six positive temperature coefficient ceramics, the temperature of injection fuel improved for 21°C–27°C within 100 s, and then could keep constant. Using positive temperature coefficient material to heat diesel in fuel pipeline of diesel engine, the injection mass per cycle had little change, approximately 0.3%/°C. This study provides a beneficial reference for improving atomization of high-viscosity liquids by employing positive temperature coefficient material without any control methods.

  17. Increased airway reactivity in a neonatal mouse model of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Catherine A.; Martin, Richard J.; MacFarlane, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a primary form of respiratory support used in the intensive care of preterm infants, but its long-term effects on airway (AW) function are unknown. Methods We developed a neonatal mouse model of CPAP treatment to determine whether it modifies later AW reactivity. Un-anesthetized spontaneously breathing mice were fitted with a mask to deliver CPAP (6cmH2O, 3hrs/day) for 7 consecutive days starting at postnatal day 1. Airway reactivity to...

  18. Analysis of reactivity feedback effects of void and temperature in the MAPLE-X10 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, P.A.; Heeds, W.; Shim, S.Y.; King, S.G.

    1992-07-01

    The methods used for evaluating the void and temperature reactivity coefficients for the MAPLE-X10 Reactor are described and factors used in estimating their accuracy are discussed. The report presents representative transient analysis results using the CATHENA thermalhydraulics code. The role of the reactivity coefficients and their precision is discussed. The results are reviewed in terms of their safety implications

  19. Increased airway reactivity in a neonatal mouse model of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Catherine A.; Martin, Richard J.; MacFarlane, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a primary form of respiratory support used in the intensive care of preterm infants, but its long-term effects on airway (AW) function are unknown. Methods We developed a neonatal mouse model of CPAP treatment to determine whether it modifies later AW reactivity. Un-anesthetized spontaneously breathing mice were fitted with a mask to deliver CPAP (6cmH2O, 3hrs/day) for 7 consecutive days starting at postnatal day 1. Airway reactivity to methacholine was assessed using the in vitro living lung slice preparation. Results One week of CPAP increased AW responsiveness to methacholine in male, but not female mice, compared to untreated control animals. The AW hyper-reactivity of male mice persisted for 2 weeks (at P21) after CPAP treatment ended. 4 days of CPAP, however, did not significantly increase AW reactivity. Females also exhibited AW hyper-reactivity at P21, suggesting a delayed response to early (7 days) CPAP treatment. The effects of 7 days of CPAP on hyper-reactivity to methacholine were unique to smaller AWs whereas larger ones were relatively unaffected. Conclusion These data may be important to our understanding of the potential long-term consequences of neonatal CPAP therapy used in the intensive care of preterm infants. PMID:25950451

  20. Measurements of the Reactivity Properties of the Aagesta Nuclear Power Reactor at Zero Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernander, G

    1967-07-15

    The moderator level and temperature coefficients of reactivity and control rod differential reactivity worths have been determined at zero power by means of period measurements. The moderator level coefficient and the corresponding critical level have been measured for the 32, 68 and 136 fuel assembly cores at room temperature for cores with and without control rods. From these results the worths of control rods have been derived. HETERO calculations give up to 15 % lower values than the experimental results. The cold fresh core has an excess reactivity of 9.0 {+-} 0.2 %. The temperature coefficient and differential control rod worths were measured for the fully loaded core with filled tank in the temperature range between 30 and 210 deg C. Critical positions as a function of temperature were obtained for the corresponding control rod groups. No relevant calculations of the temperature coefficient for comparison with the experimental values have yet been made, but the experimental results together with measured critical control rod positions give good opportunities to check calculational programs. HETERO has been shown in these cases to reproduce differential control rod worths and critical positions fairly well. However, a certain underestimation of the rod effectiveness is quite noticeable. The relative increase in control rod effectiveness with a temperature change from 20 to 220 deg C has been estimated to be 0.29 {+-} 0.06.

  1. Temperature dependence of positronium reactivities with charge transfer molecules in bilayer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean, Y.C.; Yu, C.; Wang, Y.Y.; Yeh, Y.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Rate constants for positronium atoms reacting chemically with charge-transfer molecules such as p-benzoquinone, nitrobenzene, and coenzyme Q-10 in a model bilayer membrane, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), have been measured at temperatures between 23 and 65 0 C. A strong variation of the positronium chemical reactivities, k/sub Ps/ was observed in these systems: k/sub Ps/ increases with increasing temperature until the pretransition temperature of the membrane reaches a maximum value near the main transition temperature and decreases at temperatures higher than the main transition temperature. This variation is interpreted in terms of fluidity and permeability changes associated with the phase transitions of membranes and in terms of charge-transfer-complex formation between the solubilized molecules and the polar head of the membrane. These results demonstrate that positronium and its annihilation characteristics can be employed to investigate charge transport phenomena and microstructural changes of real biological membranes

  2. Reactive intermediates in the gas phase generation and monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Setser, D W

    2013-01-01

    Reactive Intermediates in the Gas Phase: Generation and Monitoring covers methods for reactive intermediates in the gas phase. The book discusses the generation and measurement of atom and radical concentrations in flow systems; the high temperature flow tubes, generation and measurement of refractory species; and the electronically excited long-lived states of atoms and diatomic molecules in flow systems. The text also describes the production and detection of reactive species with lasers in static systems; the production of small positive ions in a mass spectrometer; and the discharge-excite

  3. The evolution of the temperature field during cavity collapse in liquid nitromethane. Part II: reactive case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, L.; Nikiforakis, N.

    2018-02-01

    This work is concerned with the effect of cavity collapse in non-ideal explosives as a means of controlling their sensitivity. The main objective is to understand the origin of localised temperature peaks (hot spots) which play a leading order role at the early stages of ignition. To this end, we perform two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations of shock-induced single gas-cavity collapse in liquid nitromethane. Ignition is the result of a complex interplay between fluid dynamics and exothermic chemical reaction. In the first part of this work, we focused on the hydrodynamic effects in the collapse process by switching off the reaction terms in the mathematical formulation. In this part, we reinstate the reactive terms and study the collapse of the cavity in the presence of chemical reactions. By using a multi-phase formulation which overcomes current challenges of cavity collapse modelling in reactive media, we account for the large density difference across the material interface without generating spurious temperature peaks, thus allowing the use of a temperature-based reaction rate law. The mathematical and physical models are validated against experimental and analytic data. In Part I, we demonstrated that, compared to experiments, the generated hot spots have a more complex topological structure and that additional hot spots arise in regions away from the cavity centreline. Here, we extend this by identifying which of the previously determined high-temperature regions in fact lead to ignition and comment on the reactive strength and reaction growth rate in the distinct hot spots. We demonstrate and quantify the sensitisation of nitromethane by the collapse of the isolated cavity by comparing the ignition times of nitromethane due to cavity collapse and the ignition time of the neat material. The ignition in both the centreline hot spots and the hot spots generated by Mach stems occurs in less than half the ignition time of the neat material. We compare

  4. Chapter 10: Calculation of the temperature coefficient of reactivity of a graphite-moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.; Richmond, R.; Stace, R.H.W.

    1963-01-01

    The temperature coefficients of reactivity of the BEPO, Windscale and Calder reactors are calculated, using the revised methods given by Lockey et al. (1956) and by Campbell and Symonds (1962). The results are compared with experimental values. (author)

  5. Emotional stress-reactivity and positive affect among college students: the role of depression history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Ross E; Armeli, Stephen; Boynton, Marcella H; Tennen, Howard

    2014-02-01

    Multiple theories posit that people with a history of depression are at higher risk for a depressive episode than people who have never experienced depression, which may be partly due to differences in stress-reactivity. In addition, both the dynamic model of affect and the broaden-and-build theory suggest that stress and positive affect interact to predict negative affect, but this moderation has never been tested in the context of depression history. The current study used multilevel modeling to examine these issues among 1,549 college students with or without a history of depression. Students completed a 30-day online diary study in which they reported daily their perceived stress, positive affect, and negative affect (including depression, anxiety, and hostility). On days characterized by higher than usual stress, students with a history of depression reported greater decreases in positive affect and greater increases in depressed affect than students with no history. Furthermore, the relations between daily stress and both depressed and anxious affect were moderated by daily positive affect among students with remitted depression. These results indicate that students with a history of depression show greater stress-reactivity even when in remission, which may place them at greater risk for recurrence. These individuals may also benefit more from positive affect on higher stress days despite being less likely to experience positive affect on such days. The current findings have various implications both clinically and for research on stress, mood, and depression. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Effect of Casmo-5 cross-section data and doppler temperature definitions on LWR reactivity initiated accidents - 166

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandi, G.; Smith, K.; Xu, Z.; Rhodes, J.

    2010-01-01

    During LWR Reactivity Initiated Accidents (RIA), the accurate evaluation of the Doppler reactivity feedback depends on the Doppler coefficient computed by the lattice physics code (e.g. CASMO-5), and on the effective Doppler temperature computed by the transient code (e.g. SIMULATE-3K) using the non-uniform intra-pellet temperature profile. CASMO-5 has many new features compared with its predecessor. Among them, the replacement of the L-library (based primarily on ENDF/B IV data) by the latest available nuclear data (ENDF/B VII.0), and the Monte Carlo based resonance elastic scattering model to overcome deficiencies in NJOY modeling have a significant impact on the fuel temperature coefficient, and hence on LWR RIA. The Doppler temperature effect in thermal reactors is driven by the 238 U absorption. The different effective Doppler temperature definitions, available in the literature, try to capture the considerable self-shielding of the 238 U absorption that occurs in the pellet surface by defining an appropriate fuel temperature to compute cross-sections. In this work, we investigate the effect of the nuclear data generated by CASMO-5 on RIA, as well as the impact of different effective Doppler temperature definitions, including one proposed by the authors. It is concluded: 1) LWR RIA evaluated using CASMO-5 cross section data will be milder because the energy released is ∼10% smaller; 2) the prompt enthalpy rise is barely affected by the choice of the Doppler temperature definition; and 3) the peak fuel enthalpy is affected by the choice of the Doppler temperature definition, the under-prediction of the Doppler reactivity by the 'NEA' Doppler temperature results in a conservative estimate of the peak fuel enthalpy. (authors)

  7. Effects of Coolant Temperature Changes on Reactivity for Various Coolants in a Liquid Salt Cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casino, William A. Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform an investigation into the relative merit of various salts and salt compounds being considered for use as coolants in the liquid salt cooled very high temperature reactor platform (LS-VHTR). Most of the non-nuclear properties necessary to evaluate these salts are known, but the neutronic characteristics important to reactor core design are still in need of a more extensive examination. This report provides a two-fold approach to further this investigation. First, a list of qualifying salts is assembled based upon acceptable non-nuclear properties. Second, the effect on system reactivity for a secondary system transient or an off-normal or accident condition is examined for each of these salt choices. The specific incident to be investigated is an increase in primary coolant temperature beyond normal operating parameters. In order to perform the relative merit comparison of each candidate salt, the System Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity is calculated for each candidate salt at various state points throughout the core burn history. (author)

  8. Possibilities of achieving non-positive void reactivity effect in fast sodium-cooled reactors with increased self-protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, P.N.; Zverkov, Yu.A.; Morozov, A.G.; Orlov, V.V.; Slesarev, I.S.; Subbotin, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    The problems of self-protection inhancement for the liquid-metal cooled fast reactors with intra-assembly heterogeneity of the core are studied. Possible approaches to arrangement of such reactors with various powers characterized by high levels of coolant natural circulation, minimum reactivity changes during fuel burn-up and non-positive void effect of reactivity are found. 10 refs.; 11 figs

  9. Measuring device for the temperature coefficient of reactor moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Yuzo.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly determine by automatic calculation the temperature coefficient for moderators which has been determined so far by a log of manual processings. Constitution: Each of signals from a control rod position indicator, a reactor reactivity, instrument and moderator temperature meter are inputted, and each of the signals and designed valued for the doppler temperature coefficients are stored. Recurling calculation is conducted based on the reactivity and the moderator temperature at an interval where the temperature changes of the moderators are equalized at an identical control rod position, to determine isothermic coefficient. Then, the temperature coefficient for moderator are calculated from the isothermic coefficient and the doppler temperature coefficient. The relationship between the reactivity and the moderator temperature is plotted on a X-Y recorder. The stored signals and the calculated temperature coefficient for moderators are sequentially displayed and the results are printed out when the measurement is completed. According to the present device, since the real time processing is conducted, the processing time can be shortened remarkably. Accordingly, it is possible to save the man power for the test of the nuclear reactor and improve the reactor operation performance. (Kamimura, M.)

  10. Local chemical potential, local hardness, and dual descriptors in temperature dependent chemical reactivity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2017-05-31

    In this work we establish a new temperature dependent procedure within the grand canonical ensemble, to avoid the Dirac delta function exhibited by some of the second order chemical reactivity descriptors based on density functional theory, at a temperature of 0 K. Through the definition of a local chemical potential designed to integrate to the global temperature dependent electronic chemical potential, the local chemical hardness is expressed in terms of the derivative of this local chemical potential with respect to the average number of electrons. For the three-ground-states ensemble model, this local hardness contains a term that is equal to the one intuitively proposed by Meneses, Tiznado, Contreras and Fuentealba, which integrates to the global hardness given by the difference in the first ionization potential, I, and the electron affinity, A, at any temperature. However, in the present approach one finds an additional temperature-dependent term that introduces changes at the local level and integrates to zero. Additionally, a τ-hard dual descriptor and a τ-soft dual descriptor given in terms of the product of the global hardness and the global softness multiplied by the dual descriptor, respectively, are derived. Since all these reactivity indices are given by expressions composed of terms that correspond to products of the global properties multiplied by the electrophilic or nucleophilic Fukui functions, they may be useful for studying and comparing equivalent sites in different chemical environments.

  11. Influence of high-temperature steam on the reactivity of CaO sorbent for CO₂ capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donat, Felix; Florin, Nicholas H; Anthony, Edward J; Fennell, Paul S

    2012-01-17

    Calcium looping is a high-temperature CO(2) capture technology applicable to the postcombustion capture of CO(2) from power station flue gas, or integrated with fuel conversion in precombustion CO(2) capture schemes. The capture technology uses solid CaO sorbent derived from natural limestone and takes advantage of the reversible reaction between CaO and CO(2) to form CaCO(3); that is, to achieve the separation of CO(2) from flue or fuel gas, and produce a pure stream of CO(2) suitable for geological storage. An important characteristic of the sorbent, affecting the cost-efficiency of this technology, is the decay in reactivity of the sorbent over multiple CO(2) capture-and-release cycles. This work reports on the influence of high-temperature steam, which will be present in flue (about 5-10%) and fuel (∼20%) gases, on the reactivity of CaO sorbent derived from four natural limestones. A significant increase in the reactivity of these sorbents was found for 30 cycles in the presence of steam (from 1-20%). Steam influences the sorbent reactivity in two ways. Steam present during calcination promotes sintering that produces a sorbent morphology with most of the pore volume associated with larger pores of ∼50 nm in diameter, and which appears to be relatively more stable than the pore structure that evolves when no steam is present. The presence of steam during carbonation reduces the diffusion resistance during carbonation. We observed a synergistic effect, i.e., the highest reactivity was observed when steam was present for both calcination and carbonation.

  12. Fluctuations of estradiol during women's menstrual cycle: Influences on reactivity towards erotic stimuli in the late positive potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Aisha J L; Zoeller, Aaron C; Hennig, Juergen

    2018-05-01

    While several studies examined the reactivity towards negative emotional stimuli across women's menstrual cycle, only few investigated responses to positive emotional cues in association with sexual hormones on a neural level. Therefore, the aim of the current EEG-experiment was to study the differential reactivity towards positive (erotic) words during the menstrual cycle (i.e. with fluctuations in the steroids estradiol and progesterone) in the late positive potential (LPP). Regarding reactivity towards erotic stimuli, the LPP is seen as the most relevant ERP-component, as more positive amplitudes in the LPP reflect larger incentive salience and higher arousal. The LPP towards erotic words was expected to be more pronounced during fertile phases of the menstrual cycle (around ovulation). Furthermore, associations with hormonal concentrations of estradiol and progesterone were investigated. 19 young, free cycling women were tested in an Erotic Stroop paradigm during the follicular phase, ovulation, and the luteal phase in a balanced cross-over design, while electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded. LPPs in reaction to erotic compared to neutral words were larger in every phase. During the follicular phase and ovulation, higher estradiol-concentrations were associated with more positive LPP-amplitudes towards erotic- than to neutral words. No effects of progesterone, as well as no effects of cycle phase, were evident. Results are being discussed regarding implications for further research. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurement of reactivity temperature coefficient by noise method in a power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, O.

    1986-07-01

    The temperature reactivity coefficient was estimated on the basis of noise measurements performed in a PWR. The magnitude of the coefficient was evaluated by relating the values of the APSD and CPSD between ex-core neutron detector signals and fuel assembly outlet thermocouple in the low frequency range. Comparison with δρ/δT measurements performed in PWR by standard methods supports the validity of the results. (author)

  14. Comparison of Conductor-Temperature Calculations Based on Different Radial-Position-Temperature Detections for High-Voltage Power Cable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the calculation of the conductor temperature is related to the temperature sensor position in high-voltage power cables and four thermal circuits—based on the temperatures of insulation shield, the center of waterproof compound, the aluminum sheath, and the jacket surface are established to calculate the conductor temperature. To examine the effectiveness of conductor temperature calculations, simulation models based on flow characteristics of the air gap between the waterproof compound and the aluminum are built up, and thermocouples are placed at the four radial positions in a 110 kV cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE insulated power cable to measure the temperatures of four positions. In measurements, six cases of current heating test under three laying environments, such as duct, water, and backfilled soil were carried out. Both errors of the conductor temperature calculation and the simulation based on the temperature of insulation shield were significantly smaller than others under all laying environments. It is the uncertainty of the thermal resistivity, together with the difference of the initial temperature of each radial position by the solar radiation, which led to the above results. The thermal capacitance of the air has little impact on errors. The thermal resistance of the air gap is the largest error source. Compromising the temperature-estimation accuracy and the insulation-damage risk, the waterproof compound is the recommended sensor position to improve the accuracy of conductor-temperature calculation. When the thermal resistances were calculated correctly, the aluminum sheath is also the recommended sensor position besides the waterproof compound.

  15. Effect of degree of polymerization and of temperature on the reactivity of poly(vinyl alcohol) by applying T-for-H exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Imai, Kazunari

    1999-01-01

    In order to reveal the effect of the degree of polymerization and of temperature on the reactivity of functional polymers, the hydrogen-isotope exchange reaction between poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) having each degree of polymerization and tritiated water vapor (HTO vapor) was dynamically observed at 35-80 deg C in a gas-solid system. The reason of the observation at 35 deg C is to clarify the possibility of the T-for-H exchange reaction at a temperature near the environment. The degree of polymerization of PVA used in this work was 500, 1000, 2000, 2800, or 3500. Applying the A''-McKay plot method to the data obtained in each observation, the rate constant (k) for each PVA in the reaction was calculated. Moreover, the Arrhenius plot for each PVA was made by using the k values. Comparing the k values and the results obtained previously, the following six matters have been clarified. In the temperature range of 35-80 deg C, the T-for-H exchange reaction between HTO vapor and each PVA occurred, and in this case, the atoms participating in the reaction are the H atoms in the OH groups in PVA and T atoms in HTO vapor. The reactivity of each PVA increases with rising temperature, and decreases with increasing the degree of polymerization. The rate of the decreasing of k with increasing the degree of polymerization changes at near the degree of polymerization of 1000, and the rate is fairly large under the degree of 1000. Under the degree of polymerization of 1000, the reactivity of PVA is more affected by the effect of the degree of polymerization than by the effect of temperature, and the reactivity is large when the degree of polymerization is small. Over the degree of polymerization of 1000, the reactivity of PVA is affected by both the degree of polymerization and temperature, and the reactivity is large when temperature is high. For the T-for-H exchange reaction in a gas-solid system, the reaction form is unchanged in the range of 35-80 deg C, and the reactivity at 35

  16. Cardiovascular reactivity of younger and older adults to positive-, negative-, and mixed-emotion cognitive challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Michael J; James, Jack E; McCabe, Tadhg R; Kilmartin, Liam; Howard, Siobhán; Noone, Chris

    2012-03-01

    Although aging is associated with progressive increases in blood pressure level, previous research has been inconsistent as to whether older adults show greater or lesser cardiovascular reactivity (CVR) to emotion than do younger adults. There is reason to believe that these inconsistencies could be clarified by examining age-related differences in hemodynamic profile revealed by measuring the pattern of cardiac output and total peripheral resistance associated with changes in blood pressure reactivity. Accordingly, the present study examined the performance, CVR, and hemodynamic profile of younger and older adults during encoding and recognition of word pairs involving four valence types: positive, negative, mixed (positive/negative), and neutral word pairs. Results revealed higher baseline blood pressure, increased CVR characterized by a vascular hemodynamic profile, and more rapid recovery (especially during encoding) for older than for younger participants. Results are discussed in light of research and theory on the relationship between aging and cardiovascular health. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Low to moderate temperature nanolaminate heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckels, J Del [Livermore, CA; Nunes, Peter J [Danville, CA; Simpson, Randall L [Livermore, CA; Hau-Riege, Stefan [Fremont, CA; Walton, Chris [Oakland, CA; Carter, J Chance [Livermore, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA

    2011-01-11

    A low to moderate temperature heat source comprising a high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures wherein the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is positioned between two thin pieces to form a close contact sheath. In one embodiment the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is a nanolaminate multilayer foil of reactive materials that produces a heating level of less than 200.degree. C.

  18. Effect of reactivity insertion rate on peak power and temperatures in swimming pool type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, L.A.; Jabbar, A.; Anwar, A.R.; Ahmad, N.

    1998-01-01

    It is essential to study the reactor behavior under different accidental conditions and take proper measures for its safe operation. We have studied the effect of reactivity insertion, with and without scram conditions, on peak power and temperatures of fuel, cladding and coolant in typical swimming pool type research reactor. The reactivity ranging from 1 $ to 2 $ and insertion times from 0.25 to 1 second have been considered. The computer code PARET has been used and results are presented in this article. (author)

  19. The influence of thorium on the temperature reactivity coefficient in a 400 MWth pebble bed high temperature plutonium incinerating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, Guy A.; Serfontein, Dawid E.

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates advanced fuel cycles containing thorium and reactor grade plutonium (Pu(PWR)) in a 400 MW th Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) Demonstration Power Plant. Results presented were determined from coupled neutronics and thermo-hydraulic simulations of the VSOP 99/05 diffusion codes. In a previous study impressive burn-ups (601 MWd/kg heavy metal (HM)) and thus plutonium destruction rates (69.2 %) were obtained with pure plutonium fuel with mass loadings of 3 g Pu(PWR)/fuel sphere or less. However the safety performance was poor in that the limit on the maximum fuel temperature during equilibrium operation was exceeded and positive Uniform Temperature Reactivity Coefficients (UTCs) were obtained. In the present study fuel cycles containing mixtures of thorium and plutonium achieved negative maximum UTCs. Plutonium only fuel cycles also achieved negative maximum UTCs, provided that much higher mass loadings are used. It is proposed that the lower thermal neutron flux was responsible for this effect. The plutonium only fuel cycle with 12 g Pu(PWR)/fuel sphere also achieved the adopted safety limits for the PBMR DPP-400 in that the maximum fuel temperature and the maximum power density did not exceed 1130°C or 4.5 kW/sphere respectively. This design would thus be licensable and could potentially be economically feasible. However the burn-up was much lower at 181 MWd/kgHM and thus the plutonium destruction fraction was also much lower at 24.5%, which may be sub-optimal with respect to proliferation and waste disposal objectives and therefore further optimisation studies are proposed. (author)

  20. Modelling of the reactive sputtering process with non-uniform discharge current density and different temperature conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasina, P; Hytkova, T; Elias, M

    2009-01-01

    The majority of current models of the reactive magnetron sputtering assume a uniform shape of the discharge current density and the same temperature near the target and the substrate. However, in the real experimental set-up, the presence of the magnetic field causes high density plasma to form in front of the cathode in the shape of a toroid. Consequently, the discharge current density is laterally non-uniform. In addition to this, the heating of the background gas by sputtered particles, which is usually referred to as the gas rarefaction, plays an important role. This paper presents an extended model of the reactive magnetron sputtering that assumes the non-uniform discharge current density and which accommodates the gas rarefaction effect. It is devoted mainly to the study of the behaviour of the reactive sputtering rather that to the prediction of the coating properties. Outputs of this model are compared with those that assume uniform discharge current density and uniform temperature profile in the deposition chamber. Particular attention is paid to the modelling of the radial variation of the target composition near transitions from the metallic to the compound mode and vice versa. A study of the target utilization in the metallic and compound mode is performed for two different discharge current density profiles corresponding to typical two pole and multipole magnetics available on the market now. Different shapes of the discharge current density were tested. Finally, hysteresis curves are plotted for various temperature conditions in the reactor.

  1. Investigations of the reactivity temperature coefficient of the Dresden Technical University training and research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, E.; Knorr, J.

    1982-01-01

    Approximate formulas are derived for determining the temperature coefficient of reactivity of the training and research reactor (AKR) of the Dresden Technical University. Values calculated on the basis of these approximations show good agreement with experimentally obtained results, thus confirming the applicability of the formulas to simple systems

  2. Steam-chemical reactivity for irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, R.A.; McCarthy, K.A.; Oates, M.A.; Petti, D.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Smolik, G.R. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental investigation to determine the influence of neutron irradiation effects and annealing on the chemical reactivity of beryllium exposed to steam. The work entailed measurements of the H{sub 2} generation rates for unirradiated and irradiated Be and for irradiated Be that had been previously annealed at different temperatures ranging from 450degC to 1200degC. H{sub 2} generation rates were similar for irradiated and unirradiated Be in steam-chemical reactivity experiments at temperatures between 450degC and 600degC. For irradiated Be exposed to steam at 700degC, the chemical reactivity accelerated rapidly and the specimen experienced a temperature excursion. Enhanced chemical reactivity at temperatures between 400degC and 600degC was observed for irradiated Be annealed at temperatures of 700degC and higher. This reactivity enhancement could be accounted for by the increased specific surface area resulting from development of a surface-connected porosity in the irradiated-annealed Be. (author)

  3. Possible effects of regulating hydroponic water temperature on plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water temperature can affect many physiological processes during plant growth and development. Temperatures below or above optimum levels may influence plant metabolic activities positively or negatively. This may include accumulation of different metabolites such as phenolic compounds, reactive oxygen species ...

  4. Impact of the Low-Temperature Reactivity of Reillex(TM) HPQ on Actinide Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Reactive System Screening Tool(TM) data and a computational model are used to predict the impact of pressurization on a typical process-scale ion exchange column due to gases generated by a low temperature exothermic reaction (LTE). The LTE results from a reaction between nitric acid and the ethylbenzene pendant groups of the Reillex(TM) HPQ resin. This reaction would occur if the resin bed were inadvertently heated above 70 degrees C

  5. Formula for radial profiles of temperature in steam-liquid sodium reactive jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbes, P.; Mora-Perez, J.L.; Carreau, J.L.; Gbahoue, L.; Roger, F.

    1987-01-01

    One of the important problems of the study of distribution of temperatures in the reactive steam-liquid sodium jet rests in the mathematical formulation of their radial effects. During the experiment, two forms have been brought to light: from a certain distance of the injector, the radial distribution of temperature can be represented, in a classical way, by an error function curve; close to the injector, the radial profile allows for a minimum located on the axis of the jet. An energy balance permits, by dividing the jet in three parts: a central nucleus composed of practically pure gas, a gas ring plus drops and a liquid peripheral area plus bubbles, to obtain a mathematical formulation of the profiles, close to the injection which accounts quite well for the experimental points and their form

  6. Compressive behaviour of hybrid fiber-reinforced reactive powder concrete after high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Wenzhong; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We complete the high temperature test and compression test of RPC after 20–900 °C. ► The presence of steel fiber and polypropylene fiber can prevent RPC from spalling. ► Compressive strength increases first and then decreases with elevated temperatures. ► Microstructure deterioration is the root cause of macro-properties recession. ► Equations to express the compressive strength change with temperature are proposed. -- Abstract: This study focuses on the compressive properties and microstructures of reactive powder concrete (RPC) mixed with steel fiber and polypropylene fiber after exposure to 20–900 °C. The volume dosage of steel fiber and polypropylene fiber is (2%, 0.1%), (2%, 0.2%) and (1%, 0.2%). The effects of heating temperature, fiber content and specimen size on the compressive properties are analyzed. The microstructures of RPC exposed to different high temperatures are studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicate that the compressive strength of hybrid fiber-reinforced RPC increases at first, then decreases with the increasing temperature, and the basic reason for the degradation of macro-mechanical properties is the deterioration of RPC microstructure. Based on the experimental results, equations to express the relationships of the compressive strength with the heating temperatures are established. Compared with normal-strength and high-strength concrete, the hybrid fiber-reinforced RPC has excellent capacity in resistance to high temperature.

  7. Analytical calculation of the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors for plutonium and uranium-thorium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    We analytically evaluated the fuel coefficient of temperature both for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors when they utilize as fuel plutonium and minor actinides from light water reactors spent fuel or a mixture of 50% uranium, enriched 20% in 235 U, and 50% thorium. In both cores the calculation involves the evaluation of the resonances integrals of the high absorbers fuel nuclides 240 Pu, 238 U and 232 Th and it requires the esteem of the Dancoff-Ginsburg factor for a pebble bed or prismatic core. The Dancoff-Ginsburg factor represents the only discriminating parameter in the results for the two different reactors types; in fact, both the pebble bed and the prismatic reactors share the same the pseudo-cross-section describing an infinite medium made of graphite filled by TRISO particles. We considered only the resolved resonances with a statistical spin factor equal to one and we took into account 267, 72, 212 resonances in the range 1.057-5692, 6.674-14485, 21.78-3472 eV for 240 Pu, 238 U and 232 Th, respectively, for investigating the influence on the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient of the variation of the TRISO kernel radius and TRISO particles packing fraction from 100, 200 to 300 μm and from 10% to 50%, respectively. Finally, in the pebble bed core, we varied the radius of the pebble for setting a fuel temperature reactivity coefficient similar to the one of a prismatic core

  8. Pathogenetic role of Factor VII deficiency and thrombosis in cross-reactive material positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, A; Sambado, L; Bonamigo, E; Ferrari, S; Lombardi, A M

    2013-12-01

    Congenital Factor VII (FVII) deficiency can be divided into two groups: cases of "true" deficiency, or cross-reactive material (CRM) negative and variants that are cross-reactive material positive.The first form is commonly recognized as Type I condition whereas the second one is known as Type II. FVII deficiency has been occasionally associated with thrombotic events, mainly venous. The reasons underlying this peculiar manifestation are unknown even though in the majority of associated patients thrombotic risk factors are present. The purpose of the present study was to investigate if a thrombotic event was more frequent in Type I or in Type II defect.The majority of patients with FVII deficiency and thrombosis belong to Type II defects. In the following paper we discuss the possible role of the dysfunctional FVII cross-reaction material as a contributory cause for the occurrence of thrombosis.

  9. Fast screening of analytes for chemical reactions by reactive low-temperature plasma ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Huang, Guangming

    2015-11-15

    Approaches for analyte screening have been used to aid in the fine-tuning of chemical reactions. Herein, we present a simple and straightforward analyte screening method for chemical reactions via reactive low-temperature plasma ionization mass spectrometry (reactive LTP-MS). Solution-phase reagents deposited on sample substrates were desorbed into the vapor phase by action of the LTP and by thermal desorption. Treated with LTP, both reagents reacted through a vapor phase ion/molecule reaction to generate the product. Finally, protonated reagents and products were identified by LTP-MS. Reaction products from imine formation reaction, Eschweiler-Clarke methylation and the Eberlin reaction were detected via reactive LTP-MS. Products from the imine formation reaction with reagents substituted with different functional groups (26 out of 28 trials) were successfully screened in a time of 30 s each. Besides, two short-lived reactive intermediates of Eschweiler-Clarke methylation were also detected. LTP in this study serves both as an ambient ionization source for analyte identification (including reagents, intermediates and products) and as a means to produce reagent ions to assist gas-phase ion/molecule reactions. The present reactive LTP-MS method enables fast screening for several analytes from several chemical reactions, which possesses good reagent compatibility and the potential to perform high-throughput analyte screening. In addition, with the detection of various reactive intermediates (intermediates I and II of Eschweiler-Clarke methylation), the present method would also contribute to revealing and elucidating reaction mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Don't Praise Me, Don't Chase Me: Emotional Reactivity to Positive and Negative Social-Evaluative Videos in Patients With Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenberger, Julia; Eibl, Johannes Josef; Pfaltz, Monique; Wilhelm, Frank H; Voderholzer, Ulrich; Hillert, Andreas; Blechert, Jens

    2017-02-01

    Diagnostic criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD) include interpersonal problems and high reactivity to negative social interactions. However, experimental studies on these symptoms are scarce, and it remains unclear whether reactivity is also altered in response to positive social interactions. To simulate such situations, the present study used videographic stimuli (E.Vids; Blechert, Schwitalla, & Wilhelm, 2013) in which actors express rejecting, neutral, or appreciating sentences. Twenty BPD patients and 20 healthy controls rated their emotional responses to these on pleasantness, arousal, and 11 specific emotions. In addition to elevated reactivity to negative E.Vids, patients with BPD showed marked reduction in pleasantness responses to positive E.Vids. Furthermore, they exhibited less pride, happiness, feelings of approval, and attraction/love in response to positive videos and more anger, anxiety, embarrassment, contempt, guilt, feelings of disapproval/rejection, and sadness to negative videos. Interestingly, BPD patients also reported negative emotions in response to positive videos. Implications for psychotherapy and research are discussed.

  11. Navigation towards a goal position: from reactive to generalised learned control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire da Silva, Valdinei [Laboratorio de Tecnicas Inteligentes - LTI, Escola Politecnica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, trav.3, n.158, Cidade Universitaria Sao Paulo (Brazil); Selvatici, Antonio Henrique [Universidade Nove de Julho, Rua Vergueiro, 235, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Reali Costa, Anna Helena, E-mail: valdinei.freire@gmail.com, E-mail: antoniohps@uninove.br, E-mail: anna.reali@poli.usp.br [Laboratorio de Tecnicas Inteligentes - LTI, Escola Politecnica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, trav.3, n.158, Cidade Universitaria Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-03-01

    The task of navigating to a target position in space is a fairly common task for a mobile robot. It is desirable that this task is performed even in previously unknown environments. One reactive architecture explored before addresses this challenge by denning a hand-coded coordination of primitive behaviours, encoded by the Potential Fields method. Our first approach to improve the performance of this architecture adds a learning step to autonomously find the best way to coordinate primitive behaviours with respect to an arbitrary performance criterion. Because of the limitations presented by the Potential Fields method, especially in relation to non-convex obstacles, we are investigating the use of Relational Reinforcement Learning as a method to not only learn to act in the current environment, but also to generalise prior knowledge to the current environment in order to achieve the goal more quickly in a non-convex structured environment. We show the results of our previous efforts in reaching goal positions along with our current research on generalised approaches.

  12. Navigation towards a goal position: from reactive to generalised learned control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire da Silva, Valdinei; Selvatici, Antonio Henrique; Reali Costa, Anna Helena

    2011-01-01

    The task of navigating to a target position in space is a fairly common task for a mobile robot. It is desirable that this task is performed even in previously unknown environments. One reactive architecture explored before addresses this challenge by denning a hand-coded coordination of primitive behaviours, encoded by the Potential Fields method. Our first approach to improve the performance of this architecture adds a learning step to autonomously find the best way to coordinate primitive behaviours with respect to an arbitrary performance criterion. Because of the limitations presented by the Potential Fields method, especially in relation to non-convex obstacles, we are investigating the use of Relational Reinforcement Learning as a method to not only learn to act in the current environment, but also to generalise prior knowledge to the current environment in order to achieve the goal more quickly in a non-convex structured environment. We show the results of our previous efforts in reaching goal positions along with our current research on generalised approaches.

  13. Energy transfer in reactive and non-reactive H2 + OH collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashed, O.; Brown, N.J.

    1985-04-01

    We have used the methods of quasi-classical dynamics to compute energy transfer properties of non-reactive and reactive H 2 + OH collisions. Energy transfer has been investigated as function of translational temperature, reagent rotational energy, and reagent vibrational energy. The energy transfer mechanism is complex with ten types of energy transfer possible, and evidence was found for all types. There is much more exchange between the translational degree of freedom and the H 2 vibrational degree of freedom than there is between translation and OH vibration. Translational energy is transferred to the rotational degrees of freedom of each molecule. There is a greater propensity for the transfer of translation to OH rotation than H 2 rotation. In reactive collisions, increases in reagent translational temperature predominantly appear as vibrational energy in the water molecule. Energy transfer in non-reactive and reactive collisions does not depend strongly on the initial angular momentum in either molecule. In non-reactive collisions, vibrational energy is transferred to translation, to the rotational degree of freedom of the same molecule, and to the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of the other molecule. In reactive collisions, the major effect of increasing the vibrational energy in reagent molecules is that, on the average, the vibrational energy of the reagents appears as product vibrational energy. 18 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs

  14. Analysis of Moderator Temperature Reactivity Coefficient of the PWR Core Using WIMS-ANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukiran; Rokhmadi

    2007-01-01

    The Moderator Temperature Reactivity Coefficient (MTRC) is an important parameter in design, control and safety, particularly in PWR reactor. It is then very important to validate any new processed library for an accurate prediction of this parameter. The objective of this work is to validate the newly WIMS library based on ENDF/B-VI nuclear data files, especially for the prediction of the MTRC parameter. For this purpose, it is used a set of light water moderated lattice experiments as the NORA experiment and R1-100H critical reactors, both of reactors using UO 2 fuel pellet. Analysis is used with WIMSD/4 lattice code with original cross section libraries and WIMS-ANL with ENDF/B-VI cross section libraries. The results showed that the moderator temperatures reactivity coefficients for the NORA reactor using original libraries is - 5.039E-04 %Δk/k/℃ but for ENDF/B-VI libraries is - 2.925E-03 %Δk/k/℃. Compared to the designed value of the reactor core, the difference is in the range of 1.8 - 3.8 % for ENDF/B-IV libraries. It can be concluded that for reactor safety and control analysis, it has to be used ENDF/B- VI libraries because the original libraries is not accurate any more. (author)

  15. Analytical calculation of the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors for plutonium and uranium-thorium fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology - KTH, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: alby@anl.gov

    2007-01-15

    We analytically evaluated the fuel coefficient of temperature both for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors when they utilize as fuel plutonium and minor actinides from light water reactors spent fuel or a mixture of 50% uranium, enriched 20% in {sup 235}U, and 50% thorium. In both cores the calculation involves the evaluation of the resonances integrals of the high absorbers fuel nuclides {sup 240}Pu, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th and it requires the esteem of the Dancoff-Ginsburg factor for a pebble bed or prismatic core. The Dancoff-Ginsburg factor represents the only discriminating parameter in the results for the two different reactors types; in fact, both the pebble bed and the prismatic reactors share the same the pseudo-cross-section describing an infinite medium made of graphite filled by TRISO particles. We considered only the resolved resonances with a statistical spin factor equal to one and we took into account 267, 72, 212 resonances in the range 1.057-5692, 6.674-14485, 21.78-3472 eV for {sup 240}Pu, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, respectively, for investigating the influence on the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient of the variation of the TRISO kernel radius and TRISO particles packing fraction from 100, 200 to 300 {mu}m and from 10% to 50%, respectively. Finally, in the pebble bed core, we varied the radius of the pebble for setting a fuel temperature reactivity coefficient similar to the one of a prismatic core.

  16. Preparation of high temperature superconductor ceramics using cuban reactives. Optimization of the synthesis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva Fabelo, A.; Cruz, C.; Aragon, B.; Suarez, J.C.; Mora, M.

    1991-01-01

    Results of the crystallographic characterization of a group of Cuban Products, which are evaluated to be employed in HTSC fabrication are presented in this paper. The first results on the synthesis of HTSC (RBa 2 Cu 3 0 7δ , R= Y, La, Nd) using Cuban reactives, are presented. The so called 'solid state reaction method of synthesis' was optimized, obtaining a critical temperature of more than 93 k

  17. [Reactive collisions of high-temperature systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graff, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    The object of this research is to study reactivity at superthermal collision energies using a fast neutral beam that is generated by photodetachment. Systems scheduled for initial study include basic oxygen-hydrogen reactions. Unfortunately, we can not yet report realization of this goal, but during this funding period we have made advances that are anticipated to lead to successful measurements during the next year. The parameters described below refer to the model system O + H 2 → OH + H. The basic design involves the collision of fast neutrals, created by photodetachment of the corresponding negative molecular ion, with a stable reactant gas in a collision cell. Products are detected by ionization and mass analysis. We are equipped to study rotational effects on reactivity by comparing results for rotational levels J = 0 and 1 of H 2 . Highlights during the funding period are given in this report

  18. Neural reactivity to monetary rewards and losses in childhood: longitudinal and concurrent associations with observed and self-reported positive emotionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawa, Autumn; Proudfit, Greg Hajcak; Kessel, Ellen M; Dyson, Margaret; Olino, Thomas; Klein, Daniel N

    2015-01-01

    Reward reactivity and positive emotion are key components of a theoretical, early-emerging approach motivational system, yet few studies have examined associations between positive emotion and neural reactivity to reward across development. In this multi-method prospective study, we examined the association of laboratory observations of positive emotionality (PE) at age 3 and self-reported positive affect (PA) at age 9 with an event-related potential component sensitive to the relative response to winning vs. losing money, the feedback negativity (ΔFN), at age 9 (N=381). Males had a larger ΔFN than females, and both greater observed PE at age 3 and self-reported PA at age 9 significantly, but modestly, predicted an enhanced ΔFN at age 9. Negative emotionality and behavioral inhibition did not predict ΔFN. Results contribute to understanding the neural correlates of PE and suggest that the FN and PE may be related to the same biobehavioral approach system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Spatial neutronics modelling to evaluate the temperature reactivity feedbacks in a lead-cooled fast reactor - 15288

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzi, S.; Cammi, A.; Luzzi, L.

    2015-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative assessment of the thermal reactivity feedbacks occurring in a nuclear reactor is a crucial issue for the time-dependent evolution of the system and, in turn, it has a great impact on the development and validation of advanced control techniques. In the present work, in order to overcome the limitations of the classic Point Kinetics adopted in the control simulators, a spatial neutronics model, representing the neutron flux as sum of a spatial basis weighted by time-dependent coefficients, has been considered. The reference reactor is ALFRED, the European demonstrator of the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor technology. Average cross-sections for each fuel assembly, calculated by means of a Monte Carlo code, have been used to solve the partial differential equations of the neutron diffusion, exploiting the capabilities of the COMSOL software. Once obtained the spatial functions, the set of equations for studying the reactivity effects has been implemented in the MATLAB environment. Among the several temperature reactivity feedbacks, specific attention has been paid to the Doppler effect in the fuel and to the lead density effect. Several spatial bases have been calculated and their capability of representing the reactivity variation have been assessed. (authors)

  20. Neutron temperature measurements in a cryogenic hydrogenous moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Hoovler, G.S.; Lewis, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    Benchmarkings of neutronic calculations are most successful when there is a direct correlation between a measurement and an analytic result. In the thermal neutron energy region, the fluence rate as a function of moderator temperature and position within the moderator is an area of potential correlation. The measurement can be done by activating natural lutetium. The two isotopes of the element lutetium have widely different cross sections and permit the discrimination of flux shape and energy distributions at different reactor conditions. The 175 Lu has a 1/v dependence in the thermal energy region, and 176 Lu has a resonance structure that approximates a constant cross section in the same region. The saturation activation of the two isotopes has been measured in an insulated moderator container at the center of a thermal heterogeneous reactor designed for space nuclear propulsion. The measurements were made in a hydrogenous (polyethylene) moderator at three temperatures (83, 184, and 297 K) and five locations within the moderator. Simultaneously, the reactivity effect of the change in the moderator temperature was determined to be positive with an increase in temperature. The plot of activation shows the variation in neutron fluence rate and current with temperature and explains the positive reactivity coefficient. A neutron temperature can be inferred from a postulated Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution and compared with Monte Carlo or other calculations

  1. Effects of Biomass Feedstock on the Yield and Reactivity of Soot from Fast Pyrolysis at High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter A.; Glarborg, Peter

    This study investigated the effect of feedstock on the yield, nanostructure and reactivity of soot. Woody and herbaceous biomass were pyrolyzed at high heating rates and temperatures of 1250 and 1400°C in a drop tube furnace. The collected solid residues were structurally characterized by electro...

  2. Temperature controls oxidative phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species production through uncoupling in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Koziel, Agnieszka; Majerczak, Joanna; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory and phosphorylation activities, mitochondrial uncoupling, and hydrogen peroxide formation were studied in isolated rat skeletal muscle mitochondria during experimentally induced hypothermia (25 °C) and hyperthermia (42 °C) compared to the physiological temperature of resting muscle (35 °C). For nonphosphorylating mitochondria, increasing the temperature from 25 to 42 °C led to a decrease in membrane potential, hydrogen peroxide production, and quinone reduction levels. For phosphorylating mitochondria, no temperature-dependent changes in these mitochondrial functions were observed. However, the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation decreased, whereas the oxidation and phosphorylation rates and oxidative capacities of the mitochondria increased, with increasing assay temperature. An increase in proton leak, including uncoupling protein-mediated proton leak, was observed with increasing assay temperature, which could explain the reduced oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and reactive oxygen species production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermogravimetric study on the hydration of reactive magnesia and silica mixture at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Fei; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The characteristics of reactive MgO vary significantly in terms of their impurity content and reactivity depending on their sources and calcination conditions. • The synthesis of magnesium silicate hydrate (MSH) is affected by the characteristics of the precursors, i.e., MgO and silica. • The reaction process in the MgO–SiO 2 –H 2 O system can be followed by TGA, and is essential to develop MSH-based materials. - Abstract: The synthesis of magnesium silicate hydrate (MSH), which has wide applications in both construction and environmental fields, has been studied for decades. However, it is known that the characteristics of magnesia (MgO) vary significantly depending on their calcination conditions, which is expected to affect their performance in the MgO–SiO 2 –H 2 O system. This paper investigated the effect of different MgO and silica sources on the formation of magnesium silicate hydrate (MSH) at room temperature. The hydration process was studied by mixing commercial reactive MgO and silica powders with water and curing for 1, 7 and 28 days. The hydration products were analysed with the help of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimatric analysis (TGA). The results showed the continuous consumption of MgO and the existence of MSH and brucite and other minor phases such as magnesite and calcite. It is found that the Mg and Si sources have significant effect on the hydration process of MgO–SiO 2 –H 2 O system. The reaction degree is controlled by the availability of dissolved Mg and Si in the solution. The former is determined by the reactivity of MgO and the latter is related to the reactivity of the silica as well as the pH of the system

  4. Method for reactivating solid catalysts used in alkylation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Coates, Kyle; Zalewski, David J.; Fox, Robert V.

    2003-06-17

    A method for reactivating a solid alkylation catalyst is provided which can be performed within a reactor that contains the alkylation catalyst or outside the reactor. Effective catalyst reactivation is achieved whether the catalyst is completely deactivated or partially deactivated. A fluid reactivating agent is employed to dissolve catalyst fouling agents and also to react with such agents and carry away the reaction products. The deactivated catalyst is contacted with the fluid reactivating agent under pressure and temperature conditions such that the fluid reactivating agent is dense enough to effectively dissolve the fouling agents and any reaction products of the fouling agents and the reactivating agent. Useful pressures and temperatures for reactivation include near-critical, critical, and supercritical pressures and temperatures for the reactivating agent. The fluid reactivating agent can include, for example, a branched paraffin containing at least one tertiary carbon atom, or a compound that can be isomerized to a molecule containing at least one tertiary carbon atom.

  5. Wetting Behavior and Reactivity of Molten Silicon with h-BN Substrate at Ultrahigh Temperatures up to 1750 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkowski, Wojciech; Sobczak, Natalia; Nowak, Rafał; Kudyba, Artur; Bruzda, Grzegorz; Polkowska, Adelajda; Homa, Marta; Turalska, Patrycja; Tangstad, Merete; Safarian, Jafar; Moosavi-Khoonsari, Elmira; Datas, Alejandro

    2017-12-01

    For a successful implementation of newly proposed silicon-based latent heat thermal energy storage systems, proper ceramic materials that could withstand a contact heating with molten silicon at temperatures much higher than its melting point need to be developed. In this regard, a non-wetting behavior and low reactivity are the main criteria determining the applicability of ceramic as a potential crucible material for long-term ultrahigh temperature contact with molten silicon. In this work, the wetting of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) by molten silicon was examined for the first time at temperatures up to 1750 °C. For this purpose, the sessile drop technique combined with contact heating procedure under static argon was used. The reactivity in Si/h-BN system under proposed conditions was evaluated by SEM/EDS examinations of the solidified couple. It was demonstrated that increase in temperature improves wetting, and consequently, non-wetting-to-wetting transition takes place at around 1650 °C. The contact angle of 90° ± 5° is maintained at temperatures up to 1750 °C. The results of structural characterization supported by a thermodynamic modeling indicate that the wetting behavior of the Si/h-BN couple during heating to and cooling from ultrahigh temperature of 1750 °C is mainly controlled by the substrate dissolution/reprecipitation mechanism.

  6. Mechanistic study on lowering the sensitivity of positive atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometric analyses: size-dependent reactivity of solvent clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Arif; Choi, Cheol Ho; Kim, Sunghwan

    2015-11-15

    Understanding the mechanism of atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) is important for studies employing APPI liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In this study, the APPI mechanism for polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds dissolved in toluene and methanol or water mixture was investigated by use of MS analysis and quantum mechanical simulation. In particular, four different mechanisms that could contribute to the signal reduction were considered based on a combination of MS data and quantum mechanical calculations. The APPI mechanism is clarified by combining MS data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. To obtain MS data, a positive-mode (+) APPI Q Exactive Orbitrap mass spectrometer was used to analyze each solution. DFT calculations were performed using the general atomic and molecular electronic structure system (GAMESS). The experimental results indicated that methanol significantly reduced the signal in (+) APPI, but no significative signal reduction was observed when water was used as a co-solvent with toluene. The signal reduction is more significant especially for molecular ions than for protonated ions. Therefore, important information about the mechanism of methanol-induced signal reduction in (+) APPI-MS can be gained due its negative impact on APPI efficiency. The size-dependent reactivity of methanol clusters ((CH3 OH)n , n = 1-8) is an important factor in determining the sensitivity of (+) APPI-MS analyses. Clusters can compete with toluene radical ions for electrons. The reactivity increases as the sizes of the methanol clusters increase and this effect can be caused by the size-dependent ionization energy of the solvent clusters. The resulting increase in cluster reactivity explains the flow rate and temperature-dependent signal reduction observed in the analytes. Based on the results presented here, minimizing the sizes of methanol clusters can improve the sensitivity of LC/(+)-APPI-MS. Copyright © 2015 John

  7. Temperature and void reactivity coefficient calculations for the high flux isotope reactor safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engle, W.W. Jr.; Williams, L.R.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides documentation of a series of calculations performed in 1991 in order to provide input for the High Flux Isotope Reactor Safety Analysis Report. In particular, temperature and void reactivity coefficients were calculated for beginning-of-life, end-of-life, and xenon equilibrium (29 h) conditions. Much of the data used to prepare the computer models for these calculations was derived from the original HFIR nuclear design study

  8. Local and linear chemical reactivity response functions at finite temperature in density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Ayers, Paul W.; Gázquez, José L.; Vela, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We explore the local and nonlocal response functions of the grand canonical potential density functional at nonzero temperature. In analogy to the zero-temperature treatment, local (e.g., the average electron density and the local softness) and nonlocal (e.g., the softness kernel) intrinsic response functions are defined as partial derivatives of the grand canonical potential with respect to its thermodynamic variables (i.e., the chemical potential of the electron reservoir and the external potential generated by the atomic nuclei). To define the local and nonlocal response functions of the electron density (e.g., the Fukui function, the linear density response function, and the dual descriptor), we differentiate with respect to the average electron number and the external potential. The well-known mathematical relationships between the intrinsic response functions and the electron-density responses are generalized to nonzero temperature, and we prove that in the zero-temperature limit, our results recover well-known identities from the density functional theory of chemical reactivity. Specific working equations and numerical results are provided for the 3-state ensemble model

  9. Continuous positive airway pressure treatment increases bronchial reactivity in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczynski, Piotr; Gorska, Katarzyna; Przybylowski, Tadeusz; Bielicki, Piotr; Zielinski, Jan; Chazan, Ryszarda

    2009-01-01

    The effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on the function of the lower airways are poorly understood. One of the methods used to determine the influence of positive pressure breathing on lower airways is the bronchial hyperreactivity test. Some authors report that CPAP increases bronchial hyperreactivity, while others report decreases. To assess the influence of CPAP treatment on bronchial reactivity and the effects of bronchial hyperreactivity on compliance to CPAP treatment. The study group consisted of 101 obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients (88 men and 13 women) with a mean age of 51 ± 11 years, mean apnea-hypopnea index of 53 ± 20 and mean body mass index of 32.6 ± 5.4. Patients were randomly assigned to a treatment group that received 3 weeks of CPAP therapy (group 1) or to a nontreatment control group (group 2). Pulmonary function tests and the methacholine bronchial provocation test were performed at baseline and 3 weeks later. There were no statistically significant differences between treated and control groups in anthropometry and polysomnography variables. At baseline, bronchial hyperreactivity was found in 6 patients from group 1 and 5 patients from group 2. A significant increase in bronchial reactivity was observed after CPAP treatment. Log PC20M decreased from 1.38 ± 0.30 at baseline to 1.26 ± 0.50 (p bronchial hyperreactivity during CPAP treatment were characterized by significantly lower FEV1, FVC and MEF50 values. CPAP produces statistically significant bronchial hyperreactivity. However, there were no clinical symptoms and it is not necessary to withdraw previous therapies. Copyright © 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. An analytical approach to the positive reactivity void coefficient of TRIGA Mark-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgue, Erdinc; Yarman, Tolga

    1988-01-01

    Previous calculations of reactivity void coefficient of I.T.U. TRIGA Mark-II Reactor was done by the second author et al. The theoretical predictions were afterwards, checked in this reactor experimentally. In this work an analytical approach is developed to evaluate rather quickly the reactivity void coefficient of I.T.U. TRIGA Mark-II, versus the size of the void inserted into the reactor. It is thus assumed that the reactor is a cylindrical, bare nuclear system. Next a belt of water of 2πrΔrH is introduced axially at a distance r from the center line of the system. r here, is the thickness of the belt, and H is the height of the reactor. The void is described by decreasing the water density in the belt region. A two group diffusion theory is adopted to determine the criticality of our configuration. The space dependency of the group fluxes are, thereby, assumed to be J 0 (2.405 r / R) cos (π Z / H), the same as that associated with the original bare reactor uniformly loaded prior to the change. A perturbation type of approach, thence, furnishes the effect of introducing a void in the belt region. The reactivity void coefficient can, rather surprisingly, be indeed positive. To our knowledge, this fact had not been established, by the supplier. The agreement of our predictions with the experimental results is good. (author)

  11. Control rod position and temperature coefficients in HTTR power-rise tests. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Nojiri, Naoki; Takada, Eiji; Saito, Kenji; Kobayashi, Shoichi; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Kokusen, Sigeru

    2001-03-01

    Power-rise tests of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) have been carried out aiming to achieve 100% power. So far, 50% of power operation and many tests have been carried out. In the HTTR, temperature change in core is so large to achieve the outlet coolant temperature of 950degC. To improve the calculation accuracy of the HTTR reactor physics characteristics, control rod positions at criticality and temperature coefficients were measured at each step to achieve 50% power level. The calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo code and diffusion theory with temperature distributions in the core obtained by reciprocal calculation of thermo-hydraulic code and diffusion theory. Control rod positions and temperature coefficients were calculated by diffusion theory and Monte Carlo method. The test results were compared to calculation results. The control rod positions at criticality showed good agreement with calculation results by Monte Carlo method with error of 50 mm. The control position at criticality at 100% was predicted around 2900mm. Temperature coefficients showed good agreement with calculation results by diffusion theory. The improvement of calculation will be carried out comparing the measured results up to 100% power level. (author)

  12. Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Understand Mechanical Response of Thaumasite under Temperature and Strain Rate Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajilar, Shahin; Shafei, Behrouz; Cheng, Tao; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres

    2017-06-22

    Understanding the structural, thermal, and mechanical properties of thaumasite is of great interest to the cement industry, mainly because it is the phase responsible for the aging and deterioration of civil infrastructures made of cementitious materials attacked by external sources of sulfate. Despite the importance, effects of temperature and strain rate on the mechanical response of thaumasite had remained unexplored prior to the current study, in which the mechanical properties of thaumasite are fully characterized using the reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) method. With employing a first-principles based reactive force field, the RMD simulations enable the description of bond dissociation and formation under realistic conditions. From the stress-strain curves of thaumasite generated in the x, y, and z directions, the tensile strength, Young's modulus, and fracture strain are determined for the three orthogonal directions. During the course of each simulation, the chemical bonds undergoing tensile deformations are monitored to reveal the bonds responsible for the mechanical strength of thaumasite. The temperature increase is found to accelerate the bond breaking rate and consequently the degradation of mechanical properties of thaumasite, while the strain rate only leads to a slight enhancement of them for the ranges considered in this study.

  13. Control Rod Driveline Reactivity Feedback Model for Liquid Metal Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Young-Min; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Chang, Won-Pyo; Cho, Chung-Ho; Lee, Yong-Bum

    2008-01-01

    The thermal expansion of the control rod drivelines (CRDL) is one important passive mitigator under all unprotected accident conditions in the metal and oxide cores. When the CRDL are washed by hot sodium in the coolant outlet plenum, the CRDL thermally expands and causes the control rods to be inserted further down into the active core region, providing a negative reactivity feedback. Since the control rods are attached to the top of the vessel head and the core attaches to the bottom of the reactor vessel (RV), the expansion of the vessel wall as it heats will either lower the core or raise the control rods supports. This contrary thermal expansion of the reactor vessel wall pulls the control rods out of the core somewhat, providing a positive reactivity feedback. However this is not a safety factor early in a transient because its time constant is relatively large. The total elongated length is calculated by subtracting the vessel expansion from the CRDL expansion to determine the net control rod expansion into the core. The system-wide safety analysis code SSC-K includes the CRDL/RV reactivity feedback model in which control rod and vessel expansions are calculated using single-nod temperatures for the vessel and CRDL masses. The KALIMER design has the upper internal structures (UIS) in which the CRDLs are positioned outside the structure where they are exposed to the mixed sodium temperature exiting the core. A new method to determine the CRDL expansion is suggested. Two dimensional hot pool thermal hydraulic model (HP2D) originally developed for the analysis of the stratification phenomena in the hot pool is utilized for a detailed heat transfer between the CRDL mass and the hot pool coolant. However, the reactor vessel wall temperature is still calculated by a simple lumped model

  14. Insertion material for controlling reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Iwao.

    1994-01-01

    Moderators and a group of suspended materials having substantially the same density as the moderator are sealed in a hollow rod vertically inserted to a fuel assembly. Specifically, the group of suspended materials is adapted to have a density changing stepwise from density of the moderator at the exit temperature of the reactor core to that at the inlet temperature of the reactor core. Reactivity is selectively controlled for a portion of high power and a portion of high reactivity by utilizing the density of the moderator and the distribution of the density. That is, if the power distribution is flat, the density of the moderators changes at a constant rate over the vertical direction of the reactor core and the suspended materials stay at a portion of the same density, to form a uniform distribution. Further, upon reactor shutdown, since the liquid temperature of the moderators is lowered and the density is increased, all of beads are collected at the upper portion to remove water at the upper portion of the reactor core of low burnup degree thereby selectively controlling the reactivity at a portion of high power and a portion of high reactivity. (N.H.)

  15. Reactivity costs in MARIA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcinkowska, Zuzanna E.; Pytel, Krzysztof M.; Frydrysiak, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The methodology for calculating consumed fuel cost of excess reactivity is proposed. • Correlation between time integral of the core excess reactivity and released energy. • Reactivity price gives number of fuel elements required for given excess reactivity. - Abstract: For the reactor operation at high power level and carrying out experiments and irradiations the major cost of reactor operation is the expense of nuclear fuel. In this paper the methodology for calculating consumed fuel cost-relatedness of excess reactivity is proposed. Reactivity costs have been determined on the basis of operating data. A number of examples of calculating the reactivity costs for processes such as: strong absorbing material irradiation, molybdenium-99 production, beryllium matrix poisoning and increased moderator temperature illustrates proposed method.

  16. Substrate temperature effects on reactively sputtered Cr2O3/n-Si heterojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocak, Yusuf Selim; Genisel, Mustafa Fatih; Issa, Ali Ahmed; Tombak, Ahmet; Kilicoglu, Tahsin

    2016-01-01

    To see the effects of substrate temperature on Cr 2 O 3 /n-Si heterojunctions, Cr 2 O 3 thin films were formed on n-Si and glass substrates at 40, 150 and 250 °C by radio frequency (RF) reactive sputtering technique. High purity Cr was used as target and oxygen was used as reactive gas. Optical properties of Cr 2 O 3 /n-Si thin films were analyzed using UV-vis data. The band gaps of the films were compared. The electrical properties of Cr 2 O 3 /n-Si heterojunction were tested by their current voltage ( I-V ) measurements in dark. It was observed that the heterojunction which was fabricated by forming Cr 2 O 3 thin film at 250 °C gave better rectification. The characteristic electrical parameters such as barrier height, ideality factor and series resistance were calculated by using its I-V data. The influence of light intensity on photovoltaic effect behavior of the device was also calculated, finally the barrier height value of the structure obtained from capacitance-voltage ( C-V ) data were compared with the one calculated from I-V measurements. (paper)

  17. Treating water-reactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Some compounds and elements, such as lithium hydride, magnesium, sodium, and calcium react violently with water to generate much heat and produce hydrogen. The hydrogen can ignite or even form an explosive mixture with air. Other metals may react rapidly only if they are finely divided. Some of the waste produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory includes these metals that are contaminated with radioactivity. By far the greatest volume of water-reactive waste is lithium hydride contaminated with depleted uranium. Reactivity of the water-reactive wastes is neutralized with an atmosphere of humid nitrogen, which prevents the formation of an explosive mixture of hydrogen and air. When we adjust the temperature of the nitrogen and the humidifier, the nitrogen can be more or less humid, and the rate of reaction can be adjusted and controlled. Los Alamos has investigated the rates of reaction of lithium hydride as a function of the temperature and humidity, and, as anticipated, they in with in temperature and humidity. Los Alamos will investigate other variables. For example, the nitrogen flow will be optimized to conserve nitrogen and yet keep the reaction rates high. Reaction rates will be determined for various forms of lithium waste, from small chips to powder. Bench work will lead to the design of a skid-mounted process for treating wastes. Other water-reactive wastes will also be investigated

  18. Fuel element reactivity worth in different rings of the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes do Prado Souza, Rose Mary

    2008-10-29

    The thermal power of the IPR-R1 TRIGA Reactor will be upgraded from 100 kW to 250 kW. Starting core: loaded with 59 aluminum cladded fuel elements; 1.34 $ excess reactivity; and 100 kW power. It is planned to go 2.5 times the power licensed, i.e., 250 kW. This forces to enlarge the reactivity level. Nuclear reactors must have sufficient excess reactivity to compensate the negative reactivity feedback effects caused by: the fuel temperature, fuel burnup, fission poisoning production, and to allow full power operation for predetermined period of time. To provide information for the calculation of the new core arrangement, the reactivity worth of some fuel elements in the core were measured as well as the determination of the core reactivity increase in the substitution of the original fuels, cladded with aluminium, for new ones, cladded with stainless steel. The reactivity worth of fuel element was measured from the difference in critical position of the control rods, calibrated by the positive period method, before and after the fuel element was withdrawn from the core. The magnitude of reactivity increase was determined when withdrawing the original Al-clad fuel (a little burned up) and the graphite elements, and inserting a fresh Al-clad fuel element, one by one. Experimental results indicated that to obtain enough reactivity excess to increase the rector power the addition of 4 new fuel elements in the core would be sufficient: - Substitution of 4 Al-clad fuel elements in ring C for fresh stainless steel clad fuel elements; - increase the reactivity {approx_equal} 4 x 6.5 = 26 cents; - The removed 4 Al-clad F. E. (a little burned up) put in the core periphery, ring F, replacing graphite elements; - add < 4 x 39 156 cents (39 cents was measured with a fresh F.E.). Neutron source was changed from position F7 to F8. Control and Safety rods were moved from ring D to C in order to increase their reactivity worth. Regulating rod was kept at the same position, F16. Four

  19. Study of the controllable reactivity of aluminum alloys and their promising application for hydrogen generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Meiqiang; Sun Lixian; Xu Fen

    2010-01-01

    The hydrolysis performances of two aluminum alloys are investigated as their reactivity can be controlled via the different additives. The additive of NaCl has the positive effect to improve the hydrolysis properties of the aluminum alloys with quicker hydrolysis kinetic and lower hydrolysis temperature. For examples, in 6 min of hydrolysis reaction, the Al-5 wt%Hg-5 wt%NaCl can produce 971 mL g -1 hydrogen, higher than 917 mL g -1 hydrogen from Al-10 wt%Hg alloy. The Al-In-NaCl alloy has lower hydrolysis temperature about 10 K than that of Al-In alloy. Meanwhile, the reactivity of Al alloys can be improved or reduced via the additive metals. It can be found that the additive cadmium can reduce the reactivity of Al-Hg alloy. The Al-Hg-Cd alloys can keep good stability at the moist atmosphere below 343 K and have excellent hydrolysis performance around 343-373 K. The debased reactivity of Al-Hg-Cd composite comes from the formation of CdHg 2 compounds in the milling process. But the additive Zn and Ga doped into the Al-In-NaCl alloys can quickly increase the reactivity of the alloy which can quickly react with water at room temperature and have high hydrogen yield up to the theoretic value. Therefore, it is a promising possibility that the controllable reactivity of aluminum alloys can be obtained through the different additive according to the practical request, and the Al alloys can produce pure hydrogen for the fuel cell via the hydrolysis reaction.

  20. Magnitude and reactivity consequences of moisture ingress into the modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, O.L.

    1992-12-01

    Inadvertent admission of moisture into the primary system of a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor has been identified in US Department of Energy-sponsored studies as an important safety concern. The work described here develops an analytical methodology to quantify the pressure and reactivity consequences of steam-generator tube rupture and other moisture-ingress-related incidents. Important neutronic and thermohydraulic processes are coupled with reactivity feedback and safety and control system responses. The rate and magnitude of steam buildup are found to be dominated by major system features such as break size compared with safety valve capacity and reliability and less sensitive to factors such as heat transfer coefficients. The results indicate that ingress transients progress at a slower pace than previously predicted by bounding analyses, with milder power overshoots and more time for operator or automatic corrective actions

  1. Electrocortical reactivity to negative and positive facial expressions in individuals with a family history of major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Anna J; Harris, Anthony W F; Williams, Leanne M

    2018-05-21

    Facial expressions signaling threat and mood-congruent loss have been used to probe abnormal neural reactivity in major depressive disorder (MDD) and may be implicated in genetic vulnerability to MDD. This study investigated electro-cortical reactivity to facial expressions 101 unaffected, adult first degree relatives of probands with MDD and non-relative controls (n = 101). We investigated event-related potentials (ERPs) to five facial expressions of basic emotion: fear, anger, disgust, sadness and happiness under both subliminal (masked) and conscious (unmasked) presentation conditions, and the source localization of group differences. In the conscious condition, controls showed a distinctly positive-going shift in responsive to negative versus happy faces, reflected in a greater positivity for the VPP frontally and the P300 parietally, and less negativity for the N200. By contrast, relatives showed less differentiation of emotions, reflected in less VPP and P300 positivity, particularly for anger and disgust, and which produced an enhanced N200 for sadness. These group differences were consistently source localized to the anterior cingulate cortex. The findings contribute new evidence for neural disruptions underlying the differentiation of salient emotions in familial risk for depression. These disruptions occur in the appraisal (∼200 ms post-stimulus) through to the context evaluation (∼300 ms+ post-stimulus) phases of of emotion processing, consistent with theories that risk for depression involves biased or attenuated processing of emotion. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. LFR safety features through intrinsic negative reactivity feedbacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, Giacomo

    2012-01-01

    The safety of Lead-cooled Fast Reactors can rely on intrinsic features such as: • the impossibility of Lead boiling, hence the unreliability of core (only) voiding; • the buoyancy of Control Rods in Lead, allowing their safe positioning also below the active region. For heightening the safety features of LFRs in safety analyses it could be required to approach the evaluation of the reactivity coefficients from a more physical point of view, including more elementary mechanisms, each one related to the proper driving temperature

  3. Method of controlling reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochihara, Hiroshi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reactivity controlling characteristics by artificially controlling the leakage of neutron from a reactor and providing a controller for controlling the reactivity. Method: A reactor core is divided into several water gaps to increase the leakage of neutron, its reactivity is reduced, a gas-filled control rod or a fuel assembly is inserted into the gap as required, the entire core is coupled in a system to reduce the leakage of the neutron, and the reactivity is increased. The reactor shutdown is conducted by the conventional control rod, and to maintain critical state, boron density varying system is used together. Futher, a control rod drive is used with that similar to the conventional one, thereby enabling fast reactivity variation, and the positive reactivity can be obtained by the insertion, thereby improving the reactivity controlling characteristics. (Yoshihara, H.)

  4. On a closed form solution of the point kinetics equations with reactivity feedback of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jeronimo J.A.; Vilhena, Marco T.M.B.; Petersen, Claudio Z.; Bodmann, Bardo E.J.; Alvim, Antonio C.M.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical solution of the point kinetics equations to calculate reactivity as a function of time by the Decomposition method has recently appeared in the literature. In this paper, we go one step forward, by considering the neutron point kinetics equations together with temperature feedback effects. To accomplish that, we extended the point kinetics by a temperature perturbation, obtaining a second order nonlinear ordinary differential equation. This equation is then solved by the Decomposition Method, that is, by expanding the neutron density in a series and the nonlinear terms into Adomian Polynomials. Substituting these expansions into the nonlinear ordinary equation, we construct a recursive set of linear problems that can be solved by the methodology previously mentioned for the point kinetics equation. We also report on numerical simulations and comparisons against literature results. (author)

  5. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  6. Hepatitis B virus reactivation during immunosuppressive therapy: Appropriate risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Wai-Kay

    2015-04-28

    Our understanding of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation during immunosuppresive therapy has increased remarkably during recent years. HBV reactivation in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive individuals has been well-described in certain immunosuppressive regimens, including therapies containing corticosteroids, anthracyclines, rituximab, antibody to tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HBV reactivation could also occur in HBsAg-negative, antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) positive individuals during therapies containing rituximab, anti-TNF or HSCT.For HBsAg-positive patients, prophylactic antiviral therapy is proven to the effective in preventing HBV reactivation. Recent evidence also demonstrated entecavir to be more effective than lamivudine in this aspect. For HBsAg-negative, anti-HBc positive individuals, the risk of reactivations differs with the type of immunosuppression. For rituximab, a prospective study demonstrated the 2-year cumulative risk of reactivation to be 41.5%, but prospective data is still lacking for other immunosupressive regimes. The optimal management in preventing HBV reactivation would involve appropriate risk stratification for different immunosuppressive regimes in both HBsAg-positive and HBsAg-negative, anti-HBc positive individuals.

  7. Curious Case of Positive Current Collectors: Corrosion and Passivation at High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Farheen N; Rodrigues, Marco-Tulio F; Kalaga, Kaushik; Gullapalli, Hemtej; Ajayan, P M

    2017-12-20

    In the evaluation of compatibility of different components of cell for high-energy and extreme-conditions applications, the highly focused are positive and negative electrodes and their interaction with electrolyte. However, for high-temperature application, the other components are also of significant influence and contribute toward the total health of battery. In present study, we have investigated the behavior of aluminum, the most common current collector for positive electrode materials for its electrochemical and temperature stability. For electrochemical stability, different electrolytes, organic and room temperature ionic liquids with varying Li salts (LiTFSI, LiFSI), are investigated. The combination of electrochemical and spectroscopic investigations reflects the varying mechanism of passivation at room and high temperature, as different compositions of decomposed complexes are found at the surface of metals.

  8. SMART core power control method by coolant temperature variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chung Chan; Cho, Byung Oh

    2001-08-01

    SMART is a soluble boron-free integral type pressurized water reactor. Its moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) is strongly negative throughout the cycle. The purpose of this report is how to utilize the primary coolant temperature as a second reactivity control system using the strong negative MTC. The reactivity components associated with reactor power change are Doppler reactivity due to fuel temperature change, moderator temperature reactivity and xenon reactivity. Doppler reactivity and moderator temperature reactivity take effects almost as soon as reactor power changes. On the other hand, xenon reactivity change takes more than several hours to reach an equilibrium state. Therefore, coolant temperature at equilibrium state is chosen as the reference temperature. The power dependent reference temperature line is limited above 50% power not to affect adversely in reactor safety. To compensate transient xenon reactivity, coolant temperature operating range is expanded. The suggested coolant temperature operation range requires minimum control rod motion for 50% power change. For smaller power changes such as 25% power change, it is not necessary to move control rods to assure that fuel design limits are not exceeded

  9. High temperature reactive ion etching of iridium thin films with aluminum mask in CF4/O2/Ar plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Pin Yeh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Reactive ion etching (RIE technology for iridium with CF4/O2/Ar gas mixtures and aluminum mask at high temperatures up to 350 °C was developed. The influence of various process parameters such as gas mixing ratio and substrate temperature on the etch rate was studied in order to find optimal process conditions. The surface of the samples after etching was found to be clean under SEM inspection. It was also shown that the etch rate of iridium could be enhanced at higher process temperature and, at the same time, very high etching selectivity between aluminum etching mask and iridium could be achieved.

  10. Development of a standard for calculation and measurement of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in water-moderated power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, R.D.; Hall, R.A.; Lancaster, D.B.; Young, E.H.; Gavin, P.H.; Robertson, S.T.

    1998-01-01

    The contents of ANS 19.11, the standard for ''Calculation and Measurement of the Moderator Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity in Water-Moderated Power Reactors,'' are described. The standard addresses the calculation of the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) both at standby conditions and at power. In addition, it describes several methods for the measurement of the at-power MTC and assesses their relative advantages and disadvantages. Finally, it specifies a minimum set of documentation requirements for compliance with the standard

  11. MTR fuel element burn-up measurements by the reactivity method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga, A.; Cuya, T.R.; Ravnik, M.

    2003-01-01

    Fuel element burn-up was measured by the reactivity method in the 10 MW Peruvian MTR reactor RP-10. The main purpose of the experiment was testing the reactivity method for an MTR reactor as the reactivity method was originally developed for TRIGA reactors. The reactivity worth of each measured fuel element was measured in its original core position in order to measure the burn-up of the fuel elements that were part of the experimental core. The burn-up of each measured fuel element was derived by interpolating its reactivity worth from the reactivity worth of two reference fuel elements of known burn-up, whose reactivity worth was measured in the position of the measured fuel element. The accuracy of the method was improved by separating the reactivity effect of burn-up from the effect of the position in the core. The results of the experiment showed that the modified reactivity method for fuel element burn-up determination could be applied also to MTR reactors. (orig.)

  12. Magnitude and reactivity consequences of accidental moisture ingress into the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, O.L.

    1992-01-01

    Accidental admission of moisture into the primary system of a Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) has been identified in US Department of Energy-sponsored studies as an important safety concern. The work described here develops an analytical methodology to quantify the pressure and reactivity consequences of steam-generator tube rupture and other moistureingress-related incidents. Important neutronic and thermohydraulic processes are coupled with reactivity feedback and safety and control system responses. Rate and magnitude of steam buildup are found to be dominated by major system features such as break size in comparison with safety valve capacity and reliability, while being less sensitive to factors such as heat transfer coefficients. The results indicate that ingress transients progress at a slower pace than previously predicted by bounding analyses, with milder power overshoots and more time for operator or automatic corrective actions

  13. Effect of the polymerization with formaldehyde on the thermal reactivity of a low-temperature coal tar pitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jose L. Crespo; Ana Arenillas; Jose A. Vin; Roberto Garcia; Colin E. Snape; Sabino R. Moinelo [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (CSIC), Oviedo (Spain)

    2005-04-01

    The influence of polymerization with formaldehyde on the thermal reactivity of a low-temperature coal tar pitch has been investigated. The mechanism and extent of the polymerization depends on the catalyst used, the greatest extent of polymerization being achieved under basic catalytic conditions. After the polymerization treatment, samples were carbonized at 420{sup o}C and the products were characterized by optical microscopy. According to the results, polymerization with formaldehyde increases the reactivity of the pitch, giving rise to increased carbonization yields and leading to the formation of the mesophase with milder conditions. The polymerization process also affects the morphology of the resultant anisotropic material, giving rise to the formation of irregularly shaped mesophase particles and reducing the optical texture size of the anisotropic domains, giving mosaic texture, especially when basic catalysis is used. 36 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Ceramic/Metal Composites with Positive Temperature Dependence of Thermal Conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianhui; Yu Qi; Sun Wei; Zhang Rui; Wang Ke; Li Jingfeng; Ichigozaki, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Most materials show decreasing thermal conductivity with increasing temperature, but an opposite temperature dependence of thermal conductivity is required for some industrial applications. The present work was conducted with a motivation to develop composite materials with a positive temperature dependence of thermal conductivity. ZrO 2 / stainless steel powders (304L) composite, with 3% stearic acid, was prepared by normal sintering under the protecting of Ar after mixing by mechanical ball milling technique. With the 304L content increasing from 10% to 20%, the thermal conductivity values increased. For all samples, the thermal conductivity in the temperature range of room temperature to 700 °C decreased with temperature below 300 °C, and then began to increase. The increasing thermal conductivity of the composites (within the high temperature range was attributed to the difference of the thermal conductivity and thermal expansion coefficient between ZrO 2 ceramic and 304L stainless steel powders. Two simple models were also used to estimate the thermal conductivity of the composites, which were in good agreement with the experiment results.

  15. Examination of Alzheimer’s-related positive, negative and reactive pathology in the brainstem of APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metaxas, Athanasios; Vaitheeswaran, Ramanan; Ilkjær, Laura

    Aim: While the positive, negative and reactive lesions of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have been extensively characterised in brain areas associated with cognition, such as the cortex and the hippocampus, the status of subcortical structures in AD remains less well characterised. In the present study...

  16. Two Proposals for determination of large reactivity of reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko; Nagao, Yoshiharu; Yamane, Tsuyoshi; Takeuchi, Mituo

    1999-01-01

    Two Proposals for determination of large reactivity of reactors are presented. One is for large positive reactivity. The other is for large negative reactivity. Existing experimental methods for determination of large positive reactivity, the fuel addition method and the neutron adsorption substitution method were analyzed. It is found that both the experimental methods are possibly affected to the substantially large systematic error up to ∼ 20%, when the value of the excess multiplication factor comes into the range close to ∼20%Δk. To cope with this difficulty, a revised method is validly proposed. The revised method evaluates the value of the potential excess multiplication factor as the consecutive increments of the effective multiplication factor in a virtual core, which are converted from those in an actual core by multiplying a conversion factor f to it. The conversion factor f is to be obtained in principle by calculation. Numerical experiments were done on a slab reactor using one group diffusion model. The rod drop experimental method is widely used for determination of large negative negative reactivity values. The decay of the neutron density followed by initiating the insertion of the rod is obliged to be slowed down according to its speed. It is proved by analysis based on the one point reactor kinetics that in such a case the integral counting method hitherto used tend to significantly underestimate the absolute values of negative reactivity, even if the insertion time is in the range of 1-2 s. As for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), the insertion time will be lengthened up to 4-6 s. In order to overcome the difficulty , the delayed integral counting method is proposed, in which the integration of neutron counting starts after the rod drop has been completed and the counts before is evaluated by calculation using one point reactor kinetics. This is because the influence of the insertion time on the decay of the neutron

  17. Reuse of waste beer yeast sludge for biosorptive decolorization of reactive blue 49 from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baoe; Guo, Xiu

    2011-06-01

    Reactive blue 49 was removed from aqueous solution by biosorption using powder waste sludge composed of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from the beer-brewing industry. The effect of initial pH, temperature and the biosorption thermodynamics, equilibrium, kinetics was investigated in this study. It was found that the biosorption capacity was at maximum at initial pH 3, that the effect of temperature on biosorption of reactive blue 49 was only slight in relation to the large biosorption capacity (25°C, 361 mg g(-1)) according as the biosorption capacity decreased only 43 mg g(-1) at the temperature increased from 25 to 50°C. The biosorption was spontaneous, exothermic in nature and the dye molecules movements decreased slightly in random at the solid/liquid interface during the biosorption of dye on biosorbents. The biosorption equilibrium data could be described by Freundich isotherm model. The biosorption rates were found to be consistent with a pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The functional group interaction analysis between waste beer yeast sludge and reactive blue 49 by the aid of Fourier transform infrared (abbr. FTIR) spectroscopy indicated that amino components involved in protein participated in the biosorption process, which may be achieved by the mutual electrostatic adsorption process between the positively charged amino groups in waste beer yeast sludge with negatively charged sulfonic groups in reactive blue 49.

  18. Reactivity estimation during a reactivity-initiated accident using the extended Kalman filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busquim e Silva, R.; Marques, A.L.F.; Cruz, J.J.; Shirvan, K.; Kazimi, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The EKF is modeled using sophisticate strategies to make the algorithm robust and accurate. • For a supercritical reactor under RIA, the EKF presents better results compared to IPK method independent of magnitude of the noise loads. • A sensitivity for five distinct carry-over effects indicates that the EKF is less sensitive to the different set of noise. • Although the P3D/R5 simulates the reactivity using a spatial kinetics method, the use of PKRE to model the EKF provides accurate results. • The reactivity’s standard deviation is higher for the IKF method. • Under HZP (slow power response) the IPK reactivity varies widely from positive to negative values (add extra difficulty to controlling the supercritical reactor): the EKF method does not have similar behavior under the same conditions (better controlling the operation). - Abstract: This study implements the extended Kalman filter (EKF) to estimate the nuclear reactor reactivity behavior under a reactivity-initiated accident (RIA). A coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics code PARCS/RELAP5 (P3D/R5) simulates a control rod assembly ejection (CRE) on a traditional 2272 MWt PWR to generate the reactor power profile. A MATLAB script adds random noise to the simulated reactor power. For comparison, the inverse point kinetics (IPK) deterministic method is also implemented. Three different cases of CRE are simulated and the EKF, IPK and the P3D/R5 reactivity are compared. It was found that the EKF method presents better results compared to the IPK method. Furthermore, under a RIA due to small reactivity insertion and slow power response, the IPK reactivity varies widely from positive to negative, which may add extra difficulty to the task of controlling a supercritical reactor. This feature is also confirmed by a sensitivity analysis for five different noise loads and three distinct noise measurements standard deviations (SD)

  19. Digital reactivity meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copie, M.; Valantic, B.

    1978-01-01

    Digital reactivity meters (DRM) are mostly used as measuring instruments, e.g. for calibration of control rods, and there are only a few cases of their incorporation into the control systems of the reactors. To move in this direction there is more development work needed. First of all, fast algorithms are needed for inverse kinetics equations to relieve the computer for more important tasks of reactor model solving in real time. The next problem, currently under investigation, is the incorporation of the reactor thermal-hydraulic model into the DRM so that it can be used in the power range. Such an extension of DHM allows presentation not only of the instantaneous reactivity of the system, but also the inserted reactivity can be estimated from the temperature reactivity feed-backs. One of the applications of this concept is the anomalous digital reactivity monitor (ADRN) as part of the reactor protection system. As a solution of the first problem, a fast algorithm for solving the inverse kinetics equations has been implemented in the off-line program RODCAL on CDC 1700 computer and tested for its accuracy by performing different control rod calibrations on the reactor TRIGA

  20. Effects of substrate temperature, substrate orientation, and energetic atomic collisions on the structure of GaN films grown by reactive sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiaber, Ziani S.; Lisboa-Filho, Paulo N.; Silva, José H. D. da [Universidade Estadual Paulista, UNESP, Bauru, São Paulo 17033-360 (Brazil); Leite, Douglas M. G. [Universidade Federal de Itajubá, UNIFEI, Itajubá, Minas Gerais 37500-903 (Brazil); Bortoleto, José R. R. [Universidade Estadual Paulista, UNESP, Sorocaba, São Paulo 18087-180 (Brazil)

    2013-11-14

    The combined effects of substrate temperature, substrate orientation, and energetic particle impingement on the structure of GaN films grown by reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering are investigated. Monte-Carlo based simulations are employed to analyze the energies of the species generated in the plasma and colliding with the growing surface. Polycrystalline films grown at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1000 °C clearly showed a dependence of orientation texture and surface morphology on substrate orientation (c- and a-plane sapphire) in which the (0001) GaN planes were parallel to the substrate surface. A large increase in interplanar spacing associated with the increase in both a- and c-parameters of the hexagonal lattice and a redshift of the optical bandgap were observed at substrate temperatures higher than 600 °C. The results showed that the tensile stresses produced during the film's growth in high-temperature deposition ranges were much larger than the expected compressive stresses caused by the difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of the film and substrate in the cool-down process after the film growth. The best films were deposited at 500 °C, 30 W and 600 °C, 45 W, which corresponds to conditions where the out diffusion from the film is low. Under these conditions the benefits of the temperature increase because of the decrease in defect density are greater than the problems caused by the strongly strained lattice that occurr at higher temperatures. The results are useful to the analysis of the growth conditions of GaN films by reactive sputtering.

  1. Oxygen diffusion and reactivity at low temperature on bare amorphous olivine-type silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minissale, M., E-mail: marco.minissale@obspm.fr; Congiu, E.; Dulieu, F. [LERMA-LAMAp, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, Observatoire de Paris, ENS, UPMC, UMR 8112 du CNRS, 5 Mail Gay Lussac, 95000 Cergy Pontoise Cedex (France)

    2014-02-21

    The mobility of O atoms at very low temperatures is not generally taken into account, despite O diffusion would add to a series of processes leading to the observed rich molecular diversity in space. We present a study of the mobility and reactivity of O atoms on an amorphous silicate surface. Our results are in the form of reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption spectra of O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} produced via two pathways: O + O and O{sub 2} + O, investigated in a submonolayer regime and in the range of temperature between 6.5 and 30 K. All the experiments show that ozone is formed efficiently on silicate at any surface temperature between 6.5 and 30 K. The derived upper limit for the activation barriers of O + O and O{sub 2} + O reactions is ∼150 K/k{sub b}. Ozone formation at low temperatures indicates that fast diffusion of O atoms is at play even at 6.5 K. Through a series of rate equations included in our model, we also address the reaction mechanisms and show that neither the Eley–Rideal nor the hot atom mechanisms alone can explain the experimental values. The rate of diffusion of O atoms, based on modeling results, is much higher than the one generally expected, and the diffusive process proceeds via the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism enhanced by tunnelling. In fact, quantum effects turn out to be a key factor that cannot be neglected in our simulations. Astrophysically, efficient O{sub 3} formation on interstellar dust grains would imply the presence of huge reservoirs of oxygen atoms. Since O{sub 3} is a reservoir of elementary oxygen, and also of OH via its hydrogenation, it could explain the observed concomitance of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O in the ices.

  2. Studies on preparation and adaptive thermal control performance of novel PTC (positive temperature coefficient) materials with controllable Curie temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-long; Yuan, Shuai; Song, Jia-liang

    2014-01-01

    PTC (positive temperature coefficient) material is a kind of thermo-sensitive material. In this study, a series of novel PTC materials adapted to thermal control of electron devices are prepared. By adding different low-melting-point blend matrixes into GP (graphite powder)/LDPE (low density polyethylene) composite, the Curie temperatures are adjusted to 9 °C, 25 °C, 34 °C and 41 °C, and the resistance–temperature coefficients are enhanced to 1.57/°C–2.15/°C. These PTC materials remain solid in the temperature region of PTC effect, which makes it possible to be used as heating element to achieve adaptive temperature control. In addition, the adaptive thermal control performances of this kind of materials are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The result shows that the adaptive effect becomes more significant while the resistance–temperature coefficient increases. A critical heating power defined as the initial heating power which makes the equilibrium temperature reach terminal temperature is presented. The adaptive temperature control will be effective only if the initial power is below this value. The critical heating power is determined by the Curie temperature and resistance–temperature coefficient of PTC materials, and a higher Curie temperature or resistance–temperature coefficient will lead to a larger critical heating power. - Highlights: • A series of novel PTC (positive temperature coefficient) materials were prepared. • The Curie point of PTC material can be adjusted by choosing different blend matrixes. • The resistance–temperature coefficient of PTC materials is enhanced to 2.15/°C. • The material has good adaptive temperature control ability with no auxiliary method. • A mathematical model is established to analyze the performance and applicability

  3. Mechanical properties of steel fiber reinforced reactive powder concrete following exposure to high temperature reaching 800 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, Yuh-Shiou, E-mail: ystai@cc.cma.edu.tw [Department of Civil Engineering, ROC Military Academy, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Pan, Huang-Hsing; Kung, Ying-Nien [Department of Civil Engineering, Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > The stress-strain relation of reactive powder concrete after exposure to high temperatures are tested by using displacement control. > Develops regression formulae to estimate the mechanical properties of RPC. > Valuable experimental data have been obtained about RPC with various fiber contents. These data include compressive strength, peak strain and modulus of elasticity. - Abstract: This study investigates the stress-strain relation of RPC in quasi-static loading after an elevated temperature. The cylinder specimens of RPC with {phi} 50 mm x 100 mm are examined at the room temperature and after 200-800 deg. C. Experimental results indicate that the residual compressive strength of RPC after heating from 200-300 deg. C increases more than that at room temperature, but, significantly decreases when the temperature exceeds 300 deg. C. The residual peak strains of RPC also initially increase up to 400-500 deg. C, then decrease gradually beyond 500 deg. C. Meanwhile, Young's modulus diminishes with an increasing temperature. Based on the regression analysis results, this study also develops regression formulae to estimate the mechanical properties of RPC after an elevated temperature, thus providing a valuable reference for industrial applications and design.

  4. Reactivity to sorbitan sesquioleate affects reactivity to fragrance mix I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Johannes; Schnuch, Axel; Lessmann, Holger; Uter, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Fragrance mix I (FM I) and its single constituents contain 5% and 1% sorbitan sesquioleate (SSO), respectively. SSO is a rare sensitizer and a potential irritant. To determine whether the outcome of the FM I breakdown test is affected by positive patch test reactivity to SSO. A retrospective analysis of data from the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology, 1998-2013, was performed. The full FM I breakdown test including SSO was tested in 2952 patients. Of these, 154 (5.2%) had a positive patch test reaction to SSO 20% pet. and 2709 (91.8%) had a negative patch test reaction. Positive reactions to one or more of the single fragrances contained in the mix were significantly more common (82.5% versus 57.3%) in SSO-positive patients, who also had more multiple reactions than FM I-positive patients with negative SSO reactions (61.5% versus 21.3% patients with reactions to two or more fragrances). Our results indicate that reactivity to SSO markedly affects the outcome of patch testing with FM I and its single constituents. SSO must be an obligatory part of the full FM I breakdown test, and should ideally be included in the baseline series. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The reactive element effect of yttrium and yttrium silicon on high temperature oxidation of NiCrAl coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramandhany, S.; Sugiarti, E.; Desiati, R. D.; Martides, E.; Junianto, E.; Prawara, B.; Sukarto, A.; Tjahjono, A.

    2018-03-01

    The microstructure formed on the bond coat affects the oxidation resistance, particularly the formation of a protective oxide layer. The adhesion of bond coat and TGO increased significantly by addition of reactive element. In the present work, the effect of yttrium and yttrium silicon as reactive element (RE) on NiCrAl coating was investigated. The NiCrAl (without RE) and NiCrAlX (X:Y or YSi) bond coating were deposited on Hastelloy C-276 substrate by High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) method. Isothermal oxidation was carried out at 1000 °C for 100 hours. The results showed that the addition of RE could prevent the breakaway oxidation. Therefore, the coating with reactive element were more protective against high temperature oxidation. Furthermore, the oxidation rate of NiCrAlY coating was lower than NiCrAlYSi coating with the total mass change was ±2.394 mg/cm2 after 100 hours of oxidation. The thickness of oxide scale was approximately 1.18 μm consisting of duplex oxide scale of spinel NiCr2O4 in outer scale and protective α-Al2O3 in inner scale.

  6. Reactivity effect of spent fuel depending on burn-up history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takafumi; Suyama, Kenya; Nomura, Yasushi

    2001-06-01

    It is well known that a composition of spent fuel depends on various parameter changes throughout a burn-up period. In this study we aimed at the boron concentration and its change, the coolant temperature and its spatial distribution, the specific power, the operation mode, and the duration of inspection, because the effects due to these parameters have not been analyzed in detail. The composition changes of spent fuel were calculated by using the burn-up code SWAT, when the parameters mentioned above varied in the range of actual variations. Moreover, to estimate the reactivity effect caused by the composition changes, the criticality calculations for an infinite array of spent fuel were carried out with computer codes SRAC95 or MVP. In this report the reactivity effects were arranged from the viewpoint of what parameters gave more positive reactivity effect. The results obtained through this study are useful to choose the burn-up calculation model when we take account of the burn-up credit in the spent fuel management. (author)

  7. Amygdala reactivity to fearful faces correlates positively with impulsive aggression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Fisher, Patrick M; Hjordt, Liv V

    2018-01-01

    Facial expressions robustly activate the amygdala, a brain structure playing a critical role in aggression. Whereas previous studies suggest that amygdala reactivity is related to various measures of impulsive aggression, we here estimate a composite measure of impulsive aggression and evaluate...

  8. Consequences of the electronic tuning of latent ruthenium-based olefin metathesis catalysts on their reactivity

    KAUST Repository

    Żukowska, Karolina; Pump, Eva; Pazio, Aleksandra E; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Cavallo, Luigi; Slugovc, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Two ruthenium olefin metathesis initiators featuring electronically modified quinoline-based chelating carbene ligands are introduced. Their reactivity in RCM and ROMP reactions was tested and the results were compared to those obtained with the parent unsubstituted compound. The studied complexes are very stable at high temperatures up to 140 °C. The placement of an electron-withdrawing functionality translates into an enhanced activity in RCM. While electronically modified precatalysts, which exist predominantly in the trans-dichloro configuration, gave mostly the RCM and a minor amount of the cycloisomerization product, the unmodified congener, which preferentially exists as its cis-dichloro isomer, shows a switched reactivity. The position of the equilibrium between the cis- and the trans-dichloro species was found to be the crucial factor governing the reactivity of the complexes.

  9. Consequences of the electronic tuning of latent ruthenium-based olefin metathesis catalysts on their reactivity

    KAUST Repository

    Żukowska, Karolina

    2015-08-20

    Two ruthenium olefin metathesis initiators featuring electronically modified quinoline-based chelating carbene ligands are introduced. Their reactivity in RCM and ROMP reactions was tested and the results were compared to those obtained with the parent unsubstituted compound. The studied complexes are very stable at high temperatures up to 140 °C. The placement of an electron-withdrawing functionality translates into an enhanced activity in RCM. While electronically modified precatalysts, which exist predominantly in the trans-dichloro configuration, gave mostly the RCM and a minor amount of the cycloisomerization product, the unmodified congener, which preferentially exists as its cis-dichloro isomer, shows a switched reactivity. The position of the equilibrium between the cis- and the trans-dichloro species was found to be the crucial factor governing the reactivity of the complexes.

  10. Soot Reactivity in Conventional Combustion and Oxy-fuel Combustion Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abián, María; Jensen, Anker D.; Glarborg, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A study of the reactivity of soot produced from ethylene pyrolysis at different temperatures and CO2 atmospheres toward O2 and CO2 has been carried out using a thermogravimetric analyzer. The purpose was to quantify how soot reactivity is affected by the gas environment and temperature history of...

  11. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Per [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2015-02-09

    This report documents the work completed on the X-PREX facility under NEUP Project 11- 3172. This project seeks to demonstrate the viability of pebble fuel handling and reactivity control for fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs). The research results also improve the understanding of pebble motion in helium-cooled reactors, as well as the general, fundamental understanding of low-velocity granular flows. Successful use of pebble fuels in with salt coolants would bring major benefits for high-temperature reactor technology. Pebble fuels enable on-line refueling and operation with low excess reactivity, and thus simpler reactivity control and improved fuel utilization. If fixed fuel designs are used, the power density of salt- cooled reactors is limited to 10 MW/m3 to obtain adequate duration between refueling, but pebble fuels allow power densities in the range of 20 to 30 MW/m3. This can be compared to the typical modular helium reactor power density of 5 MW/m3. Pebble fuels also permit radial zoning in annular cores and use of thorium or graphite pebble blankets to reduce neutron fluences to outer radial reflectors and increase total power production. Combined with high power conversion efficiency, compact low-pressure primary and containment systems, and unique safety characteristics including very large thermal margins (>500°C) to fuel damage during transients and accidents, salt-cooled pebble fuel cores offer the potential to meet the major goals of the Advanced Reactor Concepts Development program to provide electricity at lower cost than light water reactors with improved safety and system performance.This report presents the facility description, experimental results, and supporting simulation methods of the new X-Ray Pebble Recirculation Experiment (X-PREX), which is now operational and being used to collect data on the behavior of slow dense granular flows relevant to pebble bed reactor core designs. The X

  12. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Per; Greenspan, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    This report documents the work completed on the X-PREX facility under NEUP Project 11- 3172. This project seeks to demonstrate the viability of pebble fuel handling and reactivity control for fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs). The research results also improve the understanding of pebble motion in helium-cooled reactors, as well as the general, fundamental understanding of low-velocity granular flows. Successful use of pebble fuels in with salt coolants would bring major benefits for high-temperature reactor technology. Pebble fuels enable on-line refueling and operation with low excess reactivity, and thus simpler reactivity control and improved fuel utilization. If fixed fuel designs are used, the power density of salt- cooled reactors is limited to 10 MW/m 3 to obtain adequate duration between refueling, but pebble fuels allow power densities in the range of 20 to 30 MW/m 3 . This can be compared to the typical modular helium reactor power density of 5 MW/m3. Pebble fuels also permit radial zoning in annular cores and use of thorium or graphite pebble blankets to reduce neutron fluences to outer radial reflectors and increase total power production. Combined with high power conversion efficiency, compact low-pressure primary and containment systems, and unique safety characteristics including very large thermal margins (>500°C) to fuel damage during transients and accidents, salt-cooled pebble fuel cores offer the potential to meet the major goals of the Advanced Reactor Concepts Development program to provide electricity at lower cost than light water reactors with improved safety and system performance.This report presents the facility description, experimental results, and supporting simulation methods of the new X-Ray Pebble Recirculation Experiment (X-PREX), which is now operational and being used to collect data on the behavior of slow dense granular flows relevant to pebble bed reactor core designs. The X-PREX facility uses novel

  13. Revised Mark 22 coolant temperature coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Coolant temperature coefficients for the Mark 22 charge published previously are non-conservative because of the neglect of a significant mechanism which has a positive contribution to reactivity. Even after correcting for this effect, dynamic tests made on a Mark VIB charge in the early 60's suggest the results are still non-conservative. This memorandum takes both of these sources of information into account in making a best estimate of the prompt (coolant plus metal) temperature coefficient. Although no safety issues arise from this work (the overall temperature coefficient still strongly contributes to reactor stability), it is obviously desirable to use best estimates for prompt coefficients in limits and other calculations

  14. Study on erbium loading method to improve reactivity coefficients for low radiotoxic spent fuel HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukaya, Y., E-mail: fukaya.yuji@jaea.go.jp; Goto, M.; Nishihara, T.

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • We attempted and optimized erbium loading methods to improve reactivity coefficients for LRSF-HTGR. • We elucidated the mechanism of the improvements for each erbium loading method by using the Bondarenko approach. • We concluded the erbium loading method by embedding into graphite shaft is preferable. - Abstract: Erbium loading methods are investigated to improve reactivity coefficients of Low Radiotoxic Spent Fuel High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (LRSF-HTGR). Highly enriched uranium is used for fuel to reduce the generation of toxicity from uranium-238. The power coefficients are positive without the use of any additive. Then, the erbium is loaded into the core to obtain negative reactivity coefficients owing to the large resonance the peak of neutron capture reaction of erbium-167. The loading methods are attempted to find the suitable method for LRSF-HTGR. The erbium is mixed in a CPF fuel kernel, loaded by binary packing with fuel particles and erbium particles, and embedded into the graphite shaft deployed in the center of the fuel compact. It is found that erbium loading causes negative reactivity as moderator temperature reactivity, and from the viewpoint of heat transfer, it should be loaded into fuel pin elements for pin-in-block type fuel. Moreover, the erbium should be incinerated slowly to obtain negative reactivity coefficients even at the End Of Cycle (EOC). A loading method that effectively causes self-shielding should be selected to avoid incineration with burn-up. The incineration mechanism is elucidated using the Bondarenko approach. As a result, it is concluded that erbium embedded into graphite shaft is preferable for LRSF-HTGR to ensure that the reactivity coefficients remain negative at EOC.

  15. Effects of several types of biomass fuels on the yield, nanostructure and reactivity of soot from fast pyrolysis at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the effect of biomass origin on the yield, nanostructure and reactivity of soot. Soot was produced from wood and herbaceous biomass pyrolysis at high heating rates and at temperatures of 1250 and 1400 °C in a drop tube furnace. The structure of solid residues was characterized...

  16. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2013-12-31

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  17. Chemical properties and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species quenching activities of dry sugar-amino acid maillard reaction mixtures exposed to baking temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiu-Min; Liang, Ningjian; Kitts, David D

    2015-10-01

    Maillard reaction products (MRPs) derived from 10 different, dry sugar-amino acid reaction model systems were examined for changes in color index (E), sugar loss, and formation of α-dicarbonyl compounds; the changes were correlated with relative activities to quench both reactive oxygen (ROS) and reactive nitrogen (RNS) species. Reducing sugars, xylose, ribose, fructose, glucose, and non-reducing sucrose were reacted with glycine (Xyl-Gly, Rib-Gly, Fru-Gly, Glc-Gly, and Suc-Gly), or lysine (Xyl-Lys, Rib-Lys, Fru-Lys, Glc-Lys, and Suc-Lys), respectively, at temperatures of 150°C and 180°C for time periods ranging from 5 to 60min. ROS quenching capacity was negatively correlated with color index (E) (r=-0.604, P<0.001), and positively correlated with sugar loss (r=0.567, P<0.001). MRPs also exhibited activity to quench RNS as assessed by nitric oxide (NO) inhibition in differentiated Caco-2 cells that were induced with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and phorbol ester (PMA) cocktail. We also showed a correlation between RNS and color index, sugar loss, and ROS quenching activities for MR mixtures that were heated for a short time (e.g. 10min) at 150°C. MRP quenching of ROS was largely influenced by sugar type, whereas, RNS quenching was dependent more so on the interaction between reactants and reaction conditions used to generate MRPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Temperature feedback of TRIGA MARK-II fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usang, M. D.; Minhat, M. S.; Rabir, M. H.; M. Rawi M., Z.

    2016-01-01

    We study the amount of temperature feedback on reactivity for the three types of TRIGA fuel i.. ST8, ST12 and LEU fuel, are used in the TRIGA MARK II reactor in Malaysia Nuclear Agency. We employ WIMSD-5B for the calculation of kin f for a single TRIGA fuel surrounded by water. Typical calculations of TRIGA fuel reactivity are usually limited to ST8 fuel, but in this paper our investigation extends to ST12 and LEU fuel. We look at the kin f of our model at various fuel temperatures and calculate the amount reactivity removed. In one instance, the water temperature is kept at room temperature of 300K to simulate sudden reactivity increase from startup. In another instance, we simulate the sudden temperature increase during normal operation where the water temperature is approximately 320K while observing the kin f at various fuel temperatures. For accidents, two cases are simulated. The first case is for water temperature at 370K and the other is without any water. We observe that the higher Uranium content fuel such as the ST12 and LEU have much smaller contribution to the reactivity in comparison to the often studied ST8 fuel. In fact the negative reactivity coefficient for LEU fuel at high temperature in water is only slightly larger to the negative reactivity coefficient for ST8 fuel in void. The performance of ST8 fuel in terms of negative reactivity coefficient is cut almost by half when it is in void. These results are essential in the safety evaluation of the reactor and should be carefully considered when choices of fuel for core reconfiguration are made.

  19. Research of three-dimensional transient reactivity feedback in fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Li; Shi Gong; Ma Dayuan; Yu Hong

    2013-01-01

    To solve the three-dimensional time-spatial kinetics feedback problems in fast reactor, a mathematical model of the direct reactivity feedback was proposed. Based on the NAS code for fast reactor and the reactivity feedback mechanism, a feedback model which combined the direct reactivity feedback and feedback reflected by the cross section variation was provided for the transient calculation. Furthermore, the fast reactor group collapsing system was added to the code, thus the real time group collapsing calculation could be realized. The isothermal elevated temperature test of CEFR was simulated by using the code. By comparing the calculation result with the test result of the temperature reactivity coefficient, the validity of the model and the code is verified. (authors)

  20. Study of the effect of temperature on the positioning accuracy of the pneumatic muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laski, Pawel Andrzej; Blasiak, Slawomir; Takosoglu, Jakub Emanuel; Pietrala, Dawid Sebastian; Bracha, Gabriel Filip; Zwierzchowski, Jaroslaw; Nowakowski, Lukasz; Borkowski, Krzysztof; Blasiak, Malgorzata

    The article concerns experimental studies of the effect of temperature on the positioning accuracy of pneumatic muscles. It presents results of experimental studies in the form of thermal images from thermal imaging camera. Pneumatic artificial muscles have unique operational characteristics and because of that they are used in industrial production processes, where classic drives do not work. During operation of muscles with large frequencies above 60 Hz, one can observe a significant increase in temperatures on the bladder surface. The article concerns a study aimed at the determination of the maximum temperature which can be achieved and whether it affects the accuracy of their positioning.

  1. Stresses and Temperature Stability of Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing Filters Prepared by Reactive Ion-Assisted E-Gun Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao-Tsang; Shieh, Han-Ping D.

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we report the in situ measurement of the temperature stability of narrow-band-pass filters on different types of substrate, for dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) filters in optical-fiber transmission systems. The DWDM filters were designed as all-dielectric Fabry-Perot filters and fabricated by reactive ion-assisted deposition. Ta2O5 and SiO2 were used as high- and low-refractive-index layers, respectively, for constructing the DWDM filters. The accuracy and stability of the coating process were evaluated for fabricating the DWDM filters for the temperature stability of the center wavelength. The center wavelength shift was determined to be greatly dependent on the coefficient of thermal expansion of the substrate on which the filter is deposited.

  2. Temperature dependence of InN film deposition by an RF plasma-assisted reactive ion beam sputtering deposition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinoda, Hiroyuki; Mutsukura, Nobuki

    2005-01-01

    Indium nitride (InN) films were deposited on Si(100) substrates using a radiofrequency (RF) plasma-assisted reactive ion beam sputtering deposition technique at various substrate temperatures. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the InN films suggest that the InN films deposited at substrate temperatures up to 370 deg C were cubic crystalline InN; and at 500 deg C, the InN film was hexagonal crystalline InN. In a scanning electron microscope image of the InN film surface, facets of cubic single-crystalline InN grains were clearly observed on the InN film deposited at 370 deg C. The inclusion of metallic indium appeared on the InN film deposited at 500 deg C

  3. A longitudinal examination of perceived discrimination and depressive symptoms in ethnic minority youth: The roles of attributional style, positive ethnic/racial affect, and emotional reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Gabriela L; Supple, Andrew J; Huq, Nadia; Dunbar, Angel S; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2016-02-01

    Although perceived ethnic/racial discrimination is well established as a risk factor for depressive symptoms in ethnic minority youth, few studies have examined their longitudinal relationship over time. This study examined whether a negative attributional style, positive ethnic/racial affect, and emotional reactivity moderated the longitudinal relationship of perceived peer or adult discrimination and depressive symptoms in a sample of African American and Latino high school students (n = 155). African American and Latino youth who experienced increases in perceived peer discrimination also reported greater depressive symptoms over time, but positive ethnic/racial affect buffered the longitudinal association. Emotional reactivity also served as a significant moderator but only of the baseline association between perceived peer discrimination and depressive symptoms. Thus, perceived ethnic/racial discrimination appears to play a significant role in the development of depressive symptoms for ethnic minority youth, especially those who start high school with lower levels of positive ethnic/racial affect. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. An approach of SFR safety study through the most penalizing sodium void reactivity - 105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiberi, V.; Ivanov, E.; Pignet, S.

    2010-01-01

    Sodium void reactivity effects can affect the plant safety significantly during accidental transients. Accordingly, they have to be accurately investigated for any new sodium cooled fast reactor concept, even if a fuel with a melting point lower than the sodium boiling temperature is adopted. Thus all new reactor concepts should be compared to each - others adopting the value of the maximal possible sodium void reactivity as a discrimination parameter. However, taking into account that the sodium void worth is spatially depended, it is not evident which volume could be voided in order to obtain the maximal reactivity increase. Typically the complete active core voiding (zones initially loaded with 235 U or 239 Pu) is taken into account. This paper summarizes the extensive work carried-out in the IRSN to investigate the sodium-void reactivity spatial profiles of a fast sodium-cooled reactor core in the aim of defining a methodology to search for the area where the void contribution to the reactivity is strictly positive. Perturbation theory design approach available in the ERANOS 2.1 code has been adopted to evaluate the 'area of positive void worth'. To do that, the code has been previously validated against experimental based benchmarks (IRPhEP) and reference calculations. The evaluation of the absolute values of reactivity profiles can be improved later-on adopting more sophisticated methodologies to perform more accurate calculations of the sample with the voided area determined adopting the rough procedure described here. It has been demonstrated that even the non-reference way of ERANOS calculations could be used to provide the basis for different core concepts inter-comparison. (authors)

  5. Positive temperature coefficient of magnetic anisotropy in polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)-based magnetic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yiwei; Wang, Baomin; Zhan, Qingfeng; Tang, Zhenhua; Yang, Huali; Liu, Gang; Zuo, Zhenghu; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Xie, Yali; Zhu, Xiaojian; Chen, Bin; Wang, Junling; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic anisotropy is decreased with increasing temperature in normal magnetic materials, which is harmful to the thermal stability of magnetic devices. Here, we report the realization of positive temperature coefficient of magnetic anisotropy in a novel composite combining β-phase polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) with magnetostrictive materials (magnetostrictive film/PVDF bilayer structure). We ascribe the enhanced magnetic anisotropy of the magnetic film at elevated temperature to the st...

  6. Temperature and Stresses Estimation in Reactivity Control Rods for CAREM-25 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markiewicz, Mario; Estevez, Esteban

    2000-01-01

    The reactivity control rods are a critical component regarding safety.Its correct operation when required must be ensured.For this purpose, this component must maintain its operating capacity during all its residence time and under any foreseen operation condition.To evaluate the behaviour of reactivity control rods, it is necessary to analyse the demands they are exposed to, determining from the mechanical point of view, the residence time in the reactor core.In this report, using analytical calculations, the parameters affecting the performance of the reactivity control rods are analysed, with the objective of determine from the mechanical point of view, its behaviour and residence time

  7. Reactivation of αμ in muon-catalyzed fusion under plasma conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jandel, M.; Froelich, P.; Larson, G.; Stodden, C.D.

    1989-01-01

    The reactivation efficiency of αμ slowing down in a deuterium-tritium plasma has been calculated for a broad range of plasma conditions. The plasma stopping power has been obtained from the random-phase approximation, which includes both the quantum mechanics of short-range collisions and collective effects due to long-range plasma interactions. It is shown that muon reactivation increases with increasing plasma temperature and density. Near-complete reactivation is, however, reached only at temperatures higher than 1000 eV

  8. Very high temperature chemistry: Science justification for containerless experimentation in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, William H.; Nordine, Paul

    1990-01-01

    A summary is presented of the justification for application of containerless processing in space to high temperature science. Low earth orbit offers a gravitational environment that allows samples to be positioned in an experimental apparatus by very small forces. Well controlled experiments become possible on reactive materials at high temperatures in a reasonably quiescent state and without container contamination. This provides an opportunity to advance the science of high temperature chemistry that can only be realized with a commitment by NASA to provide advanced facilities for in-space containerless study of materials at very high temperature.

  9. Investigation on low room-temperature resistivity Cr/(Ba0.85Pb0.15)TiO3 positive temperature coefficient composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Zeming; Ma, J.; Qu, Yuanfang

    2009-01-01

    discussed. Using these special processes, the prepared composite with 20 wt% Cr possessed low room-temperature resistivity (2.96 Ω cm at 25 °C) and exhibited PTC effect (resistivity jump of 10), which is considered as a promising candidate for over-current protector when working at low voltage. The grain......Low room-temperature resistivity positive temperature coefficient (PTC) Cr/(Ba0.85Pb0.15)TiO3 composites were produced via a reducing sintering and a subsequent oxidation treatment. The effects of metallic content and processing conditions on materials resistivity–temperature properties were...

  10. Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) feedback reactivity components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D.H.

    1988-04-01

    The static tests conducted during Cycle 8A (1986) of the FFTF have allowed, for the first time, the experimental determination of each of the feedback reactivities caused by the following mechanisms: fuel axial expansion, control rod repositioning, core radial expansion, and subassembly bowing. A semiempirical equation was obtained to describe each of these feedback components that depended only on the relevant reactor temperature (bowing was presented in a tabular form). The Doppler and sodium density reactivities were calculated using existing mechanistic methods. Although they could also be fitted with closed-form equations depending only on temperatures, these equations are not needed in transient analyses using whole core safety computer codes, which use mechanistic methods. The static feedback reactivity model was extended to obtain a dynamic model via the concept of ''time constants.'' Besides being used for transient analyses in the FFTF, these feedback equations constitute a database for the validation and/or calibration of mechanistic feedback reactivity models. 2 refs., 6 tabs

  11. Stress Reactivity in Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrman, Philip R; Hall, Martica; Barilla, Holly; Buysse, Daniel; Perlis, Michael; Gooneratne, Nalaka; Ross, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether individuals with primary insomnia (PI) are more reactive to stress than good sleepers (GS). PI and GS (n = 20 per group), matched on gender and age, completed three nights of polysomnography. On the stress night, participants received a mild electric shock and were told they could receive additional shocks during the night. Saliva samples were obtained for analysis of cortisol and alpha amylase along with self-report and visual analog scales (VAS). There was very little evidence of increased stress on the stress night, compared to the baseline night. There was also no evidence of greater stress reactivity in the PI group for any sleep or for salivary measures. In the GS group, stress reactivity measured by VAS scales was positively associated with an increase in sleep latency in the experimental night on exploratory analyses. Individuals with PI did not show greater stress reactivity compared to GS.

  12. Borylnitrenes: electrophilic reactive intermediates with high reactivity towards C-H bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinger, Holger F; Filthaus, Matthias

    2010-12-21

    Borylnitrenes (catBN 3a and pinBN 3b; cat = catecholato, pin = pinacolato) are reactive intermediates that show high tendency towards insertion into the C-H bonds of unactivated hydrocarbons. The present article summarizes the matrix isolation investigations that were aimed at identifying, characterizing and investigating the chemical behaviour of 3a by spectroscopic means, and of the experiments in solution and in the gas phase that were performed with 3b. Comparison with the reactivity reported for difluorovinylidene 1a in solid argon indicates that 3a shows by and large similar reactivity, but only after photochemical excitation. The derivative 3b inserts into the C-H bonds of hydrocarbon solvents in high yields and thus allows the formation of primary amines, secondary amines, or amides from "unreactive" hydrocarbons. It can also be used for generation of methylamine or methylamide from methane in the gas phase at room temperature. Remaining challenges in the chemistry of borylnitrenes are briefly summarized.

  13. Measurement of reactivity worths of burnable poison rods in enriched uranium graphite-moderated core simulated to high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Fujiyoshi; Takeuchi, Motoyoshi; Kitadate, Kenji; Yoshifuji, Hisashi; Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1980-11-01

    As the core design for the Experimental Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor progresses, evaluation of design precision has become increasingly important. For a high precision design, it is required to have adequate group constants based on accurate nuclear data, as well as calculation methods properly describing the physical behavior of neutrons. We, therefore, assembled a simulation core for VHTR, SHE-14, using a graphite-moderated 20%-enriched uranium Semi-Homogeneous Experimental Critical Facility (SHE), and obtained useful experimental data in evaluating the design precision. The VHTR is designed to accommodate burnable poison and control rods for reactivity compensation. Accordingly, the experimental burnable poison rods which are similar to those to be used in the experimental reactor were prepared, and their reactivity values were measured in the SHE-14 core. One to three rods of the above experimental burnable poison rods were inserted into the central column of the SHE-14 core, and the reactivity values were measured by the period and fuel rod substitution method. The results of the measurements have clearly shown that due to the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles the reactivity value decreases with increasing particle diameter. For the particle diameter, the reactivity value is found to increase linearly with the logarithm of boron content. The measured values and those calculated are found to agree with each other within 5%. These results indicate that the reactivity of the burnable poison rod can be estimated fairly accurately by taking into account the self-shielding effect of B 4 C particles and the heterogeneity of the lattice cell. (author)

  14. Effects of Lignocellulosic Compounds on the Yield, Nanostructure and Reactivity of Soot from Fast Pyrolysis at High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Broström, Markus; Kling, Jens

    reactor. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) obtain knowledge about lignocellulosic compounds and monolignols influence on the yield, nanostructure, composition, and reactivity of soot during high-temperature gasification, (2) understand the influence of Soxhlet extraction on the soot......Gasification offers the utilization of biomass to a wide variety of applications such as heat, electricity, chemicals and transport fuels in an efficient and sustainable manner. High soot yields in the high-temperature entrained flow gasification lead to intensive gas cleaning and can cause...... primary, secondary and teriary pyrolysis products such as organic acids, aldehydes and phenolics [1]. In this study, therefore, the impacts of lignocellulosic compounds and monolignols (syringol, guaiacol, p-hydroxyphenol) on the yield and characteristics of soot were investigated at 1250°C in a drop tube...

  15. Effect of deposition temperature on the properties of nitrogen-doped AZO thin films grown on glass by rf reactive magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Shinho, E-mail: scho@silla.ac.kr [Center for Green Fusion Technology and Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Silla University, Busan 617-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Heetae [Backlight Technology, LCD Division, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Asan 336-841 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    Nitrogen-doped aluminum zinc oxide (NAZO) thin films were deposited on glass substrates at various deposition temperatures by rf reactive magnetron sputtering. The NAZO film deposited at 400 deg. C shows a strongly c-axis preferred orientation and n-type conduction with a resistivity of 2.1 x 10{sup -2} {Omega} cm, Hall mobility of 7.7 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}, and electron concentration of 3.8 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. The optimum crystallographic structure occurs at a deposition temperature of 400 deg. C, where a considerable crystallinity enhancement of the films is observed. The band gap energies of the NAZO films, obtained by using Tauc model and parabolic bands, are found to significantly depend on the deposition temperature, along with the band gap narrowing at higher deposition temperature due to renormalization effects.

  16. Spatially Resolved Quantification of the Surface Reactivity of Solid Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bing; Xiao, Li; Lu, Juntao; Zhuang, Lin

    2016-05-17

    A new property is reported that accurately quantifies and spatially describes the chemical reactivity of solid surfaces. The core idea is to create a reactivity weight function peaking at the Fermi level, thereby determining a weighted summation of the density of states of a solid surface. When such a weight function is defined as the derivative of the Fermi-Dirac distribution function at a certain non-zero temperature, the resulting property is the finite-temperature chemical softness, termed Fermi softness (SF ), which turns out to be an accurate descriptor of the surface reactivity. The spatial image of SF maps the reactive domain of a heterogeneous surface and even portrays morphological details of the reactive sites. SF analyses reveal that the reactive zones on a Pt3 Y(111) surface are the platinum sites rather than the seemingly active yttrium sites, and the reactivity of the S-dimer edge of MoS2 is spatially anisotropic. Our finding is of fundamental and technological significance to heterogeneous catalysis and industrial processes demanding rational design of solid catalysts. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Automated reactivity anomaly surveillance in the Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, B.J.; Harris, R.A.; Honeyman, D.J.; Shook, A.T.; Krohn, C.N.

    1985-01-01

    The automated technique for monitoring core reactivity during power operation used at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is described. This technique relies on comparing predicted to measured rod positions to detect any anomalous (or unpredicted) core reactivity changes. It is implemented on the Plant Data System (PDS) computer and, thus, provides rapid indication of any abnormal core conditions. The prediction algorithms use thermal-hydraulic, control rod position and neutron flux sensor information to predict the core reactivity state

  18. Adsorption of reactive dye from an aqueous solution by chitosan: isotherm, kinetic and thermodynamic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annadurai, Gurusamy; Ling, L.Y.; Lee, J.-F.

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption of Remazol black 13 (Reactive) dye onto chitosan in aqueous solutions was investigated. Experiments were carried out as function of contact time, initial dye concentration (100-300 mg/L), particle size (0.177, 0.384, 1.651 mm), pH (6.7-9.0), and temperature (30-60 deg. C). The equilibrium adsorption data of reactive dye on chitosan were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich models. The maximum adsorption capacity (q m ) has been found to be 91.47-130.0 mg/g. The amino group nature of the chitosan provided reasonable dye removal capability. The kinetics of reactive dye adsorption nicely followed the pseudo-first and second-order rate expression which demonstrates that intraparticle diffusion plays a significant role in the adsorption mechanism. Isotherms have also been used to obtain the thermodynamic parameters such as free energy, enthalpy and entropy of adsorption. The positive value of the enthalpy change (0.212 kJ/mol) indicated that the adsorption is endothermic process. The results indicate that chitosan is suitable as adsorbent material for adsorption of reactive dye form aqueous solutions

  19. A feasibility study on wavelet transform for reactivity coefficient estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, Yoichiro

    2000-01-01

    Recently, a new method using Fourier transform has been introduced in place of the conventional method in order to reduce the time required for the measurement of moderator temperature coefficient in domestic PWRs. The basic concept of these methods is to eliminate noise in the reactivity signal. From this point of view, wavelet analysis is also known as an effective method. In this paper, we tried to apply this method to estimate reactivity coefficients of a nuclear reactor. The basic idea of the reactivity coefficient estimation is to analyze the ratios themselves of the corresponding expansion coefficients of the wavelet transform of the signals of reactivity and the relevant parameter. The concept requires no inverse wavelet transform. Based on numerical simulations, it is found that the method can reasonably estimate reactivity coefficient, for example moderator temperature coefficient, with less length of time sequence data than those required for Fourier transform method. We will continue this study to examine the validity of the estimation procedure for the actual reactor data and further to estimate the other reactivity coefficients. (author)

  20. The effects of different lying positions on interface pressure, skin temperature, and tissue blood flow in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källman, Ulrika; Engström, Maria; Bergstrand, Sara; Ek, Anna-Christina; Fredrikson, Mats; Lindberg, Lars-Göran; Lindgren, Margareta

    2015-03-01

    Although repositioning is considered an important intervention to prevent pressure ulcers, tissue response during loading in different lying positions has not been adequately explored. To compare the effects of different lying positions on interface pressure, skin temperature, and tissue blood flow in nursing home residents. From May 2011 to August 2012, interface pressure, skin temperature, and blood flow at three tissue depths were measured for 1 hr over the sacrum in 30° supine tilt and 0° supine positions and over the trochanter major in 30° lateral and 90° lateral positions in 25 residents aged 65 years or older. Measurement of interface pressure was accomplished using a pneumatic pressure transmitter connected to a digital manometer, skin temperature using a temperature sensor, and blood flow using photoplethysmography and laser Doppler flowmetry. Interface pressure was significantly higher in the 0° supine and 90° lateral positions than in 30° supine tilt and 30° lateral positions. The mean skin temperature increased from baseline in all positions. Blood flow was significantly higher in the 30° supine tilt position compared to the other positions. A hyperemic response in the post pressure period was seen at almost all tissue depths and positions. The 30° supine tilt position generated less interface pressure and allowed greater tissue perfusion, suggesting that this position is the most beneficial. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Development of a noise-based method for the determination of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity (MTC) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaziere, C.

    2002-01-01

    The Moderator Temperature Coefficient of reactivity (MTC) is an important safety parameter of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). In most countries, the so-called at-power MTC has to be measured a few months before the reactor outage, in order to determine if the MTC will not become too negative. Usually, the at-power MTC is determined by inducing a change in the moderator temperature, which has to be compensated for by other means, such as a change in the boron concentration. An MTC measurement using the boron dilution method is analysed in this thesis. It is demonstrated that the uncertainty of such a measurement technique is so large, that the measured MTC could become more negative than what the Technical Specifications allow. Furthermore, this technique incurs a disturbance of the plant operation. For this reason, another technique relying on noise analysis was proposed a few years ago. In this technique, the MTC is inferred from the neutron noise measured inside the core and the moderator temperature noise measured at the core-exit, in the same or in a neighbouring fuel assembly. This technique does not require any perturbation of the reactor operation, but was nevertheless proven to underestimate the MTC by a factor of 2 to 5. In this thesis, it is shown, both theoretically and experimentally, that the reason of the MTC underestimation by noise analysis is the radially loosely coupled character of the moderator temperature noise throughout the core. A new MTC noise estimator, accounting for this radially non-homogeneous moderator temperature noise is proposed and demonstrated to give the correct MTC value. This new MTC noise estimator relies on the neutron noise measured in a single point of the reactor and the radially averaged moderator temperature noise measured inside the core. In the case of the Ringhals-2 PWR in Sweden, Gamma-Thermometers (GTs) offer such a possibility since in dynamic mode they measure the moderator temperature noise, whereas in static

  2. Comparison of Reactive and Non-Reactive Spark Plasma Sintering Routes for the Fabrication of Monolithic and Composite Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTC Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Orrù

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A wider utilization of ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC materials strongly depends on the availability of efficient techniques for their fabrication as dense bodies. Based on recent results reported in the literature, it is possible to state that Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS technology offers a useful contribution in this direction. Along these lines, the use of two different SPS-based processing routes for the preparation of massive UHTCs is examined in this work. One method, the so-called reactive SPS (R-SPS, consists of the synthesis and densification of the material in a single step. Alternatively, the ceramic powders are first synthesized by Self-propagating High-temperature Synthesis (SHS and then sintered by SPS. The obtained results evidenced that R-SPS method is preferable for the preparation of dense monolithic products, while the sintering of SHS powders requires relatively milder conditions when considering binary composites. The different kinetic mechanisms involved during R-SPS of the monolithic and composite systems, i.e., combustion-like or gradual solid-diffusion, respectively, provides a possible explanation. An important role is also played by the SHS process, particularly for the preparation of composite powders, since stronger interfaces are established between the ceramic constituents formed in situ, thus favoring diffusion processes during the subsequent SPS step.

  3. [Reactive collisions of high-temperature systems]: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graff, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    We are developing an experiment to study the reactive collisions of systems with large activation barriers or endothermicities. The basis design involves the collision of fast radicals with a stable reactant gas (hydrogen) in a collision cell. Initially, products will be detected by ionization and mass analysis. Later, laser-induced fluorescence will be used to probe internal states of products. Studies will include an investigation of rotational effects by comparing results for rotational levels J = O and 1 of molecular hydrogen. 2 figs

  4. The effects of applying silicon carbide coating on core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuhair, S.; Setiadipura, Topan [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Serpong Tagerang Selatan (Indonesia). Center for Nuclear Reactor Technology and Safety; Su' ud, Zaki [Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia). Dept. of Physics

    2017-03-15

    Graphite is used as the moderator, fuel barrier material, and core structure in High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). However, despite its good thermal and mechanical properties below the radiation and high temperatures, it cannot avoid corrosion as a consequence of an accident of water/air ingress. Degradation of graphite as a main HTR material and the formation of dangerous CO gas is a serious problem in HTR safety. One of the several steps that can be adopted to avoid or prevent the corrosion of graphite by the water/air ingress is the application of a thin layer of silicon carbide (SiC) on the surface of the fuel element. This study investigates the effect of applying SiC coating on the fuel surfaces of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident from the reactivity points of view. A series of reactivity calculations were done with the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX and continuous energy nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII at temperature of 1200 K. Three options of UO{sub 2}, PuO{sub 2}, and ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} fuel kernel were considered to obtain the inter comparison of the core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in conditions of water/air ingress accident. The calculation results indicated that the UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR reactivity was slightly reduced and relatively more decreased when the thickness of the SiC coating increased. The reactivity characteristic of ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR showed a similar trend to that of UO{sub 2}, but did not show reactivity peak caused by water ingress. In contrast with UO{sub 2}- and ThO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR, although the reactivity of PuO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR was the lowest, its characteristics showed a very high reactivity peak (0.33 Δk/k) and this introduction of positive reactivity is difficult to control. SiC coating on the surface of the plutonium fuel pebble has no significant impact. From the comparison between reactivity characteristics of uranium, thorium and plutonium cores with 0

  5. Comparative evaluation of fuel temperature coefficient of standard and CANFLEX fuels in CANDU 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woosong; Hartant, Donny; Kim, Yonghee

    2012-01-01

    The fuel temperature reactivity coefficient (FTC) of CANDU 6 has become a concerning issue. The FTC was found to be slightly positive for the operating condition of CANDU 6. Since CANDU 6 has unique fuel arrangement and very soft neutron spectrum, its Doppler reactivity feedback of U 238 is rather weak. The upscattering by oxygen in fuel and Pu 239 buildup with fuel depletion are responsible for the positive FTC value at high temperature. In this study, FTC of both standard CANDU and CANFLEX fuel lattice are re evaluated. A Monte Carlo code Serpent2 was chosen as the analysis tool because of its high calculational speed and it can account for the thermal motion of heavy nuclides in fuel by using the Doppler Broadening Rejection Correction (DBRC) method. It was reported that the fuel Doppler effect is noticeably enhanced by accounting the target thermal motion. Recently, it was found that the FTC of the CANDU 6 standard fuel is noticeably enhanced by the DBRC

  6. New Fukui, dual and hyper-dual kernels as bond reactivity descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Polanco-Ramírez, Carlos-A; Ayers, Paul W; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2017-06-21

    We define three new linear response indices with promising applications for bond reactivity using the mathematical framework of τ-CRT (finite temperature chemical reactivity theory). The τ-Fukui kernel is defined as the ratio between the fluctuations of the average electron density at two different points in the space and the fluctuations in the average electron number and is designed to integrate to the finite-temperature definition of the electronic Fukui function. When this kernel is condensed, it can be interpreted as a site-reactivity descriptor of the boundary region between two atoms. The τ-dual kernel corresponds to the first order response of the Fukui kernel and is designed to integrate to the finite temperature definition of the dual descriptor; it indicates the ambiphilic reactivity of a specific bond and enriches the traditional dual descriptor by allowing one to distinguish between the electron-accepting and electron-donating processes. Finally, the τ-hyper dual kernel is defined as the second-order derivative of the Fukui kernel and is proposed as a measure of the strength of ambiphilic bonding interactions. Although these quantities have never been proposed, our results for the τ-Fukui kernel and for τ-dual kernel can be derived in zero-temperature formulation of the chemical reactivity theory with, among other things, the widely-used parabolic interpolation model.

  7. Reactivity and burnout of wood fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall' Ora, M.

    2011-07-01

    This thesis deals with the combustion of wood in pulverised fuel power plants. In this type of boiler, the slowest step in the wood conversion process is char combustion, which is one of the factors that not only determine the degree of fuel burnout, but also affect the heat release profile in the boiler and thereby the overall operation and efficiency of the plant. Chapter 1 consists of an introduction to thermal conversion of biomass fuels as well as a description of a Danish power plant where a measuring campaign was carried out as part of this project. Chapter 2 is a brief literature review of different aspects relevant to wood combustion, including wood structure and composition, wood pyrolysis, wood char properties and wood char oxidation. The full scale campaign, which is the subject of Chapter 3, included sampling of wood fuel before and after milling and sampling of gas and particles at the top of the combustion chamber. The collected samples and data are used to obtain an evaluation of the mills in operation at the power plant, the particle size distribution of the wood fuel, as well as the char conversion attained in the furnace. In Chapter 4 an experimental investigation on the relation between pyrolysis of wood in boiler-like conditions and wood char properties is presented. Chars from pine and beech wood were produced by fast pyrolysis in an entrained flow reactor and by slow pyrolysis in a thermogravimetric analyser. The influence of pyrolysis temperature, heating rate and particle size on char yield and morphology was investigated. The applied pyrolysis temperature varied in the range 673-1673 K for slow pyrolysis and 1073-1573 K for fast pyrolysis. The chars were oxidised in a thermogravimetric analyser and the mass loss data were used to determine char oxidation reactivity. Char yield from fast pyrolysis (104-105 K/s) was as low as 1-6% on a dry ash free basis, whereas it was about 15-17% for slow pyrolysis (10-20 K/min); char yield decreased as

  8. Definition of reactivity and its measurability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Dapu

    1986-01-01

    Reactivity is the fundamental and important physical quantity in the reactor physics. The different kinds of method for defining reactivity are represented, the difference between different definitions of reactivity is indicalted and the conditions under which they have nearly the same measurable value are discussed. It is demonstrated that when the static adjointed neutron density or the neutron importance is selected to be a weight function for generating kinetic parameters used in the neutron kinetic equations, the kinetic reactivity is approximately equal to the static reactivity. Due to the constraint of the normalization condition, the shape function must be so selected that the corresponding amplitude function is proportional to the fundamental mode of neutron density variating with time. Measured reactivity by the kinetic method may vary with the position of detector, owing to the different space distribution of the prompt neutrons density and the delayed neutrons density and the effect of the higher harmonics of the neutron density. Some corresponding correction must be made in order to obtain the real static reactivity

  9. Control rod position detector for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Mitsuru; Fujiwara, Hiroshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reliability of a control rod position detector by detecting a reactive code with a combination of control rod position change signals produced from vertical and horizontal axis decoders, generation an error signal and thus simultaneously detecting the operation of more than two lead switches. Constitution: Horizontal and vertical axis position signals responsive to changes in the control rod position are applied from lead switches connected in a predetermined matrix connection corresponding to the notches of the positions of respective position detecting probes, the reactive output from the decoder is detected by a reactive code detecting circuit, which in turn generates a fault signal, and the control rod position code converted in a notch number generating circuit is converted to a predetermined value indicating invalidity. Accordingly, a fault caused by the simultaneous operation of a plurality of failed lead switches can be effectively detected. (Yoshino, Y.)

  10. Reactive low temperature plasma ionization mass spectrometry for the determination of organic UV filters in personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xuelu; Gerbig, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schulz, Sabine

    2018-02-01

    Organic UV filters in personal care products (PCPs) have been persistently reported as a potential threat to human health. In order to guarantee consumers ' safety, the dose of these compounds in PCPs needs to be monitored. Here, a methodology based on reactive low temperature plasma ionization (LTP) mass spectrometry (MS) has been developed for the determination of common organic UV filters in PCPs including benzophenone-3, ethylhexyl dimethyl p-aminobenzoic acid, ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate, 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, octocrylene, and ethylhexyl salicylate. The experiments were carried out in transmission geometry where the LTP ion source, samples loaded on a stainless steel mesh, and the MS inlet were aligned coaxially. Four chemicals, ammonia, ammonium formate, aniline, and methylamine were considered as reactive additives allowing reactions with the UV filters through different mechanisms. Methylamine-induced reactive LTP-MS showed the most prominent improvement on the detection of UV filter compounds. Compared to direct LTP-MS, the developed method improved the detection limits of UV filters more than 10 fold. Moreover, the method enabled fast semi-quantitative screening of UV filters in authentic PCPs. Concentrations of active ingredients in eight authentic PCPs as determined with reactive LTP-MS were found comparable to values offered by the cosmetic companies and corresponding HPLC data. The methodology provides high throughput analysis (70s per sample) and sensitive identification of organic UV filters. Lowest detectable concentrations ranged from 0.13µg/g for 4-methylbenzylidene camphor to 7.67µg/g for octocrylene in spiked cream. In addition, it shows the potential to be used as a screening tool for legal authentications of these chemicals in the future due to its semi-quantitative determination of UV filters in PCPs without tedious sample preparation and time-consuming chromatographic separation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synergistic effect on co-gasification reactivity of biomass-petroleum coke blended char.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Juntao; Guo, Qinghua; Gong, Yan; Ding, Lu; Yu, Guangsuo

    2017-06-01

    In this work, effects of gasification temperature (900°C-1100°C) and blended ratio (3:1, 1:1, 1:3) on reactivity of petroleum coke and biomass co-gasification were studied in TGA. Quantification analysis of active AAEM transformation and in situ investigation of morphological structure variations in gasification were conducted respectively using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer and heating stage microscope to explore synergistic effect on co-gasification reactivity. The results indicated that char gasification reactivity was enhanced with increasing biomass proportion and gasification temperature. Synergistic effect on co-gasification reactivity was presented after complete generation of biomass ash, and gradually weakened with increasing temperature from 1000°C to 1100°C after reaching the most significant value at 1000°C. This phenomenon was well related with the appearance of molten biomass ash rich in glassy state potassium and the weakest inhibition effect on active potassium transformation during co-gasification at the temperature higher than 1000°C. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Emotion Reactivity, Comfort Expressing Emotions, and Future Suicidal Ideation in Emerging Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco-Roman, Lillian; Moore, Alyssa; Tsypes, Aliona; Jacobson, Colleen; Miranda, Regina

    2018-01-01

    Emotion reactivity and difficulties in expressing emotions have been implicated in risk for suicidal behavior. This study examined comfort in expressing emotions (positive vs. negative) and depressive symptoms as mediators of the prospective relation between emotion reactivity and suicidal ideation. Emerging adults (N = 143; 72% female; 28% White) completed measures of emotion reactivity, comfort expressing emotions, and suicidal ideation at baseline and of depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation 12 months later. Emotion reactivity predicted suicidal ideation at follow-up through depressive symptoms. Difficulty expressing love-but not happiness, sadness, and anger-partially mediated the relationship between emotion reactivity and suicidal ideation at follow-up before but not after adjusting for baseline ideation. The relation between high emotion reactivity and suicidal ideation may be explained by discomfort in the expression of positive emotions and by depressive symptoms. Promotion of comfort in positive emotion expression may reduce vulnerability to suicidal ideation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Reactivity balance for a soluble boron-free small modular reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lezani van der Merwe

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Elimination of soluble boron from reactor design eliminates boron-induced reactivity accidents and leads to a more negative moderator temperature coefficient. However, a large negative moderator temperature coefficient can lead to large reactivity feedback that could allow the reactor to return to power when it cools down from hot full power to cold zero power. In soluble boron-free small modular reactor (SMR design, only control rods are available to control such rapid core transient.The purpose of this study is to investigate whether an SMR would have enough control rod worth to compensate for large reactivity feedback. The investigation begins with classification of reactivity and completes an analysis of the reactivity balance in each reactor state for the SMR model.The control rod worth requirement obtained from the reactivity balance is a minimum control rod worth to maintain the reactor critical during the whole cycle. The minimum available rod worth must be larger than the control rod worth requirement to manipulate the reactor safely in each reactor state. It is found that the SMR does have enough control rod worth available during rapid transient to maintain the SMR at subcritical below k-effectives of 0.99 for both hot zero power and cold zero power. Keywords: Control Rod Worth, Reactivity Balance, Reactivity Feedback, Small Modular Reactor, Soluble Boron Free

  14. DELIGHT-B/REDEL, point reactivity burnup code for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Ryuiti; Watanabe, Takashi.

    1977-03-01

    Code DELIGHT-2 was previously developed to analyze cell burnup characteristics and to produce few-group constants for core burnup calculation in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. In the code, burnup dependency of the burnable poison, boron-10, is considered with the homogeneous model of space. In actuality, however, the burnable poison is used as homogeneous rods or uniform rods of small granular poison and graphite, to control the reactivity and power distribution. Precise analysis of the burnup characteristics is thus difficult because of the heterogeneity due to the configuration of poison rods. In cell burnup calculation, the DELIGHT-B, which is a modification of DELIGHT-2, takes into consideration this heterogeneous effect. The auxiliary code REDEL, a reduction of DELIGHT-B, used in combination with 3 dimensional diffusion code CITATION, is for core burnup calculation with the macro-scopic cross section model. (auth.)

  15. Reactive power compensator

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.; Chen, Mingliang; Andexler, George; Huang, Tony

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  16. Reactive power compensator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Woodinville, WA); Chen, Mingliang (Kirkland, WA); Andexler, George (Everett, WA); Huang, Tony (Seattle, WA)

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  17. Reactivity feedbacks of a material test research reactor fueled with various low enriched uranium dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Farhan; Majid, Asad

    2009-01-01

    The reactivity feedbacks of a material test research reactor using various low enriched uranium fuels, having same uranium density were calculated. For this purpose, the original aluminide fuel (UAl x -Al) containing 4.40 gU/cm 3 of an MTR was replaced with silicide (U 3 Si-Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al) and oxide (U 3 O 8 -Al) dispersion fuels having the same uranium density as of the original fuel. Calculations were carried out to find the fuel temperature reactivity feedback, moderator temperature reactivity feedback, moderator density reactivity feedback and moderator void reactivity feedback. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were employed to carry out these calculations. It was observed that the magnitudes all the respective reactivity feedbacks from 38 deg. C to 50 deg. C and 100 deg. C, at the beginning of life, of all the fuels were very close to each other. The fuel temperature reactivity feedback of the U 3 O 8 -Al was about 2% more than the original UAl x -Al fuel. The magnitudes of the moderator temperature, moderator density and moderator void reactivity feedbacks of all the fuels, showed very minor variations from the original aluminide fuel.

  18. Reactivity feedback coefficients Pakistan research reactor-1 using PRIDE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansoor, Ali; Ahmed, Siraj-ul-Islam; Khan, Rustam [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Inam-ul-Haq [Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics

    2017-05-15

    Results of the analyses performed for fuel, moderator and void's temperature feedback reactivity coefficients for the first high power core configuration of Pakistan Research Reactor - 1 (PARR-1) are summarized. For this purpose, a validated three dimensional model of PARR-1 core was developed and confirmed against the reference results for reactivity calculations. The ''Program for Reactor In-Core Analysis using Diffusion Equation'' (PRIDE) code was used for development of global (3-dimensional) model in conjunction with WIMSD4 for lattice cell modeling. Values for isothermal fuel, moderator and void's temperature feedback reactivity coefficients have been calculated. Additionally, flux profiles for the five energy groups were also generated.

  19. The chemical reactivity and structure of collagen studied by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wess, T.J.; Wess, L.; Miller, A. [Univ. of Stirling (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    The chemical reactivity of collagen can be studied using neutron diffraction (a non-destructive technique), for certain reaction types. Collagen contains a number of lysine and hydroxylysine side chains that can react with aldehydes and ketones, or these side chains can themselves be converted to aldehydes by lysyl oxidase. The reactivity of these groups not only has an important role in the maintenance of mechanical strength in collagen fibrils, but can also manifest pathologically in the cases of aging, diabetes (reactivity with a variety of sugars) and alcoholism (reactivity with acetaldehyde). The reactivity of reducing groups with collagen can be studied by neutron diffraction, since the crosslink formed in the adduction process is initially of a Schiff base or keto-imine nature. The nature of this crosslink allows it to be deuterated, and the position of this relatively heavy scattering atom can be used in a process of phase determination by multiple isomorphous replacement. This process was used to study the following: the position of natural crosslinks in collagen; the position of adducts in tendon from diabetic rats in vivo and the in vitro position of acetaidehyde adducts in tendon.

  20. The chemical reactivity and structure of collagen studied by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wess, T.J.; Wess, L.; Miller, A.

    1994-01-01

    The chemical reactivity of collagen can be studied using neutron diffraction (a non-destructive technique), for certain reaction types. Collagen contains a number of lysine and hydroxylysine side chains that can react with aldehydes and ketones, or these side chains can themselves be converted to aldehydes by lysyl oxidase. The reactivity of these groups not only has an important role in the maintenance of mechanical strength in collagen fibrils, but can also manifest pathologically in the cases of aging, diabetes (reactivity with a variety of sugars) and alcoholism (reactivity with acetaldehyde). The reactivity of reducing groups with collagen can be studied by neutron diffraction, since the crosslink formed in the adduction process is initially of a Schiff base or keto-imine nature. The nature of this crosslink allows it to be deuterated, and the position of this relatively heavy scattering atom can be used in a process of phase determination by multiple isomorphous replacement. This process was used to study the following: the position of natural crosslinks in collagen; the position of adducts in tendon from diabetic rats in vivo and the in vitro position of acetaidehyde adducts in tendon

  1. Adsorption-Driven Surface Segregation of the Less Reactive Alloy Component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Klas Jerker; Calle Vallejo, Federico; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Counterintuitive to expectations and all prior observations of adsorbate-induced surface segregation of the more reactive alloy component (the one forming the stronger bond with the adsorbate), we show that CO adsorption at elevated pressures and temperatures pulls the less reactive Cu to the sur......Counterintuitive to expectations and all prior observations of adsorbate-induced surface segregation of the more reactive alloy component (the one forming the stronger bond with the adsorbate), we show that CO adsorption at elevated pressures and temperatures pulls the less reactive Cu...... to the surface of a CuPt near-surface alloy. The Cu surface segregation is driven by the formation of a stable self-organized CO/CuPt surface alloy structure and is rationalized in terms of the radically stronger Pt−CO bond when Cu is present in the first surface layer of Pt. The results, which are expected...

  2. Clinical and Laboratory Potential Predictors of Blood Culture Positivity in Under Five Children with Clinically Severe Pneumonia - Khartoum -Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Karimeldin Mohamed Ali; El-Samani, El-Fatih; Bilal, Jalal Ali; Eldouch, Widad; Ibrahim, Salah Ahmed

    2015-08-01

    Blood culture is necessary for appropriate management of clinically severe pneumonia in children under five years of age. However, in limited resource countries it might be unduly costly and waste of valuable time because of the high negative culture rate. This study aims to identify clinical and laboratory parameters that potentially predict a positive blood culture in cases of severe pneumonia. A hospital based study, enrolled 189 cases satisfying the WHO definition of severe pneumonia. Age, gender, clinical history, physical examination, temperature, complete blood count, C-reactive protein, blood culture and Chest X Ray for all the patients were recorded. Forty one patients had positive blood culture giving a prevalence of 21.7%. All variables were used in a dichotomous manner. White Blood Count (WBC) more than 20 000, very high C-reactive protein (C-RP ≥8mg/L) and Temperature more than 40(o)C, had a positive predictive value of 46.1%, 44.3% and 40.0% respectively for a positive culture as well as a Negative Predictive Value of 91.1%, 91.6% and 91.7% respectively. The WBC more than 20 000 and temperature above 40(o)C had a significant association with a positive blood culture. Their adjusted Odds Ratios were 3.9 (95% CI: 1.4-10.90) and 3.1 (95% CI: 1.2-8.4) respectively. This was not the case for C-RP (Odds Ratio=2.2, 95% CI: 0.7-2.2) or positive Chest X Ray (Odds Ratio=1.5, 95% CI: 0.6-3.6). Temperature of more than 40(o)C, Very high C-RP and WBC of more than 20 000 are good indicators of a potential positive blood culture. It is therefore recommended that further research be undertaken to refine these predictors as screening tools before resorting to blood culture. It is also recommended that antibiotic treatment may be initiated on the basis of the high temperature and WBC, while waiting for the culture results.

  3. Multiple viral/self immunological cross-reactivity in liver kidney microsomal antibody positive hepatitis C virus infected patients is associated with the possession of HLA B51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanos, D-P; Lenzi, M; Okamoto, M; Rigopoulou, E I; Muratori, P; Ma, Y; Muratori, L; Tsantoulas, D; Mieli- Vergani, G; Bianchi, F B; Vergani, D

    2004-01-01

    Liver Kidney Microsomal autoantibody type 1(LKM1) directed to cytochrome P4502D6 (CYP2D6) characterises autoimmune hepatitis type-2 (AIH-2), but is also found in a proportion of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients, CYP2D6252-271 being a major B- cell autoepitope. Molecular mimicry and immunological cross-reactivity between CYP2D6252-271, HCV polyprotein and the infected cell protein 4 (ICP4) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) have been suggested as triggers for the induction of LKM1, but reactivity and cross-reactivity to the relevant sequences have not been investigated experimentally. CYP2D6252-271 and its viral homologues were constructed and tested by ELISA in the sera of 46 chronically infected HCV patients, 23 of whom were LKM1 positive. Reactivity to the E1 HCV and ICP4 HSV1 mimics was frequently found in HCV infected patients irrespectively of their LKM1 status; viral/self cross-reactivity (as indicated by inhibition studies), however, was present in the only 2 of the 23 LKM1 seropositive HCV patients, who possessed the HLA allotype B51. Our results indicate that in HCV infected patients virus/self cross-reactivity is dependent on a specific immunogenetic background, a finding awaiting confirmation by studies in larger series of patients.

  4. The psychophysiology of parenting: Individual differences in autonomic reactivity to positive and negative mood inductions and observed parental affect during dyadic interactions with children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Arin M; Dawson, Glen C; Danzo, Sarah; McKillop, Hannah N

    2017-02-01

    Parenting is a complex activity driven, in part, by parental emotional and physiological responses. However, work examining the physiological underpinnings of parenting behavior is still in its infancy, and very few studies have examined such processes beyond early childhood. The current study examines associations between Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) indices of parents' physiological reactivity to positive and negative mood states and observed parental affect during a series of discussion tasks with their adolescent child. Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA) was measured as an index of parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activation while viewing film clips designed to induce neutral, sad, and amused mood states. Parental positive affect, anger, and distress were observed during a series of parent-child discussion tasks, which included an ambiguous discussion regarding adolescent growth, a conflict discussion, and a fun-activity planning discussion. Results supported the association between aspects of parental physiological reactivity and observed affect during dyadic interactions. Further, RSA interacted with maternal depression to predict observed positive affect, anger, and distress, although differences across tasks and specific emotions were found regarding the nature of the interaction effects. Overall, results suggest that such neurobiological processes may be particularly important predictors of parental behavior, particularly in at-risk populations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Synthesis and reactivity of single-phase Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} intermetallic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae-Hwan, E-mail: kim.jaehwan@jaea.go.jp [Breeding Functional Materials Development Group, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Iwakiri, Hirotomo; Furugen, Tatsuaki [Faculty of Education Elementary and Secondary School Teacher Training Program, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Nakamichi, Masaru [Breeding Functional Materials Development Group, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Preliminary synthesis of single-phase Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} was succeeded. • Reactivity difference between beryllium and beryllides may be caused by a lattice strain. • Oxidation of Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} at high temperatures results in the formation of TiO{sub 2}. • Simulation results reveal that a stable site for hydrogen at the center of tetrahedron exists. - Abstract: To investigate feasibility for application of Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} as a neutron multiplier as well as a refractory material, single-phase Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} intermetallic compounds were synthesized using an annealing heat treatment of the starting powder and a plasma sintering method. Scanning electron microscopic observations and X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that the single-phase Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} compounds were successfully synthesized. We examined the reactivity of Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} with 1% H{sub 2}O and discovered that a larger stoichiometric amount of Ti resulted in the formation of TiO{sub 2} on the surface at high temperatures. This oxidation may also contribute to an increase in both weight gain and generation of H{sub 2}. This suggests that the formation of the Ti-depleted Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2−x} layer as a result of oxidation facilitates an increased reactivity with H{sub 2}O. To evaluate the safety aspects of Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2}, we also investigated the hydrogen positions and solution energies based on the first principle. The calculations reveal that there are 10 theoretical sites, where 9 of these sites have hydrogen solution energies with a positive value (endothermic) and 1 site located at the center of a tetrahedron comprising two Be and two Ti atoms gives a negative value (exothermic).

  6. Affective reactivity to daily stressors is associated with elevated inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Nancy L; Graham-Engeland, Jennifer E; Ong, Anthony D; Almeida, David M

    2015-12-01

    Inflammation increases the risk of chronic diseases, but the links between emotional responses to daily events and inflammation are unknown. We examined individual differences in affective reactivity to daily stressors (i.e., changes in positive and negative affect in response to stressors) as predictors of inflammatory markers interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP). A cross-sectional sample of 872 adults from the National Study of Daily Experiences (substudy of Midlife in the United States II) reported daily stressors and affect during telephone interviews for 8 days. Blood samples were obtained at a separate clinic visit and assayed for inflammatory markers. Multilevel models estimated trait affective reactivity slopes for each participant, which were inputted into regression models to predict inflammation. People who experienced greater decreases in positive affect on days when stressors occurred (i.e., positive affect reactivity) had elevated log IL-6, independent of demographic, physical, psychological, and behavioral factors (B = 1.12, SE = 0.45, p = .01). Heightened negative affect reactivity was associated with higher log CRP among women (p = .03) but not men (p = .57); health behaviors accounted for this association in women. Adults who fail to maintain positive affect when faced with minor stressors in everyday life appear to have elevated levels of IL-6, a marker of inflammation. Women who experience increased negative affect when faced with minor stressors may be at particular risk of elevated inflammation. These findings add to growing evidence regarding the health implications of affective reactivity to daily stressors. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Affective reactivity to daily stressors is associated with elevated inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Nancy L.; Graham-Engeland, Jennifer E.; Ong, Anthony D.; Almeida, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Inflammation increases the risk of chronic diseases, but the links between emotional responses to daily events and inflammation are unknown. We examined individual differences in affective reactivity to daily stressors (i.e., changes in positive and negative affect in response to stressors) as predictors of inflammatory markers interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Methods A cross-sectional sample of 872 adults from the National Study of Daily Experiences (sub-study of Midlife in the United States II) reported daily stressors and affect during telephone interviews for 8 days. Blood samples were obtained at a separate clinic visit and assayed for inflammatory markers. Multilevel models estimated trait affective reactivity slopes for each participant, which were inputted into regression models to predict inflammation. Results People who experienced greater decreases in positive affect on days when stressors occurred (i.e, positive affect reactivity) had elevated log IL-6, independent of demographic, physical, psychological, and behavioral factors (B = 1.12, SE = 0.45, p = 0.01). Heightened negative affect reactivity was associated with higher log CRP among women (p = 0.03) but not men (p = 0.57); health behaviors accounted for this association in women. Conclusions Adults who fail to maintain positive affect when faced with minor stressors in everyday life appear to have elevated levels of IL-6, a marker of inflammation. Women who experience increased negative affect when faced with minor stressors may be at particular risk of elevated inflammation. These findings add to growing evidence regarding the health implications of affective reactivity to daily stressors. PMID:26030309

  8. Socioeconomic position, health behaviors, and C-reactive protein: A moderated-mediation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Kiarri N.; Mezuk, Briana; Abdou, Cleopatra M.; Rafferty, Jane A.; Jackson, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We sought to understand the link between low SEP and cardiovascular disease (CVD) by examining the association between SEP, health-related coping behaviors, and C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory marker and independent risk factor for CVD in a US sample of adults. Design We used a multiple mediation model to evaluate how these behaviors work in concert to influence CRP levels and whether these relationships were moderated by gender and race/ethnicity. Main outcome measures CRP levels were divided into two categories: elevated CRP (3.1–10.0 mg/L) and normal CRP (≤ 3.0 mg/L). Results Both poverty and low educational attainment were associated with elevated CRP, and these associations were primarily explained through higher levels of smoking and lower levels of exercise. In the education model, poor diet also emerged as a significant mediator. These behaviors accounted for 87.9% of the total effect of education on CRP and 55.8% the total effect of poverty on CRP. We also found significant moderation of these mediated effects by gender and race/ethnicity. Conclusion These findings demonstrate the influence of socioeconomically-patterned environmental constraints on individual-level health behaviors. Specifically, reducing socioeconomic inequalities may have positive effects on CVD disparities through reducing cigarette smoking and increasing vigorous exercise. PMID:20496985

  9. Reactive arthritis associated with Mycoplasma genitalium urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisment, D; Machelart, I; Wirth, G; Lazaro, E; Greib, C; Pellegrin, J-L; Bébéar, C; Peuchant, O

    2013-11-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is an important cause of sexually transmitted infections that is gaining recognition and is an independent cause of acute and chronic nongonococcal urethritis in men. M. genitalium has been implicated as a possible causative factor in reactive arthritis. We report a case of reactive arthritis complicating M. genitalium urethritis in an HLA-B27-positive patient. © 2013.

  10. Reactive Melt Infiltration Of Silicon Into Porous Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Donald R.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    1994-01-01

    Report describes study of synthesis of silicon carbide and related ceramics by reactive melt infiltration of silicon and silicon/molybdenum alloys into porous carbon preforms. Reactive melt infiltration has potential for making components in nearly net shape, performed in less time and at lower temperature. Object of study to determine effect of initial pore volume fraction, pore size, and infiltration material on quality of resultant product.

  11. Variation in aluminium patch test reactivity over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemund, Ingrid; Mowitz, Martin; Zimerson, Erik; Bruze, Magnus; Hindsén, Monica

    2017-11-01

    Contact allergy to aluminium has been reported more frequently in recent years. It has been pointed out that positive patch test reactions to aluminium may not be reproducible on retesting. To investigate possible variations in patch test reactivity to aluminium over time. Twenty-one adults, who had previously reacted positively to aluminium, were patch tested with equimolar dilution series in pet. of aluminium chloride hexahydrate and aluminium lactate, four times over a period of 8 months. Thirty-six of 84 (43%) serial dilution tests with aluminium chloride hexahydrate and 49 of 84 (58%) serial dilution tests with aluminium lactate gave negative results. The range of reactivity varied between a negative reaction to aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 10% and/or to aluminium lactate at 12%, and a positive reaction to aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 0.1% and/or to aluminium lactate at 0.12%. The highest individual difference in test reactivity noticed was 320-fold when the two most divergent minimal eliciting concentrations were compared. The patch test reactivity to aluminium varies over time. Aluminium-allergic individuals may have false-negative reactions. Therefore, retesting with aluminium should be considered when there is a strong suspicion of aluminium contact allergy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Measurements and calculation of reactivity in the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, P.S.B.

    1988-01-01

    Techniques and experimentals procedures utilized in the measurement of some nuclear parameters related to reactivity are presented. Measurements of reactivity coefficients, such as void, temperature and power, and control rod worth were made in the IEA-R1 Research Reactor. The techniques used to perform the measurements were: i) stable period (control rod calibration), ii) inverse kinetics (digital reactivity meter), iii) aluminium slab insertion in the fuel element coolant channels (void reactivity), iv) nuclear reactor core temperature changes by means of the changes in the coolant systems of reactor core (isothermal reactivity coefficient) and v) by making perturbation in the core through the control rod motions (power reactivity coefficient and control rod calibration). By using the computer codes HAMMER, HAMMER-TECHNION and CITATION, the experiments realized in the IEA-R1 reactor were simulated. From this simulation, the theoretical reactivity parameters were estimated and compared with the respective experimental results. Furthermore, in the second fuel load of Angra-1 Nuclear Power Station, the IPEN-CNEN/SP digital reactivity - meter were used in the lower power test with the aim to assess the equipment performance. Among several tests, the reacticity-meter were used in parallel with a Westinghouse analogic reativimeter-meter) to measure the heat additiona point, critical boron concentration, control rod calibration, isothermal and moderator reactivity coefficient. These tests, and the results obtained by the digital reactivity-meter are described. The results were compared with those obtained by Westinghouse analogic reactivity meter, showing excellent agreement. (author) [pt

  13. Analysis on void reactivity of DCA lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. J.; Noh, K. H.; Choi, H. B.; Yang, M. K.

    2001-01-01

    In case of loss of coolant accident, the void reactivity of CANDU fuel provides the positive reactivity and increases the reactor power rapidly. Therefore, it is required to secure credibility of the void reactivity for the design and analysis of reactor, which motivated a study to assess the measurement data of void reactivity. The assessment of lattice code was performed with the experimental data of void reactivity at 30, 70, 87 and 100% of void fractions. The infinite multiplication factors increased in four types of fuels as the void fractions of them grow. The infinite multiplication factors of uranium fuels are almost within 1%, but those of Pu fuels are over 10% by the results of WIMS-AECL and MCNP-4B codes. Moreover, coolant void reactivity of the core loaded with plutonium fuel is more negative compared with that with uranium fuel because of spectrum hardening resulting from large void fraction

  14. Influence of substrate temperature and annealing on structural and optical properties of TiO{sub 2} films deposited by reactive e-beam evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pjević, D., E-mail: dejanp@vinca.rs [VINČA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Marinković, T.; Savić, J.; Bundaleski, N.; Obradović, M.; Milosavljević, M. [VINČA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Kulik, M. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, JINR, Joliot-Curie St. 6, Dubna 141980, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-30

    The influence of deposition and post-deposition annealing parameters on the structure and optical properties of TiO{sub 2} thin films synthesized by reactive e-beam evaporation is reported. Pure Ti (99.9%) was evaporated in oxygen atmosphere to form thin films on Si (100) and glass substrates. Depositions were conducted on substrates held at room temperature and at 200–400 °C heated substrates. Post-deposition annealing was done for 3 h at 500 °C in air. Compositional and structural studies were performed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and optical properties were studied by ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy and analytically by pointwise unconstrained minimization approach method. It was found that both the structure and optical properties of the films are strongly influenced by the deposition and processing parameters. All deposited samples showed good stoichiometry of Ti:O ~ 1:2. Depending on the substrate temperature and oxygen pressure in the chamber during the deposition, anatase–rutile mixed films were obtained, and in some cases TiO and Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases were observed. Substrate deposition temperature appears to play the major role on the final structure of the films, while post-deposition annealing adds up for the lack of oxygen in some cases and invokes crystal grain growth of already initiated phases. The results can be interesting towards the development of TiO{sub 2} thin films with defined structure and optical properties. - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} films were deposited by reactive e-beam evaporation. • Structure and properties were studied as a function of deposition temperature. • Stoichiometry of as-deposited films was Ti:O ~ 1:2, containing different Ti-O phases. • Post-deposition annealing yielded phase transformation, affecting the properties. • Refractive index increases with the substrate deposition temperature.

  15. Poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasniqi, Xhevdet; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Gashi, Masar; Berisha, Blerim; Abazi, Flora; Koçinaj, Dardan

    2009-12-18

    We report a case of a 49-year-old patient who developed poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis. The woman presented with constitutional symptoms, arthritis, urinary infection and conjunctivitis. The blood culture was positive for the staphylococcal coagulase negative infection. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were elevated, whereas the rheumatoid factor was negative. Radiographic findings confirmed diagnosis of pleuropneumonia, and one year later of chronic asymmetric sacroileitis. Physicians should be aware of possible reactive arthritis after staphylococcal coagulase negative bacteremia.

  16. Isothermal CO2 Gasification Reactivity and Kinetic Models of Biomass Char/Anthracite Char

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Bin Zuo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gasification of four biomass chars and anthracite char were investigated under a CO2 atmosphere using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer. Reactivity differences of chars were considered in terms of pyrolysis temperature, char types, crystallinity, and inherent minerals. The results show that the gasification reactivity of char decreased with the increase of pyrolysis temperature. Char gasification reactivity followed the order of anthracite coal char (AC-char ˂ pine sawdust char (PS-char ˂ peanut hull char (PH-char ˂ wheat straw char (WS-char ˂ corncob char (CB-char under the same pyrolysis temperature. Two repesentative gas-solid models, the random pore model (RPM and the modified random pore model (MRPM, were applied to describe the reactive behaviour of chars. The results indicate RPM performs well to describe gasification rates of chars but cannot predict the phenomenon that there appears to exist a peak conversion for biomass chars at a high conversion rate, where the MRPM performs better.

  17. Reactivation of a tin oxide-containing catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Hess, Robert V. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Sidney, Barry D. (Inventor); Wood, George M. (Inventor); Paulin, Patricia A. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A method for the reactivation of a tin oxide-containing catalyst of a CO.sub.2 laser is provided. First, the catalyst is pretreated by a standard procedure. When the catalyst experiences diminished activity during usage, the heated zone surrounding the catalyst is raised to a temperature which is the operating temperature of the laser and 400.degree. C. for approximately one hour. The catalyst is exposed to the same laser gas mixture during this period. The temperature of the heated zone is then lowered to the operating temperature of the CO.sub.2 laser.

  18. Co-gasification of bituminous coal and hydrochar derived from municipal solid waste: Reactivity and synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Juntao; Guo, Qinghua; He, Qing; Ding, Lu; Yoshikawa, Kunio; Yu, Guangsuo

    2017-09-01

    In this work, the influences of gasification temperature and blended ratio on co-gasification reactivity and synergy of Shenfu bituminous coal (SF) and municipal solid waste-derived hydrochar (HTC) were investigated using TGA. Additionally, active alkaline and alkaline earth metal (AAEM) transformation during co-gasification was quantitatively analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer for correlating synergy on co-gasification reactivity. The results showed that higher char gasification reactivity existed at higher HTC char proportion and gasification temperature, and the main synergy behaviour on co-gasification reactivity was performed as synergistic effect. Enhanced synergistic effect at lower temperature was mainly resulted from more obviously inhibiting the primary AAEM (i.e. active Ca) transformation, and weak synergistic effect still existed at higher temperature since more active K with prominent catalysis was retained. Furthermore, more active HTC-derived AAEM remaining in SF sample during co-gasification would lead to enhanced synergistic effect as HTC char proportion increased. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Contribution to the study of the temperature reactivity coefficient for light water reactors; Contribution a l`etude du coefficient de temperature des reacteurs a eau legere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mounier, C.

    1994-05-01

    In this work, we looked for the error sources in the calculation of the isothermal temperature coefficient for light water lattices. We studied three fields implied: the nuclear data, the calculation methods and the temperature coefficient measurement. About the measurement, we pointed out the difficulties of he interpretation. So we used an indirect approach by the mean of critical states at various temperatures. In that way, we can say that if the errors in the effective multiplication factor are constants with temperature then the temperature coefficient is correctly calculated. We studied the neutronic influence of light water models which are used in the thermal scattering cross-section computation. This cross-section determines the thermalization process of neutrons. We showed that the actual model (JEF2) is satisfactory of the needs of the reactors physics. Concerning the majors isotopes ({sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu), the uncertainties on the nuclear data do not seem as a preponderant cause of errors, without to be totally negligible. We also studied, with the neutron transport code Apollo-2, the influence of difference approximations for cell calculation . The new possibilities of the code has been used to represent the critical experiments, particularly the improvement of the resonance self-shielding formalism. The calculation scheme adopted permits to remove partially the fundamental mode approximation by the mean of a two-dimensional transport calculation with the SN method, the axial leakage being treated as an absorption in DB{sup 2}{sub Z}. The agreement between theory and experiment is good both for the reactivity and the temperature coefficient. (author). 114 refs., 40 figs., 163 tabs., 1 append.

  20. Positive Temperature Coefficient of Breakdown Voltage in 4H-SiC PN Junction Rectifiers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neudeck, Philip

    1998-01-01

    ...-suited SiC polytype for power device implementation. This paper reports the first experimental measurements of stable positive temperature coefficient behavior observed in 4H-SiC pn junction rectifiers...

  1. Effect of dynamic temperature stimulus to plantar surface of the foot in the standing position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Watanabe

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We have previously found that a vertical force or tactile sensation occurs when the temperature of a participant's skin changes rapidly. In this illusion, upward motion, pressure or force sensation is elicited when stimulus temperature rises rapidly, whereas in the opposite case, downward motion or pulling sensation is elicited. In this paper, we applied this phenomenon to the sole (plantar surface of the foot to present the sensation of ground slope. To investigate this, we conducted an experiment that measured the correlation between stimulation temperature and front-back direction position of the center of gravity (COG. Participants stood on a thermal stimulator on Nintendo Wii Balance Board (WBB and they remained standing during 30 s dynamic temperature stimulus. In result of analysis, it was suggested that dynamic thermal change in sole might influence standing position and the effect pattern was anomalous in case of the participants who reported a swaying sensation without a haptic sensation. This behavior might be applied to the diagnosis of the presence of thermoesthesia of the patients who might have disease with absence of thermoesthesia.

  2. Monte Carlo analysis of KRITZ-2 critical benchmarks on the reactivity temperature coefficient using ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 nuclear data libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ouahdani, S.; Boukhal, H.; Erradi, L.; Chakir, E.; El Bardouni, T.; Hajjaji, O.; Boulaich, Y.; Benaalilou, K.; Kaddour, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A set of KRITZ-2 experiments with UO 2 and MOX LWR lattices, at room and elevated temperatures, have been analysed using the MCNP6.1 code with the libraries: JENDL-4 and ENDF/B-VII.1. • The detailed comparisons of the calculations and measurements demonstrate a good agreement between calculations and measurements. • To investigate better the influence of cross sections differences on the reactivity temperature coefficient, we break it down into its components using a pin cell model. - Abstract: A set of KRITZ-2 experiments light water moderated lattices with uranium oxide and mixed-oxide fuel rods, at room and elevated temperatures, performed in the early 1970’s have been assessed. Using the MCNP6.1 code with the most recent cross section libraries: JENDL-4 and ENDF/B-VII.1, the critical experiments KRITZ: 2-1, KRITZ: 2-13, and KRITZ: 2-19 achieved in the Sweden reactor KRITZ were analyzed. We have used the ENDF/B-VII.1 data provided with the MCNP6.1.1 version in ACE format and the Makxsf utility to handle the data in the specific temperatures not available in the MCNP6.1.1 original data. The JENDL-4 evaluations were processed using NJOY99 (update 364) to the temperatures of interest. The detailed comparisons of the calculated and measured (Benchmark, 2005) effective multiplication factors and pin power distributions for UO2 and MOX fuelled cores presented in this work demonstrate a good agreement between calculation and measurements. The maximum deviation of the calculation from the experimental data for k eff , is 0.58% (absolute value) obtained for the KRITZ 2:1 at 248.5 °C using ENDF/B-VII.1 data. To investigate better the influence of cross sections differences on the reactivity and temperature coefficient, we break down the infinite multiplication factor into its components using a pin cell model. Using this simple model we evaluated the temperature effect on the infinite multiplication factor and the effect on its components. We have

  3. THE IMPACT OF POWER COEFFICIENT OF REACTIVITY ON CANDU 6 REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. KASTANYA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of reactivity coefficients, along with other core nuclear characteristics, determine reactor core behavior in normal operation and accident conditions. The Power Coefficient of Reactivity (PCR is an aggregate indicator representing the change in reactor core reactivity per unit change in reactor power. It is an integral quantity which captures the contributions of the fuel temperature, coolant void, and coolant temperature reactivity feedbacks. All nuclear reactor designs provide a balance between their inherent nuclear characteristics and the engineered reactivity control features, to ensure that changes in reactivity under all operating conditions are maintained within a safe range. The CANDU® reactor design takes advantage of its inherent nuclear characteristics, namely a small magnitude of reactivity coefficients, minimal excess reactivity, and very long prompt neutron lifetime, to mitigate the demand on the engineered systems for controlling reactivity and responding to accidents. In particular, CANDU reactors have always taken advantage of the small value of the PCR associated with their design characteristics, such that the overall design and safety characteristics of the reactor are not sensitive to the value of the PCR. For other reactor design concepts a PCR which is both large and negative is an important aspect in the design of their engineered systems for controlling reactivity. It will be demonstrated that during Loss of Regulation Control (LORC and Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LBLOCA events, the impact of variations in power coefficient, including a hypothesized larger than estimated PCR, has no safety-significance for CANDU reactor design. Since the CANDU 6 PCR is small, variations in the range of values for PCR on the performance or safety of the reactor are not significant.

  4. Calculation of the void reactivity of CANDU lattices using the SCALE code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valko, J. [Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands). Interfacultair Reactor Inst.; Feher, S. [Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands). Interfacultair Reactor Inst.; Hoogenboom, J.E. [Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands). Interfacultair Reactor Inst.; Slobben, J. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)

    1995-11-01

    The reactivity effect of coolant voiding in CANDU-type fuel lattices has been calculated with different methods using the SCALE code system. The known positive void reactivity coefficient of the original lattice was correctly obtained. A modified fuel bundle containing dysprosium and slightly enriched uranium to eliminate the positive reactivity effect was also calculated. Owing to the increased heterogeneity of this modified fuel the one-dimensional cylindrical calculation with XSDRN proved to be inadequate. Code options allowing bundle geometry were successfully used for the calculation of the strongly space dependent flux and spectrum changes which determine the void reactivity. (orig.).

  5. Tools for Reactive Distillation Column Design: Graphical and Stage-to-Stage Computation Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez Daza, O.; Cisneros, Eduardo Salvador P.; Hostrup, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Based on the element mass balance concept, a graphical design method and a stage-to-stage multicomponent design method for reactive distillation columns have been developed. For distillation columns comprising reactive and non-reactive stages, a simple design strategy based on reactive and non......-reactive bubble point calculations is proposed. This strategy tracks the conversion and temperature between the feed and the end stages of the column. An illustrative example highlights the verification of the design strategy through rigorous simulation....

  6. Hardness and softness reactivity kernels within the spin-polarized density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamorro, Eduardo; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Generalized hardness and softness reactivity kernels are defined within a spin-polarized density-functional theory (SP-DFT) conceptual framework. These quantities constitute the basis for the global, local (i.e., r-position dependent), and nonlocal (i.e., r and r ' -position dependents) indices devoted to the treatment of both charge-transfer and spin-polarization processes in such a reactivity framework. The exact relationships between these descriptors within a SP-DFT framework are derived and the implications for chemical reactivity in such context are outlined

  7. Determination of reactivity parameters of model carbons, cokes and flame-chars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst; Gjernes, Erik; Jessen, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    Reactivity profiles are defined and measured with thermogravimetry for a dense metallurgical Longyear coke, a polymer-derived porous active carbon, Carboxen 1000, and three flame-chars, Illinois #6, Pittsburgh #8 and New Mexico Blue #1. For each sample it is found that the reactivity profile can...... and activation energy in oxygen are estimated for each sample over a 100 K temperature range (cases vary from 573 to 885 K) and a maximum oxygen partial pressure range of 0.01-1 bar. For the different fuel samples reaction orders range fromn =0.65 to 0.78, and global activation energies are found in the narrow...... range of 130-133 kJ/mol. For Carboxen n=0.91 and E=146 kJ/mol. The reactivity differences between the coal chars are proposed mainly due to variations in the physical structure. Over the pressure-temperature domain examined reactivity varies considerably, but the structural profile is approximately...

  8. Hepatitis B virus reactivation during immunosuppressive therapy: Appropriate risk stratification

    OpenAIRE

    Seto, Wai-Kay

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation during immunosuppresive therapy has increased remarkably during recent years. HBV reactivation in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive individuals has been well-described in certain immunosuppressive regimens, including therapies containing corticosteroids, anthracyclines, rituximab, antibody to tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HBV reactivation could also occur in HBsAg-negati...

  9. Characterization of coal and char reactivity as a function of burn-off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biede, O.; Swane Lund, J. [DTU, Dept. of Energy Engineering (Denmark); Holst Soerensen, L. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Peck, R.E. [Arizona State University (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Four coal types have been tested under varying burning conditions in three high-temperature experimental facilities: A 1.3 MW test furnace, an entrained flow reactor and a down-fired tube furnace with a flat flame burner have been used to produce char samples. More than one hundred partly burned samples with burn-off from 30% to 99% have been collected from the experimental facilities, and analyzed in a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA) giving, besides the proximate data, a char burning profile of each individual sample, using a linear TGA-temperature ramp of 3 deg. C/minute. The burning profile derived by this procedure agrees well with reactivity profiles derived at a constant temperature. It is shown that small particle burn faster than large particles, and that small particles in general are more reactive than large particles. Particles burn faster when the oxygen partial pressure is increased, and apparently the oxygen partial pressure influences the combustion rate differently for different coal types. Except for one coal type, that apparently behaves differently in different burning environments, the ranking with respect to reactivity among the coals remains consistent at both high and at low temperatures. It is further shown how samples from one coal type varies more in behavior than samples from the other coal types, indicating a larger inhomogeneity of this coal. In general the reactivity of collected samples decrease with high-temperature burn-off. (au) 20 refs.

  10. Reactivity estimation using digital nonlinear H∞ estimator for VHTRC experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Katsuo; Nabeshima, Kunihiko; Yamane, Tsuyoshi

    2003-01-01

    On-line and real-time estimation of time-varying reactivity in a nuclear reactor in necessary for early detection of reactivity anomaly and safe operation. Using a digital nonlinear H ∞ estimator, an experiment of real-time dynamic reactivity estimation was carried out in the Very High Temperature Reactor Critical Assembly (VHTRC) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Some technical issues of the experiment are described, such as reactivity insertion, data sampling frequency, anti-aliasing filter, experimental circuit and digitalising nonlinear H ∞ reactivity estimator, and so on. Then, we discussed the experimental results obtained by the digital nonlinear H ∞ estimator with sampled data of the nuclear instrumentation signal for the power responses under various reactivity insertions. Good performances of estimated reactivity were observed, with almost no delay to the true reactivity and sufficient accuracy between 0.05 cent and 0.1 cent. The experiment shows that real-time reactivity for data sampling period of 10 ms can be certainly realized. From the results of the experiment, it is concluded that the digital nonlinear H ∞ reactivity estimator can be applied as on-line real-time reactivity meter for actual nuclear plants. (author)

  11. Calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reactivity in a packed bed reactor of a chemical heat pump for high-temperature gas reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yukitaka; Yamada, Mitsuteru; Kanie, Toshihiro; Yoshizawa, Yoshio

    2001-01-01

    The thermal performance of a chemical heat pump that uses a calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reaction system was discussed as a heat storage system for utilizing heat output from high temperature gas reactors (HTGR). Calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reactivity for the heat pump was measured using a packed bed reactor containing 1.0 kg of reactant. The reactor was capable of storing heat at 900 deg. C by decarbonation of calcium carbonate and generating up to 997 deg. C by carbonation of calcium oxide. The amount of stored heat in the reactor was 800-900 kJ kg -1 . The output temperature of the reactor could be controlled by regulating the carbonation pressure. The thermal storage performance of the reactor was superior to that of conventional sensible heat storage systems. A heat pump using this CaO/CO 2 reactor is expected to contribute to thermal load leveling and to realize highly efficient utilization of HTGR output due to the high heat storage density and high-quality temperature output of the heat pump

  12. A positive relationship between spring temperature and productivity in 20 songbird species in the boreal zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, Kalle; Piha, Markus; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Lehikoinen, Aleksi

    2018-03-01

    Anthropogenic climate warming has already affected the population dynamics of numerous species and is predicted to do so also in the future. To predict the effects of climate change, it is important to know whether productivity is linked to temperature, and whether species' traits affect responses to climate change. To address these objectives, we analysed monitoring data from the Finnish constant effort site ringing scheme collected in 1987-2013 for 20 common songbird species together with climatic data. Warm spring temperature had a positive linear relationship with productivity across the community of 20 species independent of species' traits (realized thermal niche or migration behaviour), suggesting that even the warmest spring temperatures remained below the thermal optimum for reproduction, possibly due to our boreal study area being closer to the cold edge of all study species' distributions. The result also suggests a lack of mismatch between the timing of breeding and peak availability of invertebrate food of the study species. Productivity was positively related to annual growth rates in long-distance migrants, but not in short-distance migrants. Across the 27-year study period, temporal trends in productivity were mostly absent. The population sizes of species with colder thermal niches had decreasing trends, which were not related to temperature responses or temporal trends in productivity. The positive connection between spring temperature and productivity suggests that climate warming has potential to increase the productivity in bird species in the boreal zone, at least in the short term.

  13. Finite-temperature stress calculations in atomic models using moments of position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Misra, Anil; Ouyang, Lizhi

    2018-07-01

    Continuum modeling of finite temperature mechanical behavior of atomic systems requires refined description of atomic motions. In this paper, we identify additional kinematical quantities that are relevant for a more accurate continuum description as the system is subjected to step-wise loading. The presented formalism avoids the necessity for atomic trajectory mapping with deformation, provides the definitions of the kinematic variables and their conjugates in real space, and simplifies local work conjugacy. The total work done on an atom under deformation is decomposed into the work corresponding to changing its equilibrium position and work corresponding to changing its second moment about equilibrium position. Correspondingly, we define two kinematic variables: a deformation gradient tensor and a vibration tensor, and derive their stress conjugates, termed here as static and vibration stresses, respectively. The proposed approach is validated using MD simulation in NVT ensembles for fcc aluminum subjected to uniaxial extension. The observed evolution of second moments in the MD simulation with macroscopic deformation is not directly related to the transformation of atomic trajectories through the deformation gradient using generator functions. However, it is noteworthy that deformation leads to a change in the second moment of the trajectories. Correspondingly, the vibration part of the Piola stress becomes particularly significant at high temperature and high tensile strain as the crystal approaches the softening limit. In contrast to the eigenvectors of the deformation gradient, the eigenvectors of the vibration tensor show strong spatial heterogeneity in the vicinity of softening. More importantly, the elliptic distribution of local atomic density transitions to a dumbbell shape, before significant non-affinity in equilibrium positions has occurred.

  14. Probabilistic models for reactive behaviour in heterogeneous condensed phase media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, M. R.; Gartling, D. K.; DesJardin, P. E.

    2012-02-01

    This work presents statistically-based models to describe reactive behaviour in heterogeneous energetic materials. Mesoscale effects are incorporated in continuum-level reactive flow descriptions using probability density functions (pdfs) that are associated with thermodynamic and mechanical states. A generalised approach is presented that includes multimaterial behaviour by treating the volume fraction as a random kinematic variable. Model simplifications are then sought to reduce the complexity of the description without compromising the statistical approach. Reactive behaviour is first considered for non-deformable media having a random temperature field as an initial state. A pdf transport relationship is derived and an approximate moment approach is incorporated in finite element analysis to model an example application whereby a heated fragment impacts a reactive heterogeneous material which leads to a delayed cook-off event. Modelling is then extended to include deformation effects associated with shock loading of a heterogeneous medium whereby random variables of strain, strain-rate and temperature are considered. A demonstrative mesoscale simulation of a non-ideal explosive is discussed that illustrates the joint statistical nature of the strain and temperature fields during shock loading to motivate the probabilistic approach. This modelling is derived in a Lagrangian framework that can be incorporated in continuum-level shock physics analysis. Future work will consider particle-based methods for a numerical implementation of this modelling approach.

  15. Space dependence of reactivity parameters on reactor dynamic perturbation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maletti, R.; Ziegenbein, D.

    1985-01-01

    Practical application of reactor-dynamic perturbation measurements for on-power determination of differential reactivity weight of control rods and power coefficients of reactivity has shown a significant dependence of parameters on the position of outcore detectors. The space dependence of neutron flux signal in the core of a VVER-440-type reactor was measured by means of 60 self-powered neutron detectors. The greatest neutron flux alterations are located close to moved control rods and in height of the perturbation position. By means of computations, detector positions can be found in the core in which the one-point model is almost valid. (author)

  16. Varicella-Zoster Virus in Perth, Western Australia: Seasonality and Reactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor A Korostil

    Full Text Available Identification of the factors affecting reactivation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV largely remains an open question. Exposure to solar ultra violet (UV radiation is speculated to facilitate reactivation. Should the role of UV in reactivation be significant, VZV reactivation patterns would generally be expected to be synchronous with seasonal UV profiles in temperate climates.We analysed age and gender specific VZV notification time series data from Perth, Western Australia (WA. This city has more daily sunshine hours than any other major Australian city. Using the cosinor and generalized linear models, we tested these data for seasonality and correlation with UV and temperature.We established significant seasonality of varicella notifications and showed that while herpes-zoster (HZ was not seasonal it had a more stable seasonal component in males over 60 than in any other subpopulation tested. We also detected significant association between HZ notifications and UV for the entire Perth population as well as for females and males separately. In most cases, temperature proved to be a significant factor as well.Our findings suggest that UV radiation may be important for VZV reactivation, under the assumption that notification data represent an acceptably accurate qualitative measure of true VZV incidence.

  17. Cross reactivity between European hornet and yellow jacket venoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severino, M G; Caruso, B; Bonadonna, P; Labardi, D; Macchia, D; Campi, P; Passalacqua, G

    2010-08-01

    Cross-reactions between venoms may be responsible for multiple diagnostic positivities in hymenoptera allergy. There is limited data on the cross-reactivity between Vespula spp and Vespa crabro, which is an important cause of severe reactions in some parts of Europe. We studied by CAP-inhibition assays and immunoblotting the cross-reactivity between the two venoms. Sera from patients with non discriminative skin/CAP positivity to both Vespula and Vespa crabro were collected for the analyses. Inhibition assays were carried out with a CAP method, incubating the sera separately with both venoms and subsequently measuring the specific IgE to venoms themselves. Immunoblotting was performed on sera with ambiguous results at the CAP-inhibition. Seventeen patients had a severe reaction after Vespa crabro sting and proved skin and CAP positive also to vespula. In 11/17 patients, Vespula venom completely inhibited IgE binding to VC venom, whereas VC venom inhibited binding to Vespula venom only partially (Vespula germanica, thus indicating a true sensitisation to crabro. In the case of multiple positivities to Vespa crabro and Vespula spp the CAP inhibition is helpful in detecting the cross-reactivities.

  18. A novel concept of QUADRISO particles. Part II: Utilization for excess reactivity control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto, E-mail: alby@anl.go [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    In high temperature reactors, burnable absorbers are utilized to manage the excess reactivity at the early stage of the fuel cycle. In this paper QUADRISO particles are proposed to manage the initial excess reactivity of high temperature reactors. The QUADRISO concept synergistically couples the decrease of the burnable poison with the decrease of the fissile materials at the fuel particle level. This mechanism is set up by introducing a burnable poison layer around the fuel kernel in ordinary TRISO particles or by mixing the burnable poison with any of the TRISO coated layers. At the beginning of life, the initial excess reactivity is small because some neutrons are absorbed in the burnable poison and they are prevented from entering the fuel kernel. At the end of life, when the absorber is almost depleted, more neutrons stream into the fuel kernel of QUADRISO particles causing fission reactions. The mechanism has been applied to a prismatic high temperature reactor with europium or erbium burnable absorbers, showing a significant reduction in the initial excess reactivity of the core.

  19. A novel concept of QUADRISO particles. Part II: Utilization for excess reactivity control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    In high temperature reactors, burnable absorbers are utilized to manage the excess reactivity at the early stage of the fuel cycle. In this paper QUADRISO particles are proposed to manage the initial excess reactivity of high temperature reactors. The QUADRISO concept synergistically couples the decrease of the burnable poison with the decrease of the fissile materials at the fuel particle level. This mechanism is set up by introducing a burnable poison layer around the fuel kernel in ordinary TRISO particles or by mixing the burnable poison with any of the TRISO coated layers. At the beginning of life, the initial excess reactivity is small because some neutrons are absorbed in the burnable poison and they are prevented from entering the fuel kernel. At the end of life, when the absorber is almost depleted, more neutrons stream into the fuel kernel of QUADRISO particles causing fission reactions. The mechanism has been applied to a prismatic high temperature reactor with europium or erbium burnable absorbers, showing a significant reduction in the initial excess reactivity of the core.

  20. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on intraoperative core temperature in patients undergoing posterior spine surgery: prospective randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyungseok; Do Son, Je; Lee, Hyung-Chul; Oh, Hyung-Min; Jung, Chul-Woo; Park, Hee-Pyoung

    2018-03-01

    Objective Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) causes carotid baroreceptor unloading, which leads to thermoregulatory peripheral vasoconstriction. However, the effects of PEEP on intraoperative thermoregulation in the prone position remain unknown. Methods Thirty-seven patients undergoing spine surgery in the prone position were assigned at random to receive either 10 cmH 2 O PEEP (Group P) or no PEEP (Group Z). The primary endpoint was core temperature 180 minutes after intubation. Secondary endpoints were delta core temperature (difference in core temperature between 180 minutes and immediately after tracheal intubation), incidence of intraoperative hypothermia (core temperature of peripheral vasoconstriction-related data. Results The median [interquartile range] core temperature 180 minutes after intubation was 36.1°C [35.9°C-36.2°C] and 36.0°C [35.9°C-36.4°C] in Groups Z and P, respectively. The delta core temperature and incidences of intraoperative hypothermia and peripheral vasoconstriction were not significantly different between the two groups. The peripheral vasoconstriction threshold (36.2°C±0.5°C vs. 36.7°C±0.6°C) was lower and the onset of peripheral vasoconstriction (66 [60-129] vs. 38 [28-70] minutes) was slower in Group Z than in Group P. Conclusions Intraoperative PEEP did not reduce the core temperature decrease in the prone position, although it resulted in an earlier onset and higher threshold of peripheral vasoconstriction.

  1. Positive ion mobilities in normal liquid 3He at ultralow temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, P.W.

    1978-11-01

    The mobility has been measured of positive ions in liquid 3 he in the range 2.5 mK 3 sub(m)/sup(V) 5 sub(m)/sup(V). The effects of 500 p.p.m. 4 He in the 3 He were investigated. It was found that, at low temperatures, several stable ion species could be produced for 3 He pressures of 23 bar and above and, between 25 mK and 60 mK, time dependent conversion from one species of ion to another was observed at all pressures. The creation mechanism, mobility and stability of multiple positive ions were studied. Possible explanations of the phenomena are discussed. The measured drift field dependence of mobility is used to test the quasiparticle scattering model assumed for the liquid. (U.K.)

  2. Actinide and Xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, M.; Olson, K.; Henderson, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides

  3. Actinide and xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, M.; Olson, K.; Henderson, D. L.; Sailor, W. C.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides

  4. Actinide and Xenon reactivity effects in ATW high flux systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, M. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Olson, K.; Henderson, D.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately for a high flux ATW system. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change due to the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or start-up. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response due to the actinides.

  5. Reactive Spark Plasma Sintering and Mechanical Properties of Zirconium Diboride–Titanium Diboride Ultrahigh Temperature Ceramic Solid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthiselva N. S.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrahigh temperature ceramics (UHTCs such as diborides of zirconium, hafnium tantalum and their composites are considered to be the candidate materials for thermal protection systems of hypersonic vehicles due to their exceptional combination of physical, chemical and mechanical properties. A composite of ZrB2-TiB2 is expected to have better properties. In this study, an attempt has been made to fabricate ZrB2-TiB2 ceramics using mechanically activated elemental powders followed by reactive spark plasma sintering (RSPS at 1400 °C. Microstructure and phase analysis was carried out using X-ray diffractometer (XRD and electron microscopy to understand microstructure evolution. Fracture toughness and hardness were evaluated using indentation methods. Nanoindentation was used to measure elastic modulus. Compressive strength of the composites has been reported.

  6. Positive association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level and diabetes mellitus among US non-Hispanic black adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, A; Li, J

    2008-08-01

    Previous epidemiologic studies have demonstrated a positive association between serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level and diabetes mellitus. However among US race-ethnicities, the putative association between CRP and diabetes mellitus in non-Hispanic Blacks is not clear. We specifically examined the association between high-sensitivity CRP level and diabetes mellitus in a representative sample of US non-Hispanic blacks. Cross-sectional study among 1,479 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002 non-Hispanic black participants aged > or = 20 years. Main outcome-of-interest was the presence of diabetes mellitus (fasting plasma glucose > or = 126 mg/dL, non-fasting plasma glucose > or = 200 mg/dL, or self-reported current use of oral hypoglycemic medication or insulin) (n=204). Higher CRP levels were positively associated with diabetes mellitus, independent of smoking, waist circumference, hypertension, and other confounders. Multivariable odds ratio (OR) [95% confidence intervals (CI)] comparing elevated CRP level (>3 mg/L) to low CRP level (diabetes mellitus appeared to be present across the full range of CRP, without any threshold effect. Higher serum high-sensitivity CRP levels are positively associated with diabetes mellitus in a sample of US non-Hispanic blacks. Inflammatory processes previously shown to be related to diabetes mellitus in other race-ethnicities may be involved in non-Hispanic blacks also.

  7. Interaction phenomena at reactive metal/ceramic interfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, S. M.; Billings, G. W.; Indacochea, J. E.

    2000-11-03

    The objective of this study was to understand the interface chemical reactions between stable ceramics and reactive liquid metals, and developing microstructure. Experiments were conducted at elevated temperatures where small metal samples of Zr and Zr-alloy were placed on top of selected oxide and non-oxide ceramic substrates (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrN, ZrC, and HfC). The sample stage was heated in high-purity argon to about 2000 C, held in most cases for five minutes at the peak temperature, and then cooled to room temperature at {approximately}20 c/min. An external video camera was used to monitor the in-situ wetting and interface reactions. Post-test examinations of the systems were conducted by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. It was determined that the Zr and the Zr-alloy are very active in the wetting of stable ceramics at elevated temperatures. In addition, in some systems, such as Zr/ZrN, a reactive transition phase formed between the ceramic and the metal. In other systems, such as Zr/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Zr/ZrC and Zr/HfC, no reaction products formed, but a continuous and strong joint developed under these circumstances also.

  8. Reactivity feedback coefficients of a material test research reactor fueled with high-density U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersion fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammad, Farhan [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)], E-mail: farhan73@hotmail.com; Majid, Asad [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

    2008-10-15

    The reactivity feedback coefficients of a material test research reactor fueled with high-density U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersion fuels were calculated. For this purpose, the low-density LEU fuel of an MTR was replaced with high-density U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} LEU fuels currently being developed under the RERTR program. Calculations were carried out to find the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient, moderator temperature reactivity coefficient and moderator density reactivity coefficient. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were employed to carry out these calculations. It is observed that the average values of fuel temperature reactivity feedback coefficient, moderator temperature reactivity coefficient and moderator density reactivity coefficient from 20 deg. C to 100 deg. C, at the beginning of life, followed the relationships (in units of {delta}k/k x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1}) -2.116 - 0.118 {rho}{sub U}, 0.713 - 37.309/{rho}{sub U} and -12.765 - 34.309/{rho}{sub U}, respectively for 4.0 {<=} {rho}{sub U} (g/cm{sup 3}) {<=} 6.0.

  9. Low cost removal of reactive dyes using wheat bran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicek, Fatma; Ozer, Dursun; Ozer, Ahmet; Ozer, Ayla

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the adsorption of Reactive Blue 19 (RB 19), Reactive Red 195 (RR 195) and Reactive Yellow 145 (RY 145) onto wheat bran, generated as a by-product material from flour factory, was studied with respect to initial pH, temperature, initial dye concentration, adsorbent concentration and adsorbent size. The adsorption of RB 19, RR 195 and RY 145 onto wheat bran increased with increasing temperature and initial dye concentration while the adsorbed RB 19, RR 195 and RY 145 amounts decreased with increasing initial pH and adsorbent concentration. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to the experimental equilibrium data depending on temperature and the isotherm constants were determined by using linear regression analysis. The monolayer covarage capacities of wheat bran for RB 19, RR 195 and RY 145 dyes were obtained as 117.6, 119.1 and 196.1 mg/g at 60 deg. C, respectively. It was observed that the reactive dye adsorption capacity of wheat bran decreased in the order of RY 145 > RB 19 > RR 195. The pseudo-second order kinetic and Weber-Morris models were applied to the experimental data and it was found that both the surface adsorption as well as intraparticle diffusion contributed to the actual adsorption processes of RB 19, RR 195 and RY 145. Regression coefficients (R 2 ) for the pseudo-second order kinetic model were higher than 0.99. Thermodynamic studies showed that the adsorption of RB 19, RR 195 and RY 145 dyes onto wheat bran was endothermic in nature

  10. Primate body temperature and sleep responses to lower body positive pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, D. M.; Fuller, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Cephalic fluid shifts, induced by lower body positive pressure (LBPP) are known to influence various physiological systems (i.e., cardiovascular and renal). In earlier experiments, an apparent change in the arousal state of primates in such LBPP conditions was observed. This study was designed to examine the effects of LBPP on arousal state and body temperature level which is normally correlated with sleep. Chair-restrained male squirrel monkeys were exposed to 40 mmHg LBPP for 90-100 minutes between the daytime hours of 13:00-15:00. Each monkey was placed in a specially modified restraint chair to which they were highly trained. Deep body temperature (DBT) was collected from 10 animals. Sleep parameters were obtained from six animals chronically implanted for sleep recording. A video camera was used to observe each animal's apparent state of arousal. LBPP resulted in an approximate 0.9 C decrease in DBT. During video observation, some animals appeared drowsy during LBPP; however, sleep recording revealed no significant changes in the state of arousal. Thus, LBPP is capable of inducing a mild hyperthermia. Further, the mechanisms underlying the observed lowering of body temperature appear to be independent of arousal state.

  11. Computer modelling of RF ablation in cortical osteoid osteoma: Assessment of the insulating effect of the reactive zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irastorza, Ramiro M; Trujillo, Macarena; Martel Villagrán, Jose; Berjano, Enrique

    2016-05-01

    The aim was to study by computer simulations the insulating role of the reactive zone surrounding a cortical osteoid osteoma (OO) in terms of electrical and thermal performance during radiofrequency ablation (RFA). We modelled a cortical OO consisting of a nidus (10 mm diameter) enclosed by a reactive zone. The OO was near a layer of cortical bone 1.5 mm thick. Trabecular bone partially surrounds the OO and there was muscle around the cortical bone layer. We modelled RF ablations with a non-cooled-tip 17-gauge needle electrode (300 s duration and 90 °C target temperature). Sensitivity analyses were conducted assuming a reactive zone electrical conductivity value (σrz) within the limits of the cortical and trabecular bone, i.e. 0.02 S/m and 0.087 S/m, respectively. In this way we were really modelling the different degrees of osteosclerosis associated with the reactive zone. The presence of the reactive zone drastically reduced the maximum temperature reached outside it. The temperature drop was proportional to the thickness of the reactive zone: from 68 °C when it was absent to 44 °C when it is 7.5 mm thick. Higher nidus conductivity values (σn) implied higher temperatures, while lower temperatures meant higher σrz values. Changing σrz from 0.02 S/m to 0.087 S/m reduced lesion diameters from 2.4 cm to 1.8 cm. The computer results suggest that the reactive zone plays the role of insulator in terms of reducing the temperature in the surrounding area.

  12. Time to wake up: reactive countermeasures to sleep inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilditch, Cassie J; Dorrian, Jillian; Banks, Siobhan

    2016-12-07

    Sleep inertia is the period of impaired performance and grogginess experienced after waking. This period of impairment is of concern to workers who are on-call, or nap during work hours, and need to perform safety-critical tasks soon after waking. While several studies have investigated the best sleep timing and length to minimise sleep inertia effects, few have focused on countermeasures -especially those that can be implemented after waking (i.e. reactive countermeasures). This structured review summarises current literature on reactive countermeasures to sleep inertia such as caffeine, light, and temperature and discusses evidence for the effectiveness and operational viability of each approach. Current literature does not provide a convincing evidence-base for a reactive countermeasure. Caffeine is perhaps the best option, although it is most effective when administered prior to sleep and is therefore not strictly reactive. Investigations into light and temperature have found promising results for improving subjective alertness; further research is needed to determine whether these countermeasures can also attenuate performance impairment. Future research in this area would benefit from study design features highlighted in this review. In the meantime, it is recommended that proactive sleep inertia countermeasures are used, and that safety-critical tasks are avoided immediately after waking.

  13. Stability of gas atomized reactive powders through multiple step in-situ passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iver E.; Steinmetz, Andrew D.; Byrd, David J.

    2017-05-16

    A method for gas atomization of oxygen-reactive reactive metals and alloys wherein the atomized particles are exposed as they solidify and cool in a very short time to multiple gaseous reactive agents for the in-situ formation of a protective reaction film on the atomized particles. The present invention is especially useful for making highly pyrophoric reactive metal or alloy atomized powders, such as atomized magnesium and magnesium alloy powders. The gaseous reactive species (agents) are introduced into the atomization spray chamber at locations downstream of a gas atomizing nozzle as determined by the desired powder or particle temperature for the reactions and the desired thickness of the reaction film.

  14. Spectral fine structure effects on material and doppler reactivity worth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Karni, Y.

    1975-01-01

    New formulations concerning the fine structure effects on the reactivity worth of resonances are developed and conclusions are derived following the extension to more general types of perturbations which include: the removal of resonance material at finite temperatures and the temperature variation of part of the resonance material. It is concluded that the flux method can overpredict the reactivity worth of resonance materials more than anticipated. Calculations on the Doppler worth were carried out; the results can be useful for asessing the contribution of the fine structure effects to the large discrepancy that exists between the calculated and measured small sample Doppler worths. (B.G.)

  15. Study on reactor power transient characteristics (reactor training experiments). Control rod reactivity calibration by positive period method and other experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Yoshihiko; Sunagawa, Takeyoshi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, it is reported about some experiments that have been carried out in the reactor training that targets sophomore of the department of applied nuclear engineering, FUT. Reactor of Kinki University Atomic Energy Research Institute (UTR-KINKI) was used for reactor training. When each critical state was achieved at different reactor output respectively in reactor operating, it was confirmed that the control rod position at that time does not change. Further, control rod reactivity calibration experiments using positive Period method were carried out for shim safety rod and regulating rod, respectively. The results were obtained as reasonable values in comparison with the nominal value of the UTR-KINKI. The measurement of reactor power change after reactor scram was performed, and the presence of the delayed neutron precursor was confirmed by calculating the half-life. The spatial dose rate measurement experiment of neutrons and γ-rays in the reactor room in a reactor power 1W operating conditions were also performed. (author)

  16. A new kind of shape-stabilized PCMs with positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-long; Wu, Wan-fan; Song, Jia-liang; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Shuai; Liu, Na

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new kind of shape-stabilized PCMs with PTC effect is first prepared. • It provides a potential means for the thermal control of the electronic devices. • The switching temperature of the materials is about 25 °C. • The most appropriate component of the material is found out by experimental study. • The NTC effect of the new PCMs is eliminated effectively by heat treatment. - Abstract: A new kind of shape-stabilized phase change materials (PCMs) with positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect was prepared in this paper. The materials were prepared by adding graphite powder (GP) to the paraffin/low density polyethylene (LDPE) composite and the PTC characteristic was found by adjusting the component ratio of the material. Then the physical structures and thermal properties of the materials were investigated and the effect of various GP mass fractions and paraffin/LDPE mass proportions on the PTC behavior of the materials was studied experimentally. The results showed that the switching temperature of the materials was about 25 °C (room temperature) which approached to the first phase change temperature of paraffin dispersed in the materials. The PTC behavior of the materials was the best when the GP mass fraction and the mass proportion of LDPE/paraffin were 40 wt% and 30:70, respectively. Furthermore, the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) effect of the materials could be eliminated effectively with heat treatment. This new kind of materials is different from the former PTC materials which the switching temperatures focus on high temperature ranges. It makes up for the defect of previous materials that the switching temperatures only range in high temperature rather than room temperature and provides a potential means for the thermal control of the electronic devices or other room temperature thermal control applications

  17. Effect of 3-D moderator flow configurations on the reactivity of CANDU nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadeh, Foad Mehdi; Etienne, Stephane; Chambon, Richard; Marleau, Guy; Teyssedou, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • 3-D CFD simulations of CANDU-6 moderator flows are presented. • A thermal-hydraulic code using thermal physical fluid properties is used. • The numerical approach and convergence is validated against available data. • Flow configurations are correlated using Richardson’s number. • The interaction between moderator temperatures with reactivity is determined. - Abstract: The reactivity of nuclear reactors can be affected by thermal conditions prevailing within the moderator. In CANDU reactors, the moderator and the coolant are mechanically separated but not necessarily thermally isolated. Hence, any variation of moderator flow properties may change the reactivity. Until now, nuclear reactor calculations have been performed by assuming uniform moderator flow temperature distribution. However, CFD simulations have predicted large time dependent flow fluctuations taking place inside the calandria, which can bring about local temperature variations that can exceed 50 °C. This paper presents robust CANDU 3-D CFD moderator simulations coupled to neutronic calculations. The proposed methodology makes it possible to study not only different moderator flow configurations but also their effects on the reactor reactivity coefficient.

  18. The study of mechanical properties and reactive stresses in the i-Ni-Nb shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, N.N.; Sysoeva, T.I.; Lar'kin, V.F.; Vedernikova, I.I.; Prokoshkin, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    One investigated into the effect of the induced deformation value, rate and temperature, of the thermal treatment procedure and of the chemical composition on the mechanical properties and the development of the reactive stresses in Ti-Ni-Nb system shape memory alloys. One showed the effect of the material composition and of the deformation temperature on the mechanical features of the investigated alloys. One determined the temperature and deformation conditions ensuring the maximum level of the reactive stresses in the alloys. One revealed the dependence of the maximum reactive stress value on the austenite mechanical features, namely, on its yield limit. One chose Ti-Ni-Nb alloy compositions applicable in the pipeline thermomechanical connections [ru

  19. Elevated Striatal Reactivity Across Monetary and Social Rewards in Bipolar I Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Sunny J.; Cunningham, William A.; Kober, Hedy; Gruber, June

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with increased reactivity to rewards and heightened positive affectivity. It is less clear to what extent this heightened reward sensitivity is evident across contexts and what the associated neural mechanisms might be. The present investigation employed both a monetary and social incentive delay task among adults with remitted BD type I (N=24) and a healthy non-psychiatric control group (HC; N=25) using fMRI. Both whole-brain and region-of-interest analyses revealed elevated ventral and dorsal striatal reactivity across monetary and social reward receipt, but not anticipation, in the BD group. Post-hoc analyses further suggested that greater striatal reactivity to reward receipt across monetary and social reward tasks predicted decreased self-reported positive affect when anticipating subsequent rewards in the HC, but not BD, group. Results point toward elevated striatal reactivity to reward receipt as a potential neural mechanism of reward reactivity. PMID:26390194

  20. Matrix-reinforcement reactivity in P/M titanium matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amigo, V.; Romero, F.; Salvador, M. D.; Busquets, D.

    2007-01-01

    The high reactivity of titanium and the facility of the same one to form intermetallics makes difficult obtaining composites with this material and brings the need in any case of covering the principal fibres used as reinforcement. To obtain composites of titanium reinforced with ceramic particles ins proposed in this paper, for this reason it turns out to be fundamental to evaluate the reactivity between the matrix and reinforcement. Both titanium nitride and carbide (TiN and TiC) are investigated as materials of low reactivity whereas titanium silicide (TiSi 2 ) is also studied as materials of major reactivity, already stated by the scientific community. This reactivity will be analysed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) there being obtained distribution maps of the elements that allow to establish the possible influence of the sintering temperature and time. Hereby the matrix-reinforcement interactions are optimized to obtain suitable mechanical properties. (Author) 39 refs

  1. Analysis of pressurized water reactor accidents in reactivity disturbances. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinka, I.

    1978-01-01

    The logic structure of program FATRAP is described. The time course of reactivity temporal and spatial distributions of neutron flux density and power, characteristic temperatures of the individual reactor zones and the heat flux density from cladding to the coolant can be obtained as the main results. The basic program funcitons were tested for a point and a one-dimensional model. In the basic test the absorption rod was removed uncontrollably at a preset speed for 0.5 s with the reactivity feedback operative. A second test simulated the action of the accident protection system with a delay of 0.1 s started when the 7500 MW power had been obtained. The last test consisted in simulating a start-up accident with an initial power of 2.25 MW. For the said chosen accident models reactivity feedback is responsible for the formation of the appropriate power peak while the accident protection attendance alone can considerably reduce temperatures during the process. (J.F.)

  2. High-temperature reactivity in the ZrW2O8-Cu system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdon, C.; Dunand, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    Zirconium tungstate (ZrW 2 O 8 ) exhibits the unusual property of a negative coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) over a wide range of temperature, from 0.3 to 1,050 K. As a reinforcement in a composite, zirconium tungstate can reduce the overall thermal expansion of the composite much more effectively than a ceramic with positive CTE. If a metallic matrix is used, the resulting composite will also exhibit high thermal conductivity, with applications such as heat sink for microelectronics devices (CTE matching that of silicon or alumina) or high precision optical elements subjected to thermal fluctuation (zero CTE). As a matrix, copper is prime candidate, because it has the second highest thermal conductivity of all metals after silver, and because it can be easily processed within the temperature window imposed by the metastability of ZrW 2 O 8 . Moreover, copper is already widely used in electronics industry and can be easily soldered. In the present work, the authors investigate the stability of ZrW 2 O 8 when hot-isostatically pressed with copper, in order to explore the processing feasibility of a low thermal expansion, high conductivity ZrW 2 O 8 -Cu composite

  3. Thermal Performance and Reliability Analysis of Single-Phase PV Inverters with Reactive Power Injection Outside Feed-In Operating Hours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anurag, Anup; Yang, Yongheng; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    Reactive power support by photovoltaic (PV) systems is of increasingly interest, when compared to the conventional reactive power compensation devices. PV inverters can exchange reactive power with the utility grid in a decentralized manner even outside feed-in operation, especially at nights when...... there is no solar irradiance. However, reactive power injection causes additional power losses in the switching components leading to a temperature rise in the devices. Thus, this paper analyses the impact of reactive power injection by PV inverters outside feed-in operation on the thermal performance...... of their power switching components. A thermal analysis based on the mission profile (i.e., solar irradiance and ambient temperature) has been incorporated, so as to determine the additional temperature rise in the components induced by the operation outside feed-in hours. An analytical lifetime model has been...

  4. Room Temperature Reactivity Of Silicon Nanocrystals With Solvents: The Case Of Ketone And Hydrogen Production From Secondary Alcohols: Catalysis?

    KAUST Repository

    El Demellawi, Jehad K.; Holt, Christopher; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Al-Talla, Zeyad; Saih, Youssef; Chaieb, Saharoui

    2015-01-01

    Although silicon nanoparticles dispersed in liquids are used in various applications ranging from bio-labeling to hydrogen production, their reactivities with their solvents and their catalytic properties re-main still unexplored. Here, we discovered that, because of their surface structures and mechanical strain, silicon nanoparticles react strongly with their solvents and may act as catalysts for the dehydrogenation, at room temperature, of secondary alcohols (e.g. isopropanol) to ketones and hydrogen. This catalytic reaction was followed by gas chromatography, pH measurements, mass spectroscopy and solidstate NMR. This discovery provides new understanding of the role played by silicon nanoparticles, and nanosilicon in general, in their stability in solvents in general as well as being candidates in catalysis.

  5. Room Temperature Reactivity Of Silicon Nanocrystals With Solvents: The Case Of Ketone And Hydrogen Production From Secondary Alcohols: Catalysis?

    KAUST Repository

    El Demellawi, Jehad K.

    2015-05-29

    Although silicon nanoparticles dispersed in liquids are used in various applications ranging from bio-labeling to hydrogen production, their reactivities with their solvents and their catalytic properties re-main still unexplored. Here, we discovered that, because of their surface structures and mechanical strain, silicon nanoparticles react strongly with their solvents and may act as catalysts for the dehydrogenation, at room temperature, of secondary alcohols (e.g. isopropanol) to ketones and hydrogen. This catalytic reaction was followed by gas chromatography, pH measurements, mass spectroscopy and solidstate NMR. This discovery provides new understanding of the role played by silicon nanoparticles, and nanosilicon in general, in their stability in solvents in general as well as being candidates in catalysis.

  6. Characterization and temperature controlling property of TiAlN coatings deposited by reactive magnetron co-sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.T.; Wang, J.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.A.; Fan, X.Y.; Wu, Z.G.; Yan, P.X.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) ternary coating is a potential material which is expected to be applied on satellite for thermal controlling. In order to investigate thermal controlling property, TiAlN coatings were deposited on Si wafers with different N 2 and Ar flux ratio by reactive magnetron co-sputtering. The structure, morphology, chemical composition and optical reflectance are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), atom force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and spectrophotometer, respectively. The orientation of the coatings depends on the N 2 /Ar flux ratio. The coatings deposited with N 2 /Ar ratio of 10, 30 and 60% show the cubic-TiN [2 2 0] preferred orientation and the coating deposited with N 2 /Ar ratio of 100% exhibits the phase of hexagonal-AlN and cubic-TiN. The surface of the coatings becomes more compact and smoother with the N 2 /Ar ratios increase. XPS spectrum indicates that the oxides (TiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 ), oxynitride (TiN x O y ) and nitrides (TiN and AlN x ) appear at the surface of the coatings. Ignoring internal power, the optimum equilibrium temperature of TiAlN coatings is 18 deg. C and the equilibrium temperature after heat-treated has slight change, which provides the prospective application on thermal controlling

  7. Suspension Combustion of Wood: Influence of Pyrolysis Conditions on Char Yield, Morphology, and Reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall'Ora, Michelangelo; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2008-01-01

    Chars from pine and beech wood were produced by fast pyrolysis in an entrained flow reactor and by slow pyrolysis in a thermogravimetric analyzer. The influence of pyrolysis temperature, heating rate and particle size on char yield and morphology was investigated. The applied pyrolysis temperature...... varied in the range 673−1673 K for slow pyrolysis and between 873 and 1573 K for fast pyrolysis. The chars were oxidized in a thermogravimetric analyzer and the mass loss data were used to determine char oxidation reactivity. Char yield from fast pyrolysis (104−105 K/s) was as low as 1 to 6% on a dry ash......, char oxidation reactivity decreased as pyrolysis temperature increased. The amount and composition of the ash forming matter of the wood fuels seems to play an important role in determining the differences in char yield, morphology and reactivity....

  8. Impact of the thermal scattering law of H in H_2O on the isothermal temperatures reactivity coefficients for UOX and MOX fuel lattices in cold operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotta, J.P.; Noguere, G.; Bernard, D.; Santamarina, A.; Damian, J.I.M.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of the thermal scattering law of hydrogen in light water to isothermal temperature reactivity coefficients for UOX and MOX lattices was studied in the frame of the MISTRAL critical experiments carried out in the zero power reactor EOLE of CEA Cadarache (France). The interpretation of the core residual reactivity measured between 6 to 80 C. degrees (by step of 5 C. degrees) was performed with the Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4"R. The nuclear data from the JEFF-3.1.1 library were used in the calculations. 3 different thermal scattering laws of hydrogen in light water were tested in order to evaluate their impact on the MISTRAL calculations. The thermal scattering laws of interest were firstly those recommended in JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/BVII.1 and also that recently produced at the atomic center of Bariloche (CAB, Argentina) with molecular dynamic simulations. The present work indicates that the calculation-to-experimental bias is (0.4 ± 0.3) pcm/C. degree in the UOX core and (1.0 ± 0.3) pcm/C. degree in the MOX cores, when the JEFF-3.1.1 library is used. An improvement is observed over the whole temperature range with the CAB model. The calculation-to-experimental bias vanishes for the UOX core (0.02 pcm/C. degree) and becomes close to 0.7 pcm/C. degree for the MOX cores. The magnitude of these bias have to be connected to the typical value of the temperature reactivity coefficient that ranges from 5 pcm/C. degree at Beginning Of Cycle (BOC) up to 50 pcm/C. degrees at End Of Cycle (EOC), in PWR conditions. (authors)

  9. Patch test reactivity to feverfew-containing creams in feverfew-allergic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Evy; Christensen, Lars P; Fretté, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    with feverfew contact allergy were patch tested with two creams containing the feverfew extract. Subsequently, the creams were analysed by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry to detect parthenolide. Results: Four of the patients tested positive to one of the creams; reactivity was associated......-sensitive patients. The reactivity may be enhanced by simultaneous testing with parthenolide, but the reactivity is lost over time, probably because of degradation of parthenolide....

  10. Reactivity study on thermal cracking of vacuum residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, A. Y.; Díaz, S. D.; Rodríguez, R. C.; Laverde, D.

    2016-02-01

    This study focused on the process reactivity of thermal cracking of vacuum residues from crude oils mixtures. The thermal cracking experiments were carried out under a nitrogen atmosphere at 120psi between 430 to 500°C for 20 minutes. Temperature conditions were established considering the maximum fractional conversion reported in tests of thermogravimetry performed in the temperature range of 25 to 600°C, with a constant heating rate of 5°C/min and a nitrogen flow rate of 50ml/min. The obtained products were separated in to gases, distillates and coke. The results indicate that the behaviour of thermal reactivity over the chemical composition is most prominent for the vacuum residues with higher content of asphaltenes, aromatics, and resins. Finally some correlations were obtained in order to predict the weight percentage of products from its physical and chemical properties such as CCR, SARA (saturates, aromatics, resins, asphaltenes) and density. The results provide new knowledge of the effect of temperature and the properties of vacuum residues in thermal conversion processes.

  11. Observations of speciated atmospheric mercury at three sites in Nevada: Evidence for a free tropospheric source of reactive gaseous mercury

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss-Penzias, Peter; Gustin, Mae Sexauer; Lyman, Seth

    2009-01-01

    Air mercury (Hg) speciation was measured for 11 weeks (June–August 2007) at three sites simultaneously in Nevada, USA. Mean reactive gaseous Hg (RGM) concentrations were elevated at all sites relative to those reported for locations not directly influenced by known point sources. RGM concentrations at all sites displayed a regular diel pattern and were positively correlated with ozone (O3) and negatively correlated with elemental Hg (Hg0) and dew point temperature (Tdp). Superimposed on the d...

  12. Neutron and thermo - hydraulic model of a reactivity transient in a nuclear power plant fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, Jose de Jesus Rivero

    2012-01-01

    A reactivity transient without reactor scram was modeled and calculated using analytical expressions for the space distributions of the temperature fields, combined with discrete numerical calculations for the time dependences of thermal power and temperatures. The transient analysis covered the time dependencies of reactivity, global thermal power, fuel heat flux and temperatures in fuel, cladding and cooling water. The model was implemented in Microsoft Office Excel, dividing the Excel file in several separated worksheets for input data, initial steady-state calculations, calculation of parameters non-depending on eigenvalues, eigenvalues determination, calculation of parameters depending on eigenvalues, transient calculation and graphical representation of intermediate and final results. The results show how the thermal power reaches a new equilibrium state due to the negative reactivity feedback derived from the fuel temperature increment. Nevertheless, the reactor mean power increases 40% during the first second and, in the hottest channel, the maximum fuel temperature goes to a significantly high value, slightly above 2100 deg C, after 8 seconds of transient. Consequently, the results confirm that certain degree of fuel damage could be expected in case of a reactor scram failure. Once the basic model has being established the scope of accidents for future analyses can be extended, modifying the nuclear power behavior (reactivity) during transient and the boundary conditions for coolant temperature. A more complex model is underway for an annular fuel element. (author)

  13. Low Temperature Plasma Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David

    2013-10-01

    Ionized gas plasmas near room temperature are used in a remarkable number of technological applications mainly because they are extraordinarily efficient at exploiting electrical power for useful chemical and material transformations near room temperature. In this tutorial address, I will focus on the newest area of low temperature ionized gas plasmas (LTP), in this case operating under atmospheric pressure conditions, in which the temperature-sensitive material is living tissue. LTP research directed towards biomedical applications such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that LTP readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. I will review the evidence suggesting that RONS generated by plasmas are responsible for their observed therapeutic effects. Other possible bio-active mechanisms include electric fields, charges and photons. It is common in LTP applications that synergies between different mechanisms can play a role and I will review the evidence for synergies in plasma biomedicine. Finally, I will address the challenges and opportunities for plasma physicists to enter this novel, multidisciplinary field.

  14. The reactivity meter and core reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siltanen, P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discussed in depth the point kinetic equations and the characteristics of the point kinetic reactivity meter, particularly for large negative reactivities. From a given input signal representing the neutron flux seen by a detector, the meter computes a value of reactivity in dollars (ρ/β), based on inverse point kinetics. The prompt jump point of view is emphasised. (Author)

  15. Physics study of Canada deuterium uranium lattice with coolant void reactivity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Su; Lee, Hyun Suk; Tak, Tae Woo; Lee, Deok Jung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Ho Cheol [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Central Research Institute (KHNP-CRI), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    This study presents a coolant void reactivity analysis of Canada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU)-6 and Advanced Canada Deuterium Uranium Reactor-700 (ACR-700) fuel lattices using a Monte Carlo code. The reactivity changes when the coolant was voided were assessed in terms of the contributions of four factors and spectrum shifts. In the case of single bundle coolant voiding, the contribution of each of the four factors in the ACR-700 lattice is large in magnitude with opposite signs, and their summation becomes a negative reactivity effect in contrast to that of the CANDU-6 lattice. Unlike the coolant voiding in a single fuel bundle, the 2 x 2 checkerboard coolant voiding in the ACR-700 lattice shows a positive reactivity effect. The neutron current between the no-void and voided bundles, and the four factors of each bundle were analyzed to figure out the mechanism of the positive coolant void reactivity of the checkerboard voiding case. Through a sensitivity study of fuel enrichment, type of burnable absorber, and moderator to fuel volume ratio, a design strategy for the CANDU reactor was suggested in order to achieve a negative coolant void reactivity even for the checkerboard voiding case.

  16. Preliminary investigation of actinide and xenon reactivity effects in accelerator transmutation of waste high-flux systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, K.R.; Henderson, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of an unstable positive reactivity growth in an accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW)-type high-flux system is investigated. While it has always been clear that xenon is an important actor in the reactivity response of a system to flux changes, it has been suggested that in very high thermal flux transuranic burning systems, a positive, unstable reactivity growth could be caused by the actinides alone. Initial system reactivity response to flux changes caused by the actinides and xenon are investigated separately. The maximum change in reactivity after a flux change caused by the effect of the changing quantities of actinides is generally at least two orders of magnitude smaller than either the positive or negative reactivity effect associated with xenon after a shutdown or startup. In any transient flux event, the reactivity response of the system to xenon will generally occlude the response caused by the actinides. The capabilities and applications of both the current actinide model and the xenon model are discussed. Finally, the need for a complete dynamic model for the high-flux fluid-fueled ATW system is addressed

  17. Microbial Metabolism in Soil at Subzero Temperatures: Adaptation Mechanisms Revealed by Position-Specific 13C Labeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel K. Bore

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Although biogeochemical models designed to simulate carbon (C and nitrogen (N dynamics in high-latitude ecosystems incorporate extracellular parameters, molecular and biochemical adaptations of microorganisms to freezing remain unclear. This knowledge gap hampers estimations of the C balance and ecosystem feedback in high-latitude regions. To analyze microbial metabolism at subzero temperatures, soils were incubated with isotopomers of position-specifically 13C-labeled glucose at three temperatures: +5 (control, -5, and -20°C. 13C was quantified in CO2, bulk soil, microbial biomass, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC after 1, 3, and 10 days and also after 30 days for samples at -20°C. Compared to +5°C, CO2 decreased 3- and 10-fold at -5 and -20°C, respectively. High 13C recovery in CO2 from the C-1 position indicates dominance of the pentose phosphate pathway at +5°C. In contrast, increased oxidation of the C-4 position at subzero temperatures implies a switch to glycolysis. A threefold higher 13C recovery in microbial biomass at -5 than +5°C points to synthesis of intracellular compounds such as glycerol and ethanol in response to freezing. Less than 0.4% of 13C was recovered in DOC after 1 day, demonstrating complete glucose uptake by microorganisms even at -20°C. Consequently, we attribute the fivefold higher extracellular 13C in soil than in microbial biomass to secreted antifreeze compounds. This suggests that with decreasing temperature, intracellular antifreeze protection is complemented by extracellular mechanisms to avoid cellular damage by crystallizing water. The knowledge of sustained metabolism at subzero temperatures will not only be useful for modeling global C dynamics in ecosystems with periodically or permanently frozen soils, but will also be important in understanding and controlling the adaptive mechanisms of food spoilage organisms.

  18. Thermoset polymers chemo-rheology dedicated to reactive rotational moulding (RRM) understanding and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viale, J.

    2009-12-01

    This study comes within the scope of New Technology for Energy, particularly for high pressure hydrogen storage. Reactive Rotational Moulding has been identified as an adapted process for hydrogen-tight liners manufacturing. Thus the Reactive Rotational Moulding process has been studied in order to find theoretical tools dedicated to the understanding of such a reactive forming process. Chemical kinetics of four polyurethanes and poly-epoxides reactive systems have been determined on classical isothermal conditions and original aniso-thermal conditions i.e. on temperature ramps. Aniso-thermal conditions have been selected because they corresponds better to real process conditions. Rheological behaviour have also been characterized on two different approaches, an isothermal one and on temperature ramps. In particular, viscosity have been described as a function of heating rate. These physical and chemical results have been compiled in an original state diagram in order to show material properties evolution in a time-temperature space. The whole ex situ characterizations are then managed to described the behavior of the different formulations during the rotational moulding. Moreover they allow to form specific materials and so to widen the range of material to thermoset polymers. Finally, in order to correlate theoretical deduction to real reactive systems evolution, the elaboration of innovating monitoring tool based on ultrasonic analysis has been studied. To begin, polymerization monitoring criteria have been identified and then specific techniques have been set to monitor these criteria in real forming process. (author)

  19. Quick monitoring of pozzolanic reactivity of waste ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinthaworn, Suppachai; Nimityongskul, Pichai

    2009-05-01

    This article proposes a quick method of monitoring for pozzolanic reactivity of waste ashes by investigating the electrical conductivity of the suspension at an elevated temperature. This suspension is obtained by mixing tested pozzolan with an ordinary Portland cement (OPC) solution produced by mixing ordinary Portland cement with water. For comparison, silica fume, metakaolin, rice husk ash and river sand - whose pozzolanic reactivities range from reactive to inert - were used in the experimental investigation. The electrical conductivity of the suspension was continually recorded by using an electrical conductivity meter and stored by using a personal computer for a period of slightly over 1day. The indicative parameters that can be related to pozzolanic reactivity were discussed and analyzed in detail. It was found that it is possible to determine the pozzolanic reactivity of fly ash within 28h by using the proposed technique, as compared to 7 or 28 days for the determination of strength activity index according to ASTM. This technique would help concrete technologists to speedily investigate the quality of fly ash for use as a cement replacement in order to alleviate pollution caused by cement production and solve disposal problems of waste ashes.

  20. Cross-reactivity profiles of hybrid capture II, cobas, and APTIMA human papillomavirus assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Sarah Nørgaard; Rebolj, Matejka; Ejegod, Ditte Møller

    2016-01-01

    evaluated to what extent these can be explained by cross-reactivity, i.e. positive test results without evidence of high-risk HPV genotypes. The patterns of cross-reactivity have been thoroughly studied for hybrid capture II (HC2) but not yet for newer HPV assays although the manufacturers claimed...... no or limited frequency of cross-reactivity. In this independent study we evaluated the frequency of cross-reactivity for HC2, cobas, and APTIMA assays. Methods Consecutive routine cervical screening samples from 5022 Danish women, including 2859 from women attending primary screening, were tested...... with normal cytology and positive high-risk HPV test results were invited for repeated testing in 18 months. Results Cross-reactivity to low-risk genotypes was detected in 109 (2.2 %) out of 5022 samples on HC2, 62 (1.2 %) on cobas, and 35 (0.7 %) on APTIMA with only 10 of the samples cross-reacting on all 3...

  1. Assessment of reactivity devices for CANDU-6 with DUPIC fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Choi, Hang Bok

    1998-01-01

    Reactivity device characteristics for a CANDU-6 reactor loaded with DUPIC fuel have been assessed. A transport code WIMS-AECL and a three-dimensional diffusion code RFSP were used for the lattice parameter generation and the core calculation, respectively. Three major reactivity devices have been assessed for their inherent functions. For the zone controller system, damping capability for spatial oscillation was investigated. The restart capability of the adjuster system was investigated. The shim operation and power stepback calculation were also performed to confirm the compatibility of the current adjuster rod system. The mechanical control absorber was assessed for the capability to compensate the temperature reactivity feedback following a power reduction. This study has shown that the current reactivity device systems retain their functions when used in a DUPIC fuel CANDU reactor

  2. Hot gas flow cell for optical measurements on reactive gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosch, Helge; Fateev, Alexander; Nielsen, Karsten Lindorff

    2013-01-01

    A new design is presented for a gas flow cell for reactive gases at high temperatures. The design features three heated sections that are separated by flow windows. This design avoids the contact of reactive gases with the material of the exchangeable optical windows. A gas cell with this design ......-resolution measurements are presented for the absorption cross-section of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the UV range up to 773 K (500 degrees C)...

  3. Various reactivity effects value for assuring fast reactor core inherent safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, S.B.; Vasilyev, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents the results of temperature and power reactivity feedback components calculations for fast reactors with different core volume when using oxide, carbide, nitride and metal fuel. Reactor parameters change in loss of flow without scram and transient over power without scram accidents was evaluated. The importance of various reactivity feedback components in restricting the consequences of these accidents has been analyzed. (author)

  4. New England observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted August stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change in New England based on a...

  5. New England observed and predicted July stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted July stream/river temperature maximum positive daily rate of change in New England based on a...

  6. Assessment of CANDU-6 reactivity devices for DUPIC fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Choi, Hang Bok

    1998-11-01

    Reactivity device characteristics for a CANDU 6 reactor loaded with DUPIC fuel have been assessed. The lattice parameters were generated by WIMS-AECL code and the core calculations were performed by RFSP code with a 3-dimensional full core model. The reactivity devices studied are the zone controller, adjusters, mechanical control absorber and shutoff rods. For the zone controller system, damping capability for spatial oscillation was investigated. For the adjusters, the restart capability was investigated. For the adjusters, the restart capability was investigated. The shin operation and power stepback calculation were also performed to confirm the compatibility of the current adjuster system. The mechanical control absorber was assessed for the function of compensating temperature reactivity feedback following a power reduction. And shutoff rods were also assessed to investigate the following a power reduction. And shutoff rods were also assessed to investigate the static reactivity worth. This study has shown that the current reactivity device system of CANDU-6 core with the DUPIC fuel. (author). 9 refs., 17 tabs., 7 figs

  7. Stress reactivity and emotion in premenstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Q

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Qing Liu,1 Yongshun Wang,2 Cornelis Hermanus van Heck,3 Wei Qiao4 1Department of Nuclear Medicine and Medical PET Center, The Second Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 2School of Physical Education and Sport, Huaqiao University, Xiamen, People’s Republic of China; 3DCC, Donders Institute for Neuroscience and Neurocognition, Arnhem, the Netherlands; 4Department of Physical Education, Xiamen Institute of Technology, Xiamen, People’s Republic of China Background: Hormone level fluctuation across the menstrual cycle causes women to experience negative emotions and also affects their mood regulation and stress sensitivity. However, the stress reactivity and emotional variations in women with premenstrual syndrome (PMS, who are especially sensitive to the variations in hormone cycles, have not been explained. Methods: The present study used an electroencephalogram (EEG stress evaluation test, a physiology stress evaluation test, and the positive affect and negative affect scale (PANAS to evaluate the stress reactivity pattern and emotional state of women with PMS. Results: The results showed that women with PMS had higher negative affect and lower positive affect compared with controls. Moreover, under stressful conditions, the women with PMS had a higher alpha activity and a lower respiration rate than the controls. The differences in stress reactivity and emotional states between women with PMS and controls were based on a covariant analysis with menstrual cycle (luteal and follicular phases as the covariate. Conclusion: The results demonstrated that, compared with controls, women suffering from PMS have a continuous abnormality in emotional state and stress reactivity, which was independent of the menstrual cycle. Keywords: premenstrual syndrome, stress reactivity, emotion, EEG stress evaluation test, physiology stress evaluation test

  8. Reactivity feedback components of a homogeneous U10Zr-fueled 900 MWt LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghetti, D.; Kucera, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The linear and Doppler feedback components of the regional contributions of the power-reactivity-decrement (PRD) and of the temperature coefficient of reactivity for a 900 MWt homogeneous U10Zr-fueled sodium-cooled reactor are calculated. The PRD components are separated into power dependent and power-to-flow dependent parts. The values of PRD and temperature coefficient components are compared with corresponding quantities calculated for the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The implications of these comparisons upon inherent safety characteristics of metal-fueled sodium-cooled reactors are discussed

  9. Positive effects of temperature and growth conditions on enzymatic and antioxidant status in lettuce plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Hee-Ock; Heo, Buk-Gu; Gorinstein, Shela; Chon, Sang-Uk

    2011-10-01

    The contents of two bioactive compounds (polyphenols and flavonoids) and their antioxidant and enzyme activities were determined in the leaves of six lettuce (Latuca sativa L.) cultivars subjected to 4 different day/night temperatures for 6 weeks. The total polyphenol and anthocyanin contents and the corresponding antioxidant activities were the highest at 13/10°C and 20/13°C, followed by 25/20°C and 30/25°C. The enzymatic activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) were also the highest at low day/night temperatures, but the peroxidase (POD) activity was decreased at low day/night temperatures and increased at high day/night temperatures. The most significant positive correlation existed between anthocyanin content and PPO activity, total polyphenols and their antioxidant activities. The results showed that at relatively low temperatures, lettuce plants have a high antioxidant and enzymatic status. These results provide additional information for the lettuce growers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Growth and characterization of polycrystalline Ge1-xCx by reactive pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, M.P.; Farias, M.H.; Castillon, F.F.; Diaz, Jesus A.; Avalos, M.; Ulloa, L.; Gallegos, J.A.; Yee-Madeiros, H.

    2011-01-01

    Polycrystalline thin films of Ge-C were grown on Si (1 1 1) substrates by means of reactive pulsed laser deposition with methane pressure of 100 mTorr. Effect substrate temperature, T s , on C incorporation to substitutional sites (x) in Ge 1-x C x was investigated systematically by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyzes. The substrate temperatures were ranging from 250 to 400 deg. C. The substitutional C composition x in the films by XRD were estimated using the Vegard's linear law. The maximum value of x calculated by XRD was 0.032 for T s of 350 deg. C. The position of the C 1s peak at 283.4 eV in the XPS spectrum confirmed the germanium-carbon alloys. XRD measurements indicated that x increased with T s from 250 deg. C to 350 deg. C. At T s = 400 deg. C, the estimation of x was lowered. However, the C content calculated by XPS analyzes increased with T s being more these values than substitutional C composition x. XPS and XRD analyzes demonstrate that the remaining C atoms are incorporated to interstitial sites. The use of the T s plays important roles in the incorporation of substitutional C and in restraining C-cluster formation in the reactive pulsed laser deposition growth of Ge-C/Si.

  11. Characterization and temperature controlling property of TiAlN coatings deposited by reactive magnetron co-sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.T. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, J. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); National Key Laboratory of Surface Engineering, Lanzhou Institute of Physics, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.A.; Fan, X.Y.; Wu, Z.G. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yan, P.X. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute Chemical and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)], E-mail: pxyan@lzu.edu.cn

    2009-03-20

    Titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) ternary coating is a potential material which is expected to be applied on satellite for thermal controlling. In order to investigate thermal controlling property, TiAlN coatings were deposited on Si wafers with different N{sub 2} and Ar flux ratio by reactive magnetron co-sputtering. The structure, morphology, chemical composition and optical reflectance are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), atom force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and spectrophotometer, respectively. The orientation of the coatings depends on the N{sub 2}/Ar flux ratio. The coatings deposited with N{sub 2}/Ar ratio of 10, 30 and 60% show the cubic-TiN [2 2 0] preferred orientation and the coating deposited with N{sub 2}/Ar ratio of 100% exhibits the phase of hexagonal-AlN and cubic-TiN. The surface of the coatings becomes more compact and smoother with the N{sub 2}/Ar ratios increase. XPS spectrum indicates that the oxides (TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), oxynitride (TiN{sub x}O{sub y}) and nitrides (TiN and AlN{sub x}) appear at the surface of the coatings. Ignoring internal power, the optimum equilibrium temperature of TiAlN coatings is 18 deg. C and the equilibrium temperature after heat-treated has slight change, which provides the prospective application on thermal controlling.

  12. Clinical cross-reactivity among foods of the Rosaceae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, J; Crespo, J F; Lopez-Rubio, A; De La Cruz-Bertolo, J; Ferrando-Vivas, P; Vives, R; Daroca, P

    2000-07-01

    Foods from the Rosaceae botanical family have been increasingly reported as causes of allergic reaction. Patients frequently have positive skin tests or radioallergosorbent test results for multiple members of this botanical family. Our purpose was to investigate the clinical cross-reactivity assessed by double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) of Rosaceae foods (apricot, almond, plum, strawberry, apple, peach, and pear). Thirty-four consecutive adult patients complaining of adverse reactions to Rosaceae were included in the study. Skin prick tests and CAP System (FEIA) were performed with Rosaceae foods in all patients. Clinical reactivity to Rosaceae was systematically evaluated by open food challenges (OFCs), unless there was a convincing history of a recent severe anaphylaxis. Positive reactions on OFCs were subsequently evaluated by DBPCFCs. Twenty-six and 24 patients had positive skin prick tests and CAP FEIA with Rosaceae, respectively; from these 88% and 100% had positive tests with >/=2. No evidence of clinical reactivity was found in 66% percent of positive skin prick tests and 63% of positive specific IgE determinations to fruits. A total of 226 food challenges (including OFC and DBPCFC) were performed in the 28 patients with positive skin prick tests or CAP System FEIA. Of 182 initial OFCs carried out, 26 (14%) reactions were confirmed by DBPCFCs. Overall, 40 reactions were considered positive in 22 patients with positive skin tests or CAP FEIA. Thirty-eight reactions had been previously reported, the remaining two were detected by systematic challenges. Most reactions were caused by peach (22 patients), apple (6), and apricot (5). Ten patients (46%) were clinically allergic to peach and other Rosaceae. Positive skin test and CAP System FEIA should not be taken as the only guide for multi-species dietary restrictions. Nevertheless, the potential clinical allergy to other Rosaceae should not be neglected. If the reported reaction is

  13. Influence of the control bars on the fuel temperature instrumented in the C and D rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes G, L.C

    1991-12-01

    It was demonstrated that the influence on the fuel temperature to the movement of the control bars, this in direct relationship with the value in negative reactivity of each control bar for the different positions of the ring C. Consequently the influence of bigger to smaller, is given by the regulator bar, fine, of safety and transitory for the configuration of fuel No. 16. It was proven that the ring is the one that presents the biggest generation of power for ring of the reactor, for that in it is registered the fuel temperatures but high. Those were obtained response of different positions in the rings C and D in function of the route of the four control bars and safety of the reactor. (Author)

  14. Adsorption of reactive dyes from aqueous solutions by fly ash: Kinetic and equilibrium studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dizge, N.; Aydiner, C.; Demirbas, E.; Kobya, M.; Kara, S.

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption kinetic and equilibrium studies of three reactive dyes namely, Remazol Brillant Blue (RB), Remazol Red 133 (RR) and Rifacion Yellow HED (RY) from aqueous solutions at various initial dye concentration (100-500 mg/l), pH (2-8), particle size (45-112.5 μm) and temperature (293-323 K) on fly ash (FA) were studied in a batch mode operation. The adsorbent was characterized with using several methods such as SEM, XRD and FTIR. Adsorption of RB reactive dye was found to be pH dependent but both RR and RY reactive dyes were not. The result showed that the amount adsorbed of the reactive dyes increased with increasing initial dye concentration and contact time. Batch kinetic data from experimental investigations on the removal of reactive dyes from aqueous solutions using FA have been well described by external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion models. It was found that external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion had rate limiting affects on the removal process. This was attributed to the relatively simple macropore structure of FA particles. The adsorption data fitted well with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The optimum conditions for removal of the reactive dyes were 100 mg/l initial dye concentration, 0.6 g/100 ml adsorbent dose, temperature of 293 K, 45 μm particle size, pH 6 and agitation speed of 250 rpm, respectively. The values of Langmuir and Freundlich constants were found to increase with increasing temperature in the range 135-180 and 15-34 mg/g for RB, 47-86 and 1.9-3.7 mg/g for RR and 37-61 and 3.0-3.6 mg/g for RY reactive dyes, respectively. Different thermodynamic parameters viz., changes in standard free energy, enthalpy and entropy were evaluated and it was found that the reaction was spontaneous and endothermic in nature

  15. Study of reactivity of fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rammsy, J.E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The reactor physics calculations of a 19 module Fluidized Bed Nuclear Reactor using Leopard and Odog codes are performed. The behaviour of the reactor was studied by calculating the reactivity of the reactor as a function of the parameters governing the operational and accidental conditions of the reactor. The effects of temperature, pressure, and vapor generation in the core on the reactivity are calculated. Also the start up behaviour of the reactor is analyzed. For the purpose of the study of a prototype research reactor, the calculations on a one module reactor have been performed. (Author) [pt

  16. Simulation and study on reactivity disturbs dynamic character of HTR-10 nuclear power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xiaojin; Feng Yuankun

    2002-01-01

    In order to not only know 10 MW High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR-10) nuclear power system's dynamic character more deeply but also to satisfy requirements of control system's design and analysis, the dynamic model of HTR-10 nuclear power system is established on the basis of dynamic model of HTR-10 nuclear system, which supplies turbine and generate electricity system model. Using this model, system's main variables' dynamic processes are simulated when control rod takes step reactivity disturb. The concussive progresses which is caused by reactivity disturb are analyzed. The results indicate that fuel temperature changing more slowly than nuclear power makes reactivity negative feedback not to restrain power changing, and then power concussive progress comes to being

  17. The relationship of C-reactive protein levels and positive culture with quality of life in acute rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schalek P

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Petr Schalek, Zuzana Hornáčková, Aleš Hahn Ear, Nose and Throat department, 3rd Medical Faculty of Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic Background: Acute rhinosinusitis (ARS has been shown to significantly reduce patient quality of life (QoL. While the QoL in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis has been the subject of intensive research over the last decade, studies measuring the impact of ARS on patient QoL have remained relatively scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the QoL and parameters suggestive of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (C-reactive protein [CRP] levels and positive culture and to see if measurement of the QoL could be used as an indicator for antibiotic treatment in ARS.Methods: Eighty patients with ARS were enrolled in the study. A novel QoL instrument for patients with ARS, called Measurement of Acute Rhinosinusitis (MARS questionnaire, was given to patients at the time of diagnosis. We assessed patient QoL, obtained endoscopically guided cultures from the middle meatus, and measured levels of CRP. The relationship between QoL MARS scores (QoL-Mscores and CRP was determined using a correlation coefficient. To compare QoL-Mscores, relative to culture-positive and culture-negative patients, the Student’s t-test was used.Results: No correlation between the QoL, assessed using the MARS questionnaire, and positive middle meatus culture was demonstrated (P=0.332. A weak correlation was found between QoL-Mscores and CRP values, with a correlation coefficient of 0.221 and P=0.0498.Conclusion: No correlation between the QoL in ARS patients and positive culture was found in this study. The clinical significance of the correlation between QoL-Mscores and CRP values in the antibiotic decision making process needs further research. Keywords: endoscopy, quality of life, questionnaires, anti-bacterial agents

  18. High resolution x-ray diffraction study of the substrate temperature and thickness dependent microstructure of reactively sputtered epitaxial ZnO films

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Devendra

    2017-08-24

    Epitaxial ZnO films were grown on c-sapphire by reactive sputtering of zinc target in Ar-O2 mixture. High resolution X-ray diffraction measurements were carried out to obtain lateral and vertical coherence lengths, crystallite tilt and twist, micro-strain and densities of screw and edge dislocations in epilayers of different thickness (25 - 200 nm) and those grown at different temperatures (100 - 500 °C). phgr-scans indicate epitaxial growth in all the cases, although epilayers grown at lower substrate temperatures (100 °C and 200 °C) and those of smaller thickness (25 nm and 50 nm) display inferior microstructural parameters. This is attributed to the dominant presence of initially grown strained 2D layer and subsequent transition to an energetically favorable mode. With increase in substrate temperature, the transition shifts to lower thickness and growth takes place through the formation of 2D platelets with intermediate strain, over which 3D islands grow. Consequently, 100 nm thick epilayers grown at 300 °C display the best microstructural parameters (micro-strain ~1.2 x 10-3, screw and edge dislocation densities ~1.5 x 1010 cm-2 and ~2.3 x 1011 cm-2, respectively). A marginal degradation of microstructural parameters is seen in epilayers grown at higher substrate temperatures, due to the dominance of 3D hillock type growth.

  19. High resolution x-ray diffraction study of the substrate temperature and thickness dependent microstructure of reactively sputtered epitaxial ZnO films

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Devendra; Kumar, Ravi; Ganguli, Tapas; Major, Syed S

    2017-01-01

    Epitaxial ZnO films were grown on c-sapphire by reactive sputtering of zinc target in Ar-O2 mixture. High resolution X-ray diffraction measurements were carried out to obtain lateral and vertical coherence lengths, crystallite tilt and twist, micro-strain and densities of screw and edge dislocations in epilayers of different thickness (25 - 200 nm) and those grown at different temperatures (100 - 500 °C). phgr-scans indicate epitaxial growth in all the cases, although epilayers grown at lower substrate temperatures (100 °C and 200 °C) and those of smaller thickness (25 nm and 50 nm) display inferior microstructural parameters. This is attributed to the dominant presence of initially grown strained 2D layer and subsequent transition to an energetically favorable mode. With increase in substrate temperature, the transition shifts to lower thickness and growth takes place through the formation of 2D platelets with intermediate strain, over which 3D islands grow. Consequently, 100 nm thick epilayers grown at 300 °C display the best microstructural parameters (micro-strain ~1.2 x 10-3, screw and edge dislocation densities ~1.5 x 1010 cm-2 and ~2.3 x 1011 cm-2, respectively). A marginal degradation of microstructural parameters is seen in epilayers grown at higher substrate temperatures, due to the dominance of 3D hillock type growth.

  20. Reactivity anomaly surveillance in the Fast Flux Test Facility through cycle 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, B.J.; Harris, R.A.

    1984-08-01

    The technique for monitoring core reactivity during power operation used at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is described. This technique relies on comparing predicted to measured rod positions to detect any anomalous (or unpredicted) core reactivity changes. It is implemented on the Plant Data System (PDS) computer and thus provides rapid indication of any abnormal core conditions. The prediction algorithms use thermal-hydraulic, control rod position and neutron flux sensor information to predict the core reactivity state. Initial results of using this technique based mainly on theoretical formulations is presented. The results show that the reactivity changes due to increasing reactor power (power defect) and burnup of the fuel were within approx. 16% of predicted values. To increase the sensitivity and accuracy of this technique, the prediction algorithms were calibrated to actual operating data. The work of calibrating this technique and the results of using the calibrated technique up through the third full operating cycle are summarized

  1. Comparison of reactivity in a flow reactor and a single cylinder engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natelson, Robert H.; Johnson, Rodney O.; Kurman, Matthew S.; Cernansky, Nicholas P.; Miller, David L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-2875 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The relative reactivity of 2:1:1 and 1:1:1 mixtures of n-decane:n-butylcyclohexane:n-butylbenzene and an average sample of JP-8 were evaluated in a single cylinder engine and compared to results obtained in a pressurized flow reactor. At compression ratios of 14:1, 15:1, and 16:1, inlet temperature of 500 K, inlet pressure of 0.1 MPa, equivalence ratio of 0.23, and engine speed of 800 RPM, the autoignition delay times were, from shortest to longest, the 2:1:1, followed by the 1:1:1, and then the JP-8. This order corresponded with recent results in a pressurized flow reactor, where the preignition oxidation chemistry was monitored at temperatures of 600-800 K, 0.8 MPa pressure, and an equivalence ratio of 0.30, and where the preignition reactivity from highest to lowest was the 2:1:1, followed by the 1:1:1, and the JP-8. This shows that the relative reactivity at low temperatures in the flow reactor tracks the autoignition tendencies in the engine for these particular fuels. (author) the computed experimental error. (author)

  2. Room temperature giant positive junction magnetoresistance of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/n-Si heterojunction for spintronics application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, J.; Saha, S.N.; Nath, T.K., E-mail: tnath@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in

    2014-09-01

    Electronic- and magnetic-transport properties of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (NFO)–SiO{sub 2}–Si heterojunction fabricated by depositing NFO thin films on silicon substrates with the intermediate native oxide (SiO{sub 2}) layer have been investigated in details. The current–voltage (I–V) characteristics across the junction have been recorded in the temperature range of 10–300 K. All I–V curves show non-linear behavior throughout the temperature range. The dominating current transport mechanism is found to be temperature dependent tunneling assisted by Frenkel–Poole type emission. In this paper, we report the junction magnetoresistance (JMR) properties of this heterojunction in the temperature range of 10–300 K. With increasing temperature, the JMR of the heterojunction increases accordingly. The high positive JMR (∼54%) has been observed at room temperature (RT). The origin of high positive JMR at RT is attributed to efficient spin-polarized carrier transport across the junction.

  3. Reactive collisions for NO(2Π) + N(4S) at temperatures relevant to the hypersonic flight regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis-Alpizar, Otoniel; Bemish, Raymond J; Meuwly, Markus

    2017-01-18

    The NO(X 2 Π) + N( 4 S) reaction which occurs entirely in the triplet manifold of N 2 O is investigated using quasiclassical trajectories and quantum simulations. Fully-dimensional potential energy surfaces for the 3 A' and 3 A'' states are computed at the MRCI+Q level of theory and are represented using a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. The N-exchange and N 2 -formation channels are followed by using the multi-state adiabatic reactive molecular dynamics method. Up to 5000 K these reactions occur predominantly on the N 2 O 3 A'' surface. However, for higher temperatures the contributions of the 3 A' and 3 A'' states are comparable and the final state distributions are far from thermal equilibrium. From the trajectory simulations a new set of thermal rate coefficients of up to 20 000 K is determined. Comparison of the quasiclassical trajectory and quantum simulations shows that a classical description is a good approximation as determined from the final state analysis.

  4. Physico-Chemical-Managed Killing of Penicillin-Resistant Static and Growing Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Vegetative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Robert Chaffee (Inventor); Schramm, Jr., Harry F. (Inventor); Defalco, Francis G. (Inventor); Farris, III, Alex F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Systems and methods for the use of compounds from the Hofmeister series coupled with specific pH and temperature to provide rapid physico-chemical-managed killing of penicillin-resistant static and growing Gram-positive and Gram-negative vegetative bacteria. The systems and methods represent the more general physico-chemical enhancement of susceptibility for a wide range of pathological macromolecular targets to clinical management by establishing the reactivity of those targets to topically applied drugs or anti-toxins.

  5. Reactivation of a Tin-Oxide-Containing Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Robert; Sidney, Barry; Schryer, David; Miller, Irvin; Miller, George; Upchurch, Bill; Davis, Patricia; Brown, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The electrons in electric-discharge CO2 lasers cause dissociation of some CO2 into O2 and CO, and attach themselves to electronegative molecules such as O2, forming negative O2 ions, as well as larger negative ion clusters by collisions with CO or other molecules. The decrease in CO2 concentration due to dissociation into CO and O2 will reduce the average repetitively pulsed or continuous wave laser power, even if no disruptive negative ion instabilities occur. Accordingly, it is the primary object of this invention to extend the lifetime of a catalyst used to combine the CO and O2 products formed in a laser discharge. A promising low-temperature catalyst for combining CO and O2 is platinum on tin oxide (Pt/SnO2). First, the catalyst is pretreated by a standard procedure. The pretreatment is considered complete when no measurable quantity of CO2 is given off by the catalyst. After this standard pretreatment, the catalyst is ready for its low-temperature use in the sealed, high-energy, pulsed CO2 laser. However, after about 3,000 minutes of operation, the activity of the catalyst begins to slowly diminish. When the catalyst experiences diminished activity during exposure to the circulating gas stream inside or external to the laser, the heated zone surrounding the catalyst is raised to a temperature between 100 and 400 C. A temperature of 225 C was experimentally found to provide an adequate temperature for reactivation. During this period, the catalyst is still exposed to the circulating gas inside or external to the laser. This constant heating and exposing the catalyst to the laser gas mixture is maintained for an hour. After heating and exposing for an appropriate amount of time, the heated zone around the catalyst is allowed to return to the nominal operating temperature of the CO2 laser. This temperature normally resides in the range of 23 to 100 C. Catalyst activity can be measured as the percentage conversion of CO to CO2. In the specific embodiment

  6. Longevity of animals under reactive oxygen species stress and disease susceptibility due to global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Panda, Sumana Kumari; Hati, Akshaya Kumar; Mohanty, Bobllina; Mohapatra, Manoj Kumar; Kanungo, Shyama; Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda

    2016-02-26

    The world is projected to experience an approximate doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentration in the next decades. Rise in atmospheric CO2 level as one of the most important reasons is expected to contribute to raise the mean global temperature 1.4 °C-5.8 °C by that time. A survey from 128 countries speculates that global warming is primarily due to increase in atmospheric CO2 level that is produced mainly by anthropogenic activities. Exposure of animals to high environmental temperatures is mostly accompanied by unwanted acceleration of certain biochemical pathways in their cells. One of such examples is augmentation in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent increase in oxidation of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids by ROS. Increase in oxidation of biomolecules leads to a state called as oxidative stress (OS). Finally, the increase in OS condition induces abnormality in physiology of animals under elevated temperature. Exposure of animals to rise in habitat temperature is found to boost the metabolism of animals and a very strong and positive correlation exists between metabolism and levels of ROS and OS. Continuous induction of OS is negatively correlated with survivability and longevity and positively correlated with ageing in animals. Thus, it can be predicted that continuous exposure of animals to acute or gradual rise in habitat temperature due to global warming may induce OS, reduced survivability and longevity in animals in general and poikilotherms in particular. A positive correlation between metabolism and temperature in general and altered O2 consumption at elevated temperature in particular could also increase the risk of experiencing OS in homeotherms. Effects of global warming on longevity of animals through increased risk of protein misfolding and disease susceptibility due to OS as the cause or effects or both also cannot be ignored. Therefore, understanding the physiological impacts of global warming in relation to

  7. Longevity of animals under reactive oxygen species stress and disease susceptibility due to global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Panda, Sumana Kumari; Hati, Akshaya Kumar; Mohanty, Bobllina; Mohapatra, Manoj Kumar; Kanungo, Shyama; Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda

    2016-01-01

    The world is projected to experience an approximate doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentration in the next decades. Rise in atmospheric CO2 level as one of the most important reasons is expected to contribute to raise the mean global temperature 1.4 °C-5.8 °C by that time. A survey from 128 countries speculates that global warming is primarily due to increase in atmospheric CO2 level that is produced mainly by anthropogenic activities. Exposure of animals to high environmental temperatures is mostly accompanied by unwanted acceleration of certain biochemical pathways in their cells. One of such examples is augmentation in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent increase in oxidation of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids by ROS. Increase in oxidation of biomolecules leads to a state called as oxidative stress (OS). Finally, the increase in OS condition induces abnormality in physiology of animals under elevated temperature. Exposure of animals to rise in habitat temperature is found to boost the metabolism of animals and a very strong and positive correlation exists between metabolism and levels of ROS and OS. Continuous induction of OS is negatively correlated with survivability and longevity and positively correlated with ageing in animals. Thus, it can be predicted that continuous exposure of animals to acute or gradual rise in habitat temperature due to global warming may induce OS, reduced survivability and longevity in animals in general and poikilotherms in particular. A positive correlation between metabolism and temperature in general and altered O2 consumption at elevated temperature in particular could also increase the risk of experiencing OS in homeotherms. Effects of global warming on longevity of animals through increased risk of protein misfolding and disease susceptibility due to OS as the cause or effects or both also cannot be ignored. Therefore, understanding the physiological impacts of global warming in relation to

  8. Investigations of anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) for the high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckhoff, H.D.

    1981-10-01

    In this study anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) are investigated for the high temperature reactor, especially for the thorium high temperature reactor (THTR) 300 MWe as an example. It is shown that the two ATWS 'feedwater flow reduction from full power' and 'positive reactivity insertion of 1 mNile/s from 40 per cent power' are the most important transients for the THTR. The additional load caused by the ATWS can be reduced sufficiently by some small modifications of the afterheat removal system. Supplementary precautions are not necessary. In the last part of this study some possibilities to improve the behaviour of the power plant are shown with regard to high temperature reactors of the future, the partial scram as well as some modifications of heating and cooling of the steam generator. (orig.) [de

  9. Calculation of research reactor RA power at uncontrolled reactivity changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupac, S.

    1978-01-01

    The safety analysis of research reactor RA involves also the calculation of reactor power at uncontrolled reactivity changes. The corresponding computer code, based on Point Kinetics Model has been made. The short review of method applied for solving kinetic equations is given and several examples illustrating the reactor behaviour at various reactivity changes are presented. The results already obtained are giving rather rough picture of reactor behaviour in considered situations. This is the consequence of using simplified feed back and reactor cooling models, as well as temperature reactivity coefficients, which do not correspond to the actual reactor RA structure (which is now only partly fulfilled with 80% enriched uranium fuel). (author) [sr

  10. Reactivity insertion accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, J.M.L.; Nakata, H.; Yorihaz, H.

    1990-04-01

    The correct prediction of postulated accidents is the fundamental requirement for the reactor licensing procedures. Accident sequences and severity of their consequences depend upon the analysis which rely on analytical tools which must be validated against known experimental results. Present work presents a systematic approach to analyse and estimate the reactivity insertion accident sequences. The methodology is based on the CINETHICA code which solves the point-kinetics/thermohydraulic coupled equations with weighted temperature feedback. Comparison against SPERT experimental results shows good agreement for the step insertion accidents. (author) [pt

  11. Energy distribution extraction of negative charges responsible for positive bias temperature instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Shang-Qing; Yang Hong; Wang Wen-Wu; Tang Bo; Tang Zhao-Yun; Wang Xiao-Lei; Xu Hao; Luo Wei-Chun; Zhao Chao; Yan Jiang; Chen Da-Peng; Ye Tian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    A new method is proposed to extract the energy distribution of negative charges, which results from electron trapping by traps in the gate stack of nMOSFET during positive bias temperature instability (PBTI) stress based on the recovery measurement. In our case, the extracted energy distribution of negative charges shows an obvious dependence on energy, and the energy level of the largest energy density of negative charges is 0.01 eV above the conduction band of silicon. The charge energy distribution below that energy level shows strong dependence on the stress voltage. (paper)

  12. Application of the neutron noise technique for measurement of reactivity for subcritical reactor RA-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orso, J; Marenzana, A

    2012-01-01

    Reactor core RA-4 is divided into two parts that come together to start reactor. The reactor with core separate has the largest subcritical condition, this condition is more secure and therefore the reactor shutdown. In this paper measurements are made of the decay constant of the neutron prompt ' P ', using the α-Rossi and α-Feynman methods to calculate the reactivity of the reactor core for different positions. Both techniques are compared and reactivity is obtained for several position of the reactor core using the α-Rossi technical which is obtained a function that gives the reactivity depending on the separation of the core length. Both techniques are verified using a no multiplicative system. Reactivity values for different position of the core obtained by α-Rossi technique are: $[0 cm] = (-11+/-1) dollar, $[3 cm] = (-7+/-1) dollar, $[3.5 cm] (-5.5+/-0.8) dollar, $[4.2 cm] = (-3.8+/-0.3) dollar y $[4.5] = (-3.0+/-0.1) dollar (author)

  13. Treatment of reactive process wastewater with high-level ammonia by blow-off method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaotong; Quan Ying; Wang Yang; Fu Genna; Liu Bing; Tang Yaping

    2012-01-01

    The ceramic UO 2 kernels for nuclear fuel elements of high temperature gas cooled reactors were prepared through sol-gel process with uranyl nitrate, which produces process wastewater containing high-level ammonia and uranium. The blow-off method on a bench scale was investigated to remove ammonia from reactive wastewater. Under the optimized operating conditions, the ammonia can be removed by more than 95%, with little reactive uranium distilled. The effects of pH, heating temperature and stripping time were studied. Static tests with ion-exchange resin indicate that ammonia removal treatment increases uranium accumulation in anion exchange resin. (authors)

  14. Effects of interpretation training on hostile attribution bias and reactivity to interpersonal insult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Kirsten A; Cougle, Jesse R

    2013-09-01

    Research suggests that individuals high in anger have a bias for attributing hostile intentions to ambiguous situations. The current study tested whether this interpretation bias can be altered to influence anger reactivity to an interpersonal insult using a single-session cognitive bias modification program. One hundred thirty-five undergraduate students were randomized to receive positive training, negative training, or a control condition. Anger reactivity to insult was then assessed. Positive training led to significantly greater increases in positive interpretation bias relative to the negative group, though these increases were only marginally greater than the control group. Negative training led to increased negative interpretation bias relative to other groups. During the insult, participants in the positive condition reported less anger than those in the control condition. Observers rated participants in the positive condition as less irritated than those in the negative condition and more amused than the other two conditions. Though mediation of effects via bias modification was not demonstrated, among the positive condition posttraining interpretation bias was correlated with self-reported anger, suggesting that positive training reduced anger reactivity by influencing interpretation biases. Findings suggest that positive interpretation training may be a promising treatment for reducing anger. However, the current study was conducted with a non-treatment-seeking student sample; further research with a treatment-seeking sample with problematic anger is necessary. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Development of photopolymerizable clay nanocomposites utilizing reactive dispersants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Adom, Kwame

    Nanocomposites hold tremendous promise for expanding the utility of polymeric materials. However, accessing particulate sizes in the nanoscale domain continues to be a scientific challenge, especially in highly cross-linked photopolymerizable systems. In this study, photopolymerizable nanocomposites utilizing clay nanoparticles and reactive dispersants have been developed. The influence of particle size, dispersant-clay interactions, and surfactant concentration on photopolymerization behavior and nanoparticle dispersion has been elucidated. Clay particles serve as templates upon which surfactants aggregate during photopolymerization. This results in higher photopolymerization rates with addition of increasing concentrations of polymerizable surfactants. Furthermore, polymerizable surfactants induce faster photopolymerization rates compared to non-polymerizable analogues in systems that have ionically-bound dispersants on the particle surface. Utilizing reactive organoclays induces significant changes to the photopolymerization behavior depending on the choice of reactive functionality employed. Faster acrylate photopolymerization rates occur in photopolymer systems containing thiol-modified clays, while much slower rates occur for nonpolymerizable organoclay systems. In addition, chemical compatibility between monomer and clay dispersant (based on chemical similarity or polarity) allows enhancement of exfoliation in photopolymerizable formulations. With polymerizable dispersants, exfoliation is readily achieved in various multifunctional acrylate systems. The degree of exfoliation depends on the position of the reactive group relative to the surfactant's cationic site and the type of functionality. Thiolated organoclays exfoliate during polymerization, while methacrylated clays show substantially less dependence on polymerization behavior. Interestingly, changes in the physical properties of the resulting nanocomposite are independent of the degree of exfoliation

  16. C-reactive (CRP) protein in transfusion dependent thalassaemic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokhio, R.; Mughal, Z.U.N.

    2009-01-01

    In thalassaemic patients iron overload, secondary to blood transfusion, results toxic effects by producing reactive radicals. Iron overload can be studied using serum ferritin level which has a direct correlation with the body's iron status. While oxidative damage can be studied using biomarker of inflammation like hsC-reactive proteins. Blood samples of 55 thalassaemic patients (39 males, 16 females) were collected from Fatmid Foundation (Hyderabad). The samples were analyzed for CBC, serum ferritin level and hsC-reactive proteins. High mean serum ferritin levels was found in all the patients regardless of the frequency of blood transfusion (4774.2135+-3143.3040 mu g/L), indicating the iron overload. High mean hsC-reactive protein was found (2.5151+-1.3712) with a positive correlation with ferritin (r= 0.8371198, p= 0.0000) and platelets (r= 0.43293443, p=0.000962175). C-reactive proteins serve as biomarker of various inflammatory conditions, progression of cardiovascular diseases and as indicator of morbidity and mortality. High C-reactive proteins in these patients indicate ongoing iron overload toxicity related damage in these patients. The estimation of hsC-reactive proteins and other biomarkers of inflammation and oxidation may help in better management of these patients. (author)

  17. A Reactive Transport Model for Marcellus Shale Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Heidari, P.; Jin, L.; Williams, J.; Brantley, S.

    2017-12-01

    Shale formations account for 25% of the land surface globally. One of the most productive shale-gas formations is the Marcellus, a black shale that is rich in organic matter and pyrite. As a first step toward understanding how Marcellus shale interacts with water, we developed a reactive transport model to simulate shale weathering under ambient temperature and pressure conditions, constrained by soil chemistry and water data. The simulation was carried out for 10,000 years, assuming bedrock weathering and soil genesis began right after the last glacial maximum. Results indicate weathering was initiated by pyrite dissolution for the first 1,000 years, leading to low pH and enhanced dissolution of chlorite and precipitation of iron hydroxides. After pyrite depletion, chlorite dissolved slowly, primarily facilitated by the presence of CO2 and organic acids, forming vermiculite as a secondary mineral. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the most important controls on weathering include the presence of reactive gases (CO2 and O2), specific surface area, and flow velocity of infiltrating meteoric water. The soil chemistry and mineralogy data could not be reproduced without including the reactive gases. For example, pyrite remained in the soil even after 10,000 years if O2 was not continuously present in the soil column; likewise, chlorite remained abundant and porosity remained small with the presence of soil CO2. The field observations were only simulated successfully when the specific surface areas of the reactive minerals were 1-3 orders of magnitude smaller than surface area values measured for powdered minerals, reflecting the lack of accessibility of fluids to mineral surfaces and potential surface coating. An increase in the water infiltration rate enhanced weathering by removing dissolution products and maintaining far-from-equilibrium conditions. We conclude that availability of reactive surface area and transport of H2O and gases are the most important

  18. Evaluation of bituminized waste reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camaro, S.; Moulinier, D.

    2000-01-01

    The bituminization process has been used for conditioning low and medium level (LML) radioactive waste, particularly to immobilize coprecipitation slurries and evaporation concentrates generated by effluent treatment. The process consists in mixing bitumen matrix with inactive soluble and slightly soluble salts added to insolubilize the radionuclides or resulting from the neutralization of acid effluents. This operation is performed at a sufficient temperature - depending on waste composition and bitumen grade to ensure the flow of the resulting mixture into metal containers. Exothermicity due to salts/salts or salts/bitumen reactions depending on the type of waste can be induced during or after the mixing step. This could produce an additional heat emission that the drum must be able to release to avoid a potentially incidental pattern with ignition risk, explaining why the CEA has been involved in evaluating the thermal reactivity of bituminized waste and its repercussions on the bituminization process. Given the difficulty of discriminating each exothermal reaction, the characterization of a global reactivity appears as a further precautionary measure, in addition to the definition of a working safety margin. The CEA has accordingly developed studies on this aspect. The article discusses the experimental methodology developed for the determination of the global reactivity. (authors)

  19. How a gold substrate can increase the reactivity of a Pt overlayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Ø.; Helveg, Stig; Ruban, Andrei

    1999-01-01

    The growth and chemical reactivity of Pt on Au(111) have been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Deposition of Pt at coverages from 0.02 ML up to 2.5 ML on Au(111) at room temperature initially leads to the formation of a surface alloy......, in which 3% of the Au atoms are replaced by Pt. Subsequent Pt evaporation leads to island growth with a mixed Pt-Au island composition. The reactivity of the Pt/Au system is studied using CO as a probe molecule. We show that a stronger bonding of CO to the first layer of Pt on Au(111) exists compared...... with the binding of CO on clean Pt. The Au substrate therefore very surprisingly increases the Pt overlayer reactivity. The results can be understood in a simple model, in which the change in the CO binding energy is directly proportional to the shift of the d-band center of the metal overlayer. According...

  20. Synthesis of functional nanocrystallites through reactive thermal plasma processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa Ishigaki and Ji-Guang Li

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of synthesizing functional nanostructured powders through reactive thermal plasma processing has been developed. The synthesis of nanosized titanium oxide powders was performed by the oxidation of solid and liquid precursors. Quench gases, either injected from the shoulder of the reactor or injected counter to the plasma plume from the bottom of the reactor, were used to vary the quench rate, and therefore the particle size, of the resultant powders. The experimental results are well supported by numerical analysis on the effects of the quench gas on the flow pattern and temperature field of the thermal plasma as well as on the trajectory and temperature history of the particles. The plasma-synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles showed phase preferences different from those synthesized by conventional wet-chemical processes. Nanosized particles of high crystallinity and nonequilibrium chemical composition were formed in one step via reactive thermal plasma processing.

  1. Water dissociation on Ni(100) and Ni(111): Effect of surface temperature on reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seenivasan, H.; Tiwari, Ashwani K.

    2013-01-01

    Water adsorption and dissociation on Ni(100) and Ni(111) surfaces are studied using density functional theory calculations. Water adsorbs on top site on both the surfaces, while H and OH adsorb on four fold hollow and three fold hollow (fcc) sites on Ni(100) and Ni(111), respectively. Transition states (TS) on both surfaces are identified using climbing image-nudged elastic band method. It is found that the barrier to dissociation on Ni(100) surface is slightly lower than that on Ni(111) surface. Dissociation on both the surfaces is exothermic, while the exothermicity on Ni(100) is large. To study the effect of lattice motion on the energy barrier, TS calculations are performed for various values of Q (lattice atom coordinate along the surface normal) and the change in the barrier height and position is determined. Calculations show that the energy barrier to reaction decreases with increasing Q and increases with decreasing Q on both the surfaces. Dissociation probability values at different surface temperatures are computed using semi-classical approximation. Results show that the influence of surface temperature on dissociation probability on the Ni(100) is significantly larger compared to that of Ni(111). Moreover, on Ni(100), a dramatic shift in energy barrier to lower incident energy values is observed with increasing surface temperature, while the shift is smaller in the case of Ni(111)

  2. Investigation of Reactivity Feedback Mechanism of Axial and Radial Expansion Effect of Metal-Fueled Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Seung-Hwan; Choi, Chi-Woong; Jeong, Tae-Kyung; Ha, Gi-Seok

    2015-01-01

    The major inherent reactivity feedback models for a ceramic fuel used in a conventional light water reactor are Doppler feedback and moderator feedback. The metal fuel has these two reactivity feedback mechanisms previously mentioned. In addition, the metal fuel has two more reactivity feedback models related to the thermal expansion phenomena of the metal fuel. Since the metal fuel has a good capability to expand according to the temperature changes of the core, two more feedback mechanisms exist. These additional two feedback mechanism are important to the inherent safety of metal fuel and can make metal-fueled SFR safer than oxide-fueled SFR. These phenomena have already been applied to safety analysis on design extended condition. In this study, the effect of these characteristics on power control capability was examined through a simple load change operation. The axial expansion mechanism is induced from the change of the fuel temperature according to the change of the power level of PGSFR. When the power increases, the fuel temperatures in the metal fuel will increase and then the reactivity will decrease due to the axial elongation of the metal fuel. To evaluate the expansion effect, 2 cases were simulated with the same scenario by using MMS-LMR code developed at KAERI. The first simulation was to analyze the change of the reactor power according to the change of BOP power without the reactivity feedback model of the axial and radial expansion of the core during the power transient event. That is to say, the core had only two reactivity feedback mechanism of Doppler and coolant temperature

  3. Monte Carlo analysis of experiments on the reactivity temperature coefficient for UO2 and MOX light water moderated lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erradi, L.; Chetaine, A.; Chakir, E.; Kharchaf, A.; Elbardouni, T.; Elkhoukhi, T.

    2005-01-01

    In a previous work, we have analysed the main French experiments available on the reactivity temperature coefficient (RTC): CREOLE and MISTRAL experiments. In these experiments, the RTC has been measured in both UO 2 and UO 2 -PuO 2 PWR type lattices. Our calculations, using APOLLO2 code with CEA93 library based on JEF2.2 evaluation, have shown that the calculation error in UO 2 lattices is less than 1 pcm/C degrees which is considered as the target accuracy. On the other hand the calculation error in the MOX lattices is more significant in both low and high temperature ranges: an average error of -2 ± 0.5 pcm/C degrees is observed in low temperatures and an error of +3 ± 2 pcm/C degrees is obtained for temperatures higher than 250 C degrees. In the present work, we analysed additional experimental benchmarks on the RTC of UO 2 and MOX light water moderated lattices. To analyze these benchmarks and with the aim of minimizing uncertainties related to modelling of the experimental set up, we chose the Monte Carlo method which has the advantage of taking into account in the most exact manner the geometry of the experimental configurations. This analysis shows for the UO 2 lattices, a maximum experiment-calculation deviation of about 0,7 pcm/C degrees, which is below the target accuracy for this type of lattices. For the KAMINI experiment, which relates to the measurement of the RTC in a light water moderated lattice using U-233 as fuel our analysis shows that the ENDF/B6 library gives the best result, with an experiment-calculation deviation of the order of -0,16 pcm/C degrees. The analysis of the benchmarks using MOX fuel made it possible to highlight a discrepancy between experiment and calculation on the RTC of about -0.7 pcm/C degrees (for a range of temperatures going from 20 to 248 C degrees) and -1,2 pcm/C degrees (for a range of temperatures going from 20 to 80 C degrees). This result, in particular the tendency which has the error to decrease when the

  4. Double positivity to bee and wasp venom: improved diagnostic procedure by recombinant allergen-based IgE testing and basophil activation test including data about cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlein, Bernadette; Krischan, Lilian; Darsow, Ulf; Ollert, Markus; Ring, Johannes

    2012-07-01

    Specific IgE (sIgE) antibodies to both bee and wasp venom can be due to a sensitivity to both insect venoms or due to cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCDs). Investigating whether a basophil activation test (BAT) with both venoms as well as with bromelain and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or recombinant allergen-based IgE testing can improve the diagnostic procedure. Twenty-two Hymenoptera-venom allergic patients with sIgE antibodies to both bee and wasp venom were studied. sIgE antibodies to MUXF3 CCD, bromelain, HRP, rApi m 1, and rVes v 5 were determined, and a BAT (Flow2 CAST) with venom extracts, bromelain, and HRP was performed. Further recombinant allergen-based IgE testing was done by using an ELISA, if required. The reactivity of basophils was calculated from the insect venom concentration at half-maximum stimulation. Double positivity/double negativity/single positivity to rApi m 1 and rVes v 5 was seen in 12/1/9 patients. Further recombinant allergen-based IgE testing in the last ones revealed positive results to the other venom in all cases except one. BAT was double positive/double negative/single positive in 6/2/14 patients. Four patients with negative results in sIgE antibodies to CCDs had positive results in BAT. BAT with bromelain/HRP showed a sensitivity of 50%/81% and a specificity of 91%/90%. Component-resolved IgE testing elucidates the pattern of double positivity, showing a majority of true double sensitizations independent of CCD sensitization. BAT seems to add more information about the culprit insect even if the true clinical relevance of BAT is not completely determined because of ethical limitations on diagnostic sting challenges. BAT with HRP is a good method to determine sensitivity to CCDs. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reactivity considerations for the on-line refuelling of a pebble bed modular reactor—Illustrating safety for the most reactive core fuel load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    In the multi-pass fuel management scheme employed for the pebble bed modular reactor the fuel pebbles are re-circulated until they reach the target burn-up. The rate at which fresh fuel is loaded and burned fuel is discharged is a result of the core neutronics cycle analysis but in practice (on the plant) this has to be controlled and managed by the fuel handling and storage system and use of the burnup measurement system. The excess reactivity is the additional reactivity available in the core during operating conditions that is the result of loading a fuel mixture in the core that is more reactive (less burned) than what is required to keep the reactor critical at full power operational conditions. The excess reactivity is balanced by the insertion of the control rods to keep the reactor critical. The excess reactivity allows flexibility in operations, for example to overcome the xenon build up when power is decreased as part of load follow. In order to limit reactivity excursions and to ensure safe shutdown the excess reactivity and thus the insertion depth of the control rods at normal operating conditions has to be managed. One way to do this is by operational procedures. The reactivity effect of long-term operation with the control rods inserted deeper than the design point is investigated and a control rod insertion limit is proposed that will not limit normal operations. The effects of other phenomena that can increase the power defect, such as higher-than-expected fuel temperatures, are also introduced. All of these cases are then evaluated by ensuring cold shutdown is still achievable and where appropriate by reactivity insertion accident analysis. These aspects are investigated on the PBMR 400 MW design.

  6. Measurement of excitation, ionization, and electron temperatures and positive ion concentrations in a 144 MHz inductively coupled radiofrequency plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, P.E.; Chester, T.L.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    Diagnostic measurements of 144 MHz radiofrequency inductively coupled plasmas at pressures between 0.5 and 14 Torr have been made. Other variables studied included the gas type (Ar or Ne) and material in plasma (Ti or Tl). Parameters measured included excitation temperatures via the atomic Boltzmann plot and the two-line method, ionization electric probes. Excitation temperatures increased as the pressure of Ar or Ne plasmas decreased and reached a maximum of approx.9000 degreeK in the latter case and approx.6700 degreeK in the former case; Tl in the Ar plasma resulted in in a smaller rate of decrease of excitation temperature with increase of pressure of Ar. The ionization temperatures were lower than the excitation temperatures and were similar for both the Ar and Ne plasmas. Electron temperatures were about 10 times higher than the excitation temperatures indicating non-LTE behavior. Again, the electron temperatures indicating in Ne were considerably higher than in Ar. With the presence of metals, the electron temperatures with a metal in the Ar plasma were higher than in the absence. Positive ion concentrations were also measured for the various plasmas and were found to be similar (approx.10 18 m -3 ) in both the Ar and Ne plasmas. The presence of metals caused significant increase in the positive ion concentrations. From the results obtained, the optimum Ar pressure for Tl electrodeless discharge lamps operated at 144 MHz would be between 2 and 4 Torr

  7. Probabilistic analysis on the failure of reactivity control for the PWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sony Tjahyani, D. T.; Deswandri; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    The fundamental safety function of the power reactor is to control reactivity, to remove heat from the reactor, and to confine radioactive material. The safety analysis is used to ensure that each parameter is fulfilled during the design and is done by deterministic and probabilistic method. The analysis of reactivity control is important to be done because it will affect the other of fundamental safety functions. The purpose of this research is to determine the failure probability of the reactivity control and its failure contribution on a PWR design. The analysis is carried out by determining intermediate events, which cause the failure of reactivity control. Furthermore, the basic event is determined by deductive method using the fault tree analysis. The AP1000 is used as the object of research. The probability data of component failure or human error, which is used in the analysis, is collected from IAEA, Westinghouse, NRC and other published documents. The results show that there are six intermediate events, which can cause the failure of the reactivity control. These intermediate events are uncontrolled rod bank withdrawal at low power or full power, malfunction of boron dilution, misalignment of control rod withdrawal, malfunction of improper position of fuel assembly and ejection of control rod. The failure probability of reactivity control is 1.49E-03 per year. The causes of failures which are affected by human factor are boron dilution, misalignment of control rod withdrawal and malfunction of improper position for fuel assembly. Based on the assessment, it is concluded that the failure probability of reactivity control on the PWR is still within the IAEA criteria.

  8. Cephalosporin and penicillin cross-reactivity in patients allergic to penicillins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X-D; Gao, N; Qiao, H-L

    2011-03-01

    Bata-lactam antibiotics are the most commonly used antibiotics which usually cause serious IgE-mediated allergic reactions. Of all bata-lactam antibiotics, penicillins have so far been the best-studied, but the studies of cephalosporins and their cross-reactivity with penicillins are rare. We sought to evaluate the IgE response in vitro and estimate cross-reactivity between penicillins and cephalosporins in patients allergic to penicillins. We studied 87 control subjects and 420 subjects allergic to penicillins. Radioallergosorbent test (RAST) was performed to detect eight types of specific-penicillin IgE and eleven types of specific-cephalosporin IgE. The cross-reactivity and different molecules recognition by IgE were studied with a radioallergosorbent inhibition test. Of 420 patients allergic to penicillins, 95 patients (22.62%) showed specific-cephalosporin IgE positive, 73 patients (17.38%) showed IgEs positive to both penicillins and cephalosporins. In specific-penicillin IgE positive group, the positive rate of specific-cephalosporin IgE was significantly higher than in specific-penicillin IgE negative group (27.14% vs. 14.57%, p penicillin-allergic patients we studied, and compared with patients who had negative amoxicillin-IgE, the positive rates of specific-ampicillin IgE and specific-cephalexin IgE were significantly higher in patients who had positive amoxicillin-IgE (14.43% vs. 3.72%, 14.00% vs. 2.96%, p penicillins; patients allergic to several penicillins are more likely to develop allergic reaction to cephalosporins; due to sensitization to the similar structural characteristics (nuclear and R1 side-chain), penicillin-allergic patients may develop cross-allergic reactions with not only first-generation but also third-generation cephalosporins.

  9. Evaluation of the chemical reactivity in lignin precursors using the Fukui function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Carmen; Rivera, José L; Herrera, Rafael; Rico, José L; Flores, Nelly; Rutiaga, José G; López, Pablo

    2008-02-01

    The hydroxycinnamyl alcohols: p-coumarol, coniferol and sinapol are considered the basic units and precursors of lignins models. In this work, the specific reactivity of these molecules was studied. We investigate their intrinsic chemical reactivity in terms of the Fukui function, applying the principle of hard and soft acids and bases (HSAB) in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT). Comparisons of their nucleophilic, electrophilic and free radical reactivity show their most probably sites to form linkages among them. It is found that the most reactive sites, for reactions involving free radicals, are the carbons at the beta-position in the p-coumarol and sinapol molecules, whilst the regions around the carbon-oxygen bond of the phenoxyl group are the most reactive in coniferol.

  10. Dynamic modeling of the isoamyl acetate reactive distillation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Syed Sadiq

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The cost-effectiveness of reactive distillation (RD processes makes them highly attractive for industrial applications. However, their preliminary design and subsequent scale-up and operation are challenging. Specifically, the response of RD system during fluctuations in process parameters is of paramount importance to ensure the stability of the whole process. As a result of carrying out simulations using Aspen Plus, it is shown that the RD process for isoamyl acetate production was much more economical than conventional reactor distillation configuration under optimized process conditions due to lower utilities consumption, higher conversion and smaller sizes of condenser and reboiler. Rigorous dynamic modeling of RD system was performed to evaluate its sensitivity to disturbances in critical process parameters; the product flow was quite sensitive to disturbances. Even more sensitive was product composition when the disturbance in heat duties of condenser or reboiler led to a temperature decrease. However, positive disturbance in alcohol feed is of particular concern, which clearly made the system unstable.

  11. Depressive Symptoms, Rumination, and Emotion Reactivity Among Youth: Moderation by Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Jennifer A; Borelli, Jessica L; Hilt, Lori M

    2018-06-07

    The emotion context-insensitivity hypothesis (ECI; Rottenberg et al., 2005) posits that depressive symptoms are associated with blunted emotional reactivity and is supported by the results of a meta-analysis (Bylsma et al., 2008). Yet it remains unclear how strongly ECI holds across emotional response domains, whether ECI operates similarly in male and female individuals, and whether this pattern of underreactivity is observed in youth. In contrast, rumination, a cognitive style strongly associated with depressive symptoms, may be associated with heightened reactivity. We assessed the effects of youth's depressive symptoms and rumination on subjective and physiological emotion reactivity (N = 160; M age  = 12.67, SD age  = 1.12; 48% female; 94% non-Hispanic). State sadness and respiratory sinus arrhythmia were assessed during a baseline activity (nature video) and a sad mood induction. As hypothesized, depressive symptoms predicted less subjective emotional reactivity, whereas rumination predicted more subjective reactivity. Exploratory analyses revealed that associations for physiological reactivity differed by child gender. ECI may be stronger in terms of subjective rather than physiological emotional reactivity.

  12. Continuous flow chemistry: a discovery tool for new chemical reactivity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jan; Metternich, Jan B; Nikbin, Nikzad; Kirschning, Andreas; Ley, Steven V

    2014-06-14

    Continuous flow chemistry as a process intensification tool is well known. However, its ability to enable chemists to perform reactions which are not possible in batch is less well studied or understood. Here we present an example, where a new reactivity pattern and extended reaction scope has been achieved by transferring a reaction from batch mode to flow. This new reactivity can be explained by suppressing back mixing and precise control of temperature in a flow reactor set up.

  13. Continuous flow chemistry: a discovery tool for new chemical reactivity patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Hartwig, Jan; Metternich, Jan B.; Nikbin, Nikzad; Kirschning, Andreas; Ley, Steven V.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous flow chemistry as a process intensification tool is well known. However, its ability to enable chemists to perform reactions which are not possible in batch is less well studied or understood. Here we present an example, where a new reactivity pattern and extended reaction scope has been achieved by transferring a reaction from batch mode to flow. This new reactivity can be explained by suppressing back mixing and precise control of temperature in a flow reactor set up.

  14. [Frequency of skin reactivity to food allergens in allergic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camero-Martínez, Heriberto; López-García, Aída Inés; Rivero-Yeverino, Daniela; Caballero-López, Chrystopherson Gengyny; Arana-Muñoz, Oswaldo; Papaqui-Tapia, Sergio; Rojas-Méndez, Isabel Cristina; Vázquez-Rojas, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Food allergy is deemed to have a worldwide prevalence ranging from 2 to 10 %. To determine the frequency of skin reactivity to food allergens by age groups. Cross-sectional, descriptive, prolective, observational study. Patients aged from 2 to 64 years with symptoms consistent with allergic disease were included. Skin prick tests were carried out with food allergens. Frequencies and percentages were estimated. One-hundred and ninety-one patients were included, out of which 63.4% were females. Mean age was 22.5 years; 19.3 % showed positive skin reactivity to at least one food. Distribution by age group was as follows: preschool children 13.5 %, schoolchildren 24.3 %, adolescents 2.7 % and adults 59.5 %. Diagnoses included allergic rhinitis in 84.3 %, asthma in 19.4 %, urticaria in 14.1 % and atopic dermatitis in 8.4 %. Positive skin reactivity frequency distribution in descending order was: soybeans with 5.2 %, peach with 4.7 %, grapes, orange and apple with 3.6 %, nuts with 3.1 %, pineapple, avocado, tomato and tuna with 2.6 %. The frequency of skin reactivity to food allergens was similar to that reported in the national and Latin American literature, but sensitization to each specific allergen varied for each age group.

  15. Reactive power control methods for improved reliability of wind power inverters under wind speed variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Liserre, Marco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2012-01-01

    method to relieve the thermal cycling of power switching devices under severe wind speed variations, by circulating reactive power among the parallel power converters in a WTS or among the WTS's in a wind park. The amount of reactive power is adjusted to limit the junction temperature fluctuation...

  16. EFFECT OF REACTIVE MAGNESIUM OXIDE ON PROPERTIES OF ALKALI ACTIVATED SLAG GEOPOLYMER CEMENT PASTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Abdel-Gawwad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different proportions and different reactivities of MgO on the drying shrinkage and compressive strength of alkali activated slag pastes (AAS has been investigated. The slag was activated by 6 wt.% sodium hydroxide and liquid sodium silicate at ratio of 3:3 (wt.. The different reactivities of MgOs were produced from the calcination of hydromagnesite at different temperatures (550, 1000, 1250 C. The results showed that the reactivity of magnesium oxide decreases with increasing the calcination temperature. Also, the drying shrinkage of AAS was reduced by the replacement of slag with MgOs. The highly reactive MgO accelerated the hydration of AAS at early ages. The replacement of slag with 5% MgO550 increased one day compressive strength by ~26 % while MgO1250 had little effect. A significant increase in strength was observed after 7 days in case of replacement of slag with 5 % MgO1250. The MgO reacts with slag to form hydrotalcite likephases (Ht as detected by XRD, FTIR spectroscopy, TGA/DTG analysis and SEM.

  17. Reactive thermal waves in energetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Reactive thermal waves (RTWs) arise in several energetic material applications, including self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS), high explosive cookoff, and the detonation of heterogeneous explosives. In this paper I exmaine ideal RTWs, by which I mean that (1) material motion is neglected, (2) the state dependence of reaction is Arrhenius in the temperature, and (3) the reaction rate is modulated by an arbitrary mass-fraction-based reaction progress function. Numerical simulations demonstrate that one's natural intuition, which is based mainly upon experience with inert materials and which leads one to expect diffusion processes to become relatively slow after a short time period, is invalid for high energy, state-sensitive reactive systems. Instead, theory predicts that RTWs can propagate at very high speeds. This result agrees with estimates for detonating heterogeneous explosives, which indicate that RTWs must spread from hot-spot nucleation sites at rates comparable to the detonation speed in order to produce experimentally-observed reaction zone thicknesses. Using dimensionless scaling and further invoking the high activation energy approximation, I obtain an analytic formula for the steady plane RTW speed from numerical calculations. I then compute the RTW speed for real explosives, and discuss aspects of their behavior.

  18. Amorphous silica from rice husk at various temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, S.J.; Feroze, N.; Tajwar, S.

    2008-01-01

    Rice husk is being used as a source of energy in many heat generating system because of its high calorific value and its availability in many rice producing areas. Rice husk contains approximately 20% silica which is presented in hydrated form. This hydrated silica can be retrieved as amorphous silica under controlled thermal conditions. Uncontrolled burning of rice husk produces crystalline silica which is not reactive silica but can be used as filler in many applications. Amorphous silica is reactive silica which has better market value due to its reactive nature in process industry. The present study deals with the production of amorphous silica at various temperatures from rice husk. Various ashes were prepared in tube furnace by changing the burning temperatures for fixed time intervals and analyzed by XRD. It has been observed that for two hours calculation's of rice husk renders mostly amorphous silica at 650 degree C where as at higher temperatures crystalline silica was obtained. (author)

  19. Impact of seasonal forcing on reactive ecological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesipa, Riccardo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2017-04-21

    Our focus is on the short-term dynamics of reactive ecological systems which are stable in the long term. In these systems, perturbations can exhibit significant transient amplifications before asymptotically decaying. This peculiar behavior has attracted increasing attention. However, reactive systems have so far been investigated assuming that external environmental characteristics remain constant, although environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, moisture, water availability, etc.) can undergo substantial changes due to seasonal cycles. In order to fill this gap, we propose applying the adjoint non-modal analysis to study the impact of seasonal variations of environmental conditions on reactive systems. This tool allows the transient dynamics of a perturbation affecting non-autonomous ecological systems to be described. To show the potential of this approach, a seasonally forced prey-predator model with a Holling II type functional response is studied as an exemplifying case. We demonstrate that seasonalities can greatly affect the transient dynamics of the system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Reactive Kripke semantics

    CERN Document Server

    Gabbay, Dov M

    2013-01-01

    This text offers an extension to the traditional Kripke semantics for non-classical logics by adding the notion of reactivity. Reactive Kripke models change their accessibility relation as we progress in the evaluation process of formulas in the model. This feature makes the reactive Kripke semantics strictly stronger and more applicable than the traditional one. Here we investigate the properties and axiomatisations of this new and most effective semantics, and we offer a wide landscape of applications of the idea of reactivity. Applied topics include reactive automata, reactive grammars, rea

  1. The CREST reactive-burn model for explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheswaran M-A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available CREST is an innovative reactive-burn model that has been developed at AWE for simulating shock initiation and detonation propagation behaviour in explosives. The model has a different basis from other reactive-burn models in that its reaction rate is independent of local flow variables behind the shock wave e.g. pressure and temperature. The foundation for CREST, based on a detailed analysis of data from particle-velocity gauge experiments, is that the reaction rate depends only on the local shock strength and the time since the shock passed. Since a measure of shock strength is the entropy of the non-reacted explosive, which remains constant behind a shock, CREST uses an entropy-dependent reaction rate. This paper will provide an overview of the CREST model and its predictive capability. In particular, it will be shown that the model can predict a wide range of experimental phenomena for both shock initiation (e.g. the effects of porosity and initial temperature on sustained-shock and thin-flyer initiation and detonation propagation (e.g. the diameter effect curve and detonation failure cones using a single set of coefficients.

  2. Cognitive reactivity to success and failure relate uniquely to manic and depression tendencies and combine in bipolar tendencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, Filip; Ghesquière, Ine; Van Gucht, Dinska

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined simultaneously the relations between cognitive reactivity to success and failure, on the one hand, and depression, manic, and bipolar tendencies, on the other hand. Participants (161 students) completed measures of success and failure reactivity, current manic and depressive symptoms, and tendencies towards depression, mania, and bipolarity. Results showed that respondents with a greater tendency towards depression evidenced greater (negative) reactivity to failure, whereas those with a greater tendency toward mania evidenced greater (positive) reactivity to success. Depression vulnerability was unrelated to success reactivity, and manic vulnerability was unrelated to failure reactivity. Tendencies toward bipolarity correlated significantly with both failure and success reactivity in a negative and positive manner, respectively. These findings add to the growing body of literature, suggesting that different features or cognitive tendencies are related to depression vulnerability versus manic vulnerability and imply that these "mirrored" cognitive features both form part of vulnerability to bipolar disorder.

  3. Cognitive Reactivity to Success and Failure Relate Uniquely to Manic and Depression Tendencies and Combine in Bipolar Tendencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Raes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined simultaneously the relations between cognitive reactivity to success and failure, on the one hand, and depression, manic, and bipolar tendencies, on the other hand. Participants (161 students completed measures of success and failure reactivity, current manic and depressive symptoms, and tendencies towards depression, mania, and bipolarity. Results showed that respondents with a greater tendency towards depression evidenced greater (negative reactivity to failure, whereas those with a greater tendency toward mania evidenced greater (positive reactivity to success. Depression vulnerability was unrelated to success reactivity, and manic vulnerability was unrelated to failure reactivity. Tendencies toward bipolarity correlated significantly with both failure and success reactivity in a negative and positive manner, respectively. These findings add to the growing body of literature, suggesting that different features or cognitive tendencies are related to depression vulnerability versus manic vulnerability and imply that these “mirrored” cognitive features both form part of vulnerability to bipolar disorder.

  4. Nickel patch test reactivity and the menstrual cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohold, A E; Halkier-Sørensen, L; Thestrup-Pedersen, K

    1994-01-01

    Premenstrual exacerbation of allergic contact dermatitis and varying allergic patch test responses have been reported at different points of the period. Using a dilution series of nickel sulphate, we studied the variation in patch test reactivity in nickel allergic women in relation to the menstr......Premenstrual exacerbation of allergic contact dermatitis and varying allergic patch test responses have been reported at different points of the period. Using a dilution series of nickel sulphate, we studied the variation in patch test reactivity in nickel allergic women in relation...... were tested first on day 7-10 and the other half first on day 20-24. There was no difference in the degree of patch test reactivity, when the results from day 7-10 and day 20-24 were compared (p > 0.4). However, when we compared the patch test results from the first and second test procedure, we found...... of positive patch tests led to an increased skin reactivity towards the same allergen, when the patients were retested weeks later....

  5. Study of IPR-R1 dynamics by reactivity random excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedel, G.

    1983-01-01

    To demonstrate the viability of the utilization of analitical techniques of neutronic noise, a dynamic model for IPR-R1 reactor from CDTN was developed. This model allows reactivity feedback due to variations of temperature in fuel and coolant [pt

  6. Study of the Reactive-element Effect in Oxidation of Fe-cr Alloys Using Transverse Section Analytical Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, W. E.; Ethridge, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    The role of trace additions of reactive elements like Y, Ce, Th, or Hf to Cr bearing alloys was studied by applying a new developed technique of transverse section analytical electron microscopy. This reactive-element effect improves the high temperature oxidation resistance of alloys by strongly reducing the high temperature oxidation rate and enhancing the adhesion of the oxide scale, however, the mechanisms for this important effect remain largely unknown. It is indicated that the presence of yttrium affects the oxidation of Fe-Cr-Y alloys in at least two ways. The reactive element alters the growth mechanism of the oxide scale as evidenced by the marked influence of the reactive element on the oxide scale microstructure. The present results also suggest that reactive-element intermetallic compounds, which internally oxidize in the metal during oxidation, act as sinks for excess vacancies thus inhibiting vacancy condensation at the scale-metal interface and possibly enhancing scale adhesion.

  7. Impact of CO2 injection protocol on fluid-solid reactivity: high-pressure and temperature microfluidic experiments in limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Martinez, Joaquin; Porter, Mark; Carey, James; Guthrie, George; Viswanathan, Hari

    2017-04-01

    Geological sequestration of CO2 has been proposed in the last decades as a technology to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere and mitigate the global climate change. However, some questions such as the impact of the protocol of CO2 injection on the fluid-solid reactivity remain open. In our experiments, two different protocols of injection are compared at the same conditions (8.4 MPa and 45 C, and constant flow rate 0.06 ml/min): i) single phase injection, i.e., CO2-saturated brine; and ii) simultaneous injection of CO2-saturated brine and scCO2. For that purpose, we combine a unique high-pressure/temperature microfluidics experimental system, which allows reproducing geological reservoir conditions in geo-material substrates (i.e., limestone, Cisco Formation, Texas, US) and high resolution optical profilometry. Single and multiphase flow through etched fracture networks were optically recorded with a microscope, while processes of dissolution-precipitation in the etched channels were quantified by comparison of the initial and final topology of the limestone micromodels. Changes in hydraulic conductivity were quantified from pressure difference along the micromodel. The simultaneous injection of CO2-saturated brine and scCO2, reduced the brine-limestone contact area and also created a highly heterogeneous velocity field (i.e., low velocities regions or stagnation zones, and high velocity regions or preferential paths), reducing rock dissolution and enhancing calcite precipitation. The results illustrate the contrasting effects of single and multiphase flow on chemical reactivity and suggest that multiphase flow by isolating parts of the flow system can enhance CO2 mineralization.

  8. Multivariable model predictive control design of reactive distillation column for Dimethyl Ether production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, A.; Putra, I. G. E. P.

    2018-03-01

    Dimethyl ether (DME) as an alternative clean energy has attracted a growing attention in the recent years. DME production via reactive distillation has potential for capital cost and energy requirement savings. However, combination of reaction and distillation on a single column makes reactive distillation process a very complex multivariable system with high non-linearity of process and strong interaction between process variables. This study investigates a multivariable model predictive control (MPC) based on two-point temperature control strategy for the DME reactive distillation column to maintain the purities of both product streams. The process model is estimated by a first order plus dead time model. The DME and water purity is maintained by controlling a stage temperature in rectifying and stripping section, respectively. The result shows that the model predictive controller performed faster responses compared to conventional PI controller that are showed by the smaller ISE values. In addition, the MPC controller is able to handle the loop interactions well.

  9. Analytical estimation of control rod shadowing effect for excess reactivity measurement of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masaaki; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Yamashita, Kiyonobu

    1999-01-01

    The fuel addition method is generally used for the excess reactivity measurement of the initial core. The control rod shadowing effect for the excess reactivity measurement has been estimated analytically for High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). 3-dimensional whole core analyses were carried out. The movements of control rods in measurements were simulated in the calculation. It was made clear that the value of excess reactivity strongly depend on combinations of measuring control rods and compensating control rods. The differences in excess reactivity between combinations come from the control rod shadowing effect. The shadowing effect is reduced by the use of plural number of measuring and compensating control rods to prevent deep insertion of them into the core. The measured excess reactivity in the experiments is, however, smaller than the estimated value with shadowing effect. (author)

  10. Effective NH2-grafting on attapulgite surfaces for adsorption of reactive dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Ailian; Zhou, Shouyong; Zhao, Yijiang; Lu, Xiaoping; Han, Pingfang

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We prepared a new amine functionalized adsorbent derived from clay-based material. → Attapulgite surface was modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. → Some modification parameters affecting the adsorption potential were investigated. → Enhance the attapulgite adsorptive capacity for reactive dyes from aqueous solutions. - Abstract: The amine moiety has an important function in many applications, including, adsorption, catalysis, electrochemistry, chromatography, and nanocomposite materials. We developed an effective adsorbent for aqueous reactive dye removal by modifying attapulgite with an amino-terminated organosilicon (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APTES). Surface properties of the APTES-modified attapulgite were characterized by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and nitrogen adsorption-desorption. We evaluated the impact of solvent, APTES concentration, water volume, reaction time, and temperature on the surface modification. NH 2 -attapulgite was used to remove reactive dyes in aqueous solution and showed very high adsorption rates of 99.32%, 99.67%, and 96.42% for Reactive Red 3BS, Reactive Blue KE-R and Reactive Black GR, respectively. These powerful dye removal effects were attributed to strong electrostatic interactions between reactive dyes and the grafted NH 2 groups.

  11. The conformity of BPP and vibroacoustic stimulation results in fetal non reactive non stress test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Modarres

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most frequently used test for evaluation of fetal health is the Non Stress Test (NST. Unfortunately it has a high incidence of false positive results. The combination of vibroacoustic stimulation with the NTS has been shown to reduce non reactive results. Methods: A tests assessment method was chosen with a simple randomized sampling. 40 pregnant women with non reactive NST in the first 20 minutes who received VAS in one of Tehran University's Hospitals were compared with BPP scores. A vibroacoustic stimulation was applied for a 3 seconds on the maternal abdomen and fallowed within 10 minutes.Data collection tools were NST, sonography instruments ,NST result paper, tooth brusher, watch, demographic questioner and check list. Data analysis was made by descriptive static and by using the Fisher's Exact Test (with level of significant at p<0/05. All statistical analysis were performed using an spss/win. Results: After VAS, 70% of non reactive tracing became reactive. All cases with fetal reactivity response after a VAS had a subsequent BPP score of 8 (negative predictive value of 100%. False positivity of VAS was lower than NST. Conclusion: VAS offers benefits, by decreasing the incidence of non reactive test and reducing test time. VAS lowers the rate of false positive NST. VAS is safe and allows more efficient of prenatal services. This test could be used as a rapid antepartum test to predict fetal well-being.

  12. Impact of intake CO 2 addition and exhaust gas recirculation on NO x emissions and soot reactivity in a common rail diesel engine

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Qurashi, Khalid

    2012-10-18

    The impact of intake CO 2 addition and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on engine combustion characteristics, NO x emissions, and soot oxidative reactivity was studied in a common rail diesel engine equipped with a cooled EGR system. The engine test results and the heat release analysis show that the reduced flame temperature, induced by the reduction of the oxygen concentration (dilution effect) is the dominant mechanism via which CO 2 and EGR lower NO x emissions in diesel engines. On the other hand, the collected soot from the engine tests was examined for its oxidative reactivity using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Results show that EGR has a significant effect on soot reactivity and results in higher initial active sites compared to the CO 2 case. We conclude that the reduced flame temperature (thermal effect) which is a consequence of the dilution effect is responsible for the observed increase in soot reactivity. These results confirm observations from our past work on flame soot, which showed that the peak adiabatic flame temperature is the governing factor affecting soot reactivity. These findings imply that driving the combustion concepts toward low temperature is favorable to effectively control engine pollutants, including soot reactivity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  13. Impact of intake CO 2 addition and exhaust gas recirculation on NO x emissions and soot reactivity in a common rail diesel engine

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Qurashi, Khalid; Zhang, Yu; Boehman, André Louis

    2012-01-01

    The impact of intake CO 2 addition and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on engine combustion characteristics, NO x emissions, and soot oxidative reactivity was studied in a common rail diesel engine equipped with a cooled EGR system. The engine test results and the heat release analysis show that the reduced flame temperature, induced by the reduction of the oxygen concentration (dilution effect) is the dominant mechanism via which CO 2 and EGR lower NO x emissions in diesel engines. On the other hand, the collected soot from the engine tests was examined for its oxidative reactivity using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Results show that EGR has a significant effect on soot reactivity and results in higher initial active sites compared to the CO 2 case. We conclude that the reduced flame temperature (thermal effect) which is a consequence of the dilution effect is responsible for the observed increase in soot reactivity. These results confirm observations from our past work on flame soot, which showed that the peak adiabatic flame temperature is the governing factor affecting soot reactivity. These findings imply that driving the combustion concepts toward low temperature is favorable to effectively control engine pollutants, including soot reactivity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  14. The effect of temperature on pulsed positive streamer discharges in air over the range 292 K–1438 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Ryo; Ishikawa, Yuta

    2018-05-01

    The effect of temperature on pulsed positive streamer discharges in air is measured by comparing atmospheric-pressure, high-temperature discharges with low-pressure, room-temperature discharges at the same air densities n and discharge voltages. Both discharges have the same reduced electric field E/n, so the differences between the two discharges only depend on the temperature, which is varied from 292 K to 1438 K. Temperature affects the discharge pulse energy most significantly; at 1438 K, the energy of an atmospheric-pressure discharge pulse is approximately 30 times larger than that of the corresponding 20.5 kPa, room-temperature discharge. Temperature also affects the shapes of the streamers when K, but no significant effect is observed for K. There is also no significant temperature effect on the spatially integrated intensity of N2(C–B) emission. However, temperature strongly affects the ratio of the integrated emission intensity to the discharge energy. No effect of the temperature is observed on the propagation velocity of the primary streamer or on the length of the secondary streamer.

  15. Reactive transport models and simulation with ALLIANCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leterrier, N.; Deville, E.; Bary, B.; Trotignon, L.; Hedde, T.; Cochepin, B.; Stora, E.

    2009-01-01

    Many chemical processes influence the evolution of nuclear waste storage. As a result, simulations based only upon transport and hydraulic processes fail to describe adequately some industrial scenarios. We need to take into account complex chemical models (mass action laws, kinetics...) which are highly non-linear. In order to simulate the coupling of these chemical reactions with transport, we use a classical Sequential Iterative Approach (SIA), with a fixed point algorithm, within the mainframe of the ALLIANCES platform. This approach allows us to use the various transport and chemical modules available in ALLIANCES, via an operator-splitting method based upon the structure of the chemical system. We present five different applications of reactive transport simulations in the context of nuclear waste storage: 1. A 2D simulation of the lixiviation by rain water of an underground polluted zone high in uranium oxide; 2. The degradation of the steel envelope of a package in contact with clay. Corrosion of the steel creates corrosion products and the altered package becomes a porous medium. We follow the degradation front through kinetic reactions and the coupling with transport; 3. The degradation of a cement-based material by the injection of an aqueous solution of zinc and sulphate ions. In addition to the reactive transport coupling, we take into account in this case the hydraulic retroaction of the porosity variation on the Darcy velocity; 4. The decalcification of a concrete beam in an underground storage structure. In this case, in addition to the reactive transport simulation, we take into account the interaction between chemical degradation and the mechanical forces (cracks...), and the retroactive influence on the structure changes on transport; 5. The degradation of the steel envelope of a package in contact with a clay material under a temperature gradient. In this case the reactive transport simulation is entirely directed by the temperature changes and

  16. Summertime OH reactivity from a receptor coastal site in the Mediterranean Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Zannoni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Total hydroxyl radical (OH reactivity, the total loss frequency of the hydroxyl radical in ambient air, provides the total loading of OH reactants in air. We measured the total OH reactivity for the first time during summertime at a coastal receptor site located in the western Mediterranean Basin. Measurements were performed at a temporary field site located in the northern cape of Corsica (France, during summer 2013 for the project CARBOSOR (CARBOn within continental pollution plumes: SOurces and Reactivity–ChArMEx (Chemistry and Aerosols Mediterranean Experiment. Here, we compare the measured total OH reactivity with the OH reactivity calculated from the measured reactive gases. The difference between these two parameters is termed missing OH reactivity, i.e., the fraction of OH reactivity not explained by the measured compounds. The total OH reactivity at the site varied between the instrumental LoD (limit of detection  =  3 s−1 to a maximum of 17 ± 6 s−1 (35 % uncertainty and was 5 ± 4 s−1 (1σ SD – standard deviation on average. It varied with air temperature exhibiting a diurnal profile comparable to the reactivity calculated from the concentration of the biogenic volatile organic compounds measured at the site. For part of the campaign, 56 % of OH reactivity was unexplained by the measured OH reactants (missing reactivity. We suggest that oxidation products of biogenic gas precursors were among the contributors to missing OH reactivity.

  17. Effect of cation exchange on the subsequent reactivity of lignite chars to steam. [108 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hippo, E. J.; Walker, Jr., P. L.

    1977-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine the role which cations in coal play in the subsequent reactivity of chars. It is hoped that this investigation will aid in an understanding of the catalytic nature of inorganic constituents in coal during its gasification. It was found that increased heat treatment temperature decreased reactivity. The decrease in reactivity was shown to be due, at least in part, to the changes in the nature of the cation with increased heat treatment temperature. Reactivity was found to be a linear function of the amount of Ca(++) exchange on the demineralized coal. The constant utilization factor over the wide range of loadings employed indicated that below 800/sup 0/C the calcium did not markedly sinter. Potassium, sodium, and calcium-containing chars were found to be much more reactive than the iron and magnesium-containing chars. However, the iron and magnesium containing chars were more reactive than chars produced from the demineralized coal. The iron char was highly active at first but the iron phase was quickly oxidized to a comparatively unreactive ..gamma..Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/-Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ phase. The state of magnesium was found to be MgO. Sodium and calcium were equally active as catalysts but not as active as potassium.

  18. Motor reactivity of animals exposed to ionizing radiation and treated with psychotropic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szwaja, S.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of ionizing radiation on motor reactivity of animals and the influence of selected psychotropic drugs (fenactil, haloperidol, relanium) on the changes invoked by ionizing radiation were studied experimentally in rats whose motor reactivity was assessed on the basis of conditional reflexes. In unirradiated rats, fenactil and haloperidol, but not relanium, disordered positive conditional reactions. Roentgen irradiation of the rats with a single dose on the whole body caused a drop in positive conditional reactions. Relanium and fenactil enhanced psychomotor activity of rats after exposure to ionizing radiation. (author)

  19. Motor reactivity of animals exposed to ionizing radiation and treated with psychotropic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szwaja, S [Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Krakow (Poland)

    1978-01-01

    The influence of ionizing radiation on motor reactivity of animals and the influence of selected psychotropic drugs (fenactil, haloperidol, relanium) on the changes invoked by ionizing radiation were studied experimentally in rats whose motor reactivity was assessed on the basis of conditional reflexes. In unirradiated rats, fenactil and haloperidol, but not relanium, disordered positive conditional reactions. Roentgen irradiation of the rats with a single dose on the whole body caused a drop in positive conditional reactions. Relanium and fenactil enhanced psychomotor activity of rats after exposure to ionizing radiation.

  20. High-Temperature Induced Changes of Extracellular Metabolites in Pleurotus ostreatus and Their Positive Effects on the Growth of Trichoderma asperellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhiheng; Wu, Xiangli; Zhang, Jinxia; Huang, Chenyang

    2018-01-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is a widely cultivated edible fungus in China. Green mold disease of P. ostreatus which can seriously affect yield is a common disease during cultivation. It occurs mostly after P. ostreatus mycelia have been subjected to high temperatures. However, little information is available on the relationship between high temperature and green mold disease. The aim of this study is to prove that extracellular metabolites of P. ostreatus affected by high temperature can promote the growth of Trichoderma asperellum . After P. ostreatus mycelia was subjected to high temperature, the extracellular fluid of P. ostreatus showed a higher promoting effect on mycelial growth and conidial germination of T. asperellum . The thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) content reached the maximum after 48 h at 36°C. A comprehensive metabolite profiling strategy involving gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) combined with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was used to analyze the changes of extracellular metabolites in response to high temperature. A total of 141 differential metabolites were identified, including 84.4% up-regulated and 15.6% down-regulated. Exogenous metabolites whose concentrations were increased after high temperature were randomly selected, and nearly all of them were able to promote the mycelial growth and conidial germination of T. asperellum . The combination of all selected exogenous metabolites also has the promotion effects on the mycelial growth and conidial germination of T. asperellum in a given concentration range in vitro . Overall, these results provide a first view that high temperature affects the extracellular metabolites of P. ostreatus , and the extensive change in metabolites promotes T. asperellum growth.

  1. Skin irritability to sodium lauryl sulfate is associated with increased positive patch test reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitulla, J; Brasch, J; Löffler, H; Schnuch, A; Geier, J; Uter, W

    2014-07-01

    As previous observations have indicated an inter-relationship between irritant and allergic skin reactions we analysed data of synchronous allergen and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) patch tests in terms of a relationship between SLS responsiveness and allergic patch test reactions. To analyse differences in terms of allergen-specific and overall reaction profiles between patients with vs. those without an irritant reaction to SLS. Clinical data of 26 879 patients patch tested from 2008 to 2011 by members of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology were analysed. After descriptive analyses, including the MOAHLFA index, the positivity ratio and the reaction index, a negative binomial hurdle model was adopted to investigate the correlation between SLS reactivity and positive patch test reactions. Men, patients aged ≥ 40 years and patients with an occupational dermatitis background were over-represented in the SLS-reactive group. Patients with an irritant reaction to SLS showed a higher proportion of weak positive reactions, as well as more questionable and irritant reactions to contact allergens than patients not reactive to SLS. The risk of an additional positive patch test reaction increased by 22% for SLS-reactive patients compared with those who were SLS negative. The marked association between SLS reactivity and the number of positive reactions in patch test patients may be due to nonspecific increased skin reactivity at the moment of patch testing only. However, increased SLS reactivity could also be due to longer-lasting enhanced skin irritability, which may have promoted (poly-)sensitization. Further studies, for example with longitudinal data on patients repeatedly patch tested with SLS and contact allergens, are necessary. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  2. A reactive transport model for Marcellus shale weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Peyman; Li, Li; Jin, Lixin; Williams, Jennifer Z.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2017-11-01

    Shale formations account for 25% of the land surface globally and contribute a large proportion of the natural gas used in the United States. One of the most productive shale-gas formations is the Marcellus, a black shale that is rich in organic matter and pyrite. As a first step toward understanding how Marcellus shale interacts with water in the surface or deep subsurface, we developed a reactive transport model to simulate shale weathering under ambient temperature and pressure conditions, constrained by soil and water chemistry data. The simulation was carried out for 10,000 years since deglaciation, assuming bedrock weathering and soil genesis began after the last glacial maximum. Results indicate weathering was initiated by pyrite dissolution for the first 1000 years, leading to low pH and enhanced dissolution of chlorite and precipitation of iron hydroxides. After pyrite depletion, chlorite dissolved slowly, primarily facilitated by the presence of CO2 and organic acids, forming vermiculite as a secondary mineral. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the most important controls on weathering include the presence of reactive gases (CO2 and O2), specific surface area, and flow velocity of infiltrating meteoric water. The soil chemistry and mineralogy data could not be reproduced without including the reactive gases. For example, pyrite remained in the soil even after 10,000 years if O2 was not continuously present in the soil column; likewise, chlorite remained abundant and porosity remained small if CO2 was not present in the soil gas. The field observations were only simulated successfully when the modeled specific surface areas of the reactive minerals were 1-3 orders of magnitude smaller than surface area values measured for powdered minerals. Small surface areas could be consistent with the lack of accessibility of some fluids to mineral surfaces due to surface coatings. In addition, some mineral surface is likely interacting only with equilibrated pore

  3. Measurement of gas temperature and OH density in the afterglow of pulsed positive corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji

    2008-01-01

    The gas temperature and OH density in the afterglow of pulsed positive corona discharge are measured using the laser-induced predissociation fluorescence (LIPF) of OH radicals. Discharge occurs in a 13 mm point-to-plane gap in an atmospheric-pressure H 2 O(2.8%)/O 2 (2.0%)/N 2 mixture. The temperature measurement shows that (i) the temperature increases after discharge and (ii) the temperature near the anode tip (within 1 mm from the anode tip) is much higher than that of the rest of the discharge volume. Near the anode tip, the temperature increases from 500 K (t = 0 μs) to 1100 K (t = 20 μs), where t is the postdischarge time, while it increases from 400 K (t = 0 μs) to 700 K (t = 100 μs) in the rest of the discharge volume away from the anode tip. This temperature difference between the two volumes (near and far from the anode tip) causes a difference in the decay rate of OH density: OH density near the anode tip decays approximately 10 times slower than that far from the tip. The spatial distribution of OH density shows good agreement with that of the secondary streamer luminous intensity. This shows that OH radicals are mainly produced in the secondary streamer, not in the primary one

  4. Frequency of skin reactivity to food allergens in allergic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heriberto Camero-Martínez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Food allergy is deemed to have a worldwide prevalence ranging from 2 to 10 %. Objective: To determine the frequency of skin reactivity to food allergens by age groups. Methods: Cross-sectional, descriptive, prolective, observational study. Patients aged from 2 to 64 years with symptoms consistent with allergic disease were included. Skin prick tests were carried out with food allergens. Frequencies and percentages were estimated. Results: One-hundred and ninety-one patients were included, out of which 63.4% were females. Mean age was 22.5 years; 19.3 % showed positive skin reactivity to at least one food. Distribution by age group was as follows: preschool children 13.5 %, schoolchildren 24.3 %, adolescents 2.7 % and adults 59.5 %. Diagnoses included allergic rhinitis in 84.3 %, asthma in 19.4 %, urticaria in 14.1 % and atopic dermatitis in 8.4 %. Positive skin reactivity frequency distribution in descending order was: soybeans with 5.2 %, peach with 4.7 %, grapes, orange and apple with 3.6 %, nuts with 3.1 %, pineapple, avocado, tomato and tuna with 2.6 %. Conclusion: The frequency of skin reactivity to food allergens was similar to that reported in the national and Latin American literature, but sensitization to each specific allergen varied for each age group.

  5. Development of various welding techniques for refractory and reactive metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonpe, Sunil; Saibaba, N.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), Hyderabad, India with its excellent manufacturing facilities, produces nuclear fuel and structural components for nuclear reactors. NFC has taken up the challenging job of production of various critical components made out of refractory and reactive metals and alloys for nuclear and aerospace applications as an indigenization import substitute program. Refractory metals are prime candidates for many high temperature aerospace components because of refractory metal's high melting points and inherent creep resistance. The use of refractory metals is often limited because of their poor room temperature properties, inadequate oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures, difficulties associated with joining or welding etc. These advanced materials demand stringent requirement with respect to chemistry, dimensional tolerances, mechanical and metallurgical properties. This paper discusses in detail various welding techniques adopted in NFC for refractory and reactive metals and alloys such as Nb, Zr, Ti, Ta, Zircaloy, Titanium-half alloy etc. to manufacture various components and assemblies required for nuclear and aerospace applications

  6. Comparison of MCNP calculations against measurements in moderator temperature experiments with CANFLEX-LEU in ZED-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, D.G.; Adams, F.P.; Zeller, M.B.; Bromley, B.P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes sample calculations of MCNP5 compared against measurements of moderator temperature coefficient experiments in the ZED-2 critical facility with CANFLEX-LEU fuel. MCNP5 is tested for key parameters associated with various reactor physics phenomena of interest for CANDU/ACR-1000) reactors, including reactivity changes with coolant density, moderator density, and moderator temperature, and also normalized flux distributions. The experimental data for these comparisons were obtained from critical experiments in AECL's ZED-2 critical facility using CANFLEX-LEU fuel in a 24-cm square lattice pitch. These comparisons establish biases/uncertainties in the calculation of k-eff, coolant void reactivity, and moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity. Results show very little bias in the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity, and very good agreement in the calculation of normalized flux distributions. (author)

  7. Generating high temperature tolerant transgenic plants: Achievements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Anil; Mittal, Dheeraj; Negi, Manisha; Lavania, Dhruv

    2013-05-01

    Production of plants tolerant to high temperature stress is of immense significance in the light of global warming and climate change. Plant cells respond to high temperature stress by re-programming their genetic machinery for survival and reproduction. High temperature tolerance in transgenic plants has largely been achieved either by over-expressing heat shock protein genes or by altering levels of heat shock factors that regulate expression of heat shock and non-heat shock genes. Apart from heat shock factors, over-expression of other trans-acting factors like DREB2A, bZIP28 and WRKY proteins has proven useful in imparting high temperature tolerance. Besides these, elevating the genetic levels of proteins involved in osmotic adjustment, reactive oxygen species removal, saturation of membrane-associated lipids, photosynthetic reactions, production of polyamines and protein biosynthesis process have yielded positive results in equipping transgenic plants with high temperature tolerance. Cyclic nucleotide gated calcium channel proteins that regulate calcium influxes across the cell membrane have recently been shown to be the key players in induction of high temperature tolerance. The involvement of calmodulins and kinases in activation of heat shock factors has been implicated as an important event in governing high temperature tolerance. Unfilled gaps limiting the production of high temperature tolerant transgenic plants for field level cultivation are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Applying burnable poison particles to reduce the reactivity swing in high temperature reactors with batch-wise fuel loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloosterman, J.L.; Dam, H. van; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der

    2003-01-01

    Burnup calculations have been performed on a standard HTR fuel pebble with a radius of 3 cm containing 9 g of 8% enriched uranium and burnable poison particles (BPP) made of B 4 C highly enriched in 10 B. The radius of the BPP and the number of particles per fuel pebble have been varied to find the flattest reactivity-to-time curve. It was found that for a k∞ of 1.1, a reactivity swing as low as 2% can be obtained when each fuel pebble contains about 1070 BPP with a radius of 75 μm. For coated BPP that consist of a graphite kernel with a radius of 300 μm covered with a B 4 C burnable poison layer, a similar value for the reactivity swing can be obtained. Cylindrical particles seem to perform worse. In general, the modification of the geometry of BPP is an effective means to tailor the reactivity curve of HTRs

  9. Application of a Coated Film Catalyst Layer Model to a High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell with Low Catalyst Loading Produced by Reactive Spray Deposition Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy D. Myles

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a semi-empirical model is presented that correlates to previously obtained experimental overpotential data for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC. The goal is to reinforce the understanding of the performance of the cell from a modeling perspective. The HT-PEMFC membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs were constructed utilizing an 85 wt. % phosphoric acid doped Advent TPS® membranes for the electrolyte and gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs manufactured by Reactive Spray Deposition Technology (RSDT. MEAs with varying ratios of PTFE binder to carbon support material (I/C ratio were manufactured and their performance at various operating temperatures was recorded. The semi-empirical model derivation was based on the coated film catalyst layer approach and was calibrated to the experimental data by a least squares method. The behavior of important physical parameters as a function of I/C ratio and operating temperature were explored.

  10. Application of reactivity method to MTR fuel burn-up measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga, A.; Ravnik, M.; Cuya, R.

    2001-01-01

    Fuel element burn-up has been measured for the first time by reactivity method in a MTR reactor. The measurement was performed in RP-10 reactor of Peruvian Institute for Nuclear Energy (IPEN) in Lima. It is a pool type 10MW material testing reactor using standard 20% enriched uranium plate type fuel elements. A fresh element and an element with well defined burn-up were selected as reference elements. Several elements in the core were selected for burn-up measurement. Each of them was replaced in its original position by both reference elements. Change in excess reactivity was measured using control rod calibration curve. The burn-up reactivity worth of fuel elements was plotted as a function of their calculated burnup. Corrected burn-up values of the measured fuel elements were calculated using the fitting function at experimental reactivity for all elements. Good agreement between measured and calculated burn-up values was observed indicating that the reactivity method can be successfully applied also to MTR fuel element burn-up determination.(author)

  11. Cross-reactive microbial peptides can modulate HIV-specific CD8+ T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W Pohlmeyer

    Full Text Available Heterologous immunity is an important aspect of the adaptive immune response. We hypothesized that this process could modulate the HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cell response, which has been shown to play an important role in HIV-1 immunity and control. We found that stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from HIV-1-positive subjects with microbial peptides that were cross-reactive with immunodominant HIV-1 epitopes resulted in dramatic expansion of HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, the TCR repertoire of HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells generated by ex vivo stimulation of PBMCs using HIV-1 peptide was different from that of cells stimulated with cross-reactive microbial peptides in some HIV-1-positive subjects. Despite these differences, CD8+ T cells stimulated with either HIV-1 or cross-reactive peptides effectively suppressed HIV-1 replication in autologous CD4+ T cells. These data suggest that exposure to cross-reactive microbial antigens can modulate HIV-1-specific immunity.

  12. Digital reactivity meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkus, B.; Anac, H.; Alsan, S.; Erk, S.

    1991-01-01

    Nowadays, various digital methods making use of microcomputers for neutron detector signals and determining the reactivity by numerical calculations are used in reactor control systems in place of classical reactivity meters. In this work, a calculation based on the ''The Time Dependent Transport Equation'' has been developed for determining the reactivity numerically. The reactivity values have been obtained utilizing a computer-based data acquisition and control system and compared with the analog reactivity meter values as well as the values calculated from the ''Inhour Equation''

  13. Reactivity margins in heavy water moderated production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benton, F.D.

    1981-11-01

    The design of the reactor core and components of the heavy water moderated reactors at the Savannah River Plant (SFP) can be varied to produce a number of isotopes. For the past decade, the predominant reactor core design has been the enriched-depleted lattice. In this lattice, fuel assemblies of highly enriched uranium and target assemblies of depleted uranium, which produce plutonium, occupy alternate lattice positions. This heterogeneous lattice arrangement and a nonuniform control rod distribution result in a reactor core that requires sophisticated calculational methods for accurate reactivity margin and power distribution predictions. For maximum accuracy, techniques must exist to provide a base of observed data for the calculations. Frequent enriched-depleted lattice design changes are required as product demands vary. These changes provided incentive for the development of techniques to combine the results of calculations and observed reactivity data to accurately and conveniently monitor reactivity margins during operation

  14. Reference core design Mark-III of the experimental multi-purpose, high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Ryuiti; Watanabe, Takashi; Ishiguro, Okikazu; Kuroki, Syuzi

    1977-10-01

    The reactivity control system is one of the important items in reactor design, but it is much restricted by structural design of fuel element and pressure vessel in the experimental multi-purpose, high-temperature reactor. Preceding the first conceptual design of the reactor, therefore, the reactivity control system composed of control rod, burnable poison and reserve shutdown system in Mark-II design was re-studied, and several improvements were indicated. (1) The diameter of control rods must be as large as possible because it is impossible to increase the number of control rods. (2) The accuracy in estimation of the reactivity to be compensated with control rods is important because of the mutual interference of pair control rods with the twin configuration in a fuel element. (3) The improvement of core performance in burnup is accompanied by the reduction of design margin for control rods. (4) Increase of the reactivity to be compensated with the burnable poison leads to increase of the core reactivity recovery with burnup, and the assertion of the decrease for recovery of reactivity leads to increase of the temperature dependency of reactivity compensated with control rods. (5) Reduction of reactivity to be compensated with control rods is thus limited by cancellation of the effects in the reactivity recovery and the reactivity temperature dependency. (6) The reserve shutdown system can be designed with margin under the condition of excluding the reactivity of burnup from that to be compensated. (auth.)

  15. Desorption of Reactive Red 198 from activated carbon prepared from walnut shells: effects of temperature, sodium carbonate concentration and organic solvent dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Alimohamadi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of temperature, different concentrations of sodium carbonate,and the dose of organic solvent on the desorption of Reactive Red 198 dye from dye-saturated activated carbon using batch and continuous systems. The results of the batch desorption test showed 60% acetone in water as the optimum amount. However, when the concentration of sodium carbonate was raised, the dye desorption percentage increased from 26% to 42% due to economic considerations; 15 mg/L of sodium carbonate was selected to continue the processof desorption. Increasing the desorption temperature can improve the dye desorption efficiency.According to the column test results, dye desorption concentration decreased gradually with the passing of time. The column test results showed that desorption efficiency and the percentage of dye adsorbed decreased; however, it seemed to stabilize after three repeated adsorption/desorption cycles. The repeated adsorption–desorption column tests (3 cycles showed that the activated carbon which was prepared from walnut shell was a suitable and economical adsorbent for dye removal.

  16. The Everyday Emotional Experience of Adults with Major Depressive Disorder: Examining Emotional Instability, Inertia, and Reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Renee J.; Mata, Jutta; Jaeggi, Susanne M.; Buschkuehl, Martin; Jonides, John; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2013-01-01

    Investigators have begun to examine the temporal dynamics of affect in individuals diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), focusing on instability, inertia, and reactivity of emotion. How these dynamics differ between individuals with MDD and healthy controls have not before been examined in a single study. In the present study, 53 adults with MDD and 53 healthy adults carried hand-held electronic devices for approximately seven days and were prompted randomly eight times per day to report their levels of current negative affect (NA), positive affect (PA), and the occurrence of significant events. In terms of NA, compared with healthy controls, depressed participants reported greater instability and greater reactivity to positive events, but comparable levels of inertia and reactivity to negative events. Neither average levels of NA nor NA reactivity to, frequency or intensity of, events accounted for the group difference in instability of NA. In terms of PA, the MDD and control groups did not differ significantly in their instability, inertia, or reactivity to positive or negative events. These findings highlight the importance of emotional instability in MDD, particularly with respect to NA, and contribute to a more nuanced understanding of the everyday emotional experiences of depressed individuals. PMID:22708886

  17. Ignition delay and soot oxidative reactivity of MTBE blended diesel fuel

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Seung Yeon; Naser, Nimal; Chung, Suk-Ho; Al-Qurashi, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was added to diesel fuel to investigate the effect on ignition delay and soot oxidative reactivity. An ignition quality tester (IQT) was used to study the ignition propensity of MTBE blended diesel fuels in a reactive spray environment. The IQT data showed that ignition delay increases linearly as the MTBE fraction increases in the fuel. A four-stroke single cylinder diesel engine was used to generate soot samples for a soot oxidation study. Soot samples were pre-treated using a tube furnace in a nitrogen environment to remove any soluble organic fractions and moisture content. Non-isothermal oxidation of soot samples was conducted using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). It was observed that oxidation of 'MTBE soot' started began at a lower temperature and had higher reaction rate than 'diesel soot' across a range of temperatures. Several kinetic analyses including an isoconversional method and a combined model fitting method were carried out to evaluate kinetic parameters. The results showed that Diesel and MTBE soot samples had similar activation energy but the pre-exponential factor of MTBE soot was much higher than that of the Diesel soot. This may explain why MTBE soot was more reactive than Diesel soot. It is suggested that adding MTBE to diesel fuel is better for DPF regeneration since an MTBE blend can significantly influence the ignition characteristics and, consequently, the oxidative reactivity of soot. Copyright © 2014 SAE International.

  18. Ignition delay and soot oxidative reactivity of MTBE blended diesel fuel

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Seung Yeon

    2014-04-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was added to diesel fuel to investigate the effect on ignition delay and soot oxidative reactivity. An ignition quality tester (IQT) was used to study the ignition propensity of MTBE blended diesel fuels in a reactive spray environment. The IQT data showed that ignition delay increases linearly as the MTBE fraction increases in the fuel. A four-stroke single cylinder diesel engine was used to generate soot samples for a soot oxidation study. Soot samples were pre-treated using a tube furnace in a nitrogen environment to remove any soluble organic fractions and moisture content. Non-isothermal oxidation of soot samples was conducted using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). It was observed that oxidation of \\'MTBE soot\\' started began at a lower temperature and had higher reaction rate than \\'diesel soot\\' across a range of temperatures. Several kinetic analyses including an isoconversional method and a combined model fitting method were carried out to evaluate kinetic parameters. The results showed that Diesel and MTBE soot samples had similar activation energy but the pre-exponential factor of MTBE soot was much higher than that of the Diesel soot. This may explain why MTBE soot was more reactive than Diesel soot. It is suggested that adding MTBE to diesel fuel is better for DPF regeneration since an MTBE blend can significantly influence the ignition characteristics and, consequently, the oxidative reactivity of soot. Copyright © 2014 SAE International.

  19. Child temperament and parental depression predict cortisol reactivity to stress in middle childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackrell, Sarah V M; Sheikh, Haroon I; Kotelnikova, Yuliya; Kryski, Katie R; Jordan, Patricia L; Singh, Shiva M; Hayden, Elizabeth P

    2014-02-01

    Children's cortisol reactivity to stress is an important mediator of depression risk, making the search for predictors of such reactivity an important goal for psychopathologists. Multiple studies have linked maternal depression and childhood behavioral inhibition (BI) independently to child cortisol reactivity, yet few have tested multivariate models of these risks. Further, paternal depression and other child temperament traits, such as positive emotionality (PE), have been largely ignored despite their potential relevance. We therefore examined longitudinal associations between child fear/BI and PE and parental depression, and children's cortisol stress reactivity, in 205 7-year-olds. Paternal depression and child fear/BI predicted greater cortisol stress reactivity at a follow-up of 164 9-year-olds, and maternal depression and child PE interacted to predict children's cortisol reactivity, such that higher child PE predicted lower cortisol reactivity in the context of maternal depression. Results highlight the importance of both parents' depression, as well as multiple facets of child temperament, in developing more comprehensive models of childhood cortisol reactivity to stress. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed

  1. Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi [Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-07-11

    Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed.

  2. Effect of plasma immersion on crystallinity of V2O5 film grown by dc reactive sputtering at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Hee; Kim, Joosun; Yoon, Young Soo

    2005-01-01

    Vanadium oxide thin films were grown at room temperature by direct current reactive sputtering. To investigate the effect of plasma immersion on the crystallinity of as-grown film, we immersed samples in plasma during the deposition process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements show that as-deposited thin films immersed in plasma are crystalline, whereas those not immersed in the plasma are amorphous. Images taken with scanning electron microscopy show that the surface of films exposed to plasma have a different morphology to the surface of films not exposed to plasma. The Li-intercalation feature of as-deposited films immersed in plasma shows the typical behavior of crystalline vanadium oxide; such behavior is unsuitable for the cathode of thin film batteries (TFBs). These results indicate that direct current plasma promotes the growth of crystalline vanadium oxide films

  3. Skin Conductance Level Reactivity Moderates the Association Between Parental Psychological Control and Relational Aggression in Emerging Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Caitlin R; Abaied, Jamie L

    2016-04-01

    When studying factors that may heighten risk for relational aggression in youth, it is important to consider characteristics of both the individual and their environment. This research examined the associations between parental psychological control and reactive and proactive relational aggression in emerging adults in college. Given that sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation may underlie differences between reactive and proactive aggression and has been shown to moderate the effects of parenting on youth development, the moderating role of SNS reactivity [indexed by skin conductance level reactivity (SCLR)] was also examined. Emerging adults (N = 180; 77.2 % female) self-reported on perceptions of parental psychological control and reactive and proactive relational aggression. SCLR was assessed in response to an interpersonal laboratory challenge task. Parental psychological control was positively associated with reactive relational aggression only for emerging adults who exhibited high SCLR. Parental psychological control was positively associated with proactive relational aggression only among emerging adults who showed low SCLR. This study extends previous research on parenting and aggression and suggests that parental psychological control is differentially associated with reactive versus proactive relational aggression, depending on emerging adults' SCLR to interpersonal stress.

  4. Reactive chemicals and process hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surianarayanan, M.

    2016-01-01

    Exothermic chemical reactions are often accompanied by significant heat release, and therefore, need a thorough investigation before they are taken to a plant scale. Sudden thermal energy releases from exothermic decompositions and runaway reactions have contributed to serious fire and explosions in several chemical process plants. Similarly, thermal runaway had also occurred in storage and transportation of reactive chemicals. The secondary events of thermal runaway reactions can be rupture of process vessel, toxic spills and release of explosive vapor clouds or combination of these also. The explosion hazards are governed by the system thermodynamics and kinetics of the thermal process. Theoretical prediction of limiting temperature is difficult due to process complexities. Further, the kinetic data obtained through classical techniques, at conditions far away from runaway situation, is often not valid for assessing the runaway behavior of exothermic processes. The main focus of this lecture is to discuss the causes and several contributing factors for thermal runaway and instability and present analyses of the methodologies of the new instrumental techniques for assessing the thermal hazards of reactive chemicals during processing, storage and transportation. (author)

  5. Nuclear data for the calculation of thermal reactor reactivity coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    On its 15th meeting in Vienna, 16-20 June 1986, the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC) considered it important to review the accuracy with which changes in thermal reactor reactivity resulting from changes in temperature and coolant density can be predicted. It was noted that reactor physicists in several countries had to adjust the thermal neutron cross-section data base in order to reproduce measured reactivity coefficients. Consequently, it appeared to be essential to examine the consistency of the integral and differential cross-section data and to make all the information available which has a bearing on reactivity coefficient prediction. Following the recommendation of the INDC, the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency, therefore, convened the Advisory Group Meeting on Nuclear Data for the Calculation of Thermal Reaction Reactivity Coefficients, in Vienna, Austria, 7-10 Dec. 1987. The Conclusions and Recommendations of the meeting together with the papers presented, are submitted in the present document. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 12 papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. BIOCHEMICAL MECHANISMS OF MIXED EFFECT OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION AND LOW POSITIVE TEMPERATURE ON ANIMALS’ ORGANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litovchenko O.L.

    2015-05-01

    change in the activity of catalase and a trend toward an increase in MDA level. Values of lipoprotein profile also did not have reliable changes, but high values of atherogenic index throughout the study showed the negative impact of EMR on lipid metabolism. Reliable changes in liver function tests indicated a disorder of liver detoxification function and possible derangement of protein metabolism. A decrease in creatinine and uric acid in the urine of rats is also evidence of this. The mixed effect of EMR and positive low temperature predetermined deeper violations practically in all components of metabolism, which exhibit low levels of SH-groups and the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase, an increase in the concentration of ceruloplasmin. The observed increase in VLDL and triglycerides indicated the increase of the processes of atherogenesis. Acid phosphatase activity increased, increased alkaline phosphatase tends to raise the level of serum phosphorus levels in rats of the experimental group. There were more pronounced changes in the functioning of the liver. The level of urea in the blood serum was reliably increased. In the mixed action of EMR and positive low temperature, the level of uric acid in urine reliably increased, indicating that the development of renal failure in this group of animals, which was also indicated by elevated levels of chlorides in the urine. Conclusions. 1. The leading biochemical mechanisms of adverse effects of mixed action of EMR and positive low temperature is a disorder of the antioxidant system of blood, lipid metabolism and renal excretory function. 2. The mixed effect of EMR and positive low temperature on the organs and systems was more pronounced compared to the isolated action of electromagnetic radiation. 3. The above determines the need to consider the increase of biological effect of EMR established in the experiment on laboratory animals in the conditions of cold stress, when substantiating hygienic standards, the

  7. Key physical parameters and temperature reactivity coefficients of the deep burn modular helium reactor fueled with LWRs waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto E-mail: alby@neutron.kth.se; Gudowski, Waclaw E-mail: wacek@neutron.kth.se; Cetnar, Jerzy E-mail: jerzy@neutron.kth.se; Venneri, Francesco E-mail: venneri@lanl.gov

    2004-11-01

    We investigated some important neutronic features of the deep burn modular helium reactor (DB-MHR) using the MCNP/MCB codes. Our attention was focused on the neutron flux and its spectrum, capture to fission ratio of {sup 239}Pu and the temperature coefficient of fuel and moderator. The DB-MHR is a graphite-moderated helium-cooled reactor proposed by General Atomic to address the need for a fast and efficient incineration of plutonium for non-proliferation purposes as well as the management of light water reactors (LWRs) waste. In fact, recent studies have shown that the use of the DB-MHR coupled to ordinary LWRs would keep constant the world inventory of plutonium for a reactor fleet producing 400 TW{sub e}/y. In the present studies, the DB-MHR is loaded with Np-Pu driver fuel (DF) with an isotopic composition corresponding to LWRs spent fuel waste. DF uses fissile isotopes (e.g. {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu), previously generated in the LWRs, and maintains criticality conditions in the DB-MHR. After an irradiation of three years, the spent DF is reprocessed and its remaining actinides are manufactured into fresh transmutation fuel (TF). TF mainly contains non-fissile actinides which undergo neutron capture and transmutation during the subsequent three-year irradiation in the DB-MHR. At the same time, TF provides control and negative reactivity feedback to the reactor. After extraction of the spent TF, irradiated for three years, over 94% of {sup 239}Pu and 53% of all actinides coming from LWRs waste will have been destroyed in the DB-MHR. In this paper we look at the operation conditions at equilibrium for the DB-MHR and evaluate fluxes and reactivity responses using state of the art 3-D Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Ghrelin-reactive immunoglobulins and anxiety, depression and stress-induced cortisol response in adolescents. The TRAILS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Marie; Schaefer, Johanna M; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Déchelotte, Pierre; Verhulst, Frank C; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2015-06-03

    Ghrelin, a hunger hormone, has been implicated in the regulation of stress-response, anxiety and depression. Ghrelin-reactive immunoglobulins (Ig) were recently identified in healthy and obese humans showing abilities to increase ghrelin's stability and orexigenic effects. Here we studied if ghrelin-reactive Ig are associated with anxiety and depression and with the stress-induced cortisol response in a general population of adolescents. Furthermore, to test the possible infectious origin of ghrelin-reactive Ig, their levels were compared with serum IgG against common viruses. We measured ghrelin-reactive IgM, IgG and IgA in serum samples of 1199 adolescents from the Dutch TRAILS study and tested their associations with 1) anxiety and depression symptoms assessed with the Youth Self-Report, 2) stress-induced salivary cortisol levels and 3) IgG against human herpesvirus 1, 2, 4 and 6 and Influenza A and B viruses. Ghrelin-reactive IgM and IgG correlated positively with levels of antibodies against Influenza A virus. Ghrelin-reactive IgM correlated negatively with antibodies against Influenza B virus. Ghrelin-reactive IgM correlated positively with anxiety scores in girls and ghrelin-reactive IgG correlated with stress-induced cortisol secretion, but these associations were weak and not significant after correction for multiple testing. These data indicate that production of ghrelin-reactive autoantibodies could be influenced by viral infections. Serum levels of ghrelin-reactive autoantibodies probably do not play a role in regulating anxiety, depression and the stress-response in adolescents from the general population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Correlates and consequences of toddler cortisol reactivity to fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Elizabeth J; Kalomiris, Anne E

    2016-02-01

    Cortisol reactivity to fear-eliciting stimuli during toddlerhood may represent an indicator of risk for anxiety spectrum problems and other maladjustment. Thus, it is important to understand factors that may contribute to cortisol reactivity as well as those that determine its predictive relation to early emerging anxiety. In this vein, the current study investigated maternal comforting behaviors, both solicited and unsolicited by the toddler, as correlates of cortisol reactivity at 2years of age. Furthermore, we investigated maternal comforting behaviors and behavioral indicators of fear in both a low-threat and a high-threat context as moderators of the relation between cortisol reactivity at age 2 and change in anxiety from age 2 to age 3. The sample comprised 99 2-year-old toddlers and their mothers. Toddlers provided saliva samples at baseline and after a fear-eliciting stimulus that were assayed for cortisol. Mothers were observed for comforting behavior while interacting with their toddlers in laboratory tasks and completed questionnaires about their toddlers' anxiety. Results indicated that unsolicited (spontaneous) comforting behavior related to toddler cortisol reactivity above and beyond solicited comforting and the level of fear toddlers displayed in the same task. Moreover, fear in a low-threat context, but not in a high-threat context, moderated the relation between cortisol reactivity and change in anxiety, such that cortisol reactivity had a positive relation to anxiety at extreme levels of low-threat fear. Results suggest the importance of considering the caregiving environment and context-specific fear in understanding the nature of cortisol reactivity during the toddler years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pretreatment of cellulosic wastes to increase enzyme reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neese, N.; Wallick, J.; Harper, J.M.

    1977-03-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose is generally a slow reaction. Different pretreatments, such as ball milling to a -200 mesh or swelling in 1 to 2 percent NaOH are reported to increase the reactivity considerably. In this work a fiber fraction from cattle manure was treated in an autoclave for 5 to 30 min at temperatures ranging from 130 to 200/sup 0/C. The reactivity of the cellulose, measured by incubating samples with a commercial cellulase preparation for one hour at 50/sup 0/C and pH 4.8, was increased by a factor of 4 to 6 compared to NaOH treatment and 10 to 20 compared to untreated fiber. The increased reaction rate is probably mostly due to an increase in cellulose availability to enzymatic attack, as structural hemicellulose is hydrolyzed and removed during the treatment. Sugars, produced by hemicellulosis hydrolysis, will react further to give caramelization products. These side reactions were shown to be suppressed by short treatment times. The treated fiber could support growth of a mixed culture of Trichoderma viride and Candida utilis only after washing, indicating the formation of water soluble inhibitory products during treatment. The treatment with high-temperature steam can probably be used also with other cellulosic materials to increase reactivity. This may be an attractive way to prepare low-valued wastes such as manure fibers, straw, stalks, or corn cobs for fermentation processes to increase the protein content or for use directly as ruminant animal feed.

  11. HMB-45 reactivity in conventional uterine leiomyosarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Karen W; Albores-Saavedra, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    We studied the human melanoma black-45 (HMB-45) reactivity in 25 uterine leiomyosarcomas including 23 conventional and 2 myxoid variants. Eleven tumors were poorly differentiated, and 14 were well to moderately differentiated. Nine uterine leiomyosarcomas labeled with HMB-45 in 10% or less of the tumor cells. Six were poorly differentiated and 3 were well differentiated. Our study indicates that 36% of conventional leiomyosarcomas focally express HMB-45. HMB-45 reactivity was more common in the poorly differentiated than in the well-differentiated group of leiomyosarcomas. In light of our findings and of those recently reported in the literature, we believe that the term PEComa should not be used for uterine leiomyosarcomas with clear cells or for conventional leiomyosarcomas that stain positively with HMB-45.

  12. Serum Reactivity Against Bacterial Pyruvate Dehydrogenase: Increasing the Specificity of Anti-Mitochondrial Antibodies for the Diagnosis of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Miyakawa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA are the serum hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC. However, AMA-positivity can be found in non-PBC sera when lower dilutions are used, thus raising issues about the specificity and sensitivity of the test. AMA reacts primarily with the lipoylated domains of pyruvate dehydrogenase-E2 (PDC-E2 which is highly conserved across species, including bacteria. We studied 77 serum samples, including 24 from patients with anti-PDC-E2-positive PBC and 53 controls (16 with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH, 10 with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC, and 27 healthy individuals for their reactivities at serial dilutions (1:10, 1:20 and 1:40 against Escherichia coli DH5 alpha lysate overexpressing human PDC-E2 using immunoblotting (IB. A murine anti-human PDC-E2 monoclonal antibody (mAB was used as control. We further studied positive sera using adsorption with a synthetic E. coli peptide sharing similarity with human PDC-E2. Finally, we verified whether a unique buffer for E. coli preparation could reduce non-specific serum reactivity. Results demonstrated that 100% of anti-PDC-E2-positive PBC and up to 38% of control sera at 1:10 dilution recognized E. coli PDC-E2 at IB while dilution tests indicated that the overall potency of PBC reactivity was 100-fold higher compared to controls. In fact, a subgroup (20-38% of non-PBC sera were positive at low titers but lost the reactivity when absorbed with the synthetic E. coli peptide. Finally, our unique buffer reduced the reactivity of non-PBC sera as measured by ELISA. In conclusion, we demonstrated that weak cross-reactivity with E. coli PDC-E2 occurs in non-PBC sera at lower dilutions and that such reactivity is not due to AMA-positivity. The use of a specific buffer might avoid the risk of false positive AMA determinations when E. coli-expressed recombinant antigens are used.

  13. HBV reactivation in patients with HCV/HBV cirrhosis on treatment with direct-acting antivirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvaruso, V; Ferraro, D; Licata, A; Bavetta, M G; Petta, S; Bronte, F; Colomba, G; Craxì, A; Di Marco, V

    2018-01-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest that patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) hepatitis and overt or occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection may reactivate HBV when HCV is suppressed or cleared by direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). We assessed the prevalence of overt or previous HBV coinfection and the risk of HBV reactivation in patients with HCV cirrhosis treated with DAAs. This was a retrospective cohort of 104 consecutive patients with HCV cirrhosis treated with DAAs. Serum HCV-RNA and HBV-DNA were tested at weeks 4, 8 and 12 of DAAs therapy and at week 12 of follow-up. At the start of DAAs, eight patients (7.7%) were HBsAg positive/HBeAg negative with undetectable HBV-DNA and low levels of quantitative HBsAg (four on nucleos(t)ide analogues [NUCs] and four inactive carriers), 37 patients (35.6%) had markers of previous HBV infection (25 anti-HBc positive, 12 anti-HBc/anti-HBs positive) and 59 (56.7%) had no evidence of HBV infection. Sixty-seven patients (64.4%) were HCV-RNA negative at week 4 and 98 (94.2%) achieved sustained virological response. All four HBsAg-positive patients treated with NUCs remained HBV-DNA negative, but three of four untreated patients showed an increase in HBV-DNA of 2-3 log without a biochemical flare and achieved HBV-DNA suppression when given NUCs. During or after DAAs, by conventional assay, HBV-DNA remained not detectable in all 37 anti-HBc-positive patients but in three of them (8.1%) HBV-DNA became detectable with a highly sensitive PCR. HBV reactivation is likely to occur in untreated HBV/HCV-coinfected cirrhotic patients when they undergo HCV treatment with DAAs. Pre-emptive therapy with NUCs should be considered in this setting. Anti-HBc-positive patients rarely reactivate HBV without clinical or virological outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Reactivations of emotional memory in the hippocampus-amygdala system during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardeau, Gabrielle; Inema, Ingrid; Buzsáki, György

    2017-11-01

    The consolidation of context-dependent emotional memory requires communication between the hippocampus and the basolateral amygdala (BLA), but the mechanisms of this process are unknown. We recorded neuronal ensembles in the hippocampus and BLA while rats learned the location of an aversive air puff on a linear track, as well as during sleep before and after training. We found coordinated reactivations between the hippocampus and the BLA during non-REM sleep following training. These reactivations peaked during hippocampal sharp wave-ripples (SPW-Rs) and involved a subgroup of BLA cells positively modulated during hippocampal SPW-Rs. Notably, reactivation was stronger for the hippocampus-BLA correlation patterns representing the run direction that involved the air puff than for the 'safe' direction. These findings suggest that consolidation of contextual emotional memory occurs during ripple-reactivation of hippocampus-amygdala circuits.

  15. Reactivity control system of a passively safe thorium breeder pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wols, F.J.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Lathouwers, D.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A worth of over 15,000 pcm ensures achieving long-term cold shutdown in thorium PBR. • Control rod worth in side reflector is insufficient due to low-power breeder zone. • 20 control rods, just outside the driver zone, can achieve long-term cold shutdown. • BF 3 gas can be inserted for reactor shutdown, but only in case of emergency. • Perturbation theory accurately predicts absorber gas worth for many concentrations. - Abstract: This work investigates the neutronic design of the reactivity control system for a 100 MW th passively safe thorium breeder pebble bed reactor (PBR), a conceptual design introduced previously by the authors. The thorium PBR consists of a central driver zone of 100 cm radius, surrounded by a breeder zone with 300 cm outer radius. The fissile content of the breeder zone is low, leading to low fluxes in the radial reflector region. Therefore, a significant decrease of the control rod worth at this position is anticipated. The reactivity worth of control rods in the side reflector and at alternative in-core positions is calculated using different techniques, being 2D neutron diffusion, perturbation theory and more accurate 3D Monte Carlo models. Sensitivity coefficients from perturbation theory provide a first indication of effective control rod positions, while the 2D diffusion models provide an upper limit on the reactivity worth achievable at a certain radial position due to the homogeneous spreading of the absorber material over the azimuthal domain. Three dimensional forward calculations, e.g. in KENO, are needed for an accurate calculation of the total control rod worth. The two dimensional homogeneous calculations indicate that the reactivity worth in the radial reflector is by far insufficient to achieve cold reactor shutdown, which requires a control rod worth of over 15 000 pcm. Three dimensional heterogeneous KENO calculations show that placing 20 control rods just outside the driver channel, between 100 cm

  16. Reactivity control system of a passively safe thorium breeder pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wols, F.J., E-mail: f.j.wols@tudelft.nl; Kloosterman, J.L.; Lathouwers, D.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A worth of over 15,000 pcm ensures achieving long-term cold shutdown in thorium PBR. • Control rod worth in side reflector is insufficient due to low-power breeder zone. • 20 control rods, just outside the driver zone, can achieve long-term cold shutdown. • BF{sub 3} gas can be inserted for reactor shutdown, but only in case of emergency. • Perturbation theory accurately predicts absorber gas worth for many concentrations. - Abstract: This work investigates the neutronic design of the reactivity control system for a 100 MW{sub th} passively safe thorium breeder pebble bed reactor (PBR), a conceptual design introduced previously by the authors. The thorium PBR consists of a central driver zone of 100 cm radius, surrounded by a breeder zone with 300 cm outer radius. The fissile content of the breeder zone is low, leading to low fluxes in the radial reflector region. Therefore, a significant decrease of the control rod worth at this position is anticipated. The reactivity worth of control rods in the side reflector and at alternative in-core positions is calculated using different techniques, being 2D neutron diffusion, perturbation theory and more accurate 3D Monte Carlo models. Sensitivity coefficients from perturbation theory provide a first indication of effective control rod positions, while the 2D diffusion models provide an upper limit on the reactivity worth achievable at a certain radial position due to the homogeneous spreading of the absorber material over the azimuthal domain. Three dimensional forward calculations, e.g. in KENO, are needed for an accurate calculation of the total control rod worth. The two dimensional homogeneous calculations indicate that the reactivity worth in the radial reflector is by far insufficient to achieve cold reactor shutdown, which requires a control rod worth of over 15 000 pcm. Three dimensional heterogeneous KENO calculations show that placing 20 control rods just outside the driver channel

  17. Cardiovascular reactivity as a mechanism linking child trauma to adolescent psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heleniak, Charlotte; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Ormel, Johan; Riese, Harriette

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in physiological reactivity to stress are argued to be central mechanisms linking adverse childhood environmental experiences to internalizing and externalizing psychopathology. Childhood trauma exposure may influence physiological reactivity to stress in distinct ways from other forms of childhood adversity. This study applied a novel theoretical model to investigate the impact of childhood trauma on cardiovascular stress reactivity – the biopsychosocial model of challenge and threat. This model suggests that inefficient cardiovascular responses to stress – a threat as opposed to challenge profile – are characterized by blunted cardiac output (CO) reactivity and increased vascular resistance. We examined whether childhood trauma exposure predicted an indicator of the threat profile of cardiovascular reactivity and whether such a pattern was associated with adolescent psychopathology in a population-representative sample of 488 adolescents (M = 16.17 years old, 49.2% boys) in the TRacking Adolescents’ Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS). Exposure to trauma was associated with both internalizing and externalizing symptoms and a pattern of cardiovascular reactivity consistent with the threat profile, including blunted CO reactivity during a social stress task. Blunted CO reactivity, in turn, was positively associated with externalizing, but not internalizing symptoms and mediated the link between trauma and externalizing psychopathology. None of these associations varied by gender. The biopsychosocial model of challenge and threat provides a novel theoretical framework for understanding disruptions in physiological reactivity to stress following childhood trauma exposure, revealing a potential pathway linking such exposure with externalizing problems in adolescents. PMID:27568327

  18. Popularity differentially predicts reactive and proactive aggression in early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, Sabine; Cillessen, Antonius H N; van den Berg, Yvonne H M; Gommans, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that peer popularity is associated with aggressive behavior. However, it is not yet clear whether popularity is uniquely related to different functions of aggression. In this study, we examined associations between peer-perceived popularity, and reactive and proactive aggression using a cross-sectional and a longitudinal design. Yearly sociometric measures of popularity, and reactive and proactive aggression were gathered from 266 seventh and eight grade adolescents (Mage grade 7 = 12.80, SDage  = .40). Popularity was positively correlated with proactive aggression and negatively correlated with reactive aggression, both concurrently as over time. Curvilinear trends indicated that a significant minority of low versus high popular adolescents showed both functions of aggression. Somewhat stronger effects of popularity on proactive aggression were found for boys than girls. Stably popular adolescents showed the highest levels of proactive aggression, whereas stably unpopular youth showed the highest levels of reactive aggression. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The use of emanation thermal analysis for the evaluation of Fe2O3 reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V.

    1977-01-01

    The ETA method using 220 Rn was applied in studying the ZnO - Fe 2 O 3 reaction. The higher is the temperature at which the maximum is reached on the emanation vs. temperature curve of the mixture, the lower the indicated reactivity of Fe 2 O 3 used (temperature range 790 to 980 degC). The degree of order in the lattice of the ZnFe 2 O 4 formed may be judged from the emanation power at 850 to 1000 degC. Fe 2 O 3 pre-annealed to 1100 degC shows the lowest reactivity with ZnO. Associated with it is a lower capacity of forming the perfect ZnFe 2 O 4 structure. The ETA results are compared with those obtained by DTA and by dilatometry. (M.K.)

  20. Influence of reactive fillers on concrete corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhimbayev, Sh M.; Tolypina, N. M.; Khakhaleva, E. N.

    2018-03-01

    Contact surfaces represent the weakest link in a conglomerate structure of materials. They ensure the diffusion of aggressive agents inside the material. To reduce the conductivity of contact surfaces it is advisable to use reactive fillers, which interact with cement matrix via certain mechanisms, which in turn, reduces the permeability of the contact layer and fosters durability of products. The interaction of reactive fillers with calcium hydroxide of a concrete liquid phase in a contact area leads to the formation of hydrated calcium silicates of a tobermorite group. Such compounds, being settled in pores and capillaries of a product, colmatage and clog them to some extent thus leading to diffusion delay (inhibition) with regard to aggressive components of external media inside porous material, which in turn inhibits the corrosion rate. The authors studied and compared the corrosion of cement concrete with a standard filler (quartz sand) and a reactive filler (perlite and urtit). The experiments confirmed the positive influence of active fillers on concrete corrosion resistance.

  1. Green synthesized conditions impacting on the reactivity of Fe NPs for the degradation of malachite green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lanlan; Luo, Fang; Chen, Zuliang; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravendra

    2015-02-25

    This study investigates green tea extract synthesized conditions impacting on the reactivity of iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs) used for the degradation of malachite green (MG), including the volume ratio of Fe(2+) and tea extract, the solution pH and temperature. Results indicated that the reactivity of Fe NPs increased with higher temperature, but fell with increasing pH and the volume ratio of Fe(2+) and tea extract. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that Fe NPs were spherical in shape, their diameter was 70-80 nm and they were mainly composed of iron oxide nanoparticles. UV-visible (UV-vis) indicated that reactivity of Fe NPs used in degradation of MG significantly depended on the synthesized conditions of Fe NPs. This was due to their impact on the reactivity and morphology of Fe NPs. Finally, degradation of MG showed that 90.56% of MG was removed using Fe NPs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification of a new class of small molecules that efficiently reactivate latent Epstein-Barr virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhmyanova, Nadezhda; Schultz, David C.; Lee, Theresa; Salvino, Joseph M.; Lieberman, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) persists as a latent infection in many lymphoid and epithelial malignancies, including Burkitt's lymphomas, nasopharyngeal carcinomas, and gastric carcinomas. Current chemotherapeutic treatments of EBV-positive cancers include broad- spectrum cytotoxic drugs that ignore the EBV-positive status of tumors. An alternative strategy, referred to as oncolytic therapy, utilizes drugs that stimulate reactivation of latent EBV to enhance the selective killing of EBV positive tumors, especially in combination with existing inhibitors of herpesvirus lytic replication, like Ganciclovir (GCV). At present, no small molecule, including histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, have proven safe or effective in clinical trials for treatment of EBV positive cancers. Aiming to identify new chemical entities that induce EBV lytic cycle, we have developed a robust high throughput cell-based assay to screen 66,840 small molecule compounds. Five structurally related tetrahydrocarboline derivatives were identified, two of which had EC50 measurements in the range of 150-170 nM. We show that these compounds reactivate EBV lytic markers ZTA and EA-D in all EBV-positive cell lines we have tested independent of the type of latency. The compounds reactivate a higher percentage of latently infected cells than HDAC inhibitors or phorbol esters in many cell types. The most active compounds showed low toxicity to EBV-negative cells, but were highly effective at selective cell killing of EBV-positive cells when combined with GCV. We conclude that we have identified a class of small molecule compounds that are highly effective at reactivating latent EBV infection in a variety of cell types, and show promise for lytic therapy in combination with GCV. PMID:24028149

  3. A Cross-Reactivity of Fenofibric Acid With MDMA DRI Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugier, Sarah; Garcia-Hejl, Carine; Vest, Philippe; Plantamura, Julie; Chianea, Denis; Renard, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    Within the framework of routine fitness examinations, French Air Force military crew underwent urine testing for 3,4 methylenedioxymetamphetamine (MDMA [ecstasy]). The cross-reactivity of a dyslipidemic drug, fenofibrate, with an MDMA immunoassay was studied and confirmed on a large population sample. A 3-year retrospective study was performed on the MDMA DRI Ecstasy Assay on the Unicel DXC 600. In the event of positive test result, a confirmatory testing was carried out by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to establish the presence of MDMA. When analysis by GC/MS did not confirm the presence of MDMA, a false-positive result was suspected and the samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to identify a potential interfering substance. A total of 15,169 urine samples, from 7,803 patients, were tested for 3 years. Of the tested samples, 22 (0.15%) were positive by DRI Ecstasy Assay. None of them were positive by GC/MS. A cross-reactivity of fenofibrate's metabolite with MDMA using this assay was systematically found. Fenofibrate's interference with MDMA immunoassay was confirmed. Fenofibrate being widely prescribed, physicians had to be alerted that this treatment could lead to false-positive results. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. Thermogravimetric analytical procedures for determining reactivities of chars from New Zealand coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, K.J.; Beamish, B.B.; Rodgers, K.A. [University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand). Dept. of Geology

    1997-10-22

    This paper describes how tightly constrained thermogravimetric experimental procedures (particle size {lt} 212 {mu}m, sample mass 15.5 mg, CO{sub 2} reactant gas, near isothermal conditions) allow the reactivity of chars from high volatile New Zealand coals to be determined to a repeatability of {+-}0.07 h{sup -1} at 900{degree}C and {+-}0.5 h{sup -1} at 1100{degree}C. The procedure also provides proximate analyses information and affords a quick ({lt} 90 min) comparison between different coal types as well as indicating likely operating conditions and problems associated with a particular coal or blend. A clear difference is evident between reactivities of differing New Zealand coal ranks. Between 900 and 1100{degree}C, bituminous coals increase thirtyfold in reactivity compared with fourfold for subbituminous, with the latter being three to five times greater in reactivity at higher temperature.

  5. Reactivity effect of a heavy water tank as reflector in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Adimir dos; Fuga, Rinaldo

    2013-01-01

    This experiment comprises a set of experiments performed in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor and described in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments, specifically the experiment aim to evaluate the reactivity due to the heavy water tank placed at reflector region of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. An aluminum tank was designed to be filled with heavy water and positioned at the west face of the IPEN/MB-01, additionally the experiment was also designed to allow variable heavy water height inside of this tank providing different neutron leakage rate in the west face of the IPEN/MB-01, consequently providing a series of interesting combinations. The measured quantities in the experiment are reactivities and critical control bank positions for several combinations of the control banks and an excess of reactivity of the heavy water tank. The experiment will be simulated using a Monte Carlo code MCNP in order to compare the different critical control bank position. (author)

  6. Monte Carlo analysis of experiments on the reactivity temperature coefficient for UO2 and MOX light water moderated lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakir, E.; Erradi, L.; Bardouni, T El.; Khoukhi, T El.; Boukhal, H.; Meroun, O.; Bakkari, B El

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In a previous work, we have analysed the main french experiments available on the reactivity temperature coefficient (RTC) : CREAOLE and Mistral experiments. In these experiments, the RTC has been measured in both UO2 and UO2-PuO2 PWR type lattices. Our calculations, using APPOLO2 code with CEA93 library based on JEF2.2 evaluation, have shown that the calculation error in UO2 lattices is less than 1 pcm/Deg C which is considered as the target accuracy. On the other hand the calculation error in the MOX lattices is more significant in both low and high temperature ranges : an average error of -2 ± 0.5 pcm/Deg C is observed in low temperatures and an error of +3±2 pcm/Deg C is obtained for temperature higher than 250Deg C. In the present work, we analysed additional experimental benchmarks on the RTC of UO2 and MOX light water moderated lattices. To analyze these benchmarks and with the aim of minimizing uncertainties related to modelling of the experimental set up, we chose the Monte Carlo Method which has the advantage of taking into account in the most exact manner the geometry of the experimental configurations. Thus we have used the code MCNP5, for its recognized power and its availability. This analysis shows for the UO2 lattices, an average experiment-calculation deviation of about 0,5 pcm/Deg C, which is largely below the target accuracy for this type of lattices, that we estimate at approximately 1 pcm/Deg C. For the KAMINI experiment, which relates to the measurement of the RTC in light water moderated lattice using U-233 as fuel our analysis shows that the Endf/B6 library gives the best result, with an experiment -calculation deviation of the order of -0,16 pcm/Deg C. The analysis of the benchmarks using MOX fuel made it possible to highlight a discrepancy between experiment and calculation on the RTC of about -0.7pcm/Deg C ( for a range of temperature going from 20 to 248 Deg C) and -1.2 pcm/Deg C ( for a range of temperature going from 20 to

  7. Direct measurement of NO3 radical reactivity in a boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebmann, Jonathan; Karu, Einar; Sobanski, Nicolas; Schuladen, Jan; Ehn, Mikael; Schallhart, Simon; Quéléver, Lauriane; Hellen, Heidi; Hakola, Hannele; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Williams, Jonathan; Fischer, Horst; Lelieveld, Jos; Crowley, John N.

    2018-03-01

    We present the first direct measurements of NO3 reactivity (or inverse lifetime, s-1) in the Finnish boreal forest. The data were obtained during the IBAIRN campaign (Influence of Biosphere-Atmosphere Interactions on the Reactive Nitrogen budget) which took place in Hyytiälä, Finland during the summer/autumn transition in September 2016. The NO3 reactivity was generally very high with a maximum value of 0.94 s-1 and displayed a strong diel variation with a campaign-averaged nighttime mean value of 0.11 s-1 compared to a daytime value of 0.04 s-1. The highest nighttime NO3 reactivity was accompanied by major depletion of canopy level ozone and was associated with strong temperature inversions and high levels of monoterpenes. The daytime reactivity was sufficiently large that reactions of NO3 with organic trace gases could compete with photolysis and reaction with NO. There was no significant reduction in the measured NO3 reactivity between the beginning and end of the campaign, indicating that any seasonal reduction in canopy emissions of reactive biogenic trace gases was offset by emissions from the forest floor. Observations of biogenic hydrocarbons (BVOCs) suggested a dominant role for monoterpenes in determining the NO3 reactivity. Reactivity not accounted for by in situ measurement of NO and BVOCs was variable across the diel cycle with, on average, ≈ 30 % missing during nighttime and ≈ 60 % missing during the day. Measurement of the NO3 reactivity at various heights (8.5 to 25 m) both above and below the canopy, revealed a strong nighttime, vertical gradient with maximum values closest to the ground. The gradient disappeared during the daytime due to efficient vertical mixing.

  8. Surface decoration through electrostatic interaction leading to enhanced reactivity: Low temperature synthesis of nanostructured chromium borides (CrB and CrB2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menaka,; Kumar, Bharat; Kumar, Sandeep; Ganguli, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes a novel low temperature route at ambient pressure for the synthesis of nanocrystalline chromium borides (CrB and CrB 2 ) without using any flux or additives. The favorable and intimate mixing of nanoparticles of chromium acetate (Cr source) and boron forms an active chromium–boron precursor which decomposes at much lower temperature (400 °C) to form CrB (which is ∼1000 °C less than the known ambient pressure synthesis). The chromium acetate nanoparticles (∼5 nm) decorate the larger boron particles (150–200 nm) due to electrostatic interactions resulting from opposing surface charges of boron (zeta potential:+48.101 mV) and chromium acetate (zeta potential:−4.021 mV) in ethanolic medium and is evident in the TEM micrographs. The above method leads to the formation of pure CrB film like structure at 400 °C and nanospheres (40–60 nm) at 600 °C. Also, chromium diboride (CrB 2 ) nanoparticles (25 nm) could be obtained at 1000 °C. - Graphical abstract: Variation of surface charge of reactants, precursor and the products, chromium borides (CrB and CrB 2 ). Highlights: ► Novel borothermal reduction process for synthesis of chromium boride. ► Significant lowering of reaction temperature to obtain nanocrystalline chromium boride. ► Enhanced reactivity due to appropriate surface interactions

  9. Impact of long-term meditation practice on cardiovascular reactivity during perception and reappraisal of affective images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Sergei V; Reva, Natalia V; Loktev, Konstantin V; Korenyok, Vladimir V; Aftanas, Lyubomir I

    2015-03-01

    Meditation has been found to be an efficient strategy for coping with stress in healthy individuals and in patients with psychosomatic disorders. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the psychophysiological mechanisms of beneficial effects of meditation on cardiovascular reactivity. We examined effects of long-term Sahaja Yoga meditation on cardiovascular reactivity during affective image processing under "unregulated" and "emotion regulation" conditions. Twenty two experienced meditators and 20 control subjects participated in the study. Under "unregulated" conditions participants were shown neutral and affective images and were asked to attend to them. Under "emotion regulation" conditions they down-regulated negative affect through reappraisal of negative images or up-regulated positive affect through reappraisal of positive images. Under "unregulated" conditions while anticipating upcoming images meditators vs. controls did not show larger pre-stimulus total peripheral resistance and greater cardiac output for negative images in comparison with neutral and positive ones. Control subjects showed TPR decrease for negative images only when they consciously intended to reappraise them (i.e. in the "emotion regulation" condition). Both meditators and controls showed comparable cardiovascular reactivity during perception of positive stimuli, whereas up-regulating of positive affect was associated with more pronounced cardiac activation in meditators. The findings provide some insight into understanding the beneficial influence of meditation on top-down control of emotion and cardiovascular reactivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Emotional non-acceptance links early life stress and blunted cortisol reactivity to social threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cărnuţă, Mihai; Crişan, Liviu G; Vulturar, Romana; Opre, Adrian; Miu, Andrei C

    2015-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) has been recently associated with blunted cortisol reactivity and emotion dysregulation, but no study until now examined whether these characteristics are related. The main goal of this study was to examine the potential mediator role of emotion dysregulation in the relation between ELS and cortisol reactivity to social threat. Only women who were free of psychiatric and endocrine disorders, had regular menstrual cycle and did not use oral contraceptives were selected for this study (N=62). After filling in ELS and multidimensional emotion dysregulation measures, participants underwent the Trier Social Stress Test during which cortisol and autonomic responses were assessed. Most participants (85.5%) reported one or more major stressful events (i.e., physical abuse, sexual abuse, major parental conflicts, death of a family or close friend, severe illness) experienced before age 17. ELS was negatively associated with cortisol reactivity and positively associated with skin conductance level (SCL) reactivity, but it did not influence heart rate and respiratory sinus arrhythmia. In addition, ELS was positively related to emotional non-acceptance (i.e., a tendency to develop secondary emotional responses to one's negative emotions), and the latter was negatively related to cortisol responses and positively related to SCL responses. Bootstrapping analyses indicated that emotional non-acceptance was a significant mediator in the relationships between ELS and both cortisol and SCL responses. Emotional non-acceptance is thus one of the psychological mechanisms underlying blunted cortisol and increased sympathetic reactivity in young healthy volunteers with a history of ELS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ambient Temperature and Cerebrovascular Hemodynamics in the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wen-Chi; Eliot, Melissa N; Koutrakis, Petros; Coull, Brent A; Sorond, Farzaneh A; Wellenius, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Some prior studies have linked ambient temperature with risk of cerebrovascular events. If causal, the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying this putative association remain unknown. Temperature-related changes in cerebral vascular function may play a role, but this hypothesis has not been previously evaluated. We evaluated the association between ambient temperature and cerebral vascular function among 432 participants ≥65 years old from the MOBILIZE Boston Study with data on cerebrovascular blood flow, cerebrovascular resistance, and cerebrovascular reactivity in the middle cerebral artery. We used linear regression models to assess the association of mean ambient temperature in the previous 1 to 28 days with cerebrovascular hemodynamics adjusting for potential confounding factors. A 10°C increase in the 21-day moving average of ambient temperature was associated with a 10.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2%, 17.3%) lower blood flow velocity, a 9.0% (95% CI, 0.7%, 18.0%) higher cerebrovascular resistance, and a 15.3% (95%CI, 2.7%, 26.4%) lower cerebral vasoreactivity. Further adjustment for ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) did not materially alter the results. However, we found statistically significant interactions between ambient temperature and PM2.5 such that the association between temperature and blood flow velocity was attenuated at higher levels of PM2.5. In this elderly population, we found that ambient temperature was negatively associated with cerebral blood flow velocity and cerebrovascular vasoreactivity and positively associated with cerebrovascular resistance. Changes in vascular function may partly underlie the observed associations between ambient temperature and risk of cerebrovascular events.

  12. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder and prefrontal reactivity during anticipation of emotional stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingnell, Malin; Bannbers, Elin; Wikström, Johan; Fredrikson, Mats; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2013-11-01

    Premenstrual disorder (PMDD) affects around 5% of women in childbearing ages. An increased sensitivity in emotion processing areas of the brain to variations in ovarian steroid levels has been suggested as part of the pathophysiology in PMDD, but prior neuroimaging studies of emotion processing are yet inconclusive. Previous behavioral studies of women with PMDD have, however, reported enhanced luteal phase startle responsivity during emotional anticipation. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate central neural circuitry activity during anticipation of, and exposure to, emotional stimuli across the menstrual cycle in women with and without PMDD. As compared to healthy controls, women with PMDD displayed significantly enhanced reactivity in the prefrontal cortex during anticipation of, but not exposure to, negative emotional stimuli during the luteal phase. In PMDD patients, BOLD reactivity during anticipation or viewing of negative emotional stimuli was not dependent on absolute levels of estradiol or progesterone. However, progesterone levels were positively correlated with emotion-induced reactivity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to positive emotional stimuli. These findings suggest that cortical emotional circuitry reactivity during anticipation is altered in PMDD during the luteal phase, which might be part of the pathophysiology behind the emotional symptoms or lack of emotional control reported by women with PMDD. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  13. Temperature regulates positively photoblastic seed germination in four ficus (moraceae) tree species from contrasting habitats in a seasonal tropical rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Cao, Min; Baskin, Jerry M; Baskin, Carol C

    2013-08-01

    Differences in seed germination responses of trees in tropical forests to temperature and light quality may contribute to their coexistence. We investigated the effects of temperature and red:far-red light (R:FR ratio) on seed germination of two gap-demanding species (Ficus hispida and F. racemosa) and two shade-tolerant species (F. altissima and F. auriculata) in a tropical seasonal rainforest in southwest China. A R:FR ratio gradient was created by filtering fluorescent light through polyester filters. Four temperature treatments were used to test the effect of temperature on seed germination of the four Ficus tree species across the R:FR gradient. Seeds of the four Ficus species were positively photoblastic. Seed germination of F. hispida and F. racemosa was not affected across the R:FR ratio gradient (0.25-1.19) at 25/35°C, but it was inhibited under low R:FR at 22/23°C. By contrast, germination percentages of F. altissima and F. auriculata were not inhibited along the entire light gradient in all temperature treatments. Differences in germination responses of Ficus species might contribute to differences in their habitat preferences. The inhibitory effect of understory temperatures in the forest might be a new mechanism that prevents positively photoblastic seeds of the gap-demanding species such as F. hispida and F. racemosa from germinating in the understory and in small canopy gaps.

  14. Effects of age on reactive capacity and nigrostriatal dopamine function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, P.E.

    1984-01-01

    This investigation examined the effects of aging on reactive capacity (reaction time), and striatal dopamine function in the same animals. Twenty, 3 month old, and twenty, 24 month old, male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained in a reactive capacity test to quickly release a lever, in response to an auditory and visual stimulus, in order to avoid footshocks. The young animals were tested at 3, 6, and 9 months of age, while the Old animals were tested at 18, 21, and 24 months of age. Twenty-four hours after the last testing session the animals were sacrificed and their striata dissected for biochemical assays. A [ 3 H]-spiperone receptor binding assay was performed to determine the density and affinity of striatial D-2 receptors. It was hypothesized that the improvement in reactive capacity performance of the Old animals over days was due to their ability to compensate for their decrease in receptor density by an increase in the production and utilization of dopamine. Significant positive correlations were also found between reactive capacity performance and receptor density as well as between reactive capacity and the ratio of DOPAC + HVA/DA

  15. The Significance of Isolated Reactive Treponemal Enzyme Immunoassay in the Diagnosis of Early Syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Rachel J; Hathorn, Emma; Manavi, Kaveh

    2016-06-01

    The Treponemal test algorithm for syphilis screening is widely used. A diagnostic challenge between identifying early syphilis versus a false positive signal occurs in cases where the treponemal enzyme immunoassay (EIA) is reactive and confirmatory T. pallidum particle agglutination assay is negative. We investigated the diagnostic outcome of isolated reactive EIA in patients attending a sexual health clinic. Results of syphilis serology tests carried out at Birmingham Whittall Street Clinic between August 10, 2010, and November 31, 2014, were reviewed. Cases with isolated EIA were routinely invited for repeat syphilis serology. Outcomes of patients with isolated EIA were reviewed and the proportion with confirmed positive syphilis serology on their repeat test identified. The number of isolated EIA cases needed to retest to identify 1 case of early syphilis was calculated. A total of 121,724 syphilis screening tests were performed. Among the 1561 individual patients with reactive EIA sera, 316 (20% of total reactive tests) had isolated reactive EIA. Repeat syphilis serology results of 163 patients were reviewed; 106 patients remained with isolated reactive EIA, 50 had negative EIA test and 7 (4.3%) had confirmed reactive EIA. Of the 7 patients, 2 had evidence of early syphilis infection. The number of isolated EIA needed to retest to identify 1 case of early syphilis was 81.5 (95% confidence interval, 22.9-671.4). Routine recall of patients with isolated EIA sera is not warranted. Risk of acquisition or presence of early syphilis should be assessed independently and irrespective of a negative syphilis screening test or isolated EIA.

  16. Rapid temperature increase near the anode and cathode in the afterglow of a pulsed positive streamer discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Ryo

    2018-06-01

    The spatiotemporal evolution of the temperature in the afterglow of point-to-plane, pulsed positive streamer discharge was measured near the anode tip and cathode surface using laser-induced predissociation fluorescence of OH radicals. The temperature exhibited a rapid increase and displayed a steep spatial gradient after a discharge pulse. The rate of temperature rise reached 84 K μs‑1 at mm, where z represents the distance from the anode tip. The temperature rise was much faster than in the middle of the gap; it was only 2.8 K μs‑1 at mm. The temperature reached 1700 K near the anode tip at s and 1500 K near the cathode surface at s, where t represents the postdischarge time. The spatial gradient reached 1280 K mm‑1 near the anode tip at s. The mechanism responsible for the rapid temperature increase was discussed, including rapid heating of the gas in the early postdischarge phase (s), and vibration-to-translation energy transfer in the later postdischarge phase (s). The high temperatures near the anode tip and cathode surface are particularly important for the ignition of combustible mixtures and for surface treatments, including solid-surface treatments, water treatments, and plasma medicine using pulsed streamer discharges.

  17. Effects of fuel properties, temperature, and pressure on fuel reactivity, formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides, and release of alkalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aho, M.

    1998-01-01

    This study assists in the development of advanced combustion technologies (PFBC, IGCC) with high efficiency of electricity production from solid fuels (η = 47 - 50%) and in minimizing emissions of nitrogen oxides in atmospheric and pressurised FB combustion. In addition to the work done within the LIEKKI 2 programme, research work has been carried out inside the Joule 2 programme of EU. The research work may be divided into three parts: (1) Study of N x O y formation and destruction, (2) Study of fuel reactivity at elevated pressures, and (3) Study on alkali release from different coals. Experimental work was carried out utilizing a novel pressurized entrained flow reactor (PEFR) completed in VTT Energy in the autumn 1992. The device was unique in the world between 1992 and 1995. The effects of fuel properties on the formation of N 2 O and NO at conditions typical to FB combustion were studied for a large number of fuels including different coals, coal-derived char, peat, and bark. This work started before 1993 and was completed in 1995. FTIR technology was utilized for on-line gas analysis of N 2 O, NO, and NO 2 . The ratio fuel-O/fuel-N was found to be the most important fuel factor determining the formation of N 2 O and NO from volatile fuel-N. Only a small part of N 2 O is formed from char-N. The effect of pressure (0.2 - 2.0 MPa) on the formation of N 2 O, NO, and NO 2 , and destruction of NO with ammonia (Thermal DeNO x , experiments at 0.2, 0.5, and 1.5 MPa) and urea (NO x Out, experiments at 0.5 MPa) were studied in cooperation with Aabo Akademi University (AaAU). VTT performed the experimental work and AaAU the kinetic modelling. A part of these results are presented in the report by AaAU. Increase of pressure decreases NO formation and increases NO 2 formation. The behaviour of N 2 O is more complex. Both destruction processes for NO seem to operate well at elevated pressure, although clear effects of pressure on the temperature window of Thermal DeNO x

  18. CREOLE experiment study on the reactivity temperature coefficient with sensitivity and uncertainty analysis using the MCNP5 code and different neutron cross section evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulaich, Y.; El Bardouni, T.; Erradi, L.; Chakir, E.; Boukhal, H.; Nacir, B.; El Younoussi, C.; El Bakkari, B.; Merroun, O.; Zoubair, M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In the present work, we have analyzed the CREOLE experiment on the reactivity temperature coefficient (RTC) by using the three-dimensional continuous energy code (MCNP5) and the last updated nuclear data evaluations. → Calculation-experiment discrepancies of the RTC were analyzed and the results have shown that the JENDL3.3 and JEFF3.1 evaluations give the most consistent values. → In order to specify the source of the relatively large discrepancy in the case of ENDF-BVII nuclear data evaluation, the k eff discrepancy between ENDF-BVII and JENDL3.3 was decomposed by using sensitivity and uncertainty analysis technique. - Abstract: In the present work, we analyze the CREOLE experiment on the reactivity temperature coefficient (RTC) by using the three-dimensional continuous energy code (MCNP5) and the last updated nuclear data evaluations. This experiment performed in the EOLE critical facility located at CEA/Cadarache, was mainly dedicated to the RTC studies for both UO 2 and UO 2 -PuO 2 PWR type lattices covering the whole temperature range from 20 deg. C to 300 deg. C. We have developed an accurate 3D model of the EOLE reactor by using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code which guarantees a high level of fidelity in the description of different configurations at various temperatures taking into account their consequence on neutron cross section data and all thermal expansion effects. In this case, the remaining error between calculation and experiment will be awarded mainly to uncertainties on nuclear data. Our own cross section library was constructed by using NJOY99.259 code with point-wise nuclear data based on ENDF-BVII, JEFF3.1 and JENDL3.3 evaluation files. The MCNP model was validated through the axial and radial fission rate measurements at room and hot temperatures. Calculation-experiment discrepancies of the RTC were analyzed and the results have shown that the JENDL3.3 and JEFF3.1 evaluations give the most consistent values; the discrepancy is

  19. Self-organised synthesis of Rh nanostructures with tunable chemical reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizzit S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractNonequilibrium periodic nanostructures such as nanoscale ripples, mounds and rhomboidal pyramids formed on Rh(110 are particularly interesting as candidate model systems with enhanced catalytic reactivity, since they are endowed with steep facets running along nonequilibrium low-symmetry directions, exposing a high density of undercoordinated atoms. In this review we report on the formation of these novel nanostructured surfaces, a kinetic process which can be controlled by changing parameters such as temperature, sputtering ion flux and energy. The role of surface morphology with respect to chemical reactivity is investigated by analysing the carbon monoxide dissociation probability on the different nanostructured surfaces.

  20. Altered Brain Reactivity to Game Cues After Gaming Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyeon Min; Chung, Hwan Jun; Kim, Sang Hee

    2015-08-01

    Individuals who play Internet games excessively show elevated brain reactivity to game-related cues. This study attempted to test whether this elevated cue reactivity observed in game players is a result of repeated exposure to Internet games. Healthy young adults without a history of excessively playing Internet games were recruited, and they were instructed to play an online Internet game for 2 hours/day for five consecutive weekdays. Two control groups were used: the drama group, which viewed a fantasy TV drama, and the no-exposure group, which received no systematic exposure. All participants performed a cue reactivity task with game, drama, and neutral cues in the brain scanner, both before and after the exposure sessions. The game group showed an increased reactivity to game cues in the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC). The degree of VLPFC activation increase was positively correlated with the self-reported increase in desire for the game. The drama group showed an increased cue reactivity in response to the presentation of drama cues in the caudate, posterior cingulate, and precuneus. The results indicate that exposure to either Internet games or TV dramas elevates the reactivity to visual cues associated with the particular exposure. The exact elevation patterns, however, appear to differ depending on the type of media experienced. How changes in each of the regions contribute to the progression to pathological craving warrants a future longitudinal study.

  1. Grape Ripening Is Regulated by Deficit Irrigation/Elevated Temperatures According to Cluster Position in the Canopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrouk, Olfa; Brunetti, Cecilia; Egipto, Ricardo; Pinheiro, Carla; Genebra, Tânia; Gori, Antonella; Lopes, Carlos M; Tattini, Massimiliano; Chaves, M Manuela

    2016-01-01

    The impact of water deficit on berry quality has been extensively investigated during the last decades. Nonetheless, there is a scarcity of knowledge on the performance of varieties exposed to a combination of high temperatures/water stress during the growing season and under vineyard conditions. The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of two irrigation regimes, sustained deficit irrigation (SDI, 30% ET c ) and regulated deficit irrigation (RDI, 15% ET c ) and of two cluster positions within the canopy (east- and west-exposed sides) on berry ripening in red Aragonez (Tempranillo) grapevines. The study was undertaken for two successive years in a commercial vineyard in South Portugal, monitoring the following parameters: pre-dawn leaf water potential, berry temperature, sugars, polyphenols, abscisic acid (ABA) and related metabolites. Additionally, expression patterns for different transcripts encoding for enzymes responsible for anthocyanin and ABA biosynthesis ( VviUFGT, VvNCED1, Vv β G1, VviHyd1, VviHyd2 ) were analyzed. In both years anthocyanin concentration was lower in RDI at the west side (RDIW- the hottest one) from véraison onwards, suggesting that the most severe water stress conditions exacerbated the negative impact of high temperature on anthocyanin. The down-regulation of VviUFGT expression revealed a repression of the anthocyanin synthesis in berries of RDIW, at early stages of berry ripening. At full-maturation, anthocyanin degradation products were detected, being highest at RDIW. This suggests that the negative impact of water stress and high temperature on anthocyanins results from the repression of biosynthesis at the onset of ripening and from degradation at later stages. On the other hand, berries grown under SDI displayed a higher content in phenolics than those under RDI, pointing out for the attenuation of the negative temperature effects under SDI. Irrigation regime and berry position had small effect on free

  2. Increased amygdala reactivity following early life stress: a potential resilience enhancer role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Toki, Shigeru; Siegle, Greg J; Takamura, Masahiro; Takaishi, Yoshiyuki; Yoshimura, Shinpei; Okada, Go; Matsumoto, Tomoya; Nakao, Takashi; Muranaka, Hiroyuki; Kaseda, Yumiko; Murakami, Tsuneji; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2017-01-18

    Amygdala hyper-reactivity is sometimes assumed to be a vulnerability factor that predates depression; however, in healthy people, who experience early life stress but do not become depressed, it may represent a resilience mechanism. We aimed to test these hypothesis examining whether increased amygdala activity in association with a history of early life stress (ELS) was negatively or positively associated with depressive symptoms and impact of negative life event stress in never-depressed adults. Twenty-four healthy participants completed an individually tailored negative mood induction task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) assessment along with evaluation of ELS. Mood change and amygdala reactivity were increased in never-depressed participants who reported ELS compared to participants who reported no ELS. Yet, increased amygdala reactivity lowered effects of ELS on depressive symptoms and negative life events stress. Amygdala reactivity also had positive functional connectivity with the bilateral DLPFC, motor cortex and striatum in people with ELS during sad memory recall. Increased amygdala activity in those with ELS was associated with decreased symptoms and increased neural features, consistent with emotion regulation, suggesting that preservation of robust amygdala reactions may reflect a stress buffering or resilience enhancing factor against depression and negative stressful events.

  3. Control Rod Reactivity Measurements in the Aagesta Reactor with the Pulsed Neutron Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoereus, K

    1969-07-01

    An extensive series of control rod measurements was made in the Aagesta reactor during the low power experimental period following the first criticality. This report describes the part of these investigations made with the pulsed neutron method, comprising nearly 300 measurements. The main objective was the determination of control rod reactivity worths for different rods and groups of rods, but some supplementary measurements were also made, e.g. a determination of the prompt neutron decay constant for the delayed critical condition and four different cores. The cores consisted of 20, 32, 68, and 140 fuel elements respectively, and measurements were made at room temperature and with the moderator level close to critical for each core, and for the 140-element core also with full moderator height and at the temperatures 140 deg C and 215 deg C. Both fully and partly inserted control rod groups were investigated. The measurements at critical water level give directly the control rod reactivity worths, whereas those with full water height give the shut-down reactivity. A comparison was made between measured reactivity worths for a number of rod groups and those calculated with the HETERO code. The prompt neutron decay constant at delayed criticality {alpha}{sub 0}={beta}/l, for the full core at 215 deg C was found to be 9.60 {+-} 0.30/sec, corresponding to l = 0.76 {+-} 0.02 msec. The shut-down reactivity with 16 coarse control rods in pos. A-D 22, 40-04, 44, 26 is -5% at 25 deg C and -13% at 215 deg C. The relative error is usually around 8% in the reactivity worths, originating mainly from the higher harmonics content in the measured curves.

  4. EBRPOCO - a program to calculate detailed contributions of power reactivity components of EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghetti, D.; Kucera, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The EBRPOCO program has been developed to facilitate the calculations of the power coefficients of reactivity of EBR-II loadings. The program enables contributions of various components of the power coefficient to be delineated axially for every subassembly. The program computes the reactivity contributions of the power coefficients resulting from: density reduction of sodium coolant due to temperature; displacement of sodium coolant by thermal expansions of cladding, structural rods, subassembly cans, and lower and upper axial reflectors; density reductions of these steel components due to temperature; displacement of bond-sodium (if present) in gaps by differential thermal expansions of fuel and cladding; density reduction of bond-sodium (if present) in gaps due to temperature; free axial expansion of fuel if unrestricted by cladding or restricted axial expansion of fuel determined by axial expansion of cladding. Isotopic spatial contributions to the Doppler component my also be obtained. (orig.) [de

  5. Accurate reactivity void coefficient calculation for the fast spectrum reactor FBR-IME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Fabiano P.C.; Vellozo, Sergio de O.; Velozo, Marta J., E-mail: fabianopetruceli@outlook.com, E-mail: vellozo@cbpf.br, E-mail: martajann@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Militar

    2017-07-01

    This paper aims to present an accurate calculation of the void reactivity coefficient for the FBR-IME, a fast spectrum reactor in development at the Engineering Military Institute (IME). The main design peculiarity lies in using mixed oxide [MOX - PuO{sub 2} + U(natural uranium)O{sub 2}] as fuel core. For this task, SCALE system was used to calculate the reactivity for several voids distributions generated by bubbles in the sodium beyond its boiling point. The results show that although the void reactivity coefficient is positive and location dependent, they are offset by other feedback effects, resulting in a negative overall coefficient. (author)

  6. Gender differences in cue exposure reactivity and 9-month outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Robert C; Dean, Jessica; Weinstein, Stephen P; Murphy, Jennifer; Gottheil, Edward

    2004-07-01

    Gender differences have been shown to be related to the course of cocaine dependence and treatment. While previous research has shown cue exposure procedures to be somewhat effective at reducing reactivity of substance dependent individuals to drug related stimuli, the few studies that have examined gender differences in craving and cue-reactivity have yielded equivocal results. We have recently demonstrated that an active cue-exposure procedure that featured cocaine-dependent individuals receiving immediate feedback about their level of physiological arousal following videotaped exposure to cocaine-related stimuli was capable of positively influencing in-treatment (helplessness, abstinence efficacy) as well as 9-month followup outcome (i.e., urinalysis) indices (Sterling, R., Gottheil, E., Murphy, J., & Weinstein, S. (2001). Cue exposure and abstinence efficacy. College on Problems of Drug Dependence, Phoenix, AZ, June 17, 2001). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether differential in-treatment or 9-month followup outcomes were obtained for male and female study participants. Subjects in this study were 81 individuals (47 male/34 female) who met DSM-IV criteria for cocaine dependence and who had consented to be randomly assigned to either the active cue-exposure or control conditions. Participants were compared along a myriad of pre-treatment, in-treatment, and 9-month followup measures. Other than males reporting more recent employment, there was no obvious systematic pattern of differences on pre-treatment indices. No gender differences in treatment retention were observed. With respect to 9-month followup, no gender differences on measures of addiction severity, psychological functioning, or urinalyses were noted. However males were more "cue-reactive" and more successful at establishing control over their reactivity to the cocaine stimuli. Additional research is needed to determine whether these differences in reactivity can be more clearly

  7. Positive selection in octopus haemocyanin indicates functional links to temperature adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oellermann, Michael; Strugnell, Jan M; Lieb, Bernhard; Mark, Felix C

    2015-07-05

    Octopods have successfully colonised the world's oceans from the tropics to the poles. Yet, successful persistence in these habitats has required adaptations of their advanced physiological apparatus to compensate impaired oxygen supply. Their oxygen transporter haemocyanin plays a major role in cold tolerance and accordingly has undergone functional modifications to sustain oxygen release at sub-zero temperatures. However, it remains unknown how molecular properties evolved to explain the observed functional adaptations. We thus aimed to assess whether natural selection affected molecular and structural properties of haemocyanin that explains temperature adaptation in octopods. Analysis of 239 partial sequences of the haemocyanin functional units (FU) f and g of 28 octopod species of polar, temperate, subtropical and tropical origin revealed natural selection was acting primarily on charge properties of surface residues. Polar octopods contained haemocyanins with higher net surface charge due to decreased glutamic acid content and higher numbers of basic amino acids. Within the analysed partial sequences, positive selection was present at site 2545, positioned between the active copper binding centre and the FU g surface. At this site, methionine was the dominant amino acid in polar octopods and leucine was dominant in tropical octopods. Sites directly involved in oxygen binding or quaternary interactions were highly conserved within the analysed sequence. This study has provided the first insight into molecular and structural mechanisms that have enabled octopods to sustain oxygen supply from polar to tropical conditions. Our findings imply modulation of oxygen binding via charge-charge interaction at the protein surface, which stabilize quaternary interactions among functional units to reduce detrimental effects of high pH on venous oxygen release. Of the observed partial haemocyanin sequence, residue 2545 formed a close link between the FU g surface and the

  8. BN600 reactivity definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheltyshev, V.; Ivanov, A.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1980, the fast BN600 reactor with sodium coolant has been operated at Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant. The periodic monitoring of the reactivity modifications should be implemented in compliance with the standards and regulations applied in nuclear power engineering. The reactivity measurements are carried out in order to confirm the basic neutronic features of a BN600 reactor. The reactivity measurements are aimed to justify that nuclear safety is provided in course of the in-reactor installation of the experimental core components. Two reactivity meters are to be used on BN600 operation: 1. Digital on-line reactivity calculated under stationary reactor operation on power (approximation of the point-wise kinetics is applied). 2. Second reactivity meter used to define the reactor control rod operating components efficiency under reactor startup and take account of the changing efficiency of the sensor, however, this is more time-consumptive than the on-line reactivity meter. The application of two reactivity meters allows for the monitoring of the reactor reactivity under every operating mode. (authors)

  9. System Acquires Data On Reactivities Of Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Joe T.

    1994-01-01

    Data-acquisition and -plotting system, called DAPS(TM), developed enabling accurate and objective determination of physical properties related to reactivities of polyurethane and polyisocyanurate foams. Automated, computer-controlled test apparatus that acquires data on rates of rise, rise profiles, exothermic temperatures, and internal pressures of foams prepared from both manual and machine-mixed batches. Data used to determine minute differences between reaction kinetics and exothermic profiles of foam formulations, properties of end products which are statistically undifferentiated.

  10. Immunological cross-reactivity to multiple autoantigens in patients with liver kidney microsomal type 1 autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, K; Gregorio, G V; Mieli-Vergani, G; Vergani, D

    1998-11-01

    We describe two patients with liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1)-positive autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) with associated endocrinopathies. The first patient had insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM), and the second patient had Addison's disease and hypoparathyroidism, and is also positive for islet cell antibodies, without overt diabetes. To account for the existence of multiple endocrinopathy in these patients, we investigated whether there is sequence similarity between the target of LKM1 antibodies, cytochrome P4502D6 (CYP2D6), and other human proteins, and if so, whether this structural similarity produces a detectable cross-reactive immune response. Our database search identified two proteins, carboxypeptidase H, an autoantigen in insulin-dependent diabetes, and 21-hydroxylase, the major autoantigen in Addison's disease, that share sequence similarity to the second major LKM1 epitope on CYP2D6. We tested the reactivity of sera from these patients to the homologous regions of the three autoantigens using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cut-off for positivity was established by testing sera from 22 healthy children. To determine the significance of reactivity to the peptide homologues of the three autoantigens, we investigated 16 additional patients with LKM1 AIH and 20 children with chronic hepatitis B virus infection as pathological controls. We found that reactivity to the second major epitope of CYP2D6 is significantly associated with reactivity to the homologous regions of carboxypeptidase H (CPH) and 21-hydroxylase (21-OHase) in patients with LKM1 AIH, and that this simultaneous recognition is cross-reactive. We suggest that a cross-reactive immune response between homologous autoantigens may contribute to the development of multiple endocrinopathies in LKM1 AIH.

  11. Behaviour of the RBMK-1000 plant during reactivity disturbances under part load reduction - completing investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemente, M.; Langenbuch, S.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes investigations of the behavior of a RBMK-1000 reactor core during reactivity initiated accidents and completes earlier studies of the Chernobyl accident. Special questions related to this accident are studied, e.g. the effect of Xenon dynamics during the delayed load reduction and the coarse of the experiment as planned with the coast-down of four main recirculaton pumps at nominal part load conditions. The main interest is the detailed analysis of reactivity initiated accidents in the low power range till 25% during start-up. In the calculations no reactor trip is taken into account. The results confirm the unfavourable effects of the positive void coefficient, which are amplified in the low power range. Finally the results are discussed in comparison to other positive reactivity effects. (orig.) [de

  12. Intercomparison of the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and pump-probe technique for measuring total OH reactivity in an urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, R. F.; Blocquet, M.; Schoemaecker, C.; Léonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Fittschen, C.; Hanoune, B.; Stevens, P. S.; Sinha, V.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-10-01

    The investigation of hydroxyl radical (OH) chemistry during intensive field campaigns has led to the development of several techniques dedicated to ambient measurements of total OH reactivity, which is the inverse of the OH lifetime. Three techniques are currently used during field campaigns, including the total OH loss rate method, the pump-probe method, and the comparative reactivity method. However, no formal intercomparison of these techniques has been published so far, and there is a need to ensure that measurements of total OH reactivity are consistent among the different techniques. An intercomparison of two OH reactivity instruments, one based on the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and the other based on the pump-probe method, was performed in October 2012 in a NOx-rich environment, which is known to be challenging for the CRM technique. This study presents an extensive description of the two instruments, the CRM instrument from Mines Douai (MD-CRM) and the pump-probe instrument from the University of Lille (UL-FAGE), and highlights instrumental issues associated with the two techniques. It was found that the CRM instrument used in this study underestimates ambient OH reactivity by approximately 20 % due to the photolysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inside the sampling reactor; this value is dependent on the position of the lamp within the reactor. However, this issue can easily be fixed, and the photolysis of VOCs was successfully reduced to a negligible level after this intercomparison campaign. The UL-FAGE instrument may also underestimate ambient OH reactivity due to the difficulty to accurately measure the instrumental zero. It was found that the measurements are likely biased by approximately 2 s-1, due to impurities in humid zero air. Two weeks of ambient sampling indicate that the measurements performed by the two OH reactivity instruments are in agreement, within the measurement uncertainties for each instrument, for NOx mixing ratios

  13. Deletion mutant defines DQ beta variants with DR4 positive DQw3 positive haplotypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nepom, B.S.; Kim, S.J.; Nepom, G.T.

    1986-01-01

    We describe the production of an HLA deletion mutation by radiation mutagenesis of a DR4- and DQw3-homozygous, Dw4- and Dw14-heterozygous cell line designed to analyze polymorphisms associated with DR4 and DQw3. Southern blot analysis confirms a deletion of class I and class II genes on one haplotype. Variation in DQ beta alleles associated with DQw3 was previously described by characteristic RFLP patterns for a DQ beta bene. One pattern, which correlated precisely with A-10-83 monoclonal antibody reactivity (TA10), defined an allele which we call DQ''3.1''. The mutant cell line has lost the polymorphic bands on Southern blots corresponding to the DQ''3.1'' allele, while the intact Dw14 haplotype retains the alternate allele at DQ beta which is DQw-3 positive. TA10-negative. These data demonstrate the segregation of two DQw3 positive DQ beta allelic variants, both associated with DR4, which can be distinguished on the basis of both RFLP and monoclonal antibody reactivity

  14. Growth and characterization of polycrystalline Ge{sub 1-x}C{sub x} by reactive pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, M.P., E-mail: mayrap@fisica.uh.cu [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Materiales, Zapata y G, P.O. Box 10400, Universidad de La Habana (Cuba); Farias, M.H.; Castillon, F.F.; Diaz, Jesus A.; Avalos, M. [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, C.P. 22800 Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Ulloa, L. [Universidad de Guadalajara, (CUCEI) Blvd. Marcelino Garcia Barragan 1421, C.P. 44430 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Gallegos, J.A.; Yee-Madeiros, H. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas-IPN, UP' ALM' , Colonia Lindavista 07738 (Mexico)

    2011-03-15

    Polycrystalline thin films of Ge-C were grown on Si (1 1 1) substrates by means of reactive pulsed laser deposition with methane pressure of 100 mTorr. Effect substrate temperature, T{sub s}, on C incorporation to substitutional sites (x) in Ge{sub 1-x}C{sub x} was investigated systematically by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyzes. The substrate temperatures were ranging from 250 to 400 deg. C. The substitutional C composition x in the films by XRD were estimated using the Vegard's linear law. The maximum value of x calculated by XRD was 0.032 for T{sub s} of 350 deg. C. The position of the C 1s peak at 283.4 eV in the XPS spectrum confirmed the germanium-carbon alloys. XRD measurements indicated that x increased with T{sub s} from 250 deg. C to 350 deg. C. At T{sub s} = 400 deg. C, the estimation of x was lowered. However, the C content calculated by XPS analyzes increased with T{sub s} being more these values than substitutional C composition x. XPS and XRD analyzes demonstrate that the remaining C atoms are incorporated to interstitial sites. The use of the T{sub s} plays important roles in the incorporation of substitutional C and in restraining C-cluster formation in the reactive pulsed laser deposition growth of Ge-C/Si.

  15. Adsorption studies of a water soluble dye, Reactive Red MF-3B, using sonication-surfactant-modified attapulgite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jianhua; Liu Yuanfa; Jin Qingzhe; Wang Xingguo; Yang Jun

    2007-01-01

    The removal of water-soluble Reactive Red MF-3B from aqueous media by sonication-surfactant-modified attapulgite clay was studied in a batch system. The surfactant used was octodecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (OTMAC). Adsorbent characterizations were investigated using X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and surface area analysis. The effects of pH, contact time, initial solute concentration, adsorbent dose, and temperature on the adsorption of Reactive Red MF-3B onto modified clay were investigated. On the basis of kinetic studies, specific rate constants involved in the processes were calculated and second-order adsorption kinetics was observed in the case. Film diffusion was found to be the rate-limiting step. Reactive Red MF-3B adsorption was found to increase with increase temperature. The Reactive Red MF-3B equilibrium adsorption data were fitted to Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models, the former being found to provide the better fit of the experimental data. Thermodynamic parameters were calculated. From the results it can be concluded that the surfactant-modified clay could be a good adsorbent for treating Reactive Red MF-3B-contaminated waters

  16. Efficiency of a Malaria Reactive Test-and-Treat Program in Southern Zambia: A Prospective, Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch-Feldman, Molly; Hamapumbu, Harry; Lubinda, Jailos; Musonda, Michael; Katowa, Ben; Searle, Kelly M; Kobayashi, Tamaki; Shields, Timothy M; Stevenson, Jennifer C; Thuma, Philip E; Moss, William J; For The Southern Africa International Centers Of Excellence For Malaria Research

    2018-05-01

    To improve malaria surveillance and achieve elimination, the Zambian National Malaria Elimination Program implemented a reactive test-and-treat program in Southern Province in 2013 in which individuals with rapid diagnostic test (RDT)-confirmed malaria are followed-up at their home within 1 week of diagnosis. Individuals present at the index case household and those residing within 140 m of the index case are tested with an RDT and treated with artemether-lumefantrine if positive. This study evaluated the efficiency of this reactive test-and-treat strategy by characterizing infected individuals missed by the RDT and the current screening radius. The radius was expanded to 250 m, and a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) test was performed on dried blood spot specimens. From January 2015 through March 2016, 145 index cases were identified at health centers and health posts. A total of 3,333 individuals residing in 525 households were screened. Excluding index cases, the parasite prevalence was 1.1% by RDT (33 positives of 3,016 participants) and 2.4% by qPCR (73 positives of 3,016 participants). Of the qPCR-positive cases, 62% of 73 individuals tested negative by RDT. Approximately half of the infected individuals resided within the index case household (58% of RDT-positive individuals and 48% of qPCR-positive individuals). The low sensitivity of the RDT and the high proportion of secondary cases within the index case household decreased the efficiency of this reactive test-and-treat strategy. Reactive focal drug administration in index case households would be a more efficient approach to treating infected individuals associated with a symptomatic case.

  17. Serology indicates cytomegalovirus infection is associated with varicella-zoster virus reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunjimi, Benson; Theeten, Heidi; Hens, Niel; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox after which the virus remains latent in neural ganglia. Subsequent reactivation episodes occur, leading mainly to subclinical detection of VZV, but also to the clinical entity herpes zoster. These reactivations are known to occur most frequently amongst immunocompromised individuals, but the incidence of herpes zoster is also known to increase with age, supposedly as a consequence of immunosenescence. Our analysis aims to explore associations between cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and VZV reactivation by analyzing VZV-specific antibody titers as a function of age, gender, and CMV serostatus. The analysis was repeated on measles and parvovirus B19 antibody titers. At the time of the observations, measles virus circulation was virtually eliminated, whereas parvovirus B19 circulated at lower levels than VZV. Multiple linear regression analyses, using the log-transformed antibody titers, identified a positive association between ageing and VZV antibody titers suggesting that ageing increasingly stimulates VZV reactivation. CMV infection further amplified the positive association between ageing and the reactivation rate. A negative association between CMV infection and VZV antibody titers was found in young individuals, thereby supporting the hypothesis that CMV infection may have a negative effect on the number of B-cells. However, no associations between CMV infection and measles or parvovirus B19 antibody titers occurred, but ageing tended to be associated with a decrease in the antibody titer against parvovirus B19. The combined results thus suggest that both CMV-dependent and CMV-independent immunosenescence occurs. This is supported by an in-depth analysis of VZV, measles and parvovirus B19 antibody titers. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. SHOVAV-JUEL. A one dimensional space-time kinetic code for pebble-bed high-temperature reactors with temperature and Xenon feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabbi, R.; Meister, G.; Finken, R.; Haben, M.

    1982-09-01

    The present report describes the modelling basis and the structure of the neutron kinetics-code SHOVAV-Juel. Information for users is given regarding the application of the code and the generation of the input data. SHOVAV-Juel is a one-dimensional space-time-code based on a multigroup diffusion approach for four energy groups and six groups of delayed neutrons. It has been developed for the analysis of the transient behaviour of high temperature reactors with pebble-bed core. The reactor core is modelled by horizontal segments to which different materials compositions can be assigned. The temperature dependence of the reactivity is taken into account by using temperature dependent neutron cross sections. For the simulation of transients in an extended time range the time dependence of the reactivity absorption by Xenon-135 is taken into account. (orig./RW)

  19. Effect of high temperature deposition on CoSi2 phase formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comrie, C. M.; Ahmed, H.; Smeets, D.; Demeulemeester, J.; Vantomme, A.; Turner, S.; Van Tendeloo, G.; Detavernier, C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the nucleation behaviour of the CoSi to CoSi 2 transformation from cobalt silicide thin films grown by deposition at elevated substrate temperatures ranging from 375 °C to 600 °C. A combination of channelling, real-time Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, real-time x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the effect of the deposition temperature on the subsequent formation temperature of CoSi 2 , its growth behaviour, and the epitaxial quality of the CoSi 2 thus formed. The temperature at which deposition took place was observed to exert a significant and systematic influence on both the formation temperature of CoSi 2 and its growth mechanism. CoSi films grown at the lowest temperatures were found to increase the CoSi 2 nucleation temperature above that of CoSi 2 grown by conventional solid phase reaction, whereas the higher deposition temperatures reduced the nucleation temperature significantly. In addition, a systematic change in growth mechanism of the subsequent CoSi 2 growth occurs as a function of deposition temperature. First, the CoSi 2 growth rate from films grown at the lower reactive deposition temperatures is substantially lower than that grown at higher reactive deposition temperatures, even though the onset of growth occurs at a higher temperature, Second, for deposition temperatures below 450 °C, the growth appears columnar, indicating nucleation controlled growth. Elevated deposition temperatures, on the other hand, render the CoSi 2 formation process layer-by-layer which indicates enhanced nucleation of the CoSi 2 and diffusion controlled growth. Our results further indicate that this observed trend is most likely related to stress and changes in microstructure introduced during reactive deposition of the CoSi film. The deposition temperature therefore provides a handle to tune the CoSi 2 growth mechanism.

  20. Relationship between coal and coke microstructure and the high temperature properties of coke. [Temperature dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuyuguchi, K; Yamaji, M; Sugimoto, Y

    1980-02-01

    This paper considers the relationship of the properties of coke and parent coal with the high temperature properties, including reactivity, of coke. Aspects considered include coke texture and grade, and the optical reflectivity of coal and coke. (8 refs.) (In Japanese)

  1. Investigation of the Buckling-Reactivity Conversion Coefficient using SRAC and MVP codes for UO2 Lattices in TCA experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Dai Dien

    2008-01-01

    Benchmark experiments for International Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhE) Project carried out at TCA, the temperature effects on reactivity were studied for light water moderated and reflected UO 2 cores with/without soluble poisons. The buckling coefficient method using the measured critical water levels was proposed by Suzaki et al. The temperature dependence of buckling coefficient of reactivity and its variance by the core configurations of the benchmark experiments was investigated using SRAC and MVP calculations. From the calculations by SRAC as well as by MVP it is seen that the K-value can be taken as an average value only for each core with temperature changes which are considered as perturbation parameter. The difference between our calculations and benchmark results which uses constant K-value for all cores proves that the results depend on K-value and it play important role in defining reactivity effect using the water level worth method. (author)

  2. Reactivation of Hepatitis B Virus in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients in Japan: Efficacy of Nucleos(tide Analogues for Prevention and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Nakamoto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively reviewed 413 recipients with hematologic malignancies who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT between June 1986 and March 2013. Recipients with antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc and/or to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs were regarded as experiencing previous hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. Clinical data of these recipients were reviewed from medical records. We defined ≥1 log IU/mL increase in serum HBV DNA from nadir as HBV reactivation in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg-positive recipients, and also defined ≥1 log IU/mL increase or re-appearance of HBV DNA and/or HBsAg as HBV reactivation in HBsAg-negative recipients. In 5 HBsAg-positive recipients, 2 recipients initially not administered with nucleos(tide analogues (NUCs experienced HBV reactivation, but finally all 5 were successfully controlled with NUCs. HBV reactivation was observed in 11 (2.7% of 408 HBsAg-negative recipients; 8 of these were treated with NUCs, and fortunately none developed acute liver failure. In 5 (6.0% of 83 anti-HBc and/or anti-HBs-positive recipients, HBV reactivation occurred. None of 157 (0% recipients without HBsAg, anti-HBs or anti-HBc experienced HBV reactivation. In HSCT recipients, HBV reactivation is a common event in HBsAg-positive recipients, or in HBsAg-negative recipients with anti-HBc and/or anti-HBs. Further attention should be paid to HSCT recipients with previous exposure to HBV.

  3. A simple reactivity feedback model accounting for radial core expansion effects in the liquid metal fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Young Min; Lee, Yong Bum; Chang, Won Pyo; Haha, Do Hee

    2002-01-01

    The radial core expansion due to the structure temperature rise is one of major negative reactivity insertion mechanisms in metallic fueled reactor. Thermal expansion is a result of both the laws of nature and the particular core design and it causes negative reactivity feedback by the combination of increased core volume captures and increased core surface leakage. The simple radial core expansion reactivity feedback model developed for the SSC-K code was evaluated by the code-to-code comparison analysis. From the comparison results, it can be stated that the radial core expansion reactivity feedback model employed into the SSC-K code may be reasonably accurate in the UTOP analysis

  4. A simple reactivity feedback model accounting for radial core expansion effects in the liquid metal fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young Min; Lee, Yong Bum; Chang, Won Pyo; Haha, Do Hee [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    The radial core expansion due to the structure temperature rise is one of major negative reactivity insertion mechanisms in metallic fueled reactor. Thermal expansion is a result of both the laws of nature and the particular core design and it causes negative reactivity feedback by the combination of increased core volume captures and increased core surface leakage. The simple radial core expansion reactivity feedback model developed for the SSC-K code was evaluated by the code-to-code comparison analysis. From the comparison results, it can be stated that the radial core expansion reactivity feedback model employed into the SSC-K code may be reasonably accurate in the UTOP analysis.

  5. Postocclusive reactive hyperemia in hand-arm vibration syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatka Stoyneva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess laser Doppler-recorded postocclusive reactive hyperemic responses in vibration-induced Raynaud’s phenomenon and compare it with primary and secondary to sclerodermy Raynaud’s phenomenon. Material and Methods: Thirty patients with vibration-induced Raynaud’s phenomenon and 30 healthy controls and patients with primary and secondary to sclerodermy Raynaud’s phenomenon were investigated. Fingerpulp skin blood flow was monitored by laser Doppler flowmetry during postocclusive reactive hyperemia test. Results: Lower initial perfusion values were established in all the patients with Raynaud’s phenomenon compared to the healthy controls (p < 0.0001. The postocclusive reactive hyperemic peak was lower in all the Raynaud’s phenomenon groups compared to the controls (p < 0.0001. The postocclusive and basal perfusions were lower in the secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon groups compared to the control and the primary Raynaud’s phenomenon groups (p < 0.0001. The velocities to postocclusive hyperemic peak were lower in all the Raynaud’s phenomenon patients (p < 0.0001, so were in the vibration-induced (p < 0.002 and the sclerodermy Raynaud’s phenomenon (p < 0.004 groups in relation to the primary Raynaud’s phenomenon group. The perfusion values and the velocities were significantly influenced by the initial superficial skin temperatures and perfusions, while the velocities were dependent also on gender, and the hyperemic peak on age. Conclusions: Postocclusive reactive hyperemia is abnormal in all Raynaud’s phenomenon patients. Laser Doppler-recorded reactive hyperemia test contributes to diagnosing Raynaud’s phenomenon and has proved to be valuable for group analysis. The applied method is not sensitive enough to discriminate adequately the type of Raynaud’s phenomenon among individual cases.

  6. Study for reactive power on distribution system line B RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Bony Marsahala

    2010-01-01

    Study for reactive power on distribution system line B RSG-GA is already done. The study intended to evaluate how much inductive load need the reactive power (positive), how much power factor, and what will be done to increase the power factor. The reactive power is the losses power, can't be changed into energy, but it is need for transmission process and it is cause the energy losses. The loads on distribution system line B consist of induction motors which are used for primary cooling system and secondary cooling system, lift, blower on cooling tower, and air condition system. Due to the motors using, the power factor are falling down to low. By the calculation results give that the inductive loads on distribution line B are 850 KVA and these loads caused the low power factor 0.80. If we want to increase the power factor up to 0.95, it is need to install the reactive loads likes capacitor bank 250 KVAR. (author)

  7. Reactivity of Athabasca residue and of its SARA fractions during residue hydroconversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verstraete, J.; Danial-Fortain, P.; Gauthier, T.; Merdrignac, I. [IFP-Lyon, Vermaison (France); Budzinski, H. [Bordeaux Univ. (France). ISM-LPTC, UMR CNRS

    2009-07-01

    Residue conversion processes are becoming increasingly important because of the declining market for residual fuel oil and a greater demand for middle distillates. Ebullated-bed hydroconversion is a commercially proven technology for converting heavy feedstocks with high amounts of impurities. The process enables the conversion of atmospheric or vacuum residues at temperatures up to 440 degrees C, and at liquid hourly space velocity (LHSV) conditions in the range of 0.15 to 0.5 per hour. A 540 degrees C conversion of up to 80 weight per cent can be achieved under these conditions. This paper reported on a research study conducted at IFP Lyon in which the residue hydroconversion in a large-scale ebullated bed bench unit was investigated to determine the impact of operating conditions and feed properties on yield and product qualities. Hydrogen was added to the feed in the bench units to keep a high hydrogen partial pressure and favour the catalytic hydroconversion reactions. In a typical test, the reactor was fed with 50 g of feedstock and 0.45 g of crushed equilibrium industrial NiMo catalyst, pressurized hydrogen and quickly heated at the reaction temperature. This paper also discussed the conversion of Athabasca bitumen residue in the large-scale pilot plant and also in the small scale batch reactor. The effect of operating temperature and space velocity was examined. The reactivity of the saturates, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes (SARA) fractions of the bitumen was studied separately in order to better understand the conversion mechanisms and reactivities. The Athabasca bitumen feed and SARA fractions were also analyzed in terms of standard petroleum analysis, SARA fractionation, elemental analysis, size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and 13C NMR. Hydroconversion experiments were conducted in the batch unit at different reaction temperatures and reaction times. A comparison of small-scale batch results with those obtained with the continuous large-scale bench

  8. Catalytic Reactive Distillation for the Esterification Process: Experimental and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mallaiah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, methyl acetate has been synthesized using esterification of acetic acid with methanol in a continuous packed bed catalytic reactive distillation col- umn in the presence of novel Indion 180 ion exchange resin solid catalyst. The experiments were conducted at various operating conditions like reboiler temperature, reflux ratio, and different feed flow rates of the acetic acid and methanol. The non-ideal pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model has been developed for esterification of acetic acid with methanol in the presence of Indion 180 catalyst. The developed kinetic model was used for the simulation of the reactive distillation column for the synthesis of methyl acetate using equilibrium stage model in Aspen Plus version 7.3. The simulation results were compared with experimental results, and found that there is a good agreement between them. The sensitivity analyses were also carried out for the different parameters of bot- tom flow rate, feed temperatures of acetic acid and methanol, and feed flow rate of acetic acid and methanol.

  9. Reactivation of hepatitis B in patients of chronic hepatitis C with hepatitis B virus infection treated with direct acting antivirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ming-Lun; Huang, Chung-Feng; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Ko, Yu-Min; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Liu, Ta-Wei; Lin, Yi-Hung; Liang, Po-Cheng; Hsieh, Ming-Yen; Lin, Zu-Yau; Chen, Shinn-Cherng; Huang, Ching-I; Huang, Jee-Fu; Kuo, Po-Lin; Dai, Chia-Yen; Yu, Ming-Lung; Chuang, Wan-Long

    2017-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) may reactivate when treating chronic hepatitis C (CHC) with direct acting antivirals (DAA). We aim to investigate the risk of HBV reactivation during DAA therapy. Chronic hepatitis C patients receiving pan-oral DAA therapy from December 2013 to August 2016 were evaluated. Fifty-seven patients that had a past HBV infection (negative hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg] and positive hepatitis B core antibody) and seven patients that had a current HBV infection (positive HBsAg) were enrolled. Serum HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) markers were regularly measured. The endpoints were the HCV sustained virological response (SVR) and the HBV virological/clinical reactivation. The overall SVR 12 rate was 96.9%, and two patients, one with positive HBsAg, had a relapse of HCV. No episodes of HBV virological reactivation were observed among the patients with a past HBV infection. For the seven patients with a current HBV infection, HBV virological reactivation was found in four (57.1%) of the seven patients. Clinical reactivation of HBV was observed in one patient with pretreatment detectable HBV DNA and recovered after entecavir administration. For the other three patients with HBV virological reactivation, the reappearance of low level HBV DNA without clinical reactivation was observed. HBsAg levels demonstrated only small fluctuations in all the patients. There was a minimal impact of hepatitis B core antibody seropositivity on HCV efficacy and safety. For CHC patients with current HBV infection, the risk of HBV reactivation was present, and monitoring the HBV DNA level during therapy is warranted. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Assessment of reactivity of three treponemal tests in non-treponemal non-reactive cases from sexually transmitted diseases clinic, antenatal clinic, integrated counselling and testing centre, other different outdoor patient departments/indoor patients of a tertiary care centre and peripheral health clinic attendees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In India, many state reference centres for sexually transmitted infections perform only a single screening assay for syphilis diagnosis. In this study, Treponema pallidum haemagglutination (TPHA was performed on 1115 Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL/rapid plasma regain (RPR non-reactive and 107 reactive sera out of 10,489 tested by VDRL/RPR according to the National AIDS Control Organisation syphilis testing protocol. A total of 47 Specimens reactive in TPHA and non-reactive with VDRL test were subjected to fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption and enzyme-immunoassay. Seroprevalence considering both VDRL and TPHA positivity was highest (4.4% in sexually transmitted diseases clinic attendees than in other subject groups. Positivity by two treponemal tests in 24 (2.2% cases non-reactive by VDRL/RPR was representative of the fully treated patients or latent or late syphilis cases. The findings highlight that a suitable treponemal confirmatory test should be performed in all the diagnostic laboratories.

  11. Measurements and calculations of reactivity for the IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, P.S.B.; Maiorino, J.R.; Yamaguchi, M.

    1988-01-01

    This work shows a measurement of reactivity parameters, such as integral and diferential control rod worth, local void coefficient, and moderator temperature coefficient for the research reactor IEA-R1. The measured values were compared with those calculated through HAMMER-CITATION codes, having shown good agreement. (author) [pt

  12. Use of thermal time constant concept in the analysis of reactivity induced accidents with feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narain, R.

    1981-01-01

    A simple heat transfer model based on the thermal time constant concept which leads to significant reduction in fuel temperature computing time and gives a physical insight of the phenomena is presented. The fuel temperatures can be used to estimate the reactivity feedback using the measured or calculated Doppler coefficients. (E.G.) [pt

  13. Reactivity control in HTR power plants with respect to passive safety system. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnert, H; Kugeler, K [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik

    1996-12-01

    The R and D and Demonstration of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is described in overview. The HTR-MODULE power plant, as the most advanced concept, is taken for the description of the reactivity control in general. The idea of the ``modularization of the core`` of the HTR has been developed as the answer on the experiences of the core melt accident at Three Miles Island. The HTR module has two shutdown systems: The ``6 rods``-system for hot shutdown at the ``18 small absorber pebbles units`` - system for cold shutdown. With respect to the definition of ``Passive Systems`` of IAEA-TECDOC-626 the total reactivity control system of the HTR-MODULE is a passive system of category D, because it is an emergency reactor shutdown system based on gravity driven rods, and devices, activated by fail-safe trip logic. But reactivity control of the HTR does not only consist of these engineered safety system but does have a self-acting stabilization by the negative temperature coefficient of the reactivity, being rather effective in reactivity control. Examples from computer calculations are presented, and, in addition, experimental results from the ``Stuck Rod Experiment`` at the AVR reactor in Juelich. On the basis of this the proposal is made that ``self-acting stabilization as a quality of the function`` should be discussed as a new category in addition to the active and passive engineered safety systems, structures and components of IAEA-TECDOC-626. The requirements for a future ``catastrophe-free`` nuclear technology are presented. In the appendix the 7th amendment of the atomic energy act of the Federal Republic of Germany, effective 28 July 94, is given. (author).

  14. Study of CO2 gasification reactivity of biocarbon produced at different conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Liang; Maziarka, Przemysław; Skreiberg, Øyvind; Løvås, Terese; Wadrzyk, Mariusz; Sevault, Alexis

    2017-01-01

    Biocarbon has a great potential to replace fossil reductants and help reduce greenhouse gas emissions from carbon intensive metallurgical industries. In this work, biocarbon samples were produced from Norway spruce under different final temperatures (550, 650 and 800 °C) and holding times (10 and 30 minutes). The CO2 gasification reactivity of the biocarbon, or biomass char, samples was investigated in a thermogravimetric analyser at different gasification temperatures (850, 900 and 950 °C). ...

  15. Microcomputer-based equipment-control and data-acquisition system for fission-reactor reactivity-worth measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, W.P.; Bucher, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    Material reactivity-worth measurements are one of the major classes of experiments conducted on the Zero Power research reactors (ZPR) at Argonne National Laboratory. These measurements require the monitoring of the position of a servo control element as a sample material is positioned at various locations in a critical reactor configuration. In order to guarantee operational reliability and increase experimental flexibility for these measurements, the obsolete hardware-based control unit has been replaced with a microcomputer based equipment control and data acquisition system. This system is based on an S-100 bus, dual floppy disk computer with custom built cards to interface with the experimental system. To measure reactivity worths, the system accurately positions samples in the reactor core and acquires data on the position of the servo control element. The data are then analyzed to determine statistical adequacy. The paper covers both the hardware and software aspects of the design

  16. Microcomputer-based equipment-control and data-acquisition system for fission-reactor reactivity-worth measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, W.P.; Bucher, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    Material reactivity-worth measurements are one of the major classes of experiments conducted on the Zero Power research reactors (ZPR) at Argonne National Laboratory. These measurements require the monitoring of the position of a servo control element as a sample material is positioned at various locations in a critical reactor configuration. In order to guarantee operational reliability and increase experimental flexibility for these measurements, the obsolete hardware-based control unit has been replaced with a microcomputer based equipment control and data acquisition system. This system is based on an S-100 bus, dual floppy disk computer with custom built cards to interface with the experimental system. To measure reactivity worths, the system accurately positions samples in the reactor core and acquires data on the position of the servo control element. The data are then analyzed to determine statistical adequacy. The paper covers both the hardware and software aspects of the design.

  17. Reactive simulation of the chemistry behind the condensed-phase ignition of RDX from hot spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kaushik L; Chaudhuri, Santanu

    2015-07-28

    Chemical events that lead to thermal initiation and spontaneous ignition of the high-pressure phase of RDX are presented using reactive molecular dynamics simulations. In order to initiate the chemistry behind thermal ignition, approximately 5% of RDX crystal is subjected to a constant temperature thermal pulse for various time durations to create a hot spot. After application of the thermal pulse, the ensuing chemical evolution of the system is monitored using reactive molecular dynamics under adiabatic conditions. Thermal pulses lasting longer than certain time durations lead to the spontaneous ignition of RDX after an incubation period. For cases where the ignition is observed, the incubation period is dominated by intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen transfer reactions. Contrary to the widely accepted unimolecular models of initiation chemistry, N-N bond dissociations that produce NO2 species are suppressed in the condensed phase. The gradual temperature and pressure increase in the incubation period is accompanied by the accumulation of short-lived, heavier polyradicals. The polyradicals contain intact triazine rings from the RDX molecules. At certain temperatures and pressures, the polyradicals undergo ring-opening reactions, which fuel a series of rapid exothermic chemical reactions leading to a thermal runaway regime with stable gas-products such as N2, H2O and CO2. The evolution of the RDX crystal throughout the thermal initiation, incubation and thermal runaway phases observed in the reactive simulations contains a rich diversity of condensed-phase chemistry of nitramines under high-temperature/pressure conditions.

  18. Dielectric properties of DC reactive magnetron sputtered Al2O3 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasanna, S.; Mohan Rao, G.; Jayakumar, S.; Kannan, M.D.; Ganesan, V.

    2012-01-01

    Alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) thin films were sputter deposited over well-cleaned glass and Si substrates by DC reactive magnetron sputtering under various oxygen gas pressures and sputtering powers. The composition of the films was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and an optimal O/Al atomic ratio of 1.59 was obtained at a reactive gas pressure of 0.03 Pa and sputtering power of 70 W. X-ray diffraction results revealed that the films were amorphous until 550 °C. The surface morphology of the films was studied using scanning electron microscopy and the as-deposited films were found to be smooth. The topography of the as-deposited and annealed films was analyzed by atomic force microscopy and a progressive increase in the rms roughness of the films from 3.2 nm to 4.53 nm was also observed with increase in the annealing temperature. Al-Al 2 O 3 -Al thin film capacitors were then fabricated on glass substrates to study the effect of temperature and frequency on the dielectric property of the films. Temperature coefficient of capacitance, AC conductivity and activation energy were determined and the results are discussed. - Highlights: ► Al 2 O 3 thin films were deposited by DC reactive magnetron sputtering. ► The films were found to be amorphous up to annealing temperature of 550 C. ► An increase in rms roughness of the films was observed with annealing. ► Al-Al 2 O 3 -Al thin film capacitors were fabricated and dielectric constant was 7.5. ► The activation energy decreased with increase in frequency.

  19. Scaling of Anomalous Hall Effects in Facing-Target Reactively Sputtered Fe4N Films

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yan

    2015-05-13

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in the reactively sputtered epitaxial and polycrystalline γ′-Fe4N films is investigated systematically. The Hall resistivity is positive in the entire temperature range. The magnetization, carrier density and grain boundaries scattering have a major impact on the AHE scaling law. The scaling exponent γ in the conventional scaling of is larger than 2 in both the epitaxial and polycrystalline γ′-Fe4N films. Although γ>2 has been found in heterogeneous systems due to the effects of the surface and interface scattering on AHE, γ>2 is not expected in homogenous epitaxial systems. We demonstrated that γ>2 results from residual resistivity (ρxx0) in γ′-Fe4N films. Furthermore, the side-jump and intrinsic mechanisms are dominant in both epitaxial and polycrystalline samples according to the proper scaling relation.

  20. Compact very low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with mechanically driven horizontal linear positioning stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suderow, H; Guillamon, I; Vieira, S

    2011-03-01

    We describe a scanning tunneling microscope for operation in a dilution refrigerator with a sample stage which can be moved macroscopically in a range up to a cm and with an accuracy down to the tens of nm. The position of the tip over the sample as set at room temperature does not change more than a few micrometers when cooling down. This feature is particularly interesting for work on micrometer sized samples. Nanostructures can be also localized and studied, provided they are repeated over micrometer sized areas. The same stage can be used to approach a hard single crystalline sample to a knife and cleave it, or break it, in situ. In situ positioning is demonstrated with measurements at 0.1 K in nanofabricated samples. Atomic resolution down to 0.1 K and in magnetic fields of 8 T is demonstrated in NbSe(2). No heat dissipation nor an increase in mechanical noise has been observed at 0.1 K when operating the slider.

  1. The effect of temperature and the control rod position on the spatial neutron flux distribution in the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, K.; Omar, H.; Ghazi, N.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of water and fuel temperature increase and changes in the control rod positions on the spatial neutron flux distribution in the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) is discussed. The cross sections of all the reactor components at different temperatures are generated using the WIMSD4 code. These group constants are used then in the CITATION code to calculate the special neutron flux distribution using four energy groups. This work shows that water and fuel temperature increase in the reactor during the reactor daily operating time does not affect the spatial neutron flux distribution in the reactor. Changing the control rod position does not affect as well the spatial neutron flux distribution except in the region around the control rod position. This stability in the spatial neutron flux distribution, especially in the inner and outer irradiation sites, makes MNSR as a good tool for the neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique and production of radioisotopes with medium or short half lives during the reactor daily operating time. (author)

  2. Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

    2011-07-01

    The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel

  3. Reactive Uptake of Sulfur Dioxide and Ozone on Volcanic Glass and Ash at Ambient Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maters, Elena C.; Delmelle, Pierre; Rossi, Michel J.; Ayris, Paul M.

    2017-09-01

    The atmospheric impacts of volcanic ash from explosive eruptions are rarely considered alongside those of volcanogenic gases/aerosols. While airborne particles provide solid surfaces for chemical reactions with trace gases in the atmosphere, the reactivity of airborne ash has seldom been investigated. Here we determine the total uptake capacity (NiM) and initial uptake coefficient (γM) for sulfur dioxide (SO2) and ozone (O3) on a compositional array of volcanic ash and glass powders at 25°C in a Knudsen flow reactor. The measured ranges of NiSO2 and γSO2 (1011-1013 molecules cm-2 and 10-3-10-2) and NiO3 and γO3 (1012-1013 molecules cm-2 and 10-3-10-2) are comparable to values reported for mineral dust. Differences in ash and glass reactivity toward SO2 and O3 may relate to varying abundances of, respectively, basic and reducing sites on these materials. The typically lower SO2 and O3 uptake on ash compared to glass likely results from prior exposure of ash surfaces to acidic and oxidizing conditions within the volcanic eruption plume/cloud. While sequential uptake experiments overall suggest that these gases do not compete for reactive surface sites, SO2 uptake forming adsorbed S(IV) species may enhance the capacity for subsequent O3 uptake via redox reaction forming adsorbed S(VI) species. Our findings imply that ash emissions may represent a hitherto neglected sink for atmospheric SO2 and O3.

  4. Reactive Strength Index: A Poor Indicator of Reactive Strength?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Robin; Kenny, Ian; Harrison, Drew

    2017-11-28

    The primary aim was to assess the relationships between reactive strength measures and associated kinematic and kinetic performance variables achieved during drop jumps. A secondary aim was to highlight issues with the use of reactive strength measures as performance indicators. Twenty eight national and international level sprinters, consisting of fourteen men and women, participated in this cross-sectional analysis. Athletes performed drop jumps from a 0.3 m box onto a force platform with dependent variables contact time (CT), landing time (TLand), push-off time (TPush), flight time (FT), jump height (JH), reactive strength index (RSI, calculated as JH / CT), reactive strength ratio (RSR, calculated as FT / CT) and vertical leg spring stiffness (Kvert) recorded. Pearson's correlation test found very high to near perfect relationships between RSI and RSR (r = 0.91 to 0.97), with mixed relationships found between RSI, RSR and the key performance variables, (Men: r = -0.86 to -0.71 between RSI/RSR and CT, r = 0.80 to 0.92 between RSI/RSR and JH; Women: r = -0.85 to -0.56 between RSR and CT, r = 0.71 between RSI and JH). This study demonstrates that the method of assessing reactive strength (RSI versus RSR) may be influenced by the performance strategies adopted i.e. whether an athlete achieves their best reactive strength scores via low CTs, high JHs or a combination. Coaches are advised to limit the variability in performance strategies by implementing upper and / or lower CT thresholds to accurately compare performances between individuals.

  5. Fuel density effect on parameter of reactivity coefficient of the Innovative Research Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rokhmadi; Tukiran S

    2013-01-01

    The multipurpose of research reactor utilization make many countries build the new research reactor. Trend of this reactor for this moment is multipurpose reactor type with a compact core to get high neutron flux at the low or medium level of power. The research reactor in Indonesia right now is already 25 year old. Therefor, it is needed to design a new research reactor as a alternative called it innovative research reactor (IRR) and then as an exchanger for old research reactor. The aim of this research is to complete RRI core design data as a requirement for design license. Calculation done is to get the RRI core reactivity coefficients with 5 x 5 core configuration and 20 MW of power, has more than 40 days cycle of length. The RRI core reactivity coefficient calculation is done for new U-"9Mo-Al fuel with variation of densities. The calculation is done by using WIMSD-5B and BATAN-FUEL computer codes. The result of calculation for conceptual design showed that the equilibrium RRI core with 5 x 5 configuration, 450 g, 550 g and 700 g of fuel loadings have negative reactivity coefficients of fuel temperature, moderator temperature, void fraction and density of moderator but the values of the reactivities are very variation. This results has met the safety criteria for RRI core conceptual design. (author)

  6. Analysis of prompt supercritical process with heat transfer and temperature feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU BO; ZHU Qian; CHEN Zhiyun

    2009-01-01

    The prompt supercritical process of a nuclear reactor with temperature feedback and initial power as well as heat transfer with a big step reactivity (ρ0>β) is analyzed in this paper.Considering the effect of heat transfer on temperature of the reactor,a new model is set up.For any initial power,the variations of output power and reactivity with time are obtained by numerical method.The effects of the big inserted step reactivity and initial power on the prompt supercritical process are analyzed and discussed.It was found that the effect of heat transfer on the output power and reactivity can be neglected under any initial power,and the output power obtained by the adiabatic model is basically in accordance with that by the model of this paper,and the analytical solution can be adopted.The results provide a theoretical base for safety analysis and operation management of a power reactor.

  7. Effect of oxyfluorinated multi-walled carbon nanotube additives on positive temperature coefficient/negative temperature coefficient behavior in high-density polyethylene polymeric switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Byong Chol; Kang, Seok Chang; Im, Ji Sun; Lee, Se Hyun; Lee, Young-Seak

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The electrical properties of MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches and their effect on oxyfluorination. Highlights: → Oxyfluorinated MWCNTs were used to reduce the PTC/NTC phenomenon in MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches. → Electron mobility is difficult in MWCNT particles when the number of oxygen functional groups (C-O, C=O) increases by oxyfluorination. → A mechanism of improved electrical properties of oxyfluorinated MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches was suggested. -- Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were embedded into high-density polyethylene (HDPE) to improve the electrical properties of HDPE polymeric switches. The MWCNT surfaces were modified by oxyfluorination to improve their positive temperature coefficient (PTC) and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behaviors in HDPE polymeric switches. HDPE polymeric switches exhibit poor electron mobility between MWCNT particles when the number of oxygen functional groups is increased by oxyfluorination. Thus, the PTC intensity of HDPE polymeric switches was increased by the destruction of the electrical conductivity network. The oxyfluorination of MWCNTs also leads to weak NTC behavior in the MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches. This result is attributed to the reduction of the mutual attraction between the MWCNT particles at the melting temperature of HDPE, which results from a decrease in the surface free energy of the C-F bond in MWCNT particles.

  8. Inverse correlation between reactive oxygen species in unwashed semen and sperm motion parameters as measured by a computer-assisted semen analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Teppei; Yumura, Yasushi; Yasuda, Kengo; Sanjo, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Shinnosuke; Yamanaka, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Akira

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the correlation between sperm motion parameters obtained by a computer-assisted semen analyzer and levels of reactive oxygen species in unwashed semen. In total, 847 patients, except for azoospermic patients were investigated. At the time of each patient's first consultation, semen parameters were measured using SMAS™ or CellSoft 3000™, and production of reactive oxygen species was measured using a computer-driven LKB Wallac Luminometer 1251 Analyzer. The patients were divided into two groups: reactive oxygen species - positive and negative. The semen parameters within each group were measured using one of the two computer-assisted semen analyzer systems and then compared. Correlations between reactive oxygen species levels and sperm motion parameters in semen from the reactive oxygen species - positive group were also investigated. Reactive oxygen species were detected in semen samples of 282 cases (33.3%). Sperm concentration (P semen damage sperm concentration, motility, and other sperm motion parameters.

  9. ''Use of perturbative methods to break down the variation of reactivity between two systems''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perruchot-Triboulet, S.; Sanchez, R.

    1997-01-01

    The modification of the isotopic composition, the temperature or even accounting for across section uncertainties in one part of a nuclear reactor core, affects the value of the effective multiplication factor. A new tool allows the analysis of the reactivity effect generated by the modification of the system. With the help of the direct and adjoint fluxes, a detailed balance of reactivity, between the compared systems, is done for each isotopic cross section. After the presentation of the direct and adjoint transport equations in the context of the multigroup code transport APOLLO2, this note describes the method, based on perturbation theory, for the analysis of the reactivity variation. An example application is also given. (author)

  10. The social patterns of a biological risk factor for disease: race, gender, socioeconomic position, and C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herd, Pamela; Karraker, Amelia; Friedman, Elliot

    2012-07-01

    Understand the links between race and C-reactive protein (CRP), with special attention to gender differences and the role of class and behavioral risk factors as mediators. This study utilizes the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project data, a nationally representative study of older Americans aged 57-85 to explore two research questions. First, what is the relative strength of socioeconomic versus behavioral risk factors in explaining race differences in CRP levels? Second, what role does gender play in understanding race differences? Does the relative role of socioeconomic and behavioral risk factors in explaining race differences vary when examining men and women separately? When examining men and women separately, socioeconomic and behavioral risk factor mediators vary in their importance. Indeed, racial differences in CRP among men aged 57-74 are little changed after adjusting for both socioeconomic and behavioral risk factors with levels 35% higher for black men as compared to white men. For women aged 57-74, however, behavioral risk factors explain 30% of the relationship between race and CRP. The limited explanatory power of socioeconomic position and, particularly, behavioral risk factors, in elucidating the relationship between race and CRP among men, signals the need for research to examine additional mediators, including more direct measures of stress and discrimination.

  11. Reactive sites influence in PMMA oligomers reactivity: a DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, C. V.; Vásquez, S. R.; Flores, N.; García, L.; Rico, J. L.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we present a theoretical study of methyl methacrylate (MMA) living anionic polymerization. The study was addressed to understanding two important experimental observations made for Michael Szwarc in 1956. The unexpected effect of reactive sites concentration in the propagation rate, and the self-killer behavior of MMA (deactivating of living anionic polymerization). The theoretical calculations were performed by density functional theory (DFT) to obtain the frontier molecular orbitals values. These values were used to calculate and analyze the chemical interaction descriptors in DFT-Koopmans’ theorem. As a result, it was observed that the longest chain-length species (related with low concentration of reactive sites) exhibit the highest reactivity (behavior associated with the increase of the propagation rate). The improvement in this reactivity was attributed to the crosslinking produced in the polymethyl methacrylate chains. Meanwhile, the self-killer behavior was associated with the intermolecular forces present in the reactive sites. This behavior was associated to an obstruction in solvation, since the active sites remained active through all propagation species. The theoretical results were in good agreement with the Szwarc experiments.

  12. Evaluation of biochars by temperature programmed oxidation/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Jackson; Thomas Eberhardt; Akwasi Boateng; Charles Mullen; Les Groom

    2013-01-01

    Biochars produced from thermochemical conversions of biomass were evaluated by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO). This technique, used to characterize carbon deposits on petroleum cracking catalysts, provides information on the oxidative stability of carbonaceous solids, where higher temperature reactivity indicates greater structural order, an important property...

  13. Towards room temperature, direct, solvent free synthesis of tetraborohydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remhof, A; Yan, Y; Friedrichs, O; Kim, J W; Mauron, Ph; Borgschulte, A; Züttel, A; Wallacher, D; Buchsteiner, A; Hoser, A; Oh, K H; Cho, Y W

    2012-01-01

    Due to their high hydrogen content, tetraborohydrides are discussed as potential synthetic energy carriers. On the example of lithium borohydride LiBH 4 , we discuss current approaches of direct, solvent free synthesis based on gas solid reactions of the elements or binary hydrides and/or borides with gaseous H 2 or B 2 H 6 . The direct synthesis from the elements requires high temperature and high pressure (700°C, 150bar D 2 ). Using LiB or AlB 2 as boron source reduces the required temperature by more than 300 K. Reactive milling of LiD with B 2 H 6 leads to the formation of LiBD 4 already at room temperature. The reactive milling technique can also be applied to synthesize other borohydrides from their respective metal hydrides.

  14. Affective and cognitive reactivity to mood induction in chronic depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhn, Anne; Sterzer, Philipp; Haack, Friderike H; Köhler, Stephan

    2018-03-15

    Chronic depression (CD) is strongly associated with childhood maltreatment, which has been proposed to lead to inefficient coping styles that are characterized by abnormal affective responsiveness and dysfunctional cognitive attitudes. However, while this notion forms an important basis for psychotherapeutic strategies in the treatment of CD, there is still little direct empirical evidence for a role of altered affective and cognitive reactivity in CD. The present study therefore experimentally investigated affective and cognitive reactivity to two forms of negative mood induction in CD patients versus a healthy control sample (HC). For the general mood induction procedure, a combination of sad pictures and sad music was used, while for individualized mood induction, negative mood was induced by individualized scripts with autobiographical content. Both experiments included n = 15 CD patients versus n = 15 HC, respectively. Interactions between affective or cognitive reactivity and group were analyzed by repeated measurements ANOVAs. General mood induction neither revealed affective nor cognitive reactivity in the patient group while the control group reported the expected decrease of positive affect [interaction (IA) affective reactivity x group: p = .011, cognitive reactivity x group: n.s.]. In contrast, individualized mood induction specifically increased affective reactivity (IA: p = .037) as well as the amount of dysfunctional cognitions in patients versus controls (IA: p = .014). The experiments were not balanced in a crossover design, causal conclusions are thus limited. Additionally, the differences to non-chronic forms of depression are still outstanding. The results suggest that in patients with CD, specific emotional activation through autobiographical memories is a key factor in dysfunctional coping styles. Psychotherapeutic interventions aimed at modifying affective and cognitive reactivity are thus of high relevance in the treatment of CD. Copyright

  15. Modeling Of A Reactive Distillation Column: Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (Mtbe Simulation Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Mohd Saaid Abdul Rahman Mohamed and Subhash Bhatia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A process simulation stage-wise reactive distillation column model formulated from equilibrium stage theory was developed. The algorithm for solving mathematical model represented by sets of differential-algebraic equations was based on relaxation method. Numerical integration scheme based on backward differentiation formula was selected for solving the stiffness of differential-algebraic equations. Simulations were performed on a personal computer (PC Pentium processor through a developed computer program using FORTRAN90 programming language. The proposed model was validated by comparing the simulated results with the published simulation results and with the pilot plant data from the literature. The model was capable of predicting high isobutene conversion for heterogeneous system, as desirable in industrial MTBE production process. The comparisons on temperature profiles, liquid composition profile and operating conditions of reactive distillation column also showed promising results. Therefore the proposed model can be used as a tool for the development and simulation of reactive distillation column.Keywords: Modeling, simulation, reactive distillation, relaxation method, equilibrium stage, heterogeneous, MTBE

  16. Facile fabrication of HDPE-g-MA/nanodiamond nanocomposites via one-step reactive blending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ping'an; Yu, Youming; Wu, Qiang; Fu, Shenyuan

    2012-06-29

    In this letter, nanocomposites based on maleic anhydride grafted high density polyethylene (HDPE-g-MA) and amine-functionalized nanodiamond (ND) were fabricated via one-step reactive melt-blending, generating a homogeneous dispersion of ND, as evidenced by transmission electron microscope observations. Thermal analysis results suggest that addition of ND does not affect significantly thermal stability of polymer matrix in nitrogen. However, it was interestingly found that incorporating pure ND decreases the thermal oxidation degradation stability temperature, but blending amino-functionalized ND via reactive processing significantly enhances it of HDPE in air condition. Most importantly, cone tests revealed that both ND additives and reactive blending greatly reduce the heat release rate of HDPE. The results suggest that ND has a potential application as flame retardant alternative for polymers. Tensile results show that adding ND considerably enhances Young's modulus, and reactive blending leads to further improvement in Young's modulus while hardly reducing the elongation at break of HDPE.

  17. Power and power-to-flow reactivity transfer functions in EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor II] fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1989-01-01

    Reactivity transfer functions are important in determining the reactivity history during a power transient. Overall nodal transfer functions have been calculated for different subassembly types in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). Steady-state calculations for temperature changes and, hence, reactivities for power changes have been separated into power and power-to-flow-dependent terms. Axial nodal transfer functions separated into power and power-to-flow-dependent components are reported in this paper for a typical EBR-II fuel pin. This provides an improved understanding of the time dependence of these components in transient situations

  18. EKF composition estimation and GMC control of a reactive distillation column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintavon, Sirivimon; Kittisupakorn, Paisan

    2017-08-01

    This research work proposes an extended Kalman filter (EKF) estimator to give estimates of product composition and a generic model controller (GMC) to control the temperature of a reactive distillation column (RDC). One of major difficulties to control the RDC is large time delays of product composition measurement. Therefore, the estimates of the product composition are needed and determined based on available and reliable measured tray temperature via the extended Kalman Filter (EKF). With these estimates, the GMC controller is applied to control the RDC's temperature. The performance of the EKF estimator under the GMC control is evaluated in various disturbances and set point change.

  19. Track 5: safety in engineering, construction, operations, and maintenance. Reactor physics design, validation, and operating experience. 5. A Negative Reactivity Feedback Device for Actinide Burner Cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, M.J.; Hejzlar, P.

    2001-01-01

    Lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) cooled reactors are of considerable interest because they may be useful for destruction of actinides in a cost-effective manner, particularly cores fueled predominantly with minor actinides, which gain reactivity with burnup. However, they also pose several design challenges: 1. a small (and perhaps even slightly positive) Doppler feedback; 2. small effective delayed neutron yield; 3. a small negative feedback from axial fuel expansion; 4. positive coolant void and temperature coefficients for conventional designs. This has motivated a search for palliative measures, leading to conceptualization of the reactivity feedback device (RFD). The RFD consists of an in-core flask containing helium gas, tungsten wool, and a small reservoir of LBE that communicates with vertical tubes housing neutron absorber floats. The upper part of these guide tubes contains helium gas that is vented into a separate, cooler ex-core helium gas plenum. The principle of operation is as follows: 1. The tungsten wool, hence the helium gas in the in-core plenum, is heated by gammas and loses heat to the walls by convection and conduction (radiation is feeble for monatomic gases and, in any event, intercepted by the tungsten wool). An energy balance determines the gas temperature, hence, pressure, which is 10 atm here. The energy loss rate can be adjusted by using xenon or a gas mixture in place of helium. The tungsten wool mass, which is 1 vol% wool here, can also be increased to increase gamma heating and further retard convection; alternatively, a Dewar flask could be used in place of the additional wool. 2. An increase in core power causes a virtually instantaneous increase in gamma flux, hence, gas heatup: The thermal time constant of the tungsten filaments and their surrounding gas film is ∼40 μs. 3. The increased gas temperature is associated with an increased gas pressure, which forces more liquid metal into the float guide tubes: LBE will rise ∼100 cm

  20. Autonomic composite hydrogels by reactive printing: materials and oscillatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramb, R C; Buskohl, P R; Slone, C; Smith, M L; Vaia, R A

    2014-03-07

    Autonomic materials are those that automatically respond to a change in environmental conditions, such as temperature or chemical composition. While such materials hold incredible potential for a wide range of uses, their implementation is limited by the small number of fully-developed material systems. To broaden the number of available systems, we have developed a post-functionalization technique where a reactive Ru catalyst ink is printed onto a non-responsive polymer substrate. Using a succinimide-amine coupling reaction, patterns are printed onto co-polymer or biomacromolecular films containing primary amine functionality