WorldWideScience

Sample records for positive teacher-student interactions

  1. The Effects of the First Step to Success Program on Teacher-Student Positive Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Christy

    2012-01-01

    Positive student-teacher interactions have been linked to academic and social-success of all students. The present study examined the effects of the First Steps to Success program in improving the teacher-student interaction of three Latino English Language Learners (ELL) participants identified as at risk for behavioral and academic problems. A single subject multiple baseline research design was employed for this study. Data showed a functional relationship between the behavioral interventi...

  2. Students' Positioning in the Classroom: a Study of Teacher-Student Interactions in a Socioscientific Issue Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossér, Ulrika; Lindahl, Mats

    2017-07-01

    The integration of socioscientific issues (SSI) in science education calls for emphasizing dialogic classroom practices that include students' views together with multiple sources of knowledge and diverse perspectives on the issues. Such classroom practices aim to empower students to participate in decision-making on SSI. This can be accomplished by enhancing their independence as learners and positioning them as legitimate participants in societal discussions. However, this is a complex task for science teachers. In this study, we introduce positioning theory as a lens to analyse classroom discourse on SSI in order to enhance our knowledge of the manners by which teachers' interactions with students make available or promote different positions for the students, that is, different parts for the students to play as participants, when dealing with SSI in the classroom. Transcripts of interactions between one teacher and six student groups, recorded during two lessons, were analysed with respect to the positioning of the students as participants in the classroom, and in relation to the SSI under consideration. The results show that the teacher-student interactions made available contrasting student positions. The students were positioned by the teacher or positioned themselves as independent learners or as dependent on the teacher. Furthermore, the students were positioned as affected by the issue but as spectators to public negotiations of the issue. Knowledge about the manner in which teacher-student interactions can function to position students seems important for dialogic classroom practices and the promotion of student positions that sustain the pursuit of intended educational outcomes.

  3. Teacher-Student Interaction and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Joan Kelly; Walsh, Meghan

    2002-01-01

    Reviews literature on recent developments in teacher-student interaction and language learning. Based on a sociocultural perspective of language and learning, draws from three types of classrooms: first language, second language, and foreign language. Attention is given to studies that investigate the specific means used in teacher-student…

  4. Interpersonal dynamics in teacher-student interactions and relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, H.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the crucial role of teacher-student relationships for the quality of teaching and learning. Teacher-student relationships are associated with student cognitive learning outcomes and motivation and with teachers’ well-being. As daily interactions in classrooms are the

  5. The Cognitive Neuroscience of the Teacher-Student Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battro, Antonio M.; Calero, Cecilia I.; Goldin, Andrea P.; Holper, Lisa; Pezzatti, Laura; Shalóm, Diego E.; Sigman, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Pedagogy is the science and art of teaching. Each generation needs to explore the history, theory, and practice of the teacher-student interaction. Here we pave the path to develop a science that explores the cognitive and physiological processes involved in the human capacity to communicate knowledge through teaching. We review examples from our…

  6. Teacher-Student Interaction, Empathy and Their Influence on Learning in Swimming Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lémonie, Yannick; Light, Richard; Sarremejane, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The bulk of interest in the role that interaction plays in learning in sport and physical education (PE) has focused on peer interaction at the expense of teacher-student interaction. This article redresses this imbalance in the literature by reporting on a study that inquired into the nature of teacher-student interaction and its effect on…

  7. Interpersonal Interactions in Instrumental Lessons: Teacher/Student Verbal and Non-Verbal Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, Katie

    2013-01-01

    This study examined verbal and non-verbal teacher/student interpersonal interactions in higher education instrumental music lessons. Twenty-four lessons were videotaped and teacher/student behaviours were analysed using a researcher-designed instrument. The findings indicate predominance of student and teacher joke among the verbal behaviours with…

  8. Beginning and experienced secondary school teachers' self- and student schema in positive and problematic teacher-student relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, Luce|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357401530; van Tartwijk, Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/112629385; Pennings, Heleen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323242588; van der Want, Anna; Verloop, Nico; den Brok, Perry; Wubbels, Theo|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070651361

    2016-01-01

    The quality of teacher-student relationships is important for teachers' well-being in schools. In this interview study we investigated which cognitions comprise secondary school teachers' self- and student schema in positive and problematic teacher-student relationships. Frequency analyses of these

  9. Who Is Controlling the Interaction? The Effect of Nonverbal Mirroring on Teacher-Student Rapport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang-yuan, Zhou; Wei, Guo

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of nonverbal mirroring on teacher-student rapport in one-on-one interactions. Nonverbal mirroring refers to the unconscious mimicry of the postures, mannerisms, facial expressions, and other behaviors of one's interaction partner in social interactions. In a within-subjects paradigm, students had four…

  10. Interrogation in Teacher-Student Interaction in Bahasa Indonesia Learning at Elementary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akmal Hamsa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Interrogation in Teacher-Student Interaction in Bahasa Indonesia Learning at Elementary School. This study aimed to describe the form, function, and questioning strategies teachers in teacher-student interrogation in Bahasa Indonesia learning in elementary school. Data sourced from four teacher of elementary school, SDN Tamangapa and SD Inpres Tamangapa. Data were obtained by (1 recording, (2 documentation, (3 field notes, (4 interview. The results showed that: (1 the form of questioning the teacher in the teacher-student interaction in Bahasa Indonesia learning in primary schools generally examined the low-level thinking skills, (2 functions of teacher questions are generally intended to check student understanding, and (3 teachers utilize a variety of strategies in addressing student answers correctly and the apparent hesitation. Some disadvantages are indicated teachers in providing interrogation.

  11. To What Extent Do Teacher-Student Interaction Quality and Student Gender Contribute to Fifth Graders' Engagement in Mathematics Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Baroody, Alison E.; Larsen, Ross A. A.; Curby, Timothy W.; Abry, Tashia

    2015-01-01

    This study examines concurrent teacher-student interaction quality and 5th graders' (n = 387) engagement in mathematics classrooms (n = 63) and considers how teacher-student interaction quality relates to engagement differently for boys and girls. Three approaches were used to measure student engagement in mathematics: Research assistants observed…

  12. Analysis of Learning Achievement and Teacher-Student Interactions in Flipped and Conventional Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jerry Chih-Yuan; Wu, Yu-Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of two different teaching methods on learning effectiveness. OpenCourseWare was integrated into the flipped classroom model (experimental group) and distance learning (control group). Learning effectiveness encompassed learning achievement, teacher-student interactions, and learning satisfaction.…

  13. Towards a Pedagogy of Humanizing Child Education in Terms of Teacher-Student Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yi-Huang

    2018-01-01

    By reading and analyzing related studies, this article investigates methods for humanizing child education in terms of teacher-student interaction. It is hoped that this study will allow teachers to understand the essence of child education, to become better educators and humanizing child education, so that students can develop a healthy body and…

  14. Perceived positive teacher-student relationship as a protective factor for Chinese left-behind children's emotional and behavioural adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Li, Xiaowei; Chen, Li; Qu, Zhiyong

    2015-10-01

    Using cross-sectional data collected in rural communities of two provinces of China, this study examined the protective role of perceived positive teacher-student relationship for Chinese left-behind children. The participants included 1442 children with a mean age of 14.13 classified into two groups: a left-behind group (104 boys and 110 girls) and a comparison group (588 boys and 640 girls). Self-reported questionnaires concerning self-esteem, depression, problem behaviours and the teacher-student relationship were administered. Relative to the comparison group, after controlling for age, gender and family socioeconomic status, the left-behind group was disadvantaged in terms of self-esteem and depression but not in problem behaviours. As hypothesised, the results of regression analyses indicated that teacher-student relationship positively predicted self-esteem and negatively predicted depression and problem behaviours for both groups. Moreover, the association between teacher-student relationship and depression was stronger among the left-behind group, suggesting that left-behind children were more responsive to the positive effect of a desired teacher-student relationship. Taken together, the results of our study support the idea that perceived positive teacher-student relationship may serve as a protective factor for left-behind children. Practical implications and limitations of the present study are discussed. © 2014 International Union of Psychological Science.

  15. Motivation and engagement in mathematics: a qualitative framework for teacher-student interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durksen, Tracy L.; Way, Jennifer; Bobis, Janette; Anderson, Judy; Skilling, Karen; Martin, Andrew J.

    2017-02-01

    We started with a classic research question (How do teachers motivate and engage middle year students in mathematics?) that is solidly underpinned and guided by an integration of two theoretical and multidimensional models. In particular, the current study illustrates how theory is important for guiding qualitative analytical approaches to motivation and engagement in mathematics. With little research on how teachers of mathematics are able to maintain high levels of student motivation and engagement, we focused on developing a qualitative framework that highlights the influence of teacher-student interactions. Participants were six teachers (upper primary and secondary) that taught students with higher-than-average levels of motivation and engagement in mathematics. Data sources included one video-recorded lesson and associated transcripts from pre- and post-lesson interviews with each teacher. Overall, effective classroom organisation stood out as a priority when promoting motivation and engagement in mathematics. Results on classroom organisation revealed four key indicators within teacher-student interactions deemed important for motivation and engagement in mathematics—confidence, climate, contact, and connection. Since much of the effect of teachers on student learning relies on interactions, and given the universal trend of declining mathematical performance during the middle years of schooling, future research and intervention studies might be assisted by our qualitative framework.

  16. On the Connectivity of Wireless Network Systems and an Application in Teacher-Student Interactive Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Ge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A wireless network system is a pair (U;B, where B is a family of some base stations and U is a set of their users. To investigate the connectivity of wireless network systems, this paper takes covering approximation spaces as mathematical models of wireless network systems. With the help of covering approximation operators, this paper characterizes the connectivity of covering approximation spaces by their definable subsets. Furthermore, it is obtained that a wireless network system is connected if and only if the relevant covering approximation space has no nonempty definable proper subset. As an application of this result, the connectivity of a teacher-student interactive platform is discussed, which is established in the School of Mathematical Sciences of Soochow University. This application further demonstrates the usefulness of rough set theory in pedagogy and makes it possible to research education by logical methods and mathematical methods.

  17. Identified Phases in the Building and Maintaining of Positive Teacher-Student Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Teacher-student relationships are accepted as influential but the dynamics of those relationships are not well understood, especially with difficult students. A series of interviews were combined with classroom observations and written reflections to understand in what ways a teacher negotiated her relationship with a behaviorally challenging…

  18. Teacher-student interaction in contemporary science classrooms: is participation still a question of gender?†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Nina; Sørensen, Helene; Göran Karlsson, Karl

    2016-07-01

    We show that boys still have a greater access to the space for interaction in science classrooms, which is unexpected since in Sweden today girls perform better in these subjects than boys. Results from video-recorded verbal communication, referred to here as interaction, show that the distribution of teacher-student interaction in the final year of lower secondary school follows the same patterns as in the 1980s. The interaction space for all kinds of talk continues to be distributed according to the two-thirds rule for communication in science classrooms as described by previous research. We also show that the overall interaction space in science classrooms has increased for both boys and girls when talk about science alone is considered. Another finding which follows old patterns is that male teachers still address boys more often than girls. This holds true both for general talk and for talk about science. If a more even distribution of teacher-student interaction is desirable, these results once again need to be considered. More research needs to be undertaken before the association between girls' attitudes and interest in science in terms of future career choice and the opportunity to participate in teacher-student interaction is more clearly understood. Research conducted at Mid Sweden University, Department of Science Education and Mathematics.

  19. The influence of fidelity of implementation on teacher-student interaction quality in the context of a randomized controlled trial of the Responsive Classroom approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abry, Tashia; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Larsen, Ross A; Brewer, Alexis J

    2013-08-01

    This study examined the direct and indirect effects between training in the Responsive Classroom® (RC) approach, teachers' uptake of RC practices, and teacher-student interaction quality, using a structural equation modeling framework. A total of 24 schools were randomly assigned to experimental or control conditions. Third- and fourth-grade teachers in treatment schools (n=132) received training in the RC approach, whereas teachers in control schools (n=107) continued "business as usual." Observers rated teachers' fidelity of implementation (FOI) of RC practices 5 times throughout the year using the Classroom Practices Observation Measure. In addition, teachers completed self-report measures of FOI, the Classroom Practices Teacher Survey and Classroom Practices Frequency Survey, at the end of the school year. Teacher-student interactions were rated during classroom observations using the Classroom Assessment Scoring System. Controlling for teachers' grade level and teacher-student interaction quality at pretest, RC training was expected to predict posttest teacher-student interaction quality directly and indirectly through FOI. Results supported only a significant indirect effect, β=0.85, p=.002. Specifically, RC teachers had higher levels of FOI of RC practices, β=1.62, pteacher-student interaction quality, β=0.52, p=.001, R2=.32. Discussion highlights factors contributing to variability in FOI and school administrators roles in supporting FOI. Copyright © 2013 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Opportunities and Challenges of Implementing Instructional Games in Mathematics Classrooms: Examining the Quality of Teacher-Student Interactions during the Cover-Up and Un-Cover Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshmati, Saeideh; Kersting, Nicole; Sutton, Taliesin

    2018-01-01

    This study explored the design and implementation of the Cover-up and Un-cover games, two manipulative-based fraction games, in 14 fifth-grade classrooms. We examined how the fraction concepts were integrated into the game design and explored the nature of teacher-student interactions during games using lesson videos. Our examination showed that…

  1. The Classroom as a Developmental Context for Cognitive Development: A Meta-Analysis on the Importance of Teacher-Student Interactions for Children's Executive Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, Loren; Spilt, Jantine; Verschueren, Karine; Piccinin, Claire; Baeyens, Dieter

    2018-01-01

    Executive functions (EFs), important cognitive processes that enable goal-directed behavior, develop due to maturation and environmental stimulation. The current study systematically reviews and synthesizes evidence on the association between teacher-student interactions and EFs. The search resulted in 28 studies, from which 23 studies provided…

  2. Establishing Scientific Discourse in Classroom Interaction Teacher Students' Orientation to Mundane versus Technical Talk in the School Subject Norwegian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovholt, Karianne

    2018-01-01

    This article reports a case study on classroom interaction in teacher education in Norway. It addresses how teacher students in the school subject Norwegian constitute scientific talk in a student-led discussion. First, the analysis reveals tension in the classroom conversation between "mundane talk"--that is, where students make claims…

  3. Teacher-Student Relationships and L2 Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Alastair; Thorsen, Cecilia

    2018-01-01

    Positive relationships with teachers are important for students' second language motivation. However, little is known about how interpersonal interactions stimulate motivated behavior. Drawing on studies of teacher-student relationships, theories from positive psychology, and the psychology of unconscious self-regulation, this case study examines…

  4. Technology and Teacher-Student Interactions: A Review of Empirical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Ben

    2018-01-01

    As technology becomes ubiquitous in education, it is critical to understand the ways in which technology influences interactions between teachers and their students. The overarching research question that guided this systematic review was: What does research tell us about how technology influences interactions between teachers and students in K-12…

  5. Teacher-Student Interactions: Four Case Studies of Gender in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kathryn; Nicaise, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to better understand gender interactions between teachers and students in high school physical education. Gender interactions were explored in relation to the theory of reflective practice. Interview data were examined as four case studies using individual and cross-case inductive analysis. Two common themes emerged: (a)…

  6. Epistemological Models of the Teacher-Students Interaction in Academic Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavoruk, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    This study deals with the most popular forms of the classroom communication related to the scientific cognitive models. The teachers tend to use simple intuitive models to describe the teaching issues: "Bucket theory"; "Knowledge floodlight"; "Interaction"; "Rationalism"; "Criticism";…

  7. Phenomena of Inter-age Manipulations in Interaction "Teacher-Student"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklyaeva A.V.,

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thearticlepresentsthe results of studies of the phenomenon empirical inter-age manipulation in the pedagogical interaction. Inter-age manipulation is considered a form of manipulation carried out on the basis of an appeal to the participants in the interaction age roles. Based on the results of a survey 109 teenagers 13-15 years, using a questionnaire, color test of relations and projective drawing shows that inter-age manipulation is a common way to impact on the students, elected teacher. Teachers are the subjects of inter-age manipulation more often than students. It was revealed that the effectiveness of inter-age manipulation in pedagogical interaction increases if it is meaningful is consistent with the normative content of age roles, as well as «inter-age distance" between the teacher and the students. The greatest effectiveness of have inter-age manipulation undertaken for older teachers, and manipulation "from below" from young teachers

  8. Contradictory Explorative Assessment. Multimodal Teacher/Student Interaction in Scandinavian Digital Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjällander, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    Assessment in the much-discussed digital divide in Scandinavian technologically advanced schools, is the study object of this article. Interaction is studied to understand assessment; and to see how assessment can be didactically designed to recognise students' learning. With a multimodal, design theoretical perspective on learning teachers' and…

  9. Do student self-efficacy and teacher-student interaction quality contribute to emotional and social engagement in fifth grade math?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Daniel P; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E

    2015-10-01

    This study examined (a) the contribution of math self-efficacy to students' perception of their emotional and social engagement in fifth grade math classes, and (b) the extent to which high quality teacher-student interactions compensated for students' low math self-efficacy in contributing to engagement. Teachers (n = 73) were observed three times during the year during math to measure the quality of teacher-student interactions (emotional, organizational, and instructional support). Fifth graders (n = 387) reported on their math self-efficacy at the beginning of the school year and then were surveyed about their feelings of engagement in math class three times during the year immediately after the lessons during which teachers were observed. Results of multi-level models indicated that students initially lower in math self-efficacy reported lower emotional and social engagement during math class than students with higher self-efficacy. However, in classrooms with high levels of teacher emotional support, students reported similar levels of both emotional and social engagement, regardless of their self-efficacy. No comparable findings emerged for organizational and instructional support. The discussion considers the significance of students' own feelings about math in relation to their engagement, as well as the ways in which teacher and classroom supports can compensate for students lack of agency. The work has implications for school psychologists and teachers eager to boost students' engagement in math class. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Teacher-student interactions and domain-specific motivation: The relationship between students' perceptions of teacher interpersonal behavior and motivation in middle school science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Julie Brockman

    2009-11-01

    This study examined interactions between middle school science students' perceptions of teacher-student interactions and their motivation for learning science. Specifically, in order to better understand factors affecting middle school students' motivation for science, this study investigated the interactions between middle school students' perceptions of teacher interpersonal behavior in their science classroom and their efficacy, task value, mastery orientations, and goal orientation for learning science. This mixed methods study followed a sequential explanatory model (Cresswell & Plano-Clark, 2007). Quantitative and qualitative data were collected in two phases, with quantitative data in the first phase informing the selection of participants for the qualitative phase that followed. The qualitative phase also helped to clarify and explain results from the quantitative phase. Data mixing occurred between Phase One and Phase Two (participant selection) and at the interpretation level (explanatory) after quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed separately. Results from Phase One indicated that students' perceptions of teacher interpersonal behaviors were predictive of their efficacy for learning science, task value for learning science, mastery orientation, and performance orientation. These results were used to create motivation/perception composites, which were used in order to select students for the qualitative interviews. A total of 24 students with high motivation/high perceptions, low motivation/low perceptions, high motivation/low perceptions, and low motivation/high perceptions were selected in order to represent students whose profiles either supported or refuted the quantitative results. Results from Phase Two revealed themes relating to students' construction of their perceptions of teacher interpersonal behavior and dimensions of their efficacy and task value for science. Students who reported high motivation and high perceptions of teacher-student

  11. Are All Program Elements Created Equal? Relations Between Specific Social and Emotional Learning Components and Teacher-Student Classroom Interaction Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abry, Tashia; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Curby, Timothy W

    2017-02-01

    School-based social and emotional learning (SEL) programs are presented to educators with little understanding of the program components that have the greatest leverage for improving targeted outcomes. Conducted in the context of a randomized controlled trial, the present study used variation in treatment teachers' (N = 143) implementation of four core components of the Responsive Classroom approach to examine relations between each component and the quality of teachers' emotional, organizational, and instructional interactions in third, fourth, and fifth grade classrooms (controlling for pre-intervention interaction quality and other covariates). We also examined the extent to which these relations varied as a function of teachers' baseline levels of interaction quality. Indices of teachers' implementation of Morning Meeting, Rule Creation, Interactive Modeling, and Academic Choice were derived from a combination of teacher-reported surveys and classroom observations. Ratings of teacher-student classroom interactions were aggregated across five observations conducted throughout the school year. Structural path models indicated that teachers' use of Morning Meeting and Academic Choice related to higher levels of emotionally supportive interactions; Academic Choice also related to higher levels of instructional interactions. In addition, teachers' baseline interaction quality moderated several associations such that the strongest relations between RC component use and interaction quality emerged for teachers with the lowest baseline interaction quality. Results highlight the value of examining individual program components toward the identification of program active ingredients that can inform intervention optimization and teacher professional development.

  12. The Effects of Reciprocal Imitation on Teacher-Student Relationships and Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiangyuan

    2012-01-01

    Neuroscientific and developmental psychological research in imitation has yielded important insights into building teacher-student relationships and enhancing students' learning. This study investigated the effects of reciprocal imitation on teacher-student relationships and students' learning outcomes in one-on-one teacher-student interactions.…

  13. Using State Space Grids to analyze the dynamics of teacher-student interactions in foreign language classrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Nienke; de Bot, Cornelis; van de Grift, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Many scholars have stressed the importance of the role of interaction in the language learning process (Kramsch, 1986; Van Lier, 1996; Ellis, 2000; Walsh, 2011). However, studies on classroom interaction between foreign language (FL) teachers and a group of FL learners are rare, because they are

  14. Teacher-student interpersonal behaviour in the Turkish primary to higher education context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telli, S.; Brok, den P.J.; Wubbels, T.; Brok, den P.J.; Tartwijk, van J.; Levy, J.

    2012-01-01

    Teacher- student interactions are relevant in many teaching and learning processes in the classroom. The literature consistently provides support for the premise that high-quality teacher-student relationships are an important factor in effective teaching. Teachers’ behaviours as perceived by

  15. Seeing Eye to Eye: Predicting Teacher-Student Agreement on Classroom Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Jennifer Watling; Cappella, Elise; Wagner, Caroline; Atkins, Marc S.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the association between classroom characteristics and teacher-student agreement in perceptions of students’ classroom peer networks. Social network, peer nomination, and observational data were collected from a sample of second through fourth grade teachers (N=33) and students (N=669) in 33 classrooms across five high poverty urban schools. Results demonstrate that variation in teacher-student agreement on the structure of students’ peer networks can be explained, in part, by developmental factors and classroom characteristics. Developmental increases in network density partially mediated the positive relationship between grade level and teacher-student agreement. Larger class sizes and higher levels of normative aggressive behavior resulted in lower levels of teacher-student agreement. Teachers’ levels of classroom organization had mixed influences, with behavior management negatively predicting agreement, and productivity positively predicting agreement. These results underscore the importance of the classroom context in shaping teacher and student perceptions of peer networks. PMID:21666768

  16. The Teacher-Student Communication Pattern: A Need to Follow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hashamdar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is intended to investigate the teacher-student communication patterns in an upperintermediate English class. There are major questions in this study; (a what the nature of interaction is in a foreign language classroom, (b what the characteristics of teacher-student turn taking are, (c what type of feedback is taken by the teacher, (d how the teacher's competence and performance are. The participants of the study are female adult students and a female teacher majoring English literature at MA level that has had five years of teaching experience. Five partial
    sessions of the class are recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. According to the findings, the type of discourse is teacher-initiated one and the question type is both WH-questions and questions with auxiliaries. The way of student's reply is brief and limited to one teacher-student turn-taking. The type of interaction is based on the questions posed by the teacher and long interaction such as discussing, debating, and challenging could rarely be seen in the classroom in question. The type of
    feedback depending on the skill and tasks dealt with, ranging from recast to direct correction. The teacher's competence and performance are satisfactory with correct pronunciation and near native accent.

  17. The Teacher-Student Communication Pattern: A Need to Follow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hashamdar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is intended to investigate the teacher-student communication patterns in an upper-intermediate English class. There are major questions in this study; (a what the nature ofinteraction is in a foreign language classroom, (b what the characteristics of teacher-student turn taking are, (c what type of feedback is taken by the teacher, (d how the teacher's competence and performance are. The participants of the study are female adult students and a female teacher majoring English literature at MA level that has had five years of teaching experience. Five partial sessions of the class are recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. According to the findings, the type of discourse is teacher-initiated one and the question type is both WH-questions and questions with auxiliaries. The way of student's reply is brief and limited to one teacher-student turn-taking. The type of interaction is based on the questions posed by the teacher and long interaction such as discussing, debating, and challenging could rarely be seen in the classroom in question. The type of feedback depending on the skill and tasks dealt with, ranging from recast to direct correction. The teacher's competence and performance are satisfactory with correct pronunciation and near native accent.

  18. Efficient Interaction Recognition through Positive Action Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel approach to decompose two-person interaction into a Positive Action and a Negative Action for more efficient behavior recognition. A Positive Action plays the decisive role in a two-person exchange. Thus, interaction recognition can be simplified to Positive Action-based recognition, focusing on an action representation of just one person. Recently, a new depth sensor has become widely available, the Microsoft Kinect camera, which provides RGB-D data with 3D spatial information for quantitative analysis. However, there are few publicly accessible test datasets using this camera, to assess two-person interaction recognition approaches. Therefore, we created a new dataset with six types of complex human interactions (i.e., named K3HI, including kicking, pointing, punching, pushing, exchanging an object, and shaking hands. Three types of features were extracted for each Positive Action: joint, plane, and velocity features. We used continuous Hidden Markov Models (HMMs to evaluate the Positive Action-based interaction recognition method and the traditional two-person interaction recognition approach with our test dataset. Experimental results showed that the proposed recognition technique is more accurate than the traditional method, shortens the sample training time, and therefore achieves comprehensive superiority.

  19. PEER INTERACTIONS AND POSITIVE STUDENT-LECTURER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper sets out to interrogate the role played by peer interactions in the teaching and learning of College Algebra in a classroom setting. It also explores the impact of positive student-lecturer relationship on teaching and learning of College Algebra at the university level and the general improvement of student ...

  20. POSITIVE INTERACTION IN AN INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: MANIFESTATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL CHILD DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME (ICDP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Alamdar oglu Suleymanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Kind relation between a child and caregiver (parent, teacher is a critically vital point for psychological development of children. Better relations also contribute to the child’s healthy growth and intellectual, social and emotional development. Fundamental caregiving skills function as particularly important contribution to the quality and effectiveness all caregiving. In order to facilitate full development of a child, it is important that the caregiver have a positive conception of the child. In other words, a caregiver should regard a child as a person with potential for development. From this perspective International Child Development Programme (ICDP functions as a resource-based communication and mediation approach which trains caregiver to develop a positive conception of their children and gain wider and deeper insight and confidence about their responsibilities and roles. Based on the themes of ICDP, the current research studied the quality of positive interaction between teacher assistants (TA and children with special needs (CSN in an inclusive primary education in Azerbaijan. The findings suggest that some elements of ICDP approach exist in teacher-student interaction. However, these interaction patterns are unprofessional and need development through relevant in-service trainings. Methods. In this research a case study design of qualitative research was used to investigate teacher assistants’ (TA understanding of positive attitude and how they establish positive relations with the students with special needs whom they take care of. As for the research method, the case study will adopt triangulation, a multiple methods of data collection which will include interview and observation to extend confidence in its validity and improve the quality of the data and accuracy of the findings. Results. Comparative analyses of triangulation data demonstrate that TAs’ performance within the context of teacher-student positive

  1. An interactive beam position monitor system simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, W.A.; Shea, T.J.

    1993-03-01

    A system simulator has been implemented to aid the development of the RHIC position monitor system. Based on the LabVIEW software package by National Instruments, this simulator allows engineers and technicians to interactively explore the parameter space of a system during the design phase. Adjustable parameters are divided into three categories: beam, pickup, and electronics. The simulator uses these parameters in simple formulas to produce results in both time-domain and frequencydomain. During the prototyping phase, these simulated results can be compared to test data acquired with the same software package. The RHIC position monitor system is presented as an example, but the software is applicable to several other systems as well

  2. Associations between teacher-student interpersonal behaviour and student attitude to mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Darrell; Rickards, Tony

    1998-04-01

    This article reports on research using a convenient questionnaire designed to allow mathematics teachers to assess teacher-student interpersonal behaviour in their classrooms. The various forms of the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI) are discussed, and its use in past research is summarised. The article provides validation data for the first use of the QTI with a large sample of mathematics classrooms and examines the relation of teacher-student interpersonal behaviour to student attitude. It also describes how mathematics teachers can and have used the questionnaire to assess perceptions of their own teacher-student interpersonal behaviour, and how they have used such assessments as a basis for reflecting on their own teaching. The QTI may thus provide a basis for systematic attempts to improve one's own teaching practice.

  3. Reconceptualizing Teacher-Student Relationships to Foster School Success: Working Alliance within Classroom Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toste, Jessica R.

    2012-01-01

    Teacher-student relationship has been shown to be a powerful predictor of students' classroom and school adjustment. Beyond the characteristics of warmth, trust, and bond that define an emotional connection, a positive working relationship also includes a sense of collaboration and partnership shared between the teacher and the student. Classroom…

  4. Interchangeable Positions in Interaction Sequences in Science Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Rees

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Triadic dialogue, the Initiation, Response, Evaluation sequence typical of teacher /student interactions in classrooms, has long been identified as a barrier to students’ access to learning, including science learning. A large body of research on the subject has over the years led to projects and policies aimed at increasing opportunities for students to learn through interactive dialogue in classrooms. However, the triadic dialogue pattern continues to dominate, even when teachers intend changing this. Prior quantitative research on the subject has focused on identifying independent variables such as style of teacher questioning that have an impact, while qualitative researchers have worked to interpret the use of dialogue within the whole context of work in the classroom. A recent paper offers an alternative way to view the triadic dialogue pattern and its origin; the triadic dialogue pattern is an irreducible social phenomenon that arises in a particular situation regardless of the identity of the players who inhabit the roles in the turn-taking sequence (Roth & Gardner, 2012. According to this perspective, alternative patterns of dialogue would exist which are alternative irreducible social phenomena that arise in association with different situations. The aim of this paper is to examine as precisely as possible, the characteristics of dialogue patterns in a seventh-eighth grade classroom during science inquiry, and the precise situations from which these dialogue patterns emerge, regardless of the staffing (teacher or students in the turn-taking sequence. Three different patterns were identified each predominating in a particular situation. This fine-grained analysis could offer valuable insights into ways to support teachers working to alter the kinds of dialogue patterns that arise in their classrooms.

  5. Positive expectations encourage generalization from a positive intergroup interaction to outgroup attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Matthew P; Hehman, Eric; Gaertner, Samuel L; Dovidio, John F

    2015-01-01

    The current research reveals that while positive expectations about an anticipated intergroup interaction encourage generalization of positive contact to outgroup attitudes, negative expectations restrict the effects of contact on outgroup attitudes. In Study 1, when Blacks and Whites interacted with positive expectations, interaction quality predicted outgroup attitudes to a greater degree than when groups interacted with negative expectations. When expectations (Studies 2 and 3) and the actual interaction quality (Study 4) were manipulated orthogonally, negative expectations about the interaction predicted negative outgroup attitudes, regardless of actual interaction quality. By contrast, participants holding positive expectations who experienced a positive interaction expressed positive outgroup attitudes, whereas when they experienced a negative interaction, they expressed outgroup attitudes as negative as those with negative expectations. Across all four studies, positive expectations encouraged developing outgroup attitudes consistent with interaction quality. © 2014 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  6. Teacher wellbeing: the importance of teacher-student relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spilt, J.L.; Koomen, H.M.Y.; Thijs, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have examined the importance of teacher-student relationships for the development of children. Much less is known, however, about how these relationships impact the professional and personal lives of teachers. This review considers the importance of teacher-student relationships for the

  7. A Knowledge Base For Teachers on Teacher-Student Relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubbels, T.

    2017-01-01

    Teacher-student relationships are an important factor in effective learning environments and of specific importance in multicultural classrooms. This chapter presents some of the findings of a research programme that studied for more than 30 years teacher-student relationships. We first summarise

  8. Teacher-student contact : Exploring a basic but complicated concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korthagen, Fred A J; Attema-Noordewier, Saskia; Zwart, Rosanne C.

    2014-01-01

    Contact is fundamental to teacher-student relationships, but empirical studies or theoretical frameworks on teacher-student contact are rare. This article describes a theoretical and empirical exploration aimed at building such a framework. In two studies using classroom observations and interviews

  9. Teacher Student Control Ideology and Burnout: Their Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, Gokhan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the correlation between elementary teachers' student control ideologies and their perceived burnout levels and to determine to what extent teachers' student control ideologies predict their burnout. Three hundred and seventy-six teachers from 12 elementary schools in Nigde, Turkey participated in the study.…

  10. Interactive video instruction - Establishing a positive alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schillinger, F.J.; McCulloch, B.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses The New York Power Authority's (NYPA's) efforts to establish and implement a viable interactive video instruction program to provide an alternative to traditional instructor-led classroom training. The NYPA training department was looking for alternative methods of providing adequate training for a new apprenticeship program being developed for its nonnuclear plant employees. They were also looking for another way to provide cost-effective basic computer training for an ever-increasing number of company computer users. Interactive video instruction was selected because it offered an interesting and fresh approach to self-paced learning. The paper describes problems associated with startup, implementation, and administration, benefits expected, and obtaining college accreditation

  11. Routes to positive interracial interactions: approaching egalitarianism or avoiding prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, E Ashby; Devine, Patricia G; Peruche, Michelle B

    2010-09-01

    The current work examined factors that contribute to positive interracial interactions. It argues that the source of people's motivation to respond without prejudice and the goals and strategies they pursue in interracial interactions influence the quality of these interactions. Three studies show that non-Black participants who are highly internally motivated to respond without prejudice tend to focus on strategies and behaviors in interactions with Black people that approach a positive (i.e., egalitarian) outcome. As a result of engaging in these approach behaviors, their interracial interactions go more smoothly for both themselves and their interaction partners as compared to people less internally motivated. In contrast, externally motivated people tend to focus on avoiding negative (i.e., prejudiced) outcomes, which ironically results in their coming across to their partners as prejudiced. The implications of the findings for smoothing out the rocky road to positive intergroup interactions are discussed.

  12. Relational interaction in occupational therapy: Conversation analysis of positive feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiste, Elina

    2018-01-01

    The therapeutic relationship is an important factor for good therapy outcomes. The primary mediator of a beneficial therapy relationship is clinician-client interaction. However, few studies identify the observable interactional attributes of good quality relational interactions, e.g. offering the client positive feedback. The present paper aims to expand current understanding of relational interaction by analyzing the real-time interactional practices therapists use for offering positive feedback, an important value in occupational therapy. The analysis is based on the conversation analysis of 15 video-recorded occupational therapy encounters in psychiatric outpatient clinics. Two types of positive feedback were identified. In aligning feedback, therapists encouraged and complimented clients' positive perspectives on their own achievements in adopting certain behaviour, encouraging and supporting their progress. In redirecting feedback, therapists shifted the perspective from clients' negative experiences to their positive experiences. This shift was interactionally successful if they laid the foundation for the shift in perspective and attuned their expressions to the clients' emotional states. Occupational therapists routinely provide their clients with positive feedback. Awareness of the interactional attributes related to positive feedback is critically important for successful relational interaction.

  13. Chinese students' perceptions of teacher-student interpersonal behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, M.; Zhou, Yalun; Barber, C. E.; Brok, den P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Students' perceptions are one of the most important elements in evaluating the learning environment. Although the literature is replete with studies investigating teacher-student interpersonal behavior in science classrooms, relatively few studies have been conducted in foreign language classrooms,

  14. Ubiquitous Mobile Educational Data Management by Teachers, Students and Parents: Does Technology Change School-Family Communication and Parental Involvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Ina; Hameiri, Mira

    2017-01-01

    Digital educational data management has become an integral part of school practices. Accessing school database by teachers, students, and parents from mobile devices promotes data-driven educational interactions based on real-time information. This paper analyses mobile access of educational database in a large sample of 429 schools during an…

  15. Planning Together: Positive Classroom Environments. Diversity in the Classroom Series, Number Four.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Doug

    This document, the fourth in a series on diversity in the classroom, supports the belief that challenges faced by teachers working with diverse students can only be met through teacher practices that increase levels of positive teacher-student interaction and that create, in each student, effective social and problem solving skills. Section 1,…

  16. Classroom processes and positive youth development: conceptualizing, measuring, and improving the capacity of interactions between teachers and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianta, Robert C; Hamre, Bridget K

    2009-01-01

    The National Research Council's (NRC) statement and description of features of settings that have value for positive youth development have been of great importance in shifting discourse toward creating programs that capitalize on youth motivations toward competence and connections with others. This assets-based approach to promote development is consistent with the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) framework for measuring and improving the quality of teacher-student interactions in classroom settings. This chapter highlights the similarities between the CLASS and NRC systems and describes the CLASS as a tool for standardized measurement and improvement of classrooms and their effects on children. It argues that the next important steps to be taken in extending the CLASS and NRC frameworks involve reengineering assessments of teacher and classroom quality and professional development around observations of teachers' performance. This might include using observations in policies regarding teacher quality or a "highly effective teacher" that may emanate from the reauthorization of No Child Left Behind and moving away from a course or workshop mode of professional development to one that ties supports directly to teachers' practices in classroom settings.

  17. Reference Resolution in Multi-modal Interaction: Position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernando, T.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2002-01-01

    In this position paper we present our research on multimodal interaction in and with virtual environments. The aim of this presentation is to emphasize the necessity to spend more research on reference resolution in multimodal contexts. In multi-modal interaction the human conversational partner can

  18. Teacher-student Relationship and SNS-mediated Communication: Perceptions of both role-players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnon Hershkovitz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Teacher-student relationships are vital for academic and social development of students, for teachers’ professional and personal development, and for having a supportive learning environment. In the digital age, these relationships can extend beyond bricks and mortar and beyond school hours. Specifically, these relationships are extended today while teachers and students communicate via social networking sites (SNS. This paper characterizes differences between teachers (N=160 and students (N=587 who are willing to connect with their students/teachers via Facebook and those who do not wish to connect. The quantitative research reported here within is based on data collection of personal characteristics, attitudes towards Facebook, and perceptions of teacher-student relationship. Findings suggest differences in characteristics of the two groups (willing to connect vs. not willing to connect within both populations (teachers and students. Also, in both populations, those who were willing to connect, compared to those who were not willing to connect, present more positive attitudes towards using Facebook for teaching/learning and are more opposed to a banning policy of student-teacher SNS-based communication. We also found that students who were willing to connect showed a greater degree of closeness with their teachers compared to those who were not willing to connect. This study may assist policymakers when setting up regulations regarding teacher-student communication via social networking sites.

  19. Social interaction anxiety and the discounting of positive interpersonal events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilopoulos, Stephanos P; Banerjee, Robin

    2010-10-01

    Recent research has indicated that individuals with social interaction anxiety make biased interpretations of positive social interactions, with greater general apprehension in response to such events and more negative predictions about the future. There has also been some preliminary evidence for a second facet of interpretation bias, namely a failure to accept others' positive reactions at face value, but this has so far not been adequately studied. The present study developed a new measure of this "discounting" dimension and utilized a nonclinical sample of undergraduate students to provide an initial analysis of the scale. Results provide early support for the psychometric properties of our scale, and indicate that discounting mediates the relationship between social interaction anxiety and low positive affect, over and above the previously studied aspect of positive event interpretation bias. The implications for treatment interventions and further research are discussed.

  20. Interactions between electrons in the field of a positive ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heideman, A.G.M.; Eck, J. van.

    1976-01-01

    Recent studies on the (auto)ionization of atoms by means of electron-atom collisions reveal the existence of phenomena probably brought about by post-collision interactions in the vicinity of a positive ion. In this article, a review of the subject is given in relation to the research program of the Utrecht atomic physics group

  1. Education facilities and motivation of teachers & students at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Education facilities and motivation of teachers & students at correction centers: the case of Goba, Delomena and Sheshamene Oromia in Ethiopia. ... Goba Correction School had better education services. More specifically ... Keywords: Correction Centers, prison, education, teachers' and students' motivation, Ethiopia ...

  2. Reported and Unreported Teacher-Student Sexual Harassment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishnietsky, Dan H.

    1991-01-01

    Study surveyed North Carolina school superintendents (n=140) and high school seniors (n=300) on the extent of teacher-student sexual harassment. Data revealed discrepancies between the number of teachers disciplined for student sexual harassment and the number of students claiming harassment. Presents a structure for establishing guidelines to…

  3. Neuro-Linguistic Programming: Enhancing Teacher-Student Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, John H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Defines Neurolinguistic Programming (NCP) and discusses specific dimensions of the model that have applications for classroom teaching. Describes five representational systems individuals use to process information and gives examples of effective and ineffective teacher-student communication for each system. (MCF)

  4. MDMA alters emotional processing and facilitates positive social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, Margaret C; de Wit, Harriet

    2014-10-01

    ±3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") produces "prosocial" effects, such as feelings of empathy and closeness, thought to be important to its abuse and its value in psychotherapy. However, it is not fully understood how MDMA alters basic emotional processes to produce these effects, or whether it produces corresponding changes in actual social behavior. Here, we examined how MDMA affects perceptions of and responses to emotional expressions, and tested its effects on behavior during a social interaction. We also examined whether MDMA's prosocial effects related to a measure of abuse liability. Over three sessions, 36 healthy volunteers with previous ecstasy use received MDMA (0.75, 1.5 mg/kg) and placebo under double-blind conditions. We measured (i) mood and cardiovascular effects, (ii) perception of and psychophysiological responses to emotional expressions, (iii) use of positive and negative words in a social interaction, and (iv) perceptions of an interaction partner. We then tested whether these effects predicted desire to take the drug again. MDMA slowed perception of angry expressions, increased psychophysiological responses to happy expressions, and increased positive word use and perceptions of partner empathy and regard in a social interaction. These effects were not strongly related to desire to take the drug again. MDMA alters basic emotional processes by slowing identification of negative emotions and increasing responses to positive emotions in others. Further, it positively affects behavior and perceptions during actual social interaction. These effects may contribute to the efficacy of MDMA in psychotherapy, but appear less closely related to its abuse potential.

  5. Magnetic interactions, bonding, and motion of positive muons in magnetite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boekema, C.; Lichti, R.L.; Brabers, V.A.M.; Denison, A.B.; Cooke, D.W.; Heffner, R.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Leon, M.; Schillaci, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    Positive-muon behavior in magnetite is investigated by the muon-spin-rotation technique. The observed muon relaxation rate in zero applied field, in conjunction with the measured local field, allows us to separate muon-motion effects from phase transitions associated with magnetite. The local magnetic field is observed to be 4.02 kOe directed along the axis, the easy axis of magnetization. Possible origins of this field are discussed in terms which include local muon diffusion and a supertransfer hyperfine interaction resulting from muon-oxygen bonding. An anomaly in the muon hyperfine interactions is observed at 247 K

  6. No praise, please: Depressive symptoms, reactivity to positive social interaction, and fear of positive evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenberger, Julia; Wiggert, Nicole; Agroskin, Dmitrij; Wilhelm, Frank H; Blechert, Jens

    2017-03-01

    Depression is characterized by depressed mood and loss of interest or pleasure. Resulting alterations in emotional reactivity have been explained by three different accounts: 'positive attenuation', 'negative potentiation', and 'emotion context insensitivity'. Despite the importance of depression-related emotional alteration in social interactions, research with naturalistic interpersonal stimuli is scarce and underlying mechanisms largely unknown. Hence, the present study examined subjective emotional reactivity to brief negative, positive, and neutral social-evaluative videos as a function of depressive symptoms in an adult sample (N = 84). Fear of positive evaluation (FPE) and fear of negative evaluation (FNE), often conceptualized as cognitive components of social anxiety, were examined as possible mediators. Results revealed that more depression symptoms were related to diminished pleasantness responses to both positive and neutral videos. When considering all three video conditions simultaneously, only responses to positive videos remained significantly related to depression scores, supporting the 'positive attenuation' account. Moreover, FPE was found to uniquely mediate the relationship between depressive symptoms and pleasantness responses to positive videos. Results indicate that emotional reactivity to positive interpersonal stimuli is relevant for theoretical and clinical considerations of depression. This research underlines the importance of FPE not only for understanding social anxiety but also depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. ENERGETIC PHOTON AND ELECTRON INTERACTIONS WITH POSITIVE IONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaneuf, Ronald A. [UNR

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this research is a deeper understanding of the complex multi-electron interactions that govern inelastic processes involving positive ions in plasma environments, such as those occurring in stellar cares and atmospheres, x-ray lasers, thermonuclear fusion reactors and materials-processing discharges. In addition to precision data on ionic structure and transition probabilities, high resolution quantitative measurements of ionization test the theoretical methods that provide critical input to computer codes used for plasma modeling and photon opacity calculations. Steadily increasing computational power and a corresponding emphasis on simulations gives heightened relevance to precise and accurate benchmark data. Photons provide a highly selective probe of the internal electronic structure of atomic and molecular systems, and a powerful means to better understand more complex electron-ion interactions.

  8. Teacher-Student Interactions in Desegregated Classrooms in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeyar, Saloshna; Killen, Roy

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the state of desegregation and integration in South African schools 11 years after the demise of Apartheid. Three classrooms in three desegregating schools with different histories and race profiles were visited. Overall, each classroom was visited on 10 occasions over a period of 2 weeks. Direct observation was the main data…

  9. Monitoring the beam position in the SLC interaction region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denard, J.C.; Bowden, G.B.; Oxoby, G.J.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Ross, M.C.

    1987-03-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider requires special Beam Position Monitors near the Interaction Point (IP) to bring the two beams (e/sup +/ and e/sup -/) into collision. These beams pass through two monitors on each side of the IP with a short time separation (about 20 and 50 ns). The mechanics of the monitors as well as the electronics will be described. In order to bring beams of several microns diameter into collision at the IP, these monitors measure beam deflection induced by the presence of the opposite beam.

  10. Monitoring the beam position in the SLC interaction region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denard, J.C.; Bowden, G.B.; Oxoby, G.J.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Ross, M.C.

    1987-03-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider requires special Beam Position Monitors near the Interaction Point (IP) to bring the two beams (e + and e - ) into collision. These beams pass through two monitors on each side of the IP with a short time separation (about 20 and 50 ns). The mechanics of the monitors as well as the electronics will be described. In order to bring beams of several microns diameter into collision at the IP, these monitors measure beam deflection induced by the presence of the opposite beam

  11. Monitoring the beam position in the SLC interaction region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denard, J.C.; Bowden, G.B.; Oxoby, G.J.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Ross, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider requires special Beam Position Monitors near the Interaction Point (IP) to bring the two beams (e/sup +/ and /sup e-/) into collision. These beams pass through two monitors on each side of the IP with a short time separation (about 20 and 50ns). The mechanics of the monitors as well as the electronics will be described. In order to bring beams of several microns diameter into collision at the IP, these monitors measure beam deflection induced by the presence of the opposite beam

  12. Predicting Drug-Target Interactions Based on Small Positive Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pengwei; Chan, Keith C C; Hu, Yanxing

    2018-01-01

    A basic task in drug discovery is to find new medication in the form of candidate compounds that act on a target protein. In other words, a drug has to interact with a target and such drug-target interaction (DTI) is not expected to be random. Significant and interesting patterns are expected to be hidden in them. If these patterns can be discovered, new drugs are expected to be more easily discoverable. Currently, a number of computational methods have been proposed to predict DTIs based on their similarity. However, such as approach does not allow biochemical features to be directly considered. As a result, some methods have been proposed to try to discover patterns in physicochemical interactions. Since the number of potential negative DTIs are very high both in absolute terms and in comparison to that of the known ones, these methods are rather computationally expensive and they can only rely on subsets, rather than the full set, of negative DTIs for training and validation. As there is always a relatively high chance for negative DTIs to be falsely identified and as only partial subset of such DTIs is considered, existing approaches can be further improved to better predict DTIs. In this paper, we present a novel approach, called ODT (one class drug target interaction prediction), for such purpose. One main task of ODT is to discover association patterns between interacting drugs and proteins from the chemical structure of the former and the protein sequence network of the latter. ODT does so in two phases. First, the DTI-network is transformed to a representation by structural properties. Second, it applies a oneclass classification algorithm to build a prediction model based only on known positive interactions. We compared the best AUROC scores of the ODT with several state-of-art approaches on Gold standard data. The prediction accuracy of the ODT is superior in comparison with all the other methods at GPCRs dataset and Ion channels dataset. Performance

  13. The bonobo-dialium positive interactions: seed dispersal mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaune, David; Bretagnolle, François; Bollache, Loïc; Hohmann, Gottfried; Surbeck, Martin; Bourson, Chloé; Fruth, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    A positive interaction is any interaction between individuals of the same or different species (mutualism) that provides a benefit to both partners such as increased fitness. Here we focus on seed dispersal mutualism between an animal (bonobo, Pan paniscus) and a plant (velvet tamarind trees, Dialium spp.). In the LuiKotale rainforest southwest of Salonga National Park, Democratic Republic of Congo, seven species of the genus Dialium account for 29.3% of all trees. Dialium is thus the dominant genus in this forest. Dialium fruits make up a large proportion of the diet of a habituated bonobo community in this forest. During the 6 months of the fruiting season, more than half of the bonobos' feeding time is devoted to Dialium fruits. Furthermore, Dialium fruits contribute a considerable proportion of sugar and protein to bonobos' dietary intake, being among the richest fruits for these nutrients. Bonobos in turn ingest fruits with seeds that are disseminated in their feces (endozoochory) at considerable distances (average: 1.25 km after 24 hr of average transit time). Endozoochory through the gut causes loss of the cuticle protection and tegumentary dormancy, as well as an increase in size by water uptake. Thus, after gut passage, seeds are better able to germinate. We consider other primate species as a potential seed disperser and conclude that Dialium germination is dependent on passage through bonobo guts. This plant-animal interaction highlights positive effects between two major organisms of the Congo basin rainforest, and establishes the role of the bonobo as an efficient disperser of Dialium seeds. Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A symmetric positive definite formulation for monolithic fluid structure interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Robinson-Mosher, Avi; Schroeder, Craig; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a strongly coupled (monolithic) fluid structure interaction framework for incompressible flow, as opposed to a loosely coupled (partitioned) method. This requires solving a single linear system that combines the unknown velocities of the structure with the unknown pressures of the fluid. In our previous work, we were able to obtain a symmetric formulation of this coupled system; however, it was also indefinite, making it more difficult to solve. In fact in practice there have been cases where we have been unable to invert the system. In this paper we take a novel approach that consists of factoring the damping matrix of deformable structures and show that this can be used to obtain a symmetric positive definite system, at least to the extent that the uncoupled systems were symmetric positive definite. We use a traditional MAC grid discretization of the fluid and a fully Lagrangian discretization of the structures for the sake of exposition, noting that our procedure can be generalized to other scenarios. For the special case of rigid bodies, where there are no internal damping forces, we exactly recover the system of Batty et al. (2007) [4]. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  15. A symmetric positive definite formulation for monolithic fluid structure interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Robinson-Mosher, Avi

    2011-02-01

    In this paper we consider a strongly coupled (monolithic) fluid structure interaction framework for incompressible flow, as opposed to a loosely coupled (partitioned) method. This requires solving a single linear system that combines the unknown velocities of the structure with the unknown pressures of the fluid. In our previous work, we were able to obtain a symmetric formulation of this coupled system; however, it was also indefinite, making it more difficult to solve. In fact in practice there have been cases where we have been unable to invert the system. In this paper we take a novel approach that consists of factoring the damping matrix of deformable structures and show that this can be used to obtain a symmetric positive definite system, at least to the extent that the uncoupled systems were symmetric positive definite. We use a traditional MAC grid discretization of the fluid and a fully Lagrangian discretization of the structures for the sake of exposition, noting that our procedure can be generalized to other scenarios. For the special case of rigid bodies, where there are no internal damping forces, we exactly recover the system of Batty et al. (2007) [4]. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  16. Proteins interacting with cloning scars: a source of false positive protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Charles A S; Boanca, Gina; Lee, Zachary T; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P

    2015-02-23

    A common approach for exploring the interactome, the network of protein-protein interactions in cells, uses a commercially available ORF library to express affinity tagged bait proteins; these can be expressed in cells and endogenous cellular proteins that copurify with the bait can be identified as putative interacting proteins using mass spectrometry. Control experiments can be used to limit false-positive results, but in many cases, there are still a surprising number of prey proteins that appear to copurify specifically with the bait. Here, we have identified one source of false-positive interactions in such studies. We have found that a combination of: 1) the variable sequence of the C-terminus of the bait with 2) a C-terminal valine "cloning scar" present in a commercially available ORF library, can in some cases create a peptide motif that results in the aberrant co-purification of endogenous cellular proteins. Control experiments may not identify false positives resulting from such artificial motifs, as aberrant binding depends on sequences that vary from one bait to another. It is possible that such cryptic protein binding might occur in other systems using affinity tagged proteins; this study highlights the importance of conducting careful follow-up studies where novel protein-protein interactions are suspected.

  17. Teacher students' dilemmas when teaching science through inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Philipp; Nessler, Stefan H.; Schlüter, Kirsten

    2015-09-01

    Background: Inquiry-based science education (IBSE) is suitable to teach scientific contents as well as to foster scientific skills. Similar conclusions are drawn by studies with respect to scientific literacy, motivational aspects, vocabulary knowledge, conceptual understandings, critical thinking, and attitudes toward science. Nevertheless, IBSE is rarely adopted in schools. Often barriers for teachers account for this lack, with the result that even good teachers struggle to teach science as inquiry. More importantly, studies indicate that several barriers and constraints could be ascribed to problems teacher students have at the university stage. Purpose: The purpose of this explorative investigation is to examine the problems teacher students have when teaching science through inquiry. In order to draw a holistic picture of these problems, we identified problems from three different points of view leading to the research question: What problems regarding IBSE do teacher students have from an objective, a subjective, and a self-reflective perspective? Design & method: Using video analysis and observation tools as well as qualitative content analysis and open questionnaires we identified problems from each perspective. Results: The objectively stated problems comprise the lack of essential features of IBSE especially concerning 'Supporting pupils' own investigations' and 'Guiding analysis and conclusions.' The subjectively perceived problems comprise concerns about 'Teachers' abilities' and 'Pupils' abilities,' 'Differentiated instruction' and institutional frame 'Conditions' while the self-reflectively noticed problems mainly comprise concerns about 'Allowing inquiry,' 'Instructional Aspects,' and 'Pupils' behavior.' Conclusions: Each of the three different perspectives provides plenty of problems, partially overlapping, partially complementing one another, and partially revealing completely new problems. Consequently, teacher educators have to consider these

  18. The importance of teacher-student interpersonal relationships for Turkish students' attitudes towards science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telli, Sibel; den Brok, Perry; Cakiroglu, Jale

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine associations between Turkish high school students' perceptions of their science teachers' interpersonal behaviour and their attitudes towards science. Students' perceptions of the teacher-student interpersonal relationship were mapped with the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI), which uses two relational dimensions: influence and proximity. Data on Students' subject-related attitudes were collected with the Test of Science Related Attitudes (TOSRA). A total of 7484 students (Grades 9 to 11) from 278 science classes (55 public schools) in 13 major Turkish cities participated in the study. Multilevel analyses of variance indicated that influence was related with student enjoyment, while proximity was associated with attitudes towards inquiry and with enjoyment.

  19. Positive interaction of social comparison and personal responsibility for outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygolec, Jaroslaw; Coricelli, Giorgio; Rustichini, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    We formulate and test a model that allows sharp separation between two different ways in which environment affects evaluation of outcomes, by comparing social vs. private and personal responsibility vs. chance. In the experiment, subjects chose between two lotteries, one low-risk and one high-risk. They could then observe the outcomes. By varying the environment between private (they could observe the outcome of the chosen lottery and the outcome of the lottery they had not chosen) and social (they could observe the outcome of the lottery chosen by another subject) we can differentiate the response and brain activity following the feedback in social and private settings. The evidence suggests that envy and pride are significant motives driving decisions and outcomes evaluation, stronger than private emotions like regret and rejoice, with ventral striatum playing a key role. When we focus on the outcome evaluation stage we demonstrate that BOLD signal in ventral striatum is increasing in the difference between obtained and counterfactual payoffs. For a given difference in payoffs, striatal responses are more pronounced in social than in private environment. Moreover, a positive interaction (complementarity) between social comparison and personal responsibility is reflected in the pattern of activity in the ventral striatum. At decision stage we observe getting ahead of the Joneses effect in ventral striatum with subjective value of risk larger in social than in private environment.

  20. An Empirical Study on New Teacher-Student Relationship and Questioning Strategies in ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zuosheng

    2012-01-01

    Teacher-student relationship and questioning strategies are extremely crucial elements in English teaching and learning. Questioning strategies can influence learners' emotional changes in classroom and the relationship between teachers & students. The affective factors play a very important role in language teaching & learning.…

  1. Teacher-Student Interpersonal Relationships and Academic Motivation within One School Year: Developmental Changes and Linkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Maulana, Ridwan; den Brok, Perry

    2012-01-01

    The present study explored the developmental changes of teacher-student interpersonal relationships as well as that of academic motivation among first-grade secondary school students. In addition, the link between teacher-student interpersonal behaviour and academic motivation across the school year was investigated. The data were collected 5…

  2. The Protective Role of Teacher-Student Relationships against Peer Victimization and Psychosocial Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkowski, Michael L.; Simmons, Jessica

    2018-01-01

    This study examined whether teacher-student relationships protect against peer victimization and its negative psychosocial effects (i.e., depression, anxiety, and stress). Additionally, the influence of teacher-student relationships, peer relationships, and students' perceptions of school order and discipline was investigated as these variables…

  3. Teacher-student interpersonal relationships and academic motivation within one school year : developmental changes and linkage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Maulana, Ridwan; den Brok, Perry

    The present study explored the developmental changes of teacher-student interpersonal relationships as well as that of academic motivation among first-grade secondary school students. In addition, the link between teacher-student interpersonal behaviour and academic motivation across the school year

  4. Job Satisfaction and Teacher-Student Relationships across the Teaching Career: Four Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldman, Ietje; van Tartwijk, Jan; Brekelmans, Mieke; Wubbels, Theo

    2013-01-01

    We studied the development of teacher-student relationships and teachers' job satisfaction throughout the careers of four veteran teachers who retained high job satisfaction. Teacher data gathered with the narrative-biographical method were compared with students' perceptions of the teacher-student relationships, using the Questionnaire on Teacher…

  5. Job satisfaction and teacher-student relationships across the teaching career : Four case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, Ietje; van Tartwijk, Jan; Brekelmans, Mieke; Wubbels, Theo

    2013-01-01

    We studied the development of teacher-student relationships and teachers' job satisfaction throughout the careers of four veteran teachers who retained high job satisfaction. Teacher data gathered with the narrative-biographical method were compared with students' perceptions of the teacher-student

  6. Interaction between gaze and visual and proprioceptive position judgements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiehler, Katja; Rösler, Frank; Henriques, Denise Y P

    2010-06-01

    There is considerable evidence that targets for action are represented in a dynamic gaze-centered frame of reference, such that each gaze shift requires an internal updating of the target. Here, we investigated the effect of eye movements on the spatial representation of targets used for position judgements. Participants had their hand passively placed to a location, and then judged whether this location was left or right of a remembered visual or remembered proprioceptive target, while gaze direction was varied. Estimates of position of the remembered targets relative to the unseen position of the hand were assessed with an adaptive psychophysical procedure. These positional judgements significantly varied relative to gaze for both remembered visual and remembered proprioceptive targets. Our results suggest that relative target positions may also be represented in eye-centered coordinates. This implies similar spatial reference frames for action control and space perception when positions are coded relative to the hand.

  7. Negative, neutral, and positive interactions among nonnative plants: patterns, processes, and management implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuebbing, Sara E; Nuñez, Martin A

    2015-02-01

    The movement of species is one of the most pervasive forms of global change, and few ecosystems remain uninvaded by nonnative species. Studying species interactions is crucial for understanding their distribution and abundance, particularly for nonnative species because interactions may influence the probability of invasion and consequent ecological impact. Interactions among nonnatives are relatively understudied, though the likelihood of nonnative species co-occurrence is high. We quantify and describe the types of interactions among nonnative plants and determine what factors affect interaction outcomes for ecosystems globally. We reviewed 65 studies comprising 201 observations and recorded the interaction type, traits of the interacting species, and study characteristics. We conducted a census of interaction types and a meta-analysis of experiments that tested nonnative competition intensity. Both methods showed that negative and neutral interactions prevailed, and a number of studies reported that the removal of a dominant nonnative led to competitive release of other nonnatives. Positive interactions were less frequently reported and positive mean effect sizes were rare, but the plant characteristics nitrogen fixation, life cycle (annual or perennial), and functional group significantly influenced positive interactions. Positive interactions were three times more frequent when a neighboring nonnative was a nitrogen fixer and 3.5 times lower when a neighboring nonnative was an annual. Woody plants were two or four times more likely to have positive interactions relative to grasses or herbs, respectively. The prevalence of negative interactions suggests that managers should prepare for reinvasion of sites when treating dominant nonnatives. Though positive interactions were infrequent, managers may be able to anticipate positive interactions among nonnatives based upon traits of the co-occurring invaders. Predicting positive nonnative interactions is an

  8. The Implementation of Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK based Guided Inquiry on Science Teacher Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Tunjung Biru

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is examining the learning of Integrated Sciences through PCK based guided inquiry on prospective science teacher students. This research method was descriptive qualitative involving 33 science teacher students who taking Integrated Science 1 Subject in academic year 2016/2017. The research instrument used was the observation sheet to know the implementation PCK based guided inquiry. The results showed that the implementation of the activities of lecturer and science teacher students during the learning process using PCK based guided inquiry was very good conducted.

  9. Magnetic interactions, bonding, and motion of positive muons in magnetite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, C.; Lichti, R.L.; Brabers, V.A.M.; Denison, A.B.; Cooke, D.W.; Heffner, R.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Leon, M.; Schillaci, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    Positive-muon behavior in magnetite is investigated by the muon-spin-rotation technique. The observed muon relaxation rate in zero applied field, in conjunction with the measured local field, allows us to separate muon-motion effects from phase transitions associated with magnetite. The local

  10. A Numerical Study on Hydrodynamic Interactions between Dynamic Positioning Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Doo Hwa; Lee, Sang Wook [University of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this study, we conducted computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for the unsteady hydrodynamic interaction of multiple thrusters by solving Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A commercial CFD software, STAR-CCM+ was used for all simulations by employing a ducted thruster model with combination of a propeller and No. 19a duct. A sliding mesh technique was used to treat dynamic motion of propeller rotation and non-conformal hexahedral grid system was considered. Four different combinations in tilting and azimuth angles of the thrusters were considered to investigate the effects on the propulsion performance. We could find that thruster-hull and thruster-thruster interactions has significant effect on propulsion performance and further study will be required for the optimal configurations with the best tilting and relative azimuth angle between thrusters.

  11. Positive technology–A powerful partnership between positive psychology and interactive technology. A discussion of potential and challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Diefenbach

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Under the umbrella term "positive computing" concepts of positive psychology are transferred to the domain of human-computer interaction (HCI. In an interdisciplinary community psychologist, computer scientists, designers and others are exploring promising ways how to utilize interactive technology to support wellbeing and human flourishing. Along with this, the recent popularity of smartphone apps aiming at the improvement of health behavior, mindfulness and positive routines, suggests the general acceptance of technology as a facilitator of personal development. Given this, there generally seems a high potential for a technology mediated trigger of positive behavior change, especially in context of positive psychology and resource oriented approaches such as solution-focused coaching. At the same time, there is still a lack of well-founded approaches to design such technology which consider its responsible role as an "interactive coach" and systematically integrate the needed expertise of different disciplines. The present article discusses the general potential and particular challenges to support the goals of positive psychology and human desire for self-improvement through interactive technology and highlights critical steps for a successful partnership between both.

  12. Teacher-student relationship climate and school outcomes: implications for educational policy initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barile, John P; Donohue, Dana K; Anthony, Elizabeth R; Baker, Andrew M; Weaver, Scott R; Henrich, Christopher C

    2012-03-01

    In recent discussions regarding concerns about the academic achievement of US students, educational policy makers have suggested the implementation of certain teacher policies. To address the limited empirical research on the putative educational impact of such policies, this study used multilevel structural equation models to investigate the longitudinal associations between teacher evaluation and reward policies, and student mathematics achievement and dropout with a national sample of students (n = 7,779) attending one of 431 public high schools. The student sample included an equal number of boys and girls averaging 16 years of age, and included a White (53%) majority. This study examined whether associations between teacher policies and student achievement were mediated by the teacher-student relationship climate. Results of this study were threefold. First, teacher evaluation policies that allowed students to evaluate their teachers were associated with more positive student reports of the classroom teaching climate. Second, schools with teacher reward policies that included assigning higher performing teachers with higher performing students had a negative association with student perceptions of the teaching climate. Lastly, schools with better student perceptions of the teaching climate were associated with lower student dropout rates by students' senior year. These findings are discussed in light of their educational policy implications.

  13. Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Technology to Study Vector-Pathogen-Host Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0175 TITLE: Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Technology to Study Vector-Pathogen-Host Interactions PRINCIPAL...Positioning Systems (GPS) Technology to Study Vector-Pathogen-Host Interactions 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0175 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...genetic diversity in the population, in hospitalized children with severe dengue illness and cluster investigation of their neighborhoods, and by using

  14. Influencing appraisals of emotional valence with spatial touchscreen interactions: An embodied approach to Positive Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Cervera Torres, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Could bodily interactions with touchscreen interfaces influence users´s affective experiences? The present dissertation investigates, from an embodied perspective, the potential of touchscreen interfaces as "positive technologies". Positive Technology is an emergent research area within the fields of Cyberpsychology and Human-Computer Interaction interested in examining and promote the quality of user´s affective experiences. However, despite touchscreens enable the manipulation of digital co...

  15. Positive indirect interactions between neighboring plant species via a lizard pollinator.

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, D M; Kiesbüy, H C; Jones, C G; Müller, C B

    2007-01-01

    In natural communities, species are embedded in networks of direct and indirect interactions. Most studies on indirect interactions have focused on how they affect predator-prey or competitive relationships. However, it is equally likely that indirect interactions play an important structuring role in mutualistic relationships in a natural community. We demonstrate experimentally that on a small spatial scale, dense thickets of endemic Pandanus plants have a strong positive trait-mediated ind...

  16. Promoting Learner Autonomy Through Teacher-Student Partnership Assessment in an American High School: A Cycle of Action Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Picón Jácome

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article I present some findings of an action research study intended to find out to what extent a teacher-student partnership in writing assessment could promote high school students’ autonomy. The study was conducted in a U.S. school. Two main action strategies in the assessment process were the use of symbols as the form of feedback and the design of a rubric containing criteria negotiated with the students as the scoring method. Results showed that the students developed some autonomy reflected in three dimensions: ownership of their learning process, metacognition, and critical thinking, which positively influenced an enhancement of their writing skills in both English and Spanish. Likewise, the role of the teacher was found to be paramount to set appropriate conditions for the students’ development of autonomy.

  17. The Perceived Credibility of Scientific Claims, Paranormal Phenomena, and Miracles among Primary Teacher Students: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keranto, Tapio

    2001-01-01

    Presents data collected concerning scientific, religious, and magic-occult connections from Finnish, Estonian, and Michigan primary teacher students to answer questions such as Do we find any differences between the credibility estimates?, Are there any differences between primary teacher students raised in different societies and educated in…

  18. How pre-service teachers' personality traits, self-efficacy, and discipline strategies contribute to the teacher-student relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Romi; Mainhard, Tim|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30483517X; van Tartwijk, Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/112629385; Veldman, Ietje; Verloop, Nico; Wubbels, Theo|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070651361

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although the teacher-student relationship is a well-documented phenomenon, few attempts have been made to identify its predictors. Research has mainly focused on in-service teachers, less is known about characteristics of pre-service teachers in relation to the teacher-student

  19. Day-to-day Consistency in Positive Parent-Child Interactions and Youth Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippold, Melissa A; Davis, Kelly D; Lawson, Katie M; McHale, Susan M

    2016-12-01

    The frequency of positive parent-child interactions is associated with youth adjustment. Yet, little is known about daily parent-child interactions and how day-to-day consistency in positive parent-child interactions may be linked to youth well-being. Using a daily diary approach, this study added to this literature to investigate whether and how day-to-day consistency in positive parent-child interactions was linked to youth depressive symptoms, risky behavior, and physical health. Participants were youth whose parents were employed in the IT division of a Fortune 500 company ( N = 129, youth's mean age = 13.39, 55 % female), who participated in an 8 day daily diary study. Analyses revealed that, controlling for cross-day mean levels of positive parent-child interactions, older (but not younger) adolescents who experienced more consistency in positive interactions with parents had fewer depressive and physical health symptoms (e.g., colds, flu). The discussion focuses on the utility of daily diary methods for assessing the correlates of consistency in parenting, possible processes underlying these associations, and intervention implications.

  20. Positioning Theory and Discourse Analysis: Some Tools for Social Interaction Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Tirado

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines positioning theory as a discursive analysis of interaction, focusing on the topic of conflict. Moreover, said theory is applied to a new work environment for the social sciences: virtual spaces. The analysis is organized in the following way. First, the major key psychosocial issues which define the topic of conflict are reviewed. Then, virtual environments are presented as a new work space for the social sciences. Thirdly, a synthesis of positioning theory and its FOUCAULTian legacy is conducted, while appreciating its particular appropriateness for analyzing conflictive interaction in virtual environments. An empiric case is then presented. This consists of an analysis of interactive sequences within a specific virtual environment: the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC Humanitats i Filologia Catalana studies forum. Through positioning theory, the production and effects that a conflictive interaction sequence has on the community in which it is produced are understood and explained. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0702317

  1. Expressing and Amplifying Positive Emotions Facilitate Goal Attainment in Workplace Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Elena; Tschan, Franziska; Messerli, Laurence; Semmer, Norbert K.

    2013-01-01

    Expressing emotions has social functions; it provides information, affects social interactions, and shapes relationships with others. Expressing positive emotions could be a strategic tool for improving goal attainment during social interactions at work. Such effects have been found in research on social contagion, impression management, and emotion work. However, expressing emotions one does not feel entails the risk of being perceived as inauthentic. This risk may well be worth taking when the emotions felt are negative, as expressing negative emotions usually has negative effects. When experiencing positive emotions, however, expressing them authentically promises benefits, and the advantage of amplifying them is not so obvious. We postulated that expressing, and amplifying, positive emotions would foster goal attainment in social interactions at work, particularly when dealing with superiors. Analyses are based on 494 interactions involving the pursuit of a goal by 113 employes. Multilevel analyses, including polynomial analyses, show that authentic display of positive emotions supported goal attainment throughout. However, amplifying felt positive emotions promoted goal attainment only in interactions with superiors, but not with colleagues. Results are discussed with regard to the importance of hierarchy for detecting, and interpreting, signs of strategic display of positive emotions. PMID:23675358

  2. Expressing and amplifying positive emotions facilitate goal attainment in workplace interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eWong

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Expressing emotions has social functions; it provides information, affects social interactions, and shapes relationships with others. Expressing positive emotions could be a strategic tool for improving goal attainment during social interactions at work. Such effects have been found in research on social contagion, impression management, and emotion work. However, expressing emotions one does not feel entails the risk of being perceived as inauthentic. This risk may well be worth taking when the emotions felt are negative, as expressing negative emotions usually has negative effects. When experiencing positive emotions, however, expressing them authentically promises benefits, and the advantage of amplifying them is not so obvious. We postulated that expressing, and amplifying, positive emotions would foster goal attainment in social interactions at work, particularly when dealing with superiors. Analyses are based on 494 interactions involving the pursuit of a goal by 113 employees. Multilevel analyses, including polynomial analyses, show that authentic display of positive emotions supported goal attainment throughout. However, amplifying felt positive emotions promoted goal attainment only in interactions with superiors, but not with colleagues. Results are discussed with regard to the importance of hierarchy for detecting, and interpreting, signs of strategic display of positive emotions.

  3. Tomorrow's engineers through teacher/student programs at Penn State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, C.

    1992-01-01

    Interest in math and science increases when the problems and topics are current and socially relevant. A course that integrates various sciences requires a solid foundation in mathematics and an understanding that real life consists of an interaction of the basic sciences. One topical area that requires the understanding of math and science and affects our society is radiation. Although nuclear issues are prevalent in the news, very few secondary science educators receive much formal training in radiation and nuclear science. A strong push for educational programs on this topic by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and state departments of education began in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Through this effort, Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) developed the Nuclear Concepts Institute for secondary science teachers and has continued its involvement with educational programs in nuclear science for teachers and students. From discussions with teachers and students along with formal and informal surveys, the programs have had a positive impact on teachers' interest in learning more about nuclear science and on students' choices to enter nuclear engineering or a related field. The paper discusses the Nuclear Concepts Program; formation of the American Nuclear Science Teachers Association (ANSTA); ANSTA projects; other Penn State educational programs; and impact of education programs

  4. On the duality between interaction responses and mutual positions in flocking and schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Andrea; Grégoire, Guillaume; Mann, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in animal behaviour has contributed to determine how alignment, turning responses, and changes of speed mediate flocking and schooling interactions in different animal species. Here, we propose a complementary approach to the analysis of flocking phenomena, based on the idea that animals occupy preferential, anysotropic positions with respect to their neighbours, and devote a large amount of their interaction responses to maintaining their mutual positions. We test our approach by deriving the apparent alignment and attraction responses from simulated trajectories of animals moving side by side, or one in front of the other. We show that the anisotropic positioning of individuals, in combination with noise, is sufficient to reproduce several aspects of the movement responses observed in real animal groups. This anisotropy at the level of interactions should be considered explicitly in future models of flocking and schooling. By making a distinction between interaction responses involved in maintaining a preferred flock configuration, and interaction responses directed at changing it, our work provides a frame to discriminate movement interactions that signal directional conflict from interactions underlying consensual group motion.

  5. Teacher-student interpersonal relationships do change and affect academic motivation: a multilevel growth curve modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulana, Ridwan; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Bosker, Roel

    2014-09-01

    Research has shown that the teacher-student interpersonal relationship (TSIR) is important for student motivation. Although TSIR has received a growing interest, there are only few studies that focus on changes and links between TSIR and student academic motivation in a longitudinal fashion in non-Western contexts. This study investigated changes in TSIR and links with academic motivation as perceived by first-grade secondary school students in Indonesia. TSIR was studied from the perspective of interpersonal behaviour in terms of Influence and Proximity. Students' academic motivation was studied from the perspective of self-determination theory. A total of 504 first-grade secondary school students of 16 mathematics and English classes participated in the study. Surveys were administered in five waves throughout the school year. Multilevel growth curve modelling was applied. Contrary to the (limited) general research findings from Western contexts, we found that the quality of TSIR (student perceptions) increased over time. The increase was slightly more pronounced for Proximity than for Influence. In accordance with the findings for the Western countries, the level of students' controlled motivation increased, while that of autonomous motivation decreased over time. However, the negative change in autonomous motivation was less pronounced. As in Western countries, TSIR was longitudinally linked with academic motivation, in particular, with autonomous motivation. Evidence is found that TSIR can change in a favourable way, and this positively affects student motivation. Future research could benefit from unravelling the influences of cultures on changes in TSIR in broader contexts. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  6. Careers in Industrial Sewing for the Apparel Manufacturing Industry: Teacher-Student Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Apparel Manufacturers Association, Arlington, VA. Education Committee.

    The teacher-student guide has been developed as a service to schools in an effort to help them organize and operate meaningful courses in apparel manufacturing. For the school it furnishes practical information in implementing the course, such as facility design, equipment requirements, and teacher selection. For the teacher it provides a…

  7. School Belonging of Adolescents: The Role of Teacher-Student Relationships, Peer Relationships and Family Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslu, Fatma; Gizir, Sidika

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which teacher-student relationships, peer relationships, and family involvement can be used to predict a sense of school belonging among adolescents, according to gender. The sample of the study consists of 815 students enrolled in nine state primary schools in the central districts of Mersin, Turkey. The data was…

  8. "I Can See You": An Autoethnography of My Teacher-Student Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Erika Franca de Souza

    2011-01-01

    This article is an autoethnographic investigation of my second-nature teacher-student self. What has made me into the teacher I am? What makes me the teacher I am? I draw upon my memories of my own teachers and students to address these questions. As I portray my teaching-learning experiences as textual "snapshots," I find that my dearest memories…

  9. Preferred teacher-student interpersonal behaviour: Differences between Polish primary and higher education students' perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sztejnberg, A.; Brok, den P.J.; Hurek, J.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated differences between students’ perceptions of their best teachers in primary and higher education in Poland. Teacher behavior was conceptualized in terms of the teacher-student interpersonal relationship and described in terms of eight behavioral sectors – leadership,

  10. Longitudinal and Contextual Associations between Teacher-Student Relationships and Student Engagement: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quin, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This systematic review examined multiple indicators of adolescent students' engagement in school, and the indicators' associations with teacher-student relationships (TSRs). Seven psychology, education, and social sciences databases were systematically searched. From this search, 46 published studies (13 longitudinal) were included for detailed…

  11. Teacher-student relationships from a motivational perspective : The importance of involved and supportive teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdenakker, M. C. J. L.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, teacher-student relationships are approached from a motivational perspective. Theoretical underpinnings come from Self-determination theory. Basic assumptions and central concepts of this theory are discussed. The meaning of this theory to the educational context, here

  12. Educational Hospitality and Trust in Teacher-Student Relationships: A Derridarian Visiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ruyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the meaning of teacher-student relationships in the light of Derrida's notions of hospitality and trust. Drawing on Derrida, the author delineates two aspects of educational hospitality: hospitality without determinacy and hospitality as self-surrender. It is argued that educational hospitality is underpinned by trust. A sound…

  13. Interspecific neighbor interactions promote the positive diversity-productivity relationship in experimental grassland communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhua Zhang

    Full Text Available Because the frequency of heterospecific interactions inevitably increases with species richness in a community, biodiversity effects must be expressed by such interactions. However, little is understood how heterospecific interactions affect ecosystem productivity because rarely are biodiversity ecosystem functioning experiments spatially explicitly manipulated. To test the effect of heterospecific interactions on productivity, direct evidence of heterospecific neighborhood interaction is needed. In this study we conducted experiments with a detailed spatial design to investigate whether and how heterospecific neighborhood interactions promote primary productivity in a grassland community. The results showed that increasing the heterospecific: conspecific contact ratio significantly increased productivity. We found there was a significant difference in the variation in plant height between monoculture and mixture communities, suggesting that height-asymmetric competition for light plays a central role in promoting productivity. Heterospecific interactions make tall plants grow taller and short plants become smaller in mixtures compared to monocultures, thereby increasing the efficiency of light interception and utilization. Overyielding in the mixture communities arises from the fact that the loss in the growth of short plants is compensated by the increased growth of tall plants. The positive correlation between species richness and primary production was strengthened by increasing the frequency of heterospecific interactions. We conclude that species richness significantly promotes primary ecosystem production through heterospecific neighborhood interactions.

  14. Interspecific neighbor interactions promote the positive diversity-productivity relationship in experimental grassland communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuhua; Wang, Yongfan; Yu, Shixiao

    2014-01-01

    Because the frequency of heterospecific interactions inevitably increases with species richness in a community, biodiversity effects must be expressed by such interactions. However, little is understood how heterospecific interactions affect ecosystem productivity because rarely are biodiversity ecosystem functioning experiments spatially explicitly manipulated. To test the effect of heterospecific interactions on productivity, direct evidence of heterospecific neighborhood interaction is needed. In this study we conducted experiments with a detailed spatial design to investigate whether and how heterospecific neighborhood interactions promote primary productivity in a grassland community. The results showed that increasing the heterospecific: conspecific contact ratio significantly increased productivity. We found there was a significant difference in the variation in plant height between monoculture and mixture communities, suggesting that height-asymmetric competition for light plays a central role in promoting productivity. Heterospecific interactions make tall plants grow taller and short plants become smaller in mixtures compared to monocultures, thereby increasing the efficiency of light interception and utilization. Overyielding in the mixture communities arises from the fact that the loss in the growth of short plants is compensated by the increased growth of tall plants. The positive correlation between species richness and primary production was strengthened by increasing the frequency of heterospecific interactions. We conclude that species richness significantly promotes primary ecosystem production through heterospecific neighborhood interactions.

  15. Employees' negative and positive work-home interaction and their association with depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzsche, Anika; Jung, Julia; Pfaff, Holger; Driller, Elke

    2013-05-01

    Depression is the leading cause of disability and high costs worldwide. One possibility for preventing depression in the workplace, which has received little consideration so far, is the promotion of a successful balance between work and personal life. The aim of this study was to investigate employees' negative and positive work-home interaction and their association with depressive symptoms. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the micro- and nanotechnology sector in Germany. A stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed using data from N = 213 employees. The results suggest that while negative work-home interaction is associated with an increased risk for depressive symptoms, positive work-home interaction is correlated with a lower risk. Neither positive nor negative interaction in the home-to-work direction demonstrated a significant association with depressive symptoms. When attempting to prevent mental illnesses, such as depression, it is important to develop strategies aimed at reducing conflict between work and personal life and promoting a positive exchange between these two domains. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Coevolution between positive reciprocity, punishment, and partner switching in repeated interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wubs, Matthias; Bshary, Redouan; Lehmann, Laurent

    2016-06-15

    Cooperation based on mutual investments can occur between unrelated individuals when they are engaged in repeated interactions. Individuals then need to use a conditional strategy to deter their interaction partners from defecting. Responding to defection such that the future payoff of a defector is reduced relative to cooperating with it is called a partner control mechanism. Three main partner control mechanisms are (i) to switch from cooperation to defection when being defected ('positive reciprocity'), (ii) to actively reduce the payoff of a defecting partner ('punishment'), or (iii) to stop interacting and switch partner ('partner switching'). However, such mechanisms to stabilize cooperation are often studied in isolation from each other. In order to better understand the conditions under which each partner control mechanism tends to be favoured by selection, we here analyse by way of individual-based simulations the coevolution between positive reciprocity, punishment, and partner switching. We show that random interactions in an unstructured population and a high number of rounds increase the likelihood that selection favours partner switching. In contrast, interactions localized in small groups (without genetic structure) increase the likelihood that selection favours punishment and/or positive reciprocity. This study thus highlights the importance of comparing different control mechanisms for cooperation under different conditions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  17. Position-aware deep multi-task learning for drug-drug interaction extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Deyu; Miao, Lei; He, Yulan

    2018-05-01

    A drug-drug interaction (DDI) is a situation in which a drug affects the activity of another drug synergistically or antagonistically when being administered together. The information of DDIs is crucial for healthcare professionals to prevent adverse drug events. Although some known DDIs can be found in purposely-built databases such as DrugBank, most information is still buried in scientific publications. Therefore, automatically extracting DDIs from biomedical texts is sorely needed. In this paper, we propose a novel position-aware deep multi-task learning approach for extracting DDIs from biomedical texts. In particular, sentences are represented as a sequence of word embeddings and position embeddings. An attention-based bidirectional long short-term memory (BiLSTM) network is used to encode each sentence. The relative position information of words with the target drugs in text is combined with the hidden states of BiLSTM to generate the position-aware attention weights. Moreover, the tasks of predicting whether or not two drugs interact with each other and further distinguishing the types of interactions are learned jointly in multi-task learning framework. The proposed approach has been evaluated on the DDIExtraction challenge 2013 corpus and the results show that with the position-aware attention only, our proposed approach outperforms the state-of-the-art method by 0.99% for binary DDI classification, and with both position-aware attention and multi-task learning, our approach achieves a micro F-score of 72.99% on interaction type identification, outperforming the state-of-the-art approach by 1.51%, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Teacher-Families Online Interactions and Gender Differences in Parental Involvement through School Data System: Do Mothers Want to Know More than Fathers about Their Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Ina; Hameiri, Mira

    2012-01-01

    The integration of School Systems in K-12, opens new possibilities for online interaction among teachers, students, and their parents. This paper examines three years of teacher-student and teacher-parent online interactions in seven Israeli secondary schools during the implementation of a school system called Mashov (meaning "feedback"…

  19. False positive reduction in protein-protein interaction predictions using gene ontology annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yen-Han

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many crucial cellular operations such as metabolism, signalling, and regulations are based on protein-protein interactions. However, the lack of robust protein-protein interaction information is a challenge. One reason for the lack of solid protein-protein interaction information is poor agreement between experimental findings and computational sets that, in turn, comes from huge false positive predictions in computational approaches. Reduction of false positive predictions and enhancing true positive fraction of computationally predicted protein-protein interaction datasets based on highly confident experimental results has not been adequately investigated. Results Gene Ontology (GO annotations were used to reduce false positive protein-protein interactions (PPI pairs resulting from computational predictions. Using experimentally obtained PPI pairs as a training dataset, eight top-ranking keywords were extracted from GO molecular function annotations. The sensitivity of these keywords is 64.21% in the yeast experimental dataset and 80.83% in the worm experimental dataset. The specificities, a measure of recovery power, of these keywords applied to four predicted PPI datasets for each studied organisms, are 48.32% and 46.49% (by average of four datasets in yeast and worm, respectively. Based on eight top-ranking keywords and co-localization of interacting proteins a set of two knowledge rules were deduced and applied to remove false positive protein pairs. The 'strength', a measure of improvement provided by the rules was defined based on the signal-to-noise ratio and implemented to measure the applicability of knowledge rules applying to the predicted PPI datasets. Depending on the employed PPI-predicting methods, the strength varies between two and ten-fold of randomly removing protein pairs from the datasets. Conclusion Gene Ontology annotations along with the deduced knowledge rules could be implemented to partially

  20. Situational Motivation and Perceived Intensity: Their Interaction in Predicting Changes in Positive Affect from Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Guérin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that affective experiences surrounding physical activity can contribute to the proper self-regulation of an active lifestyle. Motivation toward physical activity, as portrayed by self-determination theory, has been linked to positive affect, as has the intensity of physical activity, especially of a preferred nature. The purpose of this experimental study was to examine the interaction between situational motivation and intensity [i.e., ratings of perceived exertion (RPE] in predicting changes in positive affect following an acute bout of preferred physical activity, namely, running. Fourty-one female runners engaged in a 30-minute self-paced treadmill run in a laboratory context. Situational motivation for running, pre- and post-running positive affect, and RPE were assessed via validated self-report questionnaires. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed a significant interaction effect between RPE and introjection (P<.05 but not between RPE and identified regulation or intrinsic motivation. At low levels of introjection, the influence of RPE on the change in positive affect was considerable, with higher RPE ratings being associated with greater increases in positive affect. The implications of the findings in light of SDT principles as well as the potential contingencies between the regulations and RPE in predicting positive affect among women are discussed.

  1. Situational motivation and perceived intensity: their interaction in predicting changes in positive affect from physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin, Eva; Fortier, Michelle S

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that affective experiences surrounding physical activity can contribute to the proper self-regulation of an active lifestyle. Motivation toward physical activity, as portrayed by self-determination theory, has been linked to positive affect, as has the intensity of physical activity, especially of a preferred nature. The purpose of this experimental study was to examine the interaction between situational motivation and intensity [i.e., ratings of perceived exertion (RPE)] in predicting changes in positive affect following an acute bout of preferred physical activity, namely, running. Fourty-one female runners engaged in a 30-minute self-paced treadmill run in a laboratory context. Situational motivation for running, pre- and post-running positive affect, and RPE were assessed via validated self-report questionnaires. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed a significant interaction effect between RPE and introjection (P positive affect was considerable, with higher RPE ratings being associated with greater increases in positive affect. The implications of the findings in light of SDT principles as well as the potential contingencies between the regulations and RPE in predicting positive affect among women are discussed.

  2. Positive Selection and Centrality in the Yeast and Fly Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Chakraborty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins within a molecular network are expected to be subject to different selective pressures depending on their relative hierarchical positions. However, it is not obvious what genes within a network should be more likely to evolve under positive selection. On one hand, only mutations at genes with a relatively high degree of control over adaptive phenotypes (such as those encoding highly connected proteins are expected to be “seen” by natural selection. On the other hand, a high degree of pleiotropy at these genes is expected to hinder adaptation. Previous analyses of the human protein-protein interaction network have shown that genes under long-term, recurrent positive selection (as inferred from interspecific comparisons tend to act at the periphery of the network. It is unknown, however, whether these trends apply to other organisms. Here, we show that long-term positive selection has preferentially targeted the periphery of the yeast interactome. Conversely, in flies, genes under positive selection encode significantly more connected and central proteins. These observations are not due to covariation of genes’ adaptability and centrality with confounding factors. Therefore, the distribution of proteins encoded by genes under recurrent positive selection across protein-protein interaction networks varies from one species to another.

  3. Suspicion of Motives Predicts Minorities' Responses to Positive Feedback in Interracial Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Brenda; Kunstman, Jonathan W; Malta, Brenna D; Sawyer, Pamela J; Townsend, Sarah S M; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2016-01-01

    Strong social and legal norms in the United States discourage the overt expression of bias against ethnic and racial minorities, increasing the attributional ambiguity of Whites' positive behavior to ethnic minorities. Minorities who suspect that Whites' positive overtures toward minorities are motivated more by their fear of appearing racist than by egalitarian attitudes may regard positive feedback they receive from Whites as disingenuous. This may lead them to react to such feedback with feelings of uncertainty and threat. Three studies examined how suspicion of motives relates to ethnic minorities' responses to receiving positive feedback from a White peer or same-ethnicity peer (Experiment 1), to receiving feedback from a White peer that was positive or negative (Experiment 2), and to receiving positive feedback from a White peer who did or did not know their ethnicity (Experiment 3). As predicted, the more suspicious Latinas were of Whites' motives for behaving positively toward minorities in general, the more they regarded positive feedback from a White peer who knew their ethnicity as disingenuous and the more they reacted with cardiovascular reactivity characteristic of threat/avoidance, increased feelings of stress, heightened uncertainty, and decreased self-esteem. We discuss the implications for intergroup interactions of perceptions of Whites' motives for nonprejudiced behavior.

  4. Suspicion of Motives Predicts Minorities’ Responses to Positive Feedback in Interracial Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Brenda; Kunstman, Jonathan W.; Malta, Brenna D.; Sawyer, Pamela J.; Townsend, Sarah S. M.; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2015-01-01

    Strong social and legal norms in the United States discourage the overt expression of bias against ethnic and racial minorities, increasing the attributional ambiguity of Whites’ positive behavior to ethnic minorities. Minorities who suspect that Whites’ positive overtures toward minorities are motivated more by their fear of appearing racist than by egalitarian attitudes may regard positive feedback they receive from Whites as disingenuous. This may lead them to react to such feedback with feelings of uncertainty and threat. Three studies examined how suspicion of motives relates to ethnic minorities’ responses to receiving positive feedback from a White peer or same-ethnicity peer (Experiment 1), to receiving feedback from a White peer that was positive or negative (Experiment 2), and to receiving positive feedback from a White peer who did or did not know their ethnicity (Experiment 3). As predicted, the more suspicious Latinas were of Whites’ motives for behaving positively toward minorities in general, the more they regarded positive feedback from a White peer who knew their ethnicity as disingenuous and the more they reacted with cardiovascular reactivity characteristic of threat/avoidance, increased feelings of stress, heightened uncertainty, and decreased self-esteem. We discuss the implications for intergroup interactions of perceptions of Whites’ motives for nonprejudiced behavior. PMID:26688594

  5. Synchronization unveils the organization of ecological networks with positive and negative interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girón, Andrea; Saiz, Hugo; Bacelar, Flora S.; Andrade, Roberto F. S.; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    Network science has helped to understand the organization principles of the interactions among the constituents of large complex systems. However, recently, the high resolution of the data sets collected has allowed to capture the different types of interactions coexisting within the same system. A particularly important example is that of systems with positive and negative interactions, a usual feature appearing in social, neural, and ecological systems. The interplay of links of opposite sign presents natural difficulties for generalizing typical concepts and tools applied to unsigned networks and, moreover, poses some questions intrinsic to the signed nature of the network, such as how are negative interactions balanced by positive ones so to allow the coexistence and survival of competitors/foes within the same system? Here, we show that synchronization phenomenon is an ideal benchmark for uncovering such balance and, as a byproduct, to assess which nodes play a critical role in the overall organization of the system. We illustrate our findings with the analysis of synthetic and real ecological networks in which facilitation and competitive interactions coexist.

  6. Synchronization unveils the organization of ecological networks with positive and negative interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girón, Andrea; Saiz, Hugo; Bacelar, Flora S; Andrade, Roberto F S; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    Network science has helped to understand the organization principles of the interactions among the constituents of large complex systems. However, recently, the high resolution of the data sets collected has allowed to capture the different types of interactions coexisting within the same system. A particularly important example is that of systems with positive and negative interactions, a usual feature appearing in social, neural, and ecological systems. The interplay of links of opposite sign presents natural difficulties for generalizing typical concepts and tools applied to unsigned networks and, moreover, poses some questions intrinsic to the signed nature of the network, such as how are negative interactions balanced by positive ones so to allow the coexistence and survival of competitors/foes within the same system? Here, we show that synchronization phenomenon is an ideal benchmark for uncovering such balance and, as a byproduct, to assess which nodes play a critical role in the overall organization of the system. We illustrate our findings with the analysis of synthetic and real ecological networks in which facilitation and competitive interactions coexist.

  7. Collective pedagogical teacher culture, teacher-student ethno-racial mismatch, and teacher job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Elizabeth; Banerjee, Neena; Mickelson, Roslyn; Moller, Stephanie

    2014-05-01

    Teacher job satisfaction is critical to schools' successful functioning. Using a representative sample of kindergarten teachers from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, we investigate the association among professional learning community and teacher collaboration, teacher ethno-racial group, teacher-student ethno-racial mismatch, and teacher job satisfaction. We find that White teachers are significantly less satisfied than African-American and Latino teachers, especially when they teach in majority non-White classrooms. However, the existence of a professional community moderates the negative influence of teacher-student ethno-racial mismatch on White teachers' job satisfaction. In effect, strong professional communities serve as a cushion to bolster teacher job satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Position-Sensitive Detector with Depth-of-Interaction Determination for Small Animal PET

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorov, A; Kholmetsky, A L; Korzhik, M V; Lecoq, P; Lobko, A S; Missevitch, O V; Tkatchev, A

    2002-01-01

    Crystal arrays made of LSO and LuAP crystals 2x2x10 mm pixels were manufactured for evaluation of detector with depth-of-interaction (DOI) determination capability intended for small animal positron emission tomograph. Position-sensitive LSO/LuAP phoswich DOI detector based on crystal 8x8 arrays and HAMAMATSU R5900-00-M64 position-sensitive multi-anode photomultiplier tube was developed and evaluated. Time resolution was found to be not worse than 1.0 ns FWHM for both layers, and spatial resolution mean value was 1.5 mm FWHM for the center of field-of-view.

  9. Position and Momentum Entanglement of Dipole-Dipole Interacting Atoms in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opatrný, T.; Kolář, M.; Kurizki, G.

    We consider a possible realization of the position- and momentum-correlated atomic pairs that are confined to adjacent sites of two mutually shifted optical lattices and are entangled via laser-induced dipole-dipole interactions. The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) "paradox" [Einstein 1935] with translational variables is then modified by lattice-diffraction effects. We study a possible mechanism of creating such diatom entangled states by varying the effective mass of the atoms.

  10. Situational Motivation and Perceived Intensity: Their Interaction in Predicting Changes in Positive Affect from Physical Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Guérin; Michelle S. Fortier

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that affective experiences surrounding physical activity can contribute to the proper self-regulation of an active lifestyle. Motivation toward physical activity, as portrayed by self-determination theory, has been linked to positive affect, as has the intensity of physical activity, especially of a preferred nature. The purpose of this experimental study was to examine the interaction between situational motivation and intensity [i.e., ratings of perceived exertion (RPE)] i...

  11. Competitive position, managerial ties, and profitability of foreign firms in China: an interactive perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Julie Juan Li; Kevin Zheng Zhou; Alan T Shao

    2009-01-01

    Despite the prominence of the competitive strategy perspective, it remains unclear whether foreign firms entering China can still adopt a differentiation or low-cost position to achieve superior performance, given the unique market and institutional environments in China. Alternatively, should foreign firms follow conventional wisdom and actively build managerial ties with government officials and business community to enhance their performance? This study develops and tests an interactive pe...

  12. Prenatal ultrasound screening: false positive soft markers may alter maternal representations and mother-infant interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Viaux-Savelon

    Full Text Available In up to 5% of pregnancies, ultrasound screening detects a "soft marker" (SM that places the foetus at risk for a severe abnormality. In most cases, prenatal diagnostic work-up rules out a severe defect. We aimed to study the effects of false positive SM on maternal emotional status, maternal representations of the infant, and mother-infant interaction.Utilizing an extreme-case prospective case control design, we selected from a group of 244 women undergoing ultrasound, 19 pregnant women whose foetus had a positive SM screening and a reassuring diagnostic work up, and 19 controls without SM matched for age and education. In the third trimester of pregnancy, within one week after delivery, and 2 months postpartum, we assessed anxiety, depression, and maternal representations. Mother-infant interactions were videotaped during feeding within one week after delivery and again at 2 months postpartum and coded blindly using the Coding Interactive Behavior (CIB scales. Anxiety and depression scores were significantly higher at all assessment points in the SM group. Maternal representations were also different between SM and control groups at all study time. Perturbations to early mother-infant interactions were observed in the SM group. These dyads showed greater dysregulation, lower maternal sensitivity, higher maternal intrusive behaviour and higher infant avoidance. Multivariate analysis showed that maternal representation and depression at third trimester predicted mother-infant interaction.False positive ultrasound screenings for SM are not benign and negatively affect the developing maternal-infant attachment. Medical efforts should be directed to minimize as much as possible such false diagnoses, and to limit their psychological adverse consequences.

  13. Whole plant extracts versus single compounds for the treatment of malaria: synergy and positive interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoanaivo, Philippe; Wright, Colin W; Willcox, Merlin L; Gilbert, Ben

    2011-03-15

    In traditional medicine whole plants or mixtures of plants are used rather than isolated compounds. There is evidence that crude plant extracts often have greater in vitro or/and in vivo antiplasmodial activity than isolated constituents at an equivalent dose. The aim of this paper is to review positive interactions between components of whole plant extracts, which may explain this. Narrative review. There is evidence for several different types of positive interactions between different components of medicinal plants used in the treatment of malaria. Pharmacodynamic synergy has been demonstrated between the Cinchona alkaloids and between various plant extracts traditionally combined. Pharmacokinetic interactions occur, for example between constituents of Artemisia annua tea so that its artemisinin is more rapidly absorbed than the pure drug. Some plant extracts may have an immunomodulatory effect as well as a direct antiplasmodial effect. Several extracts contain multidrug resistance inhibitors, although none of these has been tested clinically in malaria. Some plant constituents are added mainly to attenuate the side-effects of others, for example ginger to prevent nausea. More clinical research is needed on all types of interaction between plant constituents. This could include clinical trials of combinations of pure compounds (such as artemisinin + curcumin + piperine) and of combinations of herbal remedies (such as Artemisia annua leaves + Curcuma longa root + Piper nigum seeds). The former may enhance the activity of existing pharmaceutical preparations, and the latter may improve the effectiveness of existing herbal remedies for use in remote areas where modern drugs are unavailable.

  14. Positive interactions between large herbivores and grasshoppers, and their consequences for grassland plant diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhiwei; Wang, Deli; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Ling; Feng, Chao; Wang, Zhongnan

    2014-04-01

    Although the influence of positive interactions on plant and sessile communities has been well documented, surprisingly little is known about their role in structuring terrestrial animal communities. We evaluated beneficial interactions between two distantly related herbivore taxa, large vertebrate grazers (sheep) and smaller insect grazers (grasshoppers), using a set of field experiments in eastern Eurasian steppe of China. Grazing by large herbivores caused significantly higher grasshopper density, and this pattern persisted until the end of the experiment. Grasshoppers, in turn, increased the foraging time of larger herbivores, but such response occurred only during the peak of growing season (August). These reciprocal interactions were driven by differential herbivore foraging preferences for plant resources; namely, large herbivores preferred Artemisia forbs, whereas grasshoppers preferred Leymus grass. The enhancement of grasshopper density in areas grazed by large herbivores likely resulted from the selective consumption of Artemisia forbs by vertebrate grazers, which may potentially improve the host finding of grasshoppers. Likewise, grasshoppers appeared to benefit large herbivores by decreasing the cover and density of the dominant grass Leymus chinensis, which hampers large herbivores' access to palatable forbs. Moreover, we found that large herbivores grazing alone may significantly decrease plant diversity, yet grasshoppers appeared to mediate such negative effects when they grazed with large herbivores. Our results suggest that the positive, reciprocal interactions in terrestrial herbivore communities may be more prevalent and complex than previously thought.

  15. The role of hydrophobic interactions in positioning of peripheral proteins in membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomize Mikhail A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three-dimensional (3D structures of numerous peripheral membrane proteins have been determined. Biological activity, stability, and conformations of these proteins depend on their spatial positions with respect to the lipid bilayer. However, these positions are usually undetermined. Results We report the first large-scale computational study of monotopic/peripheral proteins with known 3D structures. The optimal translational and rotational positions of 476 proteins are determined by minimizing energy of protein transfer from water to the lipid bilayer, which is approximated by a hydrocarbon slab with a decadiene-like polarity and interfacial regions characterized by water-permeation profiles. Predicted membrane-binding sites, protein tilt angles and membrane penetration depths are consistent with spin-labeling, chemical modification, fluorescence, NMR, mutagenesis, and other experimental studies of 53 peripheral proteins and peptides. Experimental membrane binding affinities of peripheral proteins were reproduced in cases that did not involve a helix-coil transition, specific binding of lipids, or a predominantly electrostatic association. Coordinates of all examined peripheral proteins and peptides with the calculated hydrophobic membrane boundaries, subcellular localization, topology, structural classification, and experimental references are available through the Orientations of Proteins in Membranes (OPM database. Conclusion Positions of diverse peripheral proteins and peptides in the lipid bilayer can be accurately predicted using their 3D structures that represent a proper membrane-bound conformation and oligomeric state, and have membrane binding elements present. The success of the implicit solvation model suggests that hydrophobic interactions are usually sufficient to determine the spatial position of a protein in the membrane, even when electrostatic interactions or specific binding of lipids are substantial. Our

  16. Characteristics of positive-interaction parenting style among primiparous teenage, optimal age, and advanced age mothers in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Theresa H. M.; Connolly, Jennifer A.; Rotondi, Michael; Tamim, Hala

    2018-01-01

    Background Positive-interaction parenting early in childhood is encouraged due to its association with behavioural development later in life. The objective of this study was to examine if the level of positive-interaction parenting style differs among teen, optimal age, and advanced age mothers in Canada, and to identify the characteristics associated with positive-interaction parenting style separately for each age group. Methods This was a cross-sectional secondary analysis of the National ...

  17. Multi-sensor fusion with interacting multiple model filter for improved aircraft position accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Taehwan; Lee, Changho; Choi, Sangbang

    2013-03-27

    The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has decided to adopt Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) as the 21st century standard for navigation. Accordingly, ICAO members have provided an impetus to develop related technology and build sufficient infrastructure. For aviation surveillance with CNS/ATM, Ground-Based Augmentation System (GBAS), Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B), multilateration (MLAT) and wide-area multilateration (WAM) systems are being established. These sensors can track aircraft positions more accurately than existing radar and can compensate for the blind spots in aircraft surveillance. In this paper, we applied a novel sensor fusion method with Interacting Multiple Model (IMM) filter to GBAS, ADS-B, MLAT, and WAM data in order to improve the reliability of the aircraft position. Results of performance analysis show that the position accuracy is improved by the proposed sensor fusion method with the IMM filter.

  18. Parental support, self-concept, motivational orientaions and teacher-student relationship, and academic competnece: an exploratory analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tariq Bhatti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship among academic competence, Grade Point Averages (GPAs and factors responsible for students’ academic competence. A four factored questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of 100 graduate and post-graduate students to find out the factors responsible for academic competence. In addition, The Academic Competence Evaluation Scale (ACES-College applied for calculating the academic competence. Significant and positive correlations are found between factors affecting academic competence, GPAs and academic competence. Students’ scores on the ACES and their GPAs provided significant evidence to support the idea that the factors such as parental support, clearer self-concept, positive teacher-student relationship and strong motivational orientations are correlated with their GPAs at low magnitude and; academic competence with high ratings. It is concluded that students with stronger presence of these factors have better academic competence than their peers at graduate and post-graduate level. An integrated framework that is related to students’ academic competence and that promotes other related factors is suggested.

  19. Biogeomorphic feedbacks within riparian corridors: the role of positive interactions between riparian plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corenblit, Dov; Steiger, Johannes; Till-Bottraud, Irène

    2017-04-01

    Riparian vegetation affects hydrogeomorphic processes and leads to the construction of wooded fluvial landforms within riparian corridors. Multiple plants form dense multi- and mono-specific stands that enhance plant resistance as grouped plants are less prone to be uprooted than free-standing individuals. Riparian plants which grow in dense stands also enhance their role as ecosystem engineers through the trapping of sediment, organic matter and nutrients. The wooded biogeomorphic landforms which originate from the effect of vegetation on geomorphology lead in return to an improved capacity of the plants to survive, exploit resources, and reach sexual maturity in the intervals between destructive floods. Thus, these vegetated biogeomorphic landforms likely represent a positive niche construction of riparian plants. The nature and intensity of biotic interactions between riparian plants of different species (inter-specific) or the same species (intra-specific) which form dense stands and construct together the niche remain unclear. We strongly suspect that indirect inter-specific positive interactions (facilitation) occur between plants but that more direct intra-specific interactions, such as cooperation and altruism, also operate during the niche construction process. Our aim is to propose an original theoretical framework of inter and intra-specific positive interactions between riparian plants. We suggest that positive interactions between riparian plants are maximized in river reaches with an intermediate level of hydrogeomorphic disturbance. During establishment, plants that grow within dense stands improve their survival and growth because individuals protect each other from shear stress. In addition to the improved capacity to trap mineral and organic matter, individuals which constitute the dense stand can cooperate to mutually support a mycorrhizal fungi network that will connect plants, soil and ground water and influence nutrient transfer, cycling and

  20. Simulation of the interaction of positively charged beams and electron clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovik, Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    The incoherent (head-tail) effect on the bunch due to the interaction with electron clouds (e-clouds) leads to a blow up of the transverse beam size in storage rings operating with positively charged beams. Even more the e-cloud effects are considered to be the main limiting factor for high current, high-brightness or high-luminosity operation of future machines. Therefore the simulation of e-cloud phenomena is a highly active field of research. The main focus in this work was set to a development of a tool for simulation of the interaction of relativistic bunches with non-relativistic parasitic charged particles. The result is the Particle-In-Cell Program MOEVE PIC Tracking which can track a 3D bunch under the influence of its own and external electromagnetic fields but first and foremost it simulates the interaction of relativistic positively charged bunches and initially static electrons. In MOEVE PIC Tracking the conducting beam pipe can be modeled with an arbitrary elliptical cross-section to achieve more accurate space charge field computations for both the bunch and the e-cloud. The simulation of the interaction between positron bunches and electron clouds in this work gave a detailed insight of the behavior of both particle species during and after the interaction. Further and ultimate goal of this work was a fast estimation of the beam stability under the influence of e-clouds in the storage ring. The standard approach to simulate the stability of a single bunch is to track the bunch particles through the linear optics of the machine by multiplying the 6D vector of each particle with the transformation matrices describing the lattice. Thereby the action of the e-cloud on the bunch is approximated by a pre-computed wake kick which is applied on one or more points in the lattice. Following the idea of K.Ohmi the wake kick was pre-computed as a two variable function of the bunch part exiting the e-cloud and the subsequent parts of a bunch which receive a

  1. Positive Interactions among Foraging Seabirds, Marine Mammals and Fishes and Implications for Their Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard R. Veit

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing recognition of the importance of “positive interactions” among species in structuring communities. For seabirds, an important kind of positive interaction is the use of birds of the same species, birds of other species, and other marine predators such as cetaceans, seals and fishes as cues to the presence of prey. The process by which a single bird uses, say, a feeding flock of birds as a cue to the presence of prey is called “local enhancement” or “facilitation.” There are subtly different uses of each of these terms, but the issue we address here is the ubiquity of positive interactions between seabirds and other marine predators when foraging at sea, and whether as a result of their associations the feeding success, and therefore presumably the fitness, of individual seabirds is increased. If this contention is true, then it implies that conservation of any one species of seabird must take into consideration the status and possible conservation of those species that the focal species uses as a cue while foraging. For example, conservation of great shearwaters (Ardenna gravis, which often feed over tuna (e.g., Thunnus schools, should take in to consideration conservation of tuna. Ecosystem management depends on understanding the importance of such processes; the loss of biodiversity, and the consequent threat to foraging success, may be a substantial threat to the stability of marine ecosystems.

  2. EARLY POSTPARTUM PARENTAL PREOCCUPATION AND POSITIVE PARENTING THOUGHTS: RELATIONSHIP WITH PARENT-INFANT INTERACTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pilyoung; Mayes, Linda; Feldman, Ruth; Leckman, James F; Swain, James E

    2013-01-01

    Parenting behaviors and parent-infant emotional bonding during the early postpartum months play a critical role in infant development. However, the nature and progression of parental thoughts and their relationship with interactive behaviors have received less research. The current study investigated the trajectory of parental thoughts and behaviors among primiparous mothers ( n = 18) and fathers ( n = 15) and multiparous mothers ( n = 13) and fathers ( n = 13), which were measured at the first and third postpartum month. At the third postpartum month, the relationship between parental thoughts and parental interactive behaviors also was tested. Mothers and fathers showed high levels of preoccupations and caregiving thoughts during the first postpartum month that significantly declined by the third postpartum month. In contrast, positive thoughts about parenting and the infant increased over the same time interval. Mothers presented higher levels of preoccupations and positive thoughts than did fathers, and first-time parents reported more intense preoccupations than did experienced parents. Although maternal sensitivity was inversely related to maternal anxious thoughts, paternal sensitivity was predicted by higher levels of anxious as well as caregiving and positive thoughts.

  3. Positive animal welfare states and encouraging environment-focused and animal-to-animal interactive behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, D J

    2015-01-01

    Affective neuroscience, incorporating neurophysiology and neuropsychology, is providing increasing evidence that certain behaviours of animals may be interpreted in terms of what they are intending to achieve, i.e. their goals. It is also providing evidence that allows inferences to be made about the affective contents of some goal-directed behaviours. These neuroscience-supported inferences are aligned with recommendations based on prior behaviour-based investigations of animals' preferences, aversions and priorities, and these observations together support the cautious use of particular behaviours to infer what the accompanying affects may be. In this review, therefore, some attention is given to negative affects and their relationships to poor animal welfare, but the primary focus is the positive affects animals may experience when they successfully engage in rewarding goal-directed behaviours, encapsulated in the concept of positive affective engagement. The review draws together reports of environment-focused and animal-to-animal interactive behaviours observed in a range of species and under diverse circumstances in order to illustrate the likely widespread occurrence of the positive affects that may accompany them. Particular consideration is given to affects that are potentially associated with some aspects of exploration and food acquisition in stimulus rich or impoverished environments, and to those that may be associated with aspects of the affiliative interactions of bonding or bond affirmation, maternal care, play and sexual activity. It is concluded that animals given the opportunity to engage in such activities may experience some positive affects. However, the intensity of an animal's experience of particular positive affects is likely to range from zero to very high because the associated behaviours occur intermittently, variation may occur during different phases of a goal-directed behaviour, and other positive or negative affects experienced at

  4. Engaging teachers & students in geosciences by exploring local geoheritage sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochis, E. E.; Gierke, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding geoscience concepts and the interactions of Earth system processes in one's own community has the potential to foster sound decision making for environmental, economic and social wellbeing. School-age children are an appropriate target audience for improving Earth Science literacy and attitudes towards scientific practices. However, many teachers charged with geoscience instruction lack awareness of local geological significant examples or the pedagogical ability to integrate place-based examples into their classroom practice. This situation is further complicated because many teachers of Earth science lack a firm background in geoscience course work. Strategies for effective K-12 teacher professional development programs that promote Earth Science literacy by integrating inquiry-based investigations of local and regional geoheritage sites into standards based curriculum were developed and tested with teachers at a rural school on the Hannahville Indian Reservation located in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The workshops initiated long-term partnerships between classroom teachers and geoscience experts. We hypothesize that this model of professional development, where teachers of school-age children are prepared to teach local examples of earth system science, will lead to increased engagement in Earth Science content and increased awareness of local geoscience examples by K-12 students and the public.

  5. Depth of interaction detection with enhanced position-sensitive proportional resistor network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, Ch.W.; Benlloch, J.M.; Sanchez, F.; Pavon, N.; Gimenez, N.; Fernandez, M.; Gimenez, M.; Sebastia, A.; Martinez, J.; Mora, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    A new method of determining the depth of interaction of γ-rays in thick inorganic scintillation crystals was tested experimentally. The method uses the strong correlation between the width of the scintillation light distribution within large continuous crystals and the γ-ray's interaction depth. This behavior was successfully reproduced by a theoretical model distribution based on the inverse square law. For the determination of the distribution's width, its standard deviation σ is computed using an enhanced position-sensitive proportional resistor network which is often used in γ-ray-imaging devices. Minor changes of this known resistor network allow the analog and real-time determination of the light distribution's 2nd moment without impairing the measurement of the energy and centroid. First experimental results are presented that confirm that the described method works correctly. Since only some cheap electronic components, but no additional detectors or crystals are required, the main advantage of this method is its low cost

  6. How should periods without social interaction be scheduled? Children's preference for practical schedules of positive reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczynski, Kevin C; Hanley, Gregory P

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown that children prefer contingent reinforcement (CR) rather than yoked noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) when continuous reinforcement is programmed in the CR schedule. Preference has not, however, been evaluated for practical schedules that involve CR. In Study 1, we assessed 5 children's preference for obtaining social interaction via a multiple schedule (periods of fixed-ratio 1 reinforcement alternating with periods of extinction), a briefly signaled delayed reinforcement schedule, and an NCR schedule. The multiple schedule promoted the most efficient level of responding. In general, children chose to experience the multiple schedule and avoided the delay and NCR schedules, indicating that they preferred multiple schedules as the means to arrange practical schedules of social interaction. In Study 2, we evaluated potential controlling variables that influenced 1 child's preference for the multiple schedule and found that the strong positive contingency was the primary variable. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  7. Characteristics of positive-interaction parenting style among primiparous teenage, optimal age, and advanced age mothers in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Theresa H M; Connolly, Jennifer A; Rotondi, Michael; Tamim, Hala

    2018-01-08

    Positive-interaction parenting early in childhood is encouraged due to its association with behavioural development later in life. The objective of this study was to examine if the level of positive-interaction parenting style differs among teen, optimal age, and advanced age mothers in Canada, and to identify the characteristics associated with positive-interaction parenting style separately for each age group. This was a cross-sectional secondary analysis of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. First-time mothers with children 0-23 months were grouped into: teen (15-19 years, N = 53,409), optimal age (20-34 years, N = 790,960), and advanced age (35 years and older, N = 106,536). The outcome was positive-interaction parenting style (Parenting Practices Scale); maternal socio-demographics, health, social, and child characteristics were considered for backward stepwise multiple linear regression modeling, stratified for each of the age groups. Teen, optimal age, and advanced age mothers reported similar levels of positive- interaction parenting style. Covariates differed across the three age groups. Among optimal age mothers, being an ever-landed immigrant, childcare use, and being devoted to religion were found to decrease positive-interaction parenting style, whereas, higher education was found to increase positive-interaction parenting style. Teen mothers were not found to have any characteristics uniquely associated with positive-interaction parenting. Among advanced age mothers, social support was uniquely associated with an increase in positive-interaction parenting. Very good/excellent health was found to be positively associated with parenting in teens but negatively associated with parenting in advanced age mothers. Characteristics associated with positive-interaction parenting varied among the three age groups. Findings may have public health implications through information dissemination to first-time mothers, clinicians

  8. How pre-service teachers' personality traits, self-efficacy, and discipline strategies contribute to the teacher-student relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Romi; Mainhard, Tim; van Tartwijk, Jan; Veldman, Ietje; Verloop, Nico; Wubbels, Theo

    2014-06-01

    Although the teacher-student relationship is a well-documented phenomenon, few attempts have been made to identify its predictors. Research has mainly focused on in-service teachers, less is known about characteristics of pre-service teachers in relation to the teacher-student relationship. The purpose of this study was to identify the predictors of pre-service secondary teachers' relationships with their students. It was hypothesized that friendliness and extraversion, self-efficacy in classroom management and in student engagement, and various discipline strategies would contribute to the teacher-student relationship in terms of influence and affiliation. A total of 120 pre-service teachers in teacher education programmes participated. Data on pre-service teachers' background (e.g., gender and age), personality traits, and self-efficacy were gathered with teacher questionnaires; data on teachers' discipline strategies and the teacher-student relationship with student questionnaires. The two personality traits and self-efficacy appeared not to be related to the teacher-student relationship in terms of affiliation or influence. However, significant relationships were found between the different discipline strategies and the teacher-student relationship in terms of influence and affiliation. There were differential effects for gender on the relationship between discipline strategies on the one hand and influence and affiliation on the other. This study provides relevant new insights into the research fields of classroom management and interpersonal relationships in education. It contributes to our understanding of discipline strategies by fine tuning an existing instrument and revealing interesting connections with the teacher-student relationship. Specific gender effects on this connection are discussed, as are implications for practice. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Determination of the Interaction Position of Gamma Photons in Monolithic Scintillators Using Neural Network Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, P.; Iborra, A.; González, A. J.; Hernández, L.; Bellido, P.; Moliner, L.; Rigla, J. P.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, M. J.; Sánchez, F.; Seimetz, M.; Soriano, A.; Vidal, L. F.; Benlloch, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detectors based on monolithic scintillators, the photon interaction position needs to be estimated from the light distribution (LD) on the photodetector pixels. Due to the finite size of the scintillator volume, the symmetry of the LD is truncated everywhere except for the crystal center. This effect produces a poor estimation of the interaction positions towards the edges, an especially critical situation when linear algorithms, such as Center of Gravity (CoG), are used. When all the crystal faces are painted black, except the one in contact with the photodetector, the LD can be assumed to behave as the inverse square law, providing a simple theoretical model. Using this LD model, the interaction coordinates can be determined by means of fitting each event to a theoretical distribution. In that sense, the use of neural networks (NNs) has been shown to be an effective alternative to more traditional fitting techniques as nonlinear least squares (LS). The multilayer perceptron is one type of NN which can model non-linear functions well and can be trained to accurately generalize when presented with new data. In this work we have shown the capability of NNs to approximate the LD and provide the interaction coordinates of γ-photons with two different photodetector setups. One experimental setup was based on analog Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) and a charge division diode network, whereas the second setup was based on digital SiPMs (dSiPMs). In both experiments NNs minimized border effects. Average spatial resolutions of 1.9 ±0.2 mm and 1.7 ±0.2 mm for the entire crystal surface were obtained for the analog and dSiPMs approaches, respectively.

  10. Whole plant extracts versus single compounds for the treatment of malaria: synergy and positive interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Colin W

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In traditional medicine whole plants or mixtures of plants are used rather than isolated compounds. There is evidence that crude plant extracts often have greater in vitro or/and in vivo antiplasmodial activity than isolated constituents at an equivalent dose. The aim of this paper is to review positive interactions between components of whole plant extracts, which may explain this. Methods Narrative review. Results There is evidence for several different types of positive interactions between different components of medicinal plants used in the treatment of malaria. Pharmacodynamic synergy has been demonstrated between the Cinchona alkaloids and between various plant extracts traditionally combined. Pharmacokinetic interactions occur, for example between constituents of Artemisia annua tea so that its artemisinin is more rapidly absorbed than the pure drug. Some plant extracts may have an immunomodulatory effect as well as a direct antiplasmodial effect. Several extracts contain multidrug resistance inhibitors, although none of these has been tested clinically in malaria. Some plant constituents are added mainly to attenuate the side-effects of others, for example ginger to prevent nausea. Conclusions More clinical research is needed on all types of interaction between plant constituents. This could include clinical trials of combinations of pure compounds (such as artemisinin + curcumin + piperine and of combinations of herbal remedies (such as Artemisia annua leaves + Curcuma longa root + Piper nigum seeds. The former may enhance the activity of existing pharmaceutical preparations, and the latter may improve the effectiveness of existing herbal remedies for use in remote areas where modern drugs are unavailable.

  11. Interactive football training based on rebounders with hit position sensing and audio/light feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller; Grønbæk, Kaj; Rasmussen, Majken Kirkegård

    A Danish football club has established a (24/7/365) football training facility, where the authors developed an interactive training installation (http://vimeo.com/28446312). The training installation consist of a 12*12 m square with 4 M­Station Pro rebounders equipped with sensors that enable hit...... position sensing. The rebounders are equipped with loudspeakers and lights being used to call for the ball. Here we discuss one game “Pass ­and ­Turn”, which is meant to train speed in controlling a returned ball, reaction to a call for the ball and turning to hit rebounders to the left, right, behind...

  12. Positive and Negative Interactions Observed Between Siblings: Moderating Effects for Children Exposed to Parents’ Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturralde, Esti; Margolin, Gayla; Spies Shapiro, Lauren A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated links between interparental conflict appraisals (specifically threat and self-blame), sibling relationship quality (positive and negative dimensions), and anxiety in sibling pairs comprised of an adolescent and a younger sibling close in age. Sibling relationship quality was measured through behavioral observation. Links between self-blame and anxiety were moderated by sibling relationship quality. In older siblings, positive behavior with a sibling was associated with an attenuated relation between self-blame and anxiety. A paradoxical moderating effect was found for negative interactions; for both younger and older siblings, a relation between self-blame and anxiety was weakened in the presence of sibling negativity. Results offered support for theorized benefits of sibling relationship quality in helping early adolescents adjust to conflict between parents. PMID:24244080

  13. The effect of positive interactions on temporal turnover of community composition along an environmental gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youshi Wang

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that the interplay between negative and positive interactions simultaneously shapes community structure and composition. However, few studies have attempted to examine the effect of facilitation on compositional changes in communities through time. Additionally, due to the difficulties in collecting the long-term data, it would be useful to indicate the rate of temporal turnover using a readily obtainable metric. Using an individual-based model incorporating plant strategies, we examined the role of facilitation on the temporal turnover of communities located at different positions along an environmental gradient for three model scenarios: CM without facilitation; CFM-U, a unimodal relationship between facilitation and environmental severity; and CFM-L, a positively linear relationship between facilitation and environmental severity. Our results demonstrated that facilitation could increase, decrease or have no remarkable effect on temporal turnover. The specific outcome depended on the location of the focal community across the environmental gradient and the model employed. Compared with CM, the inclusion of positive interactions (i.e. CFM-U and CFM-L, at intermediate environmental stress levels (such as S = 0.7 and 0.8 resulted in lower Bray-Curtis similarity values; at other severity levels, facilitation slowed down (such as S = 0.3 and 0.4 at low to medium stress levels, and S = 0.9 at high stress levels or had only a subtle effect (such as at S = 0.1 on temporal turnover. We also found that the coefficient of variation (CV in species abundances and the rate of temporal variability showed a significant quadratic relationship. Our theoretical analysis contributes to the understanding of factors driving temporal turnover in biotic communities, and presents a potential metric (i.e. CV in species abundances assessing the consequences of ongoing environmental change on community structure.

  14. The effect of positive interactions on temporal turnover of community composition along an environmental gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youshi; Yang, Zhiyong; Zhou, Shurong; Soininen, Janne; Ai, Dexiecuo; Li, Yali; Chu, Chengjin

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the interplay between negative and positive interactions simultaneously shapes community structure and composition. However, few studies have attempted to examine the effect of facilitation on compositional changes in communities through time. Additionally, due to the difficulties in collecting the long-term data, it would be useful to indicate the rate of temporal turnover using a readily obtainable metric. Using an individual-based model incorporating plant strategies, we examined the role of facilitation on the temporal turnover of communities located at different positions along an environmental gradient for three model scenarios: CM without facilitation; CFM-U, a unimodal relationship between facilitation and environmental severity; and CFM-L, a positively linear relationship between facilitation and environmental severity. Our results demonstrated that facilitation could increase, decrease or have no remarkable effect on temporal turnover. The specific outcome depended on the location of the focal community across the environmental gradient and the model employed. Compared with CM, the inclusion of positive interactions (i.e. CFM-U and CFM-L), at intermediate environmental stress levels (such as S = 0.7 and 0.8) resulted in lower Bray-Curtis similarity values; at other severity levels, facilitation slowed down (such as S = 0.3 and 0.4 at low to medium stress levels, and S = 0.9 at high stress levels) or had only a subtle effect (such as at S = 0.1) on temporal turnover. We also found that the coefficient of variation (CV) in species abundances and the rate of temporal variability showed a significant quadratic relationship. Our theoretical analysis contributes to the understanding of factors driving temporal turnover in biotic communities, and presents a potential metric (i.e. CV in species abundances) assessing the consequences of ongoing environmental change on community structure.

  15. Effectively identifying compound-protein interactions by learning from positive and unlabeled examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhanzhan; Zhou, Shuigeng; Wang, Yang; Liu, Hui; Guan, Jihong; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2016-05-18

    Prediction of compound-protein interactions (CPIs) is to find new compound-protein pairs where a protein is targeted by at least a compound, which is a crucial step in new drug design. Currently, a number of machine learning based methods have been developed to predict new CPIs in the literature. However, as there is not yet any publicly available set of validated negative CPIs, most existing machine learning based approaches use the unknown interactions (not validated CPIs) selected randomly as the negative examples to train classifiers for predicting new CPIs. Obviously, this is not quite reasonable and unavoidably impacts the CPI prediction performance. In this paper, we simply take the unknown CPIs as unlabeled examples, and propose a new method called PUCPI (the abbreviation of PU learning for Compound-Protein Interaction identification) that employs biased-SVM (Support Vector Machine) to predict CPIs using only positive and unlabeled examples. PU learning is a class of learning methods that leans from positive and unlabeled (PU) samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that identifies CPIs using only positive and unlabeled examples. We first collect known CPIs as positive examples and then randomly select compound-protein pairs not in the positive set as unlabeled examples. For each CPI/compound-protein pair, we extract protein domains as protein features and compound substructures as chemical features, then take the tensor product of the corresponding compound features and protein features as the feature vector of the CPI/compound-protein pair. After that, biased-SVM is employed to train classifiers on different datasets of CPIs and compound-protein pairs. Experiments over various datasets show that our method outperforms six typical classifiers, including random forest, L1- and L2-regularized logistic regression, naive Bayes, SVM and k-nearest neighbor (kNN), and three types of existing CPI prediction models. Source code, datasets and

  16. Remarriage Beliefs as Predictors of Marital Quality and Positive Interaction in Stepcouples: An Actor-Partner Interdependence Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garneau, Chelsea L; Higginbotham, Brian; Adler-Baeder, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Using an Actor-Partner Interdependence Model, we examined remarriage beliefs as predictors of marital quality and positive interaction in a sample of 179 stepcouples. Three beliefs were measured using subscales from the Remarriage Belief Inventory (RMBI) including success is slim, children are the priority, and finances should be pooled. Several significant actor and partner effects were found for both wives' and husbands' beliefs. Wives' marital quality was positively associated with their own beliefs that finances should be pooled and negatively associated with their own beliefs that success is slim. Wives' reports of their own and spouses' positive interaction were both positively associated with their beliefs that finances should be pooled. Their reports of spouses' positive interaction were also negatively associated with husbands' beliefs that success is slim. Husbands' marital quality was positively associated with wives' beliefs that children are the priority, positively associated with their own beliefs that finances should be pooled, and negatively with success is slim. Positive interaction for husbands was positively associated with wives' beliefs that finances should be pooled and negatively associated with their own beliefs that success is slim. Finally, husbands' reports of positive interaction for their spouses were positively associated with wives' beliefs that finances should be pooled. Implications for future research utilizing dyadic data analysis with stepcouples are addressed. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  17. Positive interactions between desert granivores: localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Edelman

    Full Text Available Facilitation, when one species enhances the environment or performance of another species, can be highly localized in space. While facilitation in plant communities has been intensely studied, the role of facilitation in shaping animal communities is less well understood. In the Chihuahuan Desert, both kangaroo rats and harvester ants depend on the abundant seeds of annual plants. Kangaroo rats, however, are hypothesized to facilitate harvester ants through soil disturbance and selective seed predation rather than competing with them. I used a spatially explicit approach to examine whether a positive or negative interaction exists between banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis mounds and rough harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex rugosus colonies. The presence of a scale-dependent interaction between mounds and colonies was tested by comparing fitted spatial point process models with and without interspecific effects. Also, the effect of proximity to a mound on colony mortality and spatial patterns of surviving colonies was examined. The spatial pattern of kangaroo rat mounds and harvester ant colonies was consistent with a positive interspecific interaction at small scales (<10 m. Mortality risk of vulnerable, recently founded harvester ant colonies was lower when located close to a kangaroo rat mound and proximity to a mound partly predicted the spatial pattern of surviving colonies. My findings support localized facilitation of harvester ants by kangaroo rats, likely mediated through ecosystem engineering and foraging effects on plant cover and composition. The scale-dependent effect of kangaroo rats on abiotic and biotic factors appears to result in greater founding and survivorship of young colonies near mounds. These results suggest that soil disturbance and foraging by rodents can have subtle impacts on the distribution and demography of other species.

  18. The Role of Trust and Interaction in Global Positioning System Related Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chris W.; Shea, Christine; Holloway, C. Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) uses a network of satellites to calculate the position of a receiver over time. This technology has revolutionized a wide range of safety-critical industries and leisure applications. These systems provide diverse benefits; supplementing the users existing navigation skills and reducing the uncertainty that often characterizes many route planning tasks. GPS applications can also help to reduce workload by automating tasks that would otherwise require finite cognitive and perceptual resources. However, the operation of these systems has been identified as a contributory factor in a range of recent accidents. Users often come to rely on GPS applications and, therefore, fail to notice when they develop faults or when errors occur in the other systems that use the data from these systems. Further accidents can stem from the over confidence that arises when users assume automated warnings will be issued when they stray from an intended route. Unless greater attention is paid to the role of trust and interaction in GPS applications then there is a danger that we will see an increasing number of these failures as positioning technologies become integral in the functioning of increasing numbers of applications.

  19. Interaction between intra-abdominal pressure and positive-end expiratory pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamili Anbar Torquato

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to quantify the interaction between increased intra-abdominal pressure and Positive-End Expiratory Pressure. METHODS: In 30 mechanically ventilated ICU patients with a fixed tidal volume, respiratory system plateau and abdominal pressure were measured at a Positive-End Expiratory Pressure level of zero and 10 cm H2O. The measurements were repeated after placing a 5 kg weight on the patients' belly. RESULTS: After the addition of 5 kg to the patients' belly at zero Positive-End Expiratory Pressure, both intra-abdominal pressure (p<0.001 and plateau pressures (p=0.005 increased significantly. Increasing the Positive-End Expiratory Pressure levels from zero to 10 cm H2O without weight on the belly did not result in any increase in intra-abdominal pressure (p=0.165. However, plateau pressures increased significantly (p< 0.001. Increasing Positive-End Expiratory Pressure from zero to 10 cm H2O and adding 5 kg to the belly increased intra-abdominal pressure from 8.7 to 16.8 (p<0.001 and plateau pressure from 18.26 to 27.2 (p<0.001. Maintaining Positive-End Expiratory Pressure at 10 cm H2O and placing 5 kg on the belly increased intra-abdominal pressure from 12.3 +/- 1.7 to 16.8 +/- 1.7 (p<0.001 but did not increase plateau pressure (26.6+/-1.2 to 27.2 +/-1.1 -p=0.83. CONCLUSIONS: The addition of a 5kg weight onto the abdomen significantly increased both IAP and the airway plateau pressure, confirming that intra-abdominal hypertension elevates the plateau pressure. However, plateau pressure alone cannot be considered a good indicator for the detection of elevated intra-abdominal pressure in patients under mechanical ventilation using PEEP. In these patients, the intra-abdominal pressure must also be measured.

  20. Assessing historical empathy through simulation – How do Finnish teacher students achieve contextual historical empathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka Rantala

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been a great deal of international debate about introducing historical empathy as the focus in teaching history. However, as it is, the contents of the concept have been included in the curricula in many countries. Nevertheless, practising stepping into the shoes of a person from a previous era is still in its infancy in schools in many locations – Finland included. This article discusses Finnish class teacher students' understanding of historical empathy. The article is based on a study where 360 class teacher students played a game simulating the Cuban Missile Crisis. Their task was to assume the roles of the superpower leaders and make decisions on the basis of these roles. The simulation showed that a majority of the student teachers are able to attain a level of contextual historical empathy. They were able to empathize with the historical context in question and make such decisions that would have been possible for the historical actors. Some of the playing groups on the other hand, referred to their current knowledge and attitudes, which, according to Ashby and Lee's empathy classification, shows lower-level empathy. The study corroborates previous research results concerning great discrepancies in the understanding of empathy prevalent within one age group. Moreover, the study raises the question of how historical empathy should be handled in teaching if many future teachers have difficulties in understanding it.

  1. The Impact of Discrepant Verbal-Nonverbal Messages in the Teacher-Student Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    Noting that teachers' nonverbal behaviors are frequently inconsistent with their verbal messages, a situation that detracts from student learning, this paper offers an activity for focusing prospective teachers' attentions on the frequency and impact of discrepant verbal-nonverbal messages occurring in the classroom. The step-by-step process is…

  2. Exploring Teacher-Student Interactions: Communities of Practice, Ecological Learning Systems--or Something Else?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, V. J.

    2017-01-01

    A small-scale action research project was used to consider the policy and rhetoric surrounding development of the "expert learner" and how this might be further explored to provide opportunities for learners to have greater direct involvement in reflection and discussion with teachers. The research was based within a further education…

  3. K-12 Online Teacher Beliefs: Relationships among Intelligence, Confidence, Teacher-Student Interactions, and Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Ploeg, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    The vigorous expansion of online learning in K-12 education is a recent change to the conceptualization of schooling that has been occurring for more than 10 years. However, methods used for recruiting, hiring, and preparing online teachers have not been altered beyond the current federal standard defined by No Child Left Behind of Highly…

  4. The Impact of Teacher-Student Relationships and Achievement Motivation on Students' Intentions to Dropout According to Socio-Economic Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Julie; Chouinard, Roch; Janosz, Michel

    2011-01-01

    The main goal was to test if teacher-student relationships and achievement motivation are predicting dropout intention equally for low and high socio-economic status students. A questionnaire measuring teacher-student relationships and achievement motivation was administered to 2,360 French Canadian secondary students between 12 and 15 years old…

  5. Can Appreciative Inquiry Increase Positive Interactions, Student Self-Advocacy and Turn-Taking during IEP Meetings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozik, Peter L.

    2018-01-01

    This comparative research study in the context of action research documents the effects of Appreciative Inquiry (AI) on positive participant interactions, student turn-taking and self-advocacy interactions during IEP meetings that focused on student transition to post-secondary outcomes. AI was implemented as a written protocol for conducting IEP…

  6. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE USE OF KANGAROO POSITION ON PRETERM BABIES AND MOTHER-CHILD INTERACTION UPON DISCHARGE

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes, Cynthia Ribeiro do Nascimento; Campos, Lu?s Gustavo; Lucena, Aline Moreira; Pereira, Janser Moura; da Costa, Patr?cia Rodrigues; de Lima, Fl?via Aparecida Felipe; Azevedo, Vivian Mara Gon?alves de Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the influence of the Kangaroo Position duration in the initial interactions between mothers and preterm infants. Methods: This is an exploratory prospective observational study that analyzed the mother-infant interaction during breastfeeding, before hospital discharge. All eligible newborns, with a gestational age of 28-32 weeks and a birth weight of 1,000-1,800 g from June 11 to September 31, 2014 were included. The films of the interaction were evaluated by th...

  7. Depth of interaction resolution measurements for a high resolution PET detector using position sensitive avalanche photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yongfeng; Dokhale, Purushottam A; Silverman, Robert W; Shah, Kanai S; McClish, Mickel A; Farrell, Richard; Entine, Gerald; Cherry, Simon R

    2006-01-01

    We explore dual-ended read out of LSO arrays with two position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) as a high resolution, high efficiency depth-encoding detector for PET applications. Flood histograms, energy resolution and depth of interaction (DOI) resolution were measured for unpolished LSO arrays with individual crystal sizes of 1.0, 1.3 and 1.5 mm, and for a polished LSO array with 1.3 mm pixels. The thickness of the crystal arrays was 20 mm. Good flood histograms were obtained for all four arrays, and crystals in all four arrays can be clearly resolved. Although the amplitude of each PSAPD signal decreases as the interaction depth moves further from the PSAPD, the sum of the two PSAPD signals is essentially constant with irradiation depth for all four arrays. The energy resolutions were similar for all four arrays, ranging from 14.7% to 15.4%. A DOI resolution of 3-4 mm (including the width of the irradiation band which is ∼2 mm) was obtained for all the unpolished arrays. The best DOI resolution was achieved with the unpolished 1 mm array (average 3.5 mm). The DOI resolution for the 1.3 mm and 1.5 mm unpolished arrays was 3.7 and 4.0 mm respectively. For the polished array, the DOI resolution was only 16.5 mm. Summing the DOI profiles across all crystals for the 1 mm array only degraded the DOI resolution from 3.5 mm to 3.9 mm, indicating that it may not be necessary to calibrate the DOI response separately for each crystal within an array. The DOI response of individual crystals in the array confirms this finding. These results provide a detailed characterization of the DOI response of these PSAPD-based PET detectors which will be important in the design and calibration of a PET scanner making use of this detector approach

  8. Interaction of bistable glass-coated microwires in different positional relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionova, V., E-mail: rodionova@magn.ru [Magnetism Department, Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, 236041 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Kudinov, N. [Magnetism Department, Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. [Departamento Fisica de Materiales, Facultad Quimicas, UPV/EHU, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain); Perov, N. [Magnetism Department, Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-05-01

    The amorphous ferromagnetic glass-coated microwires with positive magnetostriction constant of the metallic core possess the bistable magnetization reversal and the fast domain wall propagation along the microwire axis. These properties and also the magnetization processes in the systems of the microwires are of interest in the magnetic sensing technology, encoding systems and smart composite applications. In this work we present the results of the experimental investigation, simulations and theoretical estimations of the hysteresis process in the systems of the magnetically bistable microwires with different length and positional relationship between them. The location of the short microwires near the long microwire affects the switching fields (external coaxial magnetic field applied for starting of the domain wall propagation along the microwire axis) and the hysteresis process. The changes of these properties are not directly proportional to the value of the shorter microwire shift along the longer one. When the short microwire was placed in the middle of the long one and when the one end of the long microwire coincided with the end of the short one, the two-steps hysteresis loops were observed for both sample orientations: before and after sample rotation on 180 Degree-Sign . When the short microwire was placed close to the end of the long microwire (but did not coincide with it) we observed at first the two-steps hysteresis loop and single step behavior for one branch of the hysteresis loop after sample rotation. Moreover, changing of the orientation of the samples results in the shift of the switching field of the shorter microwire when its end was located near the end or coincided with the end of the longer one. This uncommon hysteresis behavior was explained and illustrated using results of the simulations. The values of microwires interaction were also estimated.

  9. Interaction of bistable glass-coated microwires in different positional relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodionova, V.; Kudinov, N.; Zhukov, A.; Perov, N.

    2012-01-01

    The amorphous ferromagnetic glass-coated microwires with positive magnetostriction constant of the metallic core possess the bistable magnetization reversal and the fast domain wall propagation along the microwire axis. These properties and also the magnetization processes in the systems of the microwires are of interest in the magnetic sensing technology, encoding systems and smart composite applications. In this work we present the results of the experimental investigation, simulations and theoretical estimations of the hysteresis process in the systems of the magnetically bistable microwires with different length and positional relationship between them. The location of the short microwires near the long microwire affects the switching fields (external coaxial magnetic field applied for starting of the domain wall propagation along the microwire axis) and the hysteresis process. The changes of these properties are not directly proportional to the value of the shorter microwire shift along the longer one. When the short microwire was placed in the middle of the long one and when the one end of the long microwire coincided with the end of the short one, the two-steps hysteresis loops were observed for both sample orientations: before and after sample rotation on 180°. When the short microwire was placed close to the end of the long microwire (but did not coincide with it) we observed at first the two-steps hysteresis loop and single step behavior for one branch of the hysteresis loop after sample rotation. Moreover, changing of the orientation of the samples results in the shift of the switching field of the shorter microwire when its end was located near the end or coincided with the end of the longer one. This uncommon hysteresis behavior was explained and illustrated using results of the simulations. The values of microwires interaction were also estimated.

  10. Interactive "Video doctor" counseling reduces drug and sexual risk behaviors among HIV-positive patients in diverse outpatient settings

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, P; Ciccarone, D; Gansky, SA; Bangsberg, DR; Clanon, K; McPhee, SJ; Calderón, SH; Bogetz, A; Gerbert, B

    2008-01-01

    Background Reducing substance use and unprotected sex by HIV-positive persons improves individual health status while decreasing the risk of HIV transmission. Despite recommendations that health care providers screen and counsel their HIV-positive patients for ongoing behavioral risks, it is unknown how to best provide “prevention with positives” in clinical settings. Positive Choice, an interactive, patient-tailored computer program, was developed in the United States to improve clinic-based...

  11. Dynamics of teacher-student relationships: stability and change across elementary school and the influence on children's academic success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spilt, J.L.; Hughes, J.N.; Wu, J.Y.; Kwok, O.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study modeled teacher-student relationship trajectories throughout elementary school to predict gains in achievement in an ethnic-diverse sample of 657 academically at-risk students (mean age = 6.57 years, SD = .39). Teacher reports of warmth and conflict were collected in Grades 1-5.

  12. The Status of Corporal Punishment in Jordanian Primary Schools from the Perspectives Of: Teachers, Students, and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khateeb, Linda Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the status of corporal punishment in Jordanian Primary schools from the perspectives of: Teachers, students, and parents. The corpus of the study comprises (95) Male and female teachers, (135) male and female students form Jordanian primary schools. Two questionnaire forms were used in this study: one for teachers and…

  13. Teacher Emotions in the Classroom: Associations with Students' Engagement, Classroom Discipline and the Interpersonal Teacher-Student Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenauer, Gerda; Hascher, Tina; Volet, Simone E.

    2015-01-01

    The present study explores teacher emotions, in particular how they are predicted by students' behaviour and the interpersonal aspect of the teacher-student relationship (TSR). One hundred thirty-two secondary teachers participated in a quantitative study relying on self-report questionnaire data. Based on the model of teacher emotions by Frenzel…

  14. Teacher-Student Relationship and Academic Achievement: A Cross-Lagged Longitudinal Study on Three Different Age Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košir, Katja; Tement, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Although the relation between teacher--student relationship and academic achievement has been addressed in many studies, the reciprocal relations between these two constructs have not been explored sufficiently. The aim of the present study was to test three competing models that hypothesized directionality of influence in relations between…

  15. Pre-Service Teachers' Conceptions of Effective Teacher Talk: Their Critical Reflections on a Sample Teacher-Student Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Eun; Kim, Kyoung-Tae

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore pre-service elementary teachers' (PSTs') conceptions of effective teacher talk in mathematics instruction, which were interpreted primarily based on the concept of communicative approach. This was accomplished through a task that involves analyzing and evaluating a sample teacher-student dialogue. This study…

  16. Teachers' Views on the Impact of Teacher-Student Relationships on School Dropout: A Bourdieusian Analysis of Misrecognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairz-Wirth, Erna; Feldmann, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on Pierre Bourdieu's relational theory this paper shows that many teachers misrecognize the impact of teacher-student relationships on school dropout. The study is based on a series of 60 semi-structured interviews with teachers from Austrian secondary schools. The analysis of the empirical data reveals that many teachers attribute school…

  17. Educational Attainment, Teacher-Student Ratios, and the Risk of Adult Incarceration among U.S. Birth Cohorts since 1910

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arum, Richard; LaFree, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship between school characteristics, such as teacher-student ratios, and the risk of incarceration in adulthood. Educational skeptics argue that investment in schools has little effect on outcomes, such as criminality or the risk of incarceration, because criminal propensities are fixed at an early age and…

  18. The Subak Cultural Landscape as Environmental Education: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Experiences of Balinese Teachers, Student Teachers, and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surata, Sang Putu Kaler; Vipriyanti, Nyoman Utari

    2018-01-01

    Bali's subak cultural landscape, with its ancient and extensive paddy-fields and irrigation system, is a valuable resource for place-based education. However, this landscape is threatened by various problems. Here we analyze the relationships among Balinese teachers, student teachers, and students, and review their knowledge, attitudes, and…

  19. Solvation of positive ions in water: the dominant role of water-water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krekeler, Christian; Site, Luigi Delle

    2007-01-01

    Local polarization effects, induced by monovalent and divalent positive ions in water, influence (and in turn are influenced by) the large-scale structural properties of the solvent. Experiments can only distinguish this process of interplay in a generic qualitative way. Instead, first-principles calculations can address the question at both the electronic and atomistic scale, accounting for electronic polarization as well as geometrical conformations. For this reason we study the extension of the scales' interconnection by means of first-principle Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics applied to systems of different size. In this way we identify the general aspects dominating the physics of the first solvation shell and their connection to the effects related to the formation of the outer shells and eventually the bulk. We show that while the influence of the ions is extended to the first shell only, the water-water interaction is instead playing a dominant role even within the first shell independently of the size or the charge of the ion. (fast track communication)

  20. Interacting Effects Induced by Two Neighboring Pits Considering Relative Position Parameters and Pit Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfang Huang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For pre-corroded aluminum alloy 7075-T6, the interacting effects of two neighboring pits on the stress concentration are comprehensively analyzed by considering various relative position parameters (inclination angle θ and dimensionless spacing parameter λ and pit depth (d with the finite element method. According to the severity of the stress concentration, the critical corrosion regions, bearing high susceptibility to fatigue damage, are determined for intersecting and adjacent pits, respectively. A straightforward approach is accordingly proposed to conservatively estimate the combined stress concentration factor induced by two neighboring pits, and a concrete application example is presented. It is found that for intersecting pits, the normalized stress concentration factor Ktnor increases with the increase of θ and λ and always reaches its maximum at θ = 90°, yet for adjacent pits, Ktnor decreases with the increase of λ and the maximum value appears at a slight asymmetric location. The simulations reveal that Ktnor follows a linear and an exponential relationship with the dimensionless depth parameter Rd for intersecting and adjacent cases, respectively.

  1. Laughter and the Management of Divergent Positions in Peer Review Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raclaw, Joshua; Ford, Cecilia E.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we focus on how participants in peer review interactions use laughter as a resource as they publicly report divergence of evaluative positions, divergence that is typical in the give and take of joint grant evaluation. Using the framework of conversation analysis, we examine the infusion of laughter and multimodal laugh-relevant practices into sequences of talk in meetings of grant reviewers deliberating on the evaluation and scoring of high-level scientific grant applications. We focus on a recurrent sequence in these meetings, what we call the score-reporting sequence, in which the assigned reviewers first announce the preliminary scores they have assigned to the grant. We demonstrate that such sequences are routine sites for the use of laugh practices to navigate the initial moments in which divergence of opinion is made explicit. In the context of meetings convened for the purposes of peer review, laughter thus serves as a valuable resource for managing the socially delicate but institutionally required reporting of divergence and disagreement that is endemic to meetings where these types of evaluative tasks are a focal activity. PMID:29170594

  2. Chinese Teachers’ Professional Identity and Beliefs about the Teacher-Student Relationships in an Intercultural Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Li; Du, Xiangyun

    2014-01-01

    -teacher relationships are shaped by both their prior experiences and backgrounds and the current social and cultural contexts in which they are situated. Changes of context (e.g., from China to Denmark) often lead to a transformation of their professional identity and beliefs. Being a teacher in an intercultural......This paper presents a qualitative study of immigrant Chinese teachers’ professional identity and beliefs about the teacher-student relationship in an intercultural context. Theoretically, this study takes its departure from a sociocultural perspective on understanding professional identity....... The empirical analysis in the study drew mainly upon ethnographic interviews with a group of Chinese language teachers in Denmark concerning their life experiences, perceptions, and beliefs. The results of this study suggest that teachers’ beliefs about their roles as teachers and about student...

  3. Soil hydrology of agroforestry systems: Competition for water or positive tree-crops interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerjets, Rowena; Richter, Falk; Jansen, Martin; Carminati, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    belowground tree-crop interactions and demonstrate the positive effect of tree strips in reducing drought stress in crops.

  4. Empowering school personnel for positive youth development: the case of Hong Kong school social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Siu-ming

    2009-01-01

    While empowerment has become a popular concept in working with adolescents, few attempts have been made to explore the possibilities for empowering school personnel to create an environment in which young people can make maximum use of the opportunity to learn and grow. Based on the field experiences of 15 Hong Kong school social workers, this article examines how practitioners use various strategies to interact with school personnel to generate empowering practices in the school setting: namely, (1) exerting influence on school personnel in daily conversations and interactions; (2) creating an environment conducive to the teacher-student relationship; (3) achieving consensus with school personnel through lobbying and negotiation; and (4) collaborating with school personnel to organize life education and positive youth development programs. The findings provide valuable reference materials to guide other practitioners in applying the empowerment approach in actual practice. It also helps fill the gap in existing literature on empowerment and school social work.

  5. Interactions between sleeping position and feeding on cardiorespiratory activity in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifer, William P; Myers, Michael M; Sahni, Rakesh; Ohira-Kist, Kiyoko; Kashyap, Sudha; Stark, Raymond I; Schulze, Karl F

    2005-11-01

    Infants sleeping in the prone position are at greater risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Sleep position-dependent changes in cardiorespiratory activity may contribute to this increased risk. Cardiorespiratory activity is also affected by feeding. Twenty prematurely-born infants were studied at 31-36 weeks postconceptional age while sleeping in the prone and supine positions. Heart rate, respiratory rate, and patterns of variability were recorded during interfeed intervals, and effects of position and time after feeding were analyzed by repeated measures analyses of variance. There were significant effects of both sleeping position and time after feeding. Heart rate is higher and heart period variability is lower in the prone position, and the effects of sleeping position on cardiac functioning are more pronounced during the middle of the intrafeed interval. In preterm infants, autonomic responses to nutrient processing modulate the cardiorespiratory effects of sleeping position. Prone sleeping risk may vary with time after feeding. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The Interaction between Personality, Social Network Position and Involvement in Innovation Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Dolgova (Evgenia); W. van Olffen (Woody); F.A.J. van den Bosch (Frans); H.W. Volberda (Henk)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract This dissertation proposal investigates how personality and individuals’ social network position affect individuals’ involvement into the innovation process. It posits that people would feel inclined to become involved into the different phases of the innovation process

  7. Who is the competent physics student? A study of students' positions and social interaction in small-group discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due, Karin

    2014-06-01

    This article describes a study which explored the social interaction and the reproduction and challenge of gendered discourses in small group discussions in physics. Data for the study consisted of video recordings of eight upper secondary school groups solving physics problems and 15 audiotaped individual interviews with participating students. The analysis was based on gender theory viewing gender both as a process and a discourse. Specifically discursive psychology analysis was used to examine how students position themselves and their peers within discourses of physics and gender. The results of the study reveal how images of physics and of "skilled physics student" were constructed in the context of the interviews. These discourses were reconstructed in the students' discussions and their social interactions within groups. Traditional gendered positions were reconstructed, for example with boys positioned as more competent in physics than girls. These positions were however also resisted and challenged.

  8. The Use of Individualized Video Modeling to Enhance Positive Peer Interactions in Three Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Vanessa A.; Prior, Tessa; Smart, Emily; Boelema, Tanya; Drysdale, Heather; Harcourt, Susan; Roche, Laura; Waddington, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    The study described in this article sought to enhance the social interaction skills of 3 preschool children using video modeling. All children had been assessed as having difficulties in their interactions with peers. Two were above average on internalizing problems and the third was above average on externalizing problems. The study used a…

  9. Positive Social Interactions in a Lifespan Perspective with a Focus on Opioidergic and Oxytocinergic Systems: Implications for Neuroprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonnello, Valentina; Petrocchi, Nicola; Farinelli, Marina; Ottaviani, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, a growing interest has emerged in the beneficial effects of positive social interactions on health. The present work aims to review animal and human studies linking social interactions and health throughout the lifespan, with a focus on current knowledge of the possible mediating role of opioids and oxytocin. During the prenatal period, a positive social environment contributes to regulating maternal stress response and protecting the fetus from exposure to maternal active glucocorticoids. Throughout development, positive social contact with the caregiver acts as a “hidden regulator” and promotes infant neuroaffective development. Postnatal social neuroprotection interventions involving caregiver–infant physical contact seem to be crucial for rescuing preterm infants at risk for neurodevelopmental disorders. Attachment figures and friendships in adulthood continue to have a protective role for health and brain functioning, counteracting brain aging. In humans, implementation of meditative practices that promote compassionate motivation and prosocial behavior appears beneficial for health in adolescents and adults. Human and animal studies suggest the oxytocinergic and opioidergic systems are important mediators of the effects of social interactions. However, most of the studies focus on a specific phase of life (i.e., adulthood). Future studies should focus on the role of opioids and oxytocin in positive social interactions adopting a lifespan perspective. PMID:27538784

  10. Social Interaction and Conditional Self-Discrimination under a Paradigm of Avoidance and Positive Reinforcement in Wistar Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penagos-Corzo, Julio C.; Pérez-Acosta, Andrés M.; Hernández, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The experiment reported here uses a conditional self-discrimination task to examine the influence of social interaction on the facilitation of self-discrimination in rats. The study is based on a previous report (Penagos- Corzo et al., 2011) showing positive evidence of such facilitation, but extending the exposition to social interaction…

  11. Developing Teaching Assistants' Skills in Positive Behaviour Management: An Application of Video Interaction Guidance in a Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Ben; Richardson, Sally; Hindle, Sarah; Grayson, Katy

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports an action research project in a school in the UK designed to investigate the impact of a brief Video Interaction Guidance (VIG) intervention in promoting skills of non-teaching staff in positive behaviour management. A summary of the literature in relation to VIG is provided before describing the project and data collected. Ten…

  12. Alternative stable states and alternative endstates of community assembly through intra- and interspecific positive and negative interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerla, D.J.; Mooij, W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Positive and negative interactions within and between species may occur simultaneously, with the net effect depending on population densities. For instance, at low densities plants may ameliorate stress, while competition for resources dominates at higher densities. Here, we propose a simple

  13. Observed fearlessness and positive parenting interact to predict childhood callous-unemotional behaviors among low-income boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Rebecca; Shaw, Daniel S; Hyde, Luke W

    2017-03-01

    Callous-unemotional behaviors identify children at risk for severe and chronic antisocial behavior. Research is needed to establish pathways from temperament and parenting factors that give rise to callous-unemotional behaviors, including interactions of positive versus harsh parenting with child fearlessness. Multimethod data, including parent reports and observations of parent and child behavior, were drawn from a prospective, longitudinal sample of low-income boys (N = 310) with assessments at 18, 24, and 42 months, and at ages 10-12 years old. Parent-reported callous-unemotional, oppositional, and attention-deficit factors were separable at 42 months. Callous-unemotional behaviors at 42 months predicted callous-unemotional behaviors at ages 10-12, accounting for earlier oppositional and attention-deficit behaviors and self-reported child delinquency at ages 10-12. Observations of fearlessness at 24 months predicted callous-unemotional behaviors at 42 months, but only when parents exhibited low observed levels of positive parenting. The interaction of fearlessness and low positive parenting indirectly predicted callous-unemotional behaviors at 10-12 via callous-unemotional behaviors at 42 months. Early fearlessness interacts with low positive parenting to predict early callous-unemotional behaviors, with lasting effects of this person-by-context interaction on callous-unemotional behaviors into late childhood. © 2016 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  14. Experimental study on interaction between a positive mass and a negative effective mass through a mass–spring system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Zhou

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the interaction between a positive mass and a negative effective mass through a three-mass chain connected with elastic springs, a pair of masses is designed to have an effective negative mass, and it interacts with the third positive one as if an equivalent two-mass chain. The dynamics of the equivalent two-mass chain shows that the two bodies may be self-accelerated in same direction when the effective mass becomes negative, the experiment is also conducted to demonstrate this type of motion. We further show that the energy principle (Hamilton’s principle is applicable if the energy of the negative mass unit is properly characterized. The result may be relevant to composite with cells of effective negative mass, their interaction with matrix may lead to more richer unexpected macroscopic responses.

  15. Minimizing Teacher Stress. Structuring Positive Interactions for Handicapped and Nonhandicapped Children in Physical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Nola R.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Components of an integrated physical education program, which consists of handicapped and nonhandicapped students, include: (1) activities that promote interaction among all students; (2) strategies that place handicapped and nonhandicapped students together; and (3) reinforcement of cooperative behavior. (CJ)

  16. Maximum likelihood positioning for gamma-ray imaging detectors with depth of interaction measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, Ch.W.; Ros, A.; Monzo, J.M.; Aliaga, R.J.; Ferrando, N.; Martinez, J.D.; Herrero, V.; Esteve, R.; Gadea, R.; Colom, R.J.; Toledo, J.; Mateo, F.; Sebastia, A.; Sanchez, F.; Benlloch, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The center of gravity algorithm leads to strong artifacts for gamma-ray imaging detectors that are based on monolithic scintillation crystals and position sensitive photo-detectors. This is a consequence of using the centroids as position estimates. The fact that charge division circuits can also be used to compute the standard deviation of the scintillation light distribution opens a way out of this drawback. We studied the feasibility of maximum likelihood estimation for computing the true gamma-ray photo-conversion position from the centroids and the standard deviation of the light distribution. The method was evaluated on a test detector that consists of the position sensitive photomultiplier tube H8500 and a monolithic LSO crystal (42mmx42mmx10mm). Spatial resolution was measured for the centroids and the maximum likelihood estimates. The results suggest that the maximum likelihood positioning is feasible and partially removes the strong artifacts of the center of gravity algorithm.

  17. Maximum likelihood positioning for gamma-ray imaging detectors with depth of interaction measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerche, Ch.W. [Grupo de Sistemas Digitales, ITACA, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: lerche@ific.uv.es; Ros, A. [Grupo de Fisica Medica Nuclear, IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 46980 Paterna (Spain); Monzo, J.M.; Aliaga, R.J.; Ferrando, N.; Martinez, J.D.; Herrero, V.; Esteve, R.; Gadea, R.; Colom, R.J.; Toledo, J.; Mateo, F.; Sebastia, A. [Grupo de Sistemas Digitales, ITACA, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Sanchez, F.; Benlloch, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Medica Nuclear, IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 46980 Paterna (Spain)

    2009-06-01

    The center of gravity algorithm leads to strong artifacts for gamma-ray imaging detectors that are based on monolithic scintillation crystals and position sensitive photo-detectors. This is a consequence of using the centroids as position estimates. The fact that charge division circuits can also be used to compute the standard deviation of the scintillation light distribution opens a way out of this drawback. We studied the feasibility of maximum likelihood estimation for computing the true gamma-ray photo-conversion position from the centroids and the standard deviation of the light distribution. The method was evaluated on a test detector that consists of the position sensitive photomultiplier tube H8500 and a monolithic LSO crystal (42mmx42mmx10mm). Spatial resolution was measured for the centroids and the maximum likelihood estimates. The results suggest that the maximum likelihood positioning is feasible and partially removes the strong artifacts of the center of gravity algorithm.

  18. Associations among teacher-student interpersonal relationships and students’ intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and academic achievement: A cross cultural study

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    This cross-cultural study explored associations among teacher-student relationship, students’ intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and students’ academic achievement in grade 5 and 6 students from Vancouver, Canada (n = 102) and Hong Kong, China (n = 207). Hong Kong students perceived their teachers to be more dissatisfied, strict, admonishing, and uncertain, while Vancouver students perceived their teachers to be more helpful and friendly. Students’ levels of intrinsic and extrinsic motivatio...

  19. Positive and Negative Interactions Observed Between Siblings: Moderating Effects for Children Exposed to Parents’ Conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Iturralde, Esti; Margolin, Gayla; Spies Shapiro, Lauren A.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated links between interparental conflict appraisals (specifically threat and self-blame), sibling relationship quality (positive and negative dimensions), and anxiety in sibling pairs comprised of an adolescent and a younger sibling close in age. Sibling relationship quality was measured through behavioral observation. Links between self-blame and anxiety were moderated by sibling relationship quality. In older siblings, positive behavior with a sibling was associated with...

  20. TEACHER-STUDENTS DISCOURSE IN ENGLISH TEACHING AT HIGH SCHOOL (CLASSROOM DISCOURSE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamsyah Harahap

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available English classroom's process of teaching and learning is an important aspect of successful English teaching and learning. The analysis of classroom discourse is a very important form which the classroom process research has taken place. The present study focuses on SMA (high school English classroom discourse. The microethnography of Spradley was the research method deployed. Through a detailed description and analysis of the collected data referring to Sinclair and Coulthard’s classroom discourse analysis model, the problem of patterns of the classroom discourse is made clear. On the basis of the discourse patterns' problem found, a few strategies for high school English teachers are put forward through the teacher training in order to improve English teaching and learning at high school in Indonesia. The research results showed that teacher talk highly dominated the English classroom discourse; 94% of teacher-students talk. IRF Model of Sinclair and Coulthard was not found in the English classroom (only IF pattern and no lesson achieved.

  1. Commentary: doctors without boundaries: the ethics of teacher-student relationships in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Gregory Luke; Mello, Michael J

    2010-05-01

    Possessed of both instinct and intellect, physician teachers are required to be respectful exemplars of professionalism and interpersonal ethics in all environments, be it the hospital, classroom, or outside the educational setting. Sometimes, even while protecting the sanctity of the teacher-student relationship, they may surreptitiously find themselves in the throes of consensual intimacy, boundary violations, student exploitation, or other negative interpersonal and/or departmental dynamics. One may question how an academic can consistently resolve this tension and summon the temperance, humility, charity, and restraint needed to subdue lust, pride, abuse, and incontinence in the workplace. One important answer may lie in an improved understanding of the moral necessity of social cooperation, fairness, reciprocity, and respect that is constitutive of the physician-teacher role. Although normative expectations and duties have been outlined in extant codes of ethics and conduct within academic medicine, to date, few training programs currently teach faculty and residents about the ethics of appropriate pedagogic and intimate relations between teaching staff and students, interns, residents, researchers, and other trainees. This essay highlights examples from history, literature, and medical ethics as one small step toward filling this void.

  2. A false-positive detection bias as a function of state and trait schizotypy in interaction with intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip eGrant

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hallucinatory experiences are by far not limited to patients with clinical psychosis. A number of internal and external factors may bring about such experiences in healthy individuals, whereby the personality trait of (positive schizotypy is a major mediator of individual differences. Psychotic experiences are defined as associating abnormal meaning to real but objectively irrelevant perceptions. Especially the ambiguity of a stimulus correlates positively with the likelihood of abnormal interpretation, and intelligence is believed to have an important influence and act as protective against clinical psychosis in highly schizotypic individuals.In this study we presented 131 healthy participants with 216 15-letter strings containing either a word, a non-word or only random letters and asked them to report, whether or not they believed to have seen a word. The aim was to replicate findings that participants with high values in positive schizotypy on the trait-level make more false-positive errors and assess the role of stimulus-ambiguity and verbal intelligence. Additionally, we wanted to examine whether the same effect could be shown for indices of state schizotypy.Our results support findings that both state and trait positive schizotypy explain significant variance in seeing things that are not there and that the properties of individual stimuli have additional strong effects on the false-positive hit rates. Finally, we found that verbal intelligence and positive schizotypy interact with stimulus-ambiguity in the production of false-positive perceptions.

  3. A false-positive detection bias as a function of state and trait schizotypy in interaction with intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Phillip; Balser, Mona; Munk, Aisha Judith Leila; Linder, Jens; Hennig, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Hallucinatory experiences are by far not limited to patients with clinical psychosis. A number of internal and external factors may bring about such experiences in healthy individuals, whereby the personality trait of (positive) schizotypy is a major mediator of individual differences. Psychotic experiences are defined as associating abnormal meaning to real but objectively irrelevant perceptions. Especially, the ambiguity of a stimulus correlates positively with the likelihood of abnormal interpretation, and intelligence is believed to have an important influence and act as protective against clinical psychosis in highly schizotypic individuals. In this study, we presented 131 healthy participants with 216 15-letter strings containing either a word, a non-word, or only random letters and asked them to report, whether or not they believed to have seen a word. The aim was to replicate findings that participants with high values in positive schizotypy on the trait-level make more false-positive errors and assess the role of stimulus-ambiguity and verbal intelligence. Additionally, we wanted to examine whether the same effect could be shown for indices of state schizotypy. Our results support findings that both state and trait positive schizotypy explain significant variance in "seeing things that are not there" and that the properties of individual stimuli have additional strong effects on the false-positive hit rates. Finally, we found that verbal intelligence and positive schizotypy interact with stimulus-ambiguity in the production of false-positive perceptions.

  4. Vocal and visual stimulation, congruence and lateralization affect brain oscillations in interspecies emotional positive and negative interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balconi, Michela; Vanutelli, Maria Elide

    2016-01-01

    The present research explored the effect of cross-modal integration of emotional cues (auditory and visual (AV)) compared with only visual (V) emotional cues in observing interspecies interactions. The brain activity was monitored when subjects processed AV and V situations, which represented an emotional (positive or negative), interspecies (human-animal) interaction. Congruence (emotionally congruous or incongruous visual and auditory patterns) was also modulated. electroencephalography brain oscillations (from delta to beta) were analyzed and the cortical source localization (by standardized Low Resolution Brain Electromagnetic Tomography) was applied to the data. Frequency band (mainly low-frequency delta and theta) showed a significant brain activity increasing in response to negative compared to positive interactions within the right hemisphere. Moreover, differences were found based on stimulation type, with an increased effect for AV compared with V. Finally, delta band supported a lateralized right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activity in response to negative and incongruous interspecies interactions, mainly for AV. The contribution of cross-modality, congruence (incongruous patterns), and lateralization (right DLPFC) in response to interspecies emotional interactions was discussed at light of a "negative lateralized effect."

  5. Parental Interactions with Children with and without Mental Retardation: Behavior Management, Coerciveness, and Positive Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Frank J.; Phillippe, Kent A.

    1993-01-01

    Comparison of in-home interactions of mothers and fathers with their school-age children found that parents in 53 families having children with mental retardation were more controlling and less playful with their child than were parents of nonretarded children but they did effectively employ behavior management practices without resorting to…

  6. Interactive Football-Training Based on Rebounders with Hit Position Sensing and Audio-Visual Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller; Grønbæk, Kaj; Thomassen, Nikolaj

    2014-01-01

    . However, most of these tools are created with a single goal, either to measure or train, and are often used and tested in very controlled settings. In this paper, we present an interactive football-training platform, called Football Lab, featuring sensor- mounted rebounders as well as audio-visual...

  7. Long-Term Musical Group Interaction Has a Positive Influence on Empathy in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitch, Tal-Chen; Cross, Ian; Burnard, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Musical group interaction (MGI) is a complex social setting requiring certain cognitive skills that may also elicit shared psychological states. We argue that many MGI-specific features may also be important for emotional empathy, the ability to experience another person's emotional state. We thus hypothesized that long-term repeated participation…

  8. Negative Plant-Soil Feedback and Positive Species Interaction in a Herbaceous Plant Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonanomi, G.; Rietkerk, M.; Dekker, S.C.; Mazzoleni, S.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that facilitative interaction and negative plant¿soil feedback are driving factors of plant population dynamics and community processes. We studied the intensity and the relative impact of negative feedback on clonal growth and seed germination of Scirpus holoschoenus, a

  9. Negative Plant–Soil Feedback and Positive Species Interaction in a Herbaceous Plant Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonanomi, G.; Rietkerk, M.G.; Dekker, S.C.; Mazzoleni, S.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that facilitative interaction and negative plant–soil feedback are driving factors of plant population dynamics and community processes. We studied the intensity and the relative impact of negative feedback on clonal growth and seed germination of Scirpus holoschoenus, a

  10. Exploring the interplay between work stress and socioeconomic position in relation to common health complaints: the role of interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivanen, Susanna

    2011-10-01

    This study explored the interplay between work stress and socioeconomic position and investigated if the interaction of work stress and low socioeconomic position is associated with poorer health. A representative sample of the Swedish working population, including 2,613 employees (48.7% women) aged 19-64 years, was analyzed. The health outcomes were poor self-rated health, psychological distress, and musculoskeletal pain. Work stress was operationalized as job strain and effort-reward imbalance, and socioeconomic position as occupational class. Interaction analysis was based on departure from additivity as criterion, and a synergy index (SI) was applied, using odds ratios (ORs) from logistic regressions for women and men. In fully adjusted models, work stress, and in a lesser extent also socioeconomic position, was associated with higher odds for the three health complaints. The prevalence of poorer health was highest among those individuals jointly exposed to high work stress and low occupational class, with ORs ranging from 1.94 to 6.77 (95%CI 1.01-18.65) for poor self-rated health, 2.42-8.44 (95%CI 1.28-27.06) for psychological distress and 1.93-3.93 (95%CI 1.11-6.78) for musculoskeletal pain. The joint influence of work stress and low socioeconomic position on health was additive rather than multiplicative. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Relativistic corrections to the algebra of position variables and spin-orbital interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei A. Deriglazov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of vector model of spin, we discuss the problem of a covariant formalism [35] concerning the discrepancy between relativistic and Pauli Hamiltonians. We show how the spin-induced non-commutativity of a position accounts the discrepancy on the classical level, without appeal to the Dirac equation and Foldy–Wouthuysen transformation.

  12. Relativistic corrections to the algebra of position variables and spin-orbital interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deriglazov, Alexei A., E-mail: alexei.deriglazov@ufjf.edu.br [Departamento de Matemática, ICE, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Laboratory of Mathematical Physics, Tomsk Polytechnic University, 634050 Tomsk, Lenin Ave. 30 (Russian Federation); Pupasov-Maksimov, Andrey M., E-mail: pupasov.maksimov@ufjf.edu.br [Departamento de Matemática, ICE, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil)

    2016-10-10

    In the framework of vector model of spin, we discuss the problem of a covariant formalism [35] concerning the discrepancy between relativistic and Pauli Hamiltonians. We show how the spin-induced non-commutativity of a position accounts the discrepancy on the classical level, without appeal to the Dirac equation and Foldy–Wouthuysen transformation.

  13. Front-end circuit for position sensitive silicon and vacuum tube photomultipliers with gain control and depth of interaction measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrero, Vicente; Colom, Ricardo; Gadea, Rafael; Lerche, Christoph W.; Cerda, Joaquin; Sebastia, Angel; Benlloch, Jose M.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon Photomultipliers, though still under development for mass production, may be an alternative to traditional Vacuum Photomultipliers Tubes (VPMT). As a consequence, electronic front-ends initially designed for VPMT will need to be modified. In this simulation, an improved architecture is presented which is able to obtain impact position and depth of interaction of a gamma ray within a continuous scintillation crystal, using either kind of PM. A current sensitive preamplifier stage with individual gain adjustment interfaces the multi-anode PM outputs with a current division resistor network. The preamplifier stage allows to improve front-end processing delay and temporal resolution behavior as well as to increase impact position calculation resolution. Depth of interaction (DOI) is calculated from the width of the scintillation light distribution, which is related to the sum of voltages in resistor network input nodes. This operation is done by means of a high-speed current mode scheme

  14. Alternative stable states and alternative endstates of community assembly through intra- and interspecific positive and negative interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerla, Daan J; Mooij, Wolf M

    2014-09-01

    Positive and negative interactions within and between species may occur simultaneously, with the net effect depending on population densities. For instance, at low densities plants may ameliorate stress, while competition for resources dominates at higher densities. Here, we propose a simple two-species model in which con- and heterospecifics have a positive effect on per capita growth rate at low densities, while negative interactions dominate at high densities. The model thus includes both Allee effects (intraspecific positive effects) and mutualism (interspecific positive effects), as well as intra- and interspecific competition. Using graphical methods we derive conditions for alternative stable states and species coexistence. We show that mutual non-invasibility (i.e. the inability of each species to invade a population of the other) is more likely when species have a strong positive effect on the own species or a strong negative effect on the other species. Mutual non-invasibility implies alternative stable states, however, there may also be alternative stable states at which species coexist. In the case of species symmetry (i.e. when species are indistinguishable), such alternative coexistence states require that if the positive effect exerted at low densities at the own species is stronger than on the other species, the negative effect at higher densities is also stronger on the own species than on the other species, or, vice versa, if the interspecific positive effects at low densities are stronger than the intraspecific effects, the negative effects at higher densities are also stronger between species than within species. However, the reachability of alternative stable states is restricted by the frequency and density at which species are introduced during community assembly, so that alternative stable states do not always represent alternative endstates of community assembly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Simple Negative Interaction in the Positive Transcriptional Feedback of a Single Gene Is Sufficient to Produce Reliable Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró-Bueno, Jesús M.; Rodríguez-Patón, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Negative and positive transcriptional feedback loops are present in natural and synthetic genetic oscillators. A single gene with negative transcriptional feedback needs a time delay and sufficiently strong nonlinearity in the transmission of the feedback signal in order to produce biochemical rhythms. A single gene with only positive transcriptional feedback does not produce oscillations. Here, we demonstrate that this single-gene network in conjunction with a simple negative interaction can also easily produce rhythms. We examine a model comprised of two well-differentiated parts. The first is a positive feedback created by a protein that binds to the promoter of its own gene and activates the transcription. The second is a negative interaction in which a repressor molecule prevents this protein from binding to its promoter. A stochastic study shows that the system is robust to noise. A deterministic study identifies that the dynamics of the oscillator are mainly driven by two types of biomolecules: the protein, and the complex formed by the repressor and this protein. The main conclusion of this paper is that a simple and usual negative interaction, such as degradation, sequestration or inhibition, acting on the positive transcriptional feedback of a single gene is a sufficient condition to produce reliable oscillations. One gene is enough and the positive transcriptional feedback signal does not need to activate a second repressor gene. This means that at the genetic level an explicit negative feedback loop is not necessary. The model needs neither cooperative binding reactions nor the formation of protein multimers. Therefore, our findings could help to clarify the design principles of cellular clocks and constitute a new efficient tool for engineering synthetic genetic oscillators. PMID:22205920

  16. Teachers' Emotional Expression in Interaction with Students of Different Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosen, Simona; Vitulic, Helena Smrtnik; Škraban, Olga Poljšak

    2011-01-01

    Emotions are an integral part of "classroom life" and are experienced in teacher-student interactions quite often (Hosotani & Imai-Matsumura, 2011). The present study focuses on teachers' emotions in classrooms. Its purpose is to establish which emotions are expressed by teachers in their interactions with students, the triggering…

  17. Electrostatic Interactions Positively Regulate K-Ras Nanocluster Formation and Function▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowman, Sarah J.; Ariotti, Nicholas; Goodall, Andrew; Parton, Robert G.; Hancock, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The organization of Ras proteins into plasma membrane nanoclusters is essential for high-fidelity signal transmission, but whether the nanoscale enviroments of different Ras nanoclusters regulate effector interactions is unknown. We show using high-resolution spatial mapping that Raf-1 is recruited to and retained in K-Ras-GTP nanoclusters. In contrast, Raf-1 recruited to the plasma membrane by H-Ras is not retained in H-Ras-GTP nanoclusters. Similarly, upon epidermal growth factor receptor activation, Raf-1 is preferentially recruited to K-Ras-GTP and not H-Ras-GTP nanoclusters. The formation of K-Ras-GTP nanoclusters is inhibited by phosphorylation of S181 in the C-terminal polybasic domain or enhanced by blocking S181 phosphorylation, with a concomitant reduction or increase in Raf-1 plasma membrane recruitment, respectively. Phosphorylation of S181 does not, however, regulate in vivo interactions with the nanocluster scaffold galectin-3 (Gal3), indicating separate roles for the polybasic domain and Gal3 in driving K-Ras nanocluster formation. Together, these data illustrate that Ras nanocluster composition regulates effector recruitment and highlight the importance of lipid/protein nanoscale environments to the activation of signaling cascades. PMID:18458061

  18. Exploring Lawyer-Client Interaction: A Qualitative Study of Positive Lawyer Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbers, Nieke A; van Wees, Kiliaan A P C; Akkermans, Arno J; Cuijpers, Pim; Bruinvels, David J

    2012-03-01

    Personal injury victims involved in compensation processes have a worse recovery than those not involved in compensation processes. One predictor for worse recovery is lawyer engagement. As some people argue that this negative relation between lawyer engagement and recovery may be explained by lawyers' attitude and communications to clients, it seems important to investigate lawyer-client interaction. Although procedural justice and therapeutic jurisprudence had previously discussed aspects relevant for lawyer-client interaction, the client's perspective has been rather ignored and only few empirical studies have been conducted. In this qualitative study, 21 traffic accident victims were interviewed about their experiences with their lawyer. Five desirable characteristics for lawyers were identified: communication, empathy, decisiveness, independence, and expertise. Communication and empathy corresponded with aspects already discussed in literature, whereas decisiveness, independence and expertise had been addressed only marginally. Further qualitative and quantitative research is necessary to establish preferable lawyer characteristics and to investigate what would improve the well-being of personal injury victims during the claims settlement process.

  19. Friendship through Interaction and Interaction through Friendship: Manifestations of Positive Politeness and Footing Changes in the Interaction of Two Friends Playing Chess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigenaga, Yasumasa

    2016-01-01

    The present study uses a video recording of two friends playing chess to observe, through the concept of "positive politeness, what strategies the participants employ to construct and maintain their relationship as close friends during an activity that includes moments of heightened tension. The study also examines the dynamics of the…

  20. Interactive Web-based Visualization of Atomic Position-time Series Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, S.; Karki, B. B.

    2017-12-01

    Extracting and interpreting the information contained in large sets of time-varying three dimensional positional data for the constituent atoms of simulated material is a challenging task. We have recently implemented a web-based visualization system to analyze the position-time series data extracted from the local or remote hosts. It involves a pre-processing step for data reduction, which involves skipping uninteresting parts of the data uniformly (at full atomic configuration level) or non-uniformly (at atomic species level or individual atom level). Atomic configuration snapshot is rendered using the ball-stick representation and can be animated by rendering successive configurations. The entire atomic dynamics can be captured as the trajectories by rendering the atomic positions at all time steps together as points. The trajectories can be manipulated at both species and atomic levels so that we can focus on one or more trajectories of interest, and can be also superimposed with the instantaneous atomic structure. The implementation was done using WebGL and Three.js for graphical rendering, HTML5 and Javascript for GUI, and Elasticsearch and JSON for data storage and retrieval within the Grails Framework. We have applied our visualization system to the simulation datatsets for proton-bearing forsterite (Mg2SiO4) - an abundant mineral of Earths upper mantle. Visualization reveals that protons (hydrogen ions) incorporated as interstitials are much more mobile than protons substituting the host Mg and Si cation sites. The proton diffusion appears to be anisotropic with high mobility along the x-direction, showing limited discrete jumps in other two directions.

  1. Studies of Interactions of Positive Helium Ions with Small Neutrals at Temperatures Below 50K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Martin Michael

    1990-01-01

    Interactions of He^+ ions with small neutrals are important because of their fundamental nature and applicability to other areas of research. In the past, very little work has been done on such systems at very low temperatures (T Boehringer and Arnold (1986) and Johnsen, Chen, and Biondi (1980). A new method of detecting the ions in the trap was also developed and implemented. The Fourier Transform Ion Z-resonance (FTIZR) technique took advantage of an induced coherence in the oscillations of the ions in the trap. This method allowed for measurement of faster ion -neutral reactions. This method was demonstrated by studying the non -resonant charge transfer process ^3He ^+{+}^4He{toatop >=ts}^3He{+}^4He^+. These measurements confirmed that the forward reaction is endothermic by about 1.1 meV.

  2. Exploring teachers’ conceptions of representations in mathematics through the lens of positive deliberative interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deonarain Brijlall

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on an exploration of teachers’ views on the meaning of mathematical representations in a democratic South Africa. We explored teachers’ conceptions of ‘mathematical representations’ as a means to promote dialogue and negotiation. These conceptions helped us to gauge how these teachers viewed representations in mathematics. Semi-structured questionnaires were administered to 76 high school mathematics teachers who were registered for an upgrading mathematics education qualification at a South African university. Common themes in teacher conceptions of representations were investigated as part of an inductive analysis of the written responses, which were considered in terms of practices that support dialogue and negotiation. Findings suggest that these conceptions are in line with progressive notions of classroom interactions such as the inquiry cooperation model. Furthermore, the findings suggest that teachers can support the development of classroom environments that promote democratic values.

  3. Interaction of a vacuum arc plasma beam with an obstacle positioned normal to the plasma flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarchin, O; Zhitomirsky, V N; Goldsmith, S; Boxman, R L

    2003-01-01

    The effect of an obstacle positioned normal to a plasma jet produced by a vacuum arc plasma source on the radial distribution of ion flux in the vicinity of the obstacle was studied. This study was motivated by interest in the mutual influence of tightly packed substrates on coatings in industrial vacuum arc deposition systems. The experimental system consisted of a vacuum arc plasma source, a straight plasma duct, and a multi-probe consisting of a removable disc obstacle and a set of ring probes for measuring the radial ion flux. A dc arc discharge was ignited in vacuum between a truncated cone-shaped Cu cathode and an annular anode. The plasma jet produced by cathode spots passed through the anode aperture into the straight plasma duct. An axial magnetic field guided the plasma jet in the duct. The multi-probe consisted of a removable disc obstacle and a set of five ring probes for measuring the radial plasma flux as a function of distance from the disc obstacle. The rings and the disc probes were coaxially arranged on the multi-probe assembly and positioned so that plasma from the source passed through the ring probes and then encountered the disc. The influence of the obstacle was determined by measuring the ring ion currents, both in the presence of the obstacle, and when the disc obstacle was removed. The difference between the measured ion currents with and without the obstacle was interpreted to be the contribution of reflected or sputtered particles from the obstacle to the radial ion flux. The ring probes were biased by -60 V with respect to the grounded anode, to collect the saturated ion current. The multi-probe was connected to a movable stem, and positioned at different distances from the plasma source. A plasma density of ∼6 x 10 17 m -3 was estimated in this study based on the ion current to the obstacle. The radial ion flux collected by the ring probes increased by 20-25% due to the presence of the obstacle. As the calculated mean free path for

  4. Niche construction within riparian corridors. Part II: The unexplored role of positive intraspecific interactions in Salicaceae species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corenblit, Dov; Garófano-Gómez, Virginia; González, Eduardo; Hortobágyi, Borbála; Julien, Frédéric; Lambs, Luc; Otto, Thierry; Roussel, Erwan; Steiger, Johannes; Tabacchi, Eric; Till-Bottraud, Irène

    2018-03-01

    Within riparian corridors, Salicaceae trees and shrubs affect hydrogeomorphic processes and lead to the formation of wooded fluvial landforms. These trees form dense stands and enhance plant anchorage, as grouped plants are less prone to be uprooted than free-standing individuals. This also enhances their role as ecosystem engineers through the trapping of sediment, organic matter, and nutrients. The landform formation caused by these wooded biogeomorphic landforms probably represents a positive niche construction, which ultimately leads, through facilitative processes, to an improved capacity of the individual trees to survive, exploit resources, and reach sexual maturity in the interval between destructive floods. The facilitative effects of riparian vegetation are well established; however, the nature and intensity of biotic interactions among trees of the same species forming dense woody stands and constructing the niche remain unclear. Our hypothesis is that the niche construction process also comprises more direct intraspecific interactions, such as cooperation or altruism. Our aim in this paper is to propose an original theoretical framework for positive intraspecific interactions among riparian Salicaceae species operating from establishment to sexual maturity. Within this framework, we speculate that (i) positive intraspecific interactions among trees are maximized in dynamic river reaches; (ii) during establishment, intraspecific facilitation (or helping) occurs among trees and this leads to the maintenance of a dense stand that improves survival and growth because saplings protect each other from shear stress and scour; (iii) in addition to the improved capacity to trap mineral and organic matter, individuals that constitute the dense stand can cooperate to mutually support a mycorrhizal network that will connect plants, soil, and groundwater and influence nutrient transfer, cycling, and storage within the shared constructed niche; (iv) during post

  5. Negative (but not Positive) Parenting Interacts with Infant Negative Affect to Predict Infant Approach: Evidence of Diathesis-Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzman, Jacob B; Burt, Nicole M; Edwards, Erin S; Rosinski, Leanna D; Bridgett, David J

    2018-01-01

    Temperament by parenting interactions may reflect that individuals with greater risk are more likely to experience negative outcomes in adverse contexts (diathesis-stress) or that these individuals are more susceptible to contextual influences in a 'for better or for worse' pattern (differential susceptibility). Although such interactions have been identified for a variety of child outcomes, prior research has not examined approach characteristics - excitement and approach toward pleasurable activities - in the first year of life. Therefore, the current study investigated whether 6-month maternal reported infant negative affect - a phenotypic marker of risk/susceptibility - interacted with 8-month observed parenting behaviors (positive parenting, negative parenting) to predict 12-month infant behavioral approach. Based a sample of mothers and their infants ( N =150), results indicated that negative parenting was inversely associated with subsequent approach for infants with high, but not low, levels of early negative affect. Similar results did not occur regarding positive parenting. These findings better fit a diathesis-stress model rather than a differential susceptibility model. Implications and limitations of these findings are discussed.

  6. The collective benefits of feeling good and letting go: positive emotion and (dis)inhibition interact to predict cooperative behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, David G; Kraft-Todd, Gordon; Gruber, June

    2015-01-01

    Cooperation is central to human existence, forming the bedrock of everyday social relationships and larger societal structures. Thus, understanding the psychological underpinnings of cooperation is of both scientific and practical importance. Recent work using a dual-process framework suggests that intuitive processing can promote cooperation while deliberative processing can undermine it. Here we add to this line of research by more specifically identifying deliberative and intuitive processes that affect cooperation. To do so, we applied automated text analysis using the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) software to investigate the association between behavior in one-shot anonymous economic cooperation games and the presence inhibition (a deliberative process) and positive emotion (an intuitive process) in free-response narratives written after (Study 1, N = 4,218) or during (Study 2, N = 236) the decision-making process. Consistent with previous results, across both studies inhibition predicted reduced cooperation while positive emotion predicted increased cooperation (even when controlling for negative emotion). Importantly, there was a significant interaction between positive emotion and inhibition, such that the most cooperative individuals had high positive emotion and low inhibition. This suggests that inhibition (i.e., reflective or deliberative processing) may undermine cooperative behavior by suppressing the prosocial effects of positive emotion.

  7. The collective benefits of feeling good and letting go: positive emotion and (disinhibition interact to predict cooperative behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Rand

    Full Text Available Cooperation is central to human existence, forming the bedrock of everyday social relationships and larger societal structures. Thus, understanding the psychological underpinnings of cooperation is of both scientific and practical importance. Recent work using a dual-process framework suggests that intuitive processing can promote cooperation while deliberative processing can undermine it. Here we add to this line of research by more specifically identifying deliberative and intuitive processes that affect cooperation. To do so, we applied automated text analysis using the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC software to investigate the association between behavior in one-shot anonymous economic cooperation games and the presence inhibition (a deliberative process and positive emotion (an intuitive process in free-response narratives written after (Study 1, N = 4,218 or during (Study 2, N = 236 the decision-making process. Consistent with previous results, across both studies inhibition predicted reduced cooperation while positive emotion predicted increased cooperation (even when controlling for negative emotion. Importantly, there was a significant interaction between positive emotion and inhibition, such that the most cooperative individuals had high positive emotion and low inhibition. This suggests that inhibition (i.e., reflective or deliberative processing may undermine cooperative behavior by suppressing the prosocial effects of positive emotion.

  8. Effect of walking speed and placement position interactions in determining the accuracy of various newer pedometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonil Park

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Older types of pedometers had varied levels of accuracy, which ranged from 0% to 45%. In addition, to obtain accurate results, it was also necessary to position them in a certain way. By contrast, newer models can be placed anywhere on the body; however, their accuracy is unknown when they are placed at different body sites. We determined the accuracy of various newer pedometers under controlled laboratory and free walking conditions. A total of 40 participants, who varied widely in age and body mass index, were recruited for the study. The numbers of steps recorded using five different pedometers placed at the waist, the chest, in a pocket, and on an armband were compared against those counted with a hand tally counter. With the exception of one, all the pedometers were accurate at moderate walking speeds, irrespective of their placement on the body. However, the accuracy tended to decrease at slower and faster walking speeds, especially when the pedometers were worn in the pockets or kept in the purse (p < 0.05. In conclusion, most pedometers examined were accurate when they were placed at the waist, chest, and armband irrespective of the walking speed or terrain. However, some pedometers had reduced accuracy when they were kept in a pocket or placed in a purse, especially at a slower and faster walking speeds.

  9. A New Design Strategy for Observing Lithium Oxide Growth-Evolution Interactions Using Geometric Catalyst Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Won-Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S; Li, Jinyang; Tong, Xiao; Taylor, André D

    2016-08-10

    Understanding the catalyzed formation and evolution of lithium-oxide products in Li-O2 batteries is central to the development of next-generation energy storage technology. Catalytic sites, while effective in lowering reaction barriers, often become deactivated when placed on the surface of an oxygen electrode due to passivation by solid products. Here we investigate a mechanism for alleviating catalyst deactivation by dispersing Pd catalytic sites away from the oxygen electrode surface in a well-structured anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) porous membrane interlayer. We observe the cross-sectional product growth and evolution in Li-O2 cells by characterizing products that grow from the electrode surface. Morphological and structural details of the products in both catalyzed and uncatalyzed cells are investigated independently from the influence of the oxygen electrode. We find that the geometric decoration of catalysts far from the conductive electrode surface significantly improves the reaction reversibility by chemically facilitating the oxidation reaction through local coordination with PdO surfaces. The influence of the catalyst position on product composition is further verified by ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy in addition to morphological studies.

  10. Positive Charges on the Surface of Thaumatin Are Crucial for the Multi-Point Interaction with the Sweet Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Kigo, Satomi; Mitsumoto, Mayuko; Ohta, Keisuke; Suzuki, Mamoru; Mikami, Bunzo; Kitabatake, Naofumi; Tani, Fumito

    2018-01-01

    Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting protein, elicits sweet taste with a threshold of only 50 nM. Previous studies from our laboratory suggested that the complex model between the T1R2-T1R3 sweet receptor and thaumatin depends critically on the complementarity of electrostatic potentials. In order to further validate this model, we focused on three lysine residues (Lys78, Lys106, and Lys137), which were expected to be part of the interaction sites. Three thaumatin mutants (K78A, K106A, and K137A) were prepared and their threshold values of sweetness were examined. The results showed that the sweetness of K106A was reduced by about three times and those of K78A and K137A were reduced by about five times when compared to wild-type thaumatin. The three-dimensional structures of these mutants were also determined by X-ray crystallographic analyses at atomic resolutions. The overall structures of mutant proteins were similar to that of wild-type but the electrostatic potentials around the mutated sites became more negative. Since the three lysine residues are located in 20-40 Å apart each other on the surface of thaumatin molecule, these results suggest the positive charges on the surface of thaumatin play a crucial role in the interaction with the sweet receptor, and are consistent with a large surface is required for interaction with the sweet receptor, as proposed by the multipoint interaction model named wedge model.

  11. Quantum systems with position-dependent mass and spin-orbit interaction via Rashba and Dresselhaus terms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G. M., E-mail: agmschmidt@gmail.com; Portugal, L., E-mail: liciniolportugal@gmail.com; Jesus, Anderson L. de [Departamento de Física do polo universitário de Volta Redonda, Instituto de Ciências Exatas—Universidade Federal Fluminense, R. Des. Ellis Hermydio Figueira, 783, Volta Redonda, RJ CEP 27215-350 (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    We consider a particle with spin 1/2 with position-dependent mass moving in a plane. Considering separately Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions, we write down the Hamiltonian for this problem and solve it for Dirichlet boundary conditions. Our radial wavefunctions have two contributions: homogeneous ones which are written as Bessel functions of non-integer orders—that depend on angular momentum m—and particular solutions which are obtained after decoupling the non-homogeneous system. In this process, we find non-homogeneous Bessel equation, Laguerre, as well as biconfluent Heun equation. We also present the probability densities for m = 0, 1, 2 in an annular quantum well. Our results indicate that the background as well as the spin-orbit interaction naturally splits the spinor components.

  12. Quantum systems with position-dependent mass and spin-orbit interaction via Rashba and Dresselhaus terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G. M.; Portugal, L.; Jesus, Anderson L. de

    2015-01-01

    We consider a particle with spin 1/2 with position-dependent mass moving in a plane. Considering separately Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions, we write down the Hamiltonian for this problem and solve it for Dirichlet boundary conditions. Our radial wavefunctions have two contributions: homogeneous ones which are written as Bessel functions of non-integer orders—that depend on angular momentum m—and particular solutions which are obtained after decoupling the non-homogeneous system. In this process, we find non-homogeneous Bessel equation, Laguerre, as well as biconfluent Heun equation. We also present the probability densities for m = 0, 1, 2 in an annular quantum well. Our results indicate that the background as well as the spin-orbit interaction naturally splits the spinor components

  13. Knowing You, Knowing Me (KYKM: An interactive game to address positive mother-daughter communication and relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary eKatsikitis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This technical report describes an interactive game environment designed to bring mothers and their adolescent daughters together to discuss three issues that have previously been shown in the literature to be of concern to families, as young girls transition from middle childhood to the adolescent years. The game is called Knowing you, Knowing me or KYKM, and is used to help mothers and daughters discuss the following three topics: positive communication skills, relationship building, and managing risky behaviours in the social environment. As the game remains untested, its limitations and future implications of its utility are discussed.

  14. Knowing You, Knowing Me (KYKM): an interactive game to address positive mother-daughter communication and relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsikitis, Mary; Jones, Christian; Muscat, Melody; Crawford, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This technical report describes an interactive game environment designed to bring mothers and their adolescent daughters together to discuss three issues that have previously been shown in the literature to be of concern to families, as young girls transition from middle childhood to the adolescent years. The game is called Knowing you, Knowing me or KYKM, and is used to help mothers and daughters discuss the following three topics: positive communication skills, relationship building, and managing risky behaviors in the social environment. As the game remains untested, its limitations and future implications of its utility are discussed.

  15. Teachers of young children (3-5 years old and their interaction with pupils: approaching positive classroom management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryni Paraskevopoulou

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the social and emotional development of children between three to five years old, the factors that affect their in-school behaviour and strategies for positive teacher classroom management. It is suggested that teachers need to reflect upon children’s development in order for an effective classroom management to be achieved. Aspects of teachers’ expectations about interaction between children and teachers will also be exemplified. Literature research was employed as a method to explore the relevant issues.

  16. Controlled Social Interaction Tasks to Measure Self-Perceptions: No Evidence of Positive Illusions in Boys with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Johnston, Charlotte

    2017-08-01

    Studies have suggested that children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) possess a Positive Illusory Bias (PIB) where they have higher self-perceptions of competence than more objective measures of their competence. However, recent research calls into question the primary methodology of these studies, that is, difference scores. This study investigated the PIB in boys with ADHD within the social domain using a novel methodology that refrains from using difference scores. Eighty-one 8- to 12-year-old boys with and without ADHD completed social interaction tasks where their actual social performance was made comparable, allowing for tests of between-group differences in self-perceptions that do not rely on difference scores. In addition, to examine whether clarity of social feedback moderates the presence of the PIB, the social tasks presented unclear, clear positive, or clear negative feedback. Boys rated how well they performed in each social interaction task, and these ratings were compared between ADHD and non-ADHD groups. Compared to the non-ADHD group, boys with ADHD did not show a PIB in their ratings of performance on the social tasks. There also was no moderation of boys' ratings by type of feedback received. In contrast, when the PIB was calculated using difference scores based on child and parent ratings of child competence, boys with ADHD showed a PIB compared to boys without ADHD. These findings call attention to the need to re-examine the phenomenon of the PIB using methodologies outside of difference scores.

  17. The effect of consumer pressure and abiotic stress on positive plant interactions are mediated by extreme climatic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filazzola, Alessandro; Liczner, Amanda Rae; Westphal, Michael; Lortie, Christopher J

    2018-01-01

    Environmental extremes resulting from a changing climate can have profound implications for plant interactions in desert communities. Positive interactions can buffer plant communities from abiotic stress and consumer pressure caused by climatic extremes, but limited research has explored this empirically. We tested the hypothesis that the mechanism of shrub facilitation on an annual plant community can change with precipitation extremes in deserts. During years of extreme drought and above-average rainfall in a desert, we measured plant interactions and biomass while manipulating a soil moisture gradient and reducing consumer pressure. Shrubs facilitated the annual plant community at all levels of soil moisture through reductions in microclimatic stress in both years and herbivore protection in the wet year only. Shrub facilitation and the high rainfall year contributed to the dominance of a competitive annual species in the plant community. Precipitation patterns in deserts determine the magnitude and type of facilitation mechanisms. Moreover, shrub facilitation mediates the interspecific competition within the associated annual community between years with different rainfall amounts. Examining multiple drivers during extreme climate events is a challenging area of research, but it is a necessary consideration given forecasts predicting that these events will increase in frequency and magnitude. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Measurement of Production Properties of Positively Charged Kaons in Proton-Carbon Interactions at 31 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Abgrall, N.; Anticic, T.; Antoniou, N.; Argyriades, J.; Baatar, B.; Blondel, A.; Blumer, J.; Bogusz, M.; Boldizsar, L.; Bravar, A.; Brooks, W.; Brzychczyk, J.; Bubak, A.; Bunyatov, S.A.; Busygina, O.; Cetner, T.; Choi, K.U.; Christakoglou, P.; Czopowicz, T.; Davis, N.; Diakonos, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dominik, W.; Dumarchez, J.; Engel, R.; Ereditato, A.; Esposito, L.S.; Feofilov, G.A.; Fodor, Z.; Ferrero, A.; Fulop, A.; Garrido, X.; Gazdzicki, M.; Golubeva, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guber, F.; Haesler, A.; Hakobyan, H.; Hasegawa, T.; Idczak, R.; Ivanov, Y.; Ivashkin, A.; Kadija, K.; Kapoyannis, A.; Katrynska, N.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikola, D.; Kim, J.H.; Kirejczyk, M.; Kisiel, J.; Kobayashi, T.; Kochebina, O.; Kolesnikov, V.I.; Kolev, D.; Kondratiev, V.P.; Korzenev, A.; Kowalski, S.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kuleshov, S.; Kurepin, A.; Lacey, R.; Lagoda, J.; Laszlo, A.; Lyubushkin, V.V.; Mackowiak-Pawlowska, M.; Majka, Z.; Malakhov, A.I.; Marchionni, A.; Marcinek, A.; Maris, I.; Marin, V.; Matulewicz, T.; Matveev, V.; Melkumov, G.L.; Meregaglia, A.; Messina, M.; Mrowczynski, St.; Murphy, S.; Nakadaira, T.; Nishikawa, K.; Palczewski, T.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Paul, T.; Peryt, W.; Petukhov, O.; Planeta, R.; Pluta, J.; Popov, B.A.; Posiadala, M.; Pulawski, S.; Rauch, W.; Ravonel, M.; Renfordt, R.; Robert, A.; Rohrich, D.; Rondio, E.; Rossi, B.; Roth, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rybczynski, M.; Sadovsky, A.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Seyboth, P.; Shibata, M.; Skrzypczak, E.; Slodkowski, M.; Staszel, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stepaniak, J.; Strabel, C.; Strobele, H.; Susa, T.; Szaflik, P.; Szuba, M.; Tada, M.; Taranenko, A.; Tereshchenko, V.; Tsenov, R.; Turko, L.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Vassiliou, M.; Veberic, D.; Vechernin, V.V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Wilczek, A.; Wlodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A.; Yi, J.G.; Yoo, I.K.; Zambelli, L.; Zipper, W.

    2012-01-01

    Spectra of positively charged kaons in p+C interactions at 31 GeV/c were measured with the NA61/SHINE spectrometer at the CERN SPS. The analysis is based on the full set of data collected in 2007 with a graphite target with a thickness of 4% of a nuclear interaction length. Interaction cross sections and charged pion spectra were already measured using the same set of data. These new measurements in combination with the published ones are required to improve predictions of the neutrino flux for the T2K long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in Japan. In particular, the knowledge of kaon production is crucial for precisely predicting the intrinsic electron neutrino component and the high energy tail of the T2K beam. The results are presented as a function of laboratory momentum in 2 intervals of the laboratory polar angle covering the range from 20 up to 240 mrad. The kaon spectra are compared with predictions of several hadron production models. Using the published...

  19. Initial clinical experience with an interactive, video-based patient-positioning system for head and neck treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.; Hadley, Scott W.; Milliken, Barrett D.; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Haraf, Daniel J.; Nguyen, Ai; Chen, George T.Y.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate an interactive, video-based system for positioning head and neck patients. Materials and Methods: System hardware includes two B and W CCD cameras (mounted to provide left-lateral and AP-inferior views), zoom lenses, and a PC equipped with a frame grabber. Custom software is used to acquire and archive video images, as well as to display real-time subtraction images revealing patient misalignment in multiple views. Live subtraction images are obtained by subtracting a reference image (i.e., an image of the patient in the correct position) from real-time video. As seen in the figure, darker regions of the subtraction image indicate where the patient is currently, while lighter regions indicate where the patient should be. Adjustments in the patient's position are updated and displayed in less than 0.07s, allowing the therapist to interactively detect and correct setup discrepancies. Patients selected for study are treated BID and immobilized with conventional litecast straps attached to a baseframe which is registered to the treatment couch. Morning setups are performed by aligning litecast marks and patient anatomy to treatment room lasers. Afternoon setups begin with the same procedure, and then live subtraction images are used to fine-tune the setup. At morning and afternoon setups, video images and verification films are taken after positioning is complete. These are visually registered offline to determine the distribution of setup errors per patient, with and without video assistance. Results: Without video assistance, the standard deviation of setup errors typically ranged from 5 to 7mm and was patient-dependent. With video assistance, standard deviations are reduced to 1 to 4mm, with the result depending on patient coopertiveness and the length of time spent fine-tuning the setups. At current levels of experience, 3 to 4mm accuracy is easily achieved in about 30s, while 1 to 3mm accuracy is achieved in about 1 to 2 minutes. Studies

  20. Positive Charges on the Surface of Thaumatin Are Crucial for the Multi-Point Interaction with the Sweet Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Masuda

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting protein, elicits sweet taste with a threshold of only 50 nM. Previous studies from our laboratory suggested that the complex model between the T1R2-T1R3 sweet receptor and thaumatin depends critically on the complementarity of electrostatic potentials. In order to further validate this model, we focused on three lysine residues (Lys78, Lys106, and Lys137, which were expected to be part of the interaction sites. Three thaumatin mutants (K78A, K106A, and K137A were prepared and their threshold values of sweetness were examined. The results showed that the sweetness of K106A was reduced by about three times and those of K78A and K137A were reduced by about five times when compared to wild-type thaumatin. The three-dimensional structures of these mutants were also determined by X-ray crystallographic analyses at atomic resolutions. The overall structures of mutant proteins were similar to that of wild-type but the electrostatic potentials around the mutated sites became more negative. Since the three lysine residues are located in 20–40 Å apart each other on the surface of thaumatin molecule, these results suggest the positive charges on the surface of thaumatin play a crucial role in the interaction with the sweet receptor, and are consistent with a large surface is required for interaction with the sweet receptor, as proposed by the multipoint interaction model named wedge model.

  1. Interactive "Video Doctor" counseling reduces drug and sexual risk behaviors among HIV-positive patients in diverse outpatient settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Gilbert

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Reducing substance use and unprotected sex by HIV-positive persons improves individual health status while decreasing the risk of HIV transmission. Despite recommendations that health care providers screen and counsel their HIV-positive patients for ongoing behavioral risks, it is unknown how to best provide "prevention with positives" in clinical settings. Positive Choice, an interactive, patient-tailored computer program, was developed in the United States to improve clinic-based assessment and counseling for risky behaviors.We conducted a parallel groups randomized controlled trial (December 2003-September 2006 at 5 San Francisco area outpatient HIV clinics. Eligible patients (HIV-positive English-speaking adults completed an in-depth computerized risk assessment. Participants reporting substance use or sexual risks (n = 476 were randomized in stratified blocks. The intervention group received tailored risk-reduction counseling from a "Video Doctor" via laptop computer and a printed Educational Worksheet; providers received a Cueing Sheet on reported risks. Compared with control, fewer intervention participants reported continuing illicit drug use (RR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.689, 0.957, p = 0.014 at 3 months; and RR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.540, 0.785, p<0.001 at 6 months and unprotected sex (RR 0.88, 95% CI: 0.773, 0.993, p = 0.039 at 3 months; and RR 0.80, 95% CI: 0.686, 0.941, p = 0.007 at 6 months. Intervention participants reported fewer mean days of ongoing illicit drug use (-4.0 days vs. -1.3 days, p = 0.346, at 3 months; and -4.7 days vs. -0.7 days, p = 0.130, at 6 months than did controls, and had fewer casual sex partners at (-2.3 vs. -1.4, p = 0.461, at 3 months; and -2.7 vs. -0.6, p = 0.042, at 6 months.The Positive Choice intervention achieved significant cessation of illicit drug use and unprotected sex at the group-level, and modest individual-level reductions in days of ongoing drug use and number of casual sex partners compared with the

  2. Nuclear Protein Sam68 Interacts with the Enterovirus 71 Internal Ribosome Entry Site and Positively Regulates Viral Protein Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Song, Lei; Cong, Haolong; Tien, Po

    2015-10-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) recruits various cellular factors to assist in the replication and translation of its genome. Identification of the host factors involved in the EV71 life cycle not only will enable a better understanding of the infection mechanism but also has the potential to be of use in the development of antiviral therapeutics. In this study, we demonstrated that the cellular factor 68-kDa Src-associated protein in mitosis (Sam68) acts as an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) trans-acting factor (ITAF) that binds specifically to the EV71 5' untranslated region (5'UTR). Interaction sites in both the viral IRES (stem-loops IV and V) and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K homology (KH) domain of Sam68 protein were further mapped using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and biotin RNA pulldown assay. More importantly, dual-luciferase (firefly) reporter analysis suggested that overexpression of Sam68 positively regulated IRES-dependent translation of virus proteins. In contrast, both IRES activity and viral protein translation significantly decreased in Sam68 knockdown cells compared with the negative-control cells treated with short hairpin RNA (shRNA). However, downregulation of Sam68 did not have a significant inhibitory effect on the accumulation of the EV71 genome. Moreover, Sam68 was redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and interacts with cellular factors, such as poly(rC)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), during EV71 infection. The cytoplasmic relocalization of Sam68 in EV71-infected cells may be involved in the enhancement of EV71 IRES-mediated translation. Since Sam68 is known to be a RNA-binding protein, these results provide direct evidence that Sam68 is a novel ITAF that interacts with EV71 IRES and positively regulates viral protein translation. The nuclear protein Sam68 is found as an additional new host factor that interacts with the EV71 IRES during infection and could potentially

  3. Childhood and adult socioeconomic position interact to predict health in mid life in a cohort of British women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nettle

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Low childhood socioeconomic position (cSEP is associated with poorer adult health, even after adult socioeconomic position (aSEP is adjusted for. However, whether cSEP and aSEP combine additively or non-additively in predicting adult health is less well studied. Some evidence suggests that the combination of low cSEP and low aSEP is associated with worse health than would be predicted from the sum of their individual effects. Methods Using data from female members of the British National Child Development Study cohort, we developed continuous quantitative measures of aSEP and cSEP, and used these to predict self-rated health at ages 23, 33, and 42. Results Lower aSEP predicted poorer heath at all ages. Lower cSEP predicted poorer health at all ages, even after adjustment for aSEP, but the direct effects of cSEP were substantially weaker than those of aSEP. At age 23, the effects of cSEP and aSEP were additive. At ages 33 and 42, cSEP and aSEP interacted, such that the effects of low aSEP on health were more negative if cSEP had also been low. Conclusions As women age, aSEP and cSEP may affect their health interactively. High cSEP, by providing a good start in life, may be partially protective against later negative impacts of low aSEP. We relate this to the extended ‘silver spoon’ principle recently documented in a non-human species.

  4. Exploring Barriers to Implementing a School-Wide Positive Behavioral Intervention and Support Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Ronald Lynn

    2016-01-01

    This study examined factors related to the implementation of a School Wide Positive Behavioral Intervention and Support (SWPBIS) program at a large middle school in the United States. Parent Teacher Student Association volunteers at the school reported that teacher fidelity to implementation of SWPBIS activities was inconsistent, threatening the…

  5. Sex differences in the interacting roles of impulsivity and positive alcohol expectancy in problem drinking: A structural brain imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime S. Ide

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol expectancy and impulsivity are implicated in alcohol misuse. However, how these two risk factors interact to determine problem drinking and whether men and women differ in these risk processes remain unclear. In 158 social drinkers (86 women assessed for Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT, positive alcohol expectancy, and Barratt impulsivity, we examined sex differences in these risk processes. Further, with structural brain imaging, we examined the neural bases underlying the relationship between these risk factors and problem drinking. The results of general linear modeling showed that alcohol expectancy best predicted problem drinking in women, whereas in men as well as in the combined group alcohol expectancy and impulsivity interacted to best predict problem drinking. Alcohol expectancy was associated with decreased gray matter volume (GMV of the right posterior insula in women and the interaction of alcohol expectancy and impulsivity was associated with decreased GMV of the left thalamus in women and men combined and in men alone, albeit less significantly. These risk factors mediated the correlation between GMV and problem drinking. Conversely, models where GMV resulted from problem drinking were not supported. These new findings reveal distinct psychological factors that dispose men and women to problem drinking. Although mediation analyses did not determine a causal link, GMV reduction in the insula and thalamus may represent neural phenotype of these risk processes rather than the consequence of alcohol consumption in non-dependent social drinkers. The results add to the alcohol imaging literature which has largely focused on dependent individuals and help elucidate alterations in brain structures that may contribute to the transition from social to habitual drinking.

  6. Sex differences in the interacting roles of impulsivity and positive alcohol expectancy in problem drinking: A structural brain imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Jaime S; Zhornitsky, Simon; Hu, Sien; Zhang, Sheng; Krystal, John H; Li, Chiang-Shan R

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol expectancy and impulsivity are implicated in alcohol misuse. However, how these two risk factors interact to determine problem drinking and whether men and women differ in these risk processes remain unclear. In 158 social drinkers (86 women) assessed for Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT), positive alcohol expectancy, and Barratt impulsivity, we examined sex differences in these risk processes. Further, with structural brain imaging, we examined the neural bases underlying the relationship between these risk factors and problem drinking. The results of general linear modeling showed that alcohol expectancy best predicted problem drinking in women, whereas in men as well as in the combined group alcohol expectancy and impulsivity interacted to best predict problem drinking. Alcohol expectancy was associated with decreased gray matter volume (GMV) of the right posterior insula in women and the interaction of alcohol expectancy and impulsivity was associated with decreased GMV of the left thalamus in women and men combined and in men alone, albeit less significantly. These risk factors mediated the correlation between GMV and problem drinking. Conversely, models where GMV resulted from problem drinking were not supported. These new findings reveal distinct psychological factors that dispose men and women to problem drinking. Although mediation analyses did not determine a causal link, GMV reduction in the insula and thalamus may represent neural phenotype of these risk processes rather than the consequence of alcohol consumption in non-dependent social drinkers. The results add to the alcohol imaging literature which has largely focused on dependent individuals and help elucidate alterations in brain structures that may contribute to the transition from social to habitual drinking.

  7. Probing interaction of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells with ZnO nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Aanchal; Bhargava, Richa; Poddar, Pankaj, E-mail: p.poddar@ncl.res.in

    2013-04-01

    In the present work, the physiological effects of the ZnO nanorods on the Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Aerobacter aerogenes) bacterial cells have been studied. The analysis of bacterial growth curves for various concentrations of ZnO nanorods indicates that Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial cells show inhibition at concentrations of ∼ 64 and ∼ 256 μg/mL respectively. The marked difference in susceptibility towards nanorods was also validated by spread plate and disk diffusion methods. In addition, the scanning electron micrographs show a clear damage to the cells via changed morphology of the cells from rod to coccoid etc. The confocal optical microscopy images of these cells also demonstrate the reduction in live cell count in the presence of ZnO nanorods. These, results clearly indicate that the antibacterial activity of ZnO nanorods is higher towards Gram positive bacterium than Gram negative bacterium which indicates that the structure of the cell wall might play a major role in the interaction with nanostructured materials and shows high sensitivity to the particle concentration. Highlights: ► Effect of ZnO nanorods on the growth cycles of four bacterial strains. ► A relation has been established between growth rate of bacteria and concentration. ► Serious damage in the morphology of bacterial cells in the presence of ZnO nanorods. ► Microscopic studies to see the time dependent effect on bacterial cells.

  8. Person-organization fit and organizational identification as predictors of positive and negative work-home interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Merecz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the presented research was to explore the links between complementary and supplementary dimensions of Person-Organization fit (P-O fit, organizational identification (OI and negative (WHI- versus positive (WHI+ work-home interactions. It was assumed that both complementary and supplementary P-O fit and OI were positively related to WHI+ and negatively to WHI-. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on a large sample of Polish blue and white collar workers. The subjects were interviewed by means of questionnaires measuring: supplementary and complementary dimensions of P-O fit, OI and WHI. General work ability and demographic variables were also controlled in the study, and statistical analysis of ANOVA, pairwise comparison as well as regression were performed. Results: P-O fit and OI differentiated the subjects in terms of WHI. For women supplementary fit was a significant predictor of WHI- and explained 12% of its variance, for men it was complementary fit with the number of working days per week and the level of education, which explained 22% of variance. Supplementary fit and OI explained 16% of WHI+ variance in women; OI, tenure at the main place of employment and the level of education explained 8% of WHI+ variance in men. Conclusions: It has been proven that not only are the effects of P-O fit and OI limited to the work environment but they also permeate boundaries between work and home and influence private life - good level of P-O fit and good OI play facilitating role in the positive spillover between work and home. Gender differences in the significance and predictive values of P-O fit and OI for WHI were also found. The innovative aspect of the work is the inclusion of P-O fit and OI in the range of significant predictors of work-home interaction. The results can serve as rationale for employers that improvement of P-O fit and employees' organizational identification should be included in work

  9. Person-organization fit and organizational identification as predictors of positive and negative work-home interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merecz, Dorota; Andysz, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the presented research was to explore the links between complementary and supplementary dimensions of Person-Organization fit (P-O fit), organizational identification (OI) and negative (WHI(-)) versus positive (WHI(+)) work-home interactions. It was assumed that both complementary and supplementary P-O fit and OI were positively related to WHI(+) and negatively to WHI(-). The study was conducted on a large sample of Polish blue and white collar workers. The subjects were interviewed by means of questionnaires measuring: supplementary and complementary dimensions of P-O fit, OI and WHI. General work ability and demographic variables were also controlled in the study, and statistical analysis of ANOVA, pairwise comparison as well as regression were performed. P-O fit and OI differentiated the subjects in terms of WHI. For women supplementary fit was a significant predictor of WHI(-) and explained 12% of its variance, for men it was complementary fit with the number of working days per week and the level of education, which explained 22% of variance. Supplementary fit and OI explained 16% of WHI(+) variance in women; OI, tenure at the main place of employment and the level of education explained 8% of WHI(+) variance in men. It has been proven that not only are the effects of P-O fit and OI limited to the work environment but they also permeate boundaries between work and home and influence private life - good level of P-O fit and good OI play facilitating role in the positive spillover between work and home. Gender differences in the significance and predictive values of P-O fit and OI for WHI were also found. The innovative aspect of the work is the inclusion of P-O fit and OI in the range of significant predictors of work-home interaction. The results can serve as rationale for employers that improvement of P-O fit and employees' organizational identification should be included in work-life balance programs.

  10. Teacher-Student Negotiations and Its Relation to Physical Education Students' Motivational Processes: An Approach Based on Self-Determination Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Jean-Philippe; Carlier, Ghislain; Gerard, Philippe; Delens, Cecile

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to test a model of motivation based on self-determination theory (Deci and Ryan, 2002) and which explores the place of "teacher-student" negotiation. Cross-sectional data were gathered from 549 secondary school students (317 male, 232 female) who answered a questionnaire which included measurements of perceived…

  11. University Teachers' Perceptions of Appropriate Emotion Display and High-Quality Teacher-Student Relationship: Similarities and Differences across Cultural-Educational Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenauer, Gerda; Gläser-Zikuda, Michaela; Volet, Simone E.

    2016-01-01

    Research on teachers' emotion display and the quality of the teacher-student relationship in higher education is increasingly significant in the context of rapidly developing internationalization in higher education, with scholars (and students) moving across countries for research and teaching. However, there is little theoretically grounded…

  12. Aggressive Behaviours of 48- to 66-Month-Old Children: Predictive Power of Teacher-Student Relationship, Cartoon Preferences and Mother's Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soydan, Sema Büyüktaskapu; Alakoç pirpir, Devlet; Azak, Hayriye

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to identify the predictive power of the following variables for physical and relational aggression level of children: cartoon preferences of children, parental attitudes and teacher-student relationship. Study group consisted of 300 preschool children their mothers and 18 preschool teachers. The results showed a…

  13. Comparison of Effects of Teaching English to Thai Undergraduate Teacher-Students through Cross-Curricular Thematic Instruction Program Based on Multiple Intelligence Theory and Conventional Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanavich, Saowalak

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed at comparing the effects of teaching English to Thai undergraduate teacher-students through cross-curricular thematic instruction program based on multiple intelligence theory and through conventional instruction. Two experimental groups, which utilized Randomized True Control Group-Pretest-posttest Time Series Design and…

  14. Personal Safety and Teacher/Student Relationships Viewed through Black/White Framework in a Suburban Middle School, an Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mester, Dana C.; Spruill, Sherill A.; Giani, Joseph; Morote, Elsa-Sofia; Inserra, Albert

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of teacher-student relationships and personal student safety differences between Caucasian and African-American middle school students. The research was conducted using a survey in a suburban middle class school on Long Island, New York. Twenty-eight of 176 Caucasian students were chosen through random sampling…

  15. The Artist-Teacher in the Classroom and Changes in the Teacher-Student Relationship, with Reference to the Issue of Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, Clare

    2011-01-01

    This article examines a case study of an A-Level student's work and how the inclusion and integration of my own practice as artist-teacher into the classroom has changed the teacher-student relationship, resulting in a more collaborative environment. It investigates how the mutual sharing of practice supports opportunities for pupils to discuss…

  16. Do Perceptions of Being Treated Fairly Increase Students' Outcomes? Teacher-Student Interactions and Classroom Justice in Italian Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Luisa; Speltini, Giuseppina; Passini, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the associations between the students' perceptions of teachers' interpersonal behaviour and some school outcomes--namely, academic achievement, learning motivation, and a sense of class belonging--considering the mediating role of classroom justice. Moreover, the impact of the school type was analysed. The…

  17. Teacher-Student Interaction in Joint Word Problem Solving. The Role of Situational and Mathematical Knowledge in Mainstream Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Javier; Vicente, Santiago; Chamoso, Jose M.; Munez, David; Orrantia, Josetxu

    2012-01-01

    Word problem solving involves the construction of two different mental representations, namely, mathematical and situational. Although educational research in word problem solving has documented different kinds of instruction at these levels, less is known about how both representational levels are evoked during word problem solving in day-to-day…

  18. Teacher-Student Interactions as Predicted by Teaching Stress and the Perceived Quality of the Student-Teacher Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Richard R.; Kmetz, Christal A.

    This paper reports on a study that examined teachers' perceptions of their relationships with specific students, their experience of stress in relation to those students, and whether those perceptions and experiences translate into observable differences in actual teacher behavior toward those students in the classroom. Specifically, the project…

  19. Contribution of the residue at position 4 within classical nuclear localization signals to modulating interaction with importins and nuclear targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kate M; Di Antonio, Veronica; Bellucci, Luca; Thomas, David R; Caporuscio, Fabiana; Ciccarese, Francesco; Ghassabian, Hanieh; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Forwood, Jade K; Jans, David A; Palù, Giorgio; Alvisi, Gualtiero

    2018-08-01

    Nuclear import involves the recognition by importin (IMP) superfamily members of nuclear localization signals (NLSs) within protein cargoes destined for the nucleus, the best understood being recognition of classical NLSs (cNLSs) by the IMPα/β1 heterodimer. Although the cNLS consensus [K-(K/R)-X-(K/R) for positions P2-P5] is generally accepted, recent studies indicated that the contribution made by different residues at the P4 position can vary. Here, we apply a combination of microscopy, molecular dynamics, crystallography, in vitro binding, and bioinformatics approaches to show that the nature of residues at P4 indeed modulates cNLS function in the context of a prototypical Simian Virus 40 large tumor antigen-derived cNLS (KKRK, P2-5). Indeed, all hydrophobic substitutions in place of R impaired binding to IMPα and nuclear targeting, with the largest effect exerted by a G residue at P4. Substitution of R with neutral hydrophobic residues caused the loss of electrostatic and van der Waals interactions between the P4 residue side chains and IMPα. Detailed bioinformatics analysis confirmed the importance of the P4 residue for cNLS function across the human proteome, with specific residues such as G being associated with low activity. Furthermore, we validate our findings for two additional cNLSs from human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA polymerase catalytic subunit UL54 and processivity factor UL44, where a G residue at P4 results in a 2-3-fold decrease in NLS activity. Our results thus showed that the P4 residue makes a hitherto poorly appreciated contribution to nuclear import efficiency, which is essential to determining the precise nuclear levels of cargoes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Building positive self-image in adolescents in foster care: the use of role models in an interactive group approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, A K

    1998-01-01

    In a previous article (Yancey, 1992), the literature on identity development in individuals from socially devalued racial and ethnic groups was summarized. It was postulated that the social maladaptation of adolescents in residential group foster care is reflective of identity disturbances created by the negative images of African-Americans and Latinos perpetuated by the dominant society and unfiltered by optimal parental racial/ethnic socialization. The present article describes the development of a pilot preventive mental health intervention, the PRIDE (Personal and Racial/ethnic Identity Development and Enhancement) program, designed to provide components of parenting that are necessary for promoting positive self-image in ethnically marginalized adolescents and that are typically lacking in the group foster care milieu. PRIDE utilizes successful, ethnically relevant role models in interactive group sessions to create a significant cognitive and emotional experience for teens. While the utility of role modeling for at-risk youth is widely accepted, there is little research on the packaging, delivery, and influence of this intervention modality. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a "hybrid" role-modeling approach (intermediate in intensity of exposure and cost between one-to-one mentoring and career-day programs). Implications for further research on this type of intervention are discussed.

  1. Positive smoking cessation-related interactions with HIV care providers increase the likelihood of interest in cessation among HIV-positive cigarette smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacek, Lauren R; Rass, Olga; Johnson, Matthew W

    2017-10-01

    Smoking cessation has proven to be a challenge for HIV-positive smokers. Patient and provider characteristics may provide barriers to smoking cessation. We aimed to identify characteristics associated with interest in cessation as well as characterize use of, current interest in, and provider recommendations for smoking cessation modalities. Data came from 275 HIV-positive smokers recruited online. Half (49.1%) of the sample was interested in quitting; daily smoking was associated with decreased likelihood of interest in cessation, whereas making a lifetime quit attempt, receiving encouragement to quit from an HIV care provider, and greater frequency of discussions regarding cessation with HIV care providers were associated with increased likelihood of interest in cessation. Nicotine replacement therapy was the most commonly used (42.9%), generated the most interest (59.1%), and was the most commonly clinician-recommended (70.7%) cessation modality. Findings emphasize the importance of the healthcare provider-patient relationship for smoking cessation promotion in HIV-positive smokers.

  2. Non-specific interactions are sufficient to explain the position of heterochromatic chromocenters and nucleoli in interphase nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooijer, de S.; Wellink, J.; Mulder, B.; Bisseling, T.

    2009-01-01

    The organization of the eukaryote nucleus into functional compartments arises by self-organization both through specific protein–protein and protein–DNA interactions and non-specific interactions that lead to entropic effects, such as e.g. depletion attraction. While many specific interactions have

  3. THE TEACHER AND STUDENTS IN TERMS OF THE INTERACTION APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Wołodkiewicz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the broadly defined field of human communication an important aspect is related to the teacher-students interactions. The character of these interactions may decisively determine students’ achievements. The opinion on the transactional nature of the interaction requires the individuals organising the education process to deconstruct the paradigm on the unidirectional process of human communication and to contribute to the creation of conditions promoting reciprocity of interactions. This paper presents the contemporary concept of communication and the term “interaction” was analysed using respective examples given in literature on the subject. Moreover, results of studies describing the nature of teacher-students interactions are presented and key factors determining their course are characterised.

  4. Student Perceptions of Chemistry Laboratory Learning Environments, Student-Teacher Interactions and Attitudes in Secondary School Gifted Education Classes in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Quek Choon; Wong, Angela F. L.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2005-09-01

    This study investigated the chemistry laboratory classroom environment, teacher-student interactions and student attitudes towards chemistry among 497 gifted and non-gifted secondary-school students in Singapore. The data were collected using the 35-item Chemistry Laboratory Environment Inventory (CLEI), the 48-item Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI) and the 30-item Questionnaire on Chemistry-Related Attitudes (QOCRA). Results supported the validity and reliability of the CLEI and QTI for this sample. Stream (gifted versus non-gifted) and gender differences were found in actual and preferred chemistry laboratory classroom environments and teacher-student interactions. Some statistically significant associations of modest magnitude were found between students' attitudes towards chemistry and both the laboratory classroom environment and the interpersonal behaviour of chemistry teachers. Suggestions for improving chemistry laboratory classroom environments and the teacher-student interactions for gifted students are provided.

  5. Teacher: Students' Interpersonal Relationships and Students' Academic Achievements in Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The classroom is a social system in which the teacher and the students interact as organizational members. The quality of classroom relations is dependent on the activities of both the instructor and the students. Several environmental conditions and circumstances often tend to either improve or depress the academic performances of…

  6. The impact of positive and negative emotions on loyalty intentions and their interactions with customer equity drivers

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, Yi-Chun; Verhoef, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Customer equity drivers (CEDs) include value, brand, and relationship equity, which have a strong link with loyalty intentions. This study aims to examine the incremental effects of positive and negative emotions on loyalty intentions and to determine whether these emotions moderate the positive link between CEDs and loyalty intentions. We use customer data with 102 leading firms across eighteen services industries in the Netherlands. The results show that (1) positive and negative emotions h...

  7. In times of war, adolescents do not fall silent: Teacher-student social network communication in wartime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophir, Yaakov; Rosenberg, Hananel; Asterhan, Christa S C; Schwarz, Baruch B

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to war is associated with psychological disturbances, but ongoing communication between adolescents and teachers may contribute to adolescents' resilience. This study examined the extent and nature of teacher-student communication on Social Network Sites (SNS) during the 2014 Israel-Gaza war. Israeli adolescents (N = 208, 13-18 yrs) completed information about SNS communication. A subset of these (N = 145) completed questionnaires on social rejection and distress sharing on SNS. More than a half (56%) of the respondents communicated with teachers via SNS. The main content category was 'emotional support'. Adolescents' perceived benefits from SNS communication with teachers were associated with distress sharing. Social rejection was negatively associated with emotional support and perceived benefits from SNS communication. We conclude that SNS communication between teachers and students may provide students with easy access to human connections and emotional support, which is likely to contribute to adolescents' resilience in times of war. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of peer nominations of teacher-student support at individual and classroom levels on social and academic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jan N; Im, Myung Hee; Wehrly, Sarah E

    2014-06-01

    This longitudinal study examined the prospective relations between 713 elementary students' individual peer teacher support reputation (PTSR) and a measure of the classroom-wide dispersion of peer nominations of teacher support (Centralization of Teacher Support) on students' peer relatedness (i.e., peer acceptance and peer academic reputation) and academic motivation (i.e., academic self-efficacy and teacher-rated behavioral engagement). PTSR was measured as the proportion of classmates who nominated a given student on a descriptor of teacher-student support. Centralization of Teacher Support was assessed using social network analysis to identify the degree to which peer nominations of teacher support in a classroom centered on a few students. PTSR predicted changes in all student outcomes, above academic achievement and relevant covariates. Centralization of Teacher Support predicted changes in students' peer academic reputation, net the effect of PTSR and covariates. Students' academic achievement moderated effects of PTSR and Centralization of Teacher Support on some outcomes. Findings highlight the importance of peers' perceptions of teacher support and of the structure of those perceptions for children's social and academic outcomes. Implications for practice are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Game changing - tracing the positions, strategies and interaction modes of the German Länder towards the (ever expanding?) European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Christian Dagnis

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates how the positions, strategies and modes of interaction of the German Länder have changed over time in response to the process of Europeanization. By applying the method of process tracing within a theoretical framework of rational choice institutionalism, the article...... resulted in a more sceptical attitude of the Länder towards (the perceived ever expanding) European Union....

  10. Development and Evaluation of a Chinese Version of the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaojing; Mainhard, Tim; Wubbels, Theo

    2018-01-01

    Teacher-student interpersonal relationships play an important role in education. The Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI) was designed to measure students' interpersonal perceptions of their teachers. There are two Chinese versions of the QTI for student use, and that inherited the weaknesses of the previous English versions, such as items…

  11. Teacher Feedback and Interactions in Physical Education: Effects of Student Gender and Physical Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicaise, Virginie; Cogerino, Genevieve; Fairclough, Stuart; Bois, Julien; Davis, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Previous research conducted in both classroom and physical education (PE) settings has examined the impact of student gender on teacher-student interactions. The purpose of this study was to extend this line of research by analysing the influence of student gender and different types of physical activity on the frequency and nature of teacher…

  12. Interaction in Classes at a New Zealand University: Some International Students' Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Colleen

    1997-01-01

    Data from 5 Indonesian, 5 Thai, 21 Singaporean, and 85 Malaysian students in a New Zealand college were obtained through interviews, surveys, and observations. Differences in level and style of teacher-student interaction, difficulties learning English, perceptions of local students, lack of a common experience, and acculturation were the issues…

  13. The impact of positive and negative emotions on loyalty intentions and their interactions with customer equity drivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ou, Yi-Chun; Verhoef, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Customer equity drivers (CEDs) include value, brand, and relationship equity, which have a strong link with loyalty intentions. This study aims to examine the incremental effects of positive and negative emotions on loyalty intentions and to determine whether these emotions moderate the positive

  14. The impact of positive and negative emotions on loyalty intentions and their interactions with customer equity drivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ou, Yi-Chun; Verhoef, Peter C.

    Customer equity drivers (CEDs) include value, brand, and relationship equity, which have a strong link with loyalty intentions. This study aims to examine the incremental effects of positive and negative emotions on loyalty intentions and to determine whether these emotions moderate the positive

  15. Gender interaction in coed physical education: a study in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, Canan

    2009-01-01

    Although there has been a long-standing debate about whether a single-sex or mixed-sex environment is better for students in many Western countries, coeducation is one of the taken-for-granted issues in the modern Turkish education system. This study examined commonly expressed concerns about gender equity in a mixed-sex environment within the context of physical education (PE) in Turkey. The purpose of the study was to examine teacher-student interaction in the coed PE classroom, focusing on gender-stereotyped beliefs. Participants consisted of two PE teachers and 37 eighth-grade students from a private school situated in suburban Ankara Turkey. The modified observational instrument with the combination of Teacher-Student Interaction (TSI) and Interactions for Sex Equity in Classroom Teaching Observation System (INTERSECT) was used to assess teacher-student interaction in the classroom. In order to understand students' and teachers' gender-stereotyped beliefs, individual interviews were also conducted. The findings of this study indicated that both male and female PE teachers interact more frequently with boys, and this interaction was influenced by gender-stereotyped beliefs of both teachers and students. In sum, similar to many other western countries, the movement toward coeducation in Turkey has not automatically brought equal opportunities for girls or boys in PE.

  16. STUDY OF SPORTS TEACHERS STUDENTS' SKILLS FOR SELF-ASSESSMENT OF THEIR PROFESSIONAL QUALITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsonkova Dimitrinka Georgieva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Аn essential characteristic of the teacher’s profession is the constant process of self-improvement, which is impossible without existence of a specific personal position and criteria of the sport pedagogue. One of the trends for self-improvement are his personal and professional qualities. They are important because of their specific role – as a means of influence on the trained students in the educational process. Self-evaluation of the level of their growth is a regulator for the sport teacher’s conduct and activity, because it determines the genuine orientation for the level of his qualities,the satisfaction or dissatisfaction.

  17. Interaction Effects of Social Isolation and Peripheral Work Position on Risk of Disability Pension: A Prospective Study of Swedish Women and Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Klas; Marklund, Staffan; Aronsson, Gunnar; Wikman, Anders; Floderus, Birgitta

    2015-01-01

    The study examines various combinations of levels of social isolation in private life and peripheral work position as predictors of disability pension (DP). A second aim was to test the potential interaction effects (above additivity) of social isolation and peripheral work position on the future risk of DP, and to provide results for men and women by age. The study was based on a sample of 45567 women and men from the Swedish population who had been interviewed between 1992 and 2007. Further information on DP and diagnoses was obtained from the Swedish Social Insurance Agency's database (1993-2011). The studied predictors were related to DP using Cox's proportional hazard regression. The analyses were stratified on sex and age (20-39 years, 40-64 years), with control for selected confounders. Increased risks of DP were found for most combinations of social isolation and peripheral work position in all strata. The hazard ratios (HRs) for joint exposure to high degree of social isolation and a peripheral work position were particularly strong among men aged 20-39 (HR 5.70; CI 95% 3.74-8.69) and women aged 20-39 (HR 4.07; CI 2.99-5.56). An interaction effect from combined exposure was found for women in both age groups as well as a tendency in the same direction among young men. However, after confounder control the effects did not reach significance. Individuals who were socially isolated and in a peripheral work position had an increased risk of future DP. The fact that an interaction effect was found among women indicates that a combination of social isolation and peripheral work position may reinforce adverse health effects. There was no evidence that a peripheral work position can be compensated by a high degree of social intergration in private life.

  18. Increasing Parent and Caregiver Understanding of the Power of Positive Interactions in Promoting Prosocial Behaviour in Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Pamela

    The goal of the project presented in the practicum was to help parents develop competencies in interacting with their children in ways which foster self esteem and cooperative behavior. The objectives of the practicum included, first, increasing parents' knowledge of: (1) the factors leading to high self esteem and cooperative behavior; (2) the…

  19. NATURE OF TEACHER-STUDENTS’ INTERACTION IN ELECTRONIC LEARNING AND TRADITIONAL COURSES OF HIGHER EDUCATION- A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufiana Khatoon MALIK

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Present paper explores differential teacher-student interaction in electronic learning (el and in face to face traditional learning (tl courses at higher education. After thorough study literature available and getting information from university teachers teaching el and tl courses about the nature of teacher-students interaction in both modes it was found that teacher-students interaction is significantly different in el and tl higher education courses. There are fewer opportunities for developing students’ moral judgment, critical thinking, communication and interpersonal skills in teacher-students interaction in el courses at higher education level. Courses of tl do provide opportunities to students for developing their developing moral judgment, critical thinking, communication and interpersonal skills through face to face interaction with the teacher in direct communication and group discussions on past and current issues along with learning achievement. Arrangement for conducting local educational conference for some e. courses may arrange and participation in such conferences for e. learners may be made mandatory for qualifying a particular degree. El course may be redesigned and practical activities may be incorporate for developing in students’ moral judgment, critical thinking, communication and interpersonal skills.

  20. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  1. Mother-Child Positivity and Negativity: Family-Wide and Child-Specific Main Effects and Interactions Predict Child Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Bonamy R.; Pike, Alison

    2018-01-01

    Links between positive and negative aspects of the parent-child relationship and child adjustment are undisputed. Scholars recognize the importance of parental differential treatment (PDT) of siblings, yet, less is known about PDT in the context of the shared (family-wide) parent-child relationship climate, or about the extent to which positivity…

  2. Positive Modulatory Interactions of NMDA Receptor GluN1/2B Ligand Binding Domains Attenuate Antagonists Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Bledsoe

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available N-methyl D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR play crucial role in normal brain function and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Functional tetra-heteromeric NMDAR contains two obligatory GluN1 subunits and two identical or different non-GluN1 subunits that include six different gene products; four GluN2 (A–D and two GluN3 (A–B subunits. The heterogeneity of subunit combination facilities the distinct function of NMDARs. All GluN subunits contain an extracellular N-terminal Domain (NTD and ligand binding domain (LBD, transmembrane domain (TMD and an intracellular C-terminal domain (CTD. Interaction between the GluN1 and co-assembling GluN2/3 subunits through the LBD has been proven crucial for defining receptor deactivation mechanisms that are unique for each combination of NMDAR. Modulating the LBD interactions has great therapeutic potential. In the present work, by amino acid point mutations and electrophysiology techniques, we have studied the role of LBD interactions in determining the effect of well-characterized pharmacological agents including agonists, competitive antagonists, and allosteric modulators. The results reveal that agonists (glycine and glutamate potency was altered based on mutant amino acid sidechain chemistry and/or mutation site. Most antagonists inhibited mutant receptors with higher potency; interestingly, clinically used NMDAR channel blocker memantine was about three-fold more potent on mutated receptors (N521A, N521D, and K531A than wild type receptors. These results provide novel insights on the clinical pharmacology of memantine, which is used for the treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. In addition, these findings demonstrate the central role of LBD interactions that can be exploited to develop novel NMDAR based therapeutics.

  3. Position and Momentum Entanglement of Dipole-Dipole Interacting Atoms in Optical Lattices: The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox on a Lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Opatrny, T.; Kolar, M.; Kurizki, G.; Deb, B.

    2004-01-01

    We study a possible realization of the position- and momentum-correlated atomic pairs that are confined to adjacent sites of two mutually shifted optical lattices and are entangled via laser-induced dipole-dipole interactions. The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) ``paradox'' [Phys. Rev. 47, 777 (1935)] with translational variables is then modified by lattice-diffraction effects. This ``paradox'' can be verified to a high degree of accuracy in this scheme.

  4. The psychophysiology of parenting: Individual differences in autonomic reactivity to positive and negative mood inductions and observed parental affect during dyadic interactions with children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Arin M; Dawson, Glen C; Danzo, Sarah; McKillop, Hannah N

    2017-02-01

    Parenting is a complex activity driven, in part, by parental emotional and physiological responses. However, work examining the physiological underpinnings of parenting behavior is still in its infancy, and very few studies have examined such processes beyond early childhood. The current study examines associations between Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) indices of parents' physiological reactivity to positive and negative mood states and observed parental affect during a series of discussion tasks with their adolescent child. Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA) was measured as an index of parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activation while viewing film clips designed to induce neutral, sad, and amused mood states. Parental positive affect, anger, and distress were observed during a series of parent-child discussion tasks, which included an ambiguous discussion regarding adolescent growth, a conflict discussion, and a fun-activity planning discussion. Results supported the association between aspects of parental physiological reactivity and observed affect during dyadic interactions. Further, RSA interacted with maternal depression to predict observed positive affect, anger, and distress, although differences across tasks and specific emotions were found regarding the nature of the interaction effects. Overall, results suggest that such neurobiological processes may be particularly important predictors of parental behavior, particularly in at-risk populations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Constructing and positioning oneself bilingual: Code-switching in classroom interactions of two Turkish-Norwegian fifth-graders.

    OpenAIRE

    Kucherenko, Svitlana

    2011-01-01

    This case-study compares the language use of two Turkish-Norwegian fifth-graders, examining how they utilize their bilingual resources in order to position themselves as learning and social individuals. A common perception of bilingualism as a mental quality of an individual often results in measurement of the bilingual practices in accordance to monolingual criteria. Thus, the fact that bilinguals daily appear to be a part of a setting with two or more languages present, often remains ignore...

  6. Novel base-pairing interactions at the tRNA wobble position crucial for accurate reading of the genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozov, Alexey; Demeshkina, Natalia; Khusainov, Iskander; Westhof, Eric; Yusupov, Marat; Yusupova, Gulnara

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional modifications at the wobble position of transfer RNAs play a substantial role in deciphering the degenerate genetic code on the ribosome. The number and variety of modifications suggest different mechanisms of action during messenger RNA decoding, of which only a few were described so far. Here, on the basis of several 70S ribosome complex X-ray structures, we demonstrate how Escherichia coli tRNALysUUU with hypermodified 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridine (mnm5s2U) at the wobble position discriminates between cognate codons AAA and AAG, and near-cognate stop codon UAA or isoleucine codon AUA, with which it forms pyrimidine-pyrimidine mismatches. We show that mnm5s2U forms an unusual pair with guanosine at the wobble position that expands general knowledge on the degeneracy of the genetic code and specifies a powerful role of tRNA modifications in translation. Our models consolidate the translational fidelity mechanism proposed previously where the steric complementarity and shape acceptance dominate the decoding mechanism.

  7. Academic Performance, Course Completion Rates, and Student Perception of the Quality and Frequency of Interaction in a Virtual High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Abigail; Graham, Charles R.; Sudweeks, Richard R.; Barbour, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between students' perceptions of teacher-student interaction and academic performance at an asynchronous, self-paced, statewide virtual high school. Academic performance was measured by grade awarded and course completion. There were 2269 students who responded to an 18-item survey designed to measure student…

  8. Language-Building Activities and Interaction Variations with Mixed-Ability ESL University Learners in a Content-Based Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna Dimas, Héctor Manuel; Ruíz Castellanos, Erika

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of both language-building activities and a variety of teacher/student interaction patterns increase both oral language participation and content learning in a course of manual therapy with mixed-language ability students. In this article, the researchers describe their collaboration in a content-based course in English with English…

  9. Interaction between bedding and sleeping position in the sudden infant death syndrome: a population based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, P J; Gilbert, R; Azaz, Y; Berry, P J; Rudd, P T; Stewart, A; Hall, E

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the relation between sleeping position and quantity of bedding and the risk of sudden unexpected infant death. DESIGN--A study of all infants dying suddenly and unexpectedly and of two controls matched for age and date with each index case. The parents of control infants were interviewed within 72 hours of the index infant's death. Information was collected on bedding, sleeping position, heating, and recent signs of illness for index and control infants. SETTING--A defined geographical area comprising most of the county of Avon and part of Somerset. SUBJECTS--72 Infants who had died suddenly and unexpectedly (of whom 67 had died from the sudden infant death syndrome) and 144 control infants. RESULTS--Compared with the control infants the infants who had died from the sudden infant death syndrome were more likely to have been sleeping prone (relative risk 8.8; 95% confidence interval 7.0 to 11.0; p less than 0.001), to have been more heavily wrapped (relative risk 1.14 per tog above 8 tog; 1.03 to 1.28; p less than 0.05), and to have had the heating on all night (relative risk 2.7; 1.4 to 5.2; p less than 0.01). These differences were less pronounced in the younger infants (less than 70 days) than the older ones. The risk of sudden unexpected death among infants older than 70 days, nursed prone, and with clothing and bedding of total thermal resistance greater than 10 tog was increased by factors of 15.1 (2.6 to 89.6) and 25.2 (3.7 to 169.0) respectively compared with the risk in infants of the same age nursed supine or on their side and under less than 6 tog of bedding. CONCLUSIONS--Overheating and the prone position are independently associated with an increased risk of sudden unexpected infant death, particularly in infants aged more than 70 days. Educating parents about appropriate thermal care and sleeping position of infants may help to reduce the incidence of the sudden infant death syndrome. PMID:2390588

  10. Teacher-Child Interaction Training: A Pilot Study With Random Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Melanie A; Adelstein, Jonathan S; Miller, Samantha P; Areizaga, Margaret J; Gold, Dylann C; Sanchez, Amanda L; Rothschild, Sara A; Hirsch, Emily; Gudiño, Omar G

    2015-07-01

    Teacher-Child Interaction Training (TCIT), adapted from Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), is a classroom-based program designed to provide teachers with behavior management skills that foster positive teacher-student relationships and to improve student behavior by creating a more constructive classroom environment. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate TCIT in more classrooms than previously reported in the literature, with older children than previously reported, using random assignment of classrooms to TCIT or to a no-TCIT control condition and conducting all but two sessions within the classroom to enhance feasibility. Participants included 11 kindergarten and first grade classroom teachers and their 118 students from three urban, public schools in Manhattan, with five classrooms randomly assigned to receive TCIT and six to the no-TCIT control condition. Observations of teacher skill acquisition were conducted before, during, and after TCIT for all 11 teachers, and teacher reports of student behavior were obtained at these same time points. Teacher satisfaction with TCIT was assessed following training. Results suggested that after receiving TCIT, teachers increased rates of positive attention to students' appropriate behavior, decreased rates of negative attention to misbehavior, reported significantly less distress related to student disruptive behavior, and reported high satisfaction with the training program. Our study supports the growing evidence-base suggesting that TCIT is a promising approach for training teachers in positive behavior management strategies and for improving student disruptive behavior in the classroom. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Assessing the interactions of a natural antibacterial clay with model Gram-positive and Gram-negative human pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londono, S. C.; Williams, L. B.

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria and increasing accumulations of antibiotics in reclaimed water, drive the quest for new natural antimicrobials. We are studying the antibacterial mechanism(s) of clays that have shown an ability to destroy bacteria or significantly inhibit their growth. One possible mode of action is from soluble transition metal species, particularly reduced Fe, capable of generating deleterious oxygen radical species. Yet another possibility is related to membrane damage as a consequence of physical or electrostatic interaction between clay and bacteria. Both mechanisms could combine to produce cell death. This study addresses a natural antibacterial clay from the NW Amazon basin, South America (AMZ clay). Clay mineralogy is composed of disordered kaolinite (28.9%), halloysite (17.8%) illite (12%) and smectite (16.7%). Mean particle size is 1.6μm and total and specific surface area 278.82 and 51.23 m2/g respectively. The pH of a suspension (200mg/ml) is 4.1 and its Eh is 361mV after 24h of equilibration. The ionic strength of the water in equilibrium with the clay after 24 h. is 6 x10-4M. These conditions, affect the element solubility, speciation, and interactions between clay and bacteria. Standard microbiological methods were used to assess the viability of two model bacteria (Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis) after incubation with clay at 37 degC for 24 hrs. A threefold reduction in bacterial viability was observed upon treatment with AMZ clay. We separated the cells from the clay using Nycodenz gradient media and observed the mounts under the TEM and SEM. Results showed several membrane anomalies and structural changes that were not observed in the control cells. Additionally, clay minerals appeared in some places attached to cell walls. Experiments showed that exchanging AMZ clay with KCl caused loss of antibacterial property. Among the exchangeable -and potentially toxic- ions we measured Al+3, Cu+2, Zn+2, Ba+2 and Co+2

  12. When does poor subjective financial position hurt the elderly? Testing the interaction with educational attainment using a national representative longitudinal survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Christy; Huang, Nicole; Tang, Gao-Jun; Chou, Yiing-Jenq

    2011-03-17

    Several studies have demonstrated that perceived financial status has a significant impact on health status among the elderly. However, little is known about whether such a subjective perception interacts with objective socioeconomic status (SES) measures such as education that affect the individual's health. This research used data from the Survey of Health and Living Status of the Middle Age and Elderly in Taiwan (SHLS) conducted by the Bureau of Health Promotion, Department of Health in Taiwan. Waves 1996, 1999 and 2003 were used. The sample consisted of 2,387 elderly persons. The interactive effects of self-rated satisfaction with financial position and educational attainment were estimated. Self-rated health (SRH), depressive symptom (measured by CES-D) and mortality were used to measure health outcomes. Significant interaction effect was found for depressive symptoms. Among those who were dissatisfied with their financial position, those who were illiterate had an odds ratio (OR) of 8.3 (95% CI 4.9 to 14.0) for having depressive symptoms compared with those who were very satisfied with their financial position. The corresponding OR for those with college or above was only 2.7 (95% CI 1.0 to 7.3). No significant interaction effect was found for SRH and mortality. Although poor financial satisfaction was found to be related to poorer health, the strongest association for this effect was observed among those with low educational attainment, and this is especially true for depressive symptoms. Subjective financial status among the elderly should be explored in conjunction with traditional measures of SES.

  13. The effect of desulfation of chondroitin sulfate on interactions with positively charged growth factors and upregulation of cartilaginous markers in encapsulated MSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeremy J; Temenoff, Johnna S

    2013-07-01

    Sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are known to interact electrostatically with positively charged growth factors to modulate signaling. Therefore, regulating the degree of sulfation of GAGs may be a promising approach to tailor biomaterial carriers for controlled growth factor delivery and release. For this study, chondroitin sulfate (CS) was first desulfated to form chondroitin, and resulting crosslinked CS and chondroitin hydrogels were examined in vitro for release of positively charged model protein (histone) and for their effect on cartilaginous differentiation of encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Desulfation significantly increased the release of histone from chondroitin hydrogels (30.6 ± 2.3 μg released over 8 days, compared to natively sulfated CS with 20.2 ± 0.8 μg), suggesting that sulfation alone plays a significant role in modulating protein interactions with GAG hydrogels. MSCs in chondroitin hydrogels significantly upregulated gene expression of collagen II and aggrecan by day 21 in chondrogenic medium (115 ± 100 and 23.1 ± 7.9 fold upregulation of collagen II and aggrecan, respectively), compared to CS hydrogels and PEG-based swelling controls, indicating that desulfation may actually enhance the response of MSCs to soluble chondrogenic cues, such as TGF-β1. Thus, desulfated chondroitin materials present a promising biomaterial tool to further investigate electrostatic GAG/growth factor interactions, especially for repair of cartilaginous tissues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Alu-miRNA interactions modulate transcript isoform diversity in stress response and reveal signatures of positive selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Rajesh; Bhattacharya, Aniket; Bhardwaj, Vivek; Jha, Vineet; Mandal, Amit K.; Mukerji, Mitali

    2016-09-01

    Primate-specific Alus harbor different regulatory features, including miRNA targets. In this study, we provide evidence for miRNA-mediated modulation of transcript isoform levels during heat-shock response through exaptation of Alu-miRNA sites in mature mRNA. We performed genome-wide expression profiling coupled with functional validation of miRNA target sites within exonized Alus, and analyzed conservation of these targets across primates. We observed that two miRNAs (miR-15a-3p and miR-302d-3p) elevated in stress response, target RAD1, GTSE1, NR2C1, FKBP9 and UBE2I exclusively within Alu. These genes map onto the p53 regulatory network. Ectopic overexpression of miR-15a-3p downregulates GTSE1 and RAD1 at the protein level and enhances cell survival. This Alu-mediated fine-tuning seems to be unique to humans as evident from the absence of orthologous sites in other primate lineages. We further analyzed signatures of selection on Alu-miRNA targets in the genome, using 1000 Genomes Phase-I data. We found that 198 out of 3177 Alu-exonized genes exhibit signatures of selection within Alu-miRNA sites, with 60 of them containing SNPs supported by multiple evidences (global-FST > 0.3, pair-wise-FST > 0.5, Fay-Wu’s H  2.0, high ΔDAF) and implicated in p53 network. We propose that by affecting multiple genes, Alu-miRNA interactions have the potential to facilitate population-level adaptations in response to environmental challenges.

  15. “So, it is about how negative it is?!” Understanding researcher/researched interactions as relations between intersectional social positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sune Qvotrup Jensen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article argues that interactions in qualitative interviews and ethnography can be analyzed as relations between intersectional social positions. It draws attention to the importance of class and geographical location in such analysis. It further argues that such interactions work through typifications, that they have a power dimension and that they entail processes of identity formation. The identities being offered through these processes can, however, be negotiated or resisted. The article then analyses such interactions as they were experienced in two research projects the author participated in: His PhD project about young marginalized ethnic minority men, and the collective project INTERLOC which focused on the interplay between gender, class, ethnicity and ‘race’ in an underprivileged Danish suburb. It is demonstrated that relationality influences the assumptions research participants have about the researcher. It is also demonstrated that the research encounter entails powerful mechanism of identity formation. The informants, however, sometimes resist these processes resulting in blurred and unstable, sometimes antagonistic, power relations. It is finally argued that analyses of such interactions can provide central insight into the subject studied.

  16. Antibacterial activity and interactions of plant essential oil combinations against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Anamaria Semeniuc

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the antibacterial effects of several essential oils (EOs alone and in combination against different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria associated with food products. Parsley, lovage, basil, and thyme EOs, as well as their mixtures (1:1, v/v, were tested against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella typhimurium. The inhibitory effects ranged from strong (thyme EO against E. coli to no inhibition (parsley EO against P. aeruginosa. Thyme EO exhibited strong (against E. coli, moderate (against S. typhimurium and B. cereus, or mild inhibitory effects (against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus, and basil EO showed mild (against E. coli and B. cereus or no inhibitory effects (against S. typhimurium, P. aeruginosa, and S. aureus. Parsley and lovage EOs revealed no inhibitory effects against all tested strains. Combinations of lovage/thyme and basil/thyme EOs displayed antagonistic effects against all bacteria, parsley/thyme EOs against B. cereus, S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and E. coli, and lovage/basil EOs against B. cereus and E. coli. Combinations of parsley/lovage and parsley/basil EOs exhibited indifferent effects against all bacteria. The combination of lovage/basil EO showed indifferent effect against S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and S. typhimurium, and the combination parsley/thyme EO against S. typhimurium. Thyme EO has the highest percentage yield and antibacterial potential from all tested formulations; its combination with parsley, lovage, and basil EOs determines a reduction of its antibacterial activity. Hence, it is recommended to be used alone as the antibacterial agent.

  17. Interaction between body mass index and hormone-receptor status as a prognostic factor in lymph-node-positive breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il Yong Chung

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the body mass index (BMI at a breast cancer diagnosis and various factors including the hormone-receptor, menopause, and lymph-node status, and identify if there is a specific patient subgroup for which the BMI has an effect on the breast cancer prognosis. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 8,742 patients with non-metastatic invasive breast cancer from the research database of Asan Medical Center. The overall survival (OS and breast-cancer-specific survival (BCSS outcomes were compared among BMI groups using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional-hazards regression models with an interaction term. There was a significant interaction between BMI and hormone-receptor status for the OS (P = 0.029, and BCSS (P = 0.013 in lymph-node-positive breast cancers. Obesity in hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer showed a poorer OS (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.92 to 2.48 and significantly poorer BCSS (HR = 1.80, 95% CI = 1.08 to 2.99. In contrast, a high BMI in hormone-receptor-negative breast cancer revealed a better OS (HR = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.16 to 1.19 and BCSS (HR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.19 to 1.44. Being underweight (BMI < 18.50 kg/m2 with hormone-receptor-negative breast cancer was associated with a significantly worse OS (HR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.00-3.95 and BCSS (HR = 2.24, 95% CI = 1.12-4.47. There was no significant interaction found between the BMI and hormone-receptor status in the lymph-node-negative setting, and BMI did not interact with the menopause status in any subgroup. In conclusion, BMI interacts with the hormone-receptor status in a lymph-node-positive setting, thereby playing a role in the prognosis of breast cancer.

  18. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral stress management training on mental health, social interaction and family function in adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV positive member

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Keypour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study evaluated stress management training to improve mental health, social interaction and family function among adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV positive member. Methods: There were 34 adolescents (13-18 years old with at least one family member living with HIV from whom finally 15 attended the study and participated in 8 weekly sessions of stress management training. The tests used in this study were: Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (self and parent report, General Health Questionnare-28 (GHQ-28 and Family Assessment Device (FAD, conducted before, after and three months after the intervention. The collected data were analyzed by repeated measure test using SPSS software (Version 18.0. Results: Adolescents with one HIV positive family member showed high level of emotional problem (40% and conduct problem (33.3%. There was a significant difference between before, after and 3months after intervention based on GHQ-28 mean scores and FAD mean sores (p < 0.001. There was a significant difference between mean scores of peers′ relationship based on SDQ (self report and parents report forms before and after intervention, but there was no significant difference between mean scores of pro social behavior based on SDQ (self report and parents report forms in all three stages (before, after and three months after intervention. Conclusions: Stress management training is effective in improving mental health, family function and social interaction among adolescents living with parents infected with HIV/AIDS.

  19. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral stress management training on mental health, social interaction and family function in adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) positive member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keypour, Maryam; Arman, Soroor; Maracy, Mohammad Reza

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated stress management training to improve mental health, social interaction and family function among adolescents of families with one Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) positive member. There were 34 adolescents (13-18 years old) with at least one family member living with HIV from whom finally 15 attended the study and participated in 8 weekly sessions of stress management training. The tests used in this study were: Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (self and parent report), General Health Questionnare-28 (GHQ-28) and Family Assessment Device (FAD), conducted before, after and three months after the intervention. The collected data were analyzed by repeated measure test using SPSS software (Version 18.0). Adolescents with one HIV positive family member showed high level of emotional problem (40%) and conduct problem (33.3%). There was a significant difference between before, after and 3months after intervention based on GHQ-28 mean scores and FAD mean sores (p social behavior based on SDQ (self report and parents report forms) in all three stages (before, after and three months after intervention). Stress management training is effective in improving mental health, family function and social interaction among adolescents living with parents infected with HIV/AIDS.

  20. Positive and negative feedback loops in nutrient phytoplankton interactions related to climate dynamics factors in a shallow temperate estuary (Vistula Lagoon, southern Baltic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Marek; Kobos, Justyna; Nawrocka, Lidia; Parszuto, Katarzyna

    2018-04-01

    This study aims to demonstrate that factors associated with climate dynamics, such as temperature and wind, affect the ecosystem of the shallow Vistula Lagoon in the southern Baltic and cause nutrient forms phytoplankton interactions: the growth of biomass and constraints of it. This occurs through a network of direct and indirect relationships between environmental and phytoplankton factors, including interactions of positive and negative feedback loops. Path analysis supported by structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test hypotheses regarding the impact of climate factors on algal assemblages. Increased phytoplankton biomass was affected directly by water temperature and salinity, while the wind speed effect was indirect as it resulted in increased concentrations of suspended solids (SS) in the water column. Simultaneously, the concentration of SS in the water was positively correlated with particulate organic carbon (POC), particulate nitrogen (PN), and particulate phosphorus (PP), and was negatively correlated with the total nitrogen to phosphorus (N:P) ratio. Particulate forms of C, N, and phosphorus (P), concentrations of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and nitrate and nitrite nitrogen (NO3-N + NO2-N), and ratios of the total N:P and DIN:SRP, all indirectly effected Cyanobacteria C concentrations. These processes influence other phytoplankton groups (Chlorophyta, Bacillariophyceae and the picophytoplankton fraction). Increased levels of SRP associated with organic matter (POC), which stemmed from reduced DIN:SRP ratios, contributed to increased Cyanoprokaryota and picophytoplankton C concentrations, which created a positive feedback loop. However, a simultaneous reduction in the total N:P ratio could have inhibited increases in the biomass of these assemblages by limiting N, which likely formed a negative feedback loop. The study indicates that the nutrients-phytoplankton feedback loop phenomenon can intensify eutrophication in a temperate lagoon

  1. Stereo Photogrammetry Measurements of the Position and Attitude of a Nozzle-Plume/Shock-Wave Interaction Model in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Kushner, Laura K.; Drain, Bethany A.; Heineck, James T.; Durston, Donald A.

    2017-01-01

    Stereo photogrammetry was used to measure the position and attitude of a slender body of revolution during nozzle-plume/shock-wave interaction tests in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The model support system was designed to allow the model to be placed at many locations in the test section relative to a pressure rail on one sidewall. It included a streamwise traverse as well as a thin blade that offset the model axis from the sting axis. With these features the support system was more flexible than usual resulting in higher-than-usual uncertainty in the position and attitude of the model. Also contributing to this uncertainty were the absence of a balance, so corrections for sting deflections could not be applied, and the wings-vertical orientation of the model, which precluded using a gravity-based accelerometer to measure pitch angle. Therefore, stereo photogrammetry was chosen to provide independent measures of the model position and orientation. This paper describes the photogrammetry system and presents selected results from the test.

  2. Processos de significação na relação professor-alunos: uma perspectiva sociocultural construtivista Meaning processes in the relationship teacher-students: a sociocultural and constructivist point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carmen Villela Rosa Tacca

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo consideramos que o fracasso escolar é um fenômeno persistente que exige análises empíricas e teóricas acerca dos processos de significação envolvidos na dinâmica das interações professor-aluno relacionados com as relações ensino-aprendizagem. Com base na abordagem sociocultural construtivista, o estudo analisa a interação de fatores socioculturais com a participação ativa do indivíduo, destacando a unidade cognição-afeto. Os processos interativos atuam como mobilizadores da construção do conhecimento ao longo de convergências e divergências nas interações, especialmente nas negociações quanto aos objetivos e desenvolvimento de atividades pedagógicas. Duas turmas de segunda série do ensino fundamental foram investigadas, sendo destacados os resultados de análises microgenéticas das interações, que apontaram para crenças e estratégias comunicativas e metacomunicativas que podem favorecer ou dificultar o processo de ensino-aprendizagem. A conclusão aponta para o fato dos processos de significação estarem apoiados na metacomunicação e na unidade cognição-afeto, que direcionam as possibilidades de aprendizagem.School failure consists of a persistent problem in our educational system. This paper aims at contributing to understand the issue by presenting and theoretically discussing empirical data concerning the dynamics of teacher-students interactions. We draw our analysis on a constructivist sociocultural theoretical framework, which stresses the interactions between sociocultural factors and human agency, claiming for the unison, intertwined nature of affect and cognition. Interactive processes lie at the basis of knowledge construction, which takes place along convergent and divergent interaction frames, particularly during negotiations about goals and rules for educational activities. Two second-grade classrooms were investigated, the results of microgenetic analysis being especially

  3. 國中普通班身心障礙學生親子互動、自我概念與學校適應之關係研究 Relationships Between the Parent-Child Interaction, Self-Concept, and School Adjustment of Junior High School Students With Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    黃瓊儀 Chiung-Yi Huang

    2018-03-01

    but had positive and significant effects on self-concept, teacher-student relationship, activity participation, school climate, academic achievement, and appropriate behavior. Self-concept had positive effects on the teacher-student relationship, peer relationship, activity participation, and school climate but did not have positive effects on academic achievement or appropriate behaviors. Moreover, self-concept played a mediation role between the parent-child interaction and several dimensions of school adjustment. Parent-child interaction indirectly influenced the teacher-student relationship, peer relationship, activity participation, and school climate through self-concept. This study also proposed some relevant suggestions on the basis of the findings.

  4. Impact of the interaction with the positive charge in adsorption of benzene and other organic compounds from aqueous solutions on carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzyk, Artur P.; Ćwiertnia, Magdalena S.; Wiśniewski, Marek; Gauden, Piotr A.; Rychlicki, Gerhard; Szymański, Grzegorz S.

    2007-02-01

    We present the results of benzene adsorption at the acidic pH level determined on the series of chemically modified activated carbons and at three temperatures. The influence of carbon surface chemical composition on benzene adsorption is discussed. It is shown that the decrease in the pH level from 7 up to 1.5 increases benzene adsorption and the only exception is carbon modified with gaseous ammonia. Basing on the results of current work and those published previously (for phenol, paracetamol, acetanilide and aniline) and using the results of quantum chemistry calculations (DFT, Gaussian 98) we show, that the value of the energy of interaction with unit positive charge is crucial during the analysis of the influence of pH level on adsorption. Obtained results allow to predict the changes in adsorption of aromatics on carbons with the decrease in the pH level.

  5. Genomic selection strategies in breeding programs: Strong positive interaction between application of genotypic information and intensive use of young bulls on genetic gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Line Hjortø; Sørensen, Morten Kargo; Berg, Peer

    2012-01-01

    We tested the following hypotheses: (i) breeding schemes with genomic selection are superior to breeding schemes without genomic selection regarding annual genetic gain of the aggregate genotype (ΔGAG), annual genetic gain of the functional traits and rate of inbreeding per generation (ΔF), (ii......) a positive interaction exists between the use of genotypic information and a short generation interval on ΔGAG and (iii) the inclusion of an indicator trait in the selection index will only result in a negligible increase in ΔGAG if genotypic information about the breeding goal trait is known. We examined......, greater contributions of the functional trait to ΔGAG and lower ΔF than the two breeding schemes without genomic selection. Thus, the use of genotypic information may lead to more sustainable breeding schemes. In addition, a short generation interval increases the effect of using genotypic information...

  6. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography/positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry method for the quantification of alprazolam and α-hydroxy-alprazolam in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogria, Eleni; Pistos, Constantinos; Panderi, Irene

    2013-12-30

    A hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography/positive ion electrospray-mass spectrometry (HILIC-ESI/MS) has been developed and fully validated for the quantification of alprazolam and its main metabolite, α-hydroxy-alprazolam, in human plasma. The assay is based on 50μL plasma samples, following liquid-liquid extraction. All analytes and the internal standard (tiamulin) were separated by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography using an X-Bridge-HILIC analytical column (150.0mm×2.1mm i.d., particle size 3.5μm) under isoscratic elution. The mobile phase was composed of a 7% 10mM ammonium formate water solution in acetonitrile and pumped at a flow rate of 0.20mLmin(-1). Running in positive electrospray ionization and selected ion monitoring (SIM) the mass spectrometer was set to analyze the protonated molecules [M+H](+) at m/z 309, 325 and 494 for alprazolam, α-hydroxy-alprazolam and tiamulin (ISTD) respectively. The assay was linear over the concentration range of 2.5-250ngmL(-1) for alprazolam and 2.5-50ngmL(-1) for α-hydroxy alprazolam. Intermediate precision was less than 4.1% over the tested concentration ranges. The method is the first reported application of HILIC in the analysis benzodiazepines in human plasma. With a small sample size (50μL human plasma) and a run time less than 10.0min for each sample the method can be used to support a wide range of clinical studies concerning alprazolam quantification. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Interaction of cationic porphyrins with DNA: Importance of the number and position of the charges and minimum structural requirements for intercalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, M.A.; Battioni, J.P.; Dupre, D.; Mansuy, D.; Le Pecq, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-three porphyrins or metalloporphyrins corresponding to the general formula [meso-[N-methyl-4(or 3 or 2)-pyridiniumyl] n (aryl) 4-n porphyrin]M (M = H 2 , Cu II , or ClFe III ), with n = 2-4, have been synthesized and characterized by UV-visible and 1 H NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. These porphyrins differ not only in the number (2-4) and position of their cationic charges but also in the steric requirements to reach even temporarily a completely planar geometry. Interaction of these porphyrins or metalloporphyrins with calf thymus DNA has been studied and their apparent affinity binding constants have been determined by use of a competition method with ethidium bromide which was applicable not only for all the free base porphyrins but also for their copper (II) or iron (III) complexes. Whatever their mode of binding may be, their apparent affinity binding constants were relatively high and a linear decrease of log K app with the number of porphyrin charges was observed. Studies of porphyrin-DNA interactions by UV and fluorescence spectroscopy, viscosimetry, and fluorescence energy transfer experiments showed that not only the tetracationic meso-tetrakis[N-methyl-4(or 3)-pyridiniumyl]porphyrins, which both involved four freely rotating meso-aryl groups, but also the corresponding tri- and dicationic porphyrins were able to intercalate into calf thymus DNA. These results show that only half of the porphyrin ring is necessary for intercalation to occur

  8. The C'-terminal interaction domain of the thyroid hormone receptor confers the ability of the DNA site to dictate positive or negative transcriptional activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, J.M.; Glass, C.K.; Adler, S.; Nelson, C.A.; Rosenfeld, M.G.

    1990-01-01

    To investigate mechanisms responsible for positive and negative transcriptional control, the authors have utilized two types of promoters that are diffferentially regulated by thyroid hormone (T 3 ) receptors. Promoters containing the palindromic T 3 response element TCAGGTCA TGACCTGA are positively regulated by the T 3 receptor after the administration of T 3 , whereas otherwise identical promoters containing the estrogen response element TCAGGTCA CTG TGACCTGA can be regulated negatively; converse effects are observed with the estrogen receptor. They describe evidence that the transcriptional inhibitory effects of the T 3 or estrogen receptors on the estrogen or T 3 response elements, respectively, are imposed by amino acid sequences in the C'-terminal region that colocalize with dimerization and hormone-binding domains and that these sequences can transfer inhibitory functions to other classes of transcription factors. Removal of the C'-terminal dimerization and hormone-binding domains of either the αT 3 or estrogen receptors permits each receptor to act constitutively to enhance transcription on both T 3 and estrogen response elements. It is, therefore, suggested that protein-protein interactions between receptor C' termini limit the subset of DNA binding sites on which transcriptional activation occurs

  9. Th-Based Endohedral Metallofullerenes: Anomalous Metal Position and Significant Metal-Cage Covalent Interactions with the Involvement of Th 5f Orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Yang, Le; Liu, Chang; Hou, Qinghua; Jin, Peng; Lu, Xing

    2018-05-29

    Endohedral metallofullerenes (EMFs) containing actinides are rather intriguing due to potential 5f-orbital participation in the metal-metal or metal-cage bonding. In this work, density functional theory calculations first characterized the structure of recently synthesized ThC 74 as Th@ D 3 h (14246)-C 74 . We found that the thorium atom adopts an unusual off-axis position inside cage due to small metal ion size and the requirement of large coordination number, which phenomenon was further extended to other Th-based EMFs. Significantly, besides the strong metal-cage electrostatic attractions, topological and orbital analysis revealed that all the investigated Th-based EMFs exhibit obvious covalent interactions between metal and cage with substantial contribution from the Th 5f orbitals. The encapsulation by fullerenes is thus proposed as a practical pathway toward the f-orbital covalency for thorium. Interestingly, the anomalous internal position of Th led to a novel three-dimensional metal trajectory at elevated temperatures in the D 3 h -C 74 cavity, as elucidated by the static computations and molecular dynamic simulations.

  10. Biotic and abiotic factors investigated in two Drosophila species – evidence of both negative and positive fitness effects of interactions on performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, Michael; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård

    2017-01-01

    more informative descriptions of complex interactions we implemented re-conceptualised definitions of synergism and antagonism. We found approximately equal proportions of synergistic and antagonistic interactions in both species, however the effects of interactions on performance differed between...

  11. Negative and positive interactions among plants: effects of competitors and litter on seedling emergence and growth of forest and grassland species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loydi, A; Donath, T W; Otte, A; Eckstein, R L

    2015-05-01

    Living plant neighbours, but also their dead aboveground remains (i.e. litter), may individually exert negative or positive effects on plant recruitment. Although living plants and litter co-occur in most ecosystems, few studies have addressed their combined effects, and conclusions are ambivalent. Therefore, we examined the response in terms of seedling emergence and growth of herbaceous grassland and forest species to different litter types and amounts and the presence of competitors. We conducted a pot experiment testing the effects of litter type (grass, oak), litter amount (low, medium, high) and interspecific competition (presence or absence of four Festuca arundinacea individuals) on seedling emergence and biomass of four congeneric pairs of hemicryptophytes from two habitat types (woodland, grassland). Interactions between litter and competition were weak. Litter presence increased competitor biomass. It also had positive effects on seedling emergence at low litter amounts and negative effects at high litter amounts, while competition had no effect on seedling emergence. Seedling biomass was negatively affected by the presence of competitors, and this effect was stronger in combination with high amounts of litter. Litter affected seedling emergence while competition determined the biomass of the emerged individuals, both affecting early stages of seedling recruitment. High litter accumulation also reduced seedling biomass, but this effect seemed to be additive to competitor effects. This suggests that live and dead plant mass can affect species recruitment in natural systems, but the mechanisms by which they operate and their timing differ. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  12. Association of a missense mutation in the positional candidate gene glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1 with backfat thickness traits in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Bong Lee

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective Previously, we reported quantitative trait loci (QTLs affecting backfat thickness (BFT traits on pig chromosome 5 (SW1482–SW963 in an F2 intercross population between Landrace and Korean native pigs. The aim of this study was to evaluate glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1 (GRIP1 as a positional candidate gene underlying the QTL affecting BFT traits. Methods Genotype and phenotype analyses were performed using the 1,105 F2 progeny. A mixed-effect linear model was used to access association between these single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers and the BFT traits in the F2 intercross population. Results Highly significant associations of two informative SNPs (c.2442 T>C, c.3316 C>G [R1106G] in GRIP1 with BFT traits were detected. In addition, the two SNPs were used to construct haplotypes that were also highly associated with the BFT traits. Conclusion The SNPs and haplotypes of the GRIP1 gene determined in this study can contribute to understand the genetic structure of BFT traits in pigs.

  13. The role of a second-shell residue in modifying substrate and inhibitor interactions in the SHV beta-lactamase: a study of ambler position Asn276.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawz, Sarah M; Bethel, Christopher R; Hujer, Kristine M; Hurless, Kelly N; Distler, Anne M; Caselli, Emilia; Prati, Fabio; Bonomo, Robert A

    2009-06-02

    Inhibitor-resistant class A beta-lactamases of the TEM and SHV families that arise by single amino acid substitutions are a significant threat to the efficacy of beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations. To better understand the basis of the inhibitor-resistant phenotype in SHV, we performed mutagenesis to examine the role of a second-shell residue, Asn276. Of the 19 variants expressed in Escherichia coli, only the Asn276Asp enzyme demonstrated reduced susceptibility to ampicillin/clavulanate (MIC increased from 50/2 --> 50/8 microg/mL) while maintaining high-level resistance to ampicillin (MIC = 8192 microg/mL). Steady-state kinetic analyses of Asn276Asp revealed slightly diminished k(cat)/K(m) for all substrates tested. In contrast, we observed a 5-fold increase in K(i) for clavulanate (7.4 +/- 0.9 microM for Asn276Asp vs 1.4 +/- 0.2 microM for SHV-1) and a 40% reduction in k(inact)/K(I) (0.013 +/- 0.002 microM(-1 )s(-1) for Asn276Asp vs 0.021 +/- 0.004 microM(-1) s(-1) for SHV-1). Timed electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of clavulanate-inhibited SHV-1 and SHV Asn276Asp showed nearly identical mass adducts, arguing for a similar pathway of inactivation. Molecular modeling shows that novel electrostatic interactions are formed between Arg244Neta2 and both 276AspOdelta1 and Odelta2; these new forces restrict the spatial position of Arg244, a residue important in the recognition of the C(3)/C(4) carboxylate of beta-lactam substrates and inhibitors. Testing the functional consequences of this interaction, we noted considerable free energy costs (+DeltaDeltaG) for substrates and inhibitors. A rigid carbapenem (meropenem) was most affected by the Asn276Asp substitution (46-fold increase in K(i) vs SHV-1). We conclude that residue 276 is an important second-shell residue in class A beta-lactamase-mediated resistance to substrates and inhibitors, and only Asn is able to precisely modulate the conformational flexibility of Arg244 required for successful

  14. A positive-strand RNA virus uses alternative protein-protein interactions within a viral protease/cofactor complex to switch between RNA replication and virion morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrau, Danilo; Tortorici, M Alejandra; Rey, Félix A; Tautz, Norbert

    2017-02-01

    The viruses of the family Flaviviridae possess a positive-strand RNA genome and express a single polyprotein which is processed into functional proteins. Initially, the nonstructural (NS) proteins, which are not part of the virions, form complexes capable of genome replication. Later on, the NS proteins also play a critical role in virion formation. The molecular basis to understand how the same proteins form different complexes required in both processes is so far unknown. For pestiviruses, uncleaved NS2-3 is essential for virion morphogenesis while NS3 is required for RNA replication but is not functional in viral assembly. Recently, we identified two gain of function mutations, located in the C-terminal region of NS2 and in the serine protease domain of NS3 (NS3 residue 132), which allow NS2 and NS3 to substitute for uncleaved NS2-3 in particle assembly. We report here the crystal structure of pestivirus NS3-4A showing that the NS3 residue 132 maps to a surface patch interacting with the C-terminal region of NS4A (NS4A-kink region) suggesting a critical role of this contact in virion morphogenesis. We show that destabilization of this interaction, either by alanine exchanges at this NS3/4A-kink interface, led to a gain of function of the NS3/4A complex in particle formation. In contrast, RNA replication and thus replicase assembly requires a stable association between NS3 and the NS4A-kink region. Thus, we propose that two variants of NS3/4A complexes exist in pestivirus infected cells each representing a basic building block required for either RNA replication or virion morphogenesis. This could be further corroborated by trans-complementation studies with a replication-defective NS3/4A double mutant that was still functional in viral assembly. Our observations illustrate the presence of alternative overlapping surfaces providing different contacts between the same proteins, allowing the switch from RNA replication to virion formation.

  15. New porphyrins bearing positively charged peripheral groups linked by a sulfonamide group to meso-tetraphenylporphyrin: interactions with calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manono, Janet; Marzilli, Patricia A; Marzilli, Luigi G

    2009-07-06

    New water-soluble cationic meso-tetraarylporphyrins (TArP, Ar = 4-C(6)H(4)) and some metal derivatives have been synthesized and characterized. One main goal was to assess if N-methylpyridinium (N-Mepy) groups must be directly attached to the porphyrin core for intercalative binding of porphyrins to DNA. The new porphyrins have the general formula, [T(R(2)R(1)NSO(2)Ar)P]X(4/8) (R(1) = CH(3) or H and R(2) = N-Mepy-n-CH(2) with n = 2, 3, or 4; or R(1) = R(2) = Et(3)NCH(2)CH(2)). Interactions of selected porphyrins and metalloporphyrins (Cu(II), Zn(II)) with calf thymus DNA were investigated by visible circular dichroism (CD), absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopies. The DNA-induced changes in the porphyrin Soret region (a positive induced CD feature and, at high DNA concentration, increases in the Soret band and fluorescence intensities) indicate that the new porphyrins interact with DNA in an outside, non-self-stacking binding mode. Several new metalloporphyrins did not increase DNA solution viscosity and thus do not intercalate, confirming the conclusion drawn from spectroscopic studies. Porphyrins known to intercalate typically bear two or more N-Mepy groups directly attached to the porphyrin ring, such as the prototypical meso-tetra(N-Mepy)porphyrin tetracation (TMpyP(4)). The distances between the nitrogens of the N-Mepy group are estimated to be approximately 11 A (cis) and 16 A (trans) for the relatively rigid TMpyP(4). For the new flexible porphyrin, [T(N-Mepy-4-CH(2)(CH(3))NSO(2)Ar)P]Cl(4), the distances between the nitrogens are estimated to be able to span the range from approximately 9 to approximately 25 A. Thus, the N-Mepy groups in the new porphyrins can adopt the same spacing as in known intercalators such as TMpyP(4). The absence of intercalation by the new porphyrins indicates that the propensity for the N-Mepy group to facilitate DNA intercalation of cationic porphyrins requires direct attachment of N-Mepy groups to the porphyrin core.

  16. A positive-strand RNA virus uses alternative protein-protein interactions within a viral protease/cofactor complex to switch between RNA replication and virion morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Félix A.

    2017-01-01

    The viruses of the family Flaviviridae possess a positive-strand RNA genome and express a single polyprotein which is processed into functional proteins. Initially, the nonstructural (NS) proteins, which are not part of the virions, form complexes capable of genome replication. Later on, the NS proteins also play a critical role in virion formation. The molecular basis to understand how the same proteins form different complexes required in both processes is so far unknown. For pestiviruses, uncleaved NS2-3 is essential for virion morphogenesis while NS3 is required for RNA replication but is not functional in viral assembly. Recently, we identified two gain of function mutations, located in the C-terminal region of NS2 and in the serine protease domain of NS3 (NS3 residue 132), which allow NS2 and NS3 to substitute for uncleaved NS2-3 in particle assembly. We report here the crystal structure of pestivirus NS3-4A showing that the NS3 residue 132 maps to a surface patch interacting with the C-terminal region of NS4A (NS4A-kink region) suggesting a critical role of this contact in virion morphogenesis. We show that destabilization of this interaction, either by alanine exchanges at this NS3/4A-kink interface, led to a gain of function of the NS3/4A complex in particle formation. In contrast, RNA replication and thus replicase assembly requires a stable association between NS3 and the NS4A-kink region. Thus, we propose that two variants of NS3/4A complexes exist in pestivirus infected cells each representing a basic building block required for either RNA replication or virion morphogenesis. This could be further corroborated by trans-complementation studies with a replication-defective NS3/4A double mutant that was still functional in viral assembly. Our observations illustrate the presence of alternative overlapping surfaces providing different contacts between the same proteins, allowing the switch from RNA replication to virion formation. PMID:28151973

  17. A positive-strand RNA virus uses alternative protein-protein interactions within a viral protease/cofactor complex to switch between RNA replication and virion morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Dubrau

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The viruses of the family Flaviviridae possess a positive-strand RNA genome and express a single polyprotein which is processed into functional proteins. Initially, the nonstructural (NS proteins, which are not part of the virions, form complexes capable of genome replication. Later on, the NS proteins also play a critical role in virion formation. The molecular basis to understand how the same proteins form different complexes required in both processes is so far unknown. For pestiviruses, uncleaved NS2-3 is essential for virion morphogenesis while NS3 is required for RNA replication but is not functional in viral assembly. Recently, we identified two gain of function mutations, located in the C-terminal region of NS2 and in the serine protease domain of NS3 (NS3 residue 132, which allow NS2 and NS3 to substitute for uncleaved NS2-3 in particle assembly. We report here the crystal structure of pestivirus NS3-4A showing that the NS3 residue 132 maps to a surface patch interacting with the C-terminal region of NS4A (NS4A-kink region suggesting a critical role of this contact in virion morphogenesis. We show that destabilization of this interaction, either by alanine exchanges at this NS3/4A-kink interface, led to a gain of function of the NS3/4A complex in particle formation. In contrast, RNA replication and thus replicase assembly requires a stable association between NS3 and the NS4A-kink region. Thus, we propose that two variants of NS3/4A complexes exist in pestivirus infected cells each representing a basic building block required for either RNA replication or virion morphogenesis. This could be further corroborated by trans-complementation studies with a replication-defective NS3/4A double mutant that was still functional in viral assembly. Our observations illustrate the presence of alternative overlapping surfaces providing different contacts between the same proteins, allowing the switch from RNA replication to virion formation.

  18. The Protein Kinase SmSnRK2.6 Positively Regulates Phenolic Acid Biosynthesis in Salvia miltiorrhiza by Interacting with SmAREB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yanyan; Bai, Zhenqing; Pei, Tianlin; Ding, Kai; Liang, Zongsuo; Gong, Yuehua

    2017-01-01

    Subclass III members of the sucrose non-fermenting-1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2) play essential roles in both the abscisic acid signaling and abiotic stress responses of plants by phosphorylating the downstream ABA-responsive element (ABRE)-binding proteins (AREB/ABFs). This comprehensive study investigated the function of new candidate genes, namely SmSnRK2.3 , SmSnRK2.6 , and SmAREB1 , with a view to breeding novel varieties of Salvia miltiorrhiza with improved stress tolerance stresses and more content of bioactive ingredients. Exogenous ABA strongly induced the expression of these genes. PlantCARE predicted several hormones and stress response cis -elements in their promoters. SmSnRK2.6 and SmAREB1 showed the highest expression levels in the leaves of S. miltiorrhiza seedlings, while SmSnRK2.3 exhibited a steady expression in their roots, stems, and leaves. A subcellular localization assay revealed that both SmSnRK2.3 and SmSnRK2.6 were located in the cell membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus, whereas SmAREB1 was exclusive to the nucleus. Overexpressing SmSnRK2.3 did not significantly promote the accumulation of rosmarinic acid (RA) and salvianolic acid B (Sal B) in the transgenic S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots. However, overexpressing SmSnRK2.6 and SmAREB1 increased the contents of RA and Sal B, and regulated the expression levels of structural genes participating in the phenolic acid-branched and side-branched pathways, including SmPAL1 , SmC4H , Sm4CL1 , SmTAT , SmHPPR , SmRAS , SmCHS , SmCCR , SmCOMT , and SmHPPD . Furthermore, SmSnRK2.3 and SmSnRK2.6 interacted physically with SmAREB1. In summary, our results indicate that SmSnRK2.6 is involved in stress responses and can regulate structural gene transcripts to promote greater metabolic flux to the phenolic acid-branched pathway, via its interaction with SmAREB1 , a transcription factor. In this way, SmSnRK2.6 contributes to the positive regulation of phenolic acids in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots.

  19. The Protein Kinase SmSnRK2.6 Positively Regulates Phenolic Acid Biosynthesis in Salvia miltiorrhiza by Interacting with SmAREB1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Jia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Subclass III members of the sucrose non-fermenting-1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2 play essential roles in both the abscisic acid signaling and abiotic stress responses of plants by phosphorylating the downstream ABA-responsive element (ABRE-binding proteins (AREB/ABFs. This comprehensive study investigated the function of new candidate genes, namely SmSnRK2.3, SmSnRK2.6, and SmAREB1, with a view to breeding novel varieties of Salvia miltiorrhiza with improved stress tolerance stresses and more content of bioactive ingredients. Exogenous ABA strongly induced the expression of these genes. PlantCARE predicted several hormones and stress response cis-elements in their promoters. SmSnRK2.6 and SmAREB1 showed the highest expression levels in the leaves of S. miltiorrhiza seedlings, while SmSnRK2.3 exhibited a steady expression in their roots, stems, and leaves. A subcellular localization assay revealed that both SmSnRK2.3 and SmSnRK2.6 were located in the cell membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus, whereas SmAREB1 was exclusive to the nucleus. Overexpressing SmSnRK2.3 did not significantly promote the accumulation of rosmarinic acid (RA and salvianolic acid B (Sal B in the transgenic S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots. However, overexpressing SmSnRK2.6 and SmAREB1 increased the contents of RA and Sal B, and regulated the expression levels of structural genes participating in the phenolic acid-branched and side-branched pathways, including SmPAL1, SmC4H, Sm4CL1, SmTAT, SmHPPR, SmRAS, SmCHS, SmCCR, SmCOMT, and SmHPPD. Furthermore, SmSnRK2.3 and SmSnRK2.6 interacted physically with SmAREB1. In summary, our results indicate that SmSnRK2.6 is involved in stress responses and can regulate structural gene transcripts to promote greater metabolic flux to the phenolic acid-branched pathway, via its interaction with SmAREB1, a transcription factor. In this way, SmSnRK2.6 contributes to the positive regulation of phenolic acids in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots.

  20. Effects of Digital Storytelling in Mathematics Instruction on Academic Achievement and Examination of Teacher-Student Opinions on the Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özpinar, Ilknur; Gökçe, Semirhan; Yenmez, Arzu Aydogan

    2017-01-01

    Storytelling is a popular instrument used in every domain of natural and social interaction for human communication and commonly used in classrooms to enrich the learning experience. With the use of technological tools in every field of our daily lives, its use in educational environments has become inevitable and in parallel with the development…

  1. The Use of Immersive Virtual Reality in the Learning Sciences: Digital Transformations of Teachers, Students, and Social Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailenson, Jeremy N.; Yee, Nick; Blascovich, Jim; Beall, Andrew C.; Lundblad, Nicole; Jin, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article illustrates the utility of using virtual environments to transform social interaction via behavior and context, with the goal of improving learning in digital environments. We first describe the technology and theories behind virtual environments and then report data from 4 empirical studies. In Experiment 1, we demonstrated that…

  2. Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1a positively regulates euchromatic gene expression through RNA transcript association and interaction with hnRNPs in Drosophila.

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    Lucia Piacentini

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin Protein 1 (HP1a is a well-known conserved protein involved in heterochromatin formation and gene silencing in different species including humans. A general model has been proposed for heterochromatin formation and epigenetic gene silencing in different species that implies an essential role for HP1a. According to the model, histone methyltransferase enzymes (HMTases methylate the histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9me, creating selective binding sites for itself and the chromodomain of HP1a. This complex is thought to form a higher order chromatin state that represses gene activity. It has also been found that HP1a plays a role in telomere capping. Surprisingly, recent studies have shown that HP1a is present at many euchromatic sites along polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster, including the developmental and heat-shock-induced puffs, and that this protein can be removed from these sites by in vivo RNase treatment, thus suggesting an association of HP1a with the transcripts of many active genes. To test this suggestion, we performed an extensive screening by RIP-chip assay (RNA-immunoprecipitation on microarrays, and we found that HP1a is associated with transcripts of more than one hundred euchromatic genes. An expression analysis in HP1a mutants shows that HP1a is required for positive regulation of these genes. Cytogenetic and molecular assays show that HP1a also interacts with the well known proteins DDP1, HRB87F, and PEP, which belong to different classes of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs involved in RNA processing. Surprisingly, we found that all these hnRNP proteins also bind heterochromatin and are dominant suppressors of position effect variegation. Together, our data show novel and unexpected functions for HP1a and hnRNPs proteins. All these proteins are in fact involved both in RNA transcript processing and in heterochromatin formation. This suggests that, in general, similar epigenetic mechanisms

  3. Evc2 is a positive modulator of Hedgehog signalling that interacts with Evc at the cilia membrane and is also found in the nucleus

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    Ponting Chris P

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evc is essential for Indian Hedgehog (Hh signalling in the cartilage growth plate. The gene encoding Evc2 is in close proximity in divergent orientation to Evc and mutations in both human genes lead to the chondrodysplasia Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Results Bioinformatic analysis reveals that the Evc and Evc2 genes arose through a duplication event early in metazoan evolution and were subsequently lost in arthropods and nematodes. Here we demonstrate that Evc2 is essential for Hh pathway activation in response to the Smo agonist purmorphamine. A yeast two-hybrid screen using Evc as bait identified Evc2 as an Evc binding partner and we confirmed the interaction by immunoprecipitation. We developed anti-Evc2 antibodies and show that Evc2 and Evc co-localize at the basal body and also on primary cilia. In transfected cells, basal body and cilia localization is observed when Evc and Evc2 constructs are co-transfected but not when either construct is transfected individually. We show that Evc and Evc2 are cilia transmembrane proteins, the C-terminus for both being intracellular and Evc2, but not Evc, having an extracellular portion. Furthermore, Evc is absent at the basal body in Evc2 null cells. Using Western blots of cytoplasmic and nuclear protein, we also demonstrate that full length Evc2 but not Evc, is located in the nucleus. Conclusions We demonstrate for the first time that Evc2 is a positive regulator of the Hh signalling pathway and that it is located at the basal body of primary cilia. We show that the presence of Evc and Evc2 at the basal body and cilia membrane is co-dependent. In addition, Evc2, but not Evc, is present in the cell nucleus suggesting movement of Evc2 between the cilium and nucleus.

  4. Positively charged residues at the five-fold symmetry axis of cell culture-adapted foot-and-mouth disease virus permit novel receptor interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Stephen; Clark, Stuart; Kakker, Naresh K; Silk, Rhiannon; Seago, Julian; Wadsworth, Jemma; Chamberlain, Kyle; Knowles, Nick J; Jackson, Terry

    2013-08-01

    Field isolates of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) have a restricted cell tropism which is limited by the need for certain RGD-dependent integrin receptors. In contrast, cell culture-adapted viruses use heparan sulfate (HS) or other unidentified molecules as receptors to initiate infection. Here, we report several novel findings resulting from cell culture adaptation of FMDV. In cell culture, a virus with the capsid of the A/Turkey/2/2006 field isolate gained the ability to infect CHO and HS-deficient CHO cells as a result of a single glutamine (Q)-to-lysine (K) substitution at VP1-110 (VP1-(Q)110(K)). Using site-directed mutagenesis, the introduction of lysine at this same site also resulted in an acquired ability to infect CHO cells by type O and Asia-1 FMDV. However, this ability appeared to require a second positively charged residue at VP1-109. CHO cells express two RGD-binding integrins (α5β1 and αvβ5) that, although not used by FMDV, have the potential to be used as receptors; however, viruses with the VP1-(Q)110(K) substitution did not use these integrins. In contrast, the VP1-(Q)110(K) substitution appeared to result in enhanced interactions with αvβ6, which allowed a virus with KGE in place of the normal RGD integrin-binding motif to use αvβ6 as a receptor. Thus, our results confirmed the existence of nonintegrin, non-HS receptors for FMDV on CHO cells and revealed a novel, non-RGD-dependent use of αvβ6 as a receptor. The introduction of lysine at VP1-110 may allow for cell culture adaptation of FMDV by design, which may prove useful for vaccine manufacture when cell culture adaptation proves intractable.

  5. Electron Transport Chain Is Biochemically Linked to Pilus Assembly Required for Polymicrobial Interactions and Biofilm Formation in the Gram-Positive Actinobacterium Actinomyces oris

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    Belkys C. Sanchez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-positive actinobacteria Actinomyces spp. are key colonizers in the development of oral biofilms due to the inherent ability of Actinomyces to adhere to receptor polysaccharides on the surface of oral streptococci and host cells. This receptor-dependent bacterial interaction, or coaggregation, requires a unique sortase-catalyzed pilus consisting of the pilus shaft FimA and the coaggregation factor CafA forming the pilus tip. While the essential role of the sortase machine SrtC2 in pilus assembly, biofilm formation, and coaggregation has been established, little is known about trans-acting factors contributing to these processes. We report here a large-scale Tn5 transposon screen for mutants defective in Actinomyces oris coaggregation with Streptococcus oralis. We obtained 33 independent clones, 13 of which completely failed to aggregate with S. oralis, and the remainder of which exhibited a range of phenotypes from severely to weakly defective coaggregation. The former had Tn5 insertions in fimA, cafA, or srtC2, as expected; the latter were mapped to genes coding for uncharacterized proteins and various nuo genes encoding the NADH dehydrogenase subunits. Electron microscopy and biochemical analyses of mutants with nonpolar deletions of nuo genes and ubiE, a menaquinone C-methyltransferase-encoding gene downstream of the nuo locus, confirmed the pilus and coaggregation defects. Both nuoA and ubiE mutants were defective in oxidation of MdbA, the major oxidoreductase required for oxidative folding of pilus proteins. Furthermore, supplementation of the ubiE mutant with exogenous menaquinone-4 rescued the cell growth and pilus defects. Altogether, we propose that the A. oris electron transport chain is biochemically linked to pilus assembly via oxidative protein folding.

  6. Positively Charged Residues at the Five-Fold Symmetry Axis of Cell Culture-Adapted Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Permit Novel Receptor Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Stephen; Clark, Stuart; Kakker, Naresh K.; Silk, Rhiannon; Seago, Julian; Wadsworth, Jemma; Chamberlain, Kyle; Knowles, Nick J.

    2013-01-01

    Field isolates of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) have a restricted cell tropism which is limited by the need for certain RGD-dependent integrin receptors. In contrast, cell culture-adapted viruses use heparan sulfate (HS) or other unidentified molecules as receptors to initiate infection. Here, we report several novel findings resulting from cell culture adaptation of FMDV. In cell culture, a virus with the capsid of the A/Turkey/2/2006 field isolate gained the ability to infect CHO and HS-deficient CHO cells as a result of a single glutamine (Q)-to-lysine (K) substitution at VP1-110 (VP1-Q110K). Using site-directed mutagenesis, the introduction of lysine at this same site also resulted in an acquired ability to infect CHO cells by type O and Asia-1 FMDV. However, this ability appeared to require a second positively charged residue at VP1-109. CHO cells express two RGD-binding integrins (α5β1 and αvβ5) that, although not used by FMDV, have the potential to be used as receptors; however, viruses with the VP1-Q110K substitution did not use these integrins. In contrast, the VP1-Q110K substitution appeared to result in enhanced interactions with αvβ6, which allowed a virus with KGE in place of the normal RGD integrin-binding motif to use αvβ6 as a receptor. Thus, our results confirmed the existence of nonintegrin, non-HS receptors for FMDV on CHO cells and revealed a novel, non-RGD-dependent use of αvβ6 as a receptor. The introduction of lysine at VP1-110 may allow for cell culture adaptation of FMDV by design, which may prove useful for vaccine manufacture when cell culture adaptation proves intractable. PMID:23740982

  7. They need to be recognized as a person in everyday life: Teachers' and helpers' experiences of teacher-student relationships in upper secondary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krane, Vibeke; Karlsson, Bengt; Ness, Ottar; Binder, Per-Einar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how teachers and helpers experience that teacher-student relationship (TSR) is developed and promoted in upper secondary school.We also explored their experiences of qualities of TSR with students with mental health problems or at risk of dropping out. The study used a qualitative and participative approach; key stakeholders were included as co-researchers. Focus group interviews were held with 27 teachers and helpers. A thematic analysis was conducted. The participants' descriptions of important experiential dimensions of TSR were clustered around four themes: (1) to be recognized as a person with strengths and challenges in everyday life, (2) collaborative relationships between students and teachers, (3) flexible boundaries in the relationship between teachers and students and (4) organization of classes and procedures set the stage for TSR. Collaborative, emotional and contextual qualities were found important to the development of TSR in upper secondary school. Experiences of negative qualities of TSR can contribute to push students out of school. Teachers and helpers experience that TSR may have the potential to play a role in promoting mental health in students' everyday life.

  8. Promoting Positive Peer Interactions in the Preschool Classroom: The Role and the Responsibility of the Teacher in Supporting Children's Sociodramatic Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton-Chapman, Tina L.

    2015-01-01

    Teachers play an important role in expanding and supporting children's play and interactions with peers. This manuscript provides specific guidelines for interventions teachers can use to promote successful peer interactions in preschool settings. The strategies discussed include: (a) preparing the physical environment for play (e.g., toy…

  9. Basal electric and magnetic fields of celestial bodies come from positive-negative charge separation caused by gravitation of quasi-Casimir pressure in weak interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    According to f =d(mv)/dt=m(dv/dt)+ v(dm/dt), a same gravitational formula had been de-duced from the variance in physical mass of QFT and from the variance in mass of inductive energy-transfer of GR respectively: f QF T = f GR = -G (mM/r2 )((r/r)+(v/c)) when their interaction-constants are all taken the experimental values (H05-0029-08, E15-0039-08). f QF T is the quasi-Casimir pressure. f GR is equivalent to Einstein's equation, then more easy to solve it. The hypothesis of the equivalent principle is not used in f QF T , but required by f GR . The predictions of f QF T and f GR are identical except that f QF T has quantum effects but f GR has not and f GR has Lense-Thirring effect but f QF T has not. The quantum effects of gravitation had been verified by Nesvizhevsky et al with the ultracold neutrons falling in the earth's gravitational field in 2002. Yet Lense-Thirring effect had not been measured by GP-B. It shows that f QF T is essential but f GR is phenomenological. The macro-f QF T is the statistic average pressure collided by net virtual neutrinos ν 0 flux (after self-offset in opposite directions) and in direct proportion to the mass. But micro-f QF T is in direct proportion to the scattering section. The electric mass (in inverse proportion to de Broglie wavelength λ) far less than nucleonic mass and the electric scattering section (in direct proportion to λ2 ) far large than that of nucleon, then the net ν 0 flux pressure exerted to electron far large than that to nucleon and the electric displacement far large than that of nucleon, it causes the gravitational polarization of positive-negative charge center separation. Because the gravity far less than the electromagnetic binding force, in atoms the gravitational polarization only produces a little separation. But the net ν 0 flux can press a part freedom electrons in plasma of ionosphere into the earth's surface, the static electric force of redundant positive ions prevents electrons from further

  10. Assessment of Teaching Strategies, Classroom Interaction and Teacher Concerns in the Implementation of Large Class Policy on a Speech Communication Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Segura-Krueger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the teaching strategies used in the classroom and concerns of teachers in the implementation of large class policy. This study also looked at the perception of teachers in their interaction with their students as well as the perception of students at their teacher’s interaction with them. The six speech communication lecturers and 716 undergraduate students in the 2nd semester of 2014-2015 were the participants of the study. Researchers asked teacher respondents to fill out several questionnaires to identify large class-teaching strategies, gauge teacher-student interaction in large classes and determine personal concerns. One-on-one interview with the teacher respondents was also done to validate the results obtained from surveys. Moreover, they also asked students to fill out the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI to determine their perception of teacher’s interaction in the classroom. The teachers revealed their various large class teaching strategies, the most common of which is the discussion type. Teachers’ perceived classroom interaction with their students were in agreement with that of their students giving higher scores in the types depicting positive interpersonal behavior like leadership and helpfulness and lower scores in the types depicting negative behavior such as dissatisfaction and admonition. Based from the one-on-one interviews, teacher respondents felt lesser interaction with students in the large lecture class compared to the previous small classroom set-up. Results from teachers’ stages of concern profile showed that they were unconcerned on the implementation of large class policy. Some expressed their strong opposition on the policy and had other educational changes in mind that competed for their attention at the time of the study. There were also issues on credit loading and collaboration with recitation teachers raised during interviews.

  11. Assessment of Teaching Strategies, Classroom Interaction and Teacher Concerns in the Implementation of Large Class Policy on a Speech Communication Course (

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Segura-Krueger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the teaching strategies used in the classroom and concerns of teachers in the implementation of large class policy. This study also looked at the perception of teachers in their interaction with their students as well as the perception of students at their teacher’s interaction with them. The six speech communication lecturers and 716 undergraduate students in the 2nd semester of 2014-2015 were the participants of the study. Researchers asked teacher respondents to fill out several questionnaires to identify large class-teaching strategies, gauge teacher-student interaction in large classes and determine personal concerns. One-on-one interview with the teacher respondents was also done to validate the results obtained from surveys. Moreover, they also asked students to fill out the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI to determine their perception of teacher’s interaction in the classroom. The teachers revealed their various large class teaching strategies, the most common of which is the discussion type. Teachers’ perceived classroom interaction with their students were in agreement with that of their students giving higher scores in the types depicting positive interpersonal behavior like leadership and helpfulness and lower scores in the types depicting negative behavior such as dissatisfaction and admonition. Based from the one-on-one interviews, teacher respondents felt lesser interaction with students in the large lecture class compared to the previous small classroom set-up. Results from teachers’ stages of concern profile showed that they were unconcerned on the implementation of large class policy. Some expressed their strong opposition on the policy and had other educational changes in mind that competed for their attention at the time of the study. There were also issues on credit loading and collaboration with recitation teachers raised during interviews.

  12. Acceptability of Global Positioning System technology to survey injecting drug users' movements and social interactions: a pilot study from San Francisco, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzazadeh, A; Grasso, M; Johnson, K; Briceno, A; Navadeh, S; McFarland, W; Page, K

    2014-01-01

    Despite potential applications for improving health services using GPS technology, little is known about ethical concerns, acceptability, and logistical barriers for their use, particularly among marginalized groups. We garnered the insights of people who inject drug (PWID) in San Francisco on these topics. PWID were enrolled through street-outreach (n=20) and an ongoing study (n=4) for 4 focus group discussions. Participants also completed a self-administered questionnaire on demographic characteristics and their numbers and types of interactions with other PWID. Median age was 30.5 years, majorities were male (83.3%) and white (68.2%). Most interacted with other PWID for eating meals and purchasing drugs over the last week; fewer reported interactions such as sexual contact, drug treatment, or work. Participants identified several concerns about carrying GPS devices, including what authorities might do with the data, that other PWID and dealers may suspect them as informants, and adherence to carrying and use. Most felt concerns were surmountable with detailed informed consent on the purpose of the study and practical ways to carry, charge, and hide devices. PWID felt data collection on their movements and social interactions with other PWID using GPS can be acceptable with addressing specific concerns. The technology is now in hand to greatly expand the ability to monitor health conditions with respect to the environment and improve the location of prevention, care, and treatment facilities to serve hard to reach, mobile, and hidden populations.

  13. Who Is the Competent Physics Student? A Study of Students' Positions and Social Interaction in Small-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due, Karin

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a study which explored the social interaction and the reproduction and challenge of gendered discourses in small group discussions in physics. Data for the study consisted of video recordings of eight upper secondary school groups solving physics problems and 15 audiotaped individual interviews with participating students.…

  14. Heart and brain interaction in patients with heart failure: overview and proposal for a taxonomy. A position paper from the Study Group on Heart and Brain Interaction of the Heart Failure Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehner, Wolfram; Ural, Dilek; Haeusler, Karl Georg; Čelutkienė, Jelena; Bestetti, Reinaldo; Cavusoglu, Yuksel; Peña-Duque, Marco A; Glavas, Duska; Iacoviello, Massimo; Laufs, Ulrich; Alvear, Ricardo Marmol; Mbakwem, Amam; Piepoli, Massimo F; Rosen, Stuart D; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Vitale, Cristiana; Yilmaz, M Birhan; Anker, Stefan D; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Seferovic, Petar; Coats, Andrew J S; Ruschitzka, Frank

    2018-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome with multiple interactions between the failing myocardium and cerebral (dys-)functions. Bi-directional feedback interactions between the heart and the brain are inherent in the pathophysiology of HF: (i) the impaired cardiac function affects cerebral structure and functional capacity, and (ii) neuronal signals impact on the cardiovascular continuum. These interactions contribute to the symptomatic presentation of HF patients and affect many co-morbidities of HF. Moreover, neuro-cardiac feedback signals significantly promote aggravation and further progression of HF and are causal in the poor prognosis of HF. The diversity and complexity of heart and brain interactions make it difficult to develop a comprehensive overview. In this paper a systematic approach is proposed to develop a comprehensive atlas of related conditions, signals and disease mechanisms of the interactions between the heart and the brain in HF. The proposed taxonomy is based on pathophysiological principles. Impaired perfusion of the brain may represent one major category, with acute (cardio-embolic) or chronic (haemodynamic failure) low perfusion being sub-categories with mostly different consequences (i.e. ischaemic stroke or cognitive impairment, respectively). Further categories include impairment of higher cortical function (mood, cognition), of brain stem function (sympathetic over-activation, neuro-cardiac reflexes). Treatment-related interactions could be categorized as medical, interventional and device-related interactions. Also interactions due to specific diseases are categorized. A methodical approach to categorize the interdependency of heart and brain may help to integrate individual research areas into an overall picture. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  15. Interaction between t-butyl hydroperoxide (I) and positive halogen compounds. part I. Intermediates in the reaction between I and CI2O

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, J. van; Schors, A.; Kooyman, E.C.

    1973-01-01

    positive halogen” compounds were found to induce the decomposition of t-butyl hydroperoxide (I) in the dark. In this Cl2O proved to be particularly effective, liberating oxygen from I instantaneously at 0°. At temperature between −80° and −30°, two oxygen-rich intermediates could be observed with

  16. A qualitative interview study on the positive well-being of medical school faculty in their teaching role: job demands, job resources and role interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, J. W.; Verberg, C. P. M.; Berkhout, J. J.; Lombarts, M. J. M. H.; Scherpbier, A. J. J. A.; Jaarsma, A. D. C.

    2015-01-01

    Attention for the well-being of medical school faculty is not only important for the prevention of attrition and burnout, but may also boost performance in their tasks in medical education. Positive well-being can be conceptualized as work engagement and this is associated with increased

  17. A qualitative interview study on the positive well-being of medical school faculty in their teaching role : job demands, job resources and role interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, J W; Verberg, C P M; Berkhout, J J; Lombarts, M J M H; Scherpbier, A J J A; Jaarsma, A. D. C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Attention for the well-being of medical school faculty is not only important for the prevention of attrition and burnout, but may also boost performance in their tasks in medical education. Positive well-being can be conceptualized as work engagement and this is associated with increased

  18. Low molecular weight poly (2-dimethylamino ethylmethacrylate) polymers with controlled.positioned fluorescent labeling: Synthesis, characterization and in vitro interaction with human endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flebus, Luca; Lombart, Francois; Sevrin, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Poly (2-dimethylamino ethylmethacrylate) (PDMAEMA) is an attractive non-degradable polymer studied as nonviral vector for gene delivery but it can be also adopted for delivery of other biopharmaceutical drugs. As a parenteral carrier, the PDMAEMA free form (FF) might interact with tissues and cells...... to a minor cytotoxicity compared to the higher ones.As main conclusion this study highlights the similitude in cell trafficking of FF PDMAEMA and data previously reported for PDMAEMA/DNA complexes....

  19. Impact of variation in the BDNF gene on social stress sensitivity and the buffering impact of positive emotions: replication and extension of a gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Winkel, Mark; Peeters, Frenk; van Winkel, Ruud; Kenis, Gunter; Collip, Dina; Geschwind, Nicole; Jacobs, Nele; Derom, Catherine; Thiery, Evert; van Os, Jim; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Wichers, Marieke

    2014-06-01

    A previous study reported that social stress sensitivity is moderated by the brain-derived-neurotrophic-factor(Val66Met) (BDNF rs6265) genotype. Additionally, positive emotions partially neutralize this moderating effect. The current study aimed to: (i) replicate in a new independent sample of subjects with residual depressive symptoms the moderating effect of BDNF(Val66Met) genotype on social stress sensitivity, (ii) replicate the neutralizing impact of positive emotions, (iii) extend these analyses to other variations in the BDNF gene in the new independent sample and the original sample of non-depressed individuals. Previous findings were replicated in an experience sampling method (ESM) study. Negative Affect (NA) responses to social stress were stronger in "Val/Met" carriers of BDNF(Val66Met) compared to "Val/Val" carriers. Positive emotions neutralized the moderating effect of BDNF(Val66Met) genotype on social stress sensitivity in a dose-response fashion. Finally, two of four additional BDNF SNPs (rs11030101, rs2049046) showed similar moderating effects on social stress-sensitivity across both samples. The neutralizing effect of positive emotions on the moderating effects of these two additional SNPs was found in one sample. In conclusion, ESM has important advantages in gene-environment (GxE) research and may attribute to more consistent findings in future GxE research. This study shows how the impact of BDNF genetic variation on depressive symptoms may be explained by its impact on subtle daily life responses to social stress. Further, it shows that the generation of positive affect (PA) can buffer social stress sensitivity and partially undo the genetic susceptibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  20. The influence of gender, age, matriline and hierarchical rank on individual social position, role and interactional patterns in Macaca sylvanus at ‘La Forêt des singes’: A multilevel social network approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian OROZCO SOSA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A society is a complex system composed of individuals that can be characterized by their own attributes that influence their behaviors. In this study, a specific analytical protocol based on social network analysis was adopted to investigate the influence of four attributes (gender, age, matriline, and hierarchical rank on affiliative (allogrooming and agonistic networks in a non-human primate species, Macaca sylvanus, at the park La Forêt des Singes in France. The results show significant differences with respect to the position (i.e. centric, peripheral and role (i.e. implication in the network cohesiveness of an individual within a social network and hence interactional patterns. Females are more central, more active, and have a denser ego network in the affiliative social network tan males; thus, they contribute in a greater way to the cohesive structure of the network. High-ranking individuals are likely to receive fewer agonistic behaviors than low-ranking individuals, and high-ranking females receive more allogrooming. I also observe homophily for affiliative interactions regarding all attributes and homophily for agonistic interactions regarding gender and age. Revealing the positions, the roles, and the interactional behavioral patterns of individuals can help understand the mechanisms that shape the overall structure of a social network.

  1. The Influence of Gender, Age, Matriline and Hierarchical Rank on Individual Social Position, Role and Interactional Patterns in Macaca sylvanus at 'La Forêt des Singes': A Multilevel Social Network Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    A society is a complex system composed of individuals that can be characterized by their own attributes that influence their behaviors. In this study, a specific analytical protocol based on social network analysis was adopted to investigate the influence of four attributes (gender, age, matriline, and hierarchical rank) on affiliative (allogrooming) and agonistic networks in a non-human primate species, Macaca sylvanus, at the park La Forêt des Singes in France. The results show significant differences with respect to the position (i.e., centric, peripheral) and role (i.e., implication in the network cohesiveness) of an individual within a social network and hence interactional patterns. Females are more central, more active, and have a denser ego network in the affiliative social network tan males; thus, they contribute in a greater way to the cohesive structure of the network. High-ranking individuals are likely to receive fewer agonistic behaviors than low-ranking individuals, and high-ranking females receive more allogrooming. I also observe homophily for affiliative interactions regarding all attributes and homophily for agonistic interactions regarding gender and age. Revealing the positions, the roles, and the interactional behavioral patterns of individuals can help understand the mechanisms that shape the overall structure of a social network.

  2. Positive selection of deleterious alleles through interaction with a sex-ratio suppressor gene in African Buffalo: a plausible new mechanism for a high frequency anomaly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pim van Hooft

    Full Text Available Although generally rare, deleterious alleles can become common through genetic drift, hitchhiking or reductions in selective constraints. Here we present a possible new mechanism that explains the attainment of high frequencies of deleterious alleles in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer population of Kruger National Park, through positive selection of these alleles that is ultimately driven by a sex-ratio suppressor. We have previously shown that one in four Kruger buffalo has a Y-chromosome profile that, despite being associated with low body condition, appears to impart a relative reproductive advantage, and which is stably maintained through a sex-ratio suppressor. Apparently, this sex-ratio suppressor prevents fertility reduction that generally accompanies sex-ratio distortion. We hypothesize that this body-condition-associated reproductive advantage increases the fitness of alleles that negatively affect male body condition, causing genome-wide positive selection of these alleles. To investigate this we genotyped 459 buffalo using 17 autosomal microsatellites. By correlating heterozygosity with body condition (heterozygosity-fitness correlations, we found that most microsatellites were associated with one of two gene types: one with elevated frequencies of deleterious alleles that have a negative effect on body condition, irrespective of sex; the other with elevated frequencies of sexually antagonistic alleles that are negative for male body condition but positive for female body condition. Positive selection and a direct association with a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio suppressor are indicated, respectively, by allele clines and by relatively high numbers of homozygous deleterious alleles among sex-ratio suppressor carriers. This study, which employs novel statistical techniques to analyse heterozygosity-fitness correlations, is the first to demonstrate the abundance of sexually-antagonistic genes in a natural mammal population. It also has

  3. Interactions of cervico-ocular and vestibulo-ocular fast-phase signals in the control of eye position in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmack, N H; Errico, P; Ferraresi, A; Pettorossi, V E

    1989-01-01

    1. Eye movements in unanaesthetized rabbits were studied during horizontal neck-proprioceptive stimulation (movement of the body with respect to the fixed head), when this stimulation was given alone and when it was given simultaneously with vestibular stimulation (rotation of the head-body). The effect of neck-proprioceptive stimulation on modifying the anticompensatory fast-phase eye movements (AFPs) evoked by vestibular stimulation was studied with a 'conditioning-test' protocol; the 'conditioning' stimulus was a neck-proprioceptive signal evoked by a step-like change in body position with respect to the head and the 'test' stimulus was a vestibular signal evoked by a step rotation of the head-body. 2. The influence of eye position and direction of slow eye movements on the occurrence of compensatory fast-phase eye movements (CFPs) evoked by neck-proprioceptive stimulation was also examined. 3. The anticompensatory fast phase (AFP) evoked by vestibular stimulation was attenuated by a preceding neck-proprioceptive stimulus which when delivered alone evoked compensatory slow-phase eye movements (CSP) in the same direction as the CSP evoked by vestibular stimulation. Conversely, the vestibularly evoked AFP was potentiated by a neck-proprioceptive stimulus which evoked CSPs opposite to that of vestibularly evoked CSPs. 4. Eccentric initial eye positions increased the probability of occurrence of midline-directed compensatory fast-phase eye movements (CFPs) evoked by appropriate neck-proprioceptive stimulation. 5. The gain of the horizontal cervico-ocular reflex (GHCOR) was measured from the combined changes in eye position resulting from AFPs and CSPs. GHCOR was potentiated during simultaneous vestibular stimulation. This enhancement of GHCOR occurred at neck-proprioceptive stimulus frequencies which, in the absence of conjoint vestibular stimulation, do not evoke CSPs. PMID:2795479

  4. Communication Teacher-Student-Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatkovic, Nevenka; Sehanovic, Jusuf; Ruzic, Maja

    2006-01-01

    The work points out the importance of the use of the information and communication technologies in education. The overview of elementary, advanced and specialized informatics and information related knowledge and skills that every teacher should master and apply in the educational process is presented. Stress is laid upon the importance of the…

  5. Identifying behaviors that generate positive interactions between museums and people on a social media platform: An analysis of 27 science museums on Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stacy Christine

    The aim of this study was to provide a detailed examination of how science museums use Twitter and suggest changes these museums should make to improve their current approach on this social media platform. Previous studies have identified the types of content museums are creating on social media, but none have quantitatively investigated the specific types of content most likely to generate interaction and engagement with a social media audience. A total of 5,278 tweets from 27 science museums were analyzed to determine what type of tweet yields the greatest impact measured in retweets and favorites. 1,453 of those tweets were selected for additional qualitative analysis. The results indicate that tweets with educational content, links, and hashtags lead to the greatest number of retweets and favorites. The results also indicate that the majority of tweets posted by museums do not generate interaction and engagement with a social media audience. A model for existing museums to improve their use of Twitter was created using the results of this study.

  6. Position Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Position Information Data Asset provides the ability to search for active SSA position descriptions using various search criteria. An individual may search by PD...

  7. Tuning the magnetic interactions in GaAs:Mn/MnAs hybrid structures by controlling shape and position of MnAs nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elm, Matthias Thomas

    2010-07-01

    In this work the magnetic properties of hexagonal MnAs nanoclusters and their influence on the transport properties of GaAs:Mn /MnAs hybrid structures were studied. Various arrangements of isolated nanoclusters and cluster chains were grown on (111)B-GaAs substrates by SA-MOVPE. The first part of this work deals with the manufacturing process of the different cluster arrangements investigated. By a suitable pre-structuring of the substrate it was possible to influence the cluster size, cluster shape and cluster position systematically. Preparing various arrangements it could be shown that the hexagonal nanoclusters prefer to grow along their a-axes. In the second part, the magnetic properties of the nanoclusters were studied. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements show a hard magnetic axis perpendicular to the sample plane, i.e. parallel to the c-axis. By measurements, where the magnetic field was rotated in the sample plane, it could be demonstrated that the orientation of the magnetization can be forced into a certain direction by controlling the cluster shape. These results are confirmed by measurements using magnetic force microscopy. The third part deals with the influence of the nanoclusters and their arrangement on the transport properties of the GaAs:Mn matrix. For temperatures above 30 K the structures investigated show positive as well as negative magnetoresistance effects, which are typical for granular GaAs:Mn/MnAs hybrid structures. This behaviour can be explained in the context of transport in extended band states. The size of the magnetoresistance effects correlates strongly with the respective cluster arrangement of the sample. This behaviour has been predicted theoretically and could be confirmed experimentally in the context of this work. Below 30 K large positive magnetoresistance effects show up for the regular cluster arrangements, which cannot be observed for hybrid structures with random cluster distributions. These large positive

  8. Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

  9. Ubiquitous positioning

    CERN Document Server

    Mannings, Robin

    2008-01-01

    This groundbreaking resource offers a practical, in-depth understanding of Ubiquitous Positioning - positioning systems that identify the location and position of people, vehicles and objects in time and space in the digitized networked economy. The future and growth of ubiquitous positioning will be fueled by the convergence of many other areas of technology, from mobile telematics, Internet technology, and location systems, to sensing systems, geographic information systems, and the semantic web. This first-of-its-kind volume explores ubiquitous positioning from a convergence perspective, of

  10. Positioning consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkier, Bente; Keller, Margit

    2014-01-01

    positionings emerges based on empirical examples of research in parent–children consumption. Positionings are flexible discursive fixations of the relationship between the performances of the practitioner, other practitioners, media discourse and consumption activities. The basic positioning types...... are the practice maintenance and the practice change position, with different sorts of adapting in between. Media discourse can become a resource for a resistant position against social control or for an appropriating position in favour of space for action. Regardless of the current relation to a particular media......This article analyses the ways in which media discourses become a part of contested consumption activities. We apply a positioning perspective with practice theory to focus on how practitioners relate to media discourse as a symbolic resource in their everyday practices. A typology of performance...

  11. Rational Design of a Highly Potent and Selective Peptide Inhibitor of PACE4 by Salt Bridge Interaction with D160 at Position P3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianati, Vahid; Shamloo, Azar; Kwiatkowska, Anna; Desjardins, Roxane; Soldera, Armand; Day, Robert; Dory, Yves L

    2017-08-08

    PACE4, a member of the proprotein convertases (PCs) family of serine proteases, is a validated target for prostate cancer. Our group has developed a potent and selective PACE4 inhibitor: Ac-LLLLRVKR-NH 2 . In seeking for modifications to increase the selectivity of this ligand toward PACE4, we replaced one of its P3 Val methyl groups with a basic group capable of forming a salt bridge with D160 of PACE4. The resulting inhibitor is eight times more potent than the P3 Val parent inhibitor and two times more selective over furin, because the equivalent salt bridge with furin E257 is not optimal. Moreover, the β-branched nature of the new P3 residue favors the extended β-sheet conformation usually associated with substrates of proteases. This work provides new insight for better understanding of β-sheet backbone-backbone interactions between serine proteases and their peptidic ligands. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. CLASSROOM INTERACTION STRATEGIES EMPLOYED BY ENGLISH TEACHERS AT LOWER SECONDARY SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunung Suryati

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reports a study on teachers’ use of interaction strategies in English Language Teaching (ELT in lower secondary level of education. The study involved eighteen teachers from Lower Secondary Schools in Malang, East Java. Classroom observation was selected as a method in this study by utilizing Self Evaluation Teacher Talk (SETT as the instrument. SETT, developed by Walsh (2006, was adopted as the observation protocol as it characterises teacher-student interaction. Thirty lessons taught by 18 teachers were observed. The findings revealed that much of the teacher student interaction in Lower Secondary Schools centred on the material mode, skill and system mode. The most frequent strategies were initiation response feedback (IRF patterns, display questions, teacher echo, and extended teacher turns, while students’ extended turns were rare. It is argued that in order to improve the Indonesian ELT, there is a need to provide an alternative to ELT classroom interaction. The article concludes by highlighting the importance of adopting some classroom interaction strategies that are more facilitative to students’ oral communicative competence.

  13. Wolfram technologies as an integrated scalable platform for interactive learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaurov, Vitaliy

    2012-02-01

    We rely on technology profoundly with the prospect of even greater integration in the future. Well known challenges in education are a technology-inadequate curriculum and many software platforms that are difficult to scale or interconnect. We'll review an integrated technology, much of it free, that addresses these issues for individuals and small schools as well as for universities. Topics include: Mathematica, a programming environment that offers a diverse range of functionality; natural language programming for getting started quickly and accessing data from Wolfram|Alpha; quick and easy construction of interactive courseware and scientific applications; partnering with publishers to create interactive e-textbooks; course assistant apps for mobile platforms; the computable document format (CDF); teacher-student and student-student collaboration on interactive projects and web publishing at the Wolfram Demonstrations site.

  14. JIL-1 and Su(var)3-7 Interact Genetically and Counteract Each Other's Effect on Position-Effect Variegation in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Huai; Cai, Weili; Wang, Chao; Lerach, Stephanie; Delattre, Marion; Girton, Jack; Johansen, Jørgen; Johansen, Kristen M.

    2010-01-01

    The essential JIL-1 histone H3S10 kinase is a key regulator of chromatin structure that functions to maintain euchromatic domains while counteracting heterochromatization and gene silencing. In the absence of the JIL-1 kinase, two of the major heterochromatin markers H3K9me2 and HP1a spread in tandem to ectopic locations on the chromosome arms. Here we address the role of the third major heterochromatin component, the zinc-finger protein Su(var)3-7. We show that the lethality but not the chromosome morphology defects associated with the null JIL-1 phenotype to a large degree can be rescued by reducing the dose of the Su(var)3-7 gene and that Su(var)3-7 and JIL-1 loss-of-function mutations have an antagonistic and counterbalancing effect on position-effect variegation (PEV). Furthermore, we show that in the absence of JIL-1 kinase activity, Su(var)3-7 gets redistributed and upregulated on the chromosome arms. Reducing the dose of the Su(var)3-7 gene dramatically decreases this redistribution; however, the spreading of H3K9me2 to the chromosome arms was unaffected, strongly indicating that ectopic Su(var)3-9 activity is not a direct cause of lethality. These observations suggest a model where Su(var)3-7 functions as an effector downstream of Su(var)3-9 and H3K9 dimethylation in heterochromatic spreading and gene silencing that is normally counteracted by JIL-1 kinase activity. PMID:20457875

  15. Selective and interactive effects of D2 receptor antagonism and positive allosteric mGluR4 modulation on waiting impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isherwood, Sarah N; Robbins, Trevor W; Nicholson, Janet R; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Pekcec, Anton

    2017-09-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGluR4) and dopamine D 2 receptors are specifically expressed within the indirect pathway neurons of the striato-pallidal-subthalamic pathway. This unique expression profile suggests that mGluR4 and D 2 receptors may play a cooperative role in the regulation and inhibitory control of behaviour. We investigated this possibility by testing the effects of a functionally-characterised positive allosteric mGluR4 modulator, 4-((E)-styryl)-pyrimidin-2-ylamine (Cpd11), both alone and in combination with the D 2 receptor antagonist eticlopride, on two distinct forms of impulsivity. Rats were trained on the five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) of sustained visual attention and segregated according to low, mid, and high levels of motor impulsivity (LI, MI and HI, respectively), with unscreened rats used as an additional control group. A separate group of rats was trained on a delay discounting task (DDT) to assess choice impulsivity. Systemic administration of Cpd11 dose-dependently increased motor impulsivity and impaired attentional accuracy on the 5-CSRTT in all groups tested. Eticlopride selectively attenuated the increase in impulsivity induced by Cpd11, but not the accompanying attentional impairment, at doses that had no significant effect on behavioural performance when administered alone. Cpd11 also decreased choice impulsivity on the DDT (i.e. increased preference for the large, delayed reward) and decreased locomotor activity. These findings demonstrate that mGluR4s, in conjunction with D 2 receptors, affect motor- and choice-based measures of impulsivity, and therefore may be novel targets to modulate impulsive behaviour associated with a number of neuropsychiatric syndromes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) as an interacting partner of plant ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and a positive regulator of rDNA transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Ora [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunghan [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Plant Science, Plant Genomics and Breeding Institute, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yun-jeong [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo-Young [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Hee-Jong, E-mail: heejkoh@snu.ac.kr [Department of Plant Science, Plant Genomics and Breeding Institute, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Choong-Ill, E-mail: ccheon@sookmyung.ac.kr [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-18

    The ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is a downstream component of the signaling mediated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that acts as a central regulator of the key metabolic processes, such as protein translation and ribosome biogenesis, in response to various environmental cues. In our previous study, we identified a novel role of plant RPS6, which negatively regulates rDNA transcription, forming a complex with a plant-specific histone deacetylase, AtHD2B. Here we report that the Arabidopsis RPS6 interacts additionally with a histone chaperone, nucleosome assembly protein 1(AtNAP1;1). The interaction does not appear to preclude the association of RPS6 with AtHD2B, as the AtNAP1 was also able to interact with AtHD2B as well as with an RPS6-AtHD2B fusion protein in the BiFC assay and pulldown experiment. Similar to a positive effect of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) on rDNA transcription observed in this study, overexpression or down regulation of the AtNAP1;1 resulted in concomitant increase and decrease, respectively, in rDNA transcription suggesting a positive regulatory role played by AtNAP1 in plant rDNA transcription, possibly through derepression of the negative effect of the RPS6-AtHD2B complex. - Highlights: • Nucleosome assembly protein 1 (AtNAP1) interacts with RPS6 as well as with AtHD2B. • rDNA transcription is regulated S6K1. • Overexpression or down regulation of AtNAP1 results in concomitant increase or decrease in rDNA transcription.

  17. Genotypes Do Not Confer Risk For Delinquency ut Rather Alter Susceptibility to Positive and Negative Environmental Factors: Gene-Environment Interactions of BDNF Val66Met, 5-HTTLPR, and MAOA-uVNTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comasco, Erika; Hodgins, Sheilagh; Oreland, Lars; Åslund, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous evidence of gene-by-environment interactions associated with emotional and behavioral disorders is contradictory. Differences in findings may result from variation in valence and dose of the environmental factor, and/or failure to take account of gene-by-gene interactions. The present study investigated interactions between the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF Val66Met), the serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA-uVNTR) polymorphisms, family conflict, sexual abuse, the quality of the child-parent relationship, and teenage delinquency. Methods: In 2006, as part of the Survey of Adolescent Life in Västmanland, Sweden, 1 337 high-school students, aged 17–18 years, anonymously completed questionnaires and provided saliva samples for DNA analyses. Results: Teenage delinquency was associated with two-, three-, and four-way interactions of each of the genotypes and the three environmental factors. Significant four-way interactions were found for BDNF Val66Met × 5-HTTLPR×MAOA-uVNTR × family conflicts and for BDNF Val66Met × 5-HTTLPR×MAOA-uVNTR × sexual abuse. Further, the two genotype combinations that differed the most in expression levels (BDNF Val66Met Val, 5-HTTLPR LL, MAOA-uVNTR LL [girls] and L [boys] vs BDNF Val66Met Val/Met, 5-HTTLPR S/LS, MAOA-uVNTR S/SS/LS) in interaction with family conflict and sexual abuse were associated with the highest delinquency scores. The genetic variants previously shown to confer vulnerability for delinquency (BDNF Val66Met Val/Met × 5-HTTLPR S × MAOA-uVNTR S) were associated with the lowest delinquency scores in interaction with a positive child-parent relationship. Conclusions: Functional variants of the MAOA-uVNTR, 5-HTTLPR, and BDNF Val66Met, either alone or in interaction with each other, may be best conceptualized as modifying sensitivity to environmental factors that confer either risk or protection for teenage delinquency. PMID

  18. Researcher positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck, Line Lerche; Khawaja, Iram

    2009-01-01

    abstract  This article focuses on the complex and multi-layered process of researcher positioning, specifically in relation to the politically sensitive study of marginalised and ‘othered' groups such as Muslims living in Denmark. We discuss the impact of different ethnic, religious and racial...... political and personal involvement by the researcher, which challenges traditional perspectives on research and researcher positioning. A key point in this regard is the importance of constant awareness of and reflection on the multiple ways in which one's positioning as a researcher influences the research...

  19. Interactive Video, The Next Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, L. R.; Wold-Brennon, R.; Cooper, S. K.; Brinkhuis, D.

    2012-12-01

    Video has the ingredients to reach us emotionally - with amazing images, enthusiastic interviews, music, and video game-like animations-- and it's emotion that motivates us to learn more about our new interest. However, watching video is usually passive. New web-based technology is expanding and enhancing the video experience, creating opportunities to use video with more direct interaction. This talk will look at an Educaton and Outreach team's experience producing video-centric curriculum using innovative interactive media tools from TED-Ed and FlixMaster. The Consortium for Ocean Leadership's Deep Earth Academy has partnered with the Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations (C-DEBI) to send educators and a video producer aboard three deep sea research expeditions to the Juan de Fuca plate to install and service sub-seafloor observatories. This collaboration between teachers, students, scientists and media producers has proved a productive confluence, providing new ways of understanding both ground-breaking science and the process of science itself - by experimenting with new ways to use multimedia during ocean-going expeditions and developing curriculum and other projects post-cruise.

  20. Radiographic positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, R.L.; Dennis, C.A.; May, C.

    1989-01-01

    This book concentrates on the routine radiographic examinations commonly performed. It details the wide variety of examinations possible and their place in initial learning and in the radiology department as references for those occasions when an unusual examination is requested. This book provides information ranging from basic terminology to skeletal positioning to special procedures. Positions are discussed and supplemented with a picture of a patient, the resulting radiograph, and a labeled diagram. Immobilization and proper shielding of the patient are also shown

  1. Position encoder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goursky, Vsevolod

    1975-01-01

    A circuitry for deriving the quotient of signal delivered by position-sensitive detectors is described. Digital output is obtained in the form of 10- to 12-bit words. Impact position may be determined with 0.25% accuracy when the dynamic range of the energy signal is less 1:10, and 0.5% accuracy when the dynamic range is 1:20. The division requires an average time of 5μs for 10-bit words

  2. Position encoder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goursky, V.

    1975-05-01

    This paper describes circuitry for deriving the quotient of signals delivered by position-sensitive detectors. Digital output is obtained in the form of 10 to 12 bit words. Impact position may be determined with 0.25% accuracy when the dynamic range of the energy signal is less than 1:10, and 0.5% accuracy when the dynamic range is 1:20. The division requires an average time of 5μs for 10-bit words [fr

  3. Promoting Learner Autonomy through Teacher-Student Partnership Assessment in an American High School: A Cycle of Action Research (El papel de la evaluación negociada en el desarrollo de la autonomía del estudiante en la escuela secundaria norteamericana: un ciclo de investigación-acción)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picón Jácome, Édgar

    2012-01-01

    In this article I present some findings of an action research study intended to find out to what extent a teacher-student partnership in writing assessment could promote high school students' autonomy. The study was conducted in a U.S. school. Two main action strategies in the assessment process were the use of symbols as the form of feedback…

  4. Use of media in teacher education courses: alternatives via verbal interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Héric Silva Oliveira

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This work, based on Bakhtin (1999, 2003 and Mercado (2002, aims at offering students in Teacher Education programs some considerations on the use of media through teacher-student verbal interactions. The research originated from a review of the course curriculum. This showed the lack of a specific subject and / or contents that deal with the use of media and new technologies. The problem persists because this model prepares teachers who will eventually work with elementary school children in the traditional methodology of a Jesuit type of education. Therefore, we offer a study that points out the use of technologies and media in the classroom.

  5. Positional Concerns and Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landes, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    that invoking envy or subjective well-being is not fully satisfying for regulating positional concerns. More compelling reasons seem, in complement with efficiency, to be related to considerations for equality. In other words, if institutions could have strong reasons to pay attention to and regulate positional...... their implications for economics, positional concerns imply important normative dimensions. There have been presumed to be a symptom of envy, reduce people’s happiness, and create problems of social interaction or economic inefficiencies. Individuals are, for instance, prone to pick states of the world that improve...... concerns, it would be in virtue of their impact on the social product and individuals’ conditions of living....

  6. Positional games

    CERN Document Server

    Hefetz, Dan; Stojaković, Miloš; Szabó, Tibor

    2014-01-01

    This text serves as a thorough introduction to the rapidly developing field of positional games. This area constitutes an important branch of combinatorics, whose aim it is to systematically develop an extensive mathematical basis for a variety of two-player perfect information games. These range from such popular games as Tic-Tac-Toe and Hex to purely abstract games played on graphs and hypergraphs. The subject of positional games is strongly related to several other branches of combinatorics such as Ramsey theory, extremal graph and set theory, and the probabilistic method. These notes cover a variety of topics in positional games, including both classical results and recent important developments. They are presented in an accessible way and are accompanied by exercises of varying difficulty, helping the reader to better understand the theory. The text will benefit both researchers and graduate students in combinatorics and adjacent fields.

  7. Researcher Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khawaja, Iram; Mørck, Line Lerche

    2009-01-01

    involvement by the researcher, which challenges traditional perspectives onresearch and researcher positioning. A key point in this regard is the importance ofconstant awareness of and reflection on the multiple ways in which one's positioningas a researcher influences the research process. Studying the other...

  8. Position detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Toshifumi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to detect the position of an moving object in a control rod position detector, stably in a digital manner at a high accuracy and free from the undesired effects of circumstantial conditions such as the reactor temperature. Constitution: Coils connected in parallel with each other are disposed along the passage of a moving object and variable resistors and relays are connected in series with each of the coils respectively. Light emitting diodes is connected in series with the contacts of the respective relays. The resistance value of the variable resistors are adjusted depending on the changes in the circumstantial conditions and temperature distribution upon carrying out the positional detection. When the object is inserted into a coils, the relevant relay is deenergized, by which the relay contacts are closed to light up the diode. In the same manner, as the object is successively inserted into the coils, the diodes are lighted-up successively thereby enabling highly accurate and stable positional detection in a digital manner, free from the undesired effects of the circumstantial conditions. (Horiuchi, T.)

  9. Entanglement dynamics and position-momentum entropic uncertainty relation of a Λ-type three-level atom interacting with a two-mode cavity field in the presence of nonlinearities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, M. J.; Tavassoly, M. K.; Hooshmandasl, M. R.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the interaction between a $\\Lambda$-type three-level atom and two-mode cavity field is discussed. The detuning parameters and cross-Kerr nonlinearity are taken into account and it is assumed that atom-field coupling and Kerr medium to be $f$-deformed. Even though the system seems to be complicated, the analytical form of the state vector of the entire system for considered model is exactly obtained. The time evolution of nonclassical properties such as quantum entanglement and position-momentum entropic uncertainty relation (entropy squeezing) of the field are investigated. In each case, the influences of the detuning parameters, generalized Kerr medium and intensity-dependent coupling on the latter nonclassicality signs are analyzed, in detail.

  10. Quantum entanglement and position-momentum entropic squeezing of a moving Lambda-type three-level atom interacting with a single-mode quantized field with intensity-dependent coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, M. J.; Tavassoly, M. K.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we study the interaction between a moving Λ-type three-level atom and a single-mode cavity field in the presence of intensity-dependent atom-field coupling. After obtaining the state vector of the entire system explicitly, we study the nonclassical features of the system such as quantum entanglement, position-momentum entropic squeezing, quadrature squeezing and sub-Poissonian statistics. According to the obtained numerical results we illustrate that the squeezed period, the duration of entropy squeezing and the maximal squeezing can be controlled by choosing the appropriate nonlinearity function together with entering the atomic motion effect by the suitable selection of the field-mode structure parameter. Also, the atomic motion, as well as the nonlinearity function, leads to the oscillatory behaviour of the degree of entanglement between the atom and field.

  11. Maintaining positive

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Gh. IONESCU; Adina Letitia NEGRUSA

    2004-01-01

    Maintaining positive work-force relationships includes in effective labor-management relations and making appropriate responses to current employee issues. Among the major current employee issues are protection from arbitrary dismissal, drug and alcohol abuse, privacy rights and family maters and they impact work. In our paper we discus two problems: first, the meanings of industrial democracy; second, the three principal operational concepts of industrial democracy (1) industrial democracy t...

  12. POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY, EMOTIONAL EDUCATION AND THE HAPPY CLASSROOMS PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Bisquerra Alzina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive psychology has multiple applications. This article is focused on formal education, from the ages of 3 to 18 years. The development of well-being should be one of the aims of education, which would affect teachers, students, families and by extension society at large. This has been a clear aim for emotional education (Bisquerra, 2000, 2009, from the outset. With the emergence of positive psychology, there was a renewed effort in this direction, as a means of providing a better foundation. GROP (Grup de Recerca en Orientación Psicopedagógica [Research in Psychopedagogical Education Group] at the University of Barcelona is conducting research on this subject. The Happy Classrooms (“Aulas felices” program developed by the SATI team is the first program in Spanish aimed at working on positive education. It is designed for children and youths in pre-school, primary and secondary education. The program focuses its applications on character strengths and mindfulness. It is freely available for access and distribution. This article argues for the importance of enhancing well-being in education. Practical activities and intervention strategies are presented, with special reference to the importance of teacher training.

  13. Balancing High Quality Subject-Matter Instruction with Positive Teacher-Student Relations in the Middle Grades: Effects of Departmentalization, Tracking and Block Scheduling on Learning Environments. Report No. 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, James M.

    This study tests the general hypothesis that there is no single best way to organize a middle school to meet the variety of needs of early adolescent students. Using data from a sample of 433 schools in the Pennsylvania Educational Quality Assessment, it examines the effects of self-contained classroom instruction and departmentalization on two…

  14. Interactive cinema : engagement and interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vosmeer, M.; Schouten, B.; Mitchell, A.

    2014-01-01

    Technologies that were initially developed to be applied within the domain of video games are currently being used in experiments to explore their meaning and possibilities for cinema and cinema audiences. In this position paper we examine how narrativity, interactivity and engagement are mutually

  15. Students' and teachers' focus of attention in classroom interaction — subtle sources for the reproduction of social disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Anna-Marietha; Prediger, Susanne; Quasthoff, Uta; Heller, Vivien

    2018-01-01

    Mathematics classroom interaction has often been described as an important context for involving all students. However, this article shows that teacher-student-interaction is still not really in the focus of teachers' attention. Based on classroom video studies, some authors hypothesize that the implicitness of establishing norms and practices is, among others, an obstacle for students with low socio-economic status. The article intends to put this hypothesis into perspective by investigating teachers' and students' focus of attention on classroom interaction in video-stimulated group discussions (six discussions with 5-6 students, four discussions with 5-9 teachers). The data analysis used inductive procedures of category development, frequency analysis, and deeper qualitative analysis of the transcripts. For students' focus of attention, differential patterns could be extrapolated: Whereas students of high socio-economic status seem to be more attentive to teacher's contextual expectations, the students of low socio-economic status seem to be more focused on general norms without taking into account contextual expectations. For the teachers, the analysis shows that interactive mechanisms of teacher-student exchanges in classrooms are usually not in the teachers' focus of attention. Additionally, the teachers address, but rarely problematize the implicitness by which norms and practices are established. Together with the differential findings on students' attention, these findings are discussed with respect to equity concerns and consequences for professional development of teachers.

  16. Positive Technologies for Understanding and Promoting Positive Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baños, Rosa María; Carrillo, Alba; Etchemendy, Ernestina; Botella, Cristina

    2017-10-26

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) have become increasingly present in our lives, and their use has spread considerably. This paper presents a review of the way ICTs can help practitioners and researchers to study, promote, and train positive emotions. It is framed within the field of Positive Technologies: the applied scientific approach to the study of the use of technology to improve the quality of personal experience, with the goal of increasing wellbeing. First, the article presents an introduction to the topic of technologies and positive emotions. Then, it describes how ICTs can aid in monitoring, assessing, promoting, modifying, and training positive emotions. Finally, implications and future directions of the role of Positive Technologies in positive emotions are discussed. The authors conclude that, in the near future, Positive Technologies and the field of positive emotions will interact synergistically, producing an exponential growth in the understanding and promotion of positive emotions.

  17. Accentuate the Positive: Positive Sentiments and Status in Task Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Alison J.; Lancianese, Donna A.

    2007-01-01

    We explore the capacity of positive sentiments, those enduring affective states one achieves when one likes another, to impact status structures. Do positive sentiments combine with existing aspects of interaction to create status hierarchies and potentially change the social order, or do they moderate the effects of extant structure by dampening…

  18. University Teacher-student Conflict and Its Solutions%高校师生冲突及其应对途径

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王军芳

    2013-01-01

    师生冲突是高校教学过程中普遍存在又无法避免的事实,如果师生之间没有意见分歧或冲突,深厚的师生情谊也无从建立,频繁的交流互动过程必然会有观点分歧之时,接受分歧并积极有效解决分歧才有利于双方情感的巩固与加深。院校积极创设师生合作机会,疏通沟通渠道,促进换位思考以及不断调整自身角色定位都有利于解决师生冲突。%The conflict between teachers and students iS the Inevltable fact of common COlleges and unlversltles In the process of teaching.If there is no disagreement or conflict between teachers and students,profound friendship between teachers and students also cannot buiId,process interaction frequently wi1l have different pointS of view when, to accept the differences and effectively solve differences is beneficial to both Sides to consolidate and deepen the emot ioll.Universities should create cooperation opportunities to promote communication. Both teacher and students need to improve their ability of adjusting their role location to solve the conflict.

  19. Interaction region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The Interaction Region Group addressed the basic questions of how to collide the SLC beams, how to maximize and monitor the luminosity, and how to minimize the detector backgrounds at the interaction region. In practice, five subgroups evolved to study these questions. The final focus group provided three alternative designs to acheive the 1 to 2 micron beam spot size required by the SLC, as well as studying other problems including: eta, eta' matching from the collider arcs, the implementation of soft bends near the interaction region, beam emittance growth, and magnet tolerances in the final focus. The beam position monitor group proposed two devices, a strip line monitor, and a beamstrahlung monitor, to bring the beams into collision. The luminosity monitor group reviewed the possible QED processes that would be insensitive to weak interaction (Z 0 ) effects. The beam dumping group proposed locations for kicker and septum magnets in the final focus that would achieve a high dumping efficiency and would meet the desired beam tolerances at the Moller scattering target in the beam dump line. Working with the Polarization Group, the Moller experiment was designed into the beam dump beam line. A beam dump was proposed that would maintain radiation backgrounds (penetrating muons) at acceptible levels. The detector backgrounds group proposed soft-bend and masking configurations to shield the detector from synchrotron radiation from the hard/soft bends and from the final focus quadrupoles and evaluated the effectiveness of these designs for the three final focus optics designs. Backgrounds were also estimated from: large angle synchrotron radiation, local and distant beam-gas interactions, 2-photon interactions, and from neutrons and backscattered photons from the beamstrahlung dump

  20. Benign positional vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertigo - positional; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; BPPV: dizziness- positional ... Benign positional vertigo is also called benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). It is caused by a problem in the inner ear. ...

  1. Competency-Based Teaching in Radiology - Implementation and Evaluation of Interactive Workstation-Based Learning to Apply NKLM-Based Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koestner, Wolfgang; Otten, Wiebke; Kaireit, Till; Wacker, Frank K; Dettmer, Sabine

    2017-11-01

    Purpose  New teaching formats are required to implement competency-based teaching in radiology teaching. Therefore, we have established and evaluated two practical competency-based radiological courses. Materials and Methods  The courses were held in a multimedia room with 25 computers and a professional DICOM viewer. Students were taught basic image analysis and presented clinical cases with a DICOM viewer under supervision of an instructor using desktop monitoring software. Two courses (elective course and obligatory course) were evaluated by the students (n = 160 and n = 100) and instructors (n = 9) using an anonymized online survey. Results  Courses were evaluated positively by the students and instructors. From the perspective of the students, the courses increased understanding of cross-sectional anatomy (elective/obligatory course: 97 %/95 %) and radiologic findings (97 %/99 %). Furthermore, the course increased the students' interest in radiology (61 %/65 %). The students considered this way of teaching to be relevant to their future occupation (92 % of students in the obligatory course). The higher incidence of teacher-student interaction and the possibility of independent image analysis were rated positively. The majority of instructors did not observe increased distractibility due to the computers (67 %) or notice worse preparation for MC tests (56 %). However, 56 % of instructors reported greater preparation effort. Conclusion  Practical competency-based radiological teaching using a DICOM viewer is a feasible innovative approach with high acceptance among students and instructors. It fosters competency-based learning as proposed by the model curriculum of the German Radiological Society (DRG) and the National Competency-based Catalogue of Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM). Key Points   · Practical competency-based radiological teaching is highly accepted by students and instructors

  2. MHSP with position detection capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natal da Luz, H. [Physics Dept., University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Physics Dept., University of Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Veloso, J.F.C.A. [Physics Dept., University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal) and Physics Dept., University of Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal)]. E-mail: jveloso@fis.ua.pt; Mendes, N.F.C. [Physics Dept., University of Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Santos, J.M.F. dos [Physics Dept., University of Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Mir, J.A. [CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-01

    The first implementation of a position sensitive readout for a Micro Hole and Strip Plate (MHSP) is described and tested. The readout consists on a resistive layer crossing the anodes and connected to a preamplifier on each side. By weighing the charge pulses on both preamplifiers it is possible to determine the interaction point. A 100-200 {omega} resistance layer between consecutive strips was found to be the best compromise between position linearity and energy resolution. Preliminary results using 22.1 keV X-rays present a good linearity between the measured and the actual position with a mean deviation of about 0.15 mm and a position resolution of 1.6 mm full-width at half-maximum (FWHM), being limited by the analogue division electronic circuit. The performance of the MHSP position detector will be presented and discussed for 1D readout.

  3. A relação professor-aluno não existe: corpo e imagem, presença e distância/The relationship teacher-student does not exist: body, image, presence and distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldo Voltolini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available O recente e crescente uso de recursos áudio-visuais e de informática no ensino recolocou para muitos a questão da necessidade da presença do professor. Longe de ser apenas um recurso que vem prolongar o que já está no universo escolar, sua entrada modifica a dinâmica da relação professor-aluno. As condições que permitiram esta entrada parecem corresponder aquilo que Lacan elucida em sua teoria dos Discursos quando se pergunta: os gadgets vencerão? A mudança das relações entre o sujeito e o objeto, características deste novo discurso contemporâneo, o do Capitalista, no qual o objeto parece predominar sobre o sujeito, podem ser lidas em vários âmbitos. O objetivo deste estudo é analisar as vicissitudes desta mudança no interior das práticas educativas, particularmente em torno do que esta questão sobre a necessidade da presença do professor ilustra sobre ela. The recent and growing use of audiovisual sources and computing in teaching re-set for many people the issue of the need of the teacher’s presence. Far from being only a source that extends what already is in the school universe, its entrance changes the dynamic of the relationship teacher-student. The circumstances which permitted this entrance seem to correspond to what Lacan elucidates in his theory of the Discourses when it is questioned: will the gadgets win? The change of relationship between subject and object, typical of this new contemporary discourse, the Capitalist, in which the object seems to predominate the subject may be understood in various ways. The goal of this study is to analyze the vicissitudes of this change inside the educational practice, particularly considering what this question of the necessity of the teacher’s presence illustrates about it.

  4. O processo ensino-aprendizagem e suas conseqüências na relação professor-aluno-paciente The teaching-learning process and its consequences to the teacher-student-patient relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmênia de Araújo Soares Nuto

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo versa sobre os aspectos éticos e humanos presentes no processo ensino-aprendizagem da formação de cirurgiões-dentistas. Surge a partir do anseio crescente nos serviços de saúde por profissionais mais envolvidos com a qualidade do atendimento à população. Foi utilizada uma abordagem qualitativa tendo três instrumentos de coleta: a técnica de grupo focal, a entrevista semi-estruturada e a observação participante. A amostra foi constituída de 28 alunos de odontologia e 33 pacientes atendidos nas clínicas de cursos de odontologia. A análise do material textual identificou como principais problemas o excesso de autoridade na relação professor-aluno-paciente e a separação corpo-mente-espírito presente no modelo biomédico de prática. Esses resultados revelam pouca capacitação dos futuros cirurgiões-dentistas para o desenvolvimento de uma relação dialógica com seus pacientes e a necessidade de repensar esses aspectos na sua formação.This study deals with the ethical and human aspects present in the teaching-learning process within the dentists' formation. It arises from the growing need for professionals involved with the quality of the services they provide for the population in health care centers. In this research a qualitative approach was used and data was obtained by means of focal groups, interviews and participative observation. The sample consisted of 28 dentistry students and 33 patients attended at the dentistry course. According to the results, it was shown that the main problems are the excess of authority in the teacher-student-patient relationship and the dissociation of the body-mind-spirit as seen in the biomedical model health practice. These findings show the future professionals' insufficient abilities for developing a satisfactory relationship with their patients and the need of considering these aspects during their formation.

  5. A tabletop interactive storytelling system: designing for social interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alofs, Thijs; Theune, Mariet; Swartjes, I.M.T.

    This paper presents the Interactive Storyteller, a multi-user interface for AI-based interactive storytelling, where stories emerge from the interaction of human players with intelligent characters in a simulated story world. To support face-to-face contact and social interaction, we position users

  6. Position automatic determination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This book tells of method of position determination and characteristic, control method of position determination and point of design, point of sensor choice for position detector, position determination of digital control system, application of clutch break in high frequency position determination, automation technique of position determination, position determination by electromagnetic clutch and break, air cylinder, cam and solenoid, stop position control of automatic guide vehicle, stacker crane and automatic transfer control.

  7. education facilities and motivation of teachers & students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2017-12-28

    Dec 28, 2017 ... ... before two years ago, the priorities of the education and training system ... To analyze teachers' motivation in teaching in the Correction schools. 3. ..... Education programmes for prison inmates: Reward for offences or.

  8. Quantum interaction. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruza, Peter [Queensland Univ. of Technology, Brisbane (Australia). Faculty of Science and Technology; Sofge, Donald [Navy Center for Applied Research in Artificial Intelligence, Washington, DC (United States). Naval Research Lab.; Lawless, William [Paine Coll., Augusta, GA (United States); Rijsbergen, Keith van [Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Computing Science; Klusch, Matthias (eds.) [German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Quantum Interaction, QI 2009, held in Saarbruecken, Germany, in March 2009. The 21 revised full papers presented together with the 3 position papers were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions. The papers show the cross-disciplinary nature of quantum interaction covering topics such as computation, cognition, decision theory, information retrieval, information systems, social interaction, computational linguistics and finance. (orig.)

  9. Quantum interaction. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruza, Peter; Rijsbergen, Keith van

    2009-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Quantum Interaction, QI 2009, held in Saarbruecken, Germany, in March 2009. The 21 revised full papers presented together with the 3 position papers were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions. The papers show the cross-disciplinary nature of quantum interaction covering topics such as computation, cognition, decision theory, information retrieval, information systems, social interaction, computational linguistics and finance. (orig.)

  10. Positive Psychology: Positive Emotions and Emotional Intelegence

    OpenAIRE

    Miloseva, Lence

    2008-01-01

    The paper focuses on the and emotional intelligence. We try to answer on some questions regarding the role which positive emotions have in our life’s. The broaden-and-build theory (Fredrickson, 1998; 2001) predicts that positive emotions are useful in several ways. They guide present behavior, by broadening one’s attention and cognition, setting the stage for creative, explorative, and innovative pursuits. As well, positive emotions build personal and social resources to help individuals achi...

  11. Want Positive Behavior? Use Positive Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chip; Freeman-Loftis, Babs

    2012-01-01

    Positive adult language is the professional use of words and tone of voice to enable students to learn in an engaged, active way. This includes learning social skills. To guide children toward choosing and maintaining positive behaviors, adults need to carefully choose the words and tone of voice used when speaking to them. Learning to use…

  12. Benign positional vertigo - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertigo - positional - aftercare; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo - aftercare; BPPV - aftercare; Dizziness - positional vertigo ... Your health care provider may have treated your vertigo with the Epley maneuver . These are head movements ...

  13. PRESENTATION POTENTIAL USING IN PEDAGOGICAL INTERACTION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Ershova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The given article is aimed at considering multimedia presentation potential and its influence on strengthening classroom teacher-student interaction. In the article the importance of using this kind of activity in the study process is pointed in connection with educational state policy on the one hand. On the other hand, gained students’ skills as a final result of work with presentations met employers’ demand for both parent and world labour-markets and bring competitive benefit to the candidates. Scientific novelty and results. Multimedia presentation is considered as a specific complex of classroom activities. The students are oriented on the self analysis and presentation assessment. It is shown that well-organized process of peer students’ assessment allows to simultaneously helping in solving the didactic and methodical problems. To this purpose the system of assessment criteria should be developed. It has to be clear for students for making assessment feasible and time-saving. The example of a possible variant of criteria system is described; quality of the presentations prepared by students can be defined based on such system criteria. The author also analyzed software products of the three main platforms (Windows, Linux, MacOs which have different tools and allow to follow users’ needs for creating presentations. In the article there is a comparative table of the two most popular software development: the program Microsoft PowerPoint and the web-service Prezi for realizing the relevance of their use in the study process. Practical significance of the present article concludes in author’s suggestions of some recommendations for presentation potential use as a tool of improving pedagogical interaction process with contemporary students. 

  14. Teachers’ Emotional Expression in Interaction with Students of Different Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Prosen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Emotions are an integral part of “classroom life” and are experienced in teacher-student interactions quite often (Hosotani & Imai-Matsumura, 2011. The present study focuses on teachers’ emotions in classrooms. Its purpose is to establish which emotions are expressed by teachers in their interactions with students, the triggering situations of the two most frequent emotions, and their level of intensity and suitability. Teachers’ emotions were observed by students of primary education during their practical experience work, in grades one to five. They used a scheme constructed for observing different aspects of emotions. The observations of 108 teachers in 93 primary schools from various Slovenian regions were gathered. The results show that primary school teachers express various pleasant and unpleasant emotions, with unpleasant emotions prevailing. The average frequency of teachers’ emotion expression decreased from grade one to five. Anger was the most frequently expressed emotion (N = 261, followed by joy (N = 151. Teachers’ anger and joy were triggered in different situations: anger predominantly when students lacked discipline and joy predominantly in situations of students’ academic achievement. The intensity of expressed anger and joy was moderate in all five grades, while the assessed suitability of these two emotions was high.

  15. CRP-ductin, the mouse homologue of gp-340/deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1), binds gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and interacts with lung surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Tornøe, Ida; Nielsen, Ole

    2003-01-01

    CRP-ductin is a protein expressed mainly by mucosal epithelial cells in the mouse. Sequence homologies indicate that CRP-ductin is the mouse homologue of human gp-340, a glycoprotein that agglutinates microorganisms and binds the lung mucosal collectin surfactant protein-D (SP-D). Here we report...... that purified CRP-ductin binds human SP-D in a calcium-dependent manner and that the binding is not inhibited by maltose. The same properties have previously been observed for gp-340 binding of SP-D. CRP-ductin also showed calcium-dependent binding to both gram-positive and -negative bacteria. A polyclonal...... antibody raised against gp-340 reacted specifically with CRP-ductin in Western blots. Immunoreactivity to CRP-ductin was found in the exocrine pancreas, in epithelial cells throughout the gastrointestinal tract and in the parotid ducts. A panel of RNA preparations from mouse tissues was screened for CRP...

  16. Stromal Cells Positively and Negatively Modulate the Growth of Cancer Cells: Stimulation via the PGE2-TNFα-IL-6 Pathway and Inhibition via Secreted GAPDH-E-Cadherin Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Manabu; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ohba, Shun-ichi; Yoshida, Junjiro; Masuda, Tohru; Yamasaki, Manabu; Usami, Ihomi; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Abe, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takumi; Yamori, Takao; Shibasaki, Masakatsu; Nomoto, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast-like stromal cells modulate cancer cells through secreted factors and adhesion, but those factors are not fully understood. Here, we have identified critical stromal factors that modulate cancer growth positively and negatively. Using a cell co-culture system, we found that gastric stromal cells secreted IL-6 as a growth and survival factor for gastric cancer cells. Moreover, gastric cancer cells secreted PGE2 and TNFα that stimulated IL-6 secretion by the stromal cells. Furthermore, we found that stromal cells secreted glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Extracellular GAPDH, or its N-terminal domain, inhibited gastric cancer cell growth, a finding confirmed in other cell systems. GAPDH bound to E-cadherin and downregulated the mTOR-p70S6 kinase pathway. These results demonstrate that stromal cells could regulate cancer cell growth through the balance of these secreted factors. We propose that negative regulation of cancer growth using GAPDH could be a new anti-cancer strategy. PMID:25785838

  17. Instrumental interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani , Annie

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The expression instrumental interaction as been introduced by Claude Cadoz to identify a human-object interaction during which a human manipulates a physical object - an instrument - in order to perform a manual task. Classical examples of instrumental interaction are all the professional manual tasks: playing violin, cutting fabrics by hand, moulding a paste, etc.... Instrumental interaction differs from other types of interaction (called symbolic or iconic interactio...

  18. Multi-technology positioning

    CERN Document Server

    Lohan, Elena-Simona; Wymeersch, Henk; Seco-Granados, Gonzalo; Nykänen, Ossi

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an overview of positioning technologies, applications and services in a format accessible to a wide variety of readers. Readers who have always wanted to understand how satellite-based positioning, wireless network positioning, inertial navigation, and their combinations work will find great value in this book. Readers will also learn about the advantages and disadvantages of different positioning methods, their limitations and challenges. Cognitive positioning, adding the brain to determine which technologies to use at device runtime, is introduced as well. Coverage also includes the use of position information for Location Based Services (LBS), as well as context-aware positioning services, designed for better user experience. • Brings understanding of positioning technology to readers from a variety of disciplines • Reviews multiple techniques, providing insight on the pros, cons and challenges related to each • Designed to be a tutorial on basic principles, avoiding unnecessary de...

  19. Navicular bone position determined by positional MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Philip; Johannsen, Finn E; Hangaard, Stine

    2016-01-01

    -scanner). Scanning was performed in supine and standing position, respectively. Two radiologists evaluated the images in a blinded manner. Reliability and agreement were assessed by calculation of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and 95 % limits of agreement as a percentage of the mean (LOA%). RESULTS...

  20. Impact of faculty development programs for positive behavioural changes among teachers: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuh Shing Lee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Faculty development (FD is essential to prepare faculty members to become effective teachers to meet the challenges in medical education. Despite the growth of FD programmes, most evaluations were often conducted using short questionnaires to assess participants’ satisfaction immediately after they attended a programme. Consequently, there were calls for more rigorous evaluations based on observed changes in participants’ behaviours. Hence, this study aims to explore how the FD workshops run by the Centre for Medical Education, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore have impacted behavioural changes in the educators. Methods We followed up with the educators at least half a year after they have attended the workshops. With limited literature as reference, we initiated a small-scale case-study research design involving semi-structured interviews with six educators which was triangulated with three focus group discussions with their students. This allowed us to explore behavioural changes among the educators as well as evaluate the feasibility of this research methodology. Results We identified three emerging categories among the educators: ignorance to awareness, from intuition to confirmation and expansion, and from individualism to community of practice. Conclusion Although FD have placed much emphasis on teaching and learning approaches, we found that the teacher-student interaction or human character components (passionate, willing to sacrifice, are open to feedback in becoming a good educator are lacking in our FD workshops.

  1. DISTANCE LEARNING STUDENTS’ NEED: Evaluating Interactions from Moore’s Theory of Transactional Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusmanizah USTATI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study draws on the experience from a focus group interviews under the distance learning programme known as Program Pensiswazahan Guru (PPG organized by the Malaysian Ministry of Education in collaboration with local universities and institutes of education. Its purpose is to uncover students’ perception about the platform used by International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM which is the Learning Management System (LMS. LMS is a vital instructional medium especially for the varsity distant learners. Michael Moore’s Theory of Transactional Distance is used as the guiding framework to gain insights on learning and interactions in this e-learning setting. Teacher-student interactions are analyzed for better understanding of the phenomena under study. The findings indicate that in terms of usability LMS is perceived as a good platform to acquire information on content and to receive feedback from instructors. However, IIUM learners hope for more interactivity where learners can communicate amongst themselves beside engaging with the instructor-learner- content interactions that they currently experience via the system. This study aspires to provide insights on the significance of interactions from distance learners’ perception.

  2. Teaching and Learning Against all Odds: A Video-Based Study of Learner-to-Instructor Interaction in International Distance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie Muhirwa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Distance education and information and communication technologies (ICTs have been marketed as cost-effective ways to rescue struggling educational institutions in developing countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. This study uses classroom video analysis and follow-up interviews with teachers, students, and local tutors to analyse the interaction at a distance between learners in Mali and Burkina Faso and their French and Canadian instructors. Findings reveal multiple obstacles to quality interaction: frequent Internet disconnections, limited student access to computers, lack of instructor presence, ill-prepared local tutors, student unfamiliarity with typing and computer technology, ineffective technical support, poor social dynamics, learner-learner conflict, learner-instructor conflict, and student withdrawal and resignation. In light of the near death of the costly World Bank-initiated African Virtual University (AVU, this paper concludes by re-visiting the educational potential of traditional technologies, such as radio and video, to foster development in poor countries.

  3. K+-nucleus interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    The K + -nucleus system is reviewed and comparison with data is made. The principal conclusions are that the theoretical uncertainties in relating the K + -nucleus interaction to the K + -nucleon interaction are very small and hence the positive kaon makes an excellent probe of the nucleus. It is suggested that this particle may be more sensitive to non-nucleonic degrees of freedom (especially quarks) than classical probes

  4. Interactive Virtual Cinematography

    OpenAIRE

    Burelli, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    A virtual camera represents the point-of-view of the player through which sheperceives the game world and gets feedback on her actions. Thus, the virtualcamera plays a vital role in 3D computer games and aects player experienceand enjoyability in games. Interactive virtual cinematography is the process ofvisualising the content of a virtual environment by positioning and animatingthe virtual camera in the context of interactive applications such as a computergame.Camera placement and animatio...

  5. Pretty Easy Pervasive Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rene; Wind, Rico; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing availability of positioning based on GPS, Wi-Fi, and cellular technologies and the proliferation of mobile devices with GPS, Wi-Fi and cellular connectivity, ubiquitous positioning is becoming a reality. While offerings by companies such as Google, Skyhook, and Spotigo render...... positioning possible in outdoor settings, including urban environments with limited GPS coverage, they remain unable to offer accurate indoor positioning. We will demonstrate a software infrastructure that makes it easy for anybody to build support for accurate Wi-Fi based positioning in buildings. All...... that is needed is a building with Wi-Fi coverage, access to the building, a floor plan of the building, and a Wi-Fi enabled device. Specifically, we will explain the software infrastructure and the steps that must be completed to obtain support for positioning. And we will demonstrate the positioning obtained...

  6. Emotional intelligence and social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Paulo N; Brackett, Marc A; Nezlek, John B; Schütz, Astrid; Sellin, Ina; Salovey, Peter

    2004-08-01

    Two studies found positive relationships between the ability to manage emotions and the quality of social interactions, supporting the predictive and incremental validity of an ability measure of emotional intelligence, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). In a sample of 118 American college students (Study 1), higher scores on the managing emotions subscale of the MSCEIT were positively related to the quality of interactions with friends, evaluated separately by participants and two friends. In a diary study of social interaction with 103 German college students (Study 2), managing emotions scores were positively related to the perceived quality of interactions with opposite sex individuals. Scores on this subscale were also positively related to perceived success in impression management in social interactions with individuals of the opposite sex. In both studies, the main findings remained statistically significant after controlling for Big Five personality traits.

  7. Patterns of interactions at grade 5 classroom in learning the topic of statistics viewed from cognitive load theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setianingsih, R.

    2018-01-01

    The nature of interactions that occurs among teacher, students, learning sources, and learning environment creates different settings to enhance learning. Any setting created by a teacher is affected by 3 (three) types of cognitive load: intrinsic cognitive load, extraneous cognitive load, and germane cognitive load. This study is qualitative in nature, aims to analyse the patterns of interaction that are constituted in mathematics instructions by taking into account the cognitive load theory. The subjects of this study are 21 fifth-grade students who learn mathematics in small groups and whole-class interactive lessons. The data were collected through classroom observations which were videotaped, while field notes were also taken. The data analysis revealed that students engaged in productive interaction and inquiry while they were learning mathematics in small groups or in whole class setting, in which there was a different type of cognitive load that dominantly affecting the learning processes at each setting. During learning mathematics in whole class setting, the most frequently found interaction patterns were to discuss and compare solution based on self-developed models, followed by expressing opinions. This is consistent with the principles of mathematics learning, which gives students wide opportunities to construct mathematical knowledge through individual learning, learning in small groups as well as learning in whole class settings. It means that by participating in interactive learning, the students are habitually engaged in productive interactions and high level of mathematical thinking.

  8. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanda, R.

    1981-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental evidences to form a basis for Lagrangian Quantum field theory for Weak Interactions are discussed. In this context, gauge invariance aspects of such interactions are showed. (L.C.) [pt

  9. Intermolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, I.G.; Rodimova, O.B.; AN SSSR, Tomsk. Inst. Optiki Atmosfery)

    1978-01-01

    The present state of the intermolecular interaction theory is described. The general physical picture of the molecular interactions is given, the relative contributions of interactions of different types are analyzed (electrostatic, resonance, induction, dispersion, relativistic, magnetostatic and exchange), and the main ones in each range of separations are picked out. The methods of the potential curve calculations are considered, specific for definite separations between the interacting systems. The special attention is paid to the analysis of approximations used in different theoretical calculation methods

  10. Positive criminology in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronel, Natti; Segev, Dana

    2014-11-01

    The discourse regarding offender rehabilitation has been criticized by various scholars who have claimed that reducing negative causes and managing risk will not automatically prompt positive human development and elements that are associated with desistance. Positive criminology is an innovative concept that challenges the common preoccupation with negative elements, by placing emphasis on human encounters and forces of inclusion that are experienced positively by target individuals and that can promote crime desistance. However, as the concept is relatively new, there are still no guiding principles for the practice of positive criminology that could direct research and the criminal justice system. This article attempts to fill that gap by providing principles that could be practiced by criminal justice personnel and examples of different interventions that reflect positive criminology. The article also provides ideological explanations for adopting the concept of positive criminology in practice. © The Author(s) 2013.

  11. Effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    This chapter attempts to describe and compare some of the more important nucleon-nucleon interactions that have been used in nuclear structure calculations, and to relate them where possible to the real nucleon-nucleon interaction. Explains that different interactions have been used depending on whether one is fitting to total binding energies and densities with a Hartree Fock (HF) calculation or fitting to spectra and spectroscopic data in a shell model calculation. Examines both types of calculation after two preliminary sections concerned with notation and with the philosophy underlying the use of model spaces and effective interactions. Discusses Skyrme interactions, finite range interactions, small model space, large model space, and the Sussex potential matrix elements. Focuses on the more empirical approaches in which a simple form is chosen for the effective interaction in a given model space and the parameters are deduced from fitting many-body data

  12. Den positive psykologis metoder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Frans Ørsted; Mørck, Line Lerche; Nissen, Poul Erik

    En antologi der giver en introduktion til en række af de metoder der anvendes til forskning, assessment, test, udviklingsarbejde og intervention indenfor den positive psykologi.......En antologi der giver en introduktion til en række af de metoder der anvendes til forskning, assessment, test, udviklingsarbejde og intervention indenfor den positive psykologi....

  13. Modern management positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Petar M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze contemporary managerial positions such as program manager, project portfolio manager, crisis manager and others. The idea is to promote managerial positions in Serbia, which is quite unjustifiably undervalued, primarily because of the lack of knowledge in the field of management and other issues related to management education.

  14. Positioning and locking apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, M.L.; Harper, W.H.

    1985-06-19

    A positioning and locking apparatus including a fixture having a rotatable torque ring provided with a plurality of cam segments for automatically guiding a container into a desired location within the fixture. Rotation of the ring turns the container into a final position in pressure sealing relation against a hatch member.

  15. Positioning health professional identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Krogh Christensen, Mette; Mørcke, Anne Mette

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on positioning theory, the purpose of this paper is to characterize the activities and positions of students and supervisors at workplaces and on-campus skills training sites across the higher health professional educations of medicine, sports science, and nursing. Furthermore, the study ...... explored the impact of work-based learning (WBL) and skills training on students’ personal professional identity development....

  16. Phantom position dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorson, M.R.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1981-01-01

    Sensitivity of the Hanford dosimeter response to its position relative to the phantom and the neutron source has always been recognized. A thorough investigation was performed to quantify dosimeter response according to: (a) dosimeter position on phantom, (b) dosimeter distance from phantom, and (c) angular relationship of dosimeter relative to neutron source and phantom. Results were obtained for neutron irradiation at several different energies

  17. Position display device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Yukio.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To provide a device capable of easily and quickly reading mutual mounting relations of control bodies such as control rods mounted on a nuclear reactor and positions to which the control bodies are driven. Structure: A scanning circuit is provided to scan positions of controllably mounted control bodies such as control rods. Values detected by scanning the positions are converted into character signals according to the values and converted into preranked color signals. The character signals and color signals are stored in a memory circuit by synchronous signals in synchronism with the scanning in the scanning circuit. Outputs of the memory circuit are displayed by a display unit such as a color Braun tube in accordance with the synchronous signals to provide color representations according to positions to which control bodies are driven in the same positional relation as the mounting of the control bodies. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. Review of Positional Nystagmus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ignacio BENITO-OREJAS

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Any change of position of the head (dynamic or static can trigger a nystagmus or increase the spontaneous. This nystagmus we call it positional. We intend to review in this chapter its definition, clinical features, etiology and the way of exploring it. Method: narrative review. Results: Positional vertigo is the most frequent vestibular disorder, and most of the times of peripheral cause. Characteristics of nystagmus or its association with other neurological symptoms are sufficient grounds to request a magnetic resonance, which will provide additional information on very few occasions. Discussion: The study of the positional nystagmus as a procedure to rule out central pathology has lost much of its relevance. Signs that Nylén defined mixed findings peripheral and central, making complex classification. Conclusion: Regardless of how to bring the patient change position (very slow or fast, if it appears an atypical nystagmus should rule out a central origin.

  19. Head and neck position sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Bridget; McNair, Peter; Taylor, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic minor cervical strains are common place in high-impact sports (e.g. tackling) and premature degenerative changes have been documented in sports people exposed to recurrent impact trauma (e.g. scrummaging in rugby) or repetitive forces (e.g. Formula 1 racing drivers, jockeys). While proprioceptive exercises have been an integral part of rehabilitation of injuries in the lower limb, they have not featured as prominently in the treatment of cervical injuries. However, head and neck position sense (HNPS) testing and re-training may have relevance in the management of minor sports-related neck injuries, and play a role in reducing the incidence of ongoing pain and problems with function. For efficacious programmes to be developed and tested, fundamental principles associated with proprioception in the cervical spine should be considered. Hence, this article highlights the importance of anatomical structures in the cervical spine responsible for position sense, and how their interaction with the CNS affects our ability to plan and execute effective purposeful movements. This article includes a review of studies examining position sense in subjects with and without pathology and describes the effects of rehabilitation programmes that have sought to improve position sense. In respect to the receptors providing proprioceptive information for the CNS, the high densities and complex arrays of spindles found in cervical muscles suggest that these receptors play a key role. There is some evidence suggesting that ensemble encoding of discharge patterns from muscle spindles is relayed to the CNS and that a pattern recognition system is used to establish joint position and movement. Sensory information from neck proprioceptive receptors is processed in tandem with information from the vestibular system. There are extensive anatomical connections between neck proprioceptive inputs and vestibular inputs. If positional information from the vestibular system is inaccurate or

  20. POSITIONING STRATEGIES DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakhshir Ghassan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The positioning strategy has suffered serious changes in the last few decades, being influenced by the rapid development of competition and the growing focus on specific traits belonging to the market, to the consumer or to the product. The purpose of this paper is to present the developments of theoretical positioning strategies and the orientation from more simple, product oriented strategies, to ones more oriented towards the client and with a briefer period of time. The world is moving in a much faster pace than in the past, thanks to communication development so companies are obliged to adopt more specific strategies in order for them to be effective. This essay represents a literary review presenting a documentary research within the scientific articles and strategy and positioning books. The paper begins with the analysis of company strategies and the marketing strategies in general. The first author to group the product positioning strategies is Porter with his three generic strategies. Following the development of brands and because of the lack of competitiveness in the simple generic positioning strategies, this paper has also presented the newer positioning strategies proposed by Kotler, Treacy & Wiersema, and also more complex ones such as Bowman's Strategy Clock and Blankson and Kalafatis positioning strategy based on the type of the consumer. The fast expansion of local brands in all categories has led to mistakes in positioning strategies, categories also presented in the current essay. The results of this study show that new positioning strategies are more and more based on the consumer and market segments and on the product specification - which have also evolved in the last decades. Adaptability to fast changes in the competitive market will represent the future positioning strategies.

  1. A Symmetric Positive Definite Formulation for Monolithic Fluid Structure Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    more likely to converge than simply iterating the partitioned approach to convergence in a simple Gauss - Seidel manner. Our approach allows the use of...conditions in a second step. These approaches can also be iterated within a given time step for increased stability, noting that in the limit if one... converges one obtains a monolithic (albeit expensive) approach. Other approaches construct strongly coupled systems and then solve them in one of several

  2. Interactions of severe accident research and regulatory positions (ISARRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.

    2001-12-01

    The work Programme of the ISARRP Project was divided into several work packages. The work was conducted in the form of presentations and discussions, held during several meetings whose character was that of workshops. Short reports were prepared by the partners assigned to each task. Work Package 1: Critical review of the SA phenomenological research. The objective of this work package was to consider the progress made world-wide in research on the resolution of the outstanding phenomenological issues posed by severe accidents. Work Package 2: Relevance of severe accident research to SAMG requirements and implementation. The objective of this work package was to relate the progress made in the resolution of the SA issues to the practical matter of what results are required or have been used for the management of severe accidents. Clearly, the SAMG is the most important avenue employed by the regulatory organizations to assure themselves of the safe (from public perspective) performance of a nuclear plant in a postulated severe accident event. Work Package 3: Relevance of severe accident research to PSA and the risk informed regulatory approach. The objectives of this work package is to relate the results obtained by the severe accident research to the requirements of a PSA and of the new trend of employing the risk informed approach in promulgating regulations. Clearly a PSA identifies vulnerabilities in the knowledge base, however, their importance is decidedly plant specific. Nevertheless the uncertainties in the phenomenology or in resolution of issues lead to uncertainties in the PSA conclusions and in the adoption of the risk informed approach. Work Package 4: Questionnaire and the evaluation of responses to the questions. The purpose of this work package is to solicit the views of the regulatory organizations towards the results of the SA research and the benefits they have derived from it in terms of regulatory actions, or in the confidence they have gained in assessment of plant safety. This work package was also designed to distinguish the differences between the attitudes and approaches followed by the various regulatory organisations in Europe, Eastern Europe, USA and Japan. Work Package 5: Relevance of example PSA results to SA research. The objective of their work package was to employ the results of some recent PSAs (preferably for a PWR and a BWR) and relate their findings to the results obtained in SA research, and to the effectiveness of the SAM measures already taken or contemplated. Work Package 6: The state of resolution of the SA issues with respect to the needs. The objective of this work package is to have another look at the state of the resolution of the severe accident issues which have been identified over the years, and relate that to what the needs of the regulatory organizations are in terms of their functions. Work Package 7: Regulatory use of the results of severe accident research. The objective is to identify the results of the SA research which the regulatory organizations, over the years, have used in either defining specific regulatory actions or in not taking specific actions. Work Package 8: Remaining issues and concerns. The objective of the work here is to review the work in the previous work package and identify what are the remaining unresolved safety issues and concerns for which sufficient results of the SA research are not available. Work Package 9: Recommendations on future directions of severe accident research. The purpose of this work package is to provide recommendations to E.U. (and to the readers) by the authors of this report on the directions that should be followed, in the future for the conduct of severe accident research. These recommendations are in essence the conclusions of this study

  3. Temperature effects on interaction of positive ions with plastic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza Anaya, D.

    1992-01-01

    The range of heavy charged particles in matter is dependent mainly on two groups of parameters, one related to the particle characteristics (charge z, mass m, energy E) and the other characterized by the stopping medium (charge z, density ρ). Those two groups are enough to describe the particle energy lost, which is related to the residual range. Research on charge particles registration using solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD), probe that environmental parameters affect the stabilization and formation of the tracks. One of those, is the temperature detector which shows an important effect during the irradiation on the characteristics of the tracks produced. In order to study the dependence of track geometry as a function of irradiation temperature, some SSNTD (CR 39 type) were irradiated with α particles and fission fragments. Results of this work show the existence of irradiation temperature effect on the track geometry. It is observed a reduction of length and diameters, as temperature increases. For low irradiation temperatures, there is a reduction of the track geometry, as compared with environmental temperature. (Author)

  4. Theoretical investigation of electron-positive ion/atom interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Msezane, A.Z.

    1992-01-01

    Very brief summaries are given on three research topics. Electron impact elastic, excitation, and total cross sections for K were investigated by using elaborate Cl target wave functions in the close-coupling approximation. Photoionization cross sections from ground-state Na were calculated near the 2s 2 2p 5 3s and 2s2p 6 3s inner-shell thresholds; also, the photoionization cross sections of excited 3p 2 P o and 3d 2 D states were calculated with the R-matrix methodology near the 2s2p 6 3s thresholds. A numerical approach was developed to calculate the charge transfer matrix elements for ion-atom(ion) collisions; this was used for the proton-hydrogen collision problem as an illustration

  5. Interactions of severe accident research and regulatory positions (ISARRP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R. (comp.) [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Nuclear Power Safety

    2001-12-01

    The work Programme of the ISARRP Project was divided into several work packages. The work was conducted in the form of presentations and discussions, held during several meetings whose character was that of workshops. Short reports were prepared by the partners assigned to each task. Work Package 1: Critical review of the SA phenomenological research. The objective of this work package was to consider the progress made world-wide in research on the resolution of the outstanding phenomenological issues posed by severe accidents. Work Package 2: Relevance of severe accident research to SAMG requirements and implementation. The objective of this work package was to relate the progress made in the resolution of the SA issues to the practical matter of what results are required or have been used for the management of severe accidents. Clearly, the SAMG is the most important avenue employed by the regulatory organizations to assure themselves of the safe (from public perspective) performance of a nuclear plant in a postulated severe accident event. Work Package 3: Relevance of severe accident research to PSA and the risk informed regulatory approach. The objectives of this work package is to relate the results obtained by the severe accident research to the requirements of a PSA and of the new trend of employing the risk informed approach in promulgating regulations. Clearly a PSA identifies vulnerabilities in the knowledge base, however, their importance is decidedly plant specific. Nevertheless the uncertainties in the phenomenology or in resolution of issues lead to uncertainties in the PSA conclusions and in the adoption of the risk informed approach. Work Package 4: Questionnaire and the evaluation of responses to the questions. The purpose of this work package is to solicit the views of the regulatory organizations towards the results of the SA research and the benefits they have derived from it in terms of regulatory actions, or in the confidence they have gained in assessment of plant safety. This work package was also designed to distinguish the differences between the attitudes and approaches followed by the various regulatory organisations in Europe, Eastern Europe, USA and Japan. Work Package 5: Relevance of example PSA results to SA research. The objective of their work package was to employ the results of some recent PSAs (preferably for a PWR and a BWR) and relate their findings to the results obtained in SA research, and to the effectiveness of the SAM measures already taken or contemplated. Work Package 6: The state of resolution of the SA issues with respect to the needs. The objective of this work package is to have another look at the state of the resolution of the severe accident issues which have been identified over the years, and relate that to what the needs of the regulatory organizations are in terms of their functions. Work Package 7: Regulatory use of the results of severe accident research. The objective is to identify the results of the SA research which the regulatory organizations, over the years, have used in either defining specific regulatory actions or in not taking specific actions. Work Package 8: Remaining issues and concerns. The objective of the work here is to review the work in the previous work package and identify what are the remaining unresolved safety issues and concerns for which sufficient results of the SA research are not available. Work Package 9: Recommendations on future directions of severe accident research. The purpose of this work package is to provide recommendations to E.U. (and to the readers) by the authors of this report on the directions that should be followed, in the future for the conduct of severe accident research. These recommendations are in essence the conclusions of this study.

  6. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogava, S.; Savada, S.; Nakagava, M.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of the use of weak interaction laws to study models of elementary particles is discussed. The most typical examples of weak interaction is beta-decay of nucleons and muons. Beta-interaction is presented by quark currents in the form of universal interaction of the V-A type. Universality of weak interactions is well confirmed using as examples e- and μ-channels of pion decay. Hypothesis on partial preservation of axial current is applicable to the analysis of processes with pion participation. In the framework of the model with four flavours lepton decays of hadrons are considered. Weak interaction without lepton participation are also considered. Properties of neutral currents are described briefly

  7. Floor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter; Ludvigsen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Within architecture, there is a long tradition of careful design of floors. The design has been concerned with both decorating floors and designing floors to carry information. Ubiquitous computing technology offers new opportunities for designing interactive floors. This paper presents three...... different interactive floor concepts. Through an urban perspective it draws upon the experiences of floors in architecture, and provides a set of design issues for designing interactive floors....

  8. Playful Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The video Playful Interaction describes a future architectural office, and envisions ideas and concepts for playful interactions between people, materials and appliances in a pervasive and augmented working environment. The video both describes existing developments, technologies and designs...... as well as ideas not yet implemented such as playful modes of interaction with an augmented ball. Playful Interaction has been used as a hybrid of a vision video and a video prototype (1). Externally the video has been used to visualising our new ideas, and internally the video has also worked to inspire...

  9. Stress Management: Positive Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Positive thinking helps with stress management and can even improve your health. Practice overcoming negative self-talk ... with optimism is a key part of effective stress management. And effective stress management is associated with ...

  10. Den positive psykologis metoder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogen introducerer til de mange metoder, som anvendes i positiv psykologi. dette sker ud fra en reflekteret tilgang, der ligeledes rummer bidrag fra kritisk psykologi med det formål at nuancere den positive psykologis forståelser...

  11. Clinical Positioning Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Lars Peter Hedegaard; Christensen, Mette Krogh; Rytter, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a case study of residents’ clinical experiences and communication in outpatient oncology consultations. We apply positioning theory, a dynamic alternative to role theory, to investigate how oncology residents and patients situate themselves as persons with rights...... and duties. Drawing from seven qualitative interviews and six days of observation, we investigate the residents’ social positioning and their conversations with patients or supervisors. Our focus is on how (a) relational shifts in authority depend on each situation and its participants; (b) storylines...... establish acts and positions and narratively frame what participants can expect from a medical consultation viewed as a social episode; and (c) the positioning of rights and duties can lead to misunderstandings and frustrations. We conclude that residents and patients locate themselves in outpatient...

  12. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  13. POSITIONING STRATEGIES DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Shakhshir Ghassan

    2014-01-01

    The positioning strategy has suffered serious changes in the last few decades, being influenced by the rapid development of competition and the growing focus on specific traits belonging to the market, to the consumer or to the product. The purpose of this paper is to present the developments of theoretical positioning strategies and the orientation from more simple, product oriented strategies, to ones more oriented towards the client and with a briefer period of time. The world is moving in...

  14. How plants cope with biotic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, N.M.

    2009-01-01

    In their natural environment, plants interact with many different organisms. The nature of these interactions may range from positive, for example interactions with pollinators, to negative, such as interactions with pathogens and herbivores. In this special issue, the contributors provide several

  15. Position measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Shuichi; Maruyama, Mayumi

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a device capable of measuring accurate position and distance easily even at places where operator can not easily access, such as cell facilities for vitrifying radioactive wastes. Referring to a case of the vitrifying cell, an objective equipment settled in the cell is photographed by a photographing device. The image is stored in a position measuring device by way of an image input device. After several years, when the objective equipment is exchanged, a new objective equipment is photographed by a photographing device. The image is also stored in the position measuring device. The position measuring device compares the data of both of the images on the basis of pixel unit. Based on the image of the equipment before the exchange as a reference, extent of the displacement of the installation position of the equipment on the image after the exchange caused by installation error and manufacturing error is determined to decide the position of the equipment after exchange relative to the equipment before exchange. (I.S.)

  16. Tree-grass interactions in savannas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Savannas occur where trees and grasses interact to create a biome that is neither grassland nor forest. Woody and gramineous plants interact by many mechanisms, some negative (competition) and some positive (facilitation). The strength and sign...

  17. Aesthetic interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Krogh, Peter

    2004-01-01

    , as it promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  18. Interactive benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, Lartey; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss individual learning by interactive benchmarking using stochastic frontier models. The interactions allow the user to tailor the performance evaluation to preferences and explore alternative improvement strategies by selecting and searching the different frontiers using directional...... in the suggested benchmarking tool. The study investigates how different characteristics on dairy farms influences the technical efficiency....

  19. Explicit Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löwgren, Jonas; Eriksen, Mette Agger; Linde, Per

    2006-01-01

    We report an ongoing study of palpable computing to support surgical rehabilitation, in the general field of interaction design for ubiquitous computing. Through explorative design, fieldwork and participatory design techniques, we explore the design principle of explicit interaction as an interp...

  20. Kinesthetic Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogtmann, Maiken Hillerup; Fritsch, Jonas; Kortbek, Karen Johanne

    2008-01-01

    Within the Human-Computer Interaction community there is a growing interest in designing for the whole body in interaction design. The attempts aimed at addressing the body have very different outcomes spanning from theoretical arguments for understanding the body in the design process, to more...... practical examples of designing for bodily potential. This paper presents Kinesthetic Interaction as a unifying concept for describing the body in motion as a foundation for designing interactive systems. Based on the theoretical foundation for Kinesthetic Interaction, a conceptual framework is introduced...... to reveal bodily potential in relation to three design themes – kinesthetic development, kinesthetic means and kinesthetic disorder; and seven design parameters – engagement, sociality, movability, explicit motivation, implicit motivation, expressive meaning and kinesthetic empathy. The framework is a tool...

  1. Plasma position control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Haruhiko.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct position control stably to various plasmas and reduce the burden on the control coil power source. Constitution: Among the proportional, integration and differentiation controls, a proportional-differentiation control section and an integration control section are connected in parallel. Then, a signal switching circuit is disposed to the control signal input section for the proportional-differentiation control section such that either a present position of plasmas or deviation between the present plasma position and an aimed value can be selected as a control signal depending on the control procedures or the state of the plasmas. For instance, if a rapid response is required for the control, the deviation between the present plasma position and the aimed value is selected as the input signal to conduct proportional, integration and differentiation controls. While on the other hand, if it is intended to reduce the burden on the control coil power source, it is adapted such that the control signal inputted to the proportional-differentiation control section itself can select the present plasma position. (Yoshihara, H.)

  2. Positive Emotional Engagement and Autism Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert-Brown, Brittany L.; McDonald, Nicole M.; Mattson, Whitney I.; Martin, Katherine B.; Ibañez, Lisa V.; Stone, Wendy L.; Messinger, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Positive emotional engagement develops in the context of face-to-face interactions during the first 6 months of life. Deficits in emotional engagement are characteristic of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and may characterize the younger siblings of children with ASD (high-risk siblings). High-risk siblings are likely to exhibit a broad range of…

  3. Uncharged positive electrode composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Vissers, Donald R.; Shimotake, Hiroshi

    1977-03-08

    An uncharged positive-electrode composition contains particulate lithium sulfide, another alkali metal or alkaline earth metal compound other than sulfide, e.g., lithium carbide, and a transition metal powder. The composition along with a binder, such as electrolytic salt or a thermosetting resin is applied onto an electrically conductive substrate to form a plaque. The plaque is assembled as a positive electrode within an electrochemical cell opposite to a negative electrode containing a material such as aluminum or silicon for alloying with lithium. During charging, lithium alloy is formed within the negative electrode and transition metal sulfide such as iron sulfide is produced within the positive electrode. Excess negative electrode capacity over that from the transition metal sulfide is provided due to the electrochemical reaction of the other than sulfide alkali metal or alkaline earth metal compound.

  4. Position indication apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, T

    1964-02-24

    A plurality of magnetically operated switches are spaced equally in the hollow tube of a control rod actuating mechanism. One side of each switch is connected, via a low resistance, to a corresponding tap of a low resistance voltage divider network consisting of an equivalent number of low resistance sections with the opposite side of each switch connected to a common conducting wire A. To both ends of the voltage dividing network are connected, respectively, conducting wires B and C. Wires A, B, and C are further coupled to a fuel rod position indicator comprising a voltmeter and power source external to the control rod actuating member. The control rod actuating member is adapted to slide in the hollow tube so that switches passing a position facing a magnet secured to the lower end of the actuating member are rendered closed. Hence, the position of the control rod may be read by reading the voltage off the meter.

  5. Positioning devices for patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavens, M.

    1981-01-01

    It has been suggested that it is very important to position patients reproducibly at different stages of radiotherapy treatment planning and treatment, or similar procedures. Devices have been described for positioning a patient's upper and lower thorax. This invention provides reproducible positioning for a female patient's breasts, for example in planning treatment of and treating breast tumours. The patient is placed prone, using for example an upper thorax device. A support device is placed central to and beneath her breasts to partially displace them outwards. The device may be triangular in section with one apex contacting the chest wall at the sternum. Restraining straps may be provided to hold the breasts against the support device. Means may be provided to take a healthy breast from the path of radiation through the tumour. (author)

  6. Positioning and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogowski Jerzy B.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents national report of Poland for IAG on positioning and applications. The selected research presented was carried out at leading Polish research institutions and concern precise multi-GNSS satellite positioning - relative and absolute - and also GNSS-based ionosphere and troposphere modelling and studies. The research resulted in noticeable advancements in these subjects confirmed by the development of new algorithms and methods. New and improved methods of precise GNSS positioning were developed, and also GNSS metrology was studied. New advanced troposphere models were presented and tested. In particular, these models allowed testing IPW variability on regional and global scales. Also, new regional ionosphere monitoring web-based services were developed and launched.

  7. Massive Galileon positivity bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rham, Claudia; Melville, Scott; Tolley, Andrew J.; Zhou, Shuang-Yong

    2017-09-01

    The EFT coefficients in any gapped, scalar, Lorentz invariant field theory must satisfy positivity requirements if there is to exist a local, analytic Wilsonian UV completion. We apply these bounds to the tree level scattering amplitudes for a massive Galileon. The addition of a mass term, which does not spoil the non-renormalization theorem of the Galileon and preserves the Galileon symmetry at loop level, is necessary to satisfy the lowest order positivity bound. We further show that a careful choice of successively higher derivative corrections are necessary to satisfy the higher order positivity bounds. There is then no obstruction to a local UV completion from considerations of tree level 2-to-2 scattering alone. To demonstrate this we give an explicit example of such a UV completion.

  8. Future directions for positive body image research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, Emma

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of positive body image research during the last 10 years represents an important shift in the body image literature. The existing evidence provides a strong empirical basis for the study of positive body image and research has begun to address issues of age, gender, ethnicity, culture, development, and intervention in relation to positive body image. This article briefly reviews the existing evidence before outlining directions for future research. Specifically, six areas for future positive body image research are outlined: (a) conceptualization, (b) models, (c) developmental factors, (d) social interactions, (e) cognitive processing style, and (f) interventions. Finally, the potential role of positive body image as a protective factor within the broader body image literature is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nucleosome Positioning and Epigenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, David; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2008-03-01

    The role of chromatin structure in gene regulation has recently taken center stage in the field of epigenetics, phenomena that change the phenotype without changing the DNA sequence. Recent work has also shown that nucleosomes, a complex of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer, experience a sequence dependent energy landscape due to the variation in DNA bend stiffness with sequence composition. In this talk, we consider the role nucleosome positioning might play in the formation of heterochromatin, a compact form of DNA generically responsible for gene silencing. In particular, we discuss how different patterns of nucleosome positions, periodic or random, could either facilitate or suppress heterochromatin stability and formation.

  10. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Ready to create rich interactive experiences with your artwork, designs, or prototypes? This is the ideal place to start. With this hands-on guide, you'll explore several themes in interactive art and design-including 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, computer vision, and geolocation-and learn the basic programming and electronics concepts you need to implement them. No previous experience is necessary. You'll get a complete introduction to three free tools created specifically for artists and designers: the Processing programming language, the Arduino microcontroller, and the openFr

  11. Mixed Interaction Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke-Olesen, Andreas; Eriksson, E.; Hansen, T.R.

    In this paper, we describe a new interaction technique for mobile devices named Mixed Interaction Space that uses the camera of the mobile device to track the position, size and rotation of a fixed-point. In this demonstration we will present a system that uses a hand-drawn circle, colored object...... or a person’s face as a fixed-point to determine the location of the device. We use these features as a 4 dimensional input vector to a set of different applications....

  12. LGBTQ relationally based positive psychology: An inclusive and systemic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Daniela G; Bobele, Monte; Coppock, Jacqueline; Peña, Ezequiel

    2015-05-01

    Positive psychologists have contributed to our understandings of how positive emotions and flexible cognition enhance resiliency. However, positive psychologists' research has been slow to address the relational resources and interactions that help nonheterosexual families overcome adversity. Addressing overlooked lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ) and systemic factors in positive psychology, this article draws on family resilience literature and LGBTQ literature to theorize a systemic positive psychology framework for working with nonheterosexual families. We developed the LGBTQ relationally based positive psychology framework that integrates positive psychology's strengths-based perspective with the systemic orientation of Walsh's (1996) family resilience framework along with the cultural considerations proposed by LGBTQ family literature. We theorize that the LGBTQ relationally based positive psychology framework takes into consideration the sociopolitical adversities impacting nonheterosexual families and sensitizes positive psychologists, including those working in organized care settings, to the systemic interactions of same-sex loving relationships. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Attitude and position tracking

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Candy, LP

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Several applications require the tracking of attitude and position of a body based on velocity data. It is tempting to use direction cosine matrices (DCM), for example, to track attitude based on angular velocity data, and to integrate the linear...

  14. Logotherapy and positive psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar R. Oro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Psychology omitted to approach, during almost a century, the positive aspects from persons, like creativity, humor, optimism, hope, forgiveness, life meaning, and happiness. These themes are approached by Positive Psychology, with Seligman like the principal exponent. Psychology was dedicated to explore the negative aspects from human beings improving human health. Nevertheless, this pathogenic model could not prevent mental disease. Concepts of Positive Psychology have a solid antecedent in Víktor Frankl ́s studies, which is the Logotherapy founder. This allows incorporating another perspective to approach positive aspects, from a philosophical and anthropological focus. Although the ways adopted by Frank and Seligman are different, both considered main aspects of human existence. Nevertheless, they investigated in different countries (from Europe and EE.UU.; in different circumstances (concentration camps, deaths, tortures; vs. academic context; in different historical periods and different social contexts (a country that lost the war and other that gave freedom to Europeans. In this work is used the concept life sense as the focus in professional formation and psychotherapy approach. 

  15. Delegation. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board, Connie; Bushmiaer, Margo; Davis-Alldritt, Linda; Fekaris, Nina; Morgitan, Judith; Murphy, M. Kathleen; Yow, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the delegation of nursing tasks in the school setting can be a valuable tool for the school nurse, when based on the nursing definition of delegation and in compliance with state nursing regulations and guidance. Delegation in school nursing is a complex process in which…

  16. Precise Point Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaohong

    the airborne lidar system misalignment angle by automating the matching of lidar data with ground truth. Kinematic GPS positioning has been widely used, but the available commercial software systems are normally only suitable for the short or medium range kinematic baseline. However, in polar areas, airborne...

  17. Positionality at the Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Vanner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available As a Western feminist supporting and researching gender equality in education in postcolonial contexts, I often wonder: Am I doing more harm than good? The privilege of my social location means that my efforts to support education in postcolonial contexts risk being patronizing, insulting, threatening, imperialist, and recolonizing. Yet neglecting and ignoring postcolonial contexts similarly reflects and reproduces a privileged position. I provide a tentative framework designed to address positionality, power, and privilege while creating an ethical research process for working in a postcolonial context. Beginning with an identification of positionality, the objectives of research, and guiding theoretical frameworks to situate the research in relation to the participants and context, I proceed to establish a methodology designed to minimize the negative effects of power and maximize participants’ empowerment. I position myself as a bricoleur, layering feminist standpoint theory and postcolonial theory, and propose the collaborative data collection and analysis techniques, with particular attention to ethical and cultural sensitivity, using a social constructivist approach to grounded theory. This article highlights the need for Western researchers to reflect upon the power dynamics of their research in postcolonial contexts and develop a strategy for conducting empowering research that prevents the misrepresentation and exploitation of participants. Observations from my doctoral thesis data collection provide examples of how these concepts were operationalized in practice as well as reflections on the disconnect between theorizing and conducting ethical research in postcolonial contexts.

  18. Immunizations. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, Nichole; Garrett, Jennifer; Teskey, Carmen; Duncan, Kay; Strasser, Kathy; Burrows-Mezu, Alicia L.

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that immunizations are essential to primary prevention of disease from infancy through adulthood. Promotion of immunizations by the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is central to the public health focus of school nursing practice…

  19. Three-dimensional, position-sensitive radiation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhong; Zhang, Feng

    2010-04-06

    Disclosed herein is a method of determining a characteristic of radiation detected by a radiation detector via a multiple-pixel event having a plurality of radiation interactions. The method includes determining a cathode-to-anode signal ratio for a selected interaction of the plurality of radiation interactions based on electron drift time data for the selected interaction, and determining the radiation characteristic for the multiple-pixel event based on both the cathode-to-anode signal ratio and the electron drift time data. In some embodiments, the method further includes determining a correction factor for the radiation characteristic based on an interaction depth of the plurality of radiation interactions, a lateral distance between the selected interaction and a further interaction of the plurality of radiation interactions, and the lateral positioning of the plurality of radiation interactions.

  20. Interaction graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Interaction graphs were introduced as a general, uniform, construction of dynamic models of linear logic, encompassing all Geometry of Interaction (GoI) constructions introduced so far. This series of work was inspired from Girard's hyperfinite GoI, and develops a quantitative approach that should...... be understood as a dynamic version of weighted relational models. Until now, the interaction graphs framework has been shown to deal with exponentials for the constrained system ELL (Elementary Linear Logic) while keeping its quantitative aspect. Adapting older constructions by Girard, one can clearly define...... "full" exponentials, but at the cost of these quantitative features. We show here that allowing interpretations of proofs to use continuous (yet finite in a measure-theoretic sense) sets of states, as opposed to earlier Interaction Graphs constructions were these sets of states were discrete (and finite...

  1. Embarrassing Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deterding, Sebastian; Lucero, Andrés; Holopainen, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Wherever the rapid evolution of interactive technologies disrupts standing situational norms, creates new, often unclear situational audiences, or crosses cultural boundaries, embarrassment is likely. This makes embarrassment a fundamental adoption and engagement hurdle, but also a creative design...

  2. Diffractive interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.; Marage, P.

    1996-08-01

    The general framework of diffractive deep inelastic scattering is introduced and reports given in the session on diffractive interactions at the international workshop on deep-inelastic scattering and related phenomena, Rome, April 1996, are presented. (orig.)

  3. Interaction Widget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingstrup, Mads

    2003-01-01

    This pattern describes the idea of making a user interface of discrete, reusable entities---here called interaction widgets. The idea behind widgets is described using two perspectives, that of the user and that of the developer. It is the forces from these two perspectives that are balanced...... in the pattern. The intended audience of the pattern is developers and researchers within the field of human computer interaction....

  4. Hair Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Cani , Marie-Paule; Bertails , Florence

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Processing interactions is one of the main challenges in hair animation. Indeed, in addition to the collisions with the body, an extremely large number of contacts with high friction rates are permanently taking place between individual hair strands. Simulating the latter is essential: without hair self-interactions, strands would cross each other during motion or come to rest at the same location, yielding unrealistic behavior and a visible lack of hair volume. This c...

  5. Interactive Virtual Cinematography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo

    is the process of visualising the content of a virtual environment by positioning and animating the virtual camera in the context of interactive applications such as a computer game. Camera placement and animation in games are usually directly controlled by the player or statically predened by designers. Direct...... control of the camera by the player increases the complexity of the interaction and reduces the designer's control on game storytelling. A completely designer-driven camera releases the player from the burden of controlling the point of view, but might generate undesired camera behaviours. Furthermore......, if the content of the game is procedurally generated, the designer might not have the necessary information to dene a priori the camera positions and movements. Automatic camera control aims to dene an abstraction layer that permits to control the camera using high-level and environment-independent rules...

  6. Net positive energy buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, A.; Barreiro, E.; Sanchez Zabala, V.

    2010-01-01

    Buildings are great consumers of energy, being responsible for almost 36% of CO2 emissions in Europe. Though there are many initiatives towards the reduction of energy consumption and CO2 emissions in buildings, many of the alternatives are diminished due to a lack of a unique and holistic approach to the problem. This paper reports a new innovative concept of Positive Energy Buildings (EB+), as well as an integral methodology that covers the overall design process for achieving them. The methodology evaluates energy efficiency solutions at different scales, from building site to generation systems. An educational building design in Navarra serves as a case study to check the feasibility of the proposed methodology. The study concludes that the key to achieve a Positive Energy Building is a minimized energy demand, complemented by efficient facilities and enhanced by distributed power generation from renewable sources. (Author).

  7. Conflict, Memory, and Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brescó, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to bring the dialogical and multivoiced dimension of conflict to the fore in the study of how people remember a particular event in the past. Drawing from different case studies, it contains analyses of how subjects identifying with different political actors in the Basque...... conflict adopted their respective positions, and interpretation of the conflict, and how, in light of same, they reconstruct the failed peace process that took place in 2006 between the terrorist group ETA (Euzkadi ta Azcatasuna, or Basque Country and Freedom in English) and the Spanish government. Results...... show that the positioning adopted by participants gives rise to a certain form of interpreting the conflict, which, in turn, affects how the peace process is remembered. This occurs within a particular argumentative context in which each version constitutes an implicit response to a competing...

  8. Are Parton Distributions Positive?

    CERN Document Server

    Forte, Stefano; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Altarelli, Guido; Forte, Stefano; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    1999-01-01

    We show that the naive positivity conditions on polarized parton distributions which follow from their probabilistic interpretation in the naive parton model are reproduced in perturbative QCD at the leading log level if the quark and gluon distribution are defined in terms of physical processes. We show how these conditions are modified at the next-to-leading level, and discuss their phenomenological implications, in particular in view of the determination of the polarized gluon distribution

  9. Are parton distributions positive?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forte, Stefano; Altarelli, Guido; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    1999-01-01

    We show that the naive positivity conditions on polarized parton distributions which follow from their probabilistic interpretation in the naive parton model are reproduced in perturbative QCD at the leading log level if the quark and gluon distribution are defined in terms of physical processes. We show how these conditions are modified at the next-to-leading level, and discuss their phenomenological implications, in particular in view of the determination of the polarized gluon distribution

  10. Spatial Search, Position Papers

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Spatial Studies, UCSB

    2014-01-01

    The Spatial Search specialist meeting in Santa Barbara (December 2014) brought together 35 academic and industry representatives from computational, geospatial, and cognitive sciences with interest in focused discussions on the development of an interdisciplinary research agenda to advance spatial search from scientific and engineering viewpoints. The position papers from participants represent the shared expertise that guided discussions and the formulation of research questions about proces...

  11. Barebacking and sexual position

    OpenAIRE

    Grundy-Bowers, M.; Hardy, S.; McKeown, E.

    2015-01-01

    Bareback sex continues to fuel the HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men but despite the fact that much academic attention has been focused on the sexual behaviour of this population few authors have considered the significance of sexual position. In order to explore this relatively under-examined factor, interviews were conducted with 13 HIV-negative and unknown status gay men who had recently engaged in bareback sex. Using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis and through the lens...

  12. The strategic research positioning:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viala, Eva Silberschmidt

    to provide new insights into ‘immigrant’ parents’ perspective on home/school partnership in Denmark. The majority of the immigrant parents came from non-Western countries, and they had already been ‘labelled’ difficult in terms of home/school partnership. This calls for what I call ‘strategic research...... positioning’, meaning critical reflections about the relationship and power balance between the researcher and the researched. The paper focus' on challenges and dilemmas linked to this position....

  13. Review of HRP Positions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Center for Reliability Studies

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Human Reliability Program (HRP), published as 10 CFR Part 712, is currently being reviewed and revised to address concerns identified during its implementation. Although these ''page changes'' primarily incorporate clarification of terms and language, the following discussion relates to broadening the definition of positions that require HRP certification that is found in {section}712.10.

  14. Position indicating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellchenfeld, M.M.; Connors, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a position indicating device for producing an indication of the position of a displaceable structure comprising: a position representing member mounted for movement in response to displacement of the structure; sensing elements spaced apart along the defined path such that each element is associated with a respective location along the defined path; means operatively coupling the elements into respective pairs of elements, having, for each pair of elements, an output producing a signal only when a single element of its respective pair is responding to the presence of the member; signal producing members each operative for producing a signal representing a predetermined logic state in response to a predetermined input signal, the number of the signal producing members being smaller than the number of the sensing elements; and circuit means operatively connecting the outputs to the signal producing members for causing a signal at each output to produce a predetermined input signal at a corresponding signal producing member and for causing a predetermined input signal to be produced at least one the signal producing member whenever a signal is present at either one of at least two of the outputs

  15. Photon beam position monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.; Shu, Deming

    1995-01-01

    A photon beam position monitor for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade "shadowing". Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation.

  16. Beam Position Monitor Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Stephen R.

    1996-07-01

    The design of beam position monitors often involves challenging system design choices. Position transducers must be robust, accurate, and generate adequate position signal without unduly disturbing the beam. Electronics must be reliable and affordable, usually while meeting tough requirements on precision. accuracy, and dynamic range. These requirements may be difficult to achieve simultaneously, leading the designer into interesting opportunities for optimization or compromise. Some useful techniques and tools are shown. Both finite element analysis and analytic techniques will be used to investigate quasi-static aspects of electromagnetic fields such as the impedance of and the coupling of beam to striplines or buttons. Finite-element tools will be used to understand dynamic aspects of the electromagnetic fields of beams, such as wake-fields and transmission-line and cavity effects in vacuum-to-air feed through. Mathematical modeling of electrical signals through a processing chain will be demonstrated, in particular to illuminate areas where neither a pure time-domain nor a pure frequency-domain analysis is obviously advantageous. Emphasis will be on calculational techniques, in particular on using both time-domain and frequency domain approaches to the applicable parts of interesting problems

  17. Position reconstruction in LUX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Alsum, S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Brás, P.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Fallon, S. R.; Fan, A.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Genovesi, J.; Ghag, C.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Rhyne, C.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W. C.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Velan, V.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Xu, J.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.

    2018-02-01

    The (x, y) position reconstruction method used in the analysis of the complete exposure of the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment is presented. The algorithm is based on a statistical test that makes use of an iterative method to recover the photomultiplier tube (PMT) light response directly from the calibration data. The light response functions make use of a two dimensional functional form to account for the photons reflected on the inner walls of the detector. To increase the resolution for small pulses, a photon counting technique was employed to describe the response of the PMTs. The reconstruction was assessed with calibration data including 83mKr (releasing a total energy of 41.5 keV) and 3H (β- with Q = 18.6 keV) decays, and a deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron beam (2.45 MeV) . Within the detector's fiducial volume, the reconstruction has achieved an (x, y) position uncertainty of σ = 0.82 cm and σ = 0.17 cm for events of only 200 and 4,000 detected electroluminescence photons respectively. Such signals are associated with electron recoils of energies ~0.25 keV and ~10 keV, respectively. The reconstructed position of the smallest events with a single electron emitted from the liquid surface (22 detected photons) has a horizontal (x, y) uncertainty of 2.13 cm.

  18. Positivity and integrability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Berlin (Germany)

    2005-11-15

    Based on past contributions by Robert Schrader to the connection between (higher dimensional) Euclidean and real time QFT and by Michael Karowski to the non-perturbative bootstrap-form factor approach for factorizing two-dimensional QFTs I review the problem of existence of interacting quantum field theory and present recent ideas and results on rigorous constructions as well as new ideas on an operator-algebraic setting for chiral Euclideanization and temperature duality. The main result of chiral Euclideanization may be compressed into the slogan: SL(2,Z)-modular group properties of modular forms in thermal chiral QFTs result from the (Tomita- Takesaki) modular theory of operator algebras. (author)

  19. Positivity and integrability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroer, Bert

    2005-11-01

    Based on past contributions by Robert Schrader to the connection between (higher dimensional) Euclidean and real time QFT and by Michael Karowski to the non-perturbative bootstrap-form factor approach for factorizing two-dimensional QFTs I review the problem of existence of interacting quantum field theory and present recent ideas and results on rigorous constructions as well as new ideas on an operator-algebraic setting for chiral Euclideanization and temperature duality. The main result of chiral Euclideanization may be compressed into the slogan: SL(2,Z)-modular group properties of modular forms in thermal chiral QFTs result from the (Tomita- Takesaki) modular theory of operator algebras. (author)

  20. Interactive Information Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borlund, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The paper introduces the research area of interactive information retrieval (IIR) from a historical point of view. Further, the focus here is on evaluation, because much research in IR deals with IR evaluation methodology due to the core research interest in IR performance, system interaction...... and satisfaction with retrieved information. In order to position IIR evaluation, the Cranfield model and the series of tests that led to the Cranfield model are outlined. Three iconic user-oriented studies and projects that all have contributed to how IIR is perceived and understood today are presented......: The MEDLARS test, the Book House fiction retrieval system, and the OKAPI project. On this basis the call for alternative IIR evaluation approaches motivated by the three revolutions (the cognitive, the relevance, and the interactive revolutions) put forward by Robertson & Hancock-Beaulieu (1992) is presented...

  1. Platform Architecture for Decentralized Positioning Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Kasmi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A platform architecture for positioning systems is essential for the realization of a flexible localization system, which interacts with other systems and supports various positioning technologies and algorithms. The decentralized processing of a position enables pushing the application-level knowledge into a mobile station and avoids the communication with a central unit such as a server or a base station. In addition, the calculation of the position on low-cost and resource-constrained devices presents a challenge due to the limited computing, storage capacity, as well as power supply. Therefore, we propose a platform architecture that enables the design of a system with the reusability of the components, extensibility (e.g., with other positioning technologies and interoperability. Furthermore, the position is computed on a low-cost device such as a microcontroller, which simultaneously performs additional tasks such as data collecting or preprocessing based on an operating system. The platform architecture is designed, implemented and evaluated on the basis of two positioning systems: a field strength system and a time of arrival-based positioning system.

  2. Interactive governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Torfing, Jacob; Peters, B. Guy

    Governance has become one of the most commonly used concepts in contemporary political science. It is, however, often used to mean a variety of different things. This book helps to clarify this conceptual muddle by concentrating on one variety of governance-interactive governance. The authors argue...... that although the state may remain important for many aspects of governing, interactions between state and society represent an important, and perhaps increasingly important, dimension of governance. These interactions may be with social actors such as networks, with market actors or with other governments......, but all these forms represent means of governing involving mixtures of state action with the actions of other entities.This book explores thoroughly this meaning of governance, and links it to broader questions of governance. In the process of explicating this dimension of governance the authors also...

  3. Multiquark interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk'yanov, V.K.

    1984-01-01

    To study multiquark interactions (MQI) the data of experiments confirming the presence of 3q, 6q, 12q states in interacting nuclear nucleons, in hadron- and lepton-nuclear processes at high energies and high momentum transfers are considered. Experimental data on cumulative processes pointing to the existence of MQI are analyzed. Two-channel model of a nucleus (the model of interacting nucleons) in the theory of coupled channels is discussed. The behaviour of form factor of deuteron and NQI (6q) contributions to ed scattering as well as deep inelastic scattering on nuclei are studied. The data known as EMC effect are discussed. It is pointed out that introduction of the notion MQI and consideration of a nucleus as a system of nucleons with a low MQI addition will help to explain such processes as cumulative reactions, form factors of a deuteron and light nuclei, deep inelastic scattering on nuclei

  4. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Make cool stuff. If you're a designer or artist without a lot of programming experience, this book will teach you to work with 2D and 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, and electronic circuitry to create all sorts of interesting and compelling experiences -- online and off. Programming Interactivity explains programming and electrical engineering basics, and introduces three freely available tools created specifically for artists and designers: Processing, a Java-based programming language and environment for building projects on the desktop, Web, or mobile phonesArduino, a system t

  5. Interacting binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggleton, P.P.; Pringle, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This volume contains 15 review articles in the field of binary stars. The subjects reviewed span considerably, from the shortest period of interacting binaries to the longest, symbiotic stars. Also included are articles on Algols, X-ray binaries and Wolf-Rayet stars (single and binary). Contents: Preface. List of Participants. Activity of Contact Binary Systems. Wolf-Rayet Stars and Binarity. Symbiotic Stars. Massive X-ray Binaries. Stars that go Hump in the Night: The SU UMa Stars. Interacting Binaries - Summing Up

  6. Head position and spinal position as determinants of perceived emotional state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouwstra, S J; Hoogstraten, J

    1995-10-01

    A sample of 60 first-year psychology students judged the emotional state of 21 drawn figures and completed the Adjective Checklist and a mood questionnaire. The judgments were affected by the interaction between head position and spinal position of the figure. Each figure was associated with a unique pattern of emotions, and the judgments given were not influenced by the subjects' own emotional state.

  7. Positively deflected anomaly mediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Nobuchika

    2002-01-01

    We generalize the so-called 'deflected anomaly mediation' scenario to the case where threshold corrections of heavy messengers to the sparticle squared masses are positive. A concrete model realizing this scenario is also presented. The tachyonic slepton problem can be fixed with only a pair of messengers. The resultant sparticle mass spectrum is quite different from that in the conventional deflected anomaly mediation scenario, but is similar to the one in the gauge mediation scenario. The lightest sparticle is mostly B-ino

  8. Triangulation positioning system network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sfendourakis Marios

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents ongoing work on localization and positioning through triangulation procedure for a Fixed Sensors Network - FSN.The FSN has to work as a system.As the triangulation problem becomes high complicated in a case with large numbers of sensors and transmitters, an adequate grid topology is needed in order to tackle the detection complexity.For that reason a Network grid topology is presented and areas that are problematic and need further analysis are analyzed.The Network System in order to deal with problems of saturation and False Triangulations - FTRNs will have to find adequate methods in every sub-area of the Area Of Interest - AOI.Also, concepts like Sensor blindness and overall Network blindness, are presented. All these concepts affect the Network detection rate and its performance and ought to be considered in a way that the network overall performance won’t be degraded.Network performance should be monitored contentiously, with right algorithms and methods.It is also shown that as the number of TRNs and FTRNs is increased Detection Complexity - DC is increased.It is hoped that with further research all the characteristics of a triangulation system network for positioning will be gained and the system will be able to perform autonomously with a high detection rate.

  9. Hadron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J.; Kolar, P.; Kundrat, V.

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings contain invited lectures and papers presente at the symposium. Attention was devoted to hadron interactions a high energy in QCD, to the structure and decay of hadrons, the production of hadrons and supersymmetric particles in e + e - and ep collisions, to perturbation theory in quantum field theory, and new supersymmetric extensions of relativistic algebra. (Z.J

  10. Interactive Storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoenau-Fog, Henrik; Reng, Lars

    2015-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2015, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in November/December 2015. The 18 revised full papers and 13 short papers presented together with 9 posters, 9 workshop descriptions, an...

  11. A naturally narrow positive-parity Θ+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, Carl E.; Carone, Christopher D.; Kwee, Herry J.; Nazaryan, Vahagn

    2004-01-01

    We present a consistent color-flavor-spin-orbital wave function for a positive-parity Θ + that naturally explains the observed narrowness of the state. The wave function is totally symmetric in its flavor-spin part and totally antisymmetric in its color-orbital part. If flavor-spin interactions dominate, this wave function renders the positive-parity Θ + lighter than its negative-parity counterpart. We consider decays of the Θ + and compute the overlap of this state with the kinematically allowed final states. Our results are numerically small. We note that dynamical correlations between quarks are not necessary to obtain narrow pentaquark widths

  12. Interactive Dimensioning of Parametric Models

    KAUST Repository

    Kelly, T.

    2015-06-22

    We propose a solution for the dimensioning of parametric and procedural models. Dimensioning has long been a staple of technical drawings, and we present the first solution for interactive dimensioning: A dimension line positioning system that adapts to the view direction, given behavioral properties. After proposing a set of design principles for interactive dimensioning, we describe our solution consisting of the following major components. First, we describe how an author can specify the desired interactive behavior of a dimension line. Second, we propose a novel algorithm to place dimension lines at interactive speeds. Third, we introduce multiple extensions, including chained dimension lines, controls for different parameter types (e.g. discrete choices, angles), and the use of dimension lines for interactive editing. Our results show the use of dimension lines in an interactive parametric modeling environment for architectural, botanical, and mechanical models.

  13. Positive void reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, D.J.

    1992-09-01

    This report is a review of some of the important aspects of the analysis of large loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). One important aspect is the calculation of positive void reactivity. To study this subject the lattice physics codes used for void worth calculations and the coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic codes used for the transient analysis are reviewed. Also reviewed are the measurements used to help validate the codes. The application of these codes to large LOCAs is studied with attention focused on the uncertainty factor for the void worth used to bias the results. Another aspect of the subject dealt with in the report is the acceptance criteria that are applied. This includes the criterion for peak fuel enthalpy and the question of whether prompt criticality should also be a criterion. To study the former, fuel behavior measurements and calculations are reviewed. (Author) (49 refs., 2 figs., tab.)

  14. Conference - La discipline positive

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    Eduquer avec fermeté et bienveillance Véronique Genevay Jeudi 31 mai à 19h00 CERN Meyrin, Salle du Conseil 503-1-001 Venez vous familiariser avec la pensée et le positionnement développé dans la discipline positive. Une approche ni permissive, ni punitive, qui vise à enseigner aux enfants des compétences comme la confiance en soi, l’autonomie, le respect de soi-même et le respect mutuel, la responsabilité, la coopération… Inscrivez-vous : https://indico.cern.ch/e/disciplinepositive   Pour plus d’informations : staff.association@cern.ch ou (+41) 022 766 37 38

  15. Position paper on mesotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Rashmi; Garg, Vijay Kumar; Mysore, Venkataram

    2011-01-01

    Mesotherapy is a controversial cosmetic procedure which has received publicity among the lay people, in the internet and in the media. It refers to minimally invasive techniques which consist of the use of intra- or subcutaneous injections containing liquid mixture of compounds (pharmaceutical and homeopathic medications, plant extracts, vitamins and other ingredients) to treat local medical and cosmetic conditions. This position paper has examined the available evidence and finds that acceptable scientific evidence for its effectiveness and safety is lacking. IADVL taskforce, therefore would like to state that the use of this technique remains controversial at present. Further research and well-designed controlled scientific studies are required to substantiate the claims of benefit of this mode of therapy.

  16. Position paper on mesotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Sarkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesotherapy is a controversial cosmetic procedure which has received publicity among the lay people, in the internet and in the media. It refers to minimally invasive techniques which consist of the use of intra- or subcutaneous injections containing liquid mixture of compounds (pharmaceutical and homeopathic medications, plant extracts, vitamins and other ingredients to treat local medical and cosmetic conditions. This position paper has examined the available evidence and finds that acceptable scientific evidence for its effectiveness and safety is lacking. IADVL taskforce, therefore would like to state that the use of this technique remains controversial at present. Further research and well-designed controlled scientific studies are required to substantiate the claims of benefit of this mode of therapy.

  17. Galileo positioning technology

    CERN Document Server

    Lohan, Elena; Sand, Stephan; Hurskainen, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    This book covers multi-band Galileo receivers (especially E1-E5 bands of Galileo) and addresses all receiver building blocks, from the antenna and front end, through details of the baseband receiver processing blocks, up to the navigation processing, including the Galileo message structure and Position, Velocity, Time (PVT) computation. Moreover, hybridization solutions with communications systems for improved localization are discussed and an open-source GNSS receiver platform (available for download) developed at Tampere University of Technology (TUT) is addressed in detail. • Takes a holistic approach to GALILEO and related systems, such as EGNOS and hybrid solutions on mobile phones; • Provides an invaluable reference to Binary Offset Carrier modulations and related families, which are some of the trademarks of GALILEO; • Includes a detailed survey of GALILEO receiver research in Europe and existing software-defined radio (SDR) GALILEO receiver implementations; • Addresses the multiple challen...

  18. ISSP Position Stand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryba, Tatiana; Stambulova, Natalia; Si, Gangyan

    2013-01-01

    The multicultural landscape of contemporary sport sets a challenge to rethink sport and exercise psychology research and practice through a culturally re␣exive lens. This ISSP Position Stand provides a rigorous synthesis and engagement with existing scholarship to outline a roadmap for future work...... in the ␣eld. The shift to culturally competent sport and exercise psychology implies: (a) recognizing hidden ethnocentric philosophical assumptions permeating much of the current theory, research, and practice; (b) transitioning to professional ethics in which difference is seen as not inherent and ␣xed...... but as relational and ␣uid; and (c) focusing on meaning (instead of cause) in cross-cultural and cultural research projects, and cultural praxis work. In the paper, we ␣rst provide an overview of the concepts of cultural competence and ethics of difference. Second, we present a step-by-step approach for developing...

  19. The Power of Positive Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español The Power of Positive Emotions KidsHealth / For Teens / The Power ... great one. 2. Practice Positivity Every Day Building habits that encourage us to feel more positive emotions ...

  20. 3D position readout from thick scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Antich, P; Parkey, R; Slavin, N V; Tsyganov, E N

    2002-01-01

    A novel technique has been developed and tested for the three-dimensional measurement of position in SPECT-PET detectors. Results are presented for 2 and 20 mm thick NaI(Tl) planar crystals. In a plane of crystal, a coordinate resolution of about 1 mm (rms error) is demonstrated. The depth of interaction (DOI) is measured with an rms error of about 2 mm using light cone parameters.