WorldWideScience

Sample records for positive student feedback

  1. Effective Instructor Feedback: Perceptions of Online Graduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverley Getzlaf

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This descriptive study explored online graduate students' perceptions of effective instructor feedback. The objectives of the study were to determine the students’ perceptions of the content of effective instructor feedback (“what should be included in effective feedback?” and the process of effective instructor feedback (“how should effective feedback be provided?”. The participants were students completing health-related graduate courses offered exclusively online. Data were collected via a survey that included open ended questions inviting participants to share their perspectives regarding effective online instructor feedback. Thematic analysis revealed five major themes: student involvement/individualization, gentle guidance, being positively constructive, timeliness and future orientation. We conclude that effective instructor feedback has positive outcomes for the students. Future studies are warranted to investigate strategies to make feedback a mutual process between instructor and student that supports an effective feedback cycle.

  2. Social anxiety and the ironic effects of positive interviewer feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnick, Christopher J; Kowal, Marta; Santuzzi, Alecia M

    2015-01-01

    Positive interviewer feedback should encourage positive experiences and outcomes for interviewees. Yet, positive feedback is inconsistent with socially anxious interviewees' negative self-views. Socially anxious interviewees might experience increased self-focus while attempting to reconcile the inconsistency between their self-perceptions and that feedback. This could interfere with successful interview performance. This study used a 3 (feedback: positive, negative, no) × 2 (social anxiety: high, low) between-subjects design. Undergraduate students (N = 88) completed a measure of dispositional social anxiety. They then engaged in a simulated interview with a White confederate trained to adhere to a standardized script. Interviewees received positive, negative, or no interviewer feedback. Each interview was video recorded to code anxiety displays, impression management tactics, and interview success. Following positive feedback, socially anxious interviewees displayed more anxiety, less assertiveness, and received lower success ratings. Among anxious interviewees, increased self-focus provided an indirect path between positive feedback and lower success. Consistent with self-verification theory, anxious interviewees had poorer interview performance following positive feedback that contradicted their negative self-views. Thus, socially anxious interviewees might be at a disadvantage when interviewing, especially following positive feedback. Implications for interviewees and interviewers are discussed.

  3. Relations between third grade teachers' depressive symptoms and their feedback to students, with implications for student mathematics achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Leigh; Connor, Carol McDonald

    2018-06-01

    Recent studies have observed connections among teachers' depressive symptoms and student outcomes; however, the specific mechanisms through which teachers' mental health characteristics operate in the classroom remain largely unknown. The present study used student-level observation methods to examine the relations between third-grade teachers' (N = 32) depressive symptoms and their academic feedback to students (N = 310) and sought to make inferences about how these factors might influence students' mathematics achievement. A novel observational tool, the Teacher Feedback Coding System-Academic (TFCS-A), was used that assesses feedback across 2 dimensions-teacher affect and instructional strategy, which have been shown to be important to student learning. Multilevel exploratory factor analysis of TFCS-A data suggested 2 primary factors: positive feedback and neutral/negative feedback. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed that positive feedback was related to higher math achievement among students who began the year with weaker math skills and that teachers who reported more depressive symptoms less frequently provided this positive feedback. Results offer new information about a type of instruction that may be affected by teachers' depressive symptoms and inform efforts aimed at improving teachers' instructional interactions with students. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Student Engagement with Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jon; Shields, Cathy; Gardner, James; Hancock, Alysoun; Nutt, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This report considers Biological Sciences students' perceptions of feedback, compared with those of the University as a whole, this includes what forms of feedback were considered most useful and how feedback used. Compared with data from previous studies, Biological Sciences students gave much greater recognition to oral feedback, placing it on a…

  5. The challenge of giving written thesis feedback to nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Borglin, Gunilla

    2014-11-01

    Providing effective written feedback on nursing student's assignments can be a challenging task for any assessor. Additionally, as the student groups tend to become larger, written feedback is likely to gain an overall more prominent position than verbal feedback. Lack of formal training or regular discussion in the teaching faculty about the skill set needed to provide written feedback could negatively affect the students' learning abilities. In this brief paper, we discuss written feedback practices, whilst using the Bachelor of Science in Nursing thesis as an example. Our aim is to highlight the importance of an informed understanding of the impact written feedback can have on students. Creating awareness about this can facilitate the development of more strategic and successful written feedback strategies. We end by offering examples of some relatively simple strategies for improving this practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Engaging Students with Audio Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Students express widespread dissatisfaction with academic feedback. Teaching staff perceive a frequent lack of student engagement with written feedback, much of which goes uncollected or unread. Published evidence shows that audio feedback is highly acceptable to students but is underused. This paper explores methods to produce and deliver audio…

  7. Collective irrationality and positive feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolis, Stamatios C; Zabzina, Natalia; Latty, Tanya; Sumpter, David J T

    2011-04-26

    Recent experiments on ants and slime moulds have assessed the degree to which they make rational decisions when presented with a number of alternative food sources or shelter. Ants and slime moulds are just two examples of a wide range of species and biological processes that use positive feedback mechanisms to reach decisions. Here we use a generic, experimentally validated model of positive feedback between group members to show that the probability of taking the best of options depends crucially on the strength of feedback. We show how the probability of choosing the best option can be maximized by applying an optimal feedback strength. Importantly, this optimal value depends on the number of options, so that when we change the number of options the preference of the group changes, producing apparent "irrationalities". We thus reinterpret the idea that collectives show "rational" or "irrational" preferences as being a necessary consequence of the use of positive feedback. We argue that positive feedback is a heuristic which often produces fast and accurate group decision-making, but is always susceptible to apparent irrationality when studied under particular experimental conditions.

  8. Collective irrationality and positive feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatios C Nicolis

    Full Text Available Recent experiments on ants and slime moulds have assessed the degree to which they make rational decisions when presented with a number of alternative food sources or shelter. Ants and slime moulds are just two examples of a wide range of species and biological processes that use positive feedback mechanisms to reach decisions. Here we use a generic, experimentally validated model of positive feedback between group members to show that the probability of taking the best of options depends crucially on the strength of feedback. We show how the probability of choosing the best option can be maximized by applying an optimal feedback strength. Importantly, this optimal value depends on the number of options, so that when we change the number of options the preference of the group changes, producing apparent "irrationalities". We thus reinterpret the idea that collectives show "rational" or "irrational" preferences as being a necessary consequence of the use of positive feedback. We argue that positive feedback is a heuristic which often produces fast and accurate group decision-making, but is always susceptible to apparent irrationality when studied under particular experimental conditions.

  9. Interpreting Feedback: A Discourse Analysis of Teacher Feedback and Student Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J. T.; Anguiano, Carlos J.

    2016-01-01

    Feedback has typically been studied as a means of improving academic performance. Few studies inquire into the processes by which feedback shapes student identity. The authors carry out a discourse analysis of written comments to explore how feedback is discursively constructed by both teachers and students. Analysis of written feedback,…

  10. What higher education students do with teacher feedback: Feedback ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Writing pedagogy research has constantly maintained that feedback is 'an essential component of virtually every model of the writing process' (Hall, 1990: 43) as it motivates writers to improve their next draft. Feedback during the writing process improves not only student attitude to writing but writing performance if students ...

  11. Engaging medical students in the feedback process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, David A; Boehler, Margaret L; Schwind, Cathy J; Meier, Andreas H; Wall, Jarrod C H; Brenner, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    There are potential advantages to engaging medical students in the feedback process, but efforts to do so have yielded mixed results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a student-focused feedback instructional session in an experimental setting. Medical students were assigned randomly to either the intervention or control groups and then assigned randomly to receive either feedback or compliments. Tests of knowledge, skills, and attitudes were given before and after the intervention. There was a significant gain of knowledge and skill in the group that received instruction. Satisfaction was higher after compliments in the control group but higher after feedback in the instructional group. There was no change in the subject's willingness to seek feedback. A student-focused component should be carefully included as part of an overall effort to improve feedback in surgical education. The role of medical student attitudes about feedback requires further investigation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Student Interpretations of Diagnostic Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic assessment is increasingly being recognized as a potentially beneficial tool for teaching and learning (Jang, 2012). There have been calls in the research literature for students to receive diagnostic feedback and for researchers to investigate how such feedback is used by students. Therefore, this study examined how students…

  13. Feedback enhances the positive effects and reduces the negative effects of multiple-choice testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Andrew C; Roediger, Henry L

    2008-04-01

    Multiple-choice tests are used frequently in higher education without much consideration of the impact this form of assessment has on learning. Multiple-choice testing enhances retention of the material tested (the testing effect); however, unlike other tests, multiple-choice can also be detrimental because it exposes students to misinformation in the form of lures. The selection of lures can lead students to acquire false knowledge (Roediger & Marsh, 2005). The present research investigated whether feedback could be used to boost the positive effects and reduce the negative effects of multiple-choice testing. Subjects studied passages and then received a multiple-choice test with immediate feedback, delayed feedback, or no feedback. In comparison with the no-feedback condition, both immediate and delayed feedback increased the proportion of correct responses and reduced the proportion of intrusions (i.e., lure responses from the initial multiple-choice test) on a delayed cued recall test. Educators should provide feedback when using multiple-choice tests.

  14. Student conceptions of feedback: Impact on self-regulation, self-efficacy, and academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gavin T L; Peterson, Elizabeth R; Yao, Esther S

    2016-12-01

    Lecturers give feedback on assessed work in the hope that students will take it on board and use it to help regulate their learning for the next assessment. However, little is known about how students' conceptions of feedback relate to students' self-regulated learning and self-efficacy beliefs and academic performance. This study explores student beliefs about the role and purpose of feedback and the relationship of those beliefs to self-reported self-regulation and self-efficacy, and achievement. A total of 278 university students in a general education course on learning theory and approaches in a research-intensive university. Self-reported survey responses for students' conceptions of feedback (SCoF), self-regulation (SRL), academic self-efficacy (ASE), and Grade Point Average (GPA) were evaluated first with confirmatory factor analysis and then interlinked in a structural equation model. Three SCoF factors predicted SRL and/or GPA. The SCoF factor 'I use feedback' had positive associations with SRL (β = .44), GPA (β = .45), and ASE (β = .15). The SCoF factors 'tutor/marker comments' and 'peers help' both had negative relations to GPA (β = -.41 and -.16, respectively). 'Peers help' had a positive connection to SRL (β = .21). ASE itself made a small contribution to overall GPA (β = .16), while SRL had no statistically significant relation to GPA. The model indicates the centrality of believing that feedback exists to guide next steps in learning and thus contributes to SRL, ASE, and increased GPA. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Student Perceptions of Immediate Feedback Testing in Student Centered Chemistry Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jamie L.; Ruder, Suzanne M.; Bauer, Christopher F.

    2018-01-01

    Feedback is an important aspect of the learning process. The immediate feedback assessment technique (IF-AT®) form allows students to receive feedback on their answers during a testing event. Studies with introductory psychology students supported both perceived and real student learning gains when this form was used with testing. Knowing that…

  16. Motivation and emotion predict medical students' attention to computer-based feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naismith, Laura M; Lajoie, Susanne P

    2017-12-14

    Students cannot learn from feedback unless they pay attention to it. This study investigated relationships between the personal factors of achievement goal orientations, achievement emotions, and attention to feedback in BioWorld, a computer environment for learning clinical reasoning. Novice medical students (N = 28) completed questionnaires to measure their achievement goal orientations and then thought aloud while solving three endocrinology patient cases and reviewing corresponding expert solutions. Questionnaires administered after each case measured participants' experiences of five feedback emotions: pride, relief, joy, shame, and anger. Attention to individual text segments of the expert solutions was modelled using logistic regression and the method of generalized estimating equations. Participants did not attend to all of the feedback that was available to them. Performance-avoidance goals and shame positively predicted attention to feedback, and performance-approach goals and relief negatively predicted attention to feedback. Aspects of how the feedback was displayed also influenced participants' attention. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for educational theory as well as the design and use of computer learning environments in medical education.

  17. The Impact of Middle-School Students' Feedback Choices and Performance on Their Feedback Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutumisu, Maria; Schwartz, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel examination of the impact of students' feedback choices and performance on their feedback memory. An empirical study was designed to collect the choices to seek critical feedback from a hundred and six Grade 8 middle-school students via Posterlet, a digital assessment game in which students design posters. Upon…

  18. Systematic, digital student feedback for differentiated teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graf, Stefan Ting; Carlsen, Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    The article reports results from a qualitative study of Elevbaro, a prototype of a digital tool for student feedback developed in connection with the demonstration school project, inclusion, and differentiated teaching in digital learning environments. At the same time the study represents...... the first step of validating Elevbaro as a systematic feedback tool. There is general consensus that feedback is central to the quality of teaching, but the focus on and the exploration of systematic student feedback is an overlooked topic. Especially as regards differentiated teaching and complex teaching...... patterns, there is a need for supplementary and digital monitoring of a group of students and of individual students. The article examines how students and teachers understand and use Elevbaro, which is built on frequent ratings of five set statements in connection with teaching over a certain period...

  19. Feedback on students' clinical reasoning skills during fieldwork education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Marianne; Mårtensson, Lena

    2015-08-01

    Feedback on clinical reasoning skills during fieldwork education is regarded as vital in occupational therapy students' professional development. The nature of supervisors' feedback however, could be confirmative and/or corrective and corrective feedback could be with or without suggestions on how to improve. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of supervisors' feedback on final-year occupational therapy students' clinical reasoning skills through comparing the nature of feedback with the students' subsequent clinical reasoning ability. A mixed-method approach with a convergent parallel design was used combining the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data. From focus groups and interviews with students, data were collected and analysed qualitatively to determine how the students experienced the feedback they received from their supervisors. By quantitatively comparing the final practical exam grades with the nature of the feedback, their fieldwork End-of-Term grades and average academic performance it became possible to merge the results for comparison and interpretation. Students' clinical reasoning skills seem to be improved through corrective feedback if accompanied by suggestions on how to improve, irrespective of their average academic performance. Supervisors were inclined to underrate high performing students and overrate lower performing students. Students who obtained higher grades in the final practical examinations received more corrective feedback with suggestions on how to improve from their supervisors. Confirmative feedback alone may not be sufficient for improving the clinical reasoning skills of students. © 2015 The Authors. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Occupational Therapy Australia.

  20. A modular positive feedback-based gene amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalerao Kaustubh D

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Positive feedback is a common mechanism used in the regulation of many gene circuits as it can amplify the response to inducers and also generate binary outputs and hysteresis. In the context of electrical circuit design, positive feedback is often considered in the design of amplifiers. Similar approaches, therefore, may be used for the design of amplifiers in synthetic gene circuits with applications, for example, in cell-based sensors. Results We developed a modular positive feedback circuit that can function as a genetic signal amplifier, heightening the sensitivity to inducer signals as well as increasing maximum expression levels without the need for an external cofactor. The design utilizes a constitutively active, autoinducer-independent variant of the quorum-sensing regulator LuxR. We experimentally tested the ability of the positive feedback module to separately amplify the output of a one-component tetracycline sensor and a two-component aspartate sensor. In each case, the positive feedback module amplified the response to the respective inducers, both with regards to the dynamic range and sensitivity. Conclusions The advantage of our design is that the actual feedback mechanism depends only on a single gene and does not require any other modulation. Furthermore, this circuit can amplify any transcriptional signal, not just one encoded within the circuit or tuned by an external inducer. As our design is modular, it can potentially be used as a component in the design of more complex synthetic gene circuits.

  1. Impact of a novel teaching method based on feedback, activity, individuality and relevance on students' learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edafe, Ovie; Brooks, William S; Laskar, Simone N; Benjamin, Miles W; Chan, Philip

    2016-03-20

    This study examines the perceived impact of a novel clinical teaching method based on FAIR principles (feedback, activity, individuality and relevance) on students' learning on clinical placement. This was a qualitative research study. Participants were third year and final year medical students attached to one UK vascular firm over a four-year period (N=108). Students were asked to write a reflective essay on how FAIRness approach differs from previous clinical placement, and its advantages and disadvantages. Essays were thematically analysed and globally rated (positive, negative or neutral) by two independent researchers. Over 90% of essays reported positive experiences of feedback, activity, individuality and relevance model. The model provided multifaceted feedback; active participation; longitudinal improvement; relevance to stage of learning and future goals; structured teaching; professional development; safe learning environment; consultant involvement in teaching. Students perceived preparation for tutorials to be time intensive for tutors/students; a lack of teaching on medical sciences and direct observation of performance; more than once weekly sessions would be beneficial; some issues with peer and public feedback, relevance to upcoming exam and large group sizes. Students described negative experiences of "standard" clinical teaching. Progressive teaching programmes based on the FAIRness principles, feedback, activity, individuality and relevance, could be used as a model to improve current undergraduate clinical teaching.

  2. Self-evaluation and peer-feedback of medical students' communication skills using a web-based video annotation system. Exploring content and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsman, Robert L; van der Vloodt, Jane

    2015-03-01

    Self-evaluation and peer-feedback are important strategies within the reflective practice paradigm for the development and maintenance of professional competencies like medical communication. Characteristics of the self-evaluation and peer-feedback annotations of medical students' video recorded communication skills were analyzed. Twenty-five year 4 medical students recorded history-taking consultations with a simulated patient, uploaded the video to a web-based platform, marked and annotated positive and negative events. Peers reviewed the video and self-evaluations and provided feedback. Analyzed were the number of marked positive and negative annotations and the amount of text entered. Topics and specificity of the annotations were coded and analyzed qualitatively. Students annotated on average more negative than positive events. Additional peer-feedback was more often positive. Topics most often related to structuring the consultation. Students were most critical about their biomedical topics. Negative annotations were more specific than positive annotations. Self-evaluations were more specific than peer-feedback and both show a significant correlation. Four response patterns were detected that negatively bias specificity assessment ratings. Teaching students to be more specific in their self-evaluations may be effective for receiving more specific peer-feedback. Videofragmentrating is a convenient tool to implement reflective practice activities like self-evaluation and peer-feedback to the classroom in the teaching of clinical skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. How does feedback in mini-CEX affect students' learning response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarso, Sulistiawati; Rahayu, Gandes Retno; Suhoyo, Yoyo

    2016-12-19

    This study was aimed to explore students' learning response toward feedback during mini-CEX encounter. This study used a phenomenological approach to identify the students' experiences toward feedback during mini-CEX encounter. Data was collected using Focus Group Discussion (FGD) for all students who were in their final week of clerkship in the internal medicine rotation. There were 4 FGD groups (6 students for each group). All FGD were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The FGD transcripts were analyzed thematically and managed using Atlas-ti (version 7.0). Feedback content and the way of providing feedback on mini-CEX stimulated students' internal process, including self-reflection, emotional response, and motivation. These internal processes encouraged the students to take action or do a follow-up on the feedback to improve their learning process. In addition, there was also an external factor, namely consequences, which also influenced the students' reaction to the follow-up on feedback. In the end, this action caused several learning effects that resulted in the students' increased self-efficacy, attitude, knowledge and clinical skill. Feedback content and the way of providing feedback on mini-CEX stimulates the students' internal processes to do a follow-up on feedback. However, another external factor also affects the students' decision on the follow-up actions. The follow-ups result in various learning effects on the students. Feedback given along with summative assessment enhances learning effects on students, as well. It is suggested that supervisors of clinical education are prepared to comprehend every factor influencing feedback on mini CEX to improve the students' learning response.

  4. Feedback Providing Improvement Strategies and Reflection on Feedback Use: Effects on Students' Writing Motivation, Process, and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijnhouwer, Hendrien; Prins, Frans J.; Stokking, Karel M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of feedback providing improvement strategies and a reflection assignment on students' writing motivation, process, and performance. Students in the experimental feedback condition (n = 41) received feedback including improvement strategies, whereas students in the control feedback condition (n = 41) received…

  5. Students' Informal Peer Feedback Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headington, Rita

    2018-01-01

    The nature and significance of students' informal peer feedback networks is an under-explored area. This paper offers the findings of a longitudinal investigation of the informal peer feedback networks of a cohort of student teachers [n = 105] across the three years of a UK primary education degree programme. It tracked the dynamic nature of these…

  6. Assessing Whether Students Seek Constructive Criticism: The Design of an Automated Feedback System for a Graphic Design Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutumisu, Maria; Blair, Kristen P.; Chin, Doris B.; Schwartz, Daniel L.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a choice-based assessment strategy that measures students' choices to seek constructive feedback and to revise their work. We present the feedback system of a game we designed to assess whether students choose positive or negative feedback and choose to revise their posters in the context of a poster design task, where they learn…

  7. The motivating role of positive feedback in sport and physical education: evidence for a motivational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouratidis, Athanasios; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Lens, Willy; Sideridis, Georgios

    2008-04-01

    Based on self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000), an experimental study with middle school students participating in a physical education task and a correlational study with highly talented sport students investigated the motivating role of positive competence feedback on participants' well-being, performance, and intention to participate. In Study 1, structural equation modeling favored the hypothesized motivational model, in which, after controlling for pretask perceived competence and competence valuation, feedback positively predicted competence satisfaction, which in turn predicted higher levels of vitality and greater intentions to participate, through the mediation of autonomous motivation. No effects on performance were found. Study 2 further showed that autonomous motivation mediated the relation between competence satisfaction and well-being, whereas a motivation mediated the negative relation between competence satisfaction and ill-being and rated performance. The discussion focuses on the motivational role of competence feedback in sports and physical education settings.

  8. A Role for Technology in Enhancing Students' Engagement with Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Helen J.; Hepplestone, Stuart; Holden, Graham; Irwin, Brian; Thorpe, Louise

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of technology-enabled feedback to improve student learning. "Technology, Feedback, Action!: The impact of learning technology upon students' engagement with their feedback" aimed to evaluate how a range of technical interventions might encourage students to engage with feedback and formulate actions to…

  9. Feedback: an essential element of student learning in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynes, Mary P; Raftery, Sara E C

    2008-11-01

    Clinical practice is an essential component of the nursing curriculum. In order for the student to benefit fully from the experience regular performance feedback is required. Feedback should provide the student with information on current practice and offer practical advice for improved performance. The importance of feedback is widely acknowledged however it appears that there is inconsistency in its provision to students. The benefits of feedback include increased student confidence, motivation and self-esteem as well as improved clinical practice. Benefits such as enhanced interpersonal skills and a sense of personal satisfaction also accrue to the supervisor. Barriers to the feedback process are identified as inadequate supervisor training and education, unfavourable ward learning environment and insufficient time spent with students. In addition to the appropriate preparation of the supervisor effective feedback includes an appreciation of the steps of the feedback process, an understanding of the student response to feedback and effective communication skills.

  10. Master's Thesis Projects: Student Perceptions of Supervisor Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleijn, Renske A. M.; Mainhard, M. Tim; Meijer, Paulien C.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Pilot, Albert

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of research has investigated student perceptions of written feedback in higher education coursework, but few studies have considered feedback perceptions in one-on-one and face-to-face contexts such as master's thesis projects. In this article, student perceptions of feedback are explored in the context of the supervision of…

  11. Responding Effectively to Composition Students: Comparing Student Perceptions of Written and Audio Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbro, J.; Iluzada, C.; Clark, D. E.

    2013-01-01

    The authors compared student perceptions of audio and written feedback in order to assess what types of students may benefit from receiving audio feedback on their essays rather than written feedback. Many instructors previously have reported the advantages they see in audio feedback, but little quantitative research has been done on how the…

  12. Fostering Dental Students' Academic Achievements and Reflection Skills Through Clinical Peer Assessment and Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricio, Jorge A; Woolford, Mark J; Escudier, Michael P

    2016-08-01

    Peer assessment is increasingly being encouraged to enhance dental students' learning. The aim of this study was to evaluate the educational impact in terms of academic achievements and reflective thinking of a formative prospective peer assessment and feedback protocol. Volunteer final-year dental students at King's College London Dental Institute, UK, received training on peer assessment, peer feedback, and self-reflection. At the beginning (baseline) and end (resultant) of the 2012-13 academic year, 86 students (55% of the year group) completed a reflection questionnaire (RQ). Sixty-eight of those students used a modified Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS) as a framework for peer assessment and peer feedback during a complete academic year. End-of-year, high-stakes examination grades and RQ scores from the participants and nonparticipants were statistically compared. The participants completed 576 peer DOPS. Those 22 students who peer assessed each other ≥10 times exhibited highly statistically significant differences and powerful positive effect sizes in their high-stakes exam grades (p=0.0001, d=0.74) and critical reflection skills (p=0.005, d=1.41) when compared to those who did not assess one another. Furthermore, only the same 22 students showed a statistically significant increase and positive effect size in their critical reflection skills from baseline to resultant (p=0.003, d=1.04). The results of this study suggest that the protocol used has the potential to impact dental students' academic and reflection skills, provided it is practiced in ten or more peer encounters and ensuring peer feedback is provided followed by self-reflection.

  13. Exploring Elementary Student Perceptions of Writing Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, Sarah; Zumbrunn, Sharon; McBride, Caitlin; Stringer, J. K.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive qualitative investigation was to explore elementary students' (N = 867) perceptions of the feedback they receive on their writing. After responding to the closed-ended question, "Do you like to receive feedback about your writing?" students were branched to the appropriate follow-up open-ended question,…

  14. Relational interaction in occupational therapy: Conversation analysis of positive feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiste, Elina

    2018-01-01

    The therapeutic relationship is an important factor for good therapy outcomes. The primary mediator of a beneficial therapy relationship is clinician-client interaction. However, few studies identify the observable interactional attributes of good quality relational interactions, e.g. offering the client positive feedback. The present paper aims to expand current understanding of relational interaction by analyzing the real-time interactional practices therapists use for offering positive feedback, an important value in occupational therapy. The analysis is based on the conversation analysis of 15 video-recorded occupational therapy encounters in psychiatric outpatient clinics. Two types of positive feedback were identified. In aligning feedback, therapists encouraged and complimented clients' positive perspectives on their own achievements in adopting certain behaviour, encouraging and supporting their progress. In redirecting feedback, therapists shifted the perspective from clients' negative experiences to their positive experiences. This shift was interactionally successful if they laid the foundation for the shift in perspective and attuned their expressions to the clients' emotional states. Occupational therapists routinely provide their clients with positive feedback. Awareness of the interactional attributes related to positive feedback is critically important for successful relational interaction.

  15. Negative and Positive Outflow-Feedback in Nearby (U)LIRGs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazzoli, Sara, E-mail: sara@iaa.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), Granada (Spain)

    2017-12-15

    The starburst-AGN coexistence in local (U)LIRGs makes these galaxies excellent laboratories for the study of stellar and AGN outflows and feedback. Outflows regulate star formation and AGN activity, redistributing gas, dust and metals over large scales in the interstellar and intergalactic media (negative feedback) being also considered to be able to undergo vigorous star formation (positive feedback). In this contribution, I will summarize the results from a search for outflows in a sample of nearby 38 local (U)LIRG systems observed with VIMOS/VLT integral field unit. For two galaxies of the sample I will detail the outflow properties and discuss the observational evidence for negative and positive outflow-feedback. The assessment of both negative and positive feedback effects represent a novel approach toward a comprehensive understanding of the impact of outflow feedback in the galaxy evolution.

  16. Influence of feedback characteristics on perceived learning value of feedback in clerkships : does culture matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suhoyo, Yoyo; Van Hell, Elisabeth A.; Kerdijk, Wouter; Emilia, Ova; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2017-01-01

    Background: Various feedback characteristics have been suggested to positively influence student learning. It is not clear how these feedback characteristics contribute to students' perceived learning value of feedback in cultures classified low on the cultural dimension of individualism and high on

  17. Influence of feedback characteristics on perceived learning value of feedback in clerkships : does culture matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suhoyo, Yoyo; Van Hell, Elisabeth A; Kerdijk, Wouter; Emilia, Ova; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Kuks, Jan B M; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Various feedback characteristics have been suggested to positively influence student learning. It is not clear how these feedback characteristics contribute to students' perceived learning value of feedback in cultures classified low on the cultural dimension of individualism and high on

  18. Using Audience Response Technology to provide formative feedback on pharmacology performance for non-medical prescribing students--a preliminary evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostyn, Alison; Meade, Oonagh; Lymn, Joanne S

    2012-11-13

    The use of anonymous audience response technology (ART) to actively engage students in classroom learning has been evaluated positively across multiple settings. To date, however, there has been no empirical evaluation of the use of individualised ART handsets and formative feedback of ART scores. The present study investigates student perceptions of such a system and the relationship between formative feedback results and exam performance. Four successive cohorts of Non-Medical Prescribing students (n=107) had access to the individualised ART system and three of these groups (n=72) completed a questionnaire about their perceptions of using ART. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with a purposive sample of seven students who achieved a range of scores on the formative feedback. Using data from all four cohorts of students, the relationship between mean ART scores and summative pharmacology exam score was examined using a non-parametric correlation. Questionnaire and interview data suggested that the use of ART enhanced the classroom environment, motivated students and promoted learning. Questionnaire data demonstrated that students found the formative feedback helpful for identifying their learning needs (95.6%), guiding their independent study (86.8%), and as a revision tool (88.3%). Interviewees particularly valued the objectivity of the individualised feedback which helped them to self-manage their learning. Interviewees' initial anxiety about revealing their level of pharmacology knowledge to the lecturer and to themselves reduced over time as students focused on the learning benefits associated with the feedback.A significant positive correlation was found between students' formative feedback scores and their summative pharmacology exam scores (Spearman's rho = 0.71, N=107, p<.01). Despite initial anxiety about the use of individualised ART units, students rated the helpfulness of the individualised handsets and personalised formative feedback highly

  19. Providing Effective Feedback to EFL Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Holi Ibrahim Holi; Al-Adawi, Hamed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Feedback on school practicum is of utmost importance for student teachers to help them to develop their pedagogical and teaching skills. This paper attempts to collect data from both student teachers and their mentors in an ELT teacher training programme in Oman to answer the questions which are raised by this study: 1) What kind of feedback do…

  20. Writing Helpful Feedback: The Influence of Feedback Type on Students' Perceptions and Writing Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Taylor

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Written feedback on students’ assignments is a common method that instructors and teaching assistants use to inform students about their performance or guide revisions. Despite its frequency of use, written feedback often lacks sufficient detail to be beneficial to students, and additional empirical research should examine its effectiveness as a teaching tool. The current study examined the effectiveness of two different types of feedback, developed and undeveloped, in terms of its influence on students’ subsequent writing performance and students’ perceptions of the feedback. Results demonstrated that the type of feedback significantly affected students’ perceptions, with developed feedback related to higher ratings of fairness and helpfulness; however, this feedback did not have a significant positive effect on students’ written performance.Les commentaires écrits sur les travaux sont une méthode courante utilisée par les enseignants et les aides-enseignants pour renseigner les étudiants sur leurs performances ou pour orienter les révisions. Malgré leur fréquence, il arrive souvent que les commentaires écrits ne soient pas assez détaillés pour être profitables aux étudiants. De plus amples recherches empiriques devraient se pencher sur l’efficacité de cet outil d'enseignement. La présente étude porte sur l'efficacité de différents types de commentaires élaborés et sous-élaborés; sur leur influence sur la performance écrite subséquente des étudiants et sur la perception de ces derniers à propos des commentaires. Les résultats démontrent que le type de commentaires influe significativement sur la perception des étudiants, les commentaires élaborés entraînant des évaluations supérieures en ce qui a trait à l’impartialité et à l'utilité; cependant, ces commentaires n'ont pas d'effets positifs importants sur la performance écrite des étudiants.

  1. A qualitative study on feedback provided by students in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y; Stanley, David John; Meadus, Robert J; Chien, Wai Tong

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to help nurse educators/academics understand the perspectives and expectations of students providing their feedback to educators about teaching performance and subject quality. The aim of this study is to reveal students' voices regarding their feedback in nurse education in order to shed light on how the current student feedback practice may be modified. A qualitative study using focus group inquiry. Convenience sampling was adopted and participants recruited from one school of nursing in Hong Kong. A total of 66 nursing students from two pre-registration programs were recruited for seven focus group interviews: one group of Year 1 students (n=21), two groups of Year 3 students (n=27), and four groups of Final Year students (n=18). The interviews were guided by a semi-structured interview guideline and the interview narratives were processed through content analysis. The trustworthiness of this study was guaranteed through peer checking, research meetings, and an audit trail. The participants' privacy was protected throughout the study. Four core themes were discerned based on the narratives of the focus group interviews: (1) "timing of collecting feedback at more than one time point"; (2) "modify the questions being asked in collecting student feedback"; (3) "are electronic means of collecting feedback good enough?; and (4) "what will be next for student feedback?". This study is significant in the following three domains: 1) it contributed to student feedback because it examined the issue from a student's perspective; 2) it explored the timing and channels for collecting feedback from the students' point of view; and 3) it showed the preferred uses of student feedback. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Using Audience Response Technology to provide formative feedback on pharmacology performance for non-medical prescribing students - a preliminary evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostyn Alison

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of anonymous audience response technology (ART to actively engage students in classroom learning has been evaluated positively across multiple settings. To date, however, there has been no empirical evaluation of the use of individualised ART handsets and formative feedback of ART scores. The present study investigates student perceptions of such a system and the relationship between formative feedback results and exam performance. Methods Four successive cohorts of Non-Medical Prescribing students (n=107 had access to the individualised ART system and three of these groups (n=72 completed a questionnaire about their perceptions of using ART. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with a purposive sample of seven students who achieved a range of scores on the formative feedback. Using data from all four cohorts of students, the relationship between mean ART scores and summative pharmacology exam score was examined using a non-parametric correlation. Results Questionnaire and interview data suggested that the use of ART enhanced the classroom environment, motivated students and promoted learning. Questionnaire data demonstrated that students found the formative feedback helpful for identifying their learning needs (95.6%, guiding their independent study (86.8%, and as a revision tool (88.3%. Interviewees particularly valued the objectivity of the individualised feedback which helped them to self-manage their learning. Interviewees’ initial anxiety about revealing their level of pharmacology knowledge to the lecturer and to themselves reduced over time as students focused on the learning benefits associated with the feedback. A significant positive correlation was found between students’ formative feedback scores and their summative pharmacology exam scores (Spearman’s rho = 0.71, N=107, p Conclusions Despite initial anxiety about the use of individualised ART units, students rated the helpfulness of the

  3. Feedback providing improvement strategies and reflection on feedback use: Effects on students' writing motivation, process, and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnhouwer, H.; Prins, F.J.; Stokking, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of feedback providing improvement strategies and a reflection assignment on students’ writing motivation, process, and performance. Students in the experimental feedback condition (n = 41) received feedback including improvement strategies, whereas students in the

  4. Developing students' teaching through peer observation and feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Eliot L; Davies, Benjamin; Eastwood, Michael

    2015-10-01

    With the increasing popularity and scale of peer teaching, it is imperative to develop methods that ensure the quality of teaching provided by undergraduate students. We used an established faculty development and quality assurance process in a novel context: peer observation of teaching for undergraduate peer tutors. We have developed a form to record observations and aid the facilitation of feedback. In addition, experienced peer tutors have been trained to observe peer-taught sessions and provide tutors with verbal and written feedback. We have found peer observation of teaching to be a feasible and acceptable process for improving quality of teaching provided by undergraduate medical students. However, feedback regarding the quality of peer observer's feedback may help to develop students' abilities further.

  5. Student Engagement with Computer-Generated Feedback: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    In order to benefit from feedback on their writing, students need to engage effectively with it. This article reports a case study on student engagement with computer-generated feedback, known as automated writing evaluation (AWE) feedback, in an EFL context. Differing from previous studies that explored commercially available AWE programs, this…

  6. Feedback in online course for non-native English-speaking students

    CERN Document Server

    Olesova, Larisa

    2013-01-01

    Feedback in Online Course for Non-Native English-Speaking Students is an investigation of the effectiveness of audio and text feedback provided in English in an online course for non-native English-speaking students. The study presents results showing how audio and text feedback can impact on non-native English-speaking students' higher-order learning as they participate in an asynchronous online course. It also discusses the results of how students perceive both types of the feedback provided. In addition, the study examines how the impact and perceptions differ when the instructor giving the

  7. Exploring Occupational Therapy Students' Meaning of Feedback during Fieldwork Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathgeber, Karen Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have revealed that students' confidence and performance improve after they receive feedback from clinical supervisors regarding the delivery of quality patient care. Multiple studies of feedback have focused on the provision and acceptance of feedback; however, it was not known if or how students internalized feedback to promote…

  8. Motivational beliefs, student effort, and feedback behaviour in computer-based formative assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, C.F.; Braber-van den Broek, J.; van den Berg, Stéphanie Martine

    2013-01-01

    Feedback can only be effective when students seek feedback and process it. This study examines the relations between students' motivational beliefs, effort invested in a computer-based formative assessment, and feedback behaviour. Feedback behaviour is represented by whether a student seeks feedback

  9. Using Audience Response Technology to provide formative feedback on pharmacology performance for non-medical prescribing students - a preliminary evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of anonymous audience response technology (ART) to actively engage students in classroom learning has been evaluated positively across multiple settings. To date, however, there has been no empirical evaluation of the use of individualised ART handsets and formative feedback of ART scores. The present study investigates student perceptions of such a system and the relationship between formative feedback results and exam performance. Methods Four successive cohorts of Non-Medical Prescribing students (n=107) had access to the individualised ART system and three of these groups (n=72) completed a questionnaire about their perceptions of using ART. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with a purposive sample of seven students who achieved a range of scores on the formative feedback. Using data from all four cohorts of students, the relationship between mean ART scores and summative pharmacology exam score was examined using a non-parametric correlation. Results Questionnaire and interview data suggested that the use of ART enhanced the classroom environment, motivated students and promoted learning. Questionnaire data demonstrated that students found the formative feedback helpful for identifying their learning needs (95.6%), guiding their independent study (86.8%), and as a revision tool (88.3%). Interviewees particularly valued the objectivity of the individualised feedback which helped them to self-manage their learning. Interviewees’ initial anxiety about revealing their level of pharmacology knowledge to the lecturer and to themselves reduced over time as students focused on the learning benefits associated with the feedback. A significant positive correlation was found between students’ formative feedback scores and their summative pharmacology exam scores (Spearman’s rho = 0.71, N=107, pstudents rated the helpfulness of the individualised handsets and personalised formative feedback highly. The significant correlation between ART

  10. Medical student perspective: working toward specific and actionable clinical clerkship feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Haley A; Derman, Peter B; Clement, R Carter

    2012-01-01

    Feedback on the wards is an important component of medical student education. Medical schools have incorporated formalized feedback mechanisms such as clinical encounter cards and standardized patient encounters into clinical curricula. However, the system could be further improved as medical students frequently feel uncomfortable requesting feedback, and are often dissatisfied with the quality of the feedback they receive. This article explores the shortcomings of the existing medical student feedback system and examines the relevant literature in an effort to shed light on areas in which the system can be enhanced. The discussion focuses on resident-provided feedback but is broadly applicable to delivering feedback in general. A review of the organizational psychology and business administration literature on fostering effective feedback was performed. These insights were then applied to the setting of medical education. Providing effective feedback requires training and forethought. Feedback itself should be specific and actionable. Utilizing these strategies will help medical students and educators get the most out of existing feedback systems.

  11. Brain activity elicited by positive and negative feedback in preschool-aged children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqin Mai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the processing of positive vs. negative feedback in children aged 4-5 years, we devised a prize-guessing game that is analogous to gambling tasks used to measure feedback-related brain responses in adult studies. Unlike adult studies, the feedback-related negativity (FRN elicited by positive feedback was as large as that elicited by negative feedback, suggesting that the neural system underlying the FRN may not process feedback valence in early childhood. In addition, positive feedback, compared with negative feedback, evoked a larger P1 over the occipital scalp area and a larger positive slow wave (PSW over the right central-parietal scalp area. We believe that the PSW is related to emotional arousal and the intensive focus on positive feedback that is present in the preschool and early school years has adaptive significance for both cognitive and emotional development during this period.

  12. Students' motivation toward feedback-seeking in the clinical workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Lubberta H; Favier, Robert P; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; Bok, Harold G J

    2017-09-01

    In medical education, students are increasingly regarded as active seekers of feedback rather than passive recipients. Previous research showed that in the intentions of students to seek feedback, a learning and performance goal can be distinguished. In this study, we investigated the intentions (defined as level and orientation of motivation) of different performing students (low, average, and high performing students) to seek feedback in the clinical workplace using Self-Determination Theory. We conducted a quantitative study with students in their clinical clerkships and grouped them based on their performance. The level of motivation was measured by the number of Mini-CEXs each student collected. The orientation of motivation was measured by conducting the Academic Self-Regulation Questionnaire. We found that high performing students were more motivated and demonstrated higher self-determination compared to low performing students.

  13. EFFECT OF FEEDBACK IN FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT IN THE STUDENT LEARNING ACTIVITIES ON CHEMICAL COURSE TO THE FORMATION OF HABITS OF MIND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahadi -

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to find the impact of feedback in formative assessment in the learning process activity and students learning outcomes on learning chemistry. The method used on this study was quasi experiment research with non-equivalent control group design. The result showed that the application of feedback in formative assessment has a positive impact toward students learning process activity. Students become more enthusiastic, motivated, and more active on the learning process. Thus in this study can be conclude that feedback in formative assessment have a positive impact toward the learning process activity to form a habits of mind.

  14. Enhancing Students' Learning: Instant Feedback Cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohrweis, Lawrence C.; Shinham, Kathe M.

    2015-01-01

    This study illustrates an active learning approach using instant feedback cards in the first course in accounting. The objectives of this study are to (1) describe instant feedback cards and (2) show how this tool, when used in an active learning environment, can enhance learning. We examined whether students exposed to immediate feedback…

  15. Feedforward: helping students interpret written feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Hurford, Donna; Read, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    "Assessment for Learning is the process of seeking and interpreting evidence for use by learners... "(Assessment Reform Group, 2002, p.2): for the Higher Education tutor, written feedback forms an integral part of this. This short article reports on teaching methods to engage students in feedback and assessment of their written work.

  16. X-ray beam-position feedback system with easy-to-use beam-position monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Yeon; Kim, Yesul; Lee, Sangsul; Lim, Jun

    2018-05-01

    X-ray beam-position stability is indispensable in cutting-edge experiments using synchrotron radiation. Here, for the first time, a beam-position feedback system is presented that utilizes an easy-to-use X-ray beam-position monitor incorporating a diamond-fluorescence screen. The acceptable range of the monitor is above 500 µm and the feedback system maintains the beam position within 3 µm. In addition to being inexpensive, the system has two key advantages: it works without a scale factor for position calibration, and it has no dependence on X-ray energy, X-ray intensity, beam size or beam shape.

  17. Performance Feedback Processing Is Positively Biased As Predicted by Attribution Theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph W Korn

    Full Text Available A considerable literature on attribution theory has shown that healthy individuals exhibit a positivity bias when inferring the causes of evaluative feedback on their performance. They tend to attribute positive feedback internally (e.g., to their own abilities but negative feedback externally (e.g., to environmental factors. However, all empirical demonstrations of this bias suffer from at least one of the three following drawbacks: First, participants directly judge explicit causes for their performance. Second, participants have to imagine events instead of experiencing them. Third, participants assess their performance only after receiving feedback and thus differences in baseline assessments cannot be excluded. It is therefore unclear whether the classically reported positivity bias generalizes to setups without these drawbacks. Here, we aimed at establishing the relevance of attributions for decision-making by showing an attribution-related positivity bias in a decision-making task. We developed a novel task, which allowed us to test how participants changed their evaluations in response to positive and negative feedback about performance. Specifically, we used videos of actors expressing different facial emotional expressions. Participants were first asked to evaluate the actors' credibility in expressing a particular emotion. After this initial rating, participants performed an emotion recognition task and did--or did not--receive feedback on their veridical performance. Finally, participants re-rated the actors' credibility, which provided a measure of how they changed their evaluations after feedback. Attribution theory predicts that participants change their evaluations of the actors' credibility toward the positive after receiving positive performance feedback and toward the negative after negative performance feedback. Our results were in line with this prediction. A control condition without feedback showed that correct or

  18. Performance Feedback Processing Is Positively Biased As Predicted by Attribution Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Christoph W; Rosenblau, Gabriela; Rodriguez Buritica, Julia M; Heekeren, Hauke R

    2016-01-01

    A considerable literature on attribution theory has shown that healthy individuals exhibit a positivity bias when inferring the causes of evaluative feedback on their performance. They tend to attribute positive feedback internally (e.g., to their own abilities) but negative feedback externally (e.g., to environmental factors). However, all empirical demonstrations of this bias suffer from at least one of the three following drawbacks: First, participants directly judge explicit causes for their performance. Second, participants have to imagine events instead of experiencing them. Third, participants assess their performance only after receiving feedback and thus differences in baseline assessments cannot be excluded. It is therefore unclear whether the classically reported positivity bias generalizes to setups without these drawbacks. Here, we aimed at establishing the relevance of attributions for decision-making by showing an attribution-related positivity bias in a decision-making task. We developed a novel task, which allowed us to test how participants changed their evaluations in response to positive and negative feedback about performance. Specifically, we used videos of actors expressing different facial emotional expressions. Participants were first asked to evaluate the actors' credibility in expressing a particular emotion. After this initial rating, participants performed an emotion recognition task and did--or did not--receive feedback on their veridical performance. Finally, participants re-rated the actors' credibility, which provided a measure of how they changed their evaluations after feedback. Attribution theory predicts that participants change their evaluations of the actors' credibility toward the positive after receiving positive performance feedback and toward the negative after negative performance feedback. Our results were in line with this prediction. A control condition without feedback showed that correct or incorrect performance

  19. Medical Student Perceptions of Learner-Initiated Feedback Using a Mobile Web Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy C Robertson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Feedback, especially timely, specific, and actionable feedback, frequently does not occur. Efforts to better understand methods to improve the effectiveness of feedback are an important area of educational research. This study represents preliminary work as part of a plan to investigate the perceptions of a student-driven system to request feedback from faculty using a mobile device and Web-based application. We hypothesize that medical students will perceive learner-initiated, timely feedback to be an essential component of clinical education. Furthermore, we predict that students will recognize the use of a mobile device and Web application to be an advantageous and effective method when requesting feedback from supervising physicians. Focus group data from 18 students enrolled in a 4-week anesthesia clerkship revealed the following themes: (1 students often have to solicit feedback, (2 timely feedback is perceived as being advantageous, (3 feedback from faculty is perceived to be more effective, (4 requesting feedback from faculty physicians poses challenges, (5 the decision to request feedback may be influenced by the student’s clinical performance, and (6 using a mobile device and Web application may not guarantee timely feedback. Students perceived using a mobile Web-based application to initiate feedback from supervising physicians to be a valuable method of assessment. However, challenges and barriers were identified.

  20. Using Peer Feedback to Improve Students' Scientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Tammy Q.; Herrenkohl, Leslie Rupert

    2016-02-01

    This article examines a 7th grade teacher's pedagogical practices to support her students to provide peer feedback to one another using technology during scientific inquiry. This research is part of a larger study in which teachers in California and Washington and their classes engaged in inquiry projects using a Web-based system called Web of Inquiry. Videotapes of classroom lessons and artifacts such as student work were collected as part of the corpus of data. In the case examined, Ms. E supports her students to collectively define "meaningful feedback," thereby improving the quality of feedback that was provided in the future. This is especially timely, given the attention in Next Generation Science Standards to cross-cutting concepts and practices that require students discuss and debate ideas with each other in order to improve their understanding and their written inquiry reports (NGSS, 2013).

  1. A multiple relevance feedback strategy with positive and negative models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Ma

    Full Text Available A commonly used strategy to improve search accuracy is through feedback techniques. Most existing work on feedback relies on positive information, and has been extensively studied in information retrieval. However, when a query topic is difficult and the results from the first-pass retrieval are very poor, it is impossible to extract enough useful terms from a few positive documents. Therefore, the positive feedback strategy is incapable to improve retrieval in this situation. Contrarily, there is a relatively large number of negative documents in the top of the result list, and it has been confirmed that negative feedback strategy is an important and useful way for adapting this scenario by several recent studies. In this paper, we consider a scenario when the search results are so poor that there are at most three relevant documents in the top twenty documents. Then, we conduct a novel study of multiple strategies for relevance feedback using both positive and negative examples from the first-pass retrieval to improve retrieval accuracy for such difficult queries. Experimental results on these TREC collections show that the proposed language model based multiple model feedback method which is generally more effective than both the baseline method and the methods using only positive or negative model.

  2. On-line student feedback: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Barnett

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Student feedback on courses has been a standard feature of university life for several years, with a substantial research backing to it (see, for example, reviews by Marsh, 1987; Marsh and Dunkin, 1992. Most feedback systems endeavour to serve more than one purpose, with student feedback forming part of the evidence used by: • individual teachers to improve teaching • heads of departments to monitor and guide individual teachers, especially part-time teachers; • course leaders for course development; • senior managers to make decisions on probation and promotion related to teaching performance; consider changes to the wider learning environment; help with the marketing of programmes; • external agencies to assess quality of provision

  3. Feedback of Interface Agents on Student Perception: Level, Dialogue, and Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Hong; Chou, Chih-Yueh; Tseng, Shu-Fen; Su, Ying-Chu

    2018-01-01

    Although feedback from interface agents has recently attracted increasing research attention, most studies emphasize the cognitive influences. Thus, the effect of each feedback type on student perception remains unclear. This study focuses on three types of feedback from interface agents to clarify student perception of single feedback and…

  4. Students' motivation toward feedback-seeking in the clinical workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, L.H. de; Favier, R.P.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Bok, H.G.

    2017-01-01

    In medical education, students are increasingly regarded as active seekers of feedback rather than passive recipients. Previous research showed that in the intentions of students to seek feedback, a learning and performance goal can be distinguished. In this study, we investigated the intentions

  5. Novel matched amplifiers with low noise positive feedback. Part II: Resistive-capacitive feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Y.; Zakharenko, V.

    2010-02-01

    This article is a continuation of consideration for an amplifier with resistive positive feedback (RPF) (Bruck (2008), 'Novel Matched LNA with Low Noise Positive Feedback. Part 1: General Features and Resistive Feedback', International Journal of Electronics, 95, 441-456). We propose here new configuration schematics of a transformer-less selective LNA with resistive-capacitive positive feedback (RCPF). A circuit of an amplifier with a transistor connected into a circuit with a common base (CB) configuration is analysed in detail. RCPF and RPF circuits are compared. It is shown that the LNA RCPF provides any pass-band, a good level of input and output matching, a minimum noise temperature which is significantly lower than that of the LNA RPF, a rather high linearity, and stability of amplification. The simulation results and some experimental data for the amplifiers intended for use in the LOFAR radiotelescope (Konovalenko et al. (2003), 'Thirty Element Array Antenna as a Prototype of a Huge Low-Frequency Radio Telescope,' Experimental Astronomy, 16, 149-164; Konovalenko (2007), 'Ukrainian Contribution to LOFAR', A scientific workshop, organised by LOFAR/ASTRON' Emmen, Netherlands, 23-27. http://www.lofar.org/workshop) are given. It is assumed that such devices are of a special interest for high-frequency integral circuits (IC).

  6. Student Satisfaction on Getting Feedback in Clinical Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ahmady

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among the factors that are involved in medical education, undoubtedly feedback is a special place. Feedback is a link between assessment and learning. Student satisfaction has an important indicator in the quality of learning and teaching. Learning is also associated with the satisfaction of students from the courses. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of feedback in clinical education. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was performed on all of the seventh term nursing students in the faculty of Nursing and Midwifery in Arak and shazand cities. In the first semester in 93-94, they were trained post-CCU ward. The participants were selected through the census procedure. The students in both groups (intervention and control were selected randomly in subgroups of 7 and 8 participants. In each group, the students were trained for 4 weeks in the morning shift. To determine the effects of these two methods, after completion of each of the training courses, all of the students completed the questionnaires and the results were compared. Results: The results showed that the intervention and the control groups were similar in terms of demographic characteristics (gender, indigenous and student work experience and there was no statistically significant difference. Therefore, the mean of overall student satisfaction scores in the intervention group was higher than the control group. In all of the levels, the intervention group had more satisfaction compared to the control one. Statistical test showed a significant difference between the two groups (P <0/003. Conclusion: Generally, it can be said that the immediate and planned feedbacks during the training were offered to students and it could lead the way clinical training in the correct direction. So, the student satisfaction was increased with this process.

  7. Usefulness of feedback in e-learning from the students' perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Jesús Martínez-Argüelles

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Functionality of feedback in pedagogical processes has been broadly analyzed in face-to-face learning, although to a lesser extent than in the on-line learning. Narciss (2004, 2008 distinguishes two dimensions within the feedback, the semantic dimension and the structural dimension. This article aims to analyze, from the student’s perspective, the semantic dimension of feedback in a virtual learning environment (VLE. Firstly, we analyze the importance that VLE students give to feedback and its degree of personalization. Later, the usefulness that students deem feedback should have, paying special attention to each of its semantic subdimensions (Narciss, 2004. Design/methodology/approach: A survey was conducted among students of Business Administration degree of the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC. 182 students took part, separated into two groups (pilot and control. Findings: It has been proved that 90% of students give a great or very great importance to reception of feedback from their tutors, a relevance they consider to be higher than the one within a face-to-face environment. This percentage is around 75% with regard to the importance given to the level of personalization of feedback. The development of a factor analysis has revealed that usefulness of personalized feedback perceived by the students can be subsumed under two large dimensions: the one that facilitates learning (related to its semantic dimension and the motivational one (by allowing an easier and more fluid communication with the tutor, contributing not to leave the course, etc. The latter dimension has been also proved to be key in order to attain improvements in the students’ satisfaction with the learning process. This research was funded by the Catalan government and the UOC, within the framework of projects to Improve Teaching Quality (ITQ. Originality/value: Implementing personalized feedback has a relevant impact on the student, who values it because

  8. Mind the gap! Automated concept map feedback supports students in writing cohesive explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachner, Andreas; Burkhart, Christian; Nückles, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    Many students are challenged with the demand of writing cohesive explanations. To support students in writing cohesive explanations, we developed a computer-based feedback tool that visualizes cohesion deficits of students' explanations in a concept map. We conducted three studies to investigate the effectiveness of such feedback as well as the underlying cognitive processes. In Study 1, we found that the concept map helped students identify potential cohesion gaps in their drafts and plan remedial revisions. In Study 2, students with concept map feedback conducted revisions that resulted in more locally and globally cohesive, and also more comprehensible, explanations than the explanations of students who revised without concept map feedback. In Study 3, we replicated the findings of Study 2 by and large. More importantly, students who had received concept map feedback on a training explanation 1 week later wrote a transfer explanation without feedback that was more cohesive than the explanation of students who had received no feedback on their training explanation. The automated concept map feedback appears to particularly support the evaluation phase of the revision process. Furthermore, the feedback enabled novice writers to acquire sustainable skills in writing cohesive explanations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. The impact of online video lecture recordings and automated feedback on student performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieling, M. B.; Hofman, W. H. A.

    To what extent a blended learning configuration of face-to-face lectures, online on-demand video recordings of the face-to-face lectures and the offering of online quizzes with appropriate feedback has an additional positive impact on the performance of these students compared to the traditional

  10. Comparing the effects of positive and negative feedback in information-integration category learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedberg, Michael; Glass, Brian; Filoteo, J Vincent; Hazeltine, Eliot; Maddox, W Todd

    2017-01-01

    Categorical learning is dependent on feedback. Here, we compare how positive and negative feedback affect information-integration (II) category learning. Ashby and O'Brien (2007) demonstrated that both positive and negative feedback are required to solve II category problems when feedback was not guaranteed on each trial, and reported no differences between positive-only and negative-only feedback in terms of their effectiveness. We followed up on these findings and conducted 3 experiments in which participants completed 2,400 II categorization trials across three days under 1 of 3 conditions: positive feedback only (PFB), negative feedback only (NFB), or both types of feedback (CP; control partial). An adaptive algorithm controlled the amount of feedback given to each group so that feedback was nearly equated. Using different feedback control procedures, Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that participants in the NFB and CP group were able to engage II learning strategies, whereas the PFB group was not. Additionally, the NFB group was able to achieve significantly higher accuracy than the PFB group by Day 3. Experiment 3 revealed that these differences remained even when we equated the information received on feedback trials. Thus, negative feedback appears significantly more effective for learning II category structures. This suggests that the human implicit learning system may be capable of learning in the absence of positive feedback.

  11. Exploring Student Perceptions of Audiovisual Feedback via Screencasting in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Using Moore's (1993) theory of transactional distance as a framework, this action research study explored students' perceptions of audiovisual feedback provided via screencasting as a supplement to text-only feedback. A crossover design was employed to ensure that all students experienced both text-only and text-plus-audiovisual feedback and to…

  12. Suspicion of Motives Predicts Minorities' Responses to Positive Feedback in Interracial Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Brenda; Kunstman, Jonathan W; Malta, Brenna D; Sawyer, Pamela J; Townsend, Sarah S M; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2016-01-01

    Strong social and legal norms in the United States discourage the overt expression of bias against ethnic and racial minorities, increasing the attributional ambiguity of Whites' positive behavior to ethnic minorities. Minorities who suspect that Whites' positive overtures toward minorities are motivated more by their fear of appearing racist than by egalitarian attitudes may regard positive feedback they receive from Whites as disingenuous. This may lead them to react to such feedback with feelings of uncertainty and threat. Three studies examined how suspicion of motives relates to ethnic minorities' responses to receiving positive feedback from a White peer or same-ethnicity peer (Experiment 1), to receiving feedback from a White peer that was positive or negative (Experiment 2), and to receiving positive feedback from a White peer who did or did not know their ethnicity (Experiment 3). As predicted, the more suspicious Latinas were of Whites' motives for behaving positively toward minorities in general, the more they regarded positive feedback from a White peer who knew their ethnicity as disingenuous and the more they reacted with cardiovascular reactivity characteristic of threat/avoidance, increased feelings of stress, heightened uncertainty, and decreased self-esteem. We discuss the implications for intergroup interactions of perceptions of Whites' motives for nonprejudiced behavior.

  13. Suspicion of Motives Predicts Minorities’ Responses to Positive Feedback in Interracial Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Brenda; Kunstman, Jonathan W.; Malta, Brenna D.; Sawyer, Pamela J.; Townsend, Sarah S. M.; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2015-01-01

    Strong social and legal norms in the United States discourage the overt expression of bias against ethnic and racial minorities, increasing the attributional ambiguity of Whites’ positive behavior to ethnic minorities. Minorities who suspect that Whites’ positive overtures toward minorities are motivated more by their fear of appearing racist than by egalitarian attitudes may regard positive feedback they receive from Whites as disingenuous. This may lead them to react to such feedback with feelings of uncertainty and threat. Three studies examined how suspicion of motives relates to ethnic minorities’ responses to receiving positive feedback from a White peer or same-ethnicity peer (Experiment 1), to receiving feedback from a White peer that was positive or negative (Experiment 2), and to receiving positive feedback from a White peer who did or did not know their ethnicity (Experiment 3). As predicted, the more suspicious Latinas were of Whites’ motives for behaving positively toward minorities in general, the more they regarded positive feedback from a White peer who knew their ethnicity as disingenuous and the more they reacted with cardiovascular reactivity characteristic of threat/avoidance, increased feelings of stress, heightened uncertainty, and decreased self-esteem. We discuss the implications for intergroup interactions of perceptions of Whites’ motives for nonprejudiced behavior. PMID:26688594

  14. Feedback Codes and Action Plans: Building the Capacity of First-Year Students to Apply Feedback to a Scientific Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Fiona L.; Yucel, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    Effective feedback can build self-assessment skills in students so that they become more competent and confident to identify and self-correct weaknesses in their work. In this study, we trialled a feedback code as part of an integrated programme of formative and summative assessment tasks, which provided feedback to first-year students on their…

  15. Audio Feedback to Physiotherapy Students for Viva Voce: How Effective Is "The Living Voice"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Wendy; Hollingworth, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Assessment and feedback remains one of the categories that students are least satisfied with within the United Kingdom National Student Survey. The Student Charter promotes the use of various formats of feedback to enhance student learning. This study evaluates the use of audio MP3 as an alternative feedback mechanism to written feedback for…

  16. Web-based feedback after summative assessment: how do students engage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison, C.J.; Konings, K.D.; Molyneux, A.; Schuwirth, L.W.; Wass, V.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT: There is little research into how to deliver summative assessment student feedback effectively. The main aims of this study were to clarify how students engage with feedback in this context and to explore the roles of learning-related characteristics and previous and current performance.

  17. An audience response system strategy to improve student motivation, attention, and feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff; Black, Esther P; Rohr, Jürgen

    2009-04-07

    To implement an audience response system (ARS) to improve student motivation and attention during lectures and provide immediate feedback to the instructor concerning student understanding of lecture content in a Physiological Chemistry/Molecular Biology course. Students used ARS devices to respond to strategically placed questions throughout physiological chemistry/molecular biology lectures. The instructor inserted 6 to 7 questions that promoted student/class interactivity into each of several 50-minute lectures to focus students' attention and provide feedback on students' comprehension of material. Ninety-eight percent of first-year pharmacy (P1) students (n = 109) reported that strategically placed ARS questions throughout lectures helped them maintain attention. Reports from an independent focus group indicated that students favored this strategy. Furthermore, ARS feedback helped the instructor gauge student comprehension and adjust lectures accordingly. Focused, strategically placed ARS questions throughout lectures may help students maintain attention and stay motivated to learn. Feedback from these questions also allows instructors to adapt lectures to address areas of deficiency.

  18. Positivity effect in healthy aging in observational but not active feedback-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellebaum, Christian; Rustemeier, Martina; Daum, Irene

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the impact of healthy aging on the bias to learn from positive or negative performance feedback in observational and active feedback learning. In active learning, a previous study had already shown a negative learning bias in healthy seniors older than 75 years, while no bias was found for younger seniors. However, healthy aging is accompanied by a 'positivity effect', a tendency to primarily attend to stimuli with positive valence. Based on recent findings of dissociable neural mechanisms in active and observational feedback learning, the positivity effect was hypothesized to influence older participants' observational feedback learning in particular. In two separate experiments, groups of young (mean age 27) and older participants (mean age 60 years) completed an observational or active learning task designed to differentially assess positive and negative learning. Older but not younger observational learners showed a significant bias to learn better from positive than negative feedback. In accordance with previous findings, no bias was found for active learning. This pattern of results is discussed in terms of differences in the neural underpinnings of active and observational learning from performance feedback.

  19. Influence of feedback characteristics on perceived learning value of feedback in clerkships: does culture matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhoyo, Yoyo; Van Hell, Elisabeth A; Kerdijk, Wouter; Emilia, Ova; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Kuks, Jan B M; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2017-04-05

    Various feedback characteristics have been suggested to positively influence student learning. It is not clear how these feedback characteristics contribute to students' perceived learning value of feedback in cultures classified low on the cultural dimension of individualism and high on power distance. This study was conducted to validate the influence of five feedback characteristics on students' perceived learning value of feedback in an Indonesian clerkship context. We asked clerks in Neurology (n = 169) and Internal Medicine (n = 132) to assess on a 5-point Likert scale the learning value of the feedback they received. We asked them to record whether the feedback provider (1) informed the student what went well, (2) mentioned which aspects of performance needed improvement, (3) compared the student's performance to a standard, (4) further explained or demonstrated the correct performance, and (5) prepared an action plan with the student to improve performance. Data were analyzed using multilevel regression. A total of 250 students participated in this study, 131 from Internal Medicine (response rate 99%) and 119 from Neurology (response rate 70%). Of these participants, 225 respondents (44% males, 56% females) completed the form and reported 889 feedback moments. Students perceived feedback as more valuable when the feedback provider mentioned their weaknesses (β = 0.153, p learning value of feedback. No gender differences were found for perceived learning value. In Indonesia, we could validate four out of the five characteristics for effective feedback. We argue that our findings relate to culture, in particular to the levels of individualism and power distance. The recognized characteristics of what constitutes effective feedback should be validated across cultures.

  20. Formative feedback in the clinical practice setting: What are the perceptions of student radiographers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, P.; Wilford, B.

    2016-01-01

    The role of feedback to a learner's development has been well established. There is an absence of studies relating to student radiographers experience of gaining and applying formative feedback. This study investigated processes involved in gaining written formative feedback in the clinical practice setting as well as the impact feedback had on student radiographers learning. The data was collected from radiography students at two higher education institutions by electronic questionnaire comprising scaled and open questions. There was a response rate of 37% (n = 103/279). Scaled data was analysed using inferential statistics and the qualitative data helped explain the findings. The majority of students recognised radiographers were frequently busy; resulting in feedback that is generic and not always timely. There is strength of opinion 82.6% (n = 85/103) that student radiographers do not work with any one radiographer consistently enough to enable the provision of constructive and meaningful feedback. There appears to be difficulty in obtaining the comments but the evidence shows they are valued. The majority of students seek feedback that is specific and will clearly identify areas for development. They reflect on feedback as well as use self-criticism of their practice performance indicating the development of autonomous skills. The challenge of enabling consistent one to one working with radiographers, the need to maximise a learning culture within practice environments and ensuring full engagement by radiographers and students could be addressed by modification of the feedback system, a working group being formed from students, supervising radiographers and academic tutors. - Highlights: • Students value constructive criticism and on-going verbal feedback. • Written feedback is not always easy to obtain because of pressures on staff time. • Student radiographers are rarely able to work consistently with the same person. • Student and mentor

  1. Combined student ratings and self-assessment provide useful feedback for clinical teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Wolfhagen, Ineke H. A. P.; Peters, Wim G.; van Coppenolle, Lieve; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Many evaluation instruments have been developed to provide feedback to physicians on their clinical teaching but written feedback alone is not always effective. We explored whether feedback effectiveness improved when teachers’ self-assessment was added to written feedback based on student ratings. 37 physicians (10 residents, 27 attending physicians) from different specialties (Internal Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics/Gynecology, Pediatrics, Neurology, Dermatology, Ophthalmology, ENT, and Psychiatry) were invited to fill out a self-assessment questionnaire on their teaching skills. Students completed an almost identical questionnaire to evaluate the same teachers based on their experiences during clerkships. After receiving written feedback incorporating their self-assessment and the student ratings, the teachers indicated their perceptions of the self-assessment exercise and the written feedback in a questionnaire (five-point Likert scale items) and next, in more detail, in semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of 12 of the participating teachers. 25 physicians participated (67%). The results showed that self-assessment and student feedback were both perceived as useful (3.7, SD 1.0) but the latter was considered more effective. The physicians we interviewed considered the combination of self-assessment with student ratings more effective than either self-assessment or written feedback alone. Notably, discrepancies between student ratings and self-assessment were deemed a strong incentive for change. We conclude that self-assessment can be a useful tool to stimulate improvement of clinical teaching when it is combined with written feedback based on student ratings. Future research among larger groups is needed to confirm our findings and examine whether these combined tools actually lead to improved teaching. PMID:19779976

  2. Effects of positive electrical feedback in the oscillating Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction: Experiments and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes both the experimental and numerical investigations on the effect of positive electrical feedback in the oscillating Belovsou-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction under batch conditions. Positive electrical feedback causes an increase in the amplitude and period of the oscillations with the corresponding increase of the feedback strength. Oregonator model with a positive feedback term suitably incorporated in one of the dynamical variables is used to account for these experimental observations. Further, the effect of positive feedback on the Hopf points are investigated numerically by constructing the bifurcation diagrams. In the absence of feedback, for a particular stoichiometric parameter, the model exhibits both supercritical and subcritical Hopf bifurcations with canard existing near the former Hopf point. In the presence of positive feedback it is observed that (i) both the Hopf points advances, (ii) the distance between the two Hopf points decreases linearly, while the period increases exponentially with the increase of feedback strength near the Hopf points, (iii) only supercritical Hopf point without canard survives for a very strong positive feedback strength and (iv) moderate feedback strength takes the system away from limit cycle to the canard regime. These observations are explained in terms of Field-Koeroes-Noyes mechanism of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. This may be the first instance where the advancement of Hopf points due to positive feedback is clearly shown

  3. An Anatomy of Feedback: A Phenomenographic Investigation of Undergraduate Students' Conceptions of Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Angela J.; Bond, Carol H.; Nicholson, Helen D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate how undergraduate students conceptualise feedback, and compare this with research into conceptions of teaching and learning related phenomena in higher education. Using a phenomenographic approach, 28 physiotherapy students in New Zealand were interviewed about their experiences. Data analysis resulted…

  4. Using Screencasts to Enhance Assessment Feedback: Students' Perceptions and Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Pru; Teoh, Lim Keong

    2012-01-01

    In the UK, assessment and feedback have been regularly highlighted by the National Student Survey as critical aspects that require improvement. An innovative approach to delivering feedback that has proved successful in non-business-related disciplines is the delivery of audio and visual feedback using screencast technology. The feedback on…

  5. Constructive feedback as a learning tool to enhance students' self ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If feedback is provided in a way that can develop students' self-regulatory skills, it could enhance learning and, consequently, lead to improved performance. To improve teaching and learning in higher education (HE), this study sought to determine whether the feedback to first-year students affords them an opportunity to ...

  6. A beam position feedback system for beam lines at the photon factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsura, T.; Kamiya, Y.; Haga, K.; Mitsuhashi, T.

    1987-01-01

    The beam position of the synchrotron radiation produced from the Storage Ring was stabilized by a twofold position feedback system. A digital feedback system was developed to suppress the diurnal beam movement (one cycle of sin-like drifting motion per day) which became a serious problem in low-emittance operation. The feedback was applied to the closed-orbit-distortion (COD) correction system in order to cancel the position variation at all the beam lines proportionately to the variation monitored at one beam line. An analog feedback system is also used to suppress frequency components faster than the slow diurnal movement

  7. Feedback in Clinical Education, Part II: Approved Clinical Instructor and Student Perceptions of and Influences on Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Sara; Henning, Jolene

    2014-01-01

    Context: Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs; now known as preceptors) are expected to provide feedback to athletic training students (ATSs) during clinical education experiences. Researchers in other fields have found that clinical instructors and students often have different perceptions of actual and ideal feedback and that several factors may influence the feedback exchanges between instructors and students. However, understanding of these issues in athletic training education is minimal. Objective: To investigate the current characteristics and perceptions of and the influences on feedback exchanges between ATSs and ACIs. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: One entry-level master's degree program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Patients or Other Participants: Four ACIs and 4 second-year ATSs. Data Collection and Analysis: Individual, semistructured interviews were conducted with participants and integrated with field notes and observations for analysis. We used the constant comparative approach to inductively analyze data and develop codes and categories. Member checking, triangulation, and peer debriefing were used to promote trustworthiness of the study. Results: Participants described that feedback plays an important role in clinical education and has several purposes related to improving performance. The ACIs and ATSs also discussed several preferred characteristics of feedback. Participants identified 4 main influences on their feedback exchanges, including the ACI, the ATS, personalities, and the learning environment. Conclusions: The ACIs and ATSs had similar perceptions of ideal feedback in addition to the actual feedback that was provided during their clinical education experiences. Most of the preferences for feedback were aligned with recommendations in the literature, suggesting that existing research findings are applicable to athletic training clinical education. Several factors influenced the

  8. Student Feedback of Career Development Workshops for Program Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBeau, J. E.; Pressley, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    A number of techniques are employed each year to evaluate the effectiveness of and to identify opportunities for improvement in the Laboratory for Atmospheric Research (LAR) REU program at Washington State University. For example, information gathered from pre-/post-surveys and pre-/post-interviews provides information regarding students' perceptions and levels of experience with the scientific process, career and academic goals, and motivation for joining the REU program. Poster session rubrics assess students' abilities to summarize their experiences in a professional setting. Alumni surveys gauge former participants' perceptions of the REU experience. One seemingly simple and highly useful, but often less documented, component of the evaluation process for program improvement is the use of workshop feedback forms. Weekly workshops are designed to provide students with enhanced knowledge and skills in the area of atmospheric chemistry as well as research design skills, academic and career guidance, and presentation skills. According to previous years' evaluation reports, workshops are largely beneficial to students for learning new skills. Yet, students suggest a number of recommendations that may benefit any REU program, such as: providing slides beforehand to provide a framework for the upcoming workshop, having instructors speak in more student-friendly language, covering higher-level topics, and including more hands-on, instructor-guided practice during the workshops. Thus, workshop feedback forms provide meaningful feedback to increase learning outcomes and enhance the REU student experience. This presentation will offer ideas gathered from over five years of workshop feedback forms that, while somewhat specific to workshops offered for the LAR REU, can offer faculty and PIs insight into the student experience, enhancing their ability to improve programming and achieve greater learning outcomes.

  9. Types of Feedback in Competency-Based Predoctoral Orthodontics: Effects on Students' Attitudes and Confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, Mitchell J; Cho, Kiyoung; Kim, Han Suk

    2017-05-01

    Feedback can exert a powerful influence on learning and achievement although its effect varies. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of three types of feedback on dental students' attitudes and confidence in a competency-based course in predoctoral orthodontics at New York University College of Dentistry. In 2013-14, all 253 third-year students in a course using test-enhanced instructional methods received written feedback on formative assessments. The type of feedback varied across three groups: pass/fail grades (PF) N=77, emoticons (EM) N=90, or written comments (WC) N=86. At the end of the course, students completed surveys that included four statements addressing their attitudes toward course instruction and confidence in their abilities. The survey response rate ranged from 75% to 100% among groups. The lowest response rate (75%) was in the PF group. In attitudes toward course instruction and confidence in their abilities, the WC group trended to more positive responses than the other groups, while the PF group trended to negative responses. On two of the four statements, the trend for the WC group was significant (95% CI). In both statements concerning attitudes toward instruction, the PF group trended to negative responses that were significant (95% CI). These results support the effectiveness of descriptive written comments over pass/fail grades or emoticons in improving dental students' confidence in their abilities and their attitudes toward instruction.

  10. Asymmetric positive feedback loops reliably control biological responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratushny, Alexander V; Saleem, Ramsey A; Sitko, Katherine; Ramsey, Stephen A; Aitchison, John D

    2012-04-24

    Positive feedback is a common mechanism enabling biological systems to respond to stimuli in a switch-like manner. Such systems are often characterized by the requisite formation of a heterodimer where only one of the pair is subject to feedback. This ASymmetric Self-UpREgulation (ASSURE) motif is central to many biological systems, including cholesterol homeostasis (LXRα/RXRα), adipocyte differentiation (PPARγ/RXRα), development and differentiation (RAR/RXR), myogenesis (MyoD/E12) and cellular antiviral defense (IRF3/IRF7). To understand why this motif is so prevalent, we examined its properties in an evolutionarily conserved transcriptional regulatory network in yeast (Oaf1p/Pip2p). We demonstrate that the asymmetry in positive feedback confers a competitive advantage and allows the system to robustly increase its responsiveness while precisely tuning the response to a consistent level in the presence of varying stimuli. This study reveals evolutionary advantages for the ASSURE motif, and mechanisms for control, that are relevant to pharmacologic intervention and synthetic biology applications.

  11. A study on the students feedback on the foundation course in first year MBBS curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srimathi T

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: To study the students feedback on the short orientation course in first year MBBS curriculum, which was introduced in the institution as per the recommendations of Medical Council of India for the Foundation course. Methodology: 250 First year MBBS students were divided into 7 small groups of 35 to 36 each. They attended a short orientation course over a period of 8 days on a rotation basis. The skills taught include Stress and Time Management, language, communication, use of information technology, National health policies, Biohazard safety, Introduction to the preclinical subjects, Medical literature search, First Aid and Basic life support, Medical ethics and professionalism. The results were analyzed on the 8th day by student’s feedback and debate sessions. Results: Positive feedback of 88.5 to 98.5% was recorded regarding the objectives of the course, contents, presentation, future value of the course in the student’s career by a Questionnaire issued to the students. Remedial measures undertaken for negative Feedback. The course enabled self directed learning of the subjects. Conclusion: The Foundation Course at the beginning of the First phase of the course enables the First year students to acquire the basic knowledge and skills required for all the subsequent phases in MBBS course and later on their medical practice and career.

  12. The Effects of Source, Revision Possibility, and Amount of Feedback on Marketing Students' Impressions of Feedback on an Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, David S.; Dommeyer, Curt J.; Gross, Barbara L.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how three factors affect students' reactions to critical feedback on an assignment--amount of feedback (none vs. low amount vs. high amount), source of feedback (instructor-provided feedback vs. peer-provided feedback), and the situational context of the feedback (revision of paper is or is not possible). An incomplete 3 × 2 ×…

  13. Finding Positive Feedback Loops in Environmental Models: A Mathematical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, R.; Razavi, S.

    2016-12-01

    Dynamics of most earth and environmental systems are generally governed by interactions between several hydrological (e.g., soil moisture and precipitation), geological (e.g., and erosion), geochemical (e.g., nutrient loading), and atmospheric (e.g., temperature) processes which operate on a range of spatio-temporal scales. These interactions create numerous feedback mechanisms with complex behaviours, and their understanding and representation can vary depending on the scale in space and/or time at which the system is analyzed. One of the most crucial characteristics of such complex systems is the existence of positive feedback loops. The presence of positive feedbacks may increase complexity, accelerate change, or trigger multiple stable states in the underlying dynamical system. Furthermore, because of the inherent non-linearity, it is often very difficult to obtain a general idea of their complex dynamics. Feedback loops in environmental systems have been well recognized and qualitatively discussed. With a quantitative/mathematical view, in this presentation, we address the question of how the positive feedback loops can be identified/implemented in environmental models. We investigate the nature of different feedback mechanisms and dynamics of simple example case studies that underlie fundamental processes such as vegetation, precipitation and soil moisture. To do this, we apply the concept of "interaction graph" from mathematics which is built from the Jacobian matrix of the dynamical system. The Jacobian matrix contains information on how variations of one state variable depends on variations of other variables, and thus can be used to understand the dynamical possibilities of feedback mechanisms in the underlying system. Moreover, this study highlights that there are some situations where the existence of positive feedback loops can cause multiple stable states, and thereby regime shifts in environmental systems. Systems with multiple stable states are

  14. Positive Feedback From Male Authority Figures Boosts Women's Math Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Lora E; Kondrak, Cheryl L; Ward, Deborah E; Streamer, Lindsey

    2018-03-01

    People often search for cues in the environment to determine whether or not they will be judged or treated negatively based on their social identities. Accordingly, feedback from gatekeepers-members of majority groups who hold authority and power in a field-may be an especially important cue for those at risk of experiencing social identity threat, such as women in math settings. Across a series of studies, women who received positive ("Good job!") versus objective (score only) feedback from a male (vs. female) authority figure in math reported greater confidence; belonging; self-efficacy; more favorable Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) attitudes/identification/interest; and greater implicit identification with math. Men were affected only by the type of math feedback they received, not by the source of feedback. A meta-analysis across studies confirmed results. Together, these findings suggest that positive feedback from gatekeepers is an important situational cue that can improve the outcomes of negatively stereotyped groups.

  15. PLS beam position measurement and feedback system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.Y.; Lee, J.; Park, M.K.; Kim, J.H.; Won, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    A real-time orbit correction system is proposed for the stabilization of beam orbit and photon beam positions in Pohang Light Source. PLS beam position monitoring system is designed to be VMEbus compatible to fit the real-time digital orbit feedback system. A VMEbus based subsystem control computer, Mil-1553B communication network and 12 BPM/PS machine interface units constitute digital part of the feedback system. With the super-stable PLS correction magnet power supply, power line frequency noise is almost filtered out and the dominant spectra of beam obtit fluctuations are expected to appear below 15 Hz. Using DSP board in SCC for the computation and using an appropriate compensation circuit for the phase delay by the vacuum chamber, PLS real-time orbit correction system is realizable without changing the basic structure of PLS computer control system. (author)

  16. Students’ expectations of feedback given on draft writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Simpson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Academic writing is the primary means of assessing university students and feedback (oral or written responses on writing can contribute significantly to student learning and success (Ferris, 2003; Hyland & Hyland, 2006. This study explores students’ expectations of feedback on draft writing. The research design was two-pronged. The initial quantitative aspect employed a questionnaire which students completed after receiving feedback from Writing Centre consultants who aim to give developmental feedback. A subsequent phase involved focus groups with volunteer students. This mixed methods design allowed for greater depth of understanding as the qualitative findings extended the quantitative results. The study concludes that students expect feedback to be understandable, encouraging and to focus on both positive and negative aspects of their writing. Importantly, students expect feedback to ‘unpack’ the conventions of academic literacy while still encouraging independence and originality.

  17. Thirdyear medical students’ and clinical teachers’ perceptions of formative assessment feedback in the simulated clinical setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reina Abraham

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Clinical skills training in the clinical skills laboratory (CSL environment forms an important part of the undergraduate medical curriculum. These skills are better demonstrated than described. A lack of direct observation and feedback given to medical students performing these skills has been reported. Without feedback, errors are uncorrected, good performance is not reinforced and clinical competence is minimally achieved. Objectives. To explore the perceptions of 3rd-year medical students and their clinical teachers about formative clinical assessment feedback in the CSL setting. Methods. Questionnaires with open- and closed-ended questions were administered to 3rd-year medical students and their clinical skills teachers. Quantitative data were statistically analysed while qualitative data were thematically analysed. Results. Five clinical teachers and 183 medical students participated. Average scores for the items varied between 1.87 and 5.00 (1: negative to 5:positive. The majority of students reported that feedback informed them of their competence level and learning needs, and motivated them to improve their skills and participation in patient-centred learning activities. Teachers believed that they provided sufficient and balanced feedback. Some students were concerned about the lack of standardised and structured assessment criteria and variation in teacher feedback. No statistical difference (p<0.05 was found between the mean item ratings based on demographic and academic background. Conclusion. Most teachers and students were satisfied with the feedback given and received, respectively. Structured and balanced criterion-referenced feedback processes, together with feedback training workshops for staff and students, are recommended to enhance feedback practice quality in the CSL. Limited clinical staff in the CSL was noted as a concern.

  18. Student Self-Assessment and Multisource Feedback Assessment: Exploring Benefits, Limitations, and Remedies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Scott N.

    2014-01-01

    It has become common practice for management students to participate in some sort of self-assessment or multisource feedback assessment (MSF; also called 360-degree assessment or multirater assessment) during their management degree program. These assessments provide students invaluable feedback about themselves and assist students in their…

  19. Dissociation between active and observational learning from positive and negative feedback in Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobza, Stefan; Ferrea, Stefano; Schnitzler, Alfons; Pollok, Bettina; Südmeyer, Martin; Bellebaum, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Feedback to both actively performed and observed behaviour allows adaptation of future actions. Positive feedback leads to increased activity of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, whereas dopamine neuron activity is decreased following negative feedback. Dopamine level reduction in unmedicated Parkinson's Disease patients has been shown to lead to a negative learning bias, i.e. enhanced learning from negative feedback. Recent findings suggest that the neural mechanisms of active and observational learning from feedback might differ, with the striatum playing a less prominent role in observational learning. Therefore, it was hypothesized that unmedicated Parkinson's Disease patients would show a negative learning bias only in active but not in observational learning. In a between-group design, 19 Parkinson's Disease patients and 40 healthy controls engaged in either an active or an observational probabilistic feedback-learning task. For both tasks, transfer phases aimed to assess the bias to learn better from positive or negative feedback. As expected, actively learning patients showed a negative learning bias, whereas controls learned better from positive feedback. In contrast, no difference between patients and controls emerged for observational learning, with both groups showing better learning from positive feedback. These findings add to neural models of reinforcement-learning by suggesting that dopamine-modulated input to the striatum plays a minor role in observational learning from feedback. Future research will have to elucidate the specific neural underpinnings of observational learning.

  20. Beam position feedback system for the advanced photon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will implement both global and local beam position feedback systems to stabilize the particle and x-ray beams for the storage ring. The systems consist of 20 VME crates distributed around the ring, each running multiple digital signal processors (DSP) running at 4 kHz sampling rate with a proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) control algorithm. The particle and x-ray beam position data is shared by the distributed processors through networked reflective memory. A theory of closed orbit correction using the technique of singular value decomposition (SVD) of the response matrix and simulation of its application to the APS storage ring will be discussed. This technique combines the global and local feedback systems and resolves the conflict among multiple local feedback systems due to local bump closure error. Maximum correction efficiency is achieved by feeding back to the global orbit data to the local feedback systems. The effect of the eddy current induced in the relatively thick (1/2 in.) vacuum chamber by the ac corrector magnet field for local feedback systems is compensated by digital filters. Results of experiments conducted on the x-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source and the SPEAR at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory will also be presented

  1. Beam position feedback system for the advanced photon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will implement both global and local beam position feedback systems to stabilize the particle and X-ray beams for the storage ring. The systems consist of 20 VME crates distributed around the ring, each running multiple digital signal processors (DSP) running at 4 kHz sampling rate with a proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) control algorithm. The particle and X-ray beam position data is shared by the distributed processors through networked reflective memory. A theory of closed orbit correction using the technique of singular value decomposition (SVD) of the response matrix and simulation of its application to the APS storage ring will be discussed. This technique combines the global and local feedback systems and resolves the conflict among multiple local feedback systems due to local bump closure error. Maximum correction efficiency is achieved by feeding back the global orbit data to the local feedback systems. The effect of the vacuum chamber eddy current induced by the AC corrector magnet field for local feedback systems is compensated by digital filters. Results of experiments conducted on the X-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source and the SPEAR at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory will be presented. copyright 1994 American Institute of Physics

  2. Beam position feedback system for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will implement both global and local beam position feedback systems to stabilize the particle and X-ray beams for the storage ring. The systems consist of 20 VME crates distributed around the ring, each running multiple digital signal processors (DSP) running at 4kHz sampling rate with a proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) control algorithm. The particle and X-ray beam position data is shared by the distributed processors through networked reflective memory. A theory of closed orbit correction using the technique of singular value decomposition (SVD) of the response matrix and simulation of its application to the APS storage ring will be discussed. This technique combines the global and local feedback systems and resolves the conflict among multiple local feedback systems due to local bump closure error. Maximum correction efficiency is achieved by feeding back the global orbit data to the local feedback systems. The effect of the vacuum chamber eddy current induced by the AC corrector magnet field for local feedback systems is compensated by digital filters. Results of experiments conducted on the X-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source and the SPEAR at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory will be presented

  3. Beam position feedback system for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will implement both global and local beam position feedback systems to stabilize the particle and X-ray beams for the storage ring. The systems consist of 20 VME crates distributed around the ring, each running multiple digital signal processors (DSP) running at 4kHz sampling rate with a proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) control algorithm. The particle and X-ray beam position data is shared by the distributed processors through networked reflective memory. A theory of closed orbit correction using the technique of singular value decomposition (SVD) of the response matrix and simulation of its application to the APS storage ring will be discussed. This technique combines the global and local feedback systems and resolves the conflict among multiple local feedback systems due to local bump closure error. Maximum correction efficiency is achieved by feeding back the global orbit data to the local feedback systems. The effect of the eddy current induced in the relatively thick (1/2 inch) vacuum chamber by the AC corrector magnet field for local feedback systems is compensated by digital filters. Results of experiments conducted on the X-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source and the SPEAR at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory will also be presented

  4. The effect of formative feedback on students achievement in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of formative feedback on students achievement in graphical element of economic curriculum. ... Journal of Educational Foundations ... Students achievement in graphical elements of economics curriculums has been a problem over the years, students have been performing poorly in SSCE (WAEC & NECO).

  5. Perceptions of teachers' general and informational feedback and intrinsic motivation in physical education: two-year effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koka, Andre; Hein, Vello

    2006-10-01

    Relative change or stability of perceived positive general feedback and perceived informational feedback and their influence on students' intrinsic motivation in physical education over two years were examined. 302 students, ages 11 to 15 years, responded to the Perception of Teacher's Feedback questionnaire. Two years later, these students filled out the questionnaire again, along with a modified version of the Sport Motivation Scale. Analysis showed that both types of perceived feedback exhibited moderate stability over the two years. Perceived positive general feedback demonstrated a significant direct effect on students' intrinsic motivation measured concurrently in physical education. Further, fixing to zero the effect of perceived positive general feedback on intrinsic motivation measured concurrently, an effect emerged over the two years.

  6. "I Really Need Feedback to Learn:" Students' Perspectives on the Effectiveness of the Differential Feedback Messages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipnevich, Anastasiya A.; Smith, Jeffrey K.

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined students' perceptions of the effects of different forms of instructional feedback on their performance, motivation, and emotion. Forty-nine students attending an eastern US university participated in focus group discussions. The groups explored students' reactions to grades, praise, and computer versus instructor…

  7. Evaluation feedback as a predictor of students' achievement in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation feedback as a predictor of students' achievement in technical education. ... The major purpose of evaluation is to assess the strength and weaknesses of the learner. Therefore, for evaluation to be meaningful, students should ...

  8. Learning climate and feedback as predictors of dental students' self-determined motivation: The mediating role of basic psychological needs satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, C; Binnie, V; Wilson, S; Villegas, M J

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to test the mediating role of the satisfaction of dental students' basic psychological needs of autonomy, competence and relatedness on the association between learning climate, feedback and student motivation. The latter was based on the self-determination theory's concepts of differentiation of autonomous motivation, controlled motivation and amotivation. A cross-sectional correlational study was conducted where 924 students completed self-reported questionnaires measuring motivation, perception of the learning climate, feedback and basic psychological needs satisfaction. Descriptive statistics, Cronbach's alpha scores and bivariate correlations were computed. Mediation of basic needs on each predictor-outcome association was tested based on a series of regression analyses. Finally, all variables were integrated into one structural equation model, controlling for the effects of age, gender and year of study. Cronbach's alpha scores were acceptable (.655 to .905). Correlation analyses showed positive and significant associations between both an autonomy-supportive learning climate and the quantity and quality of feedback received, and students' autonomous motivation, which decreased and became negative when correlated with controlled motivation and amotivation, respectively. Regression analyses revealed that these associations were indirect and mediated by how these predictors satisfied students' basic psychological needs. These results were corroborated by the structural equation analysis, in which data fit the model well and regression paths were in the expected direction. An autonomy-supportive learning climate and the quantity and quality of feedback were positive predictors of students' autonomous motivation and negative predictors of amotivation. However, this was an indirect association mediated by the satisfaction of students' basic psychological needs. Consequently, supporting students' needs of autonomy, competence and

  9. Unpacking Student Feedback as a Basis for Metacognition and Mediated Learning Experiences: A Socio-cultural perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmore Mutekwe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The study examines the effects of the feedback given to students by lecturers as learning support. It was conducted with undergraduates in an educational theory course in a South African university. The thesis was that although some of the feedback messages transmitted to students regarding strengths and weaknesses in learning get easily decoded and turned into action to improve performance, some messages are misconstrued by the students making the process of giving feedback complex. Data was collected through a cross-sectional feedback survey utilizing focus group interviews with 50 Bachelor of Education pre-service students conveniently sampled. The data analysis followed a thematic approach with superordinate themes used to structure the discussion of findings. The study found that student feedback needs to be culturally responsive for it to foster metacognition in them. The conclusion was that unless lecturers provide feedback that is simple, meaningful and clearly focused, students are unlikely to take much heed of it as there is a general tendency to focus more on the marks obtained than on the role of the feedback provided. This makes some students leave university under-prepared or half-baked in terms of providing student feedback on performance.

  10. Closing the feedback loop: engaging students in large first-year mathematics test revision sessions using pen-enabled screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Diane; Loch, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    How can active learning, peer learning and prompt feedback be achieved in large first-year mathematics classes? Further, what technologies may support these aims? In this article, we assert that test revision sessions in first-year mathematics held in a technology-enhanced lecture theatre can be highly interactive with students solving problems, learning from each other and receiving immediate feedback. This is facilitated by pen-enabled screens and synchronization software. We argue that the educational benefits achievable through the technology do outweigh the technological distractions, and that these benefits can be achieved by focused, targeted one-off sessions and not only by a semester-long, regular approach. Repeat mid-semester test revision sessions were offered on a non-compulsory basis using pen-enabled screens for all students. Students worked practice test questions and marked solutions to mathematical problems on the screens. Students' work was then displayed anonymously for their peers to see. Answers were discussed with the whole class. We discuss outcomes from two offerings of these sessions using student feedback and lecturer reflections and show the impact of participation on self-reported student confidence. Pedagogical approaches that the technology allowed for the first time in a large class are highlighted. Students responded uniformly positively.

  11. Peer-teaching in the food chemistry laboratory: student-produced experiments, peer and audio feedback, and integration of employability skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Lisa Dunne

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the author’s experience over the last several years of implementing an alternative Food Chemistry laboratory practical model for a group of third-year BSc Nutraceuticals students. The initial main objectives were to prepare students for the more independent final-year research project; to incorporate innovative approaches to feedback; and to integrate key employability skills into the curriculum. These were achieved through building the skills required to ultimately allow students working in groups to research, design and run a laboratory for their class. The first year of the project involved innovative approaches to feedback, including weekly feedback sessions, report checklists and audio feedback podcasts. Student evaluation after one year suggested the case group felt more prepared for final-year research projects and work placement owing to the redesign of the laboratory assessment. This, together with general positive feedback across several indicators, was proof of concept, and was a foundation for an improved model. The improvements related to the organisation and management of the project, but the same pedagogical approach has been retained. The second year saw the introduction of a more rigorous and easier to manage peer evaluation though use of the online Comprehensive Assessment for Team-Member Effectiveness (CATME tool. The most recent revision has included a Project Wiki hosted on Blackboard to facilitate the organisation, communication, assessment and feedback of student-generated resources.More recently, the final-year students who had participated in the peer-teaching Food Chemistry labs when in third year have been evaluated. This evaluation took place following their research projects, and suggests that the peer-teaching model better prepared them for these activities, compared to traditional laboratories.

  12. Impact of tailored feedback in assessment of communication skills for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Seilin; Lee, Gui H; Jin, Jeong K; Bak, Yong I; Jeoung, Yeon O; Kim, Chan W

    2015-01-01

    Finding out the effective ways of teaching and assessing communication skills remain a challenging part of medication education. This study aims at exploring the usefulness and effectiveness of having additional feedback using qualitative analysis in assessment of communication skills in undergraduate medical training. We also determined the possibilities of using qualitative analysis in developing tailored strategies for improvement in communication skills training. This study was carried out on medical students (n=87) undergoing their final year clinical performance examination on communication skills using standardized patient by video-recording and transcribing their performances. Video-recordings of 26 students were randomly selected for qualitative analysis, and additional feedback was provided. We assessed the level of acceptance of communication skills scores between the study and nonstudy group and within the study group, before and after receiving feedback based on qualitative analysis. There was a statistically significant increase in the level of acceptance of feedback after delivering additional feedback using qualitative analysis, where the percentage of agreement with feedback increased from 15.4 to 80.8% (pskills assessment gives essential information for medical students to learn and self-reflect, which could potentially lead to improved communication skills. As evident from our study, feedback becomes more meaningful and effective with additional feedback using qualitative analysis.

  13. Social Media and Peer Feedback: What Do Students Really Think about Using Wiki and Facebook as Platforms for Peer Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirbilek, Muhammet

    2015-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools are becoming increasingly pervasive in higher education, and as a result, there is increasing interest in the use of online feedback activities. This study investigated students' actual experiences and perceptions using social media, Wiki and Facebook, tools to provide peer feedback on students' instructional material projects and to…

  14. Student Beliefs towards Written Corrective Feedback: The Case of Filipino High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balanga, Roselle A.; Fidel, Irish Van B.; Gumapac, Mone Virma Ginry P.; Ho, Howell T.; Tullo, Riza Mae C.; Villaraza, Patricia Monette L.; Vizconde, Camilla J.

    2016-01-01

    The study identified the beliefs of high school students toward Written Corrective Feedback (WCF), based on the framework of Anderson (2010). It also investigated the most common errors that students commit in writing stories and the type of WCF students receive from teachers. Data in the form of stories which were checked by teachers were…

  15. Student laboratory reports: an approach to improving feedback and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingsen, Pål Gunnar; Støvneng, Jon Andreas

    2018-05-01

    We present an ongoing effort in improving the quality of laboratory reports written by first and second year physics students. The effort involves a new approach where students are given the opportunity to submit reports at intermediate deadlines, receive feedback, and then resubmit for the final deadline. In combination with a differential grading system, instead of pass/fail, the improved feedback results in higher quality reports. Improvement in the quality of the reports is visible through the grade statistics.

  16. People newly in love are more responsive to positive feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cassandra L; Beninger, Richard J

    2012-06-01

    Passionate love is associated with increased activity in dopamine-rich regions of the brain. Increased dopamine in these regions is associated with a greater tendency to learn from reward in trial-and-error learning tasks. This study examined the prediction that individuals who were newly in love would be better at responding to reward (positive feedback). In test trials, people who were newly in love selected positive outcomes significantly more often than their single (not in love) counterparts but were no better at the task overall. This suggests that people who are newly in love show a bias toward responding to positive feedback, which may reflect a general bias towards reward-seeking.

  17. Students want feedback and educators need dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Rask, Morten

    2015-01-01

    wanting: a survey found that only a third of students at Business and Social Science (BSS), Aarhus University (AU), think they get sufficient feedback on their work , while educators bemoan the impossibility of activating and engaging students in the substantive, theoretical and methodological discussions...... and performance levels for both students and educators, and also be used as a medium to provide suggestions for improving learning. The conceptual model can be used to solve the interaction paradox. It has implications for both individual educators and on an institutional level for creating the conditions...

  18. A unified approach to global and local beam position feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will implement both global and local beam position feedback systems to stabilize the particle and X-ray beams for the storage ring. The global feedback system uses 40 BPMs and 40 correctors per plane. Singular value decomposition (SVD) of the response matrix is used for closed orbit correction. The local feedback system uses two X-ray BPMS, two rf BPMS, and the four-magnet local bump to control the angle and displacement of the X-ray beam from a bending magnet or an insertion device. Both the global and local feedback systems are based on digital signal processing (DSP) running at 4-kHz sampling rate with a proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) control algorithm. In this paper, we will discuss resolution of the conflict among multiple local feedback systems due to local bump closure error and decoupling of the global and local feedback systems to maximize correction efficiency. In this scheme, the global feedback system absorbs the local bump closure error and the local feedback systems compensate for the effect of global feedback on the local beamlines. The required data sharing between the global and local feedback systems is done through the fiber-optically networked reflective memory

  19. EFL Students' Preferences toward the Lecturer's Corrective Feedback in Business Letters Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanu, La Ode

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the students' preferences toward the lecturer's corrective feedback in the business letter writing and their reasons why they preferred particular corrective feedback types. A case study was used by involving 15 EFL students who enrolled in the Business Correspondence Course. The questionnaire and interview were…

  20. Attitude, perception and feedback of second year medical students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: To assess the student's attitude, perception and feedback on teaching–learning methodology and evaluation methods in pharmacology. Materials and Methods: One hundred and forty second year medical students studying at Smt. Kashibai Navale Medical College, Pune, were selected. They were ...

  1. Improved Position Sensor for Feedback Control of Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyers, Robert; Savage, Larry; Rogers, Jan

    2004-01-01

    An improved optoelectronic apparatus has been developed to provide the position feedback needed for controlling the levitation subsystem of a containerless-processing system. As explained, the advantage of this apparatus over prior optoelectronic apparatuses that have served this purpose stems from the use of an incandescent lamp, instead of a laser, to illuminate the levitated object. In containerless processing, a small object to be processed is levitated (e.g., by use of a microwave, low-frequency electromagnetic, electrostatic, or acoustic field) so that it is not in contact with the wall of the processing chamber or with any other solid object during processing. In the case of electrostatic or low-frequency electromagnetic levitation, real-time measurement of the displacement of the levitated object from its nominal levitation position along the vertical axis (and, in some cases, along one or two horizontal axes) is needed for feedback control of the levitating field.

  2. Which characteristics of written feedback are perceived as stimulating students' reflective competence : an exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Hanke; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Snoek, Jos W.; van der Molen, Thys; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2013-01-01

    Background: Teacher feedback on student reflective writing is recommended to improve learners' reflective competence. To be able to improve teacher feedback on reflective writing, it is essential to gain insight into which characteristics of written feedback stimulate students' reflection processes.

  3. English Learners Perception on Lecturers’ Corrective Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titien Fatmawaty Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The importance of written corrective feedback (CF has been an issue of substantial debate in the literature and this controversial issue has led to a development in latest studies to draw on foreign language acquisition (FLA research as a way to further comprehend the complexities of this issue particularly how students and teachers perceive the effectiveness of written corrective feedback. This research has largely focused on students’ perception on Lecturers’ corrective feedback, perceives the usefulness of different types of corrective feedback and the reasons they have for their preferences. Qualitative data was collected from 40 EFL students in 6th semester, by means of written questionnaires, interview and observation. Four feedback strategies were employed in this research and ranked each statement by using five-point Likert scale. Findings showed that almost all students 81.43 % want correction or feedback from lecturers for the mistakes on their writing. For the type of written corrective feedback, students prefer lecturers mark their mistakes and give comment on their work with the percentage as follows: 93% students found that giving clues or comment about how to fix errors can improve their writing ability, 76.69% of the students found that error identification is the most useful type of feedback, and 57.50% of students have a positive opinion for the provision of correction which is accompanied by comment. Those percentages of students perspective is supported by students’ explanation in an open ended question of questionnaire. Pedagogical implications of the study are also discussed.

  4. Drafting and acting on feedback supports student learning when writing essay assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freestone, Nicholas

    2009-06-01

    A diverse student population is a relatively recent feature of the higher education system in the United Kingdom. Consequently, it may be thought that more "traditional" types of assessment based around essay writing skills for science undergraduates may be of decreasing value and relevance to contemporary students. This article describes a study in which the process of feedback on, and associated redrafting of, an essay was closely supervised to improve essay writing skills and subsequent exam performance. The results of this study show that students can significantly improve their learning and academic performance, as assessed by final examination mark, by a process that more closely mimics a "real-world" situation of review and redrafting. Additionally, the data show that students benefit from feedback only when this is used appropriately by the student. The article also discusses the continuing importance and relevance of essay writing skills so that writing, and acting upon feedback to do with that writing, remains an integral part of the process of learning.

  5. Effectiveness of Consultation on Student Ratings Feedback: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, Angela R.; Coe, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Consultation on student ratings is recognized as an important strategy to support university teachers in learning from student ratings feedback. However, there is little evidence to suggest which practices and strategies are most important for successful consultation. As the use of student ratings increases, such evidence becomes increasingly…

  6. Does Feedback Influence Student Postings to Online Discussions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina A. Meyer, Ph.D.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Feedback theory proposes that feedback influences the behavior of a system and its parts and that is governed by rules. This exploratory study attempts to test this theory in a graduate-level class on leadership theory. Twelve students were asked to participate in five online discussions, each lasting one week. The questions for each discussion were selected to be provocative and rich, without having any correct answer. At the end of the discussion, students were asked to indicate which posting and poster they felt was “best” or most valuable and why they felt the posting was “best.” There is mixed evidence that the voting influenced subsequent postings; some individuals did improve while others were consistently good or poor posters. Students selected postings that were (in declining frequency of occurrence: thoughtful or thought-provoking, well written or justified, uplifting, presented new information, same as their own opinions, changed me, or complex. These reasons are similar to those of the instructor, although the students’ difficulty in choosing and rationalizing a choice and the frequency at which students chose posts that captured their own thoughts and opinions are of some concern. This study provides some evidence that these graduate students could evaluate their own discussions without the instructor intruding or dictating an evaluation scheme, although this may not be true for other groups of online students.

  7. Feedback on video recorded consultations in medical teaching: why students loathe and love it – a focus-group based qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baerheim Anders

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feedback on videotaped consultations is a useful way to enhance consultation skills among medical students. The method is becoming increasingly common, but is still not widely implemented in medical education. One obstacle might be that many students seem to consider this educational approach a stressful experience and are reluctant to participate. In order to improve the process and make it more acceptable to the participants, we wanted to identify possible problems experienced by students when making and receiving feedback on their video taped consultations. Methods Nineteen of 75 students at the University of Bergen, Norway, participating in a consultation course in their final term of medical school underwent focus group interviews immediately following a video-based feedback session. The material was audio-taped, transcribed, and analysed by phenomenological qualitative analysis. Results The study uncovered that some students experienced emotional distress before the start of the course. They were apprehensive and lacking in confidence, expressing fear about exposing lack of skills and competence in front of each other. The video evaluation session and feedback process were evaluated positively however, and they found that their worries had been exaggerated. The video evaluation process also seemed to help strengthen the students' self esteem and self-confidence, and they welcomed this. Conclusion Our study provides insight regarding the vulnerability of students receiving feedback from videotaped consultations and their need for reassurance and support in the process, and demonstrates the importance of carefully considering the design and execution of such educational programs.

  8. Structured feedback on students' concept maps: the proverbial path to learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Conran; Conradsson, David; Nilsson Wikmar, Lena; Rowe, Michael

    2017-05-25

    Good conceptual knowledge is an essential requirement for health professions students, in that they are required to apply concepts learned in the classroom to a variety of different contexts. However, the use of traditional methods of assessment limits the educator's ability to correct students' conceptual knowledge prior to altering the educational context. Concept mapping (CM) is an educational tool for evaluating conceptual knowledge, but little is known about its use in facilitating the development of richer knowledge frameworks. In addition, structured feedback has the potential to develop good conceptual knowledge. The purpose of this study was to use Kinchin's criteria to assess the impact of structured feedback on the graphical complexity of CM's by observing the development of richer knowledge frameworks. Fifty-eight physiotherapy students created CM's targeting the integration of two knowledge domains within a case-based teaching paradigm. Each student received one round of structured feedback that addressed correction, reinforcement, forensic diagnosis, benchmarking, and longitudinal development on their CM's prior to the final submission. The concept maps were categorized according to Kinchin's criteria as either Spoke, Chain or Net representations, and then evaluated against defined traits of meaningful learning. The inter-rater reliability of categorizing CM's was good. Pre-feedback CM's were predominantly Chain structures (57%), with Net structures appearing least often. There was a significant reduction of the basic Spoke- structured CMs (P = 0.002) and a significant increase of Net-structured maps (P student development.

  9. Evaluating the negative or valuing the positive? Neural mechanisms supporting feedback-based learning across development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C K; Zanolie, Kiki; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Raijmakers, Maartje E J; Crone, Eveline A

    2008-09-17

    How children learn from positive and negative performance feedback lies at the foundation of successful learning and is therefore of great importance for educational practice. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural developmental changes related to feedback-based learning when performing a rule search and application task. Behavioral results from three age groups (8-9, 11-13, and 18-25 years of age) demonstrated that, compared with adults, 8- to 9-year-old children performed disproportionally more inaccurately after receiving negative feedback relative to positive feedback. Additionally, imaging data pointed toward a qualitative difference in how children and adults use performance feedback. That is, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and superior parietal cortex were more active after negative feedback for adults, but after positive feedback for children (8-9 years of age). For 11- to 13-year-olds, these regions did not show differential feedback sensitivity, suggesting that the transition occurs around this age. Pre-supplementary motor area/anterior cingulate cortex, in contrast, was more active after negative feedback in both 11- to 13-year-olds and adults, but not 8- to 9-year-olds. Together, the current data show that cognitive control areas are differentially engaged during feedback-based learning across development. Adults engage these regions after signals of response adjustment (i.e., negative feedback). Young children engage these regions after signals of response continuation (i.e., positive feedback). The neural activation patterns found in 11- to 13-year-olds indicate a transition around this age toward an increased influence of negative feedback on performance adjustment. This is the first developmental fMRI study to compare qualitative changes in brain activation during feedback learning across distinct stages of development.

  10. Designing Feedback in an Immersive Videogame: Supporting Student Mathematical Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresalfi, Melissa Sommerfeld; Barnes, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    This paper draws from and contributes to two bodies of research: how particular elements of game design support learning; and how particular characteristics of feedback impact student engagement. This paper reports findings from two rounds of a design-based research project that focuses on better understanding how feedback is integrated into, and…

  11. Student Teacher Assessment Feedback Preferences: The Influence of Cognitive Styles and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Carol; Waring, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The enhancement of assessment feedback is an international concern. This study is unique in its exploration of the nature of the relationship between student teachers' assessment feedback preferences, cognitive styles and gender, with a view to informing the development of assessment feedback practices and course design within initial teacher…

  12. Closing the Loop on Student Feedback: The Case of Australian and Scottish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mahsood; Cheng, Ming; Fitzgerald, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Universities have a long history of collecting student feedback using surveys and other mechanisms. The last decade has witnessed a significant shift in how student feedback is systematically collected, analysed, reported, and used by governments and institutions. This shift is due to a number of factors, including changes in government policy…

  13. Towards positive feedbacks between vegetation and tropospheric O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanLoocke, A. D.; Bernacchi, C. J.; Ainsworth, E. A.; Betzelberger, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    The concentration of tropospheric ozone ([O3]) has approximately doubled since 1900 and is projected to continue increasing. The extent of this increase depends strongly on the emission of ozone precursors as well as changing temperature and humidity. The responses of vegetation to O3 may also have the potential to positively feedback on regional climate and on the cycle of O3 formation and destruction. Plant productivity is linked to feedbacks in the climate indirectly through the carbon cycle as well as directly through the partitioning of radiation into sensible and latent heat fluxes. In the troposphere, O3 reduces plant productivity, an effect that is pronounced in soybean, the 4th most important food crop in the world. The soybean-maize agro-ecosystem is the largest ecosystem in the contiguous U.S., therefore changes in productivity and water use by soybean under increasing [O3] could impact the regional climate and hydrologic cycle in Midwestern U.S. with feedback effects on tropospheric O3 production and cycling. To assess the response to increasing [O3], soybeans were grown under open-air agricultural conditions at the SoyFACE research facility. During the 2009 growing season, eight 20 m diameter plots were exposed to different [O3] ranging from 40 to 200 ppb. Measurements of leaf-level gas exchange were made on four dates throughout the growing season and non-destructive measurements of Leaf Area Index were made weekly. Canopy latent and sensible heat fluxes were measured continuously throughout the growing season (day of year 197-245) using a residual energy balance micrometeorological technique. Results show that as [O3] increased, rates of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance decreased. Productivity, (i.e. seed yield) decreased by over 60% from 40 to 200 ppb while canopy evapotranspiration decreased by 30%. Sensible heat flux increased by 30%, while the growing season average canopy temperatures increased by 1 °C and with peak increases of 2

  14. Evaluating the effectiveness of real-time feedback on the bedside hand hygiene behaviors of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Lora K; Irani, Vida R

    2015-05-01

    Traditional hand hygiene teaching methods lack long-term effectiveness. A longitudinal, within-subject design explored the influence of real-time hand microbe feedback and a critical-thinking decision exercise on nursing student hand hygiene behaviors. In three community hospitals, the students' (n = 68) hand swabs were tested for normal flora, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus at three time points. Students completed the Partnering to Heal (PTH) online exercise on hospital-acquired infection prevention decisions. Normal flora colony counts decreased across the semester and MRSA-positive cultures increased in frequency and colony counts. MRSA-positive cultures were not associated with caring for patients in isolation precautions. Significantly higher colony counts were noted in the students who completed the PTH than those who did not complete the PTH. This study explores innovative pedagogy bringing the nonvisible microbial risk to the consciousness of nursing students in an attempt to change hand hygiene behaviors. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Learning from peer feedback on student-generated multiple choice questions: Views of introductory physics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Alison E.; Hardy, Judy; Galloway, Ross K.

    2018-06-01

    PeerWise is an online application where students are encouraged to generate a bank of multiple choice questions for their classmates to answer. After answering a question, students can provide feedback to the question author about the quality of the question and the question author can respond to this. Student use of, and attitudes to, this online community within PeerWise was investigated in two large first year undergraduate physics courses, across three academic years, to explore how students interact with the system and the extent to which they believe PeerWise to be useful to their learning. Most students recognized that there is value in engaging with PeerWise, and many students engaged deeply with the system, thinking critically about the quality of their submissions and reflecting on feedback provided to them. Students also valued the breadth of topics and level of difficulty offered by the questions, recognized the revision benefits afforded by the resource, and were often willing to contribute to the community by providing additional explanations and engaging in discussion.

  16. Collaborative and Bidirectional Feedback Between Students and Clinical Preceptors: Promoting Effective Communication Skills on Health Care Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kara; Chou, Calvin L

    2016-11-01

    Current literature on feedback suggests that clinical preceptors lead feedback conversations that are primarily unidirectional, from preceptor to student. While this approach may promote clinical competency, it does not actively develop students' competency in facilitating feedback discussions and providing feedback across power differentials (ie, from student to preceptor). This latter competency warrants particular attention given its fundamental role in effective health care team communication and its related influence on patient safety. Reframing the feedback process as collaborative and bidirectional, where both preceptors and students provide and receive feedback, maximizes opportunities for role modeling and skills practice in the context of a supportive relationship, thereby enhancing team preparedness. We describe an initiative to introduce these fundamental skills of collaborative, bidirectional feedback in the nurse-midwifery education program at the University of California, San Francisco. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  17. Competition overwhelms the positive plant-soil feedback generated by an invasive plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Kerri M; Knight, Tiffany M

    2017-01-01

    Invasive plant species can modify soils in a way that benefits their fitness more than the fitness of native species. However, it is unclear how competition among plant species alters the strength and direction of plant-soil feedbacks. We tested how community context altered plant-soil feedback between the non-native invasive forb Lespedeza cuneata and nine co-occurring native prairie species. In a series of greenhouse experiments, we grew plants individually and in communities with soils that differed in soil origin (invaded or uninvaded by L. cuneata) and in soils that were live vs. sterilized. In the absence of competition, L. cuneata produced over 60% more biomass in invaded than uninvaded soils, while native species performance was unaffected. The absence of a soil origin effect in sterile soil suggests that the positive plant-soil feedback was caused by differences in the soil biota. However, in the presence of competition, the positive effect of soil origin on L. cuneata growth disappeared. These results suggest that L. cuneata may benefit from positive plant-soil feedback when establishing populations in disturbed landscapes with few interspecific competitors, but does not support the hypothesis that plant-soil feedbacks influence competitive outcomes between L. cuneata and native plant species. These results highlight the importance of considering whether competition influences the outcome of interactions between plants and soils.

  18. The combination of positive and negative feedback loops confers exquisite flexibility to biochemical switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeuty, Benjamin; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2009-01-01

    A wide range of cellular processes require molecular regulatory pathways to convert a graded signal into a discrete response. One prevalent switching mechanism relies on the coexistence of two stable states (bistability) caused by positive feedback regulations. Intriguingly, positive feedback is often supplemented with negative feedback, raising the question of whether and how these two types of feedback can cooperate to control discrete cellular responses. To address this issue, we formulate a canonical model of a protein–protein interaction network and analyze the dynamics of a prototypical two-component circuit. The appropriate combination of negative and positive feedback loops can bring a bistable circuit close to the oscillatory regime. Notably, sharply activated negative feedback can give rise to a bistable regime wherein two stable fixed points coexist and may collide pairwise with two saddle points. This specific type of bistability is found to allow for separate and flexible control of switch-on and switch-off events, for example (i) to combine fast and reversible transitions, (ii) to enable transient switching responses and (iii) to display tunable noise-induced transition rates. Finally, we discuss the relevance of such bistable switching behavior, and the circuit topologies considered, to specific biological processes such as adaptive metabolic responses, stochastic fate decisions and cell-cycle transitions. Taken together, our results suggest an efficient mechanism by which positive and negative feedback loops cooperate to drive the flexible and multifaceted switching behaviors arising in biological systems

  19. A state variable approach to the BESSY II local beam-position-feedback system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, J.D.; Khan, S.; Kraemer, D.

    1996-01-01

    At the BESSY II facility, stability of the electron beam position and angle near insertion devices (IDs) is of utmost importance. Disturbances due to ground motion could result in unwanted broad-bandwidth beam-jitter which decreases the electron (and resultant photon) beam's effective brightness. Therefore, feedback techniques must be used. Operating over a frequency range of 100-Hz, a local feedback system will correct these beam-trajectory errors using the four bumps around IDs. This paper reviews how the state-variable feedback approach can be applied to real-time correction of these beam position and angle errors. A frequency-domain solution showing beam jitter reduction is presented. Finally, this paper reports results of a beam-feedback test at BESSY I

  20. Simulation Pedagogy With Nurse Practitioner Students: Impact of Receiving Immediate Individualized Faculty Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Sheila; Conelius, Jaclyn

    2015-01-01

    Family nurse practitioner (FNP) students must achieve basic competency in managing patients' primary care needs across the lifespan. Students in the FNP program have simulations integrated throughout their clinical theory courses to increase practice time with various patient cases. Students who received individualized faculty feedback immediately after self-evaluation of simulation performance showed statistically significantly increased knowledge (as evidenced by higher grades in course examinations and preceptor evaluations) than a control group of students who received feedback in a group class via a rubric grading guide 2-4 weeks after all students completed their individual simulations.

  1. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  2. Room for improvement: Palliating the ego in feedback-resistant medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrella, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    Feedback in medical education provides the impetus for growth in a field pressured to demonstrate continuous progress. Unfortunately, as it always incorporates some level of judgment, certain students appear more resistant than receptive to receiving feedback. Coupled with the ubiquitous stressors of medicine-examinations, perpetual knowledge acquisition, competition for employment-there subtly emerges a learning environment in which the mindset of medical trainees morphs from collegiality to outperformance of one's peers. As the unconscious mind is ultimately focused on self-protection, the cognitive response of reflecting upon received feedback is overcome by an emotional response to safeguard one's self-image against criticism in a culture of comparison. Although self-confidence plays a critical role in mitigating burnout, the relationship between resiliency and ego-armoring is rarely discussed in the literature. Consequently, despite the best intentions of educators in fostering clinical maturity among their trainees, the fact remains that insecurity, inadequacy and invulnerability continue to drive feedback-resistance among medical students.

  3. Predicting Learning-Related Emotions from Students' Textual Classroom Feedback via Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altrabsheh, Nabeela; Cocea, Mihaela; Fallahkhair, Sanaz

    2015-01-01

    Teachers/lecturers typically adapt their teaching to respond to students' emotions, e.g. provide more examples when they think the students are confused. While getting a feel of the students' emotions is easier in small settings, it is much more difficult in larger groups. In these larger settings textual feedback from students could provide…

  4. Understanding Arts and Humanities Students' Experiences of Assessment and Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Joelle; McNab, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how undergraduate students on arts and humanities courses experience assessment and feedback. The research uses a detailed audit, a specially devised questionnaire (the Assessment Experience Questionnaire), and student focus group data, and the article examines results from 19 programmes, comparing those from "arts and…

  5. Student feedback about the integrated curriculum in a Caribbean medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ravi Shankar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Xavier University School of Medicine adopted an integrated, organ system-based curriculum in January 2013. The present study was aimed at determining students’ perceptions of the integrated curriculum and related assessment methods. Methods: The study was conducted on first- to fourth-semester undergraduate medical students during March 2014. The students were informed of the study and subsequently invited to participate. Focus group discussions were conducted. The curriculum’s level of integration, different courses offered, teaching-learning methods employed, and the advantages and concerns relating to the curriculum were noted. The respondents also provided feedback about the assessment methods used. Deductive content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results: Twenty-two of the 68 students (32.2% participated in the study. The respondents expressed generally positive opinions. They felt that the curriculum prepared them well for licensing examinations and future practice. Problem-based learning sessions encouraged active learning and group work among students, thus, improving their understanding of the course material. The respondents felt that certain subjects were allocated a larger proportion of time during the sessions, as well as more questions during the integrated assessment. They also expressed an appreciation for medical humanities, and felt that sessions on the appraisal of literature needed modification. Their opinions about assessment of behavior, attitudes, and professionalism varied. Conclusion: Student opinion was positive, overall. Our findings would be of interest to other medical schools that have recently adopted an integrated curriculum or are in the process of doing so.

  6. Audio-Visual Feedback for Self-monitoring Posture in Ballet Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Esben Winther; Hølledig, Malte Lindholm; Bach-Nielsen, Sebastian Siem

    2017-01-01

    An application for ballet training is presented that monitors the posture position (straightness of the spine and rotation of the pelvis) deviation from the ideal position in real-time. The human skeletal data is acquired through a Microsoft Kinect v2. The movement of the student is mirrored......-coded. In an experiment with 9-12 year-old dance students from a ballet school, comparing the audio-visual feedback modality with no feedback leads to an increase in posture accuracy (p

  7. The Emergence of Contesting Motives for Student Feedback-Based Evaluation in Australian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwin, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Student feedback-based evaluation performs a significant social role in framing perceptions of the quality of teaching in contemporary Australian higher education. Yet its emergence is a relatively recent phenomenon, having only been in widespread application since the mid-1980s. The early manifestations of student feedback-based evaluation came…

  8. Influence of Strategies-Based Feedback in Students' Oral Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisquiarco, Angie; Rojas, Santiago Sánchez; Abad, José Vicente

    2018-01-01

    This article reports on an action research study that assessed the influence of cognitive and metacognitive strategies-based feedback in the oral performance of a group of 6th grade students at a public school in Medellin, Colombia. Researchers analyzed students' oral performance through assessment and self-assessment rubrics, applied inventories…

  9. Factors influencing students' receptivity to formative feedback emerging from different assessment cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison, C.J.; Konings, K.D.; Dannefer, E.F.; Schuwirth, L.W.; Wass, V.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Feedback after assessment is essential to support the development of optimal performance, but often fails to reach its potential. Although different assessment cultures have been proposed, the impact of these cultures on students' receptivity to feedback is unclear. This study aimed to

  10. On the evocability of a positive oestrogen feedback action on LH secretion in transsexual men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörner, G; Rohde, W; Seidel, K; Haas, W; Schott, G S

    1976-03-01

    In transsexual men with homosexual behaviour and intact testicular function, as well as in homosexual men with normal gender identity, following a negative oestrogen feedback effect a delayed positive oestrogen feedback action on LH secretion was evoked. By contrast, in transsexual men with hypo- or asexuality and intact testes or hypergonadotrophic hypo- or agonadism, as well as in heterosexual men with normal gender identity, a negative oestrogen feedback effect was not followed by a positive feedback action on LH release. In transsexual women with homosexual behaviour and oligo- and/or hypomenorrhoea, only a weak or at best moderate positive oestrogen feedback action on LH release was evocable, similarly as in castrated and oestrogen-primed heterosexual men. By contrast, in a transsexual woman with bisexual behaviour and eumenorrhoea, a strong positive oestrogen feedback action on LH secretion was evocable, as well as in heterosexual women with normal gender identity.

  11. Does Reflective Learning with Feedback Improve Dental Students' Self-Perceived Competence in Clinical Preparedness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihm, Jung-Joon; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2016-02-01

    The value of dental students' self-assessment is often debated. The aim of this study was to explore whether reflective learning with feedback enabled dental students to more accurately assess their self-perceived levels of preparedness on dental competencies. Over 16 weeks, all third- and fourth-year students at a dental school in the Republic of Korea took part in clinical rotations that incorporated reflective learning and feedback. Following this educational intervention, they were asked to assess their perceptions of their clinical competence. The results showed that the students reported feeling most confident about performing periodontal treatment (mean 7.1 on a ten-point scale) and least confident about providing orthodontic care (mean 5.6). The fourth-year students reported feeling more confident on all the competencies than the third-year students. Their self-perceived competence in periodontal treatment and oral medicine significantly predicted the instructors' clinical evaluations. This study offered insights into determining if structured reflective learning with effective feedback helps to increase dental students' self-perceived level of clinical preparedness.

  12. Feedback control of plasma position in the HL-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Baoshan; Jiao Boliang; Yang Kailing

    1991-01-01

    In the HL-1 tokamak with a thick copper shell, the control of plasma position is successfully performed by a feedback-feedforward system with dual mode regulator and the equilibrium field coils outside the shell. The plasma position can be controlled within ±2 mm in both vertical and horizontal directions under the condition that the iron core of transformer is not saturated

  13. Student Views of Technology-Mediated Written Corrective Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher

    2017-01-01

    and practices concerning the specific – and time-consuming – language-teacher activity of providing WCF and 2) potential changes in student attitudes when technology is used to mediate the feedback. At the core of the study is an eight-month intervention which was carried out with three teachers of English...

  14. Improve beam position stability of SSRF BL15U beamline by using beam intensity feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guoqiang; Liang Dongxu; Yan Fen; Li Aiguo; Yu Xiaohan

    2013-01-01

    Background: The shaking of micro-focus spot in the vertical direction is found during the energy scan experiments, such as XAFS scan. The beam position of vertical direction changes obviously with the energy. Purpose: In order to make the beam position shaking amplitude less than 1/10 of the beam size. Methods: The beam position stability of SSRF BL15U beamline is improved by using beam intensity feedback. The feedback system include beam intensity monitor of the beamline and fine adjust mechanism of pitch 2 (the pitch angle of the second crystal of the double crystal monochromator). The feedback control of the beam position is realized by adjusting the pitch 2 to fix beam intensity at its maximum value. Results: The test results show that the vertical beam vibration below 10 Hz frequency is significantly reduced and also the beam position stability during photon energy scan is improved by more than 5 times. Conclusions: By adopting the new feedback systems, the stability of the beam spot on the specimen stage was dramatically improved which achieved the anticipated target. (authors)

  15. Formative Feedback in a Business School: Understanding the Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppitt, Nicola J.; Iqbal, Yasser

    2009-01-01

    Inspired by a desire to improve the student experience, this paper reviews primary research carried out into the use of formative feedback within a Business School at a "new" university in the UK. The research adopted a qualitative approach with key objectives to gain staff and student perspectives on the role and practice of feedback…

  16. Entry knowledge and situational feedback of MBBS students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S C; Maharjan, S

    2005-01-01

    A need has been felt to acquire knowledge of students at Kathmandu Medical College (KMC) who have decided to take up a medical career and have enrolled at KMC after completing two years of basic sciences. The intent was to (i) find out the entering status with regard to general knowledge, (ii) get feedback from the students about the facilities provided by the management both at basic sciences complex at Duwakot and clinical sciences at Sinamangal and (iii) get feedback regarding the teaching learning activities provided by various departments in KMC. This attempt at getting their point of view was for trying to improve upon the facilities by taking up their suggestions and doing away with the weaknesses. Preference was given to hostel students as they would be able to comment on living conditions. A total of 150 students from three consecutive batches from basic and clinical sciences were included in the study. Survey questionnaires were distributed and all the forms were returned. The obtained data was analyzed using SPSS 11.5 version for Windows. It was found that the entry knowledge on general issue was better in 6th batch of students (87.08+/-17.41) than 5th batch (82.19+/-17.43) and 7th batch (78.93+/-20.60), but not significant (p=0.164>0.05). The students in different batches differed in their rating of various facilities provided by KMCTH. The most liked departments in terms of teaching learning activities were departments of Anatomy and Pathology. Entry knowledge of the students of three batches was found to differ but not significant, correlating with the amount of teaching and learning received at KMC. The facilities provided by KMC were perceived as more satisfactory by the students who enrolled at KMC in later years. The earlier students had to cope with more difficulties as KMC was trying to improve on various facilities it provided to its students. Level of entry knowledge got better as the students attained more and more years of teaching and

  17. The Influence of Peer Feedback on the Acquisition of Physical-Examination Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Martineau

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies have suggested that having students observe peers while acquiring physical-examination (PE skills fosters the acquisition of the psychomotor skills required to conduct a PE. One difficulty, however, has been to disentangle the effect of peer observation from peer feedback, both of which occur when students learn in groups. This study investigated the influence of peer feedback on learning the neurolocomotor physical exam for low-back pain. 120 second-year medical students were randomly assigned to a peer-feedback group (n=61 or a no-peer-feedback group (n=53, during a regular learning activity with a standardized-patient instructor. Students first practised the NLE in groups of three, with or without peer feedback, depending on the group to which they were assigned. Subsequently, the members of both groups performed the NLE individually. The final NLE was videotaped and assessed later. Peer feedback had a positive effect on the acquisition of PE skills (87.9% vs. 90.8%, p=0.023, despite the fact that students had an initial preference for instructor feedback compared with peer feedback. These results support the use of group activities that give students the opportunity to provide feedback to their peers while learning PE skills.

  18. Supporting Third Year Medical Students' Skill Acquisition and Self-Efficacy with Coping Models and Process Feedback during Laparoscopic Knot Tying Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Michael S; Kauffman, Douglas F

    2017-01-01

    Background: During the third year general surgery clerkship, medical students are required to develop laparoscopic knot-tying skills. Knot-tying skills studies often rely on objective variables (e.g., time, materials used, number of iterations) that lend themselves to correlational analysis of pre- and post-intervention skill level. This study differs by examining how instructional interventions-role modeling and feedback-affect medical students' skill acquisition and self-efficacy during a laparoscopic surgical simulation training session. Methods: Seventy-eight surgical clerkship students were assigned randomly to one cell of a 2X2 factorial design. Participants observed one of two types of role modeling (expert vs. coping) and received either process-oriented or outcome-oriented feedback during a 30-min laparoscopic training session. Participants also completed several surveys that assessed their interest in surgery and their self-efficacy for laparoscopic knot tying. Results: Coping model groups tended to perform better on the knot tying task, though this was less the case in the presence of outcome feedback. Expert model groups slightly outperformed the coping model group on the peg transfer task, but in the presence of outcome feedback they reported the lowest satisfaction with their performance and the lowest self-efficacy for the knot tying task. The coping model combined with process feedback had a positive influence on students' efficiency in learning the task, on their satisfaction with their performance, and on their self-efficacy for laparoscopic knot typing. Conclusions: Results are discussed relative to self-regulated learning theory.

  19. Modulation of dynamic modes by interplay between positive and negative feedback loops in gene regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liu-Suo; Li, Ning-Xi; Chen, Jing-Jia; Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2018-04-01

    A positive and a negative feedback loop can induce bistability and oscillation, respectively, in biological networks. Nevertheless, they are frequently interlinked to perform more elaborate functions in many gene regulatory networks. Coupled positive and negative feedback loops may exhibit either oscillation or bistability depending on the intensity of the stimulus in some particular networks. It is less understood how the transition between the two dynamic modes is modulated by the positive and negative feedback loops. We developed an abstract model of such systems, largely based on the core p53 pathway, to explore the mechanism for the transformation of dynamic behaviors. Our results show that enhancing the positive feedback may promote or suppress oscillations depending on the strength of both feedback loops. We found that the system oscillates with low amplitudes in response to a moderate stimulus and switches to the on state upon a strong stimulus. When the positive feedback is activated much later than the negative one in response to a strong stimulus, the system exhibits long-term oscillations before switching to the on state. We explain this intriguing phenomenon using quasistatic approximation. Moreover, early switching to the on state may occur when the system starts from a steady state in the absence of stimuli. The interplay between the positive and negative feedback plays a key role in the transitions between oscillation and bistability. Of note, our conclusions should be applicable only to some specific gene regulatory networks, especially the p53 network, in which both oscillation and bistability exist in response to a certain type of stimulus. Our work also underscores the significance of transient dynamics in determining cellular outcome.

  20. Positive Feedback Keeps Duration of Mitosis Temporally Insulated from Upstream Cell-Cycle Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Ana Rita; Gelens, Lendert; Sheriff, Rahuman S M; Santos, Silvia D M

    2016-10-20

    Cell division is characterized by a sequence of events by which a cell gives rise to two daughter cells. Quantitative measurements of cell-cycle dynamics in single cells showed that despite variability in G1-, S-, and G2 phases, duration of mitosis is short and remarkably constant. Surprisingly, there is no correlation between cell-cycle length and mitotic duration, suggesting that mitosis is temporally insulated from variability in earlier cell-cycle phases. By combining live cell imaging and computational modeling, we showed that positive feedback is the molecular mechanism underlying the temporal insulation of mitosis. Perturbing positive feedback gave rise to a sluggish, variable entry and progression through mitosis and uncoupled duration of mitosis from variability in cell cycle length. We show that positive feedback is important to keep mitosis short, constant, and temporally insulated and anticipate it might be a commonly used regulatory strategy to create modularity in other biological systems. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Feedback Valence Affects Auditory Perceptual Learning Independently of Feedback Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitay, Sygal; Moore, David R.; Molloy, Katharine; Halliday, Lorna F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that negative feedback is more effective in driving learning than positive feedback. We investigated the effect on learning of providing varying amounts of negative and positive feedback while listeners attempted to discriminate between three identical tones; an impossible task that nevertheless produces robust learning. Four feedback conditions were compared during training: 90% positive feedback or 10% negative feedback informed the participants that they were doing equally well, while 10% positive or 90% negative feedback informed them they were doing equally badly. In all conditions the feedback was random in relation to the listeners’ responses (because the task was to discriminate three identical tones), yet both the valence (negative vs. positive) and the probability of feedback (10% vs. 90%) affected learning. Feedback that informed listeners they were doing badly resulted in better post-training performance than feedback that informed them they were doing well, independent of valence. In addition, positive feedback during training resulted in better post-training performance than negative feedback, but only positive feedback indicating listeners were doing badly on the task resulted in learning. As we have previously speculated, feedback that better reflected the difficulty of the task was more effective in driving learning than feedback that suggested performance was better than it should have been given perceived task difficulty. But contrary to expectations, positive feedback was more effective than negative feedback in driving learning. Feedback thus had two separable effects on learning: feedback valence affected motivation on a subjectively difficult task, and learning occurred only when feedback probability reflected the subjective difficulty. To optimize learning, training programs need to take into consideration both feedback valence and probability. PMID:25946173

  2. Switching of the positive feedback for RAS activation by a concerted function of SOS membrane association domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuki; Hibino, Kayo; Yanagida, Toshio; Sako, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Son of sevenless (SOS) is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that regulates cell behavior by activating the small GTPase RAS. Recent in vitro studies have suggested that an interaction between SOS and the GTP-bound active form of RAS generates a positive feedback loop that propagates RAS activation. However, it remains unclear how the multiple domains of SOS contribute to the regulation of the feedback loop in living cells. Here, we observed single molecules of SOS in living cells to analyze the kinetics and dynamics of SOS behavior. The results indicate that the histone fold and Grb2-binding domains of SOS concertedly produce an intermediate state of SOS on the cell surface. The fraction of the intermediated state was reduced in positive feedback mutants, suggesting that the feedback loop functions during the intermediate state. Translocation of RAF, recognizing the active form of RAS, to the cell surface was almost abolished in the positive feedback mutants. Thus, the concerted functions of multiple membrane-associating domains of SOS governed the positive feedback loop, which is crucial for cell fate decision regulated by RAS.

  3. What Learning Analytics‐Based Prediction Models Tell Us About Feedback Preferences of Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Quan; Tempelaar, Dirk; Rienties, Bart; Giesbers, Bas

    2016-01-01

    Learning analytics seeks to enhance learning processes through systematic measurements of learning-related data and to provide informative feedback to learners and educators (Siemens & Long, 2011). This study examined the use of preferred feedback modes in students by using a dispositional

  4. Graduate Students' Needs and Preferences for Written Feedback on Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjet Kaur Mehar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine graduate students' needs and preferences for written feedback on academic writing from their lecturers and thesis supervisors. Quantitative method via survey questionnaire was used to collect data from 21 respondents. The data collection involved Master and Doctorate students at a tertiary level institution…

  5. Enhancing Student Performance in First-Semester General Chemistry Using Active Feedback through the World Wide Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Kent A.; Blake, Bob

    2007-01-01

    The World Wide Web recently launched a new interactive feedback system for the instructors, so that can better understanding about their students and their problems. The feedback, in combination with tailored lectures is expected to enhance student performance in the first semester of general chemistry.

  6. Tutor Feedback on Draft Essays: Developing Students' Academic Writing and Subject Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Krista

    2014-01-01

    Providing feedback on draft essays is an accepted means of enacting a social-constructivist approach to assessment, aligning with current views on the value of formative feedback and assessment for learning (AFL). However, the use of this process as a means of improving not only content but also students' academic writing skills has not been…

  7. The Value of Peer Feedback Opportunities for Students in Writing Intensive Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennette, Lynne N.; Frank, Nichole M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to examine the usefulness of peer feedback on APA-style research papers in a writing-intensive class. Subsequent to APA training, students were asked to review and provide feedback on a classmate's APA-style research report for both content and formatting. Performance on this research report was then compared to…

  8. Positive Feedback Investment Strategies and Destabilizing Rational Speculation

    OpenAIRE

    J. Bradford De Long; Andrei Shleifer; Lawrence H. Summers; Robert J. Waldmann

    1989-01-01

    Analyses of the role of rational speculators in financial markets usually presume that such investors dampen price fluctuations by trading against liquidity or noise traders. This conclusion does not necessarily hold when noise traders follow positive-feedback investment strategies buy when prices rise and sell when prices fall. In such cases, it may pay rational speculators to try to jump on the bandwagon early and to purchase ahead of noise trader demand. If rational speculators' attempts t...

  9. Performance feedback, self-esteem, and cardiovascular adaptation to recurring stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eoin G; Creaven, Ann-Marie

    2017-05-01

    This study sought to examine the effects of performance feedback and individual differences in self-esteem on cardiovascular habituation to repeat stress exposure. Sixty-six university students (n = 39 female) completed a self-esteem measure and completed a cardiovascular stress-testing protocol involving repeated exposure to a mental arithmetic task. Cardiovascular functioning was sampled across four phases: resting baseline, initial stress exposure, a recovery period, and repeated stress exposure. Participants were randomly assigned to receive fictional positive feedback, negative feedback, or no feedback following the recovery period. Negative feedback was associated with a sensitized blood pressure response to a second exposure of the stress task. Positive feedback was associated with decreased cardiovascular and psychological responses to a second exposure. Self-esteem was also found to predict reactivity and this interacted with the type of feedback received. These findings suggest that negative performance feedback sensitizes cardiovascular reactivity to stress, whereas positive performance feedback increases both cardiovascular and psychological habituation to repeat exposure to stressors. Furthermore, an individual's self-esteem also appears to influence this process.

  10. Effectiveness of chest compression feedback during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in lateral tilted and semirecumbent positions: a randomised controlled simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y; Oh, J; Chee, Y; Cho, Y; Lee, S; Lim, T H

    2015-11-01

    Feedback devices have been shown to improve the quality of chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patients in the supine position, but no studies have reported the effects of feedback devices on chest compression when the chest is tilted. Basic life support-trained providers were randomly assigned to administer chest compressions to a manikin in the supine, 30° left lateral tilt and 30° semirecumbent positions, with or without the aid of a feedback device incorporated into a smartphone. Thirty-six participants were studied. The feedback device did not affect the quality of chest compressions in the supine position, but improved aspects of performance in the tilted positions. In the lateral tilted position, the median (IQR [range]) chest compression rate was 99 (99-100 [96-117]) compressions.min(-1) with and 115 (95-128 [77-164]) compressions.min(-1) without feedback (p = 0.05), and the proportion of compressions of correct depth was 55 (0-96 [0-100])% with and 1 (0-30 [0-100])% without feedback (p = 0.03). In the semirecumbent position, the proportion of compressions of correct depth was 21 (0-87 [0-100])% with and 1 (0-26 [0-100])% without feedback (p = 0.05). Female participants applied chest compressions at a more accurate rate using the feedback device in the lateral tilted position but were unable to increase the chest compression depth, whereas male participants were able to increase the force of chest compression using the feedback device in the lateral tilted and semirecumbent positions. We conclude that a feedback device improves the application of chest compressions during simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation when the chest is tilted. © 2015 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  11. Local beam position feedback experiments on the ESRF storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y.; Kahana, E.; Kirchman, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the results of local beam position feedback experiments conducted on the ESRF storage ring using digital signal processing (DSP) under the trilateral agreement of collaboration among ESRF, APS, and SPring-8. Two rf beam position monitors (BPMS) in the, upstream and downstream of the insertion device (ID) and two x-ray BPMs in the sixth cell were used to monitor the electron beam and the x-ray beam emitted from the ID, respectively. The local bump coefficients were obtained using the technique of singular value decomposition (SVD) on the global response matrix for the bump magnets and all the available BPMs outside the local bump. The local response matrix was then obtained between the two three-magnet bumps and the position monitors. The data sampling frequency was 4 kHz and a proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) controller was used. The result indicates the closed-loop feedback bandwidth close to 100 Hz and clear attenuation (∼ -40 dB) of the 7-Hz beam motion due to girder vibration resonance. Comparison of the results using the rf BPMs and x-ray BPMs will be also discussed

  12. Using Video Feedback to Measure Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, Linda; Andrews, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    When a student has a high sense of self-efficacy, foreseeing success and providing positive guides and supports for performing the skill will usually occur. A low self-efficacy tends to predict failure and anticipation of what could go wrong. Videotape feedback provided to students has reported favorable outcomes. Self-efficacy could alter…

  13. Feedback using an ePortfolio for medicine long cases: quality not quantity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleasel, Jane; Burgess, Annette; Weeks, Ruth; Haq, Inam

    2016-10-21

    The evidence for the positive impact of an electronic Portfolio (ePortfolio) on feedback in medicine is mixed. An ePortfolio for medical long cases in a Graduate Medical Program was developed. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of medical students and faculty of the impact of the ePortfolio on the feedback process. In total, 130 Year 3 medical students, and six faculty participated in the study. This is a mixed methods study, using a combination of both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Quantitative methods were used to quantify the number of long cases performed. Qualitative methods were used to explore the relationship between quantity and quality of feedback, and provide a rich understanding of both students' and faculty's experience and perceptions of the ePortfolio. Students received a variable quantity of feedback at each of the three studied clinical schools, with an average of between 4 - 5.4 feedback episodes per student. Feedback that was constructive, specific and timely and delivered by a senior academic was important. Quantity was not an essential factor, with two episodes of detailed feedback reported to be adequate. The barriers to the use of the ePortfolio were technical aspects of the platform that interfered with student engagement. Feedback using the ePortfolio for medical long cases is a valuable tool providing a senior clinician delivers detailed, constructive and personalized feedback in a timely fashion. The ePortfolio system needs to be user-friendly to engage students.

  14. Annotation an effective device for student feedback: a critical review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Elaine C

    2010-05-01

    The paper examines hand-written annotation, its many features, difficulties and strengths as a feedback tool. It extends and clarifies what modest evidence is in the public domain and offers an evaluation of how to use annotation effectively in the support of student feedback [Marshall, C.M., 1998a. The Future of Annotation in a Digital (paper) World. Presented at the 35th Annual GLSLIS Clinic: Successes and Failures of Digital Libraries, June 20-24, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, March 24, pp. 1-20; Marshall, C.M., 1998b. Toward an ecology of hypertext annotation. Hypertext. In: Proceedings of the Ninth ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia, June 20-24, Pittsburgh Pennsylvania, US, pp. 40-49; Wolfe, J.L., Nuewirth, C.M., 2001. From the margins to the centre: the future of annotation. Journal of Business and Technical Communication, 15(3), 333-371; Diyanni, R., 2002. One Hundred Great Essays. Addison-Wesley, New York; Wolfe, J.L., 2002. Marginal pedagogy: how annotated texts affect writing-from-source texts. Written Communication, 19(2), 297-333; Liu, K., 2006. Annotation as an index to critical writing. Urban Education, 41, 192-207; Feito, A., Donahue, P., 2008. Minding the gap annotation as preparation for discussion. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education, 7(3), 295-307; Ball, E., 2009. A participatory action research study on handwritten annotation feedback and its impact on staff and students. Systemic Practice and Action Research, 22(2), 111-124; Ball, E., Franks, H., McGrath, M., Leigh, J., 2009. Annotation is a valuable tool to enhance learning and assessment in student essays. Nurse Education Today, 29(3), 284-291]. Although a significant number of studies examine annotation, this is largely related to on-line tools and computer mediated communication and not hand-written annotation as comment, phrase or sign written on the student essay to provide critique. Little systematic research has been conducted to consider how this latter form

  15. Using student models to generate feedback in a university course on statistical sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tacoma, S.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411923080; Drijvers, P.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074302922; Boon, P.B.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/203374207

    2017-01-01

    Due to the complexity of the topic and a lack of individual guidance, introductory statistics courses at university are often challenging. Automated feedback might help to address this issue. In this study, we explore the use of student models to provide feedback. The research question is how

  16. Relationship between Counseling Students' Childhood Memories and Current Negative Self-Evaluations When Receiving Corrective Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Daniel; Olguin, David; Marley, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This article entails a study focused on the relationship between counseling students' negative childhood memories of receiving corrective feedback and current negative self-evaluations when receiving similar feedback in counselor education programs. Participants (N = 186) completed the Corrective Feedback Instrument-Revised (CFI-R; Hulse-Killacky…

  17. The Effect of Choosing versus Receiving Feedback on College Students' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutumisu, Maria; Schwartz, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the effect of choosing versus receiving feedback on the learning performance of n = 98 post-secondary students from California on a digital poster design task. The study employs a yoked experimental design where college students are randomly assigned to play a choice-based assessment game, Posterlet, in one of two conditions,…

  18. STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS OF THEIR REFLECTIVE ESSAY WRITING EXPERIENCE AND TEACHER FEEDBACK COMMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asiah Mohd Sharif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reflection which encompasses critical and analytical capabilities is a critical 21st century skill for students to develop. To ensure students are equipped with this skill, reflective writing has been identified as a possible tool. Teacher feedback on students’ written output therefore plays a role in developing students’ reflective skills. This study asks two questions: How do students perceive their experience writing reflective essays? What is the nature of the teacher’s feedback comments on students’ reflective essays and how do students perceive them? To answer these questions, nineteen ESL students in an entry-level Medical programme completed a questionnaire concerning their experiences writing reflective essays and perceptions of teacher feedback on these essays. Interviews were conducted with two students to follow-up on questionnaire responses. The content analysis showed that the students believed reflective writing played a small contribution to their language learning. Further investigation into the students’ perspectives of their teachers’ feedback comments suggests that even though the teachers’ feedback was positive, the students also referred to the comments as inadequate and ineffective. Pedagogical implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  19. Confinement and diffusion modulate bistability and stochastic switching in a reaction network with positive feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynarczyk, Paul J.; Pullen, Robert H.; Abel, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Positive feedback is a common feature in signal transduction networks and can lead to phenomena such as bistability and signal propagation by domain growth. Physical features of the cellular environment, such as spatial confinement and the mobility of proteins, play important but inadequately understood roles in shaping the behavior of signaling networks. Here, we use stochastic, spatially resolved kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to explore a positive feedback network as a function of system size, system shape, and mobility of molecules. We show that these physical properties can markedly alter characteristics of bistability and stochastic switching when compared with well-mixed simulations. Notably, systems of equal volume but different shapes can exhibit qualitatively different behaviors under otherwise identical conditions. We show that stochastic switching to a state maintained by positive feedback occurs by cluster formation and growth. Additionally, the frequency at which switching occurs depends nontrivially on the diffusion coefficient, which can promote or suppress switching relative to the well-mixed limit. Taken together, the results provide a framework for understanding how confinement and protein mobility influence emergent features of the positive feedback network by modulating molecular concentrations, diffusion-influenced rate parameters, and spatiotemporal correlations between molecules

  20. Optimal allocation of reviewers for peer feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind, David Kofoed; Jensen, Ulf Aslak; Jørgensen, Rasmus Malthe

    2017-01-01

    feedback to be effective students should give and receive useful feedback. A key challenge in peer feedback is allocating the feedback givers in a good way. It is important that reviewers are allocated to submissions such that the feedback distribution is fair - meaning that all students receive good......Peer feedback is the act of letting students give feedback to each other on submitted work. There are multiple reasons to use peer feedback, including students getting more feedback, time saving for teachers and increased learning by letting students reflect on work by others. In order for peer...... indicated the quality of the feedback. Using this model together with historical data we calculate the feedback-giving skill of each student and uses that as input to an allocation algorithm that assigns submissions to reviewers, in order to optimize the feedback quality for all students. We test...

  1. Understanding constructive feedback: a commitment between teachers and students for academic and professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Yasir; Mahmood, Sajid

    2010-03-01

    This review highlights the need in the Pakistani medical education system for teachers and students to be able to: define constructive feedback; provide constructive feedback; identify standards for constructive feedback; identify a suitable model for the provision of constructive feedback and evaluate the use of constructive feedback. For the purpose of literature review we had defined the key word glossary as: feedback, constructive feedback, teaching constructive feedback, models for feedback, models for constructive feedback and giving and receiving feedback. The data bases for the search include: Medline (EBSCO), Web of Knowledge, SCOPUS, TRIP, ScienceDirect, Pubmed, U.K. Pubmed Central, ZETOC, University of Dundee Library catalogue, SCIRUS (Elsevier) and Google Scholar. This article states that the Pakistani medical schools do not reflect on or use the benefits of the constructive feedback process. The discussion about constructive feedback suggests that in the context of Pakistan, constructive feedback will facilitate the teaching and learning activities.

  2. Audit and feedback by medical students to improve the preventive care practices of general practice supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkes, Lucy A; Liira, Helena; Emery, Jon

    Medical students benefit from their contact with clinicians and patients in the clinical setting. However, little is known about whether patients and clinicians also benefit from medical students. We developed an audit and feedback intervention activity to be delivered by medical students to their general practice supervisors. We tested whether the repeated cycle of audit had an effect on the preventive care practices of general practitioners (GPs). The students performed an audit on topics of preventive medicine and gave feedback to their supervisors. Each supervisor in the study had more than one student performing the audit over the academic year. After repetitive cycles of audit and feedback, the recording of social history items by GPs improved. For example, recording alcohol history increased from 24% to 36%. This study shows that medical students can be effective auditors, and their repeated audits may improve their general practice supervisors' recording of some aspects of social history.

  3. "Are You Listening Please?" The Advantages of Electronic Audio Feedback Compared to Written Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, Tom; Curran, John

    2010-01-01

    Feedback on students' work is, probably, one of the most important aspects of learning, yet students' report, according to the National Union of Students (NUS) Survey of 2008, unhappiness with the feedback process. Students were unhappy with the quality, detail and timing of feedback. This paper examines the benefits of using audio, as opposed to…

  4. Innovative curriculum for second-year Harvard-MIT medical students: practicing communication skills with volunteer patients giving immediate feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali NB

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nadaa B Ali,1 Stephen R Pelletier,2 Helen M Shields1 1Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 2Center for Evaluation, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Purpose: Medical students are expected to develop excellent communication skills. The purpose of our study was to create an innovative communication skills exercise using real volunteer patients and physician co-teachers for students to practice communication skills while receiving immediate feedback.Method: This is a mixed methods study where second-year medical students participated in the communication skills exercise with real patients and physician co-teachers giving immediate feedback. Clinical scenarios reflected the patients’ actual experiences. Students acted out roles as physicians. Physicians co-taught with the patients and gave immediate feedback to students. Students completed an anonymous written survey at the end of the exercise. Qualitative and quantitative responses were recorded. Student feedback from the 2014 surveys was used to modify the teaching designs to increase active role play opportunities by having only two students in each group and doubling the number of stations with real patients.Results: Students rated the overall exercise and the utility of patient volunteers in learning how to communicate on a Likert scale of 1–5, where in this medical school traditionally 1 is excellent and 5 is poor. In 2014, the exercises were rated with a mean score of 1.47 (SD 0.621. In 2015, the exercises were rated with a mean score of 1.03 (SD 0.62. In 2016, the exercises were rated with a mean score of 1.27 (SD 0.52. ANOVA analysis (p=0.002 and Bonferroni corrections indicate a statistically significant difference between combined mean scores of the exercise in 2014 and 2015 (p=0.001. No difference was shown between 2014 and 2016 or 2015 and 2016.Conclusions: Medical students rated practicing communication skills with real patient volunteers and physician co

  5. Nonlatching positive feedback enables robust bimodality by decoupling expression noise from the mean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razooky, Brandon S. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States). Lab. of Virology and Infectious Disease; Gladstone Institutes (Virology and Immunology), San Francisco, CA (United States); Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science (CNMS); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Bredesen Center for Interdisciplinary; Cao, Youfang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hansen, Maike M. K. [Gladstone Institutes (Virology and Immunology), San Francisco, CA (United States); Perelson, Alan S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Simpson, Michael L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science (CNMS); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Bredesen Center for Interdisciplinary; Weinberger, Leor S. [Gladstone Institutes (Virology and Immunology), San Francisco, CA (United States); Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics; Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). QB3: California Inst. of Quantitative Biosciences; Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Pharmaceutical Chemistry

    2017-10-18

    Fundamental to biological decision-making is the ability to generate bimodal expression patterns where two alternate expression states simultaneously exist. Here in this study, we use a combination of single-cell analysis and mathematical modeling to examine the sources of bimodality in the transcriptional program controlling HIV’s fate decision between active replication and viral latency. We find that the HIV Tat protein manipulates the intrinsic toggling of HIV’s promoter, the LTR, to generate bimodal ON-OFF expression, and that transcriptional positive feedback from Tat shifts and expands the regime of LTR bimodality. This result holds for both minimal synthetic viral circuits and full-length virus. Strikingly, computational analysis indicates that the Tat circuit’s non-cooperative ‘non-latching’ feedback architecture is optimized to slow the promoter’s toggling and generate bimodality by stochastic extinction of Tat. In contrast to the standard Poisson model, theory and experiment show that non-latching positive feedback substantially dampens the inverse noise-mean relationship to maintain stochastic bimodality despite increasing mean-expression levels. Given the rapid evolution of HIV, the presence of a circuit optimized to robustly generate bimodal expression appears consistent with the hypothesis that HIV’s decision between active replication and latency provides a viral fitness advantage. More broadly, the results suggest that positive-feedback circuits may have evolved not only for signal amplification but also for robustly generating bimodality by decoupling expression fluctuations (noise) from mean expression levels.

  6. Developing effective automated feedback in temporal bone surgery simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijewickrema, Sudanthi; Piromchai, Patorn; Zhou, Yun; Ioannou, Ioanna; Bailey, James; Kennedy, Gregor; O'Leary, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    We aim to test the effectiveness, accuracy, and usefulness of an automated feedback system in facilitating skill acquisition in virtual reality surgery. We evaluate the performance of the feedback system through a randomized controlled trial of 24 students allocated to feedback and nonfeedback groups. The feedback system was based on the Melbourne University temporal bone surgery simulator. The study was conducted at the simulation laboratory of the Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne. The study participants were medical students from the University of Melbourne, who were asked to perform virtual cortical mastoidectomy on the simulator. The extent to which the drilling behavior of the feedback and nonfeedback groups differed was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the system. Its accuracy was determined through a postexperiment observational assessment of recordings made during the experiment by an expert surgeon. Its usability was evaluated using students' self-reports of their impressions of the system. A Friedman's test showed that there was a significant improvement in the drilling performance of the feedback group, χ(2)(1) = 14.450, P feedback (when trainee behavior was detected) 88.6% of the time and appropriate feedback (accurate advice) 84.2% of the time. Participants' opinions about the usefulness of the system were highly positive. The automated feedback system was observed to be effective in improving surgical technique, and the provided feedback was found to be accurate and useful. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  7. The impact of expert- and peer feedback on communication skills of undergraduate dental students - a single-blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Felix; Schmalz, Gerhard; Haak, Rainer; Rockenbauch, Katrin

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of peer- and expert feedback on communication skills of undergraduate dental students. All students of the first clinical treatment course (n=46) were randomly assigned into two groups. For three times a medical-dental interview/consultation of each student with a real patient was videotaped. After every consultation the videos were assessed either by a person experienced in communication (expert group) or by a fellow student (peer group), giving the students feedback regarding their chairside performed communication skills. Before and after the feedback-interventions all students conducted an interview with simulated patients, which was rated using a validated global rating and analyzed statistically. Global ratings mean scores after feedback-intervention were significantly improved (p0.05). During this study students improved their communication skills in dentist-patient interactions. The communication experience of the feedback provider seems not to have any impact on the communication skills in undergraduate dental students. The clinical courses in dentistry offer the opportunity to implement peer-feedback interventions in real treatment situation as part of communication training to longitudinally improve communication skills. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Relation of College Student Self-Efficacy toward Writing and Writing Self-Regulation Aptitude: Writing Feedback Perceptions as a Mediating Variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekholm, Eric; Zumbrunn, Sharon; Conklin, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Despite the powerful effect feedback often has on student writing success more research is needed on how students emotionally react to the feedback they receive. This study tested the predictive and mediational roles of college student writing self-efficacy beliefs and feedback perceptions on writing self-regulation aptitude. Results suggested…

  9. Experiments with positive, negative and topical relevance feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, R.; Kamps, J.; Li, R.; Hiemstra, D.

    2008-01-01

    This document contains a description of experiments for the 2008 Relevance Feedback track. We experiment with different amounts of feedback, including negative relevance feedback. Feedback is implemented using massive weighted query expansion. Parsimonious query expansion using Dirichlet smoothing

  10. [Computerized ranking test in three French universities: Staff experience and students' feedback].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, D; Meyer, G; Cymbalista, F; Bouaziz, J-D; Falgarone, G; Tesniere, A; Gervais, J; Cariou, A; Peffault de Latour, R; Marat, M; Moenaert, E; Guebli, T; Rodriguez, O; Lefort, A; Dreyfuss, D; Hajage, D; Ricard, J-D

    2016-03-01

    The year 2016 will be pivotal for the evaluation of French medical students with the introduction of the first computerized National Ranking Test (ECNi). The SIDES, online electronic system for medical student evaluation, was created for this purpose. All the universities have already organized faculty exams but few a joint computerized ranking test at several universities simultaneously. We report our experience on the organization of a mock ECNi by universities Paris Descartes, Paris Diderot and Paris 13. Docimological, administrative and technical working groups were created to organize this ECNi. Students in their fifth year of medical studies, who will be the first students to sit for the official ECNi in 2016, were invited to attend this mock exam that represented more than 50% of what will be proposed in 2016. A final electronic questionnaire allowed a docimological and organizational evaluation by students. An analysis of ratings and rankings and their distribution on a 1000-point scale were performed. Sixty-four percent of enrolled students (i.e., 654) attended the three half-day exams. No difference in total score and ranking between the three universities was observed. Students' feedback was extremely positive. Normalized over 1000 points, 99% of students were scored on 300 points only. Progressive clinical cases were the most discriminating test. The organization of a mock ECNi involving multiple universities was a docimological and technical success but required an important administrative, technical and teaching investment. Copyright © 2016 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Active vibration control of clamped beams using positive position feedback controllers with moment pair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Chang Joo; Jeong, Weui Bong; Hong, Chin Suk

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the active vibration control of clamp beams using positive position feedback (PPF) controllers with a sensor/ moment pair actuator. The sensor/moment pair actuator which is the non-collocated configuration leads to instability of the control system when using the direct velocity feedback (DVFB) control. To alleviate the instability problem, a PPF controller is considered in this paper. A parametric study of the control system with PPF controller is first conducted to characterize the effects of the design parameters (gain and damping ratio in this paper) on the stability and performance. The gain of the controller is found to affect only the relative stability. Increasing the damping ratio of the controller slightly improves the stability condition while the performance gets worse. In addition, the higher mode tuned PPF controller affects the system response at the lower modes significantly. Based on the characteristics of PPF controllers, a multi-mode controllable SISO PPF controller is then considered and tuned to different modes (in this case, three lowest modes) numerically and experimentally. The multi-mode PPF controller can be achieved to have a high gain margin. Moreover, it reduces the vibration of the beam significantly. The vibration levels at the tuned modes are reduced by about 11 dB

  12. Short structured feedback training is equivalent to a mechanical feedback device in two-rescuer BLS: a randomised simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavo, Noemi; Goliasch, Georg; Nierscher, Franz Josef; Stumpf, Dominik; Haugk, Moritz; Breckwoldt, Jan; Ruetzler, Kurt; Greif, Robert; Fischer, Henrik

    2016-05-13

    Resuscitation guidelines encourage the use of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) feedback devices implying better outcomes after sudden cardiac arrest. Whether effective continuous feedback could also be given verbally by a second rescuer ("human feedback") has not been investigated yet. We, therefore, compared the effect of human feedback to a CPR feedback device. In an open, prospective, randomised, controlled trial, we compared CPR performance of three groups of medical students in a two-rescuer scenario. Group "sCPR" was taught standard BLS without continuous feedback, serving as control. Group "mfCPR" was taught BLS with mechanical audio-visual feedback (HeartStart MRx with Q-CPR-Technology™). Group "hfCPR" was taught standard BLS with human feedback. Afterwards, 326 medical students performed two-rescuer BLS on a manikin for 8 min. CPR quality parameters, such as "effective compression ratio" (ECR: compressions with correct hand position, depth and complete decompression multiplied by flow-time fraction), and other compression, ventilation and time-related parameters were assessed for all groups. ECR was comparable between the hfCPR and the mfCPR group (0.33 vs. 0.35, p = 0.435). The hfCPR group needed less time until starting chest compressions (2 vs. 8 s, p feedback or by using a mechanical audio-visual feedback device was similar. Further studies should investigate whether extended human feedback training could further increase CPR quality at comparable costs for training.

  13. The learner as co-creator: A new peer review and self-assessment feedback form created by student nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duers, Lorraine E

    2017-11-01

    Engagement with peer review and self-assessment is not always regarded by student nurses as an activity that results in a positive learning experience. Literature indicates that withdrawal from the learning process becomes attractive to individuals affected by a negative experience of peer review. Literature also provides examples of student nurses' feeling 'torn to shreds' during the process of peer review, resulting in loss of confidence and self-esteem. An influencing factor in such situations appears to be the absence of specific learner-driven criteria against which student nurses can assess peer and self-performance. The idea was thus ignited, that creation and utilisation of a learner-driven feedback form might potentially prevent, or at least minimise, the possibility of negative peer review experience. Set within the context of a pre-registration nursing programme, within a Higher Education institution, student nurses (n=25), created a peer review/self-assessment feedback form. Its potential cross-discipline, global applicability is reasonably speculated. Purposive sampling, followed by Stratified Random sampling, maximised participant variation. Data collection took place on 34 occasions, utilising focus group discussions using Nominal Group Technique, a practical task which was video recorded for mediating artefact purposes, and individual interviews. Analysis was concept and theme driven. The study found that participants desired a new feedback form that specifically asks the evaluator to judge human qualities, such as 'compassion' and 'kindness', in addition to the skills and knowledge criteria that any peer review or self-assessment form used currently had incorporated. Providing the participants with the opportunity to develop criteria, against which performance could be measured, with emphasis being afforded to student inclusivity and resultant shift in power balance from the educator to the learner, embraces the idea of teaching and learning in the

  14. Designing student peer assessment in higher education: Analysis of written and oral peer feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, I.; Admiraal, W.; Pilot, A.

    2006-01-01

    Designing student peer assessment in higher education: analysis of written and oral peer feedback Relating it to design features, the present article describes the nature of written and oral peer feedback as it occurred in seven writing courses, each with a different PA design. Results indicate that

  15. Feedback using an ePortfolio for medicine long cases: quality not quantity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Bleasel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evidence for the positive impact of an electronic Portfolio (ePortfolio on feedback in medicine is mixed. An ePortfolio for medical long cases in a Graduate Medical Program was developed. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of medical students and faculty of the impact of the ePortfolio on the feedback process. Methods In total, 130 Year 3 medical students, and six faculty participated in the study. This is a mixed methods study, using a combination of both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Quantitative methods were used to quantify the number of long cases performed. Qualitative methods were used to explore the relationship between quantity and quality of feedback, and provide a rich understanding of both students’ and faculty’s experience and perceptions of the ePortfolio. Results Students received a variable quantity of feedback at each of the three studied clinical schools, with an average of between 4 – 5.4 feedback episodes per student. Feedback that was constructive, specific and timely and delivered by a senior academic was important. Quantity was not an essential factor, with two episodes of detailed feedback reported to be adequate. The barriers to the use of the ePortfolio were technical aspects of the platform that interfered with student engagement. Conclusions Feedback using the ePortfolio for medical long cases is a valuable tool providing a senior clinician delivers detailed, constructive and personalized feedback in a timely fashion. The ePortfolio system needs to be user-friendly to engage students.

  16. Observations of Local Positive Low Cloud Feedback Patterns and Their Role in Internal Variability and Climate Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tianle; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Platnick, Steven E.; Meyer, Kerry

    2018-05-01

    Modeling studies have shown that cloud feedbacks are sensitive to the spatial pattern of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, while cloud feedbacks themselves strongly influence the magnitude of SST anomalies. Observational counterparts to such patterned interactions are still needed. Here we show that distinct large-scale patterns of SST and low-cloud cover (LCC) emerge naturally from objective analyses of observations and demonstrate their close coupling in a positive local SST-LCC feedback loop that may be important for both internal variability and climate change. The two patterns that explain the maximum amount of covariance between SST and LCC correspond to the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, leading modes of multidecadal internal variability. Spatial patterns and time series of SST and LCC anomalies associated with both modes point to a strong positive local SST-LCC feedback. In many current climate models, our analyses suggest that SST-LCC feedback strength is too weak compared to observations. Modeled local SST-LCC feedback strength affects simulated internal variability so that stronger feedback produces more intense and more realistic patterns of internal variability. To the extent that the physics of the local positive SST-LCC feedback inferred from observed climate variability applies to future greenhouse warming, we anticipate significant amount of delayed warming because of SST-LCC feedback when anthropogenic SST warming eventually overwhelm the effects of internal variability that may mute anthropogenic warming over parts of the ocean. We postulate that many climate models may be underestimating both future warming and the magnitude of modeled internal variability because of their weak SST-LCC feedback.

  17. Activation of Students with Various Teaching Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma

    2011-01-01

    A group of teaching methodes to active engineer students have been tried out. The methodes are developed based on the Pedagogical Cyclic Workflow (PCW). Comparing with earlier evaluation, positive feedback is achieved among the students.......A group of teaching methodes to active engineer students have been tried out. The methodes are developed based on the Pedagogical Cyclic Workflow (PCW). Comparing with earlier evaluation, positive feedback is achieved among the students....

  18. An FPGA-based Bunch-by-Bunch Position and Angle Feedback System at ATF2

    CERN Document Server

    Christian, G B; Bett, D R; Burrows, P N; Constance, B; Davis, M R; Gerbershagen, A; Perry, C; Resta Lopez, J

    2011-01-01

    The FONT5 intra-train feedback system serves as a prototype for an interaction point beam-based feedback system for future electron-positron colliders, such as the International Linear Collider. The system has been tested on the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) and is deployed to stabilise the beam orbit at the ATF2. The goal of this system is to correct both position and angle jitter in the vertical plane, providing stability of ~1 micron at the entrance to the ATF2 final-focus system. The system comprises three stripline beam position monitors (BPMs) and two stripline kickers, custom low-latency analogue front-end BPM processors, a custom FPGA-based digital processing board with fast ADCs, and custom kicker-drive amplifiers. An overview of the hardware, and the latest results from beam tests at ATF2, will be presented. The total latency of the system with coupled position and angle feedback loops operating simultaneously was measured to be approximately 140 ns. The greatest degree of correction observed ...

  19. Feedback on Feedback: Eliciting Learners' Responses to Written Feedback through Student-Generated Screencasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Toro, María; Furnborough, Concha

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential benefits of assignment feedback, learners often fail to use it effectively. This study examines the ways in which adult distance learners engage with written feedback on one of their assignments. Participants were 10 undergraduates studying Spanish at the Open University, UK. Their responses to feedback were elicited by means…

  20. Saudi EFL Preparatory Year Students' Perception about Corrective Feedback in Oral Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaysony, Maha

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the attitudes of Saudi EFL students towards corrective feedback (henceforth CF) on classroom oral errors. The subjects were 3200 (1223 male and 1977 female) students enrolled in an intensive English language programme in the preparatory year at the University of Ha'il. A questionnaire was the main instrument. This…

  1. Response of Students to Statement Bank Feedback: The Impact of Assessment Literacy on Performances in Summative Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Philip; McIlroy, David

    2018-01-01

    Efficiency gains arising from the use of electronic marking tools that allow tutors to select comments from a statement bank are well documented, but how students use this type of feedback remains under explored. Natural science students (N = 161) were emailed feedback reports on a spreadsheet assessment that included an invitation to reply placed…

  2. Midwifery students experience of teamwork projects involving mark-related peer feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Carolyn R; Fahy, Kathleen M; Parratt, Jenny A; Grace, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    Lack of teamwork skills among health care professionals endangers patients and enables workplace bullying. Individual teamwork skills are increasingly being assessed in the undergraduate health courses but rarely defined, made explicit or taught. To remedy these deficiencies we introduced a longitudinal educational strategy across all three years of the Bachelor of Midwifery program. To report on students' experiences of engaging in team based assignments which involved mark-related peer feedback. Stories of midwifery students' experiences were collected from 17 participants across the three years of the degree. These were transcribed and analysed thematically and interpreted using feminist collaborative conversations. Most participants reported being in well-functioning teams and enjoyed the experience; they spoke of 'we' and said 'Everyone was on Board'. Students in poorly functioning teams spoke of 'I' and 'they'. These students complained about the poor performance of others but they didn't speak up because they 'didn't want to make waves' and they didn't have the skills to be able to confidently manage conflict. All participants agreed 'Peer-related marks cause mayhem'. Teamwork skills should be specifically taught and assessed. These skills take time to develop. Students, therefore, should be engaged in a teamwork assignment in each semester of the entire program. Peer feedback should be moderated by the teacher and not directly related to marks. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Effects of Writing Anxiety and Motivation on EFL College Students' Self-Evaluative Judgments of Corrective Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Jui-Jung; Tseng, Wen-Ta; Wang, Chaochang

    2017-04-01

    Feedback is regarded as a way to foster students' motivation and to ensure linguistic accuracy. However, mixed findings are reported in the research on written corrective feedback because of its multifaceted nature and its correlations with learners' individual differences. It is necessary, therefore, to conduct further research on corrective feedback from the student's perspective and to examine how individual differences in terms of factors such as writing anxiety and motivation predict learners' self-evaluative judgments of both teacher-corrected and peer-corrected feedback. For this study, 158 Taiwanese college sophomores participated in a survey that comprised three questionnaires. Results demonstrated that intrinsic motivation and different types of writing anxiety predicted English as foreign language learners' evaluative judgments of teacher and peer feedback. The findings have implications for English-writing instruction.

  4. Positive Feedbacks Enhance Macroalgal Resilience on Degraded Coral Reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Claire L A; Longo, Guilherme O; Hay, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Many reefs have shifted from coral and fish dominated habitats to less productive macroalgal dominated habitats, and current research is investigating means of reversing this phase shift. In the tropical Pacific, overfished reefs with inadequate herbivory can become dominated by the brown alga Sargassum polycystum. This alga suppresses recruitment and survival of corals and fishes, thus limiting the potential for reef recovery. Here we investigate the mechanisms that reinforce S. polycystum dominance and show that in addition to negatively affecting other species, this species acts in a self-reinforcing manner, positively promoting survival and growth of conspecifics. We found that survival and growth of both recruit-sized and mature S. polycystum fronds were higher within Sargassum beds than outside the beds and these results were found in both protected and fished reefs. Much of this benefit resulted from reduced herbivory within the Sargassum beds, but adult fronds also grew ~50% more within the beds even when herbivory did not appear to be occurring, suggesting some physiological advantage despite the intraspecific crowding. Thus via positive feedbacks, S. polycystum enhances its own growth and resistance to herbivores, facilitating its dominance (perhaps also expansion) and thus its resilience on degraded reefs. This may be a key feedback mechanism suppressing the recovery of coral communities in reefs dominated by macroalgal beds.

  5. Positive Feedbacks Enhance Macroalgal Resilience on Degraded Coral Reefs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L A Dell

    Full Text Available Many reefs have shifted from coral and fish dominated habitats to less productive macroalgal dominated habitats, and current research is investigating means of reversing this phase shift. In the tropical Pacific, overfished reefs with inadequate herbivory can become dominated by the brown alga Sargassum polycystum. This alga suppresses recruitment and survival of corals and fishes, thus limiting the potential for reef recovery. Here we investigate the mechanisms that reinforce S. polycystum dominance and show that in addition to negatively affecting other species, this species acts in a self-reinforcing manner, positively promoting survival and growth of conspecifics. We found that survival and growth of both recruit-sized and mature S. polycystum fronds were higher within Sargassum beds than outside the beds and these results were found in both protected and fished reefs. Much of this benefit resulted from reduced herbivory within the Sargassum beds, but adult fronds also grew ~50% more within the beds even when herbivory did not appear to be occurring, suggesting some physiological advantage despite the intraspecific crowding. Thus via positive feedbacks, S. polycystum enhances its own growth and resistance to herbivores, facilitating its dominance (perhaps also expansion and thus its resilience on degraded reefs. This may be a key feedback mechanism suppressing the recovery of coral communities in reefs dominated by macroalgal beds.

  6. Peer Feedback Through SNSs (Social Networking Sites): Student Teachers’ Views about Using Facebook for Peer Feedback on Microteachings

    OpenAIRE

    Okumuş, Kübra; Yurdakal, İbrahim Halil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to determine the views of pre-service teachers on the use of Facebook for providing peer feedback on their microteachings. To serve this aim, a case study was conducted with 38 English language student teachers.  Firstly, these student teachers did their microteachings and uploaded them to a Facebook group opened by the researchers. Then, it was provided that their classmates comment on these videos. In order to collect data, an open-ended questionnaire was ...

  7. A CASE STUDY OF COMBINED PEER-TEACHER FEEDBACK ON PARAGRAPH WRITING AT A UNIVERSITY IN THAILAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thi Thuy Loan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Writing in English is challenging for ESL writers, so feedback is crucial in assisting them. Although several studies have been conducted on the effectiveness of peer and teacher-feedback in ESL writing, studies on the combined peer-teacher feedback model tend to be scarce. This study thus reported on the combined feedback model in two paragraph-writing classes of sixty students at a university in Thailand where English is taught as a foreign language, students are reported to be passive in class activities and most writing programs are still taught using the traditional method. Students’ peer comments (both valid and invalid ones, their revisions based on both their peers’ and teacher’s feedback (correct and incorrect revisions and their grades on each paragraph were recorded, and a five-point Likert scale survey and a focus group interview were conducted. The findings indicated its success in terms of students’ positive attitudes towards this feedback model, the usefulness of peer comments, high percentages of feedback incorporations and the high overall writing scores. This paper is thus expected to shed some light on how Thai university students with their passive style of learning English positively react to this interactive activity and partly reflect how in-service teachers adjust feedback strategies in their actual teaching situations.

  8. The Mythology of Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adcroft, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Much of the general education and discipline-specific literature on feedback suggests that it is a central and important element of student learning. This paper examines feedback from a social process perspective and suggests that feedback is best understood through an analysis of the interactions between academics and students. The paper argues…

  9. Students' and Tutors' Perceptions of Feedback on Academic Essays in an Open and Distance Learning Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokwe, Jack Matlou

    2015-01-01

    Feedback is the most important aspect of the learning and teaching process. Through feedback, tutors/lecturers provide an important intervention in teaching as students would always like to know where they did right or wrong in their written assessed work. Without feedback, learning is not complete. This article reports on the results of a major…

  10. Computational Model of a Positive BDNF Feedback Loop in Hippocampal Neurons Following Inhibitory Avoidance Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yili; Smolen, Paul; Alberini, Cristina M.; Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory avoidance (IA) training in rodents initiates a molecular cascade within hippocampal neurons. This cascade contributes to the transition of short- to long-term memory (i.e., consolidation). Here, a differential equation-based model was developed to describe a positive feedback loop within this molecular cascade. The feedback loop begins…

  11. Clinical skills-related learning goals of senior medical students after performance feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anna; Chou, Calvin L; Teherani, Arianne; Hauer, Karen E

    2011-09-01

    Lifelong learning is essential for doctors to maintain competence in clinical skills. With performance feedback, learners should be able to formulate specific and achievable learning goals in areas of need. We aimed to determine: (i) the type and specificity of medical student learning goals after a required clinical performance examination; (ii) differences in goal setting among low, average and high performers, and (iii) whether low performers articulate learning goals that are concordant with their learning needs. We conducted a single-site, multi-year, descriptive comparison study. Senior medical students were given performance benchmarks, individual feedback and guidelines on learning goals; each student was subsequently instructed to write two clinical skills learning goals. Investigators coded the learning goals for specificity, categorised the goals, and performed statistical analyses to determine their concordance with student performance level (low, average or high) in data gathering (history taking and physical examination) or communication skills. All 208 students each wrote two learning goals and most (n=200, 96%) wrote two specific learning goals. Nearly two-thirds of low performers in data gathering wrote at least one learning goal that referred to history taking or physical examination; one-third wrote learning goals pertaining to the organisation of the encounter. High performers in data gathering wrote significantly more patient education goals and significantly fewer history-taking goals than average or low performers. Only 50% of low performers in communication wrote learning goals related to communication skills. Low performers in communication were significantly more likely than average or high performers to identify learning goals related to improving performance in future examinations. The provision of performance benchmarking, individual feedback and brief written guidelines helped most senior medical students in our study to write specific

  12. Exploratory study of the characteristics of feedback in the reflective dialogue group given to medical students in a clinical clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Chen Wen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Structured narrative reflective writing combined with guided feedback is an efficient teaching method for enhancing medical students’ reflective capacity. However, what kinds of feedback offered and reflection presented in a reflective group remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of feedback in a reflective dialogue group. Methods: Fifth-year medical students on a monthly interval rotation at the pediatric department of a medical center in eastern Taiwan during the 2012 academic year completed their reflective writing regarding patient and family psychosocial issues, and were subsequently debriefed in a 2-h group discussion session to receive feedback from a clinical tutor and peers. Content analysis was conducted to explore the characteristics of feedback and reflection presented in the reflective dialogue. The evaluative questionnaire regarding the benefits of reflection with others was administrated following the group session. Results: Forty students participated in five reflective groups and 108 psychosocial issues were discussed and identified. The tutor played an initiating role in the group discussion by providing six equal feedback types involving exploring new knowledge, initiating advanced discussion, highlighting the issues, and encouraging the students. The students provided eight types of feedback that involved a substantial deep discussion on psychosocial issues and action plans based on the complex interactive ecological network of clinical encounters. Each student attained 1.25 times the depth or breadth of reflection after receiving feedback and experienced the benefits of reflection with others. Conclusion: Through structured narrative reflective writing combined with pluralistic group discussion with a tutor and peers, the medical students had time to think deeply and broadly about psychosocial issues among patients and their family members. Facilitative feedback providing new

  13. A Design-Based Research Project on Information Literacy Focusing on Process, Reflections and Self-Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majbritt Ursula Johansen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many curriculums assume that the new generation of students are digital natives and information literate. However, studies show that this is not often the case. From these studies and our own experiences working with multidisciplinary students in the Health Sciences we found that students were not as information literate as required in the curriculum. Using Design Based Research as a method (following the four phases below, we developed a new information search process and a web-based tool with feedback opportunities from teachers and librarians in order to qualify the students competencies. Problem identification: Despite earlier initiatives from library and department, the students didn’t achieve higher levels of information literacy. Prototyping: Requirements and educational material were merged and tested while gathering feedback. Iterations: The prototype and feedback were evaluated and developed into a new information search process, which was tested and evaluated. Reflection and generalization: Initiative was taken to develope a web-based application visualizing the steps with the learning points: self-feedback, peer-feedback and counselor feedback. The result of the project is a new information search process model and a web-based learning environment called B!NKO 2.0. The evaluations have shown positive feedback on both the process and the web tool. The project has opened up new possibilities that go beyond the Health multidisciplinary students. A new project concerning the Humanities and Social Sciences is incipient. In this project new functionalities are also expected. B!NKO 2.0 has to a great extent shown its worth to help Health multidisciplinary students to get a deeper understanding of information literacy, and how to develop and change searches to get better results. B!NKO 2.0 has also given a positive "side effect” on the librarians work. Time spend on the "Book a Librarian” service have decreased for the librarians using

  14. Daresbury SRS Positional Feedback Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, S L

    2000-01-01

    The Daresbury SRS is a second generation synchrotron radiation source which ramps from its injection energy of 600 MeV to 2.0 GeV. Beam orbit feedback systems have been in routine operation on the SRS since 1994 and are now an essential element in delivering stable photon beams to experimental stations. The most recent enhancements to these systems have included the introduction of a ramp servo system to provide the orbit control demanded by the installation of two new narrow gap insertion device and development of the vertical orbit feedback system to cope with an increasing number of photon beamlines. This paper summaries the current status of these systems and briefly discusses proposed developments.

  15. Malaysian Tertiary Level ESL Students’ Perceptions toward Teacher Feedback, Peer Feedback and Self-assessment in their Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayatri Vasu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In Malaysia, teacher feedback is highly preferred by students, who often believe that teachers know best. Teacher feedback shows them their teacher’s idea of an ideal writing. However, excessive dependence on teachers adds to their workload. Therefore, teachers are increasingly promoting two other alternative methods that are gradually gaining importance. These methods are peer feedback and self-assessment. This study investigates ESL students’ perceptions toward teacher feedback, peer feedback and self-assessment in students’ writing process. Questionnaires, adapted from the instruments in the literature, were administered to 107 randomly selected students in a private local university in Malaysia. Students found feedback given to the content and organization of their writing more useful than feedback provided for their vocabulary and grammar. It was also found that students perceived feedback from teacher, peers and self-assessment all as highly useful. Additionally the results indicated while there was no significant difference (p > .05 between the students’ perceptions toward teacher feedback and self-assessment, they were both perceived as significantly more useful (p < .001 than peer feedback. The students also perceived explicit feedback as significantly more useful (p < .001 than implicit feedback. The results of this study have implications for English language learning-teaching practitioners and researchers. They shed light on the options preferred by students in revising their writing in ESL writing classrooms. Future research on the effects of teacher feedback, peer feedback and self-assessment on students’ writing performance will provide better insight on the preferred methods in ESL writing classrooms in similar settings.

  16. National Student Feedback Surveys in Distance Education: An Investigation at the UK Open University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Alison; Richardson, John T. E.; Woodley, Alan

    2011-01-01

    National student feedback surveys are administered in a number of countries, and several of these encompass both campus-based and distance learning students. The UK Open University achieves a high ranking in the annual National Student Survey (NSS), but there are some anomalies in the results. The NSS questionnaire was administered to three…

  17. Positive Change in Feedback Perceptions and Behavior: A 10-Year Follow-up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Dorene F; Tenney-Soeiro, Rebecca; Mejia, Erika; Rezet, Beth

    2018-01-01

    Providing and learning from feedback are essential components of medical education, and typically described as resistant to change. But given a decade of change in the clinical context in which feedback occurs, the authors asked if, and how, perceptions of feedback and feedback behaviors might have changed in response to contextual affordances. In 2017, the authors conducted a follow-up, ethnographic study on 2 general pediatric floors at the same children's hospital where another ethnographic study on a general pediatric floor was conducted in 2007. Data sources included (1) 21 and 34 hours of observation in 2007 and 2017, respectively, (2) 35 and 25 interviews with general pediatric attending physicians and residents in 2007 and 2017, respectively, and (3) a review of 120 program documents spanning 2007 to 2017. Data were coded and organized around 3 recommendations for feedback that were derived from 2007 data and served as standards for assessing change in 2017. Data revealed progress in achieving each recommendation. Compared with 2007, participants in 2017 more clearly distinguished between feedback and evaluation; residents were more aware of in-the-moment feedback, and they had shifted their orientation from evaluation and grades to feedback and learning. Explanations for progress in achieving recommendations, which were derived from the data, pointed to institutional and national influences, namely, the pediatric milestones. On the basis of follow-up, ethnographic data, changes in the clinical context of pediatric education may afford positive change in perceptions of feedback and feedback behavior and point to influences within and beyond the institution. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. A Simple Negative Interaction in the Positive Transcriptional Feedback of a Single Gene Is Sufficient to Produce Reliable Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró-Bueno, Jesús M.; Rodríguez-Patón, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Negative and positive transcriptional feedback loops are present in natural and synthetic genetic oscillators. A single gene with negative transcriptional feedback needs a time delay and sufficiently strong nonlinearity in the transmission of the feedback signal in order to produce biochemical rhythms. A single gene with only positive transcriptional feedback does not produce oscillations. Here, we demonstrate that this single-gene network in conjunction with a simple negative interaction can also easily produce rhythms. We examine a model comprised of two well-differentiated parts. The first is a positive feedback created by a protein that binds to the promoter of its own gene and activates the transcription. The second is a negative interaction in which a repressor molecule prevents this protein from binding to its promoter. A stochastic study shows that the system is robust to noise. A deterministic study identifies that the dynamics of the oscillator are mainly driven by two types of biomolecules: the protein, and the complex formed by the repressor and this protein. The main conclusion of this paper is that a simple and usual negative interaction, such as degradation, sequestration or inhibition, acting on the positive transcriptional feedback of a single gene is a sufficient condition to produce reliable oscillations. One gene is enough and the positive transcriptional feedback signal does not need to activate a second repressor gene. This means that at the genetic level an explicit negative feedback loop is not necessary. The model needs neither cooperative binding reactions nor the formation of protein multimers. Therefore, our findings could help to clarify the design principles of cellular clocks and constitute a new efficient tool for engineering synthetic genetic oscillators. PMID:22205920

  19. Students' feedback on teaching and assessment at Nishtar Medical College, Multan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Shoaib; Rafique, Hasaan

    2013-09-01

    To obtain feedback on teaching and assessment methods in professional undergraduate medical examinations. The study was conducted at Nishtar Medical College, Multan, Pakistan, from May 21 to May 26, 2012. A written questionnaire covering topics on various teaching and assessment methods was used to get feedback from students of 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th year M.B.B.S. SPSS version 17 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 534 questionnaires distributed, 538 (99%) were returned duly filled. Overall, 382 (71%) students were satisfied with all aspects of the lectures delivered and 393 (73%) students agreed that teaching staff was punctual in delivering lectures. Although 312 (58%) students were satisfied with the teaching conducted in the wards, students felt dissatisfaction with the teaching carried out in outpatient departments and operating theatres. Multimedia was favoured by 306 (56%) students as a supporting teaching tool. Although the students agreed that questions asked in examinations were relevant and the pattern of Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) / Objective Structured Practical Examination (OSPE) was satisfactory, they felt that the time allowed was insufficient. 399 (74%) students agreed that multiple modes of assessment improved their knowledge and skill. There was no consensus among the students on the best form of assessment. Number of students favouring short essay questions (SEQ's), multiple choice questions including true/false type, single best choice questions (BCQ'S) and descriptive questions were 209(38.8%), 176(32.7%), 70 (13%) and 28 (5%) respectively. There was disparity in students' satisfaction in internal assessment and university examination. Although 226 (42%) students were satisfied with internal assessment, 199 (37%) were satisfied with university assessment. Overall, the students were satisfied with the lectures and clinical teaching conducted in the wards. Preferred methods of assessment included short essay questions

  20. A Haptic Feedback Scheme to Accurately Position a Virtual Wrist Prosthesis Using a Three-Node Tactor Array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Erwin

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel haptic feedback scheme, used for accurately positioning a 1DOF virtual wrist prosthesis through sensory substitution, is presented. The scheme employs a three-node tactor array and discretely and selectively modulates the stimulation frequency of each tactor to relay 11 discrete haptic stimuli to the user. Able-bodied participants were able to move the virtual wrist prosthesis via a surface electromyography based controller. The participants evaluated the feedback scheme without visual or audio feedback and relied solely on the haptic feedback alone to correctly position the hand. The scheme was evaluated through both normal (perpendicular and shear (lateral stimulations applied on the forearm. Normal stimulations were applied through a prototype device previously developed by the authors while shear stimulations were generated using an ubiquitous coin motor vibrotactor. Trials with no feedback served as a baseline to compare results within the study and to the literature. The results indicated that using normal and shear stimulations resulted in accurately positioning the virtual wrist, but were not significantly different. Using haptic feedback was substantially better than no feedback. The results found in this study are significant since the feedback scheme allows for using relatively few tactors to relay rich haptic information to the user and can be learned easily despite a relatively short amount of training. Additionally, the results are important for the haptic community since they contradict the common conception in the literature that normal stimulation is inferior to shear. From an ergonomic perspective normal stimulation has the potential to benefit upper limb amputees since it can operate at lower frequencies than shear-based vibrotactors while also generating less noise. Through further tuning of the novel haptic feedback scheme and normal stimulation device, a compact and comfortable sensory substitution

  1. Determination of acid ionization constants for weak acids by osmometry and the instrumental analysis self-evaluation feedback approach to student preparation of solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakolesha, Nyanguila

    Analysis from fall 1998 through spring 2001. Surveys eliciting students' reactions to the instrument feedback approach showed an overwhelmingly positive response. The results of this research demonstrated that self-evaluation with instrumental feedback was a useful tool in helping students apply the knowledge they have acquired in lectures to the practice of chemistry. A demographic survey to determine whether part-time or full-time jobs had a negative impact on their experiment grades showed a small but significant correlation between hours worked and grade earned. However, the study showed that grades students earned on this experiment were predictive of overall semester lab grades.

  2. Pre-training evaluation and feedback improved skills retention of basic life support in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Zhou, Rong-hua; Liu, Jin; Lin, Jing; Ma, Er-Li; Liang, Peng; Shi, Ting-wei; Fang, Li-qun; Xiao, Hong

    2013-09-01

    Pre-training evaluation and feedback have been shown to improve medical students' skills acquisition of basic life support (BLS) immediately following training. The impact of such training on BLS skills retention is unknown. This study was conducted to investigate effects of pre-training evaluation and feedback on BLS skills retention in medical students. Three hundred and thirty 3rd year medical students were randomized to two groups, the control group (C group) and pre-training evaluation and feedback group (EF group). Each group was subdivided into four subgroups according to the time of retention-test (at 1-, 3-, 6-, 12-month following the initial training). After a 45-min BLS lecture, BLS skills were assessed (pre-training evaluation) in both groups before training. Following this, the C group received 45 min training. 15 min of group feedback corresponding to students' performance in pre-training evaluation was given only in the EF group that was followed by 30 min of BLS training. BLS skills were assessed immediately after training (post-test) and at follow up (retention-test). No skills difference was observed between the two groups in pre-training evaluation. Better skills acquisition was observed in the EF group (85.3 ± 7.3 vs. 68.1 ± 12.2 in C group) at post-test (p<0.001). In all retention-test, better skills retention was observed in each EF subgroup, compared with its paired C subgroup. Pre-training evaluation and feedback improved skills retention in the EF group for 12 months after the initial training, compared with the control group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 'I wish someone watched me interview:' medical student insight into observation and feedback as a method for teaching communication skills during the clinical years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopper, Heather; Rosenbaum, Marcy; Axelson, Rick

    2016-11-09

    Experts suggest observation and feedback is a useful tool for teaching and evaluating medical student communication skills during the clinical years. Failing to do this effectively risks contributing to deterioration of students' communication skills during the very educational period in which they are most important. While educators have been queried about their thoughts on this issue, little is known about what this process is like for learners and if they feel they get educational value from being observed. This study explored student perspectives regarding their experiences with clinical observation and feedback on communication skills. A total of 125 senior medical students at a U.S. medical school were interviewed about their experiences with observation and feedback. Thematic analysis of interview data identified common themes among student responses. The majority of students reported rarely being observed interviewing, and they reported receiving feedback even less frequently. Students valued having communication skills observed and became more comfortable with observation the more it occurred. Student-identified challenges included supervisor time constraints and grading based on observation. Most feedback focused on information gathering and was commonly delayed until well after the observed encounter. Eliciting students' perspectives on the effect of observation and feedback on the development of their communication skills is a unique way to look at this topic, and brings to light many student-identified obstacles and opportunities to maximize the educational value of observation and feedback for teaching communication, including increasing the number of observations, disassociating observation from numerically scored evaluation, training faculty to give meaningful feedback, and timing the observation/feedback earlier in clerkships.

  4. Feedback on Feedback--Does It Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speicher, Oranna; Stollhans, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that providing assessment feedback through the medium of screencasts is favourably received by students and encourages deeper engagement with the feedback given by the language teacher (inter alia Abdous & Yoshimura, 2010; Brick & Holmes, 2008; Cann, 2007; Stannard, 2007). In this short paper we will report the…

  5. Feedback Conversations: Creating Feedback Dialogues with a New Textual Tool for Industrial Design Student Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Mathias; van Diggelen, Migchiel

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe how a study of a large database of written university teacher feedback in the department of Industrial Design led to the development of a new conceptual framework for feedback and the design of a new feedback tool. This paper focuses on the translation of related work in the area of feedback mechanisms for…

  6. Effect of position feedback during task-oriented upper-limb training after stroke: Five-case pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molier, B.I.; Prange, Grada Berendina; Krabben, T.; Stienen, Arno; van der Kooij, Herman; Buurke, Jaap; Jannink, M.J.A.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2011-01-01

    Feedback is an important element in motor learning during rehabilitation therapy following stroke. The objective of this pilot study was to better understand the effect of position feedback during task-oriented reach training of the upper limb in people with chronic stroke. Five subjects

  7. A computational model clarifies the roles of positive and negative feedback loops in the Drosophila circadian clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Junwei, E-mail: wangjunweilj@yahoo.com.c [Cisco School of Informatics, Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhou Tianshou [School of Mathematics and Computational Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2010-06-14

    Previous studies showed that a single negative feedback structure should be sufficient for robust circadian oscillations. It is thus pertinent to ask why current cellular clock models almost universally have interlocked negative feedback loop (NFL) and positive feedback loop (PFL). Here, we propose a molecular model that reflects the essential features of the Drosophila circadian clock to clarify the different roles of negative and positive feedback loops. In agreement with experimental observations, the model can simulate circadian oscillations in constant darkness, entrainment by light-dark cycles, as well as phenotypes of per{sup 01} and clk{sup Jrk} mutants. Moreover, sustained oscillations persist when the PFL is removed, implying the crucial role of NFL for rhythm generation. Through parameter sensitivity analysis, it is revealed that incorporation of PFL increases the robustness of the system to regulatory processes in PFL itself. Such reduced models can aid understanding of the design principles of circadian clocks in Drosophila and other organisms with complex transcriptional feedback structures.

  8. A computational model clarifies the roles of positive and negative feedback loops in the Drosophila circadian clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junwei; Zhou Tianshou

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies showed that a single negative feedback structure should be sufficient for robust circadian oscillations. It is thus pertinent to ask why current cellular clock models almost universally have interlocked negative feedback loop (NFL) and positive feedback loop (PFL). Here, we propose a molecular model that reflects the essential features of the Drosophila circadian clock to clarify the different roles of negative and positive feedback loops. In agreement with experimental observations, the model can simulate circadian oscillations in constant darkness, entrainment by light-dark cycles, as well as phenotypes of per 01 and clk Jrk mutants. Moreover, sustained oscillations persist when the PFL is removed, implying the crucial role of NFL for rhythm generation. Through parameter sensitivity analysis, it is revealed that incorporation of PFL increases the robustness of the system to regulatory processes in PFL itself. Such reduced models can aid understanding of the design principles of circadian clocks in Drosophila and other organisms with complex transcriptional feedback structures.

  9. Teachers' Accounts of Their Perceptions and Practices of Providing Written Feedback to Nursing Students on Their Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Sajid; Gul, Raisa; Lakhani, Arusa; Rizvi, Nusrat Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Written feedback can facilitate students' learning in several ways. However, the teachers' practices of written feedback may be affected by various factors. This study aimed to explore the nurse teachers' accounts of their perceptions and practices of providing written feedback. A descriptive exploratory design was employed in the study. A…

  10. Student Responses to a Flipped Introductory Physics Class with built-in Post-Video Feedback Quizzes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Roberto

    We present and analyze student responses to multiple Introductory physics classes in a university setting, taught in a ''flipped'' class format. The classes included algebra- and calculus-based introductory physics. Outside class, students viewed over 100 online video lectures on Classical Mechanics, Electricity and Magnetism, and Modern Physics prepared by this author and in some cases, by a third-party lecture package available over YouTube. Inside the class, students solved and discussed problems and conceptual issues in greater detail. A pre-class online quiz was deployed as an important source of feedback. I will report on the student reactions to the feedback mechanism, student responses using data based on anonymous surveys, as well as on learning gains from pre-/post- physics diagnostic tests. The results indicate a broad mixture of responses to different lecture video packages that depend on learning styles and perceptions. Students preferred the online quizzes as a mechanism to validate their understanding. The learning gains based on FCI and CSEM surveys were significant.

  11. Moving Feedback Forward: Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsmond, Paul; Maw, Stephen J.; Park, Julian R.; Gomez, Stephen; Crook, Anne C.

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial research interest in tutor feedback and students' perception and use of such feedback. This paper considers some of the major issues raised in relation to tutor feedback and student learning. We explore some of the current feedback drivers, most notably the need for feedback to move away from simply a monologue from a tutor to…

  12. Mode Selection Rules for a Two-Delay System with Positive and Negative Feedback Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kin'ya; Kobayashi, Taizo

    2018-04-01

    The mode selection rules for a two-delay system, which has negative feedback with a short delay time t1 and positive feedback with a long delay time t2, are studied numerically and theoretically. We find two types of mode selection rules depending on the strength of the negative feedback. When the strength of the negative feedback |α1| (α1 0), 2m + 1-th harmonic oscillation is well sustained in a neighborhood of t1/t2 = even/odd, i.e., relevant condition. In a neighborhood of the irrelevant condition given by t1/t2 = odd/even or t1/t2 = odd/odd, higher harmonic oscillations are observed. However, if |α1| is slightly less than α2, a different mode selection rule works, where the condition t1/t2 = odd/even is relevant and the conditions t1/t2 = odd/odd and t1/t2 = even/odd are irrelevant. These mode selection rules are different from the mode selection rule of the normal two-delay system with two positive feedback loops, where t1/t2 = odd/odd is relevant and the others are irrelevant. The two types of mode selection rules are induced by individually different mechanisms controlling the Hopf bifurcation, i.e., the Hopf bifurcation controlled by the "boosted bifurcation process" and by the "anomalous bifurcation process", which occur for |α1| below and above the threshold value αth, respectively.

  13. Positive Feedback of NDT80 Expression Ensures Irreversible Meiotic Commitment in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Dai; Yang, Yang; Lacefield, Soni

    2014-01-01

    In budding yeast, meiotic commitment is the irreversible continuation of the developmental path of meiosis. After reaching meiotic commitment, cells finish meiosis and gametogenesis, even in the absence of the meiosis-inducing signal. In contrast, if the meiosis-inducing signal is removed and the mitosis-inducing signal is provided prior to reaching meiotic commitment, cells exit meiosis and return to mitosis. Previous work has shown that cells commit to meiosis after prophase I but before entering the meiotic divisions. Since the Ndt80 transcription factor induces expression of middle meiosis genes necessary for the meiotic divisions, we examined the role of the NDT80 transcriptional network in meiotic commitment. Using a microfluidic approach to analyze single cells, we found that cells commit to meiosis in prometaphase I, after the induction of the Ndt80-dependent genes. Our results showed that high-level expression of NDT80 is important for the timing and irreversibility of meiotic commitment. A modest reduction in NDT80 levels delayed meiotic commitment based on meiotic stages, although the timing of each meiotic stage was similar to that of wildtype cells. A further reduction of NDT80 resulted in the surprising finding of inappropriately uncommitted cells: withdrawal of the meiosis-inducing signal and addition of the mitosis-inducing signal to cells at stages beyond metaphase I caused return to mitosis, leading to multi-nucleate cells. Since Ndt80 enhances its own transcription through positive feedback, we tested whether positive feedback ensured the irreversibility of meiotic commitment. Ablating positive feedback in NDT80 expression resulted in a complete loss of meiotic commitment. These findings suggest that irreversibility of meiotic commitment is a consequence of the NDT80 transcriptional positive feedback loop, which provides the high-level of Ndt80 required for the developmental switch of meiotic commitment. These results also illustrate the

  14. Psychology Students' Perception of and Engagement with Feedback as a Function of Year of Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nadia; Rose, Sarah; Ahmed, Lubna

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate students' perception of feedback and level of engagement with the feedback they receive have gained increasing attention in the educational literature recently to identify areas which require educators' attention. However, research in this area has generally been based on limited self-selecting samples, and has not considered how…

  15. Data-feedback in teacher training : Using observational data to improve student teachers' reading instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henk van den Hurk; Dr. Thoni Houtveen; W.J.C.M. van de Grift; Dorothe Cras

    A study of the improvement of the quality of student teachers’ lessons in interactive (story)book reading through the use of data-feedback on observed lessons. Variables regarding the optimal time use, the quality of instruction and the student teachers’ pedagogical relation with pupils were

  16. Using Students' Explanatory Models as Sources of Feedback: Conceptualizing Ocean Acidification and Its Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezen-Barrie, A.; Stapleton, M.; Wolfson, J.

    2017-12-01

    This qualitative study focuses on students evidence-based explanatory models on how ocean acidification impacts oysters. Explanatory models are the crucial components of scientific endeavors as it helps scientists explain how the natural world functions and the reasons for the ways it functions. Moreover, these models assemble individual practices to understand how they work together to reach clear conclusions through scientific investigations. Due to their critical roles in making sense of authentic science, recent studies in science education suggest that these models should be part of the curriculum aligned with new science standards, i.e. Next Generation Science Standards, which stress the importance of engaging students in scientific practices. By collecting data from 400 secondary school students in Maryland, we aim to respond to the question: How can we use secondary school students' explanatory models to provide students with constructive feedback for more comprehensive learning of ocean acidification (the related evidence, causes and impact)? The data were analyzed through discourse analysis method. We highlighted and coded students' inscriptions (e.g., drawings, writings, and representations) that are signs of students' understanding (or lack thereof) of ocean acidification. These signs included explanations of pH levels, drawings of oyster growth, and inclusions of relevant data. The findings showed that the explanatory models can be critical forms of feedback as they reveal a) students' alternative conceptions on how ocean acidification impacts oysters or how acidification works in general; b) students' interpretations of oceans' (non)connectedness to Earth system; c) the choice of scientific representations and their sources; and d) the way students' integrate evidence or data from the investigations. Our work tackles an understanding of one of the most vital signs of modern climatic changes. Recent scientific evidence shows that if the change in ocean

  17. The impact of positive, negative and topical relevance feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, Rianne; Kamps, Jaap; Hiemstra, Djoerd

    2008-01-01

    This document contains a description of experiments for the 2008 Relevance Feedback track. We experiment with different amounts of feedback, including negative relevance feedback. Feedback is implemented using massive weighted query expansion. Parsimonious query expansion using only relevant

  18. [Effects of real-time audiovisual feedback on secondary-school students' performance of chest compressions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelairas-Gómez, Cristian; Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; Vilas-Pintos, Elisardo; Prieto Saborit, José Antonio; Barcala-Furelos, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    To describe the quality of chest compressions performed by secondary-school students trained with a realtime audiovisual feedback system. The learners were 167 students aged 12 to 15 years who had no prior experience with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). They received an hour of instruction in CPR theory and practice and then took a 2-minute test, performing hands-only CPR on a child mannequin (Prestan Professional Child Manikin). Lights built into the mannequin gave learners feedback about how many compressions they had achieved and clicking sounds told them when compressions were deep enough. All the learners were able to maintain a steady enough rhythm of compressions and reached at least 80% of the targeted compression depth. Fewer correct compressions were done in the second minute than in the first (P=.016). Real-time audiovisual feedback helps schoolchildren aged 12 to 15 years to achieve quality chest compressions on a mannequin.

  19. Extremum seeking x-ray position feedback using power line harmonic leakage as the perturbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zohar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Small x-ray beam sizes necessary for probing nanoscale phenomena require exquisite stability to prevent data corruption by noise. One source of instability at synchrotron radiation x-ray beamlines is the slow detuning of x-ray optics to marginal alignment where the onset of clipping increases the beam’s susceptibility to higher frequency position oscillations. In this article, we show that a 1  μm amplitude horizontal x-ray beam oscillation driven by power line harmonic leakage into the electron storage ring can be used as perturbation for horizontal position extremum seeking feedback. Feedback performance is characterized by convergence to 1.5% away from maximum intensity at optimal alignment.

  20. The FONT5 Bunch-by-Bunch Position and Angle Feedback System at ATF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsimon, R. J.; Bett, D. R.; Burrows, P. N.; Christian, G. B.; Constance, B.; Davis, M. R.; Gerbershagen, A.; Perry, C.; Resta-Lopez, J.

    The FONT5 upstream beam-based feedback system at ATF2 is designed to correct the position and angle jitter at the entrance to the ATF2 final-focus system, and also to demonstrate a prototype intra-train feedback system for the International Linear Collider interaction point. We discuss the hardware, from stripline BPMs to kickers, and RF and digital signal processing, as well as presenting results from the latest beam tests at ATF2.

  1. A Journey towards Sustainable Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, Allyson; Young, Charlotte; Davey, Tamzyn; Fitzgerald, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Meeting students' expectations associated with the provision of feedback is a perennial challenge for tertiary education. Efforts to provide comprehensive, timely feedback within our own first year undergraduate public health courses have not always met students' expectations. In response, we sought to develop peer feedback activities to support…

  2. Impact of a novel teaching method based on feedback, activity, individuality and relevance on students’ learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, William S.; Laskar, Simone N.; Benjamin, Miles W.; Chan, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study examines the perceived impact of a novel clinical teaching method based on FAIR principles (feedback, activity, individuality and relevance) on students’ learning on clinical placement. Methods This was a qualitative research study. Participants were third year and final year medical students attached to one UK vascular firm over a four-year period (N=108). Students were asked to write a reflective essay on how FAIRness approach differs from previous clinical placement, and its advantages and disadvantages. Essays were thematically analysed and globally rated (positive, negative or neutral) by two independent researchers. Results Over 90% of essays reported positive experiences of feedback, activity, individuality and relevance model.  The model provided multifaceted feedback; active participation; longitudinal improvement; relevance to stage of learning and future goals; structured teaching; professional development; safe learning environment; consultant involvement in teaching. Students perceived preparation for tutorials to be time intensive for tutors/students; a lack of teaching on medical sciences and direct observation of performance; more than once weekly sessions would be beneficial; some issues with peer and public feedback, relevance to upcoming exam and large group sizes. Students described negative experiences of “standard” clinical teaching. Conclusions Progressive teaching programmes based on the FAIRness principles, feedback, activity, individuality and relevance, could be used as a model to improve current undergraduate clinical teaching. PMID:26995588

  3. Online Questionnaires Use with Automatic Feedback for e-Innovation in University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Remesal, Ana; Colomina, Rosa M.; Mauri, Teresa; Rochera, M. José

    2017-01-01

    Technological tools have permeated higher education programs. However, their mere introduction does not guarantee instructional quality. This article presents the results of an innovation project aimed at fostering autonomous learning among students at a Pre-School and Primary Teacher Grade. For one semester all freshmen students used a system for autonomous learning embedded in the institutional online platform (Moodle), which included automatic formative feedback. The system was part of a c...

  4. Designing Student Feedback System within the Course Evaluation Process: Dokuz Eylül University Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet DAMAR

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Bologna Process at National Higher Education Programs initiated a series of studies regarding the assessment and evaluation of quality in higher education. Dokuz Eylül University has taken this initiation into a primary concern to develop a methodology for the measurement of quality in undergraduate education. Besides the existing systems on this subject at Dokuz Eylül University, substantial progress was recently made by developing innovative sub-systems aiming further improvements. As one of the most important stakeholders, the feedback from students about the quality of the courses was selected as the major concern and a Student Course Feedback System was developed for this purpose. As an exemplary case study, this reveals how the Student Course Feedback System was designed, the process, the technologies used, the problems and constraints encountered, and the roadmap that can be followed by other universities. Dokuz Eylül University has interiorized this process as a corporate culture by directing instructors to make improvements in the courses with respect to the outputs of the evaluation forms, including questions about learning outcomes, instructors, and physical conditions. The integrated design of the Student Course Feedback System with the existing information systems has enabled management to implement a course evaluation system comprising the trilogy of students, instructors, and courses as a whole. The existence of such an assessment process supports the principles of continuous improvement and helps to establish the factual decision making process as an important milestone on the roadmap for a living quality assurance system.

  5. Effectiveness of Feedback in First Year Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bearden, Ian; Voigt, Karen A; Mathiasen, Helle

    How can we provide better and more effective feedback to our students? How can we encourage students to use feedback effectively? We will present results of a study of first year physics students addressing these questions and comparing the effectiveness of written and screencast feedback....

  6. Effects of Interspersed versus Summary Feedback on the Quality of Students' Case Report Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Fred; Wolcott, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This study examines whether students show greater improvement in written case analyses when given feedback that is either interspersed throughout their written case analyses or presented only as a summary, and whether the benefits of these placements vary across differing levels of student performance in the course. Results from an exploratory…

  7. How positive is the feedback between climate change and the carbon cycle?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedlingstein, P.; Rayner, P.

    2003-01-01

    Future climate change induced by atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases is believed to have a large impact on the global carbon cycle. Several offline studies focusing either on the marine or on the terrestrial carbon cycle highlighted such potential effects. Two recent online studies, using ocean-atmosphere general circulation models coupled to land and ocean carbon cycle models, investigated in a consistent way the feedback between the climate change and the carbon cycle. These two studies used observed anthropogenic CO 2 emissions for the 1860-1995 period and IPCC scenarios for the 1995-2100 period to force the climate - carbon cycle models. The study from the Hadley Centre group showed a very large positive feedback, atmospheric CO 2 reaching 980 ppmv by 2100 if future climate impacts on the carbon cycle, but only about 700 ppmv if the carbon cycle is included but assumed to be insensitive to the climate change. The IPSL coupled climate - carbon cycle model simulated a much smaller positive feedback: climate impact on the carbon cycle leads by 2100 to an addition of less than 100 ppmv in the atmosphere. Here we perform a detailed feedback analysis to show that such differences are due to two key processes that are still poorly constrained in these coupled models: first Southern Ocean circulation, which primarily controls the geochemical uptake of CO 2 , and second vegetation and soil carbon response to global warming. Our analytical analysis reproduces remarkably the results obtained by the fully coupled models. Also it allows us to identify that, amongst the two processes mentioned above, the latter (the land response to global warming) is the one that essentially explains the differences between the IPSL and the Hadley results

  8. Effect of Student Feedback on the Motivation of Indian University Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Ananta Kumar; Chakraborty, Piyali

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to measure the motivation of the teachers of higher education towards students' feedback policy of National Assessment and Accreditation Council (NAAC) established by Internal Quality Assurance Cell (IQAC) for different Universities. By the help of questionnaires, the data were gathered, which were earlier sent to the…

  9. Fractional-order positive position feedback compensator for active vibration control of a smart composite plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinangeli, L.; Alijani, F.; HosseinNia, S. Hassan

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, Active Vibration Control (AVC) of a rectangular carbon fibre composite plate with free edges is presented. The plate is subjected to out-of-plane excitation by a modal vibration exciter and controlled by Macro Fibre Composite (MFC) transducers. Vibration measurements are performed by using a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) system. A fractional-order Positive Position Feedback (PPF) compensator is proposed, implemented and compared to the standard integer-order PPF. MFC actuator and sensor are positioned on the plate based on maximal modal strain criterion, so as to control the second natural mode of the plate. Both integer and fractional-order PPF allowed for the effective control of the second mode of vibration. However, the newly proposed fractional-order controller is found to be more efficient in achieving the same performance with less actuation voltage. Moreover, it shows promising performance in reducing spillover effect due to uncontrolled modes.

  10. ERRORS AND CORRECTIVE FEEDBACK IN WRITING: IMPLICATIONS TO OUR CLASSROOM PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Corazon Saturnina A Castro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Error correction is one of the most contentious and misunderstood issues in both foreign and second language teaching. Despite varying positions on the effectiveness of error correction or the lack of it, corrective feedback remains an institution in the writing classes. Given this context, this action research endeavors to survey prevalent attitudes of teachers and students toward corrective feedback and examine their implications to classroom practices.  This paper poses the major problem:  How do teachers’ perspectives on corrective feedback match the students’ views and expectations about error treatment in their writing? Professors of the University of the Philippines who teach composition classes and over a hundred students enrolled in their classes were surveyed.  Results showed that there are differing perceptions of teachers and students regarding corrective feedback. These oppositions must be addressed as they have implications to current pedagogical practices which include constructing and establishing appropriate lesson goals, using alternative corrective strategies, teaching grammar points in class even in the tertiary level, and further understanding the learning process.

  11. An Exploration of the Relationship between Students' Preferences for Formative Feedback and Self-Regulated Learning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Recep; Korkmaz, Özgen; Bacanak, Ahmet; Arslan, Ömer

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore students' preferences for formative feedback and its relationship with their self-regulated learning skills. The study used a mixed methods approach in which quantitative data collection and analysis was followed by qualitative data collection and analysis. "Preferences toward Formative Feedback"…

  12. Distribution of Feedback among Teacher and Students in Online Collaborative Learning in Small Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Cesar; Rochera, Maria Jose; de Gispert, Ines; Diaz-Barriga, Frida

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the characteristics and distribution of the feedback provided by the participants (a teacher and her students) in an activity organized inside a collaborative online learning environment. We analyse 853 submissions made by two groups of graduate students and their teacher (N1 = 629 & N2 = 224) involved in the collaborative…

  13. Quantifying Feedback – Insights Into Peer Assessment Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind, David Kofoed; Jensen, Ulf Aslak

    2017-01-01

    The act of producing content - for example in forms of written reports - is one of the most used methods for teaching and learning all the way from primary school to university. It is a learning tool which helps students relate their theories to practice. Getting relevant and helpful feedback...... of more than 10,000 students. The students have together made more than 100,000 peer-evaluations of work by other students, and these evaluations together contain more than 10,000,000 words of text feedback. A key problem when using peer assessment is to ensure high quality feedback between peers....... Feedback here can be a combination of quantitative / summative feedback (numerical) and qualitative / formative feedback (text). A lot of work has been done on validating and ensuring quality of quantitative feedback. We propose a way to let students evaluate the quality of the feedback they receive...

  14. Improving the accuracy of self-assessment of practical clinical skills using video feedback--the importance of including benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, S C; Osborne, A; Schofield, S J; Pournaras, D J; Chester, J F

    2012-01-01

    Isolated video recording has not been demonstrated to improve self-assessment accuracy. This study examines if the inclusion of a defined standard benchmark performance in association with video feedback of a student's own performance improves the accuracy of student self-assessment of clinical skills. Final year medical students were video recorded performing a standardised suturing task in a simulated environment. After the exercise, the students self-assessed their performance using global rating scales (GRSs). An identical self-assessment process was repeated following video review of their performance. Students were then shown a video-recorded 'benchmark performance', which was specifically developed for the study. This demonstrated the competency levels required to score full marks (30 points). A further self-assessment task was then completed. Students' scores were correlated against expert assessor scores. A total of 31 final year medical students participated. Student self-assessment scores before video feedback demonstrated moderate positive correlation with expert assessor scores (r = 0.48, p benchmark performance demonstration, self-assessment scores demonstrated a very strong positive correlation with expert scores (r = 0.83, p benchmark performance in combination with video feedback may significantly improve the accuracy of students' self-assessments.

  15. Can Performance Feedback during Instruction Boost Knowledge Acquisition? Contrasting Criterion-Based and Social Comparison Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollöffel, Bas; de Jong, Ton

    2016-01-01

    Feedback indicating how well students are performing during a learning task can be very stimulating. In this study with a pre- and post-test design, the effects of two types of performance feedback on learning results were compared: feedback during a learning task was either stated in terms of how well the students were performing relative to…

  16. Developing Business Management Students' Persuasive Writing through Blog-Based Peer-Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Osama H.

    2010-01-01

    The present study attempted to investigate the effect of using blog-based peer feedback on the persuasive writing of EFL business management students at the community college in Bisha, King Khalid University, Saudi Arabia. The study used a pre-test/post-test experimental and control group design. An experimental group and a control group were…

  17. Rational destabilizing speculation, positive feedback trading, and the oil bubble of 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokic, Damir

    2011-01-01

    This article examines how the interaction of different participants in the crude oil futures markets affects the crude oil price efficiency. Normally, the commercial market participants, such as oil producers and oil consumers, act as arbitrageurs and ensure that the price of crude oil remains within the fundamental value range. However, institutional investors that invest in crude oil to diversify their portfolios and/or hedge inflation can destabilize the interaction among commercial participants and liquidity-providing speculators. We argue that institutional investors can impose limits to arbitrage, particularly during the financial crisis when the investment demand for commodities is particularly strong. In support, we show that commercials hedgers had significantly reduced their short positions leading to the 2008 oil bubble-they were potentially aggressively offsetting their short hedges. As a result, by essentially engaging in a positive feedback trading, commercial hedgers at least contributed to 'the 2008 oil bubble'. These findings have been mainly overlooked by the existing research. - Research Highlights: → This article finds that commercial hedgers at least contributed to the 2008 oil bubble. → Commercial hedgers were aggressively offsetting their short hedges leading to the oil bubble peak. → Commercial hedgers, thus, unwillingly engaged in positive feedback trading. → Institutional investors potentially destabilized the oil markets in 2008.

  18. Rational destabilizing speculation, positive feedback trading, and the oil bubble of 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokic, Damir, E-mail: Damir.tokic@esc-rennes.f [ESC Rennes - International School of Business, 2 Rue Robert d' Arbissel, 35065 Rennes cedex (France)

    2011-04-15

    This article examines how the interaction of different participants in the crude oil futures markets affects the crude oil price efficiency. Normally, the commercial market participants, such as oil producers and oil consumers, act as arbitrageurs and ensure that the price of crude oil remains within the fundamental value range. However, institutional investors that invest in crude oil to diversify their portfolios and/or hedge inflation can destabilize the interaction among commercial participants and liquidity-providing speculators. We argue that institutional investors can impose limits to arbitrage, particularly during the financial crisis when the investment demand for commodities is particularly strong. In support, we show that commercials hedgers had significantly reduced their short positions leading to the 2008 oil bubble-they were potentially aggressively offsetting their short hedges. As a result, by essentially engaging in a positive feedback trading, commercial hedgers at least contributed to 'the 2008 oil bubble'. These findings have been mainly overlooked by the existing research. - Research Highlights: {yields} This article finds that commercial hedgers at least contributed to the 2008 oil bubble. {yields} Commercial hedgers were aggressively offsetting their short hedges leading to the oil bubble peak. {yields} Commercial hedgers, thus, unwillingly engaged in positive feedback trading. {yields} Institutional investors potentially destabilized the oil markets in 2008.

  19. Online feedback assessments in physiology: effects on students' learning experiences and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marden, Nicole Y; Ulman, Lesley G; Wilson, Fiona S; Velan, Gary M

    2013-06-01

    Online formative assessments have become increasingly popular; however, formal evidence supporting their educational benefits is limited. This study investigated the impact of online feedback quizzes on the learning experiences and outcomes of undergraduate students enrolled in an introductory physiology course. Four quiz models were tested, which differed in the amount of credit available, the number of attempts permitted, and whether the quizzes were invigilated or unsupervised, timed or untimed, or open or closed book. All quizzes were composed of multiple-choice questions and provided immediate individualized feedback. Summative end-of-course examination marks were analyzed with respect to performance in quizzes and were also compared with examination performance in the year before the quizzes were introduced. Online surveys were conducted to gather students' perceptions regarding the quizzes. The vast majority of students perceived online quizzes as a valuable learning tool. For all quiz models tested, there was a significant relationship between performance in quizzes and end-of-course examination scores. Importantly, students who performed poorly in quizzes were more likely to fail the examination, suggesting that formative online quizzes may be a useful tool to identify students in need of assistance. Of the four quiz models, only one quiz model was associated with a significant increase in mean examination performance. This model had the strongest formative focus, allowing multiple unsupervised and untimed attempts. This study suggests that the format of online formative assessments is critical in achieving the desired impact on student learning. Specifically, such assessments are most effective when they are low stakes.

  20. Training Sessional Academic Staff to Provide Quality Feedback on University Students' Assessment: Lessons from a Faculty of Law Learning and Teaching Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kelly; Bell, Tamara; Dwyer, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The quality of feedback provided to university students has long been recognised as the most important predictor of student learning and satisfaction. However, providing quality feedback to students is challenging in the current context, in which universities increasingly rely on casualised and inexperienced academic staff to assess undergraduate…

  1. Dynamics and feedback control of plasma equilibrium position in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burenko, O.

    1983-01-01

    A brief history of the beginnings of nuclear fusion research involving toroidal closed-system magnetic plasma containment is presented. A tokamak machine is defined mathematically for the purposes of plasma equilibrium position perturbation analysis. The perturbation equations of a tokamak plasma equilibrium position are developed. Solution of the approximated perturbation equations is carried out. A unique, simple, and useful plasma displacement dynamics transfer function of a tokamak is developed. The dominant time constants of the dynamics transfer function are determined in a symbolic form. This symbolic form of the dynamics transfer function makes it possible to study the stability of a tokamak's plasma equilibrium position. Knowledge of the dynamics transfer function permits systematic syntheses of the required plasma displacement feedback control systems

  2. Trainees' Perceptions of Feedback: Validity Evidence for Two FEEDME (Feedback in Medical Education) Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing-You, Robert; Ramesh, Saradha; Hayes, Victoria; Varaklis, Kalli; Ward, Denham; Blanco, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Construct: Medical educators consider feedback a core component of the educational process. Effective feedback allows learners to acquire new skills, knowledge, and attitudes. Learners' perceptions of feedback are an important aspect to assess with valid methods in order to improve the feedback skills of educators and the feedback culture. Although guidelines for delivering effective feedback have existed for several decades, medical students and residents often indicate that they receive little feedback. A recent scoping review on feedback in medical education did not reveal any validity evidence on instruments to assess learner's perceptions of feedback. The purpose of our study was to gather validity evidence on two novel FEEDME (Feedback in Medical Education) instruments to assess medical students' and residents' perceptions of the feedback that they receive. After the authors developed an initial instrument with 54 items, cognitive interviews with medical students and residents suggested that 2 separate instruments were needed, one focused on the feedback culture (FEEDME-Culture) and the other on the provider of feedback (FEEDME-Provider). A Delphi study with 17 medical education experts and faculty members assessed content validity. The response process was explored involving 31 medical students and residents at 2 academic institutions. Exploratory factor analysis and reliability analyses were performed on completed instruments. Two Delphi consultation rounds refined the wording of items and eliminated several items. Learners found both instruments easy and quick to answer; it took them less than 5 minutes to complete. Learners preferred an electronic format of the instruments over paper. Factor analysis revealed a two- and three-factor solution for the FEEDME-Culture and FEEDME-Provider instruments, respectively. Cronbach's alpha was greater than 0.80 for all factors. Items on both instruments were moderately to highly correlated (range, r = .3-.7). Our

  3. Corrective feedback, learner uptake, and feedback perception in a Chinese as a foreign language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingfeng Fu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of corrective feedback in second language classrooms has received considerable research attention in the past few decades. However, most of this research has been conducted in English-teaching settings, either ESL or EFL. This study examined teacher feedback, learner uptake as well as learner and teacher perception of feedback in an adult Chinese as a foreign language classroom. Ten hours of classroom interactions were videotaped, transcribed and coded for analysis. Lyster and Ranta’s (1997 coding system involving six types of feedback was initially used to identify feedback frequency and learner uptake. However, the teacher was found to use a number of additional feedback types. Altogether, 12 types of feedback were identified: recasts, delayed recasts, clarification requests, translation, metalinguistic feedback, elicitation, explicit correction, asking a direct question, repetition, directing question to other students, re-asks, and using L1-English. Differences were noted in the frequency of some of the feedback types as well as learner uptake compared to what had been reported in some previous ESL and EFL studies. With respect to the new feedback types, some led to noticeable uptake. As for the students’ and teacher’s perceptions, they did not match and both the teacher and the students were generally not accurate in perceiving the frequency of each feedback type. The findings are discussed in terms of the role of context in affecting the provision and effectiveness of feedback and its relationship to student and teacher perception of feedback.

  4. An adaptive feedback controller for transverse angle and position jitter correction in linear particle beam accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    It is desired to design a position and angle jitter control system for pulsed linear accelerators that will increase the accuracy of correction over that achieved by currently used standard feedback jitter control systems. Interpulse or pulse-to-pulse correction is performed using the average value of each macropulse. The configuration of such a system resembles that of a standard feedback correction system with the addition of an adaptive controller that dynamically adjusts the gain-phase contour of the feedback electronics. The adaptive controller makes changes to the analog feedback system between macropulses. A simulation of such a system using real measured jitter data from the Stanford Linear Collider was shown to decrease the average rms jitter by over two and a half times. The system also increased and stabilized the correction at high frequencies; a typical problem with standard feedback systems

  5. An adaptive feedback controller for transverse angle and position jitter correction in linear particle beam accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    It is desired to design a position and angle jitter control system for pulsed linear accelerators that will increase the accuracy of correction over that achieved by currently used standard feedback jitter control systems. Interpulse or pulse-to-pulse correction is performed using the average value of each macropulse. The configuration of such a system resembles that of a standard feedback correction system with the addition of an adaptive controller that dynamically adjusts the gain-phase contour of the feedback electronics. The adaptive controller makes changes to the analog feedback system between macropulses. A simulation of such a system using real measured jitter data from the Stanford Linear Collider was shown to decrease the average rms jitter by over two and a half times. The system also increased and stabilized the correction at high frequencies; a typical problem with standard feedback systems

  6. Position feedback control of a nonmagnetic body levitated in magnetic fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J H; Nam, Y J; Park, M K; Yamane, R

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the position feedback control of a magnetic fluid actuator which is characterized by the passive levitation of a nonmagnetic body immersed in a magnetic fluid under magnetic fields. First of all, the magnetic fluid actuator is designed based on the ferrohydrostatic relation. After manufacturing the actuator, its static and dynamic characteristics are investigated experimentally. With the aid of the dynamic governing relation obtained experimentally and the proportional-derivative controller, the position tracking control of the actuator is carried out both theoretically and experimentally. As a result, the applicability of the proposed magnetic fluid actuator to various engineering devices is verified.

  7. Dynamics of gene expression with positive feedback to histone modifications at bivalent domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rongsheng; Lei, Jinzhi

    2018-03-01

    Experiments have shown that in embryonic stem cells, the promoters of many lineage-control genes contain “bivalent domains”, within which the nucleosomes possess both active (H3K4me3) and repressive (H3K27me3) marks. Such bivalent modifications play important roles in maintaining pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. Here, to investigate gene expression dynamics when there are regulations in bivalent histone modifications and random partition in cell divisions, we study how positive feedback to histone methylation/demethylation controls the transition dynamics of the histone modification patterns along with cell cycles. We constructed a computational model that includes dynamics of histone marks, three-stage chromatin state transitions, transcription and translation, feedbacks from protein product to enzymes to regulate the addition and removal of histone marks, and the inheritance of nucleosome state between cell cycles. The model reveals how dynamics of both nucleosome state transition and gene expression are dependent on the enzyme activities and feedback regulations. Results show that the combination of stochastic histone modification at each cell division and the deterministic feedback regulation work together to adjust the dynamics of chromatin state transition in stem cell regenerations.

  8. Responding to personalised social norms feedback from a web-based alcohol reduction intervention for students: Analysis of think-aloud verbal protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, S; Bekker, H L; Bewick, B M

    2016-09-01

    Web-based interventions enable organisations to deliver personalised individually tailored brief feedback to individuals without the need of a third party. Web-based interventions are effective in reducing alcohol consumption among university students. There is a paucity of evidence to indicate those who access web-based personalised feedback interventions respond in a way consistent with hypothesised active ingredients. This research uses the think-aloud technique to explore how students respond to instant web-based personalised normative feedback. Between-subjects experimental design employing qualitative methods. Twenty-one UK university students generated think-aloud transcripts while completing a web-based intervention (Unitcheck). This was followed by a semi-structured interview. One coding frame was developed to classify all utterances. Narrative synthesis revealed five meta-themes: active thinking about alcohol use; comparisons with others; beliefs and knowledge about alcohol consumption; inter-relationship between personal codes and context; and engagement with Unitcheck. Students willingly engaged with the online assessment and personalised feedback. Students consciously engaged with the intervention and this engagement prompted students to actively consider their own behaviour, knowledge, perceptions, and to reflect on future behaviour. The ability of web-based personalised feedback interventions to effect change in individual's behaviours is likely related to their ability to encourage cognitive engagement and active processing of the information provided.

  9. Consensus positive position feedback control for vibration attenuation of smart structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi, Ehsan; Nima Mahmoodi, S.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a new network-based approach for active vibration control in smart structures. In this approach, a network with known topology connects collocated actuator/sensor elements of the smart structure to one another. Each of these actuators/sensors, i.e., agent or node, is enhanced by a separate multi-mode positive position feedback (PPF) controller. The decentralized PPF controlled agents collaborate with each other in the designed network, under a certain consensus dynamics. The consensus constraint forces neighboring agents to cooperate with each other such that the disagreement between the time-domain actuation of the agents is driven to zero. The controller output of each agent is calculated using state-space variables; hence, optimal state estimators are designed first for the proposed observer-based consensus PPF control. The consensus controller is numerically investigated for a flexible smart structure, i.e., a thin aluminum beam that is clamped at its both ends. Results demonstrate that the consensus law successfully imposes synchronization between the independently controlled agents, as the disagreements between the decentralized PPF controller variables converge to zero in a short time. The new consensus PPF controller brings extra robustness to vibration suppression in smart structures, where malfunctions of an agent can be compensated for by referencing the neighboring agents’ performance. This is demonstrated in the results by comparing the new controller with former centralized PPF approach.

  10. A tool for assessing case history and feedback skills in audiology students working with simulated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jane; Wilson, Wayne J; MacBean, Naomi; Hill, Anne E

    2016-12-01

    To develop a tool for assessing audiology students taking a case history and giving feedback with simulated patients (SP). Single observation, single group design. Twenty-four first-year audiology students, five simulated patients, two clinical educators, and three evaluators. The Audiology Simulated Patient Interview Rating Scale (ASPIRS) was developed consisting of six items assessing specific clinical skills, non-verbal communication, verbal communication, interpersonal skills, interviewing skills, and professional practice skills. These items are applied once for taking a case history and again for giving feedback. The ASPIRS showed very high internal consistency (α = 0.91-0.97; mean inter-item r = 0.64-0.85) and fair-to-moderate agreement between evaluators (29.2-54.2% exact and 79.2-100% near agreement; κ weighted up to 0.60). It also showed fair-to-moderate absolute agreement amongst evaluators for single evaluator scores (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] r = 0.35-0.59) and substantial consistency of agreement amongst evaluators for three-evaluator averaged scores (ICC r = 0.62-0.81). Factor analysis showed the ASPIRS' 12 items fell into two components, one containing all feedback items and one containing all case history items. The ASPIRS shows promise as the first published tool for assessing audiology students taking a case history and giving feedback with an SP.

  11. Collaborative Assembly Operation between Two Modular Robots Based on the Optical Position Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Su

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the cooperation between two master-slave modular robots. A cooperative robot system is set up with two modular robots and a dynamic optical meter-Optotrak. With Optotrak, the positions of the end effectors are measured as the optical position feedback, which is used to adjust the robots' end positions. A tri-layered motion controller is designed for the two cooperative robots. The RMRC control method is adopted to adjust the master robot to the desired position. With the kinematics constraints of the two robots including position and pose, joint velocity, and acceleration constraints, the two robots can cooperate well. A bolt and nut assembly experiment is executed to verify the methods.

  12. Regulative feedback in pattern formation: towards a general relativistic theory of positional information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Johannes; Irons, David; Monk, Nick

    2008-10-01

    Positional specification by morphogen gradients is traditionally viewed as a two-step process. A gradient is formed and then interpreted, providing a spatial metric independent of the target tissue, similar to the concept of space in classical mechanics. However, the formation and interpretation of gradients are coupled, dynamic processes. We introduce a conceptual framework for positional specification in which cellular activity feeds back on positional information encoded by gradients, analogous to the feedback between mass-energy distribution and the geometry of space-time in Einstein's general theory of relativity. We discuss how such general relativistic positional information (GRPI) can guide systems-level approaches to pattern formation.

  13. Student-Teachers across the Curriculum Learn to Write Feedback: Does It Reflect on Their Writing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-sayag, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The study examined the connection between writing competency and writing feedback experiences through academic writing course for student-teachers across the curriculum. The aims of the course were to prepare student-teachers to their role as writing facilitators and to improve their writing. Experimental and control group differed in course plan…

  14. Cognitive and Social Factors Influencing Students׳ Response and Utilization of Facilitator Feedback in a Problem Based Learning Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloysius Gonzaga Mubuuke

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Both cognitive and socio-contextual factors have the potential in influencing ways in which students receive and utilize facilitator feedback in PBL tutorials. Therefore, tutorial facilitators need to be cognizant of these factors when framing their feedback messages.

  15. Feedback on composition: a case study of a remedial sixth-grader Feedback on composition: a case study of a remedial sixth-grader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilda C. Cavalcanti

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a case study conducted in Brazil, aimed at investigating the relationship between what a Portuguese native-language teacher provided as feedback on compositions in a remedial sixth-grade class and what the students thought about and did with that feedback. The study called for the teacher to fill out a questionnaire and to provide verbal report protocol data while making comments on the composition of a selected student. The student also provided a verbal report protocol concerning his reactions to the feedback, and all the students in the class filled out a questionnaire about their handling of the feedback. This paper reports on a case study conducted in Brazil, aimed at investigating the relationship between what a Portuguese native-language teacher provided as feedback on compositions in a remedial sixth-grade class and what the students thought about and did with that feedback. The study called for the teacher to fill out a questionnaire and to provide verbal report protocol data while making comments on the composition of a selected student. The student also provided a verbal report protocol concerning his reactions to the feedback, and all the students in the class filled out a questionnaire about their handling of the feedback.

  16. Paper Review Revolution: Screencasting Feedback for Developmental Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Joni; Carlson, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Researchers from Kaplan University present findings from a media-rich feedback pilot program that targets students from developmental writing courses. One study of student reactions reveals how screencasting feedback encouraged more formative, holistic feedback and students' awareness of writing process, audience, and revision. A second study…

  17. New positive feedback mechanism between boundary layer meteorology and secondary aerosol formation during severe haze events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quan; Jia, Xingcan; Quan, Jiannong; Li, Jiayun; Li, Xia; Wu, Yongxue; Chen, Dan; Wang, Zifa; Liu, Yangang

    2018-04-17

    Severe haze events during which particulate matter (PM) increases quickly from tens to hundreds of microgram per cubic meter in 1-2 days frequently occur in China. Although it has been known that PM is influenced by complex interplays among emissions, meteorology, and physical and chemical processes, specific mechanisms remain elusive. Here, a new positive feedback mechanism between planetary boundary layer (PBL), relative humidity (RH), and secondary PM (SPM) formation is proposed based on a comprehensive field experiment and model simulation. The decreased PBL associated with increased PM increases RH by weakening the vertical transport of water vapor; the increased RH in turn enhances the SPM formation through heterogeneous aqueous reactions, which further enhances PM, weakens solar radiation, and decreases PBL height. This positive feedback, together with the PM-Radiation-PBL feedback, constitutes a key mechanism that links PM, radiation, PBL properties (e.g. PBL height and RH), and SPM formation, This mechanism is self-amplifying, leading to faster PM production, accumulation, and more severe haze pollution.

  18. Unpredictability in seagrass restoration: analysing the role of positive feedback and environmental stress on

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suykerbuyk, W.; Govers, L.L.; Bouma, T.J.; Giesen, W.B.J.T.; de Jong, D.J.; van de Voort, R.; Giesen, K.; Giesen, P.T.; van Katwijk, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    1. Restoration of key species in dynamic coastal ecosystems benefits from reduction in environmentalstress. This can be realized by promoting positive feedback (intrinsic processes) orby reducing extrinsic negative forcing.2. In a seagrass (Zostera noltii) restoration project in the south-western

  19. Closing the Feedback Loop: Physics Undergraduates' Use of Feedback Comments on Laboratory Coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Pam

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory notebooks of physics undergraduates taking two second-year practical courses were audited to discover whether they had used feedback comments in their subsequent coursework. Ninety-five per cent of the 37 students on the first course and 100% of the 14 students on the second course whose work was audited had used feedback. The…

  20. Sp1-CD147 positive feedback loop promotes the invasion ability of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Ye, Wei; Wu, Juan; Liu, Lijuan; Yang, Lina; Gao, Lu; Chen, Biliang; Zhang, Fanglin; Yang, Hong; Li, Yu

    2015-07-01

    CD147 is a novel cancer biomarker that has been confirmed to be overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma, which is significantly associated with poor prognosis. Although the Sp1 protein regulates the expression level of CD147, it remains unclear whether Sp1 phosphorylation plays a role in this regulation. A dual-luciferase assay revealed that T453 and T739 mutations decreased the activity of Sp1 binding to the promoter of CD147, followed by a decrease in CD147 mRNA and protein expression. Western blot analysis showed that CD147 promoted Sp1 phosphorylation at T453 and T739 through the PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK pathways. In addition, blocking the Sp1-CD147 positive feedback loop reduced the invasion ability of HO-8910pm cells. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the components of the feedback loop were overexpressed in ovarian cancer tissues. The correlation analysis revealed a significant correlation between phospho-Sp1 (T453), phospho-Sp1 (T739) and CD147 expression levels, with correlation coefficients of r=0.477 and r=0.461, respectively. Collectively, our results suggest that a Sp1-CD147 positive feedback loop plays a critical role in the invasion ability of ovarian cancer cells.

  1. Feedback en educación médica Feedback in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Fornells

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available La propuesta de un modelo centrado en la persona que aprende y el desarrollo de estrategias de aprender a aprender persigue que los estudiantes sean más reflexivos y más autónomos en su propio proceso de aprendizaje y que se conviertan en los protagonistas de dicho proceso. Se trata, en definitiva, de dar los elementos necesarios a los estudiantes para que puedan autogestionar un proceso de aprendizaje permanente a lo largo de toda su vida profesional, una cuestión crucial en un contexto de evolución constante de los conocimientos. El feedback sería el retorno de información sobre su proceso de aprendizaje de acuerdo con unos objetivos preestablecidos. El feedback presenta información y no juicio, a diferencia de la evaluación, en consecuencia siempre es formativo. El feedback no es un fin en sí mismo sino un instrumento que informa al estudiante sobre su proceso de aprendizaje y facilita los cambios necesarios. El feedback estructurado y centrado en quien aprende se caracteriza por: autorreflexión del estudiante, centrado en quien aprende, preparación previa y relación de confianza tutor-residente.The proposal of a learner-centered model and the development of strategies for learning to learn, intends that students are more reflective and more independent in their own learning process and that they become the protagonists of this process. It really tries to give the students the necessary elements so that they can selfmanage a process of permanent learning throughout their professional life, a crucial question in a context of constant evolution of the knowledge. The return of information on the process of learning, in agreement with preestablished objectives. Feedback presents/displays information and is nonjudgemental, unlike the evaluation. Feedback always is formative. Feedback is not an aim in itself, but an instrument that informs the student on its process of learning and facilitates the necessary changes. Structured and

  2. Playing with Positive Feedback: External Pressure-triggering of a Star-forming Disk Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Rebekka; Dubois, Yohan; Silk, Joseph; Mamon, Gary A.

    2015-10-01

    In massive galaxies, the currently favored method for quenching star formation is via active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback, which ejects gas from the galaxy using a central supermassive black hole. At high redshifts however, explanation of the huge rates of star formation often found in galaxies containing AGNs may require a more vigorous mode of star formation than is attainable by simply enriching the gas content of galaxies in the usual gravitationally driven mode that is associated with the nearby universe. Using idealized hydrodynamical simulations, we show that AGN-pressure-driven star formation potentially provides the positive feedback that may be required to generate the accelerated star formation rates observed in the distant universe.

  3. College Students' Positivity toward Teen Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshbaugh, Elaine M.

    2011-01-01

    Although teen pregnancy and parenthood are more visible in society than in the past, teen mothers are often stereotyped and stigmatized. The study examined positivity toward teen mothers among college students (N = 316) at a midwestern university. Although students responded positively to some items regarding teen mothers, other statements showed…

  4. Feedback and learning support that fosters students' independent learning: an Australian case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Issa, Tomayess; Issa, Theodora; Kommers, Petrus A.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to examine students’ reactions to formative (i.e. face to face, audio, wiki and live, email) feedback. This approach is used to improve students’ communication and critical-thinking skills and to encourage independent learning. This paper provides empirical evidence from 327 students

  5. Feedback and assessment for clinical placements: achieving the right balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgess A

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Annette Burgess, Craig Mellis Central Clinical School, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: During clinical placements, the provision of feedback forms an integral part of the learning process and enriches students' learning experiences. The purpose of feedback is to improve the learner's knowledge, skills, or behavior. Receipt of accurate feedback can help to narrow the gap between actual and desired performance. Effective and regular feedback has the potential to reinforce good practice and motivate the learner toward the desired outcome. Despite the obvious role of feedback in effective teaching and learning, a common complaint from students is that they do not receive adequate feedback. Unfortunately, skills in giving and receiving feedback are rarely taught to students or clinicians. This study aims to provide an understanding of the role of feedback within the learning process, consider consequences of inadequate or poorly given feedback, consider the barriers to the feedback process, provide practical guidelines for providing feedback, and consider the need for student and faculty development in feedback skills. Keywords: medical students, formative, summative, assessment

  6. [Medical intern or locum doctor--does job position affect learning?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Nina; Kalske, Jaakko; Halttunen-Nieminen, Mervi; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2015-01-01

    At the University of Helsinki, the licentiate degree in medicine involves internships that can be conducted as a medical intern or locum doctor. The students and their supervisors fill out a feedback form, which helps in assessing the students' improvement in various areas. Based on the feedback form between 2008 and 2013, students having worked as locum doctor rated better improvement in their diagnostic skills, writing medical records, interacting with the patient, and operating in the work community. Supervisor evaluations did not show a similar clear difference between the job positions.

  7. Feedback-related brain activity predicts learning from feedback in multiple-choice testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Benjamin; Steinhauser, Marco

    2012-06-01

    Different event-related potentials (ERPs) have been shown to correlate with learning from feedback in decision-making tasks and with learning in explicit memory tasks. In the present study, we investigated which ERPs predict learning from corrective feedback in a multiple-choice test, which combines elements from both paradigms. Participants worked through sets of multiple-choice items of a Swahili-German vocabulary task. Whereas the initial presentation of an item required the participants to guess the answer, corrective feedback could be used to learn the correct response. Initial analyses revealed that corrective feedback elicited components related to reinforcement learning (FRN), as well as to explicit memory processing (P300) and attention (early frontal positivity). However, only the P300 and early frontal positivity were positively correlated with successful learning from corrective feedback, whereas the FRN was even larger when learning failed. These results suggest that learning from corrective feedback crucially relies on explicit memory processing and attentional orienting to corrective feedback, rather than on reinforcement learning.

  8. Amplification of ABA biosynthesis and signaling through a positive feedback mechanism in seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonogaki, Mariko; Sall, Khadidiatou; Nambara, Eiji; Nonogaki, Hiroyuki

    2014-05-01

    Abscisic acid is an essential hormone for seed dormancy. Our previous study using the plant gene switch system, a chemically induced gene expression system, demonstrated that induction of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED), a rate-limiting ABA biosynthesis gene, was sufficient to suppress germination in imbibed Arabidopsis seeds. Here, we report development of an efficient experimental system that causes amplification of NCED expression during seed maturation. The system was created with a Triticum aestivum promoter containing ABA responsive elements (ABREs) and a Sorghum bicolor NCED to cause ABA-stimulated ABA biosynthesis and signaling, through a positive feedback mechanism. The chimeric gene pABRE:NCED enhanced NCED and ABF (ABRE-binding factor) expression in Arabidopsis Columbia-0 seeds, which caused 9- to 73-fold increases in ABA levels. The pABRE:NCED seeds exhibited unusually deep dormancy which lasted for more than 3 months. Interestingly, the amplified ABA pathways also caused enhanced expression of Arabidopsis NCED5, revealing the presence of positive feedback in the native system. These results demonstrated the robustness of positive feedback mechanisms and the significance of NCED expression, or single metabolic change, during seed maturation. The pABRE:NCED system provides an excellent experimental system producing dormant and non-dormant seeds of the same maternal origin, which differ only in zygotic ABA. The pABRE:NCED seeds contain a GFP marker which enables seed sorting between transgenic and null segregants and are ideal for comparative analysis. In addition to its utility in basic research, the system can also be applied to prevention of pre-harvest sprouting during crop production, and therefore contributes to translational biology. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Integrating 360° behavior-orientated feedback in communication skills training for medical undergraduates: concept, acceptance and students' self-ratings of communication competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engerer, Cosima; Berberat, Pascal O; Dinkel, Andreas; Rudolph, Baerbel; Sattel, Heribert; Wuensch, Alexander

    2016-10-18

    Feedback is considered a key didactic element in medical education, especially for teaching of communication skills. This study investigates the impact of a best evidence-based practice feedback concept within the context of communication skills training (CST). We evaluate this concept for acceptance and changes in students self-ratings of communication competence. Our CST integrating feedback process comprises a short theoretical introduction presenting standards for good communication and a constructive 360° feedback from three perspectives: feedback from peers, from standardized patients (SPs), and from a trainer. Feed-forward process was facilitated for documenting suggestions for improvements based on observable behaviors to maximize learning benefits. Our CST was applied to four groups of eight or nine students. We assessed the data on students' acceptance using a 6-point scale ranging from very good (1) to poor (6), applied a forced choice question to rank didactic items, and assessed changes in student' self-ratings of their communication competence on a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS). Thirty-four medical undergraduates (82 % female, 18 % male) in their first clinical year, with an average age of 21.4 years (SD = 1.0), participated in the new training. The concept achieved high acceptance from good to very good: overall impression (M = 1.56), sufficient interaction for discussion (M = 1.15), and constructive learning atmosphere (M = 1.18). Specific elements, such as practical training with SPs (M = 1.18) and feedback by SPs (M = 1.12), showed highest acceptance. The forced choice ranking placed all feedback elements at the top of the list (feedback (FB) by SPs, rank 2; FB by trainer, rank 3; FB by colleagues, rank 4), whereas theoretical elements were at the bottom (theoretical introduction, rank 7; memory card, rank 9). Overall, student self-ratings of communication competence significantly improved in nine of the ten

  10. Ultra high-speed (508 MHz) beam position digital feedback system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurokawa, Shin-ichi; Kametani, Masatsugu; Nakayama, Takahide; Moriyama, Kunio.

    1997-01-01

    The B-Factory which is constructed by National Laboratory for High Energy Physics is the device for elucidating the breakdown of symmetry of matter and antimatter by studying the behavior of B mesons which are generated in large quantity when the electrons and the positrons which are accelerated to light velocity level are collided. In order to maintain electron beam-positron beam bunch circling the ring at light velocity stably, the instability of the coupled bunch must be overcome. For this purpose, the ultrahigh speed beam position digital feedback control system was developed. This system is composed of the high speed input-output substrate using GaAs LSI, the feedback computation substrate using complementary metal oxide semiconductor and the memory mounted on it, and the real time operation device. The development of both substrates and their functions are explained. The real time data collection and the change of computation parameters for specific bunch in the real time operation device have become feasible. The signal transmission characteristics of this system are shown. As the result of the action test of this system, it was confirmed to work normally. (K.I.)

  11. The effect of video-assisted oral feedback versus oral feedback on surgical communicative competences in undergraduate training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesseler, M; Sterz, J; Bender, B; Hoefer, S; Walcher, F

    2017-08-01

    Feedback can significantly improve future performance. Reviewing one's performance by video is discussed as useful adjunct to debriefing, particularly for non-technical skills. Communicative competencies are an essential part of daily clinical practice; thus should be taught and assessed during undergraduate training. The aim of this study was to compare the educational value of video-assisted feedback versus oral feedback in communicative competencies in the surgical context. Fourth-year medical students completed a 210-min training unit of 'taking patient's history and obtaining informed consents prior to surgery' using role plays. Oral feedback was received directly thereafter using agenda-led, outcome-based guidelines (ALOBA). In the study group, the role plays were video-taped and reviewed thereafter. Afterwards, students completed two OSCE stations, where they were assessed regarding their communicative competencies and the content of the clinical scenario. One-hundred students (49 receiving video-assisted feedback, 51 oral) participated in the study. Those receiving video-assisted feedback performed significantly better in overall score in both OSCE stations (p feedback offered a significant educational benefit over oral feedback alone during a simulated patient encounter in a surgical context.

  12. Teacher feedback in the classroom. Analyzing and developing teachers' feedback behavior in secondary education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voerman, A.

    2014-01-01

    Providing feedback is one of the most influential means of teachers to enhance student learning. In this dissertation, we first focused on what is known from research about effective (i.e. learning-enhancing) feedback. Effective feedback, mostly studied from a cognitive psychologist point of view,

  13. The Role of Feedback in the Bologna Process, According to Goal Setting Theory: An Exploratory Study of Students' Perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Puig Terrón, Miriam; Balagué i Canadell, Jordi; Solé Pla, Joan

    2016-01-01

    This study has been carried out while The Bologna Process was implemented in the European Higher Education Area (EHEA). One of the main features of TBP is Lifelong Learning (LLL), introduced to improve student learning, by emphasizing the role of feedback. The Goal Setting Theory of Motivation (GST) considers feedback as a mechanism to enhance performance. Starting from this theoretical framework, our objective is to analyse whether, for those students with specific and challenging goals, fee...

  14. What Motivates Students to Provide Feedback to Teachers about Teaching and Learning? An Expectancy Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Jay

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this empirical research study was to investigate what motivates students to provide formative anonymous feedback to teachers regarding their perceptions of the teaching and learning experience in order to improve student learning. Expectancy theory, specifically Vroom's Model, was used as the conceptual framework for the study.…

  15. Using Feedback to Promote Physical Activity: The Role of the Feedback Sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Jan-Niklas; Kowatsch, Tobias

    2017-06-02

    Providing feedback is a technique to promote health behavior that is emphasized by behavior change theories. However, these theories make contradicting predictions regarding the effect of the feedback sign-that is, whether the feedback signals success or failure. Thus, it is unclear whether positive or negative feedback leads to more favorable behavior change in a health behavior intervention. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the feedback sign in a health behavior change intervention. Data from participants (N=1623) of a 6-month physical activity intervention was used. Participants received a feedback email at the beginning of each month. Feedback was either positive or negative depending on the participants' physical activity in the previous month. In an exploratory analysis, change in monthly step count averages was used to evaluate the feedback effect. The feedback sign did not predict the change in monthly step count averages over the course of the intervention (b=-84.28, P=.28). Descriptive differences between positive and negative feedback can be explained by regression to the mean. The feedback sign might not influence the effect of monthly feedback emails sent out to participants of a large-scale physical activity intervention. However, randomized studies are needed to further support this conclusion. Limitations as well as opportunities for future research are discussed. ©Jan-Niklas Kramer, Tobias Kowatsch. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 02.06.2017.

  16. The relation between feedback perceptions and the supervisor-student relationship in master's thesis projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kleijn, Renske A M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323054080; Meijer, Paulien C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/176063765; Pilot, Albert|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068350880; Brekelmans, Mieke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074625411

    2014-01-01

    Research supervision can be investigated from social-emotional and cognitive perspectives, but most studies include only one perspective. This study aims to understand the interplay between a social-emotional (supervisor-student relationship) and cognitive (feedback) perspective on the outcomes of

  17. Peer feedback on writing : The relation between students' ability match, feedback quality, and essay performance. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, B.A.; Saab, N.; Driel, van J.H.; Van, den Broek P.W.

    2017-01-01

    There does not appear to be consensus on how to optimally match students during the peer feedback phase: with same-ability or different-ability peers. The current study explored this issue in the context of an academic writing task. Adopting a quasi-experimental design, 94 undergraduate students

  18. Documenting clinical performance problems among medical students: feedback for learner remediation and curriculum enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E. Mavis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We operationalized the taxonomy developed by Hauer and colleagues describing common clinical performance problems. Faculty raters pilot tested the resulting worksheet by observing recordings of problematic simulated clinical encounters involving third-year medical students. This approach provided a framework for structured feedback to guide learner improvement and curricular enhancement. Methods: Eighty-two problematic clinical encounters from M3 students who failed their clinical competency examination were independently rated by paired clinical faculty members to identify common problems related to the medical interview, physical examination, and professionalism. Results: Eleven out of 26 target performance problems were present in 25% or more encounters. Overall, 37% had unsatisfactory medical interviews, with ‘inadequate history to rule out other diagnoses’ most prevalent (60%. Seventy percent failed because of physical examination deficiencies, with missing elements (69% and inadequate data gathering (69% most common. One-third of the students did not introduce themselves to their patients. Among students failing based on standardized patient (SP ratings, 93% also failed to demonstrate competency based on the faculty ratings. Conclusions: Our review form allowed clinical faculty to validate pass/fail decisions based on standardized patient ratings. Detailed information about performance problems contributes to learner feedback and curricular enhancement to guide remediation planning and faculty development.

  19. Be kind to your eating disorder patients: the impact of positive and negative feedback on the explicit and implicit self-esteem of female patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlinden, J; Kamphuis, J H; Slagmolen, C; Wigboldus, D; Pieters, G; Probst, M

    2009-12-01

    Lack of self-esteem may play an important role in the development of eating disorders (ED). This study investigated the differential impact of positive and negative feedback on implicit and explicit self-esteem in women with an ED (N=25) as compared to women without an ED (N=29). False feedback (positive or negative) was given on participant's performance on a specifically developed intellectual test. Before and after the performance, explicit and implicit self-esteem was measured. On the explicit measure ED patients reacted congruently with the nature of the feedback. On the implicit measure only ED patients responded to the positive feedback with an improvement of self-esteem, with no effect for negative feedback. The control group was unaffected by either feedback. Furthermore, no correlation was observed between the explicit and implicit measures, a finding suggesting that these measurements tap different constructs. Positive feedback affects implicit self-esteem of female patients with eating disorders. The results underline the importance of positively approaching women with ED.

  20. The Making Assessment Count (MAC consortium maximising assessment and feedback design by working together

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark JP Kerrigan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Making Assessment Count (MAC project started at the University of Westminster in 2008. It sought to align staff and student expectations of feedback and support greater use of feed-forward approaches. A baseline analysis of staff views in the School of Life Sciences suggested that students did not make strategic use of the feedback they received. A similar analysis of the student position revealed that as a group they felt that the feedback provided to them was often insufficiently helpful. To address this dichotomy, a MAC process was developed in the School of Life Sciences and trialled with a cohort of about 350 first year undergraduate students. The process was based on a student-centred, three-stage model of feedback: Subject specific, Operational, and Strategic (SOS model. The student uses the subject tutor's feedback on an assignment to complete an online self-review questionnaire delivered by a simple tool. The student answers are processed by a web application called e-Reflect to generate a further feedback report. Contained within this report are personalised graphical representations of performance, time management, satisfaction and other operational feedback designed to help the student reflect on their approach to preparation and completion of future work. The student then writes in an online learning journal, which is shared with their personal tutor to support the personal tutorial process and the student's own development plan (PDP. Since the initial development and implementation of the MAC process within Life Sciences at Westminster, a consortium of universities has worked together to maximise the benefits of the project outcomes and collaboratively explore how the SOS model and e-Reflect can be exploited in different institutional and subject contexts. This paper presents and discusses an evaluation of the use of the MAC process within Life Sciences at Westminster from both staff and student perspective. In addition, the

  1. The Practice of Feedback Provision in teaching writing skills: Adu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study showed that the teachers and students had positive perception towards the contribution of feedback provision in improving writing skills. The study also showed that teachers don't provide regular writing activities which create conducive environment and encourage multi draft writing. The study further showed that ...

  2. Pairing attachment theory and social learning theory in video-feedback intervention to promote positive parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juffer, Femmie; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H

    2017-06-01

    Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting and Sensitive Discipline (VIPP-SD) is a social-learning and attachment-based intervention using video feedback to support sensitive parenting and at the same time setting firm limits. Empirical studies and meta-analyses have shown that sensitive parenting is the key determinant to promote secure child-parent attachment relationships and that adequate parental discipline contributes to fewer behavior problems in children. Building on this evidence, VIPP-SD has been tested in various populations of at-risk parents and vulnerable children (in the age range of zero to six years), as well as in the context of child care. In twelve randomized controlled trials including 1116 parents and caregivers, VIPP-SD proved to be effective in promoting sensitive caregiving, while positive social-emotional child outcomes were also found. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Advanced ESL Students' Prior EFL Education and Their Perceptions of Oral Corrective Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    The author in this study examines how advanced-level adult English as a Second Language (ESL) students' previous English as a Foreign Language (EFL) classroom experiences influence their perceptions of their teachers' oral corrective feedback (CF). It uses in-depth qualitative data to characterize the participants' prior English learning, and to…

  4. Sustainable feedback: students’ and tutors’ perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geitz, Gerry; Joosten-ten Brinke, Desirée; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    Feedback has been shown to substantially influence students’ learning. However, not everything characterized as feedback is effective. Sustainable feedback places students in an active role in which they generate and use feedback from peers, self or others and aims at developing lifelong learning

  5. Peer feedback: Using diciplinary-specific teaching formats as "bridges" to enable student engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine Wirenfeldt; Dankl, Kathrina

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Peer feedback has been proven to significantly strengthen students’ academic writing skills as well as foster meta-cognitive awareness on learning processes (Gibbs et al. 2004, Nicol et. al 2006). In order to unleash this potential, a collaborative and trusting ethos is required...... disciplinary-specific teaching formats and using these as “bridges” to enable students’ active engagement and unlock student’s co-creation skills. Method The proposed method has been applied at the Design School in Kolding at a course initiated as a part of the Master’s thesis supervision. As a method...... for a synopsis, and peer feedback was introduced for ‘shaping and co-creating’ first drafts of a synopsis. Both peer feedback and the concept of creative constraints (see freewriting format), are commonly used in design as methods to spur creativity. Results According to students own written evaluations (fifteen...

  6. Computer-Generated Feedback on Student Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Paige

    2011-01-01

    A distinction must be made between "computer-generated scoring" and "computer-generated feedback". Computer-generated scoring refers to the provision of automated scores derived from mathematical models built on organizational, syntactic, and mechanical aspects of writing. In contrast, computer-generated feedback, the focus of this article, refers…

  7. Importance and process of feedback in undergraduate medical education in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaqwi, Ali I

    2012-09-01

    Feedback is an essential element in the process of students' learning and development. This study aimed to explore the views of medical students regarding the importance and process of feedback in their medical education. A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted in our college of medicine. The questionnaire included questions to assess the students' views about the importance and the need of feedback in the learning process and whether feed-back should follow certain or all forms of assessment. In addition, the questionnaire contained questions that aimed to explore students' views about the contents and process of feedback. One hundred and eighty-six male medical students participated in this study. While the majority of students (85%) indicated that feedback was important for their learning and expressed their need for regular feedback during their study, only about 20% of them indicated receiving regular feed-back. Senior students perceived that they received feedback less frequently than their junior colleagues' (P importance and should be considered for planning and implementing an effective feedback system.

  8. Reproducibility of The Abdominal and Chest Wall Position by Voluntary Breath-Hold Technique Using a Laser-Based Monitoring and Visual Feedback System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nomoto, Satoru; Ohga, Saiji; Toba, Takashi; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Anai, Shigeo; Terashima, Hiromi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The voluntary breath-hold (BH) technique is a simple method to control the respiration-related motion of a tumor during irradiation. However, the abdominal and chest wall position may not be accurately reproduced using the BH technique. The purpose of this study was to examine whether visual feedback can reduce the fluctuation in wall motion during BH using a new respiratory monitoring device. Methods and Materials: We developed a laser-based BH monitoring and visual feedback system. For this study, five healthy volunteers were enrolled. The volunteers, practicing abdominal breathing, performed shallow end-expiration BH (SEBH), shallow end-inspiration BH (SIBH), and deep end-inspiration BH (DIBH) with or without visual feedback. The abdominal and chest wall positions were measured at 80-ms intervals during BHs. Results: The fluctuation in the chest wall position was smaller than that of the abdominal wall position. The reproducibility of the wall position was improved by visual feedback. With a monitoring device, visual feedback reduced the mean deviation of the abdominal wall from 2.1 ± 1.3 mm to 1.5 ± 0.5 mm, 2.5 ± 1.9 mm to 1.1 ± 0.4 mm, and 6.6 ± 2.4 mm to 2.6 ± 1.4 mm in SEBH, SIBH, and DIBH, respectively. Conclusions: Volunteers can perform the BH maneuver in a highly reproducible fashion when informed about the position of the wall, although in the case of DIBH, the deviation in the wall position remained substantial

  9. Implementation of an Automated Grading System with an Adaptive Learning Component to Affect Student Feedback and Response Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kevin; Janicki, Thomas; He, Ling; Patterson, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    This research focuses on the development and implementation of an adaptive learning and grading system with a goal to increase the effectiveness and quality of feedback to students. By utilizing various concepts from established learning theories, the goal of this research is to improve the quantity, quality, and speed of feedback as it pertains…

  10. Positive feedback between increasing atmospheric CO2 and ecosystem productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, I.; Hamilton, S. K.; Robertson, G. P.

    2009-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 will likely affect both the hydrologic cycle and ecosystem productivity. Current assumptions that increasing CO2 will lead to increased ecosystem productivity and plant water use efficiency (WUE) are driving optimistic predictions of higher crop yields as well as greater availability of freshwater resources due to a decrease in evapotranspiration. The plant physiological response that drives these effects is believed to be an increase in carbon uptake either by (a) stronger CO2 gradient between the stomata and the atmosphere, or by (b) reduced CO2 limitation of enzymatic carboxylation within the leaf. The (a) scenario will lead to increased water use efficiency (WUE) in plants. However, evidence for increased WUE is mostly based on modeling studies, and experiments producing a short duration or step-wise increase in CO2 concentration (e.g. free-air CO2 enrichment). We hypothesize that the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration is having a positive effect on ecosystem productivity and WUE. To investigate this hypothesis, we analyzed meteorological, ANPP, and soil CO2 flux datasets together with carbon isotopic ratio (13C/12C) of archived plant samples from the long term ecological research (LTER) program at Kellogg Biological Station. The datasets were collected between 1989 and 2007 (corresponding to an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration of ~33 ppmv at Mauna Loa). Wheat (Triticum aestivum) samples taken from 1989 and 2007 show a significant decrease in the C isotope discrimination factor (Δ) over time. Stomatal conductance is directly related to Δ, and thus Δ is inversely related to plant intrinsic WUE (iWUE). Historical changes in the 13C/12C ratio (δ13C) in samples of a perennial forb, Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), taken from adjacent successional fields, indicate changes in Δ upon uptake of CO2 as well. These temporal trends in Δ suggest a positive feedback between the increasing CO2 concentration in the

  11. The Effect of Prior Knowledge and Feedback Type Design on Student Achievement and Satisfaction in Introductory Accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Donald P.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of student prior knowledge and feedback type on student achievement and satisfaction in an introductory managerial accounting course using computer-based formative assessment tools. The study involved a redesign of the existing Job Order Costing unit using the ADDIE model of instructional design. The…

  12. Developing a Collaborative Model of Industry Feedback for Work Placement of Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Joan; Jackling, Beverley; Henschke, Kathy; Tempone, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) is a signature feature of study in many higher education institutions. In business degrees, industry feedback is recognized as an integral part of the assessment of WIL, yet the role played by industry in appraising student performance in the workplace has not been clearly defined. Based on interviews with industry…

  13. Educators' Perceptions of Automated Feedback Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debuse, Justin C. W.; Lawley, Meredith; Shibl, Rania

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of student learning is a core function of educators. Ideally students should be provided with timely, constructive feedback to facilitate learning. However, provision of high quality feedback becomes more complex as class sizes increase, modes of study expand and academic workloads increase. ICT solutions are being developed to…

  14. Improving the positive feedback adiabatic logic familiy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fischer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive Feedback Adiabatic Logic (PFAL shows the lowest energy dissipation among adiabatic logic families based on cross-coupled transistors, due to the reduction of both adiabatic and non-adiabatic losses. The dissipation primarily depends on the resistance of the charging path, which consists of a single p-channel MOSFET during the recovery phase. In this paper, a new logic family called Improved PFAL (IPFAL is proposed, where all n- and pchannel devices are swapped so that the charge can be recovered through an n-channel MOSFET. This allows to decrease the resistance of the charging path up to a factor of 2, and it enables a significant reduction of the energy dissipation. Simulations based on a 0.13µm CMOS process confirm the improvements in terms of power consumption over a large frequency range. However, the same simple design rule, which enables in PFAL an additional reduction of the dissipation by optimal transistor sizing, does not apply to IPFAL. Therefore, the influence of several sources of dissipation for a generic IPFAL gate is illustrated and discussed, in order to lower the power consumption and achieve better performance.

  15. The Relation between Feedback Perceptions and the Supervisor-Student Relationship in Master's Thesis Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleijn, Renske A. M.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Pilot, Albert; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2014-01-01

    Research supervision can be investigated from social-emotional and cognitive perspectives, but most studies include only one perspective. This study aims to understand the interplay between a social-emotional (supervisor-student relationship) and cognitive (feedback) perspective on the outcomes of master's thesis supervision in specific, by…

  16. Positive feedback between global warming and atmospheric CO2 concentration inferred from past climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, M.; Brovkin, V.; Cox, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    There is good evidence that higher global temperatures will promote a rise of greenhouse gas levels, implying a positive feedback which will increase the effect of anthropogenic emissions on global temperatures. However, the magnitude of this effect predicted by the available models remains highly

  17. Design and evaluation of a digital module with guided peer feedback for student learning biotechnology and molecular life sciences, attitudinal change, and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noroozi, Omid; Mulder, Martin

    2017-01-02

    This study aims to investigate the impacts of a digital learning module with guided peer feedback on students' domain-specific knowledge gain and their attitudinal change in the field of biotechnology and molecular life sciences. The extent to which the use of this module is appreciated by students is studied as well. A pre-test, post-test design was used with 203 students who were randomly assigned to groups of three. They were asked to work on the digital module with the aim of exploring various perspectives, and the "pros and cons" on the topic of "Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs)." The results suggest that the module can be used to foster students' domain-specific knowledge gain and their attitudinal change. Furthermore, the module was evaluated positively in terms of students' motivation and satisfaction with the learning experiences. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(1):31-39, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  18. Functional characteristics of a double positive feedback loop coupled with autorepression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Subhasis; Bose, Indrani

    2008-01-01

    We study the functional characteristics of a two-gene motif consisting of a double positive feedback loop and an autoregulatory negative feedback loop. The motif appears in the gene regulatory network controlling the functional activity of pancreatic β-cells. The model exhibits bistability and hysteresis in appropriate parameter regions. The two stable steady states correspond to low (OFF state) and high (ON state) protein levels, respectively. Using a deterministic approach, we show that the region of bistability increases in extent when the copy number of one of the genes is reduced from 2 to 1. The negative feedback loop has the effect of reducing the size of the bistable region. Loss of a gene copy, brought about by mutations, hampers the normal functioning of the β-cells giving rise to the genetic disorder, maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). The diabetic phenotype makes its appearance when a sizable fraction of the β-cells is in the OFF state. Using stochastic simulation techniques we show that, on reduction of the gene copy number, there is a transition from the monostable ON to the ON state in the bistable region of the parameter space. Fluctuations in the protein levels, arising due to the stochastic nature of gene expression, can give rise to transitions between the ON and OFF states. We show that as the strength of autorepression increases, the ON → OFF state transitions become less probable whereas the reverse transitions are more probable. The implications of the results in the context of the occurrence of MODY are pointed out

  19. Functional characteristics of a double positive feedback loop coupled with autorepression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Subhasis; Bose, Indrani

    2008-12-01

    We study the functional characteristics of a two-gene motif consisting of a double positive feedback loop and an autoregulatory negative feedback loop. The motif appears in the gene regulatory network controlling the functional activity of pancreatic β-cells. The model exhibits bistability and hysteresis in appropriate parameter regions. The two stable steady states correspond to low (OFF state) and high (ON state) protein levels, respectively. Using a deterministic approach, we show that the region of bistability increases in extent when the copy number of one of the genes is reduced from 2 to 1. The negative feedback loop has the effect of reducing the size of the bistable region. Loss of a gene copy, brought about by mutations, hampers the normal functioning of the β-cells giving rise to the genetic disorder, maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). The diabetic phenotype makes its appearance when a sizable fraction of the β-cells is in the OFF state. Using stochastic simulation techniques we show that, on reduction of the gene copy number, there is a transition from the monostable ON to the ON state in the bistable region of the parameter space. Fluctuations in the protein levels, arising due to the stochastic nature of gene expression, can give rise to transitions between the ON and OFF states. We show that as the strength of autorepression increases, the ON → OFF state transitions become less probable whereas the reverse transitions are more probable. The implications of the results in the context of the occurrence of MODY are pointed out.

  20. Designing and implementing a physiology course for a new doctoral occupational therapy program with student feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Barbara E; Ikiugu, Moses N

    2017-09-01

    Recently, the Occupational Therapy Department requested a custom-designed medical physiology course for the students in the new occupational therapy doctoral program. The first author, a physiologist with extensive experience in teaching both undergraduate preprofessional and medical students in human physiology, was recruited to design and implement the course. The course was designed to be consistent with the constructivist philosophy that guides the occupational therapy curriculum. The course was offered for the first time during fall/spring 2015/2016 and included both first- and second-year occupational therapy doctoral students. A number of anonymous assessment tools were used to evaluate students' perceptions regarding the effectiveness of various pedagogies used in the course in enhancing their learning. A summative course assessment survey with comments was used at the end of the course. This paper describes the model of course design and the student feedback, which generated some suggestions for improvement of the course. This approach in designing a new course for a new disciplinary group of students should be helpful to other faculty involved in developing courses for health career programs populated by students with variable physiology backgrounds and different educational needs. The final relevant feedback from the course would be to have the students evaluate the usefulness of the course to their future careers immediately following their certification examinations in a year or two and during their subsequent clinical experiences; however, that information will likely be more difficult to obtain. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Student Feedback on the Effectiveness of Using a Webquest for an Integrative Skills Course in a Korean University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobylinski, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the students' feedback after their participation in a WebQuest research project and aims to determine if the format of a WebQuest enhances student interest and engagement with a text compared to a traditional reading. It was hypothesized that students would respond favorably to this format, and that the increased engagement…

  2. Holistic feedback approach with video and peer discussion under teacher supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunukumbure, Agra Dilshani; Smith, Susan F; Das, Saroj

    2017-09-29

    High quality feedback is vital to learning in medical education but many students and teachers have expressed dissatisfaction on current feedback practices. Lack of teachers' insight into students' feedback requirements may be a key, which might be addressed by giving control to the students with student led feedback practices. The conceptual framework was built on three dimensions of learning theory by Illeris and Vygotsky's zone of proximal development and scaffolding. We introduced a feedback session with self-reflection and peer feedback in the form of open discussion on video-recorded student performances under teacher's guidance. The aims of this qualitative study were to explore students' perception on this holistic feedback approach and to investigate ways of maximising effective feedback and learning. Semi-structured interviews were used to gather data which were evaluated using a thematic analytical approach. The participants were third year medical students of Imperial College London on clinical placements at Hillingdon Hospital. Video based self-reflection helped some students to identify mistakes in communication and technical skills of which they were unaware prior to the session. Those who were new to video feedback found their expected self-image different to that of their actual image on video, leading to some distress. However many also identified that mistakes were not unique to themselves through peer videos and learnt from both model performances and from each other's mistakes. Balancing honest feedback with empathy was a challenge for many during peer discussion. The teacher played a vital role in making the session a success by providing guidance and a supportive environment. This study has demonstrated many potential benefits of this holistic feedback approach with video based self-reflection and peer discussion with students engaging at a deeper cognitive level than the standard descriptive feedback.

  3. To what extent is feedback in teacher education ‘for learning’?

    OpenAIRE

    Carver, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Feedback for student teachers during their work-based learning in schools offers significant advantages over feedback in the university-based element of their degree programme. Students receive frequent, often immediate, feedback from an experienced teacher who sees their gradual development and has only a few students to manage. This includes formal feedback linked to assessment criteria but also opportunities for informal, verbal feedback and dialogue that supports socialisation as a collea...

  4. Investigating Feedback on Practice Among Teachers: Coherence of Observed and Perceived Feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2018-01-01

    Despite that benefits of feedback in student learning are reported in much research, little has been reported regarding the use of feedback from teach- ers to other teachers—a key tool in professional development. In this study, we triangulated data from videotaped peer coaching sessions, ques-

  5. Assessing Online Textual Feedback to Support Student Intrinsic Motivation Using a Collaborative Text-Based Dialogue System: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Ronnie H.; Deneen, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This paper assesses textual feedback to support student intrinsic motivation using a collaborative text-based dialogue system. A research model is presented based on research into intrinsic motivation, and the specific construct of feedback provides a framework for the model. A qualitative research methodology is used to validate the model.…

  6. Positive feedback between mycorrhizal fungi and plants influences plant invasion success and resistance to invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Ruyi; Tang, Jianjun; Yang, Haishui; Hu, Shuijin; Chen, Xin

    2010-08-24

    Negative or positive feedback between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and host plants can contribute to plant species interactions, but how this feedback affects plant invasion or resistance to invasion is not well known. Here we tested how alterations in AMF community induced by an invasive plant species generate feedback to the invasive plant itself and affect subsequent interactions between the invasive species and its native neighbors. We first examined the effects of the invasive forb Solidago canadensis L. on AMF communities comprising five different AMF species. We then examined the effects of the altered AMF community on mutualisms formed with the native legume forb species Kummerowia striata (Thunb.) Schindl. and on the interaction between the invasive and native plants. The host preferences of the five AMF were also assessed to test whether the AMF form preferred mutualistic relations with the invasive and/or the native species. We found that S. canadensis altered AMF spore composition by increasing one AMF species (Glomus geosporum) while reducing Glomus mosseae, which is the dominant species in the field. The host preference test showed that S. canadensis had promoted the abundance of AMF species (G. geosporum) that most promoted its own growth. As a consequence, the altered AMF community enhanced the competitiveness of invasive S. canadensis at the expense of K. striata. Our results demonstrate that the invasive S. canadensis alters soil AMF community composition because of fungal-host preference. This change in the composition of the AMF community generates positive feedback to the invasive S. canadensis itself and decreases AM associations with native K. striata, thereby making the native K. striata less dominant.

  7. Positive feedback between mycorrhizal fungi and plants influences plant invasion success and resistance to invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Negative or positive feedback between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and host plants can contribute to plant species interactions, but how this feedback affects plant invasion or resistance to invasion is not well known. Here we tested how alterations in AMF community induced by an invasive plant species generate feedback to the invasive plant itself and affect subsequent interactions between the invasive species and its native neighbors. We first examined the effects of the invasive forb Solidago canadensis L. on AMF communities comprising five different AMF species. We then examined the effects of the altered AMF community on mutualisms formed with the native legume forb species Kummerowia striata (Thunb. Schindl. and on the interaction between the invasive and native plants. The host preferences of the five AMF were also assessed to test whether the AMF form preferred mutualistic relations with the invasive and/or the native species. We found that S. canadensis altered AMF spore composition by increasing one AMF species (Glomus geosporum while reducing Glomus mosseae, which is the dominant species in the field. The host preference test showed that S. canadensis had promoted the abundance of AMF species (G. geosporum that most promoted its own growth. As a consequence, the altered AMF community enhanced the competitiveness of invasive S. canadensis at the expense of K. striata. Our results demonstrate that the invasive S. canadensis alters soil AMF community composition because of fungal-host preference. This change in the composition of the AMF community generates positive feedback to the invasive S. canadensis itself and decreases AM associations with native K. striata, thereby making the native K. striata less dominant.

  8. Examining the Efficacy of a Personalized Normative Feedback Intervention to Reduce College Student Gambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celio, Mark A.; Lisman, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of a stand-alone personalized normative feedback (PNF) intervention targeting misperceptions of gambling among college students. Participants: Undergraduates (N = 136; 55% male) who reported gambling in the past 30 days were recruited between September 2011 and March 2012. Methods: Using a randomized clinical…

  9. Student and Instructor Responses to Emotional Motivational Feedback Messages in an Online Instructional Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsar, Firat

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of Emotional Motivational Feedback Message (EMFEM) in an online learning environment. This exploratory research was conducted using mixed method single case study design. Participants were 15 undergraduate students enrolled in an instructional technology course in a large state…

  10. Situated Formative Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Niels Bech; Wahl, Christian; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    refer to this type of feedback as, Situated Formative Feedback (SFF). As a basis for exploring, identifying and discussing relevant aspects of SFF the paper analyses qualitative data from a Moodle dialogue. Data are embedded in the qualitative analytic program Nvivo and are analysed with a system...... theoretical textual analysis method. Asynchronous written dialogue from an online master’s course at Aalborg University forms the empirical basis of the study. The findings suggests in general that students play an essential role in SFF and that students and educators are equal in the COP, but holds different...

  11. Can performance feedback during instruction boost knowledge acquisition? Contrasting criterion-based and social comparison feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolloffel, Bas Jan; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Feedback indicating how well students are performing during a learning task can be very stimulating. In this study with a pre- and post-test design, the effects of two types of performance feedback on learning results were compared: feedback during a learning task was either stated in terms of how

  12. Investigating Students' Ideas About Buoyancy and the Influence of Haptic Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minogue, James; Borland, David

    2016-04-01

    While haptics (simulated touch) represents a potential breakthrough technology for science teaching and learning, there is relatively little research into its differential impact in the context of teaching and learning. This paper describes the testing of a haptically enhanced simulation (HES) for learning about buoyancy. Despite a lifetime of everyday experiences, a scientifically sound explanation of buoyancy remains difficult to construct for many. It requires the integration of domain-specific knowledge regarding density, fluid, force, gravity, mass, weight, and buoyancy. Prior studies suggest that novices often focus on only one dimension of the sinking and floating phenomenon. Our HES was designed to promote the integration of the subconcepts of density and buoyant forces and stresses the relationship between the object itself and the surrounding fluid. The study employed a randomized pretest-posttest control group research design and a suite of measures including an open-ended prompt and objective content questions to provide insights into the influence of haptic feedback on undergraduate students' thinking about buoyancy. A convenience sample (n = 40) was drawn from a university's population of undergraduate elementary education majors. Two groups were formed from haptic feedback (n = 22) and no haptic feedback (n = 18). Through content analysis, discernible differences were seen in the posttest explanations sinking and floating across treatment groups. Learners that experienced the haptic feedback made more frequent use of "haptically grounded" terms (e.g., mass, gravity, buoyant force, pushing), leading us to begin to build a local theory of language-mediated haptic cognition.

  13. Effects of intrinsic motivation on feedback processing during learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePasque, Samantha; Tricomi, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    Learning commonly requires feedback about the consequences of one's actions, which can drive learners to modify their behavior. Motivation may determine how sensitive an individual might be to such feedback, particularly in educational contexts where some students value academic achievement more than others. Thus, motivation for a task might influence the value placed on performance feedback and how effectively it is used to improve learning. To investigate the interplay between intrinsic motivation and feedback processing, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during feedback-based learning before and after a novel manipulation based on motivational interviewing, a technique for enhancing treatment motivation in mental health settings. Because of its role in the reinforcement learning system, the striatum is situated to play a significant role in the modulation of learning based on motivation. Consistent with this idea, motivation levels during the task were associated with sensitivity to positive versus negative feedback in the striatum. Additionally, heightened motivation following a brief motivational interview was associated with increases in feedback sensitivity in the left medial temporal lobe. Our results suggest that motivation modulates neural responses to performance-related feedback, and furthermore that changes in motivation facilitate processing in areas that support learning and memory. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Effects of Intrinsic Motivation on Feedback Processing During Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePasque, Samantha; Tricomi, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Learning commonly requires feedback about the consequences of one’s actions, which can drive learners to modify their behavior. Motivation may determine how sensitive an individual might be to such feedback, particularly in educational contexts where some students value academic achievement more than others. Thus, motivation for a task might influence the value placed on performance feedback and how effectively it is used to improve learning. To investigate the interplay between intrinsic motivation and feedback processing, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during feedback-based learning before and after a novel manipulation based on motivational interviewing, a technique for enhancing treatment motivation in mental health settings. Because of its role in the reinforcement learning system, the striatum is situated to play a significant role in the modulation of learning based on motivation. Consistent with this idea, motivation levels during the task were associated with sensitivity to positive versus negative feedback in the striatum. Additionally, heightened motivation following a brief motivational interview was associated with increases in feedback sensitivity in the left medial temporal lobe. Our results suggest that motivation modulates neural responses to performance-related feedback, and furthermore that changes in motivation facilitates processing in areas that support learning and memory. PMID:26112370

  15. The Effect of Positive and Negative Feedback on Risk-Taking across Different Contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losecaat Vermeer, Annabel B; Sanfey, Alan G

    2015-01-01

    Preferences for risky choices have often been shown to be unstable and context-dependent. Though people generally avoid gambles with mixed outcomes, a phenomenon often attributed to loss aversion, contextual factors can impact this dramatically. For example, people typically prefer risky options after a financial loss, while generally choosing safer options after a monetary gain. However, it is unclear what exactly contributes to these preference shifts as a function of prior outcomes, as these gain/loss outcomes are usually confounded with participant performance, and therefore it is unclear whether these effects are driven purely by the monetary gains or losses, or rather by success or failure at the actual task. Here, we experimentally separated the effects of monetary gains/losses from performance success/failure prior to a standard risky choice. Participants performed a task in which they experienced contextual effects: 1) monetary gain or loss based directly on performance, 2) monetary gain or loss that was randomly awarded and was, crucially, independent from performance, and 3) success or failure feedback based on performance, but without any monetary incentive. Immediately following these positive/negative contexts, participants were presented with a gain-loss gamble that they had to decide to either play or pass. We found that risk preferences for identical sets of gambles were biased by positive and negative contexts containing monetary gains and losses, but not by contexts containing performance feedback. This data suggests that the observed framing effects are driven by aversion for monetary losses and not simply by the positive or negative valence of the context, or by potential moods resulting from positive or negative contexts. These results highlight the specific context dependence of risk preferences.

  16. Harnessing members' positive mood for team-directed learning behaviour and team innovation : The moderating role of perceived team feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, Frank; van der Vegt, Gerben S.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the role of individual team members' positive mood and perceived team feedback for their team-directed learning behaviour. Results obtained in a sample of 186 members from 27 work teams showed that positive mood was positively associated with team-directed learning behaviour if

  17. Spatial pattern formation of coastal vegetation in response to external gradients and positive feedbacks affecting soil porewater salinity: A model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Smith, T. J.; Teh, S.Y.; Koh, H. L.

    2012-01-01

    Coastal vegetation of South Florida typically comprises salinity-tolerant mangroves bordering salinity-intolerant hardwood hammocks and fresh water marshes. Two primary ecological factors appear to influence the maintenance of mangrove/hammock ecotones against changes that might occur due to disturbances. One of these is a gradient in one or more environmental factors. The other is the action of positive feedback mechanisms, in which each vegetation community influences its local environment to favor itself, reinforcing the boundary between communities. The relative contributions of these two factors, however, can be hard to discern. A spatially explicit individual-based model of vegetation, coupled with a model of soil hydrology and salinity dynamics is presented here to simulate mangrove/hammock ecotones in the coastal margin habitats of South Florida. The model simulation results indicate that an environmental gradient of salinity, caused by tidal flux, is the key factor separating vegetation communities, while positive feedback involving the different interaction of each vegetation type with the vadose zone salinity increases the sharpness of boundaries, and maintains the ecological resilience of mangrove/hammock ecotones against small disturbances. Investigation of effects of precipitation on positive feedback indicates that the dry season, with its low precipitation, is the period of strongest positive feedback. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. (outside the USA).

  18. Autogenic Feedback Training (Body FORTRAN) for Musically Gifted Students at Bonita Vista High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John M.

    1982-01-01

    The Gifted Self-Understanding Assessment Battery (GSAB) was given to 34 (27 females, 7 males) music students (aged 15-17) at Bonita Vista High School in Chula Vista (California). Biofeedback training and assessment were followed by individual counseling for Autogenic Feedback Training (AFT) to achieve improvement of the individual's own well…

  19. Students' Positioning in the Classroom: a Study of Teacher-Student Interactions in a Socioscientific Issue Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossér, Ulrika; Lindahl, Mats

    2017-07-01

    The integration of socioscientific issues (SSI) in science education calls for emphasizing dialogic classroom practices that include students' views together with multiple sources of knowledge and diverse perspectives on the issues. Such classroom practices aim to empower students to participate in decision-making on SSI. This can be accomplished by enhancing their independence as learners and positioning them as legitimate participants in societal discussions. However, this is a complex task for science teachers. In this study, we introduce positioning theory as a lens to analyse classroom discourse on SSI in order to enhance our knowledge of the manners by which teachers' interactions with students make available or promote different positions for the students, that is, different parts for the students to play as participants, when dealing with SSI in the classroom. Transcripts of interactions between one teacher and six student groups, recorded during two lessons, were analysed with respect to the positioning of the students as participants in the classroom, and in relation to the SSI under consideration. The results show that the teacher-student interactions made available contrasting student positions. The students were positioned by the teacher or positioned themselves as independent learners or as dependent on the teacher. Furthermore, the students were positioned as affected by the issue but as spectators to public negotiations of the issue. Knowledge about the manner in which teacher-student interactions can function to position students seems important for dialogic classroom practices and the promotion of student positions that sustain the pursuit of intended educational outcomes.

  20. Making the Grade: Using Instructional Feedback and Evaluation to Inspire Evidence-Based Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickman, Peggy; Gormally, Cara; Martella, Amedee Marchand

    2016-01-01

    Typically, faculty receive feedback about teaching via two mechanisms: end-of-semester student evaluations and peer observation. However, instructors require more sustained encouragement and constructive feedback when implementing evidence-based teaching practices. Our study goal was to characterize the landscape of current instructional-feedback practices in biology and uncover faculty perceptions about these practices. Findings from a national survey of 400 college biology faculty reveal an overwhelming dissatisfaction with student evaluations, regardless of self-reported teaching practices, institution type, or position. Faculty view peer evaluations as most valuable, but less than half of faculty at doctoral-granting institutions report participating in peer evaluation. When peer evaluations are performed, they are more supportive of evidence-based teaching than student evaluations. Our findings reveal a large, unmet desire for greater guidance and assessment data to inform pedagogical decision making. Informed by these findings, we discuss alternate faculty-vetted feedback strategies for providing formative instructional feedback. © 2016 P. Brickman et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  1. Teacher feedback during active learning: current practices in primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bergh, Linda; Ros, Anje; Beijaard, Douwe

    2013-06-01

    Feedback is one of the most powerful tools, which teachers can use to enhance student learning. It appears difficult for teachers to give qualitatively good feedback, especially during active learning. In this context, teachers should provide facilitative feedback that is focused on the development of meta-cognition and social learning. The purpose of the present study is to contribute to the existing knowledge about feedback and to give directions to improve teacher feedback in the context of active learning. The participants comprised 32 teachers who practiced active learning in the domain of environmental studies in the sixth, seventh, or eighth grade of 13 Dutch primary schools. A total of 1,465 teacher-student interactions were examined. Video observations were made of active learning lessons in the domain of environmental studies. A category system was developed based on the literature and empirical data. Teacher-student interactions were assessed using this system. Results. About half of the teacher-student interactions contained feedback. This feedback was usually focused on the tasks that were being performed by the students and on the ways in which these tasks were processed. Only 5% of the feedback was explicitly related to a learning goal. In their feedback, the teachers were directing (rather than facilitating) the learning processes. During active learning, feedback on meta-cognition and social learning is important. Feedback should be explicitly related to learning goals. In practice, these kinds of feedback appear to be scarce. Therefore, giving feedback during active learning seems to be an important topic for teachers' professional development. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  2. Just-in-Time or Plenty-of-Time Teaching? Different Electronic Feedback Devices and Their Effect on Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jerry Chih-Yuan; Martinez, Brandon; Seli, Helena

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how incorporating different electronic feedback devices (i.e., clickers versus web-based polling) may affect specific types of student engagement (i.e., behavioral, emotional, and cognitive engagement), whether students' self-efficacy for learning and performance may differ between courses that have integrated clickers and…

  3. Feedback in Clinical Education, Part I: Characteristics of Feedback Provided by Approved Clinical Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Sara; Henning, Jolene

    2014-01-01

    Context Providing students with feedback is an important component of athletic training clinical education; however, little information is known about the feedback that Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs; now known as preceptors) currently provide to athletic training students (ATSs). Objective To characterize the feedback provided by ACIs to ATSs during clinical education experiences. Design Qualitative study. Setting One National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletic training facility and 1 outpatient rehabilitation clinic that were clinical sites for 1 entry-level master's degree program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Patients or Other Participants A total of 4 ACIs with various experience levels and 4 second-year ATSs. Data Collection and Analysis Extensive field observations were audio recorded, transcribed, and integrated with field notes for analysis. The constant comparative approach of open, axial, and selective coding was used to inductively analyze data and develop codes and categories. Member checking, triangulation, and peer debriefing were used to promote trustworthiness of the study. Results The ACIs gave 88 feedback statements in 45 hours and 10 minutes of observation. Characteristics of feedback categories included purpose, timing, specificity, content, form, and privacy. Conclusions Feedback that ACIs provided included several components that made each feedback exchange unique. The ACIs in our study provided feedback that is supported by the literature, suggesting that ACIs are using current recommendations for providing feedback. Feedback needs to be investigated across multiple athletic training education programs to gain more understanding of certain areas of feedback, including frequency, privacy, and form. PMID:24143902

  4. The Role of Locus of Control and Feedback on Performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined Students' Locus of Control and Teacher Feedback using a 2x3 factorial to measure the performance of thirty-six (36) primary school students utilizing the two locus of control types and three levels of teacher feedback: no feedback, attributional feedback, and progressive feedback. No significant ...

  5. Peer Feedback in Learning a Foreign Language in Facebook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari, E.; Simons, P.R.J.; Pilot, A.; Naderi, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Feedback can have different forms and functions depending on its objectives as well as its provider: teacher feedback, student feedback, peer feedback, written feedback, oral feedback, etc. One of the most constructive forms of feedback may be peer feedback, since it involves group learning (Van

  6. Audiotape Feedback for Essays in Distance Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, P.A.; Brink, H. van den; Meester, M.

    1991-01-01

    Students who were required to write three short essays for a university level course on photochemistry at the Open university of the Netherlands received either audio-cassette or written feedback on their essays. The students receiving the audio feedback described their experience as personal,

  7. MEDICAL STUDENTS’ FEEDBACK ABOUT FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT PATTERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navajothi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Pharmacology is the toughest subject in the II MBBS syllabus. Students have to memorise a lot about the drugs’ name and classification. We are conducting internal assessment exams after completion of each system. Number of failures will be more than 60% in the internal assessments conducted during first six months of II MBBS course. AIM To assess the formative assessment pattern followed in our institution with the students’ feedback and modify the pattern according to the students’ feedback. SETTINGS & DESIGN Prospective Observational Study conducted at Department of Pharmacology, Government Sivagangai Medical College, Sivagangai, Tamil Nadu. MATERIALS AND METHODS Questionnaire was prepared and distributed to the 300 students of Government Sivagangai Medical College and feedback was collected. Data collected was analysed in Microsoft Excel 2007 version. RESULTS Received feedback from 274 students. Most (80% of the students wanted to attend the tests in all systems. Monthly assessment test was preferred by 47% of the students. Students who preferred to finish tests before holidays was 57%. Most (56% of the students preferred tests for 1 hour. Multiple choice question (MCQ type was preferred by 43%, which is not a routine question pattern. Only 7% preferred viva. Recall type of questions was preferred by 41% of the students. CONCLUSION In our institution, internal assessment is conducted as per the students’ mind setup. As the feedback has been the generally followed one, we will add MCQs in the forthcoming tests. Application type questions will be asked for more marks than Recall type of questions.

  8. Assessment Feedback Only on Demand: Supporting the Few Not Supplying the Many

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ollie; Gorra, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    There are many pressures on academics to "satisfy" students' needs for feedback, not least the inclusion of questions about feedback. Many have commentated on the lack of student engagement with summative feedback while most believe that feedback is necessary to improve individual student performance. Several have looked at a range of…

  9. Barriers to effective feedback in undergraduate medical education: Case study from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrebish, Saleh Ali

    2018-01-01

    Students' feedback is an essential source of data for evaluation and improvement of the quality of education. Nonetheless, feedback may be routinely practised for accreditation purposes, and it is considered as a ritual employed by students, which makes its effectiveness questionable. The aim of this study is to explore and analyze the students' perceptions about the importance of feedback and the barriers for effective feedback and suggest proper ways to overcome these barriers. This cross-sectional, anonymous, questionnaire-based study was conducted in the College of Medicine, Qassim University. A total of 299 medical students, composed of 185 male and 114 female, from different levels during December 2015 participated. Mean value, standard deviation, and proportion were used to quantify the quantitative and categorical study and outcome variables. 47% of students responded to the questionnaire with more participation of juniors and females. Half of the students believed that feedback is not important and agreed for the presence of barriers for effective feedback. 5 th level students exhibited higher resistance for participation in feedback, and there was a significant difference between male and female students. Promisingly, most of the participant did not believe the presence cultural barrier for feedback. Saudi medical students are willing to involve in effective feedback. Some barriers that make feedback practised as tokenistic is present. They can be overcome through proper orientation and appropriate closing the loop with response to the feedback declared to students. Further investigation is needed to explore barriers to feedback in higher education settings and help designing an approach to enhance the effectiveness of feedback on a national level.

  10. The price of soliciting and receiving negative feedback: self-verification theory as a vulnerability to depression theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, T E

    1995-05-01

    The hypothesis that people who seek and receive negative feedback are vulnerable to increases in depressed symptoms was tested among 100 undergraduates and their roommates. Students and roommates completed questionnaires on their views of each other and on their own levels of negative feedback seeking, depressed and anxious symptoms, negative and positive affect, and self-esteem. Three weeks later, students and roommates completed the same questionnaires. Results were, in general, consistent with prediction. Students who reported an interest in their roommates' negative feedback and who lived with a roommate who viewed them negatively were at heightened risk for increases in depressed symptoms. These results could not be explained in terms of the variables' relations to trait self-esteem. The symptom specificity of the effect was moderately supported. Implications for work on interpersonal vulnerability to depression are discussed.

  11. Making Sense of Student Feedback Using Text Analysis--Adapting and Expanding a Common Lexicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, Elizabeth; Lynch, Bernardine; Jones, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to report the findings of a study into the automated text analysis of student feedback comments to assist in investigating a high volume of qualitative information at various levels in an Australian university. It includes the drawbacks and advantages of using selected applications and established lexicons. There has been…

  12. The Effects of Video Feedback Coaching for Teachers on Scientific Knowledge of Primary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vondel, Sabine; Steenbeek, Henderien; van Dijk, Marijn; van Geert, Paul

    2018-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the effects of a video feedback coaching intervention for upper-grade primary school teachers on students' cognitive gains in scientific knowledge. This teaching intervention was designed with the use of inquiry-based learning principles for teachers, such as the empirical cycle and the posing of…

  13. Analysis of Feedback processes in Online Group Interaction: a methodological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Espasa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present a methodological model to analyze students' group interaction to improve their essays in online learning environments, based on asynchronous and written communication. In these environments teacher and student scaffolds for discussion are essential to promote interaction. One of these scaffolds can be the feedback. Research on feedback processes has predominantly focused on feedback design rather than on how students utilize feedback to improve learning. This methodological model fills this gap contributing to analyse the implementation of the feedback processes while students discuss collaboratively in a specific case of writing assignments. A review of different methodological models was carried out to define a framework adjusted to the analysis of the relationship of written and asynchronous group interaction, and students' activity and changes incorporated into the final text. The model proposed includes the following dimensions: 1 student participation 2 nature of student learning and 3 quality of student learning. The main contribution of this article is to present the methodological model and also to ascertain the model's operativity regarding how students incorporate such feedback into their essays.

  14. Uncover it, students would learn leadership from Team-Based Learning (TBL): The effect of guided reflection and feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Maryam; Mirzazadeh, Azim; Parmelee, Dean X; Peyton, Elizabeth; Janani, Leila; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2017-04-01

    Little is known about best practices for teaching and learning leadership through Team-Based learning™ (TBL™) with medical students. We hypothesized that guided reflection and feedback would improve shared leadership and shared leadership capacity, and enhance team decision quality in TBL teams. We used the Kolb experiential learning theory as the theoretical framework. The study was conducted at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Three TBL sessions with 206 students (39 teams) participated in the study. Using a quasi-experimental design, one batch received guided reflection and feedback on their team leadership processes (n = 20 teams) and the other received only TBL (n = 19 teams). Observers measured shared leadership using a checklist. Shared leadership capacity was measured using a questionnaire. Scores on a team application exercise were used to assess quality of team decisions. Evidence did not support our first hypothesis that reflection and feedback enhance shared leadership in TBL teams. Percentages of teams displaying shared leadership did not differ between intervention and control groups in sessions 1 (p = 0.6), 2 (p = 1) or 3 (p = 1). The results did not support the second hypothesis. We found no difference in quality of decision making between the intervention and control groups for sessions 1 (p = 0.77), 2 (p = 0.23), or 3 (p = 0.07). The third hypothesis that the reflection and feedback would have an effect on shared leadership capacity was supported (T = -8.55, p > 0.001 adjusted on baseline; T = -8.55, p > 0.001 adjusted on gender). We found that reflection and feedback improved shared leadership capacity but not shared leadership behaviors or team decision quality. We propose medical educators who apply TBL, should provide guided exercise in reflection and feedback so that students may better understand the benefits of working in teams as preparation for their future roles as leaders and

  15. Moving mesh finite element method for finite time extinction of distributed parameter systems with positive exponential feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnadi, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    In the distributed parameter systems with exponential feedback, non-global existence of solution is not always exist. For some positive initial values, there exist finite time T such that the solution goes to infinity, i.e. finite time extinction or blow-up. Here is present a numerical solution using Moving Mesh Finite Element to solve the distributed parameter systems with exponential feedback close to blow-up time. The numerical behavior of the mesh close to the time of extinction is the prime interest in this study

  16. RANCANG BANGUN SISTEM E-LEARNING PEMROGRAMAN PADA MODUL DETEKSI PLAGIARISME KODE PROGRAM DAN STUDENT FEEDBACK SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Munif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Kompetensi utama yang harus dimiliki oleh mahasiswa jurusan ilmu komputer/informatika adalah pemrograman. Perkuliahan yang berbasis pemrograman seringkali mewajibkan mahasiswa untuk mengerjakan soal yang cukup banyak. Hal ini tentunya akan menyulitkan dosen dalam mengevaluasi hasil pekerjaan mahasiswa. Selain itu, dimungkinkan pula adanya praktik mahasiswa yang memplagiat hasil dari mahasiswa lain. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menjawab permasalahan tersebut. Pada penelitian ini dikembangkan sebuah sistem pembelajaran/e-learning pemrograman. Modul sistem e-learning yang dibuat pada artikel ini terbatas pada modul deteksi kemiripan kode program dan student feedback system. Modul deteksi kemiripan kode program berfungsi untuk mengecek kemiripan kode program antar mahasiswa. Kemudian kode-kode program yang memiliki tingkat kemiripan tinggi akan dikelompokkan menjadi satu menggunakan algoritma hierarchical clustering. Proses pengecekan kemiripan program dimulai dari proses transformasi kode program ke dalam Abstract Syntax Tree (AST, kemudian ditransformasi menjadi sequence dan dihitung kemiripannya menggunakan algoritma Levenshtein Distance. Modul student feedback system berfungsi untuk mengecek kemiripan kode program mahasiswa dengan dosen. Mahasiswa akan mendapatkan informasi apakah kode program mereka sudah sesuai dengan yang diinginkan oleh dosen atau belum. Sebelum sistem memberikan umpan balik, terlebih dahulu kode program dosen dan mahasiswa diproses menjadi AST dan kemudian menjadi sequence. Sistem akan membandingkan kemiripan kode program dosen dan mahasiswa menggunakan algoritma Smith-Waterman yang telah dimodifikasi. Kemudian sistem menampilkan baris-baris kode mana saja yang sama antara kode program dosen dengan kode program mahasiswa. Dari hasil pengujian dapat disimpulkan bahwa modul deteksi plagiarisme dan student feedback system telah terimplementasi dengan baik.

  17. The Role of Feedback in Cross-Cultural Learning: A Case Study of Chinese Taught Postgraduate Students in a UK University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Mei; Lowe, John

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient attention has been given to the role of cultural differences in feedback communication with the UK's increasingly internationalised student body. This issue is particularly significant for international students taking short -- one-year -- postgraduate taught courses and we illustrate this in a study of Chinese students at a UK…

  18. Perfectionism in students and positive career planning attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Stoeber, Joachim; Mutinelli, Sofia; Corr, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    In today's uncertain job market, university students who show positive attitudes in their career planning have an advantage. Yet, we know little what personality characteristics are associated with individual differences in career planning attitudes. The present study examined 177 university students to investigate whether perfectionism (self-oriented, other-oriented, and socially prescribed) predicted students' positive career planning attitudes (career adaptability, career optimism, and per...

  19. The real-time orbit-position feedback system for the ELETTRA storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulfone, D.

    1990-01-01

    To take full advantage of the low emittance and the small insertion-device source sizes, real-time global harmonic and local feedback systems have been designed for the Trieste synchrotron light source (ELETTRA). A fully digital approach has been chosen for data communication and processing, using VME as the standard system bus. The system architecture is presented, showing the open approach which allows a free choice in the use of beam-position monitors and correctors. The design considerations are given, pointing out the advantages in flexibility offered by the digital processing. (orig.)

  20. The Effects of Handwritten Feedback on Paper and Tablet PC in Learning Japanese Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai LI

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares the effect of paper-basedhandwritten feedback (PBHF and that of Tablet PC-basedhandwritten feedback (TBHF in learning Japanese writing.The study contributes to the research on motivation,usability and presence when learners are given differentmedia-based handwritten error feedback. The resultsindicated that there was little difference in the effect of thetwo media on motivation and usability factors. However,PBHF showed a positive effect on presence factor thanTBHF. Also, there was little difference in proficiencyimprovement after the students reviewed different mediabased handwritten feedback. The results of this studysuggest that language teachers should not use ICT withtraditional strategies, but in an innovative way to improvetheir writing instruction and enhance learners’ writingproficiency.

  1. Construction and modelling of an inducible positive feedback loop stably integrated in a mammalian cell-line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velia Siciliano

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the relationship between topology and dynamics of transcriptional regulatory networks in mammalian cells is essential to elucidate the biology of complex regulatory and signaling pathways. Here, we characterised, via a synthetic biology approach, a transcriptional positive feedback loop (PFL by generating a clonal population of mammalian cells (CHO carrying a stable integration of the construct. The PFL network consists of the Tetracycline-controlled transactivator (tTA, whose expression is regulated by a tTA responsive promoter (CMV-TET, thus giving rise to a positive feedback. The same CMV-TET promoter drives also the expression of a destabilised yellow fluorescent protein (d2EYFP, thus the dynamic behaviour can be followed by time-lapse microscopy. The PFL network was compared to an engineered version of the network lacking the positive feedback loop (NOPFL, by expressing the tTA mRNA from a constitutive promoter. Doxycycline was used to repress tTA activation (switch off, and the resulting changes in fluorescence intensity for both the PFL and NOPFL networks were followed for up to 43 h. We observed a striking difference in the dynamics of the PFL and NOPFL networks. Using non-linear dynamical models, able to recapitulate experimental observations, we demonstrated a link between network topology and network dynamics. Namely, transcriptional positive autoregulation can significantly slow down the "switch off" times, as compared to the non-autoregulated system. Doxycycline concentration can modulate the response times of the PFL, whereas the NOPFL always switches off with the same dynamics. Moreover, the PFL can exhibit bistability for a range of Doxycycline concentrations. Since the PFL motif is often found in naturally occurring transcriptional and signaling pathways, we believe our work can be instrumental to characterise their behaviour.

  2. Construction and modelling of an inducible positive feedback loop stably integrated in a mammalian cell-line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Velia; Menolascina, Filippo; Marucci, Lucia; Fracassi, Chiara; Garzilli, Immacolata; Moretti, Maria Nicoletta; di Bernardo, Diego

    2011-06-01

    Understanding the relationship between topology and dynamics of transcriptional regulatory networks in mammalian cells is essential to elucidate the biology of complex regulatory and signaling pathways. Here, we characterised, via a synthetic biology approach, a transcriptional positive feedback loop (PFL) by generating a clonal population of mammalian cells (CHO) carrying a stable integration of the construct. The PFL network consists of the Tetracycline-controlled transactivator (tTA), whose expression is regulated by a tTA responsive promoter (CMV-TET), thus giving rise to a positive feedback. The same CMV-TET promoter drives also the expression of a destabilised yellow fluorescent protein (d2EYFP), thus the dynamic behaviour can be followed by time-lapse microscopy. The PFL network was compared to an engineered version of the network lacking the positive feedback loop (NOPFL), by expressing the tTA mRNA from a constitutive promoter. Doxycycline was used to repress tTA activation (switch off), and the resulting changes in fluorescence intensity for both the PFL and NOPFL networks were followed for up to 43 h. We observed a striking difference in the dynamics of the PFL and NOPFL networks. Using non-linear dynamical models, able to recapitulate experimental observations, we demonstrated a link between network topology and network dynamics. Namely, transcriptional positive autoregulation can significantly slow down the "switch off" times, as compared to the non-autoregulated system. Doxycycline concentration can modulate the response times of the PFL, whereas the NOPFL always switches off with the same dynamics. Moreover, the PFL can exhibit bistability for a range of Doxycycline concentrations. Since the PFL motif is often found in naturally occurring transcriptional and signaling pathways, we believe our work can be instrumental to characterise their behaviour.

  3. Perceptions of Feedback One Year on: A Comparative Study of the Views of First and Second Year Biological Sciences Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jon; Badge, Jo; Cann, Alan

    2009-01-01

    The results are presented of a survey comparing the perceptions of first and second year bioscience students regarding their experience of feedback on coursework. The two cohorts displayed similar levels of satisfaction regarding the quantity and timing of feedback, even though changes in assessment format entailed different actual experiences. By…

  4. The Effect of Positive and Negative Feedback on Risk-Taking across Different Contexts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabel B Losecaat Vermeer

    Full Text Available Preferences for risky choices have often been shown to be unstable and context-dependent. Though people generally avoid gambles with mixed outcomes, a phenomenon often attributed to loss aversion, contextual factors can impact this dramatically. For example, people typically prefer risky options after a financial loss, while generally choosing safer options after a monetary gain. However, it is unclear what exactly contributes to these preference shifts as a function of prior outcomes, as these gain/loss outcomes are usually confounded with participant performance, and therefore it is unclear whether these effects are driven purely by the monetary gains or losses, or rather by success or failure at the actual task. Here, we experimentally separated the effects of monetary gains/losses from performance success/failure prior to a standard risky choice. Participants performed a task in which they experienced contextual effects: 1 monetary gain or loss based directly on performance, 2 monetary gain or loss that was randomly awarded and was, crucially, independent from performance, and 3 success or failure feedback based on performance, but without any monetary incentive. Immediately following these positive/negative contexts, participants were presented with a gain-loss gamble that they had to decide to either play or pass. We found that risk preferences for identical sets of gambles were biased by positive and negative contexts containing monetary gains and losses, but not by contexts containing performance feedback. This data suggests that the observed framing effects are driven by aversion for monetary losses and not simply by the positive or negative valence of the context, or by potential moods resulting from positive or negative contexts. These results highlight the specific context dependence of risk preferences.

  5. MiR-192-Mediated Positive Feedback Loop Controls the Robustness of Stress-Induced p53 Oscillations in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Moore

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a critical role in cellular stress and cancer prevention. A number of post-transcriptional regulators, termed microRNAs, are closely connected with the p53-mediated cellular networks. While the molecular interactions among p53 and microRNAs have emerged, a systems-level understanding of the regulatory mechanism and the role of microRNAs-forming feedback loops with the p53 core remains elusive. Here we have identified from literature that there exist three classes of microRNA-mediated feedback loops revolving around p53, all with the nature of positive feedback coincidentally. To explore the relationship between the cellular performance of p53 with the microRNA feedback pathways, we developed a mathematical model of the core p53-MDM2 module coupled with three microRNA-mediated positive feedback loops involving miR-192, miR-34a, and miR-29a. Simulations and bifurcation analysis in relationship to extrinsic noise reproduce the oscillatory behavior of p53 under DNA damage in single cells, and notably show that specific microRNA abrogation can disrupt the wild-type cellular phenotype when the ubiquitous cell-to-cell variability is taken into account. To assess these in silico results we conducted microRNA-perturbation experiments in MCF7 breast cancer cells. Time-lapse microscopy of cell-population behavior in response to DNA double-strand breaks, together with image classification of single-cell phenotypes across a population, confirmed that the cellular p53 oscillations are compromised after miR-192 perturbations, matching well with the model predictions. Our study via modeling in combination with quantitative experiments provides new evidence on the role of microRNA-mediated positive feedback loops in conferring robustness to the system performance of stress-induced response of p53.

  6. Tailoring of feedback in online assessment: Lessons learnt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasilyeva, E.; De Bra, P.M.E.; Pechenizkiy, M.; Bonk, C.J.; et al., xx

    2008-01-01

    Feedback plays an important role in the learning process. Particularly, the functions of the elaborated feedback (EF) in online assessment may include assisting students in understanding their mistakes and misconceptions, motivating the student for further learning, suggesting directions for

  7. Retesting the Limits of Data-Driven Learning: Feedback and Error Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosthwaite, Peter

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have looked at the value of corpus-based data-driven learning (DDL) for second language (L2) written error correction, with generally positive results. However, a potential conundrum for language teachers involved in the process is how to provide feedback on students' written production for DDL. The study looks at…

  8. The Impact of Multimedia Feedback on Student Perceptions: Video Screencast with Audio Compared to Text Based eMail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkoski, Robert R.

    2017-01-01

    Computer technology provides a plethora of tools to engage students and make the classroom more interesting. Much research has been conducted on the impact of educational technology regarding instruction but little has been done on students' preferences for the type of instructor feedback (Watts, 2007). Mayer (2005) has developed an integrative,…

  9. Breaststroke learning through the use of videotape feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de Castro Ferracioli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2013v15n2p204 People from all age groups and social backgrounds have always sought to learn swimming. However, the swimming learning process is usually considered repetitive and tiring, requiring the teacher to use methods that motivate students to join the practice without ignoring the need for improvement in their performance. This study assessed motivation during a breaststroke learning process in students who received videotape feedback, verbal feedback, and who did not receive any feedback during practice. Thirty seven swimming inexperienced students were divided into three groups: Video (n=13, which received videotape feedback; Verbal (n=15, which received verbal feedback; and Control (n=9, which did not receive any feedback during experimental phases (pre-test, acquisition (5 days, post-test and retention. Participants completed a questionnaire based on Likert scale for motivation assessment. Scores were given to their performance by a swimming teacher to assess breaststroke learning during each experimental phase. Results of motivation assessment showed that students who received feedback (videotape or verbal felt more motivated during practice than those who did not receive any feedback. Regarding the breaststroke learning, all participants improved their performance along experimental phases, but, during the retention one, Verbal group’s performance was considered superior to the Control group’s performance. This study concluded that the use of videotape and verbal feedback has motivational results on breaststroke learning, and that it is effective in the learning process.

  10. Piloting the feasibility of head-mounted video technology to augment student feedback during simulated clinical decision-making: An observational design pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Helen; Bucknall, Tracey K; Hutchinson, Alison M

    2016-04-01

    Clinical decision-making is a complex activity that is critical to patient safety. Simulation, augmented by feedback, affords learners the opportunity to learn critical clinical decision-making skills. More detailed feedback following simulation exercises has the potential to further enhance student learning, particularly in relation to developing improved clinical decision-making skills. To investigate the feasibility of head-mounted video camera recordings, to augment feedback, following acute patient deterioration simulations. Pilot study using an observational design. Ten final-year nursing students participated in three simulation exercises, each focussed on detection and management of patient deterioration. Two observers collected behavioural data using an adapted version of Gaba's Clinical Simulation Tool, to provide verbal feedback to each participant, following each simulation exercise. Participants wore a head-mounted video camera during the second simulation exercise only. Video recordings were replayed to participants to augment feedback, following the second simulation exercise. Data were collected on: participant performance (observed and perceived); participant perceptions of feedback methods; and head-mounted video camera recording feasibility and capability for detailed audio-visual feedback. Management of patient deterioration improved for six participants (60%). Increased perceptions of confidence (70%) and competence (80%), were reported by the majority of participants. Few participants (20%) agreed that the video recording specifically enhanced their learning. The visual field of the head-mounted video camera was not always synchronised with the participant's field of vision, thus affecting the usefulness of some recordings. The usefulness of the video recordings, to enhance verbal feedback to participants on detection and management of simulated patient deterioration, was inconclusive. Modification of the video camera glasses, to improve

  11. Parent Feedback about Individualized Education Program Team Meetings for Students in Kindergarten through Grade 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper-Martin, Elizabeth; Wilson, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents parent feedback from a study that focused on experiences at Individualized Education Program (IEP) team meetings and also explored parent satisfaction with delivery of special education services. The study included all parents of Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) students who had educational disabilities, were…

  12. Destruction of intertidal bar morphology during a summer storm surge event: Example of positive morphodynamic feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masselink, Gerd; Aagaard, Troels; Kroon, Aart

    2011-01-01

    . The measurements demonstrated an example of positive morphodynamic feedback. Once the bar crest elevation started to decrease because of wave overtopping and sediment transport into the runnel on the rising tide, the bar crest lowered and overwash frequency increased, leading to enhanced crest erosion, even under...

  13. Differences in the Uptake of Peer and Teacher Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegg, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine differences in the uptake of peer and teacher feedback after writing students received longitudinal feedback from only one of these sources. It also investigates the types of feedback given by peers and a teacher in order to explain those any differences. Data was collected from 64 Japanese university students in four…

  14. Implementation status of the global and local beam position feedback systems for the Advanced Photon Source storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y.; Barr, D.; Decker, G.; Galayda, J.; Kirchman, J.; Lenkszus, F.; Lumpkin, A.; Votaw, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is implementing an extensive beam position feedback system for both global and local stabilization of particle and photon beams based on digital signal processing. The description and operational experience of the system will be given in this paper. In particular, we will discuss the underlying fundamental principles, hardware layout, controls interface, and automatic software generation for multiple digital signal processors (DSPS) distributed in 20 VME crates around the ring. The feedback system runs at 4-kHz sampling frequency in order to achieve the correction bandwidth of approximately 100 Hz. For the maximum correction efficiency and resolution of conflicts among multiple local feedback systems due to the local bump closure error, the global and local feedback systems are combined into a single unified system. This novel approach is made possible through data sharing among the global and local systems via the fiber-optically networked reflective memories

  15. PEER INTERACTIONS AND POSITIVE STUDENT-LECTURER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper sets out to interrogate the role played by peer interactions in the teaching and learning of College Algebra in a classroom setting. It also explores the impact of positive student-lecturer relationship on teaching and learning of College Algebra at the university level and the general improvement of student ...

  16. Sex Differences, Positive Feedback and Intrinsic Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deci, Edward L.; And Others

    The paper presents two experiments which test the "change in feelings of competence and self-determination" proposition of cognitive evaluation theory. This proposition states that when a person receives feedback about his performance on an intrinsically motivated activity this information will affect his sense of competence and…

  17. How does feedback in mini-CEX affect students’ learning response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahayu, Gandes Retno; Suhoyo, Yoyo

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was aimed to explore students’ learning response toward feedback during mini-CEX encounter. Methods This study used a phenomenological approach to identify the students’ experiences toward feedback during mini-CEX encounter. Data was collected using Focus Group Discussion (FGD) for all students who were in their final week of clerkship in the internal medicine rotation. There were 4 FGD groups (6 students for each group). All FGD were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The FGD transcripts were analyzed thematically and managed using Atlas-ti (version 7.0). Results Feedback content and the way of providing feedback on mini-CEX stimulated students’ internal process, including self-reflection, emotional response, and motivation. These internal processes encouraged the students to take action or do a follow-up on the feedback to improve their learning process. In addition, there was also an external factor, namely consequences, which also influenced the students’ reaction to the follow-up on feedback. In the end, this action caused several learning effects that resulted in the students’ increased self-efficacy, attitude, knowledge and clinical skill. Conclusions Feedback content and the way of providing feedback on mini-CEX stimulates the students’ internal processes to do a follow-up on feedback. However, another external factor also affects the students’ decision on the follow-up actions. The follow-ups result in various learning effects on the students. Feedback given along with summative assessment enhances learning effects on students, as well. It is suggested that supervisors of clinical education are prepared to comprehend every factor influencing feedback on mini CEX to improve the students’ learning response. PMID:28008136

  18. Qualitative and quantitative feedback in the context of competency-based education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekian, Ara; Watling, Christopher J; Roberts, Trudie E; Steinert, Yvonne; Norcini, John

    2017-12-01

    Research indicates the importance and usefulness of feedback, yet with the shift of medical curricula toward competencies, feedback is not well understood in this context. This paper attempts to identify how feedback fits within a competency-based curriculum. After careful consideration of the literature, the following conclusions are drawn: (1) Because feedback is predicated on assessment, the assessment should be designed to optimize and prevent inaccuracies in feedback; (2) Giving qualitative feedback in the form of a conversation would lend credibility to the feedback, address emotional obstacles and create a context in which feedback is comfortable; (3) Quantitative feedback in the form of individualized data could fulfill the demand for more feedback, help students devise strategies on how to improve, allow students to compare themselves to their peers, recognizing that big data have limitations; and (4) Faculty development needs to incorporate and promote cultural and systems changes with regard to feedback. A better understanding of the role of feedback in competency-based education could result in more efficient learning for students.

  19. Indications of a positive feedback between coastal development and beach nourishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Scott B.; Lazarus, Eli D.; Limber, Patrick W.; Goldstein, Evan B.; Thorpe, Curtis; Ballinger, Rhoda C.

    2016-12-01

    Beach nourishment, a method for mitigating coastal storm damage or chronic erosion by deliberately replacing sand on an eroded beach, has been the leading form of coastal protection in the United States for four decades. However, investment in hazard protection can have the unintended consequence of encouraging development in places especially vulnerable to damage. In a comprehensive, parcel-scale analysis of all shorefront single-family homes in the state of Florida, we find that houses in nourishing zones are significantly larger and more numerous than in non-nourishing zones. The predominance of larger homes in nourishing zones suggests a positive feedback between nourishment and development that is compounding coastal risk in zones already characterized by high vulnerability.

  20. Trait self-esteem and neural activities related to self-evaluation and social feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Xu, Xiaofan; Chen, Yu; Shi, Zhenhao; Han, Shihui

    2016-01-01

    Self-esteem has been associated with neural responses to self-reflection and attitude toward social feedback but in different brain regions. The distinct associations might arise from different tasks or task-related attitudes in the previous studies. The current study aimed to clarify these by investigating the association between self-esteem and neural responses to evaluation of one’s own personality traits and of others’ opinion about one’s own personality traits. We scanned 25 college students using functional MRI during evaluation of oneself or evaluation of social feedback. Trait self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg self-esteem scale after scanning. Whole-brain regression analyses revealed that trait self-esteem was associated with the bilateral orbitofrontal activity during evaluation of one’s own positive traits but with activities in the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, and occipital cortices during evaluation of positive social feedback. Our findings suggest that trait self-esteem modulates the degree of both affective processes in the orbitofrontal cortex during self-reflection and cognitive processes in the medial prefrontal cortex during evaluation of social feedback. PMID:26842975

  1. Trait self-esteem and neural activities related to self-evaluation and social feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Xu, Xiaofan; Chen, Yu; Shi, Zhenhao; Han, Shihui

    2016-02-04

    Self-esteem has been associated with neural responses to self-reflection and attitude toward social feedback but in different brain regions. The distinct associations might arise from different tasks or task-related attitudes in the previous studies. The current study aimed to clarify these by investigating the association between self-esteem and neural responses to evaluation of one's own personality traits and of others' opinion about one's own personality traits. We scanned 25 college students using functional MRI during evaluation of oneself or evaluation of social feedback. Trait self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg self-esteem scale after scanning. Whole-brain regression analyses revealed that trait self-esteem was associated with the bilateral orbitofrontal activity during evaluation of one's own positive traits but with activities in the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, and occipital cortices during evaluation of positive social feedback. Our findings suggest that trait self-esteem modulates the degree of both affective processes in the orbitofrontal cortex during self-reflection and cognitive processes in the medial prefrontal cortex during evaluation of social feedback.

  2. Teaching pediatric communication skills to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Katherine A; Metcalf, Elizabeth P; Brooks, Rachel; Kinnersley, Paul; Greenwood, Stephen R; Powell, Colin Ve

    2015-01-01

    Delivering effective clinical pediatric communication skills training to undergraduate medical students is a distinct and important challenge. Pediatric-specific communication skills teaching is complex and under-researched. We report on the development of a scenario-based pediatric clinical communication skills program as well as students' assessment of this module. We designed a pediatric clinical communication skills program and delivered it five times during one academic year via small-group teaching. Students were asked to score the workshop in eight domains (learning objectives, complexity, interest, competencies, confidence, tutors, feedback, and discussion) using 5-point Likert scales, along with free text comments that were grouped and analyzed thematically, identifying both the strengths of the workshop and changes suggested to improve future delivery. Two hundred and twenty-one of 275 (80%) student feedback forms were returned. Ninety-six percent of students' comments were positive or very positive, highlighting themes such as the timing of teaching, relevance, group sizes, and the use of actors, tutors, and clinical scenarios. Scenario-based teaching of clinical communication skills is positively received by students. Studies need to demonstrate an impact on practice, performance, development, and sustainability of communications training.

  3. Interactivity of Question Prompts and Feedback on Secondary Students' Science Knowledge Acquisition and Cognitive Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kun; Chen, Ching-Huei; Wu, Wen-Shiuan; Chen, Wei-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated how question prompts and feedback influenced knowledge acquisition and cognitive load when learning Newtonian mechanics within a web-based multimedia module. Participants were one hundred eighteen 9th grade students who were randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions, forming a 2 x 2 factorial design with the…

  4. Feedback in formative OSCEs: comparison between direct observation and video-based formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod Perron, Noëlle; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Cerutti, Bernard; Pfarrwaller, Eva; Sommer, Johanna; Nendaz, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Medical students at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Switzerland, have the opportunity to practice clinical skills with simulated patients during formative sessions in preparation for clerkships. These sessions are given in two formats: 1) direct observation of an encounter followed by verbal feedback (direct feedback) and 2) subsequent review of the videotaped encounter by both student and supervisor (video-based feedback). The aim of the study was to evaluate whether content and process of feedback differed between both formats. Methods In 2013, all second- and third-year medical students and clinical supervisors involved in formative sessions were asked to take part in the study. A sample of audiotaped feedback sessions involving supervisors who gave feedback in both formats were analyzed (content and process of the feedback) using a 21-item feedback scale. Results Forty-eight audiotaped feedback sessions involving 12 supervisors were analyzed (2 direct and 2 video-based sessions per supervisor). When adjusted for the length of feedback, there were significant differences in terms of content and process between both formats; the number of communication skills and clinical reasoning items addressed were higher in the video-based format (11.29 vs. 7.71, p=0.002 and 3.71 vs. 2.04, p=0.010, respectively). Supervisors engaged students more actively during the video-based sessions than during direct feedback sessions (self-assessment: 4.00 vs. 3.17, p=0.007; active problem-solving: 3.92 vs. 3.42, p=0.009). Students made similar observations and tended to consider that the video feedback was more useful for improving some clinical skills. Conclusion Video-based feedback facilitates discussion of clinical reasoning, communication, and professionalism issues while at the same time actively engaging students. Different time and conceptual frameworks may explain observed differences. The choice of feedback format should depend on the educational

  5. Feedback in formative OSCEs: comparison between direct observation and video-based formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noëlle Junod Perron

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical students at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Switzerland, have the opportunity to practice clinical skills with simulated patients during formative sessions in preparation for clerkships. These sessions are given in two formats: 1 direct observation of an encounter followed by verbal feedback (direct feedback and 2 subsequent review of the videotaped encounter by both student and supervisor (video-based feedback. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether content and process of feedback differed between both formats. Methods: In 2013, all second- and third-year medical students and clinical supervisors involved in formative sessions were asked to take part in the study. A sample of audiotaped feedback sessions involving supervisors who gave feedback in both formats were analyzed (content and process of the feedback using a 21-item feedback scale. Results: Forty-eight audiotaped feedback sessions involving 12 supervisors were analyzed (2 direct and 2 video-based sessions per supervisor. When adjusted for the length of feedback, there were significant differences in terms of content and process between both formats; the number of communication skills and clinical reasoning items addressed were higher in the video-based format (11.29 vs. 7.71, p=0.002 and 3.71 vs. 2.04, p=0.010, respectively. Supervisors engaged students more actively during the video-based sessions than during direct feedback sessions (self-assessment: 4.00 vs. 3.17, p=0.007; active problem-solving: 3.92 vs. 3.42, p=0.009. Students made similar observations and tended to consider that the video feedback was more useful for improving some clinical skills. Conclusion: Video-based feedback facilitates discussion of clinical reasoning, communication, and professionalism issues while at the same time actively engaging students. Different time and conceptual frameworks may explain observed differences. The choice of feedback format should depend on

  6. Does Gender Influence Emotions Resulting from Positive Applause Feedback in Self-Assessment Testing? Evidence from Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Ju; Huang, Chin-Fei; Liu, Ming-Chi; Chien, Yu-Cheng; Lai, Chia-Hung; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2015-01-01

    Computerized self-assessment testing can help learners reflect on learning content and can also promote their motivation toward learning. However, a positive affective state is the key to achieving these learning goals. This study aims to examine learning gains and emotional reactions resulting from receiving emotional feedback in the form of…

  7. A Proposed Conceptual Framework and Investigation of Upward Feedback Receptivity in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Amanda; Combs, Heidi; Smith, Sherilyn; Klein, Eileen; Kritek, Patricia; Robins, Lynne; Cianciolo, Anna T; Butani, Lavjay; Gigante, Joseph; Ramani, Subha

    2015-01-01

    WGEA 2015 CONFERENCE ABSTRACT (EDITED). Faculty Perceptions of Receiving Feedback From Third-Year Clerkship Students. Amanda Kost, Heidi Combs, Sherilyn Smith, Eileen Klein, Patricia Kritek, and Lynne Robins. PHENOMENON: In addition to giving feedback to 3rd-year clerkship students, some clerkship instructors receive feedback, requested or spontaneous, from students prior to the clerkship's end. The concept of bidirectional feedback is appealing as a means of fostering a culture of respectful communication and improvement. However, little is known about how teachers perceive this feedback in practice or how it impacts the learning environment. We performed 24 semistructured 30-minute interviews with 3 to 7 attending physician faculty members each in Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Surgery, Psychiatry, and Obstetrics and Gynecology who taught in 3rd-year required clerkships during the 2012-2013 academic year. Questions probed teachers' experience with and attitudes toward receiving student feedback. Prompts were used to elicit stories and obtain participant demographics. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and entered into Dedoose for qualitative analysis. Researchers read transcripts holistically for meaning, designed a coding template, and then independently coded each transcript. A constant comparative approach and regular meetings were used to ensure consistent coding between research team members. Participants ranged in age from 37 to 74, with 5 to 35 years of teaching experience. Seventy-one percent were male, and 83% identified as White. In our preliminary analysis, our informants reported a range of experience in receiving student feedback prior to the end of a clerkship, varying from no experience to having developed mechanisms to regularly request specific feedback about their programs. Most expressed openness to actively soliciting and receiving student feedback on their teaching during the clerkship although many questioned

  8. Leadership Identity Development Through Reflection and Feedback in Team-Based Learning Medical Student Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Maryam; Mirzazadeh, Azim; Parmelee, Dean X; Peyton, Elizabeth; Mehrdad, Neda; Janani, Leila; Shahsavari, Hooman

    2018-01-01

    Studies on leadership identity development through reflection with Team-Based Learning (TBL) in medical student education are rare. We assumed that reflection and feedback on the team leadership process would advance the progression through leadership identity development stages in medical students within the context of classes using TBL. This study is a quasi-experimental design with pretest-posttest control group. The pretest and posttest were reflection papers of medical students about their experience of leadership during their TBL sessions. In the intervention group, TBL and a team-based, guided reflection and feedback on the team leadership process were performed at the end of all TBL sessions. In the other group, only TBL was used. The Stata 12 software was used. Leadership Identity was treated both as a categorical and quantitative variable to control for differences in baseline and gender variables. Chi-square, t tests, and linear regression analysis were performed. The population was a cohort of 2015-2016 medical students in a TBL setting at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, School of Medicine. Teams of four to seven students were formed by random sorting at the beginning of the academic year (intervention group n = 20 teams, control group n = 19 teams). At baseline, most students in both groups were categorized in the Awareness and Exploration stage of leadership identity: 51 (52%) in the intervention group and 59 (55%) in the control group: uncorrected χ 2 (3) = 15.6, design-based F(2.83, 108) = 4.87, p = .003. In the posttest intervention group, 36 (36%) were in exploration, 33 (33%) were in L-identified, 20 (20%) were in Leadership Differentiated, and 10 (10%) were in the Generativity. None were in the Awareness or Integration stages. In the control group, 3 (20%) were in Awareness, 56 (53%) were in Exploration, 35 (33%) were in Leader Identified, 13 (12%) were in Leadership Differentiated. None were in the Generativity and Integration stages

  9. Ultrasound-based teaching of cardiac anatomy and physiology to undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoudi, Nadjib; Arangalage, Dimitri; Boubrit, Lila; Renaud, Marie Christine; Isnard, Richard; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Cohen, Ariel; Duguet, Alexandre

    2013-10-01

    Ultrasonography is a non-invasive imaging modality that offers the opportunity to teach living cardiac anatomy and physiology. The objectives of this study were to assess the feasibility of integrating an ultrasound-based course into the conventional undergraduate medical teaching programme and to analyse student and teacher feedback. An ultrasound-based teaching course was implemented and proposed to all second-year medical students (n=348) at the end of the academic year, after all the conventional modules at our faculty. After a brief theoretical and practical demonstration, students were allowed to take the probe and use the ultrasound machine. Students and teachers were asked to complete a survey and were given the opportunity to provide open feedback. Two months were required to implement the entire module; 330 (95%) students (divided into 39 groups) and 37 teachers participated in the course. Student feedback was very positive: 98% of students agreed that the course was useful; 85% and 74% considered that their understanding of cardiac anatomy and physiology, respectively, was improved. The majority of the teachers (97%) felt that the students were interested, 81% agreed that the course was appropriate for second-year medical students and 84% were willing to participate to future sessions. Cardiac anatomy and physiology teaching using ultrasound is feasible for undergraduate medical students and enhances their motivation to improve their knowledge. Student and teacher feedback on the course was very positive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Latest Performance Results from the FONT5 Intra-train Beam Position and Angle Feedback System at ATF2

    CERN Document Server

    Christian, G B; Bett, D R; Blaskovic Kraljevic, N; Burrows, P N; Davis, M R; Gerbershagen, A; Perry, C; Constance, B; Resta-Lopez, J

    2012-01-01

    A prototype Interaction Point beam-based feedback system for future electron-positron colliders, such as the International Linear Collider, has been designed and tested on the extraction line of the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The FONT5 intra-train feedback system aims to stabilize the beam orbit by correcting both the position and angle jitter in the vertical plane on bunch-tobunch time scales, providing micron-level stability at the entrance to the ATF2 final-focus system. The system comprises three stripline beam position monitors (BPMs) and two stripline kickers, custom low-latency analogue front-end BPM processors, a custom FPGA-based digital processing board with fast ADCs, and custom kickerdrive amplifiers. The latest results from beam tests at ATF2 will be presented, including the system latency and correction performance.

  11. Personalised normative feedback for preventing alcohol misuse in university students: Solomon three-group randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria T Moreira

    Full Text Available Young people tend to over-estimate peer group drinking levels. Personalised normative feedback (PNF aims to correct this misperception by providing information about personal drinking levels and patterns compared with norms in similar aged peer groups. PNF is intended to raise motivation for behaviour change and has been highlighted for alcohol misuse prevention by the British Government Behavioural Insight Team. The objective of the trial was to assess the effectiveness of PNF with college students for the prevention of alcohol misuse.Solomon three-group randomised controlled trial. 1751 students, from 22 British Universities, allocated to a PNF group, a normal control group, or a delayed measurement control group to allow assessment of any measurement effects. PNF was provided by email. Participants completed online questionnaires at baseline, 6- and 12-months (only 12-months for the delayed measurement controls. Drinking behaviour measures were (i alcohol disorders; (ii frequency; (iii typical quantity, (iv weekly consumption; (v alcohol-related problems; (vi perceived drinking norms; and (vii positive alcohol expectancies. Analyses focused on high-risk drinkers, as well as all students, because of research evidence for the prevention paradox in student drinkers.Follow-up rates were low, with only 50% and 40% responding at 6- and 12-months, respectively, though comparable to similar European studies. We found no evidence for any systematic attrition bias. Overall, statistical analyses with the high risk sub-sample, and for all students, showed no significant effects of the intervention, at either time-point, in a completed case analysis and a multiple imputation analysis.We found no evidence for the effectiveness of PNF for the prevention of alcohol misuse and alcohol-related problems in a UK student population.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN30784467.

  12. Feedback-Training für Lehrärzte in der Allgemeinmedizin [Feedback training for general practitioners involved in teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engeser, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: Ever since the last amendment to the German Medical Licensing Act took effect in 2002, medical students may complete four months of the Practical Year (PY in general practices. Formative feedback between the teaching general practitioner (GP and the PY student is a key element in creating a learning environment. GPs involved in teaching therefore need further education in giving feedback.Methods: A 4-hour feedback training session for GPs involved in teaching which used standardized patients and students was developed and tested in a pilot study. In role plays, GPs experienced feedback situations. Using an evaluation questionnaire, changes in self-perceived feedback skills were assessed (familiarity of feedback rules, preparation for giving feedback to PY students, possibilities to improve communication skills in doctor–patient situations.Results: Sixteen GPs who were involved or interested in PY teaching participated in the feedback training program. Afterwards, participants said they felt more comfortable in giving formative feedback and more assured in their communication skills. The confidence in their own feedback improved, especially by taking the student’s part in the role plays. An exercise between a standardized patient and a standardized stubborn student was a challenge, but proved to be extremely useful.Conclusion: The opinions of the participating GPs to the feedback training underscore its importance. Therefore, we recommend integrating such a feedback training program into the education of GPs involved in teaching.[german] Hintergrund: Seit der letzten Novelle der Approbationsordnung 2002 besteht die Möglichkeit, ein Tertial des Praktischen Jahres (PJ in Hausarztpraxen zu absolvieren. Konstruktives Feedback zwischen Arzt und PJ-Studenten ist dabei ein zentrales Element in der Gestaltung des Lernumfeldes in der Arztpraxis. Es bedarf dahingehend einer Ausbildung der in die Lehre involvierten

  13. Effects of longitudinal small-group learning on delivery and receipt of communication skills feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Calvin L; Masters, Dylan E; Chang, Anna; Kruidering, Marieke; Hauer, Karen E

    2013-11-01

    Although feedback is a critical component of learning, recent data suggest that learners may discount feedback they receive. The emotional threat inherent in feedback can contribute to its ineffectiveness, particularly for sensitive topics like communication skills. Longitudinal relationships among peers may increase their sense of safety and soften the perceived threat of feedback to allow students to give, receive and potentially more effectively incorporate feedback. We studied the effects of prior shared learning experiences among medical students in the delivery and receipt of feedback on clinical (communication) skills. During a formative clinical skills examination, we divided Year 3 students at a US medical school into two subgroups comprising, respectively, small-group classmates from a 2-year longitudinal pre-clerkship clinical skills course (with prior peer-learning relationships), and peers with no prior shared small-group coursework. Students in both subgroups observed peers in a simulated clinical case and then provided feedback, which was videotaped, transcribed and coded. Feedback recipients also completed a survey on their perceptions of the feedback. Students valued the feedback they received and intended to enact it, regardless of whether they had prior peer-learning relationships. Coding of feedback revealed high specificity. Feedback providers who had prior peer-learning relationships with recipients provided more specific corrective feedback on communication skills than those with no such relationships (p = 0.014); there was no significant difference between subgroups in the provision of reinforcing feedback on communication skills. Year 3 medical student peers can deliver specific feedback on clinical skills; prior peer-learning relationships in pre-clerkship clinical skills courses enrich the provision of specific corrective feedback about communication skills. Feedback between peers with pre-existing peer-learning relationships represents

  14. Explaining how honors students position themselves when collaborating with regular students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volker, Judith; Kamans, Elanor; Tiesinga, Lammert; Wolfensberger, Marca

    2015-01-01

    Paper presentatie tijdens de EARLI Conference 2015, Limassol, Cypres, 28 augustus. In this line of research we take a social psychological approach to understanding how honors students position themselves when collaborating with regular students. More specifically, we explore whether stereotypes

  15. Medical students' perception of objective structured clinical examination: a feedback for process improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Abdulrasheed A; Yusuf, Ayodeji S; Abdur-Rahman, Lukman O; Babalola, Olasunkanmi M; Adeyeye, Ademola A; Popoola, Ademola A; Adeniran, James O

    2014-01-01

    Medical educators have always been desirous of the best methods for formative and summative evaluation of trainees. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is an approach for student assessment in which aspects of clinical competence are evaluated in a comprehensive, consistent, and structured manner with close attention to the objectivity of the process. Though popular in most medical schools globally, its use in Nigeria medical schools appears limited. This study was conceived to explore students' perception about the acceptability of OSCE process and to provide feedback to be used to improve the assessment technique. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on final-year medical students, who participated in the final MBBS surgery examination in June 2011. A 19-item self-administered structured questionnaire was employed to obtain relevant data on demographics of respondents and questions evaluating the OSCE stations in terms of the quality of instructions and organization, learning opportunities, authenticity and transparency of the process, and usefulness of the OSCE as an assessment instrument compared with other formats. Students' responses were based on a 5-point Likert scales ranging from strongly disagree to strongly agree. The data were analyzed using SPSS, version 15 (SPSS, Inc, Chicago, IL). The study took place at the University of Ilorin, College of Health Science. A total of 187 final-year medical students were enrolled in to the survey. Of 187 eligible students, 151 completed the self-administered questionnaire representing 80.7% response rate. A total of 61 (40.4%) students felt that it was easy to understand written instructions at the OSCE stations. In total, 106 (70.2%) students felt that the time allocated to each station was adequate. A total of 89 (58.9%) students agreed that the OSCE accurately measured their knowledge and skill, and 85 (56.3%) reported that OSCE enhanced their communication skill. Of the respondents, 80 (53

  16. Gamification and Smart, Competence-Centered Feedback: Promising Experiences in the Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Kickmeier-Rust

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Gamification appears being a promising approach to utilize the strong motivational potential of “gaming” in classroom without suffering from shortcomings such as low efficiency, weak pedagogy, or maybe most importantly the high costs. In the context of a European project we developed a rather light weight tool for learning and practicing multiplications. The target age group of the tool is 6 to 8 years. To benefit from the motivational potential of games we used a “gamification” approach. Accordingly we designed and developed a game-like, attractive user interface and integrated aspects of competition. The system is capable of providing students formative, competence-oriented feedback in real-time. Tailored to the age group this feedback is presented in form of a ninja character. For an experimental comparison of the effects of different feedback modes, we realized the conditions (i no feedback, (ii written only right/wrong feedback, (iii audio right/wrong feedback, and (iv competence-based, smart formative feedback. We applied and evaluated the tool in Austrian classrooms and found some evidence for the motivational aspect of the gamification elements, in particular the scoring. We also found strong positive effects of an individualized and meaningful feedback about achievements and progress.

  17. A memory advantage for past-oriented over future-oriented performance feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Robert A; Winstone, Naomi E; Gregory, Samantha E A; Papps, Emily

    2018-03-05

    People frequently receive performance feedback that describes how well they achieved in the past, and how they could improve in future. In educational contexts, future-oriented (directive) feedback is often argued to be more valuable to learners than past-oriented (evaluative) feedback; critically, prior research led us to predict that it should also be better remembered. We tested this prediction in six experiments. Subjects read written feedback containing evaluative and directive comments, which supposedly related to essays they had previously written (Experiments 1-2), or to essays another person had written (Experiments 3-6). Subjects then tried to reproduce the feedback from memory after a short delay. In all six experiments, the data strongly revealed the opposite effect to the one we predicted: despite only small differences in wording, evaluative feedback was in fact recalled consistently better than directive feedback. Furthermore, even when adult subjects did recall directive feedback, they frequently misremembered it in an evaluative style. These findings appear at odds with the position that being oriented toward the future is advantageous to memory. They also raise important questions about the possible behavioral effects and generalizability of such biases, in terms of students' academic performance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Feedback For Helpers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromer, Walter F.

    1975-01-01

    The author offers some feedback to those in the helping professions in three areas: (1) forms and letters; (2) jumping to conclusions; and (3) blaming and belittling, in hopes of stimulating more feedback as well as more positive ways of performing their services. (HMV)

  19. Rhetorical meta-language to promote the development of students' writing skills and subject matter understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelger, Susanne; Sigrell, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background: Feedback is one of the most significant factors for students' development of writing skills. For feedback to be successful, however, students and teachers need a common language - a meta-language - for discussing texts. Not least because in science education such a meta-language might contribute to improve writing training and feedback-giving. Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore students' perception of teachers' feedback given on their texts in two genres, and to suggest how writing training and feedback-giving could become more efficient. Sample: In this study were included 44 degree project students in biology and molecular biology, and 21 supervising teachers at a Swedish university. Design and methods: The study concerned students' writing about their degree projects in two genres: scientific writing and popular science writing. The data consisted of documented teacher feedback on the students' popular science texts. It also included students' and teachers' answers to questionnaires about writing and feedback. All data were collected during the spring of 2012. Teachers' feedback, actual and recalled - by students and teachers, respectively - was analysed and compared using the so-called Canons of rhetoric. Results: While the teachers recalled the given feedback as mainly positive, most students recalled only negative feedback. According to the teachers, suggested improvements concerned firstly the content, and secondly the structure of the text. In contrast, the students mentioned language style first, followed by content. Conclusions: The disagreement between students and teachers regarding how and what feedback was given on the students texts confirm the need of improved strategies for writing training and feedback-giving in science education. We suggest that the rhetorical meta-language might play a crucial role in overcoming the difficulties observed in this study. We also discuss how training of writing skills may contribute to

  20. The Secret of Effective Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiliam, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    "The only important thing about feedback is what students do with it," declares Dylan Wiliam in this article. The standard school procedure (in which a teacher looks at a piece of student work and writes something on it, and the student later looks at what the teacher has written) does not necessarily increase student learning. Teachers…

  1. Formative feedback from the first-person perspective using Google Glass in a family medicine objective structured clinical examination station in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youm, Julie; Wiechmann, Warren

    2018-01-01

    This case study explored the use of Google Glass in a clinical examination scenario to capture the first-person perspective of a standardized patient as a way to provide formative feedback on students' communication and empathy skills 'through the patient's eyes.' During a 3-year period between 2014 and 2017, third-year students enrolled in a family medicine clerkship participated in a Google Glass station during a summative clinical examination. At this station, standardized patients wore Google Glass to record an encounter focused on communication and empathy skills 'through the patient's eyes.' Students completed an online survey using a 4-point Likert scale about their perspectives on Google Glass as a feedback tool (N= 255). We found that the students' experiences with Google Glass 'through the patient's eyes' were largely positive and that students felt the feedback provided by the Google Glass recording to be helpful. Although a third of the students felt that Google Glass was a distraction, the majority believed that the first-person perspective recordings provided an opportunity for feedback that did not exist before. Continuing exploration of first-person perspective recordings using Google Glass to improve education on communication and empathy skills is warranted.

  2. The effectiveness of immediate feedback during the objective structured clinical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, R V; Rivington, R N; Calcutt, L E; Hart, I R

    1989-03-01

    Using eight different physical examination or technical stations, 400 examinations were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of immediate feedback during the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). The test group comprised 50 medical students who underwent a standard 4-minute examination followed by 2 minutes of feedback. Immediately following feedback the students repeated an identical 4-minute examination scored by the same examiners. The control group consisted of 50 students from the same class who underwent an identical testing sequence, but instead of receiving feedback, they were instructed to continue their examinations for an additional 2 minutes before repeating the stations. Simple repetition of the task did not significantly improve score (mean increase 2.0%, NS). Extending the testing period from 4 to 6 minutes resulted in a small but significant increase in score (mean 6.7%, P less than 0.001). However, there was a much larger increase in the scores obtained following 2 minutes of immediate feedback compared to pre-feedback performance (mean 26.3%, P less than 0.0001). The majority of students and examiners felt that feedback, as administered in this study, was valuable both as a learning and teaching experience. Short periods of immediate feedback during an OSCE are practical and can improve competency in the performance of criterion-based tasks, at least over the short term. In addition, such feedback provides students with valuable self-assessment that may stimulate further learning.

  3. MOOC-inspiration i e-læring – læring, feedback og relationer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Winther Jensen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Artiklen omhandler et e-læringsforløb, hvori der forsøgsvis var indlagt MOOC-elementer. Forløbet er fra pædagoguddannelsen, UCSJ. Der redegøres for didaktiske overvejelser forud for forløbet og den konkrete forløbsudmøntning. Det teoretiske perspektiv er socialkonstruktionistisk, og undervisningen forstås som kommunikationssituationer med skabelse af sociale verdener. Refleksion hos de studerende fremhæves som undervisningens overordnede mål, og dette understreges som en betydende faktor i forhold til at tænke e-læringsudbuddet mere eller mindre MOOC-præget. Med dette perspektiv og ud fra underviser- og studerendes evalueringer peges der på betydningen for forskellige typer studerende af implementeringen af MOOC-elementer i den eksisterende e-læringsundervisning. Fokus er især på feedback, og der fremhæves både fordele og ulemper ved implementeringen, samtidig med at aspekter af relationsforholdet mellem studerende og underviser inddrages. Fordelene angår det øgede element af peer to peer feedback, mens ulemperne vedrører den mangel på refleksionsbefordring, som den nedtonede underviserrolle medførte. Artiklen konkluderer i forhold til forløbet, at de i forvejen svagest præsterende studerende led mest under implementeringen af MOOC-elementer, mens implementeringseffekten for de bedre præsterende studerende syntes mere kompleks med både positive og negative elementer. The article reports experiences regarding e-learning within a preschool teacher education at a University College in Denmark. The overall focus is on the impact of MOOCs on the existing e-learning programme and on the consequences for different types of students when parts of MOOCs are included in the programme. An e-learning course is presented including reflections upon objectives and goals within a theoretical perspective of social constructionism. Students´ ability to reflect upon all aspects of being preschool teacher is underlined as the overall

  4. MOOC-inspiration i e-læring – læring, feedback og relationer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Winther Jensen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Artiklen omhandler et e-læringsforløb, hvori der forsøgsvis var indlagt MOOC-elementer. Forløbet er fra pædagoguddannelsen, UCSJ. Der redegøres for didaktiske overvejelser forud for forløbet og den konkrete forløbsudmøntning. Det teoretiske perspektiv er socialkonstruktionistisk, og undervisningen forstås som kommunikationssituationer med skabelse af sociale verdener. Refleksion hos de studerende fremhæves som undervisningens overordnede mål, og dette understreges som en betydende faktor i forhold til at tænke e-læringsudbuddet mere eller mindre MOOC-præget. Med dette perspektiv og ud fra underviser- og studerendes evalueringer peges der på betydningen for forskellige typer studerende af implementeringen af MOOC-elementer i den eksisterende e-læringsundervisning. Fokus er især på feedback, og der fremhæves både fordele og ulemper ved implementeringen, samtidig med at aspekter af relationsforholdet mellem studerende og underviser inddrages. Fordelene angår det øgede element af peer to peer feedback, mens ulemperne vedrører den mangel på refleksionsbefordring, som den nedtonede underviserrolle medførte. Artiklen konkluderer i forhold til forløbet, at de i forvejen svagest præsterende studerende led mest under implementeringen af MOOC-elementer, mens implementeringseffekten for de bedre præsterende studerende syntes mere kompleks med både positive og negative elementer. The article reports experiences regarding e-learning within a preschool teacher education at a University College in Denmark. The overall focus is on the impact of MOOCs on the existing e-learning programme and on the consequences for different types of students when parts of MOOCs are included in the programme. An e-learning course is presented including reflections upon objectives and goals within a theoretical perspective of social constructionism. Students´ ability to reflect upon all aspects of being preschool teacher is underlined as the overall

  5. A positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qiao, E-mail: zhangqiao200824@126.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China); Yang, Zhe, E-mail: zheyang@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China); Wang, Weiping, E-mail: wwp@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China); Guo, Ting, E-mail: luckyguoting@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Gastrointestinal Translation Research, Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Peking University Cancer Hospital, 52 Fucheng Road, 100142 Beijing (China); Jia, Zhuqing, E-mail: zhuqingjia@126.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China); Ma, Kangtao, E-mail: makangtao11@126.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China); Zhou, Chunyan, E-mail: chunyanzhou@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Ministry of Education), Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, 100191 Beijing (China)

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • ISL-1 is highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL. • ISL-1 accelerates the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. • c-Myc positively regulates ISL-1 expression in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells. • ISL-1 and c-Myc forms an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex only in DLBCL. • Positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 does not exist in normal pancreatic β-cell. - Abstract: Insulin enhancer binding protein-1 (ISL-1), a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor, has been reported to play essential roles in promoting adult pancreatic β-cells proliferation. Recent studies indicate that ISL-1 may also involve in the occurrence of a variety of tumors. However, whether ISL-1 has any functional effect on tumorigenesis, and what are the differences on ISL-1 function in distinct conditions, are completely unknown. In this study, we found that ISL-1 was highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells, as well as in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), but to a much less extent in other normal tissues or tumor specimens. Further study revealed that ISL-1 promoted the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL cells, and also accelerated the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. We also found that ISL-1 could activate c-Myc transcription not only in pancreatic β-cells but also in DLBCL cells. However, a cell-specific feedback regulation was detectable only in DLBCL cells. This auto-regulatory loop was established by the interaction of ISL-1 and c-Myc to form an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex, and synergistically to promote ISL-1 transcription through binding on the ISL-1 promoter. Taken together, our results demonstrate a positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells, which might result in the functional diversities of ISL-1 in different physiological and pathological processes.

  6. A positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qiao; Yang, Zhe; Wang, Weiping; Guo, Ting; Jia, Zhuqing; Ma, Kangtao; Zhou, Chunyan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • ISL-1 is highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL. • ISL-1 accelerates the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. • c-Myc positively regulates ISL-1 expression in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells. • ISL-1 and c-Myc forms an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex only in DLBCL. • Positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 does not exist in normal pancreatic β-cell. - Abstract: Insulin enhancer binding protein-1 (ISL-1), a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor, has been reported to play essential roles in promoting adult pancreatic β-cells proliferation. Recent studies indicate that ISL-1 may also involve in the occurrence of a variety of tumors. However, whether ISL-1 has any functional effect on tumorigenesis, and what are the differences on ISL-1 function in distinct conditions, are completely unknown. In this study, we found that ISL-1 was highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells, as well as in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), but to a much less extent in other normal tissues or tumor specimens. Further study revealed that ISL-1 promoted the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL cells, and also accelerated the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. We also found that ISL-1 could activate c-Myc transcription not only in pancreatic β-cells but also in DLBCL cells. However, a cell-specific feedback regulation was detectable only in DLBCL cells. This auto-regulatory loop was established by the interaction of ISL-1 and c-Myc to form an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex, and synergistically to promote ISL-1 transcription through binding on the ISL-1 promoter. Taken together, our results demonstrate a positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells, which might result in the functional diversities of ISL-1 in different physiological and pathological processes

  7. Effect of Positive Training on Positive Psychological States (Character Strengths of Female High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Farnam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available psychological states of female students in second and third grades of high school. The research method was quasi-experimental with pre-test, post-test and follow-up. The sample consisted of forty students selected randomly in two groups (twenty students in each group. To collect data, Positive Psychological State Inventory (Rajaei, Khuy Nzhad and Nesaei was used. The experimental group received ninety minute positive training sessions (for two months and the control group did not receive treatment. The results of analysis  of covariance showed that positive training had positive effects on positive psychological states (trust in God, optimism, self-efficacy, duty, sense of control, targeted, hope, satisfaction with life, meaningful life, pleasant, sociability, self-esteem and self-worth, sense of peace, gratitude, and forgiveness among adolescents  both in the post  and follow-up tests

  8. Responsibility-Sharing in the Giving and Receiving of Assessment Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Nash

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Many argue that effective learning requires students to take a substantial share of responsibility for their academic development, complementing the responsibilities taken by their educators. Yet this notion of responsibility-sharing receives minimal discussion in the context of assessment feedback, where responsibility for enhancing learning is often framed as lying principally with educators. Developing discussion on this issue is critical: many barriers can prevent students from engaging meaningfully with feedback, but neither educators nor students are fully empowered to remove these barriers without collaboration. In this discussion paper we argue that a culture of responsibility-sharing in the giving and receiving of feedback is essential, both for ensuring that feedback genuinely benefits students by virtue of their skilled and proactive engagement, and also for ensuring the sustainability of educators' effective feedback practices. We propose some assumptions that should underpin such a culture, and we consider the practicalities of engendering this cultural shift within modern higher education.

  9. Responsibility-Sharing in the Giving and Receiving of Assessment Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Robert A.; Winstone, Naomi E.

    2017-01-01

    Many argue that effective learning requires students to take a substantial share of responsibility for their academic development, complementing the responsibilities taken by their educators. Yet this notion of responsibility-sharing receives minimal discussion in the context of assessment feedback, where responsibility for enhancing learning is often framed as lying principally with educators. Developing discussion on this issue is critical: many barriers can prevent students from engaging meaningfully with feedback, but neither educators nor students are fully empowered to remove these barriers without collaboration. In this discussion paper we argue that a culture of responsibility-sharing in the giving and receiving of feedback is essential, both for ensuring that feedback genuinely benefits students by virtue of their skilled and proactive engagement, and also for ensuring the sustainability of educators' effective feedback practices. We propose some assumptions that should underpin such a culture, and we consider the practicalities of engendering this cultural shift within modern higher education. PMID:28932202

  10. Use of a Real-Time Training Software (Laerdal QCPR®) Compared to Instructor-Based Feedback for High-Quality Chest Compressions Acquisition in Secondary School Students: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortegiani, Andrea; Russotto, Vincenzo; Montalto, Francesca; Iozzo, Pasquale; Meschis, Roberta; Pugliesi, Marinella; Mariano, Dario; Benenati, Vincenzo; Raineri, Santi Maurizio; Gregoretti, Cesare; Giarratano, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    High-quality chest compressions are pivotal to improve survival from cardiac arrest. Basic life support training of school students is an international priority. The aim of this trial was to assess the effectiveness of a real-time training software (Laerdal QCPR®) compared to a standard instructor-based feedback for chest compressions acquisition in secondary school students. After an interactive frontal lesson about basic life support and high quality chest compressions, 144 students were randomized to two types of chest compressions training: 1) using Laerdal QCPR® (QCPR group- 72 students) for real-time feedback during chest compressions with the guide of an instructor who considered software data for students' correction 2) based on standard instructor-based feedback (SF group- 72 students). Both groups had a minimum of a 2-minute chest compressions training session. Students were required to reach a minimum technical skill level before the evaluation. We evaluated all students at 7 days from the training with a 2-minute chest compressions session. The primary outcome was the compression score, which is an overall measure of chest compressions quality calculated by the software expressed as percentage. 125 students were present at the evaluation session (60 from QCPR group and 65 from SF group). Students in QCPR group had a significantly higher compression score (median 90%, IQR 81.9-96.0) compared to SF group (median 67%, IQR 27.7-87.5), p = 0.0003. Students in QCPR group performed significantly higher percentage of fully released chest compressions (71% [IQR 24.5-99.0] vs 24% [IQR 2.5-88.2]; p = 0.005) and better chest compression rate (117.5/min [IQR 106-123.5] vs 125/min [115-135.2]; p = 0.001). In secondary school students, a training for chest compressions based on a real-time feedback software (Laerdal QCPR®) guided by an instructor is superior to instructor-based feedback training in terms of chest compression technical skill acquisition. Australian

  11. Pinus contorta invasions increase wildfire fuel loads and may create a positive feedback with fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kimberley T; Maxwell, Bruce D; McWethy, David B; Pauchard, Aníbal; Nuñez, Martín A; Whitlock, Cathy

    2017-03-01

    Invasive plant species that have the potential to alter fire regimes have significant impacts on native ecosystems. Concern that pine invasions in the Southern Hemisphere will increase fire activity and severity and subsequently promote further pine invasion prompted us to examine the potential for feedbacks between Pinus contorta invasions and fire in Patagonia and New Zealand. We determined how fuel loads and fire effects were altered by P. contorta invasion. We also examined post-fire plant communities across invasion gradients at a subset of sites to assess how invasion alters the post-fire vegetation trajectory. We found that fuel loads and soil heating during simulated fire increase with increasing P. contorta invasion age or density at all sites. However, P. contorta density did not always increase post-fire. In the largest fire, P. contorta density only increased significantly post-fire where the pre-fire P. contorta density was above an invasion threshold. Below this threshold, P. contorta did not dominate after fire and plant communities responded to fire in a similar manner as uninvaded communities. The positive feedback observed at high densities is caused by the accumulation of fuel that in turn results in greater soil heating during fires and high P. contorta density post-fire. Therefore, a positive feedback may form between P. contorta invasions and fire, but only above an invasion density threshold. These results suggest that management of pine invasions before they reach the invasion density threshold is important for reducing fire risk and preventing a transition to an alternate ecosystem state dominated by pines and novel understory plant communities. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  12. STUDENTS’ PREFERENCES TOWARD CORRECTIVE FEEDBACKS ON STUDENTS’ ORAL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rinda fitriana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed on revealing students’ preference on types of corrective feedback given by their English teacher as well as their reason. The study was conducted in a vocational school in Samarinda. Data collection was done by means of observation, interview and questionnaire. The observation was done for three meetings each in two different level of English proficiency classes (high and low and ten students from the observed classes were interviewed. Moreover, the questionnaires were administered to 196 out of 385 students from all classes of twelfth grade. Furthermore, the result of this study revealed that the students preferred to have Explicit, Meta-Linguistic Clue and Elicitation corrective feedback. However, there was mismatch between students’ preference on the expected type corrective feedback (Explicit and the teacher’s corrective feedback (Recast. The students’ preference on explicit corrective feedback was based on the reason that it provided answer and explanation on the correct version of the corrected oral production. The students’ preference on Meta-linguistic Clue and Elicitation corrective feedback were because these feedbacks activated their knowledge and generated students’ thinking to discover the correct version.

  13. Students’ motivation toward feedback-seeking in the clinical workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Lubberta H.; Favier, Robert P.; Van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Bok, Harold G.J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In medical education, students are increasingly regarded as active seekers of feedback rather than passive recipients. Previous research showed that in the intentions of students to seek feedback, a learning and performance goal can be dis- tinguished. In this study, we investigated the

  14. Pilot study of a 'RIME'-based tool for giving feedback in a multi-specialty longitudinal clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Dawn; Carline, Jan; Paauw, Douglas; Pangaro, Louis

    2008-12-01

    The Reporter-Interpreter-Manager-Educator (RIME) evaluation framework is intuitive and reliable. Our preceptors' frustration with using summative tools for formative feedback and the hypothesis that the RIME vocabulary might improve students' and preceptors' experiences with feedback prompted us to develop and pilot a RIME-based feedback tool. The tool was based on the RIME vocabulary, which has previously been used for evaluation. As interpersonal skills and professionalism are difficult areas in which to give feedback, we added these as explicit categories. We piloted the tool in a longitudinal, 5-month, multi-specialty clerkship. Preceptors completed pre- and post-introductory workshop surveys. Students completed post-workshop and post-clerkship surveys. Preceptors (n = 14) and students (n = 8) preferred RIME-based feedback to 'usual feedback' (previously given using end-of-clerkship evaluation forms). After the initial workshop, preceptors expected that giving feedback, including critical feedback, would be easier. After the 5-month clerkship, students reported receiving more feedback than in previous clerkships and rated feedback given using this tool more highly (P = 0.002; effect size 1.2). Students also felt it helped them understand specifically how to improve their performance (P = 0.003; effect size 1.2). In this pilot study, preceptors and students preferred feedback with a specific RIME-based tool. Students felt such feedback was more useful and helped them identify specifically how to improve. Whether this method can improve student performance through improved feedback remains an area for further research.

  15. Age differences in feedback reactions: The roles of employee feedback orientation on social awareness and utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mo; Burlacu, Gabriela; Truxillo, Donald; James, Keith; Yao, Xiang

    2015-07-01

    Organizations worldwide are currently experiencing shifts in the age composition of their workforces. The workforce is aging and becoming increasingly age-diverse, suggesting that organizational researchers and practitioners need to better understand how age differences may manifest in the workplace and the implications for human resource practice. Integrating socioemotional selectivity theory with the performance feedback literature and using a time-lagged design, the current study examined age differences in moderating the relationships between the characteristics of performance feedback and employee reactions to the feedback event. The results suggest that older workers had higher levels of feedback orientation on social awareness, but lower levels of feedback orientation on utility than younger workers. Furthermore, the positive associations between favorability of feedback and feedback delivery and feedback reactions were stronger for older workers than for younger workers, whereas the positive association between feedback quality and feedback reactions was stronger for younger workers than for older workers. Finally, the current study revealed that age-related differences in employee feedback orientation could explain the different patterns of relationships between feedback characteristics and feedback reactions across older and younger workers. These findings have both theoretical and practical implications for building theory about workplace aging and improving ways that performance feedback is managed across employees from diverse age groups. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. The Effects of Feedback on Online Quizzes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Melanie; Pyzdrowski, Laura; Goodykoontz, Adam; Walker, Vennessa

    2008-01-01

    Online homework is unable to provide the detailed feedback of paper and pencil assignments. However, immediate feedback is an advantage that online assessments provide. A research study was conducted that focused on the effects of immediate feedback; students in 5 sections of a Pre-calculus course were participants. Three sections were randomly…

  17. Feedback and Incentives:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback about relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedba...... of positive peer effects since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly behind, and frontrunners do not slack off. Moreover, in both pay schemes information feedback reduces the quality of the low performers' work....

  18. Neuroscientists' classroom visits positively impact student attitudes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L Fitzakerley

    Full Text Available The primary recommendation of the 2010 President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology report on K-12 education was to inspire more students so that they are motivated to study science. Scientists' visits to classrooms are intended to inspire learners and increase their interest in science, but verifications of this impact are largely qualitative. Our primary goal was to evaluate the impact of a longstanding Brain Awareness classroom visit program focused on increasing learners understanding of their own brains. Educational psychologists have established that neuroscience training sessions can improve academic performance and shift attitudes of students from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset. Our secondary goal was to determine whether short interactive Brain Awareness scientist-in-the-classroom sessions could similarly alter learners' perceptions of their own potential to learn. Teacher and student surveys were administered in 4(th-6(th grade classrooms throughout Minnesota either before or after one-hour Brain Awareness sessions that engaged students in activities related to brain function. Teachers rated the Brain Awareness program as very valuable and said that the visits stimulated students' interest in the brain and in science. Student surveys probed general attitudes towards science and their knowledge of neuroscience concepts (particularly the ability of the brain to change. Significant favorable improvements were found on 10 of 18 survey statements. Factor analyses of 4805 responses demonstrated that Brain Awareness presentations increased positive attitudes toward science and improved agreement with statements related to growth mindset. Overall effect sizes were small, consistent with the short length of the presentations. Thus, the impact of Brain Awareness presentations was positive and proportional to the efforts expended, demonstrating that short, scientist-in-the-classroom visits can make a positive contribution to

  19. Pulsed feedback defers cellular differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe H Levine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental signals induce diverse cellular differentiation programs. In certain systems, cells defer differentiation for extended time periods after the signal appears, proliferating through multiple rounds of cell division before committing to a new fate. How can cells set a deferral time much longer than the cell cycle? Here we study Bacillus subtilis cells that respond to sudden nutrient limitation with multiple rounds of growth and division before differentiating into spores. A well-characterized genetic circuit controls the concentration and phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A, which rises to a critical concentration to initiate sporulation. However, it remains unclear how this circuit enables cells to defer sporulation for multiple cell cycles. Using quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of Spo0A dynamics in individual cells, we observed pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation at a characteristic cell cycle phase. Pulse amplitudes grew systematically and cell-autonomously over multiple cell cycles leading up to sporulation. This pulse growth required a key positive feedback loop involving the sporulation kinases, without which the deferral of sporulation became ultrasensitive to kinase expression. Thus, deferral is controlled by a pulsed positive feedback loop in which kinase expression is activated by pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation. This pulsed positive feedback architecture provides a more robust mechanism for setting deferral times than constitutive kinase expression. Finally, using mathematical modeling, we show how pulsing and time delays together enable "polyphasic" positive feedback, in which different parts of a feedback loop are active at different times. Polyphasic feedback can enable more accurate tuning of long deferral times. Together, these results suggest that Bacillus subtilis uses a pulsed positive feedback loop to implement a "timer" that operates over timescales much longer than a cell cycle.

  20. Promoting Increased Pitch Variation in Oral Presentations with Transient Visual Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Hincks

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates learner response to a novel kind of intonation feedback generated from speech analysis. Instead of displays of pitch curves, our feedback is flashing lights that show how much pitch variation the speaker has produced. The variable used to generate the feedback is the standard deviation of fundamental frequency as measured in semitones. Flat speech causes the system to show yellow lights, while more expressive speech that has used pitch to give focus to any part of an utterance generates green lights. Participants in the study were 14 Chinese students of English at intermediate and advanced levels. A group that received visual feedback was compared with a group that received audio feedback. Pitch variation was measured at four stages: in a baseline oral presentation; for the first and second halves of three hours of training; and finally in the production of a new oral presentation. Both groups increased their pitch variation with training, and the effect lasted after the training had ended. The test group showed a significantly higher increase than the control group, indicating that the feedback is effective. These positive results imply that the feedback could be beneficially used in a system for practicing oral presentations.

  1. Mindfulness based stress reduction for medical students: optimising student satisfaction and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aherne, Declan; Farrant, Katie; Hickey, Louise; Hickey, Emma; McGrath, Lisa; McGrath, Deirdre

    2016-08-18

    Medical practitioners and students are at increased risk of a number of personal and psychological problems. Stress and anxiety due to work-load and study requirements are common and self-care methods are important in maintaining well-being. The current study examines perceptions of and satisfaction ratings with a mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR) programme for 1(st) year (compulsory) and 2(nd) year (optional) Graduate Entry Medical School students. A mixed method pre and post study of Year 1 (n = 140) and Year 2 (n = 88) medical students completing a 7 week MBSR course compared student satisfaction ratings. Thematic analysis of feedback from the students on their perception of the course was also carried out. Year 1 students (compulsory course) were less satisfied with content and learning outcomes than Year 2 students (optional course) (p levels of satisfaction and positive feedback when delivered on an optional basis. Catering for the individual needs of the participant and promoting a safe environment are core elements of a successful self-care programme.

  2. Engaging students as partners in developing online learning and feedback activities for first-year fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alan

    2018-01-01

    Much learning takes place outside of formal class settings, yet students starting in higher education are not always well equipped with independent learning skills, appropriate self-knowledge or the required levels of intrinsic motivation This project used students as partners to develop resources that could be used by first-year undergraduates in fluid mechanics, using activities and receiving feedback through the virtual learning environment (VLE), in order to build these three attributes of independent learners. While there were significant benefits to the students who developed the resources, the target students saw much lower benefits as a result of poorer than expected engagement. The challenge this research presents is to develop activities that maximise engagement in large classes, as well as develop appropriate independent learning skills.

  3. Positive Aspects of International Student Transitions: A Qualitative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, Lisa; Popadiuk, Natalee

    2011-01-01

    Despite the considerable growth of the international student population, positive aspects of their experience have received little attention. The current study combines a Critical Incident Technique methodology and a positive psychology lens to explore the cross-cultural transition of seven international students, focusing on facilitative factors,…

  4. An Analysis of Students' Perceptions of the Value and Efficacy of Instructors' Auditory and Text-Based Feedback Modalities across Multiple Conceptual Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ice, Phil; Swan, Karen; Diaz, Sebastian; Kupczynski, Lori; Swan-Dagen, Allison

    2010-01-01

    This article used work from the writing assessment literature to develop a framework for assessing the impact and perceived value of written, audio, and combined written and audio feedback strategies across four global and 22 discrete dimensions of feedback. Using a quasi-experimental research design, students at three U.S. universities were…

  5. The Effectiveness of Internet-Based Peer Feedback Training on Chinese EFL College Students' Writing Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiahong; Yu, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    English writing, an indispensable skill in English learning, plays an important role in improving learners' language proficiency. With the wide spread and use of wired or wireless internet, EFL students can easily help and be helped with English writing. Therefore, the application of internet-based peer feedback training on writing to foreign or…

  6. The effects of feedback self-consistency, therapist status, and attitude toward therapy on reaction to personality feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David R; Stukas, Arthur A

    2006-08-01

    Individuals' reactions to interpersonal feedback may depend on characteristics of the feedback and the feedback source. The present authors examined the effects of experimentally manipulated personality feedback that they--in the guise of therapists--e-mailed to participants on the degree of their acceptance of the feedback. Consistent with Self-Verification Theory (W. B. Swann Jr., 1987), participants accepted feedback that was consistent with their self-views more readily than they did feedback that was inconsistent with their self-views. Furthermore, the authors found main effects for therapist's status and participant's attitude toward therapy. Significant interactions showed effects in which high-status therapists and positive client attitudes increased acceptance of self-inconsistent feedback, effects that were only partially mediated by clients' perceptions of therapist competence. The present results indicate the possibility that participants may be susceptible to self-concept change or to self-fulfilling prophecy effects in therapy when they have a positive attitude toward therapy or are working with a high-status therapist.

  7. A Collaborative Approach to Implement Positive Behavior Support Plans for Children with Problem Behaviors: A Comparison of Consultation versus Consultation and Feedback Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbas, Dilek

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of consultation alone and consultation plus feedback on the proper use of positive behavior support strategies (PBS) on behaviors of three mothers with children with developmental disabilities. Results indicated that consultation plus feedback was more effective than consultation alone…

  8. Making connections through reflection: writing and feedback in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes the writing and feedback processes in an academic literacy course for first-year students in an extended studies programme at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg. We argue that feedback together with metacognitive reflection form a 'vital link' between students' early experiences of a ...

  9. Sources of Instructional Feedback, Job Satisfaction, and Basic Psychological Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wininger, Steven R.; Birkholz, Paige M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined college instructors' utilization and perceived value of sources of instructional feedback (institutional student ratings, consultation with an instructional specialist, soliciting feedback from students, self-assessment, self-observation, peer/administrator observation, and peer coaching). We examined relationships between the…

  10. Utility of an app-based system to improve feedback following workplace-based assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefroy, Janet; Roberts, Nicola; Molyneux, Adrian; Bartlett, Maggie; Gay, Simon; McKinley, Robert

    2017-05-31

    To determine whether an app-based software system to support production and storage of assessment feedback summaries makes workplace-based assessment easier for clinical tutors and enhances the educational impact on medical students. We monitored our workplace assessor app's usage by Year 3 to 5 medical students in 2014-15 and conducted focus groups with Year 4 medical students and interviews with clinical tutors who had used the apps. Analysis was by constant comparison using a framework based on elements of van der Vleuten's utility index. The app may enhance the content of feedback for students. Using a screen may be distracting if the app is used during feedback discussions.    Educational impact was reduced by students' perceptions that an easy-to-produce feedback summary is less valuable than one requiring more tutor time and effort. Tutors' typing, dictation skills and their familiarity with mobile devices varied. This influenced their willingness to use the assessment and feedback mobile app rather than the equivalent web app. Electronic feedback summaries had more real and perceived uses than anticipated both for tutors and students including perceptions that they were for the school rather than the student. Electronic workplace-based assessment systems can be acceptable to tutors and can make giving detailed written feedback more practical but can interrupt the social interaction required for the feedback conversation. Tutor training and flexible systems will be required to minimise unwanted consequences. The educational impact on both tutors and students of providing pre-formulated advice within the app is worth further study.

  11. Framing of Feedback Impacts Student's Satisfaction, Self-Efficacy and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ridder, J. M. Monica; Peters, Claudia M. M.; Stokking, Karel M.; de Ru, J. Alexander; ten Cate, Olle Th. J.

    2015-01-01

    Feedback is considered important to acquire clinical skills. Research evidence shows that feedback does not always improve learning and its effects may be small. In many studies, a variety of variables involved in feedback provision may mask either one of their effects. E.g., there is reason to believe that the way oral feedback is framed may…

  12. Triangulation of written assessments from patients, teachers and students: useful for students and teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gran, Sarah Frandsen; Braend, Anja Maria; Lindbaek, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Many medical students in general practice clerkships experience lack of observation-based feedback. The StudentPEP project combined written feedback from patients, observing teachers and students. This study analyzes the perceived usefulness of triangulated written feedback. A total of 71 general practitioners and 79 medical students at the University of Oslo completed project evaluation forms after a 6-week clerkship. A principal component analysis was performed to find structures within the questionnaire. Regression analysis was performed regarding students' answers to whether StudentPEP was worthwhile. Free-text answers were analyzed qualitatively. Student and teacher responses were mixed within six subscales, with highest agreement on 'Teachers oral and written feedback' and 'Attitude to patient evaluation'. Fifty-four per cent of the students agreed that the triangulation gave concrete feedback on their weaknesses, and 59% valued the teachers' feedback provided. Two statements regarding the teacher's attitudes towards StudentPEP were significantly associated with the student's perception of worthwhileness. Qualitative analysis showed that patient evaluations were encouraging or distrusted. Some students thought that StudentPEP ensured observation and feedback. The patient evaluations increased the students' awareness of the patient perspective. A majority of the students considered the triangulated written feedback beneficial, although time-consuming. The teacher's attitudes strongly influenced how the students perceived the usefulness of StudentPEP.

  13. The Effect of Direct and Indirect Corrective Feedback on Students' Spelling Errors (El efecto de la retroalimentación directa e indirecta sobre los errores de ortografía de los estudiantes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleghizadeh, Sasan; Dadashi, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    The study presented here is an attempt to examine the role of indirect feedback in promoting junior high school students' spelling accuracy in English. It compares the effect of direct feedback with indirect feedback on students' written work dictated by their teacher from their textbooks. Two classes were selected from the Zanjanrood District in…

  14. Students' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Assessment Feedback as a Learning Tool in an Introductory Problem-solving Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Randall

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available There have been calls in the literature for reforms to assessment to enhance student learning (Shepard, 2000. In many instances, this refers to the need to move from traditional assessment procedures that are characterized as content-heavy, summative, and norm-referenced approaches to more constructivist and student-centred approaches, often characterized as more “…flexible, integrative, contextualized, process oriented, criteria referenced and formative” (Ellery, 2008, p. 421. Whereas summative assessment techniques rarely allow students to act on the feedback provided, formative feedback provided throughout the learning process can be used to improve future work and promote learning (Ellery, 2008; Higgins, Hartley & Skelton, 2002 by providing students an opportunity to learn from mistakes.Allowing students to learn from their mistakes makes good pedagogical sense. To date there has been little research examining students’ use of feedback (Higgins, Hartley, and Skelton, 2002. In an effort to begin to add to the literature in this area, this paper describes a study that explored the effectiveness of oral and written formative feedback when students were provided the opportunity to use it. The paper begins by reviewing literature related to assessment and how assessment relates to feedback in general. It then presents what the research has found in relation to students’ perspectives of effective feedback and how they use it. The paper ends by presenting the results and discussion.La documentation fait état de demandes de réforme de l’évaluation pour améliorer l’apprentissage des étudiants (Shepard, 2000. Dans plusieurs cas, cela traduit le besoin de passer des procédures d’évaluation traditionnelles caractérisées par la lourdeur de leur contenu, par leur aspect sommatif et par leurs approches normatives à des approches plus constructivistes et centrées sur les étudiants, souvent qualifiées de plus « ... souples, int

  15. The Role of Item Feedback in Self-Adapted Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Linda L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    The importance of item feedback in self-adapted testing was studied by comparing feedback and no feedback conditions for computerized adaptive tests and self-adapted tests taken by 363 college students. Results indicate that item feedback is not necessary to realize score differences between self-adapted and computerized adaptive testing. (SLD)

  16. The role of formative feedback in promoting higher order thinking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of formative feedback in promoting higher order thinking skills in ... activities, task characteristics, validating students' thinking, and providing feedback. ... Keywords: classroom environment, formative assessment, formative feedback, ...

  17. Who Is Giving Feedback To Whom In Entrepreneurship Education?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle Elmholdt, Stine; Warhuus, Jan; Blenker, Per

    evaluate and provide feedback on, with regard to both the teaching and the learning that takes place in these types of courses. We therefore ask: Who is giving feedback to whom in entrepreneurship education - and for what purpose?The intent of the paper is to develop and explore the system of feedback......The question we care about (objectives):When entrepreneurship is taught through the process of practicing entrepreneurship and based on experiential learning, a need arises for different forms of assessment, evaluation, and feedback procedures than those applied to traditional forms of higher...... is at play that involves both feedback among educators and students and between educators and students;3. that the complexity is further increased when it is acknowledged that the subject of the feedback may concern the learning, the teaching, the process, the object of the process (the entrepreneurial...

  18. Problems in the Research Problem: Critical Feedback and Resistance in Academic Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehvilainen, Sanna

    2009-01-01

    The paper focuses on a routine activity of academic supervision: Giving and receiving feedback based on the student's master's thesis manuscript. Two case analyses are presented on fundamentally critical feedback. Such feedback constitutes a recommendation to the student to seriously rethink the thesis, but there are various interactional…

  19. Clinical study of student learning using mastery style versus immediate feedback online activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Gladding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is part of a series of studies to improve the efficacy of online physics homework activities by integrating narrated animated solutions with mastery inspired exercises. In a clinical study using first- and second-year university students, the mastery group attempted question sets in four levels, with animated solutions between each attempt, until mastery was achieved on each level. This combined elements of formative assessment, the worked example effect, and mastery learning. The homework group attempted questions with immediate feedback and unlimited tries. The two groups took a similar amount of time to complete the activity. The mastery group significantly outperformed the homework group on a free response post-test that required students to show their work in solving near and far transfer problems.

  20. Perceived Insider Status and Feedback Reactions: A Dual Path of Feedback Motivation Attribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijiong Wu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have evaluated how the characteristics of feedback receiver, feedback deliverer and feedback information influence psychological feedback reactions of the feedback receiver while largely neglecting that feedback intervention is a kind of social interaction process. To address this issue, this study proposes that employees’ perceived insider status (PIS, as a kind of employee-organization relationship, could also influence employees’ reactions to supervisory feedback. In particular, this study investigates the influence of PIS focusing on affective and cognitive feedback reactions, namely feedback satisfaction and feedback utility. Surveys were conducted in a machinery manufacturing company in the Guangdong province of China. Samples were collected from 192 employees. Data analysis demonstrated that PIS and feedback utility possessed a U-shaped relationship, whereas PIS and feedback satisfaction exhibited positively linear relationships. The analysis identified two kinds of mediating mechanisms related to feedback satisfaction and feedback utility. Internal feedback motivation attribution partially mediated the relationship between PIS and feedback satisfaction but failed to do the same with respect to the relationship between PIS and feedback utility. In contrast, external feedback motivation attribution partially mediated the relationship between PIS and feedback utility while failing to mediate the relationship between PIS and feedback satisfaction. Theoretical contributions and practical implications of the findings are discussed at the end of the paper.

  1. Teaching Techniques: Audiovisual Feedback in EFL/ESL Writing Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, William J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, William J. Woodard, an English teacher preparing students for university-level work in academic English, describes a more effective student feedback technique that decreases the amount of time spent writing such feedback. Woodard explains his discovery of the tool "Jing." Jing is a free application for PCs and Macs by…

  2. A Role of Base Plate Jerk Feedback Scheme for Suppression of the Self Vibration in a Pneumatic Positioning Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Mohebullah; Nakamura, Yukinori; Wakui, Shinji

    In this study, a positioning stage is considered, which is actuated by four pneumatic cylinders and vertically supported by four coil-type spring isolators. Previously, we realized the base plate jerk feedback (BPJFB) to be analogues to a Master-Slave system which can synchronize the motion of the stage as a Slave to the motion of the base plate as a Master. However, in the case of real positioning, the stage had slightly self oscillation with higher frequency due to the higher gains set to the outer feedback loop controller besides its oscillation due to the natural vibration of the base plate. The self oscillation of stage was misunderstood to be the natural vibration of base plate due to the reaction force. However, according to the experimental results, the BPJFB scheme was able to control both of the mentioned vibrations. Suppression of the self vibration of stage is an interesting phenomenon, which should be experimentally investigated. Therefore, the current study focuses on the suppression of the self vibration of stage by using the BPJFB scheme. The experimental results show that besides operating as a Master-Slave synchronizing system, the PBJFB scheme is able to increase the damping ratio and stiffness of stage against its self vibration. This newly recognized phenomenon contributes to further increase the proportional gain of the outer feedback loop controller. As a result, the positioning speed and stability can be improved.

  3. Hvad siger forskningen om feedback?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Feedback skal serveres ligesom en gammeldags sandwich. Først lidt brød, så det lidt sejere kød og til sidst igen til lidt brød”. Sådan nogenlunde lyder en pragmatisk løsning på udfordringerne ved at give feedback. Når medarbejdere skal have negativ feedback, skal denne altså pakkes ind, så...... feedbacken indledes med let fordøjeligt positiv feedback, derefter kommer den negative – og noget sværere fordøjelige – feedback, og til sidst afrundes feedbacken med en god udgangsreplik, nemlig den positive feedback....

  4. The role of noise and positive feedback in the onset of autosomal dominant diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosl William J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autosomal dominant (AD diseases result when a single mutant or non-functioning gene is present on an autosomal chromosome. These diseases often do not emerge at birth. There are presently two prevailing theories explaining the expression of AD diseases. One explanation originates from the Knudson two-hit theory of hereditary cancers, where loss of heterozygosity or occurrence of somatic mutations impairs the function of the wild-type copy. While these somatic second hits may be sufficient for stable disease states, it is often difficult to determine if their occurrence necessarily marks the initiation of disease progression. A more direct consequence of a heterozygous genetic background is haploinsufficiency, referring to a lack of sufficient gene function due to reduced wild-type gene copy number; however, haploinsufficiency can involve a variety of additional mechanisms, such as noise in gene expression or protein levels, injury and second hit mutations in other genes. In this study, we explore the possible contribution to the onset of autosomal dominant diseases from intrinsic factors, such as those determined by the structure of the molecular networks governing normal cellular physiology. Results First, simple models of single gene insufficiency using the positive feedback loops that may be derived from a three-component network were studied by computer simulation using Bionet software. The network structure is shown to affect the dynamics considerably; some networks are relatively stable even when large stochastic variations in are present, while others exhibit switch-like dynamics. In the latter cases, once the network switches over to the disease state it remains in that state permanently. Model pathways for two autosomal dominant diseases, AD polycystic kidney disease and mature onset diabetes of youth (MODY were simulated and the results are compared to known disease characteristics. Conclusions By identifying the

  5. Peer Teaching in the Food Chemistry Laboratory: Student-produced Experiments, Peer and Audio Feedback and Integration of Employability

    OpenAIRE

    Dunne, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the author’s experience over the last several years of implementing an alternative Food Chemistry laboratory practical for a group of third-year BSc Nutraceuticals students. The initial main objectives were to prepare students for the more independent final-year research project; to incorporate innovative approaches to feedback; and to integrate key employability skills into the curriculum. These were achieved through building the skills required to ultimately allow stude...

  6. Using patients as educators for communication skills: Exploring dental students' and patients' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, C; Pooler, J; Lloyd, H

    2018-05-01

    A qualitative study to explore the issues for patients and students when giving feedback on the communication of dental students. The Department of Health and National Institute for Health Research are committed to involving patients in improving clinical education, research and service delivery. Yet, there is a limited body of evidence on the perceptions of patients when asked to be involved in this way, and specifically when asked to provide feedback on the communication skills of dental students. This study seeks to address this gap and heighten the understanding of the issues faced by patients when asked to be involved in clinical education. Data were collected using focus groups with dental students (n=10) and patients (n=8) being treated by these students. Both groups were asked about their thoughts, feelings and beliefs about patients being asked to provide feedback on the communication skills of dental students. Data analysis involved inductive thematic analysis of transcribed audio recordings. Four themes emerged from the data: "legitimacy," "co-educators," "maintaining the equilibrium of the patient-student relationship" and the "timing of patient feedback." Support for involving patients in giving feedback on students' communication skills was established, with patients considering they were best placed to comment on the communication skills of dental students. Patients and students do not want to provide feedback alone and want support to assist them, especially if feedback was negative. Issues of anonymity, confidentiality and ownership of the feedback process were worrisome, and the positioning of patient feedback in the programme was seen as critical. Patients and students are willing to engage in patient feedback on students' communication skills, and with support and training, the concerns around this are not insurmountable and the benefits could potentially profit both groups. These findings have resonance with other healthcare educators when

  7. Prefrontal cortex and striatal activation by feedback in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keitz, Martijn; Koerts, Janneke; Kortekaas, Rudie; Renken, Remco; de Jong, Bauke M.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2008-01-01

    Positive feedbacks reinforce goal-directed behavior and evoke pleasure. in Parkinson's disease (PD) the striatal dysfunction impairs motor performance, but also may lead to decreased positive feedback (reward) processing. This study investigates two types of positive feedback processing (monetary

  8. Individualized feedback during simulated laparoscopic training:a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborg, Liv; Weurlander, Maria; Hedman, Leif; Nisel, Henry; Lindqvist, Pelle G; Felländer-Tsai, Li; Enochsson, Lars

    2015-07-29

    This study aimed to explore the value of individualized feedback on performance, flow and self-efficacy during simulated laparoscopy. Furthermore, we wished to explore attitudes towards feedback and simulator training among medical students. Sixteen medical students were included in the study and randomized to laparoscopic simulator training with or without feedback. A teacher provided individualized feedback continuously throughout the procedures to the target group. Validated questionnaires and scales were used to evaluate self-efficacy and flow. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to evaluate differences between groups regarding laparoscopic performance (instrument path length), self-efficacy and flow. Qualitative data was collected by group interviews and interpreted using inductive thematic analyses. Sixteen students completed the simulator training and questionnaires. Instrument path length was shorter in the feedback group (median 3.9 m; IQR: 3.3-4.9) as compared to the control group (median 5.9 m; IQR: 5.0-8.1), pfeedback group were more concentrated on the task and also more anxious. Both groups had high ambitions to succeed and also expressed the importance of getting feedback. The authenticity of the training scenario was important for the learning process. This study highlights the importance of individualized feedback during simulated laparoscopy training. The next step is to further optimize feedback and to transfer standardized and individualized feedback from the simulated setting to the operating room.

  9. The Nature of Feedback Given to Elementary Student Teachers from University Supervisors after Observations of Mathematics Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Catherine; Walkowiak, Temple A.; Poling, Lisa; Richardson, Kerri; Polly, Drew

    2018-01-01

    This research explores the frequency and nature of mathematics-specific feedback given to elementary student teachers by university supervisors across a collection of post-lesson observation forms. Approximately one-third of the forms (n = 250) analysed from five large universities had no comments related to mathematics. Forms that did have…

  10. Students' Feedback of mDPBL Approach and the Learning Impact towards Computer Networks Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarno, Sri; Muthu, Kalaiarasi Sonai; Ling, Lew Sook

    2018-01-01

    This study presents students' feedback and learning impact on design and development of a multimedia learning in Direct Problem-Based Learning approach (mDPBL) for Computer Networks in Dian Nuswantoro University, Indonesia. This study examined the usefulness, contents and navigation of the multimedia learning as well as learning impacts towards…

  11. Control of conducting polymer actuators without physical feedback: simulated feedback control approach with particle swarm optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Xingcan; Mutlu, Rahim; Alici, Gursel; Li, Weihua

    2014-01-01

    Conducting polymer actuators have shown significant potential in articulating micro instruments, manipulation devices, and robotics. However, implementing a feedback control strategy to enhance their positioning ability and accuracy in any application requires a feedback sensor, which is extremely large in size compared to the size of the actuators. Therefore, this paper proposes a new sensorless control scheme without the use of a position feedback sensor. With the help of the system identification technique and particle swarm optimization, the control scheme, which we call the simulated feedback control system, showed a satisfactory command tracking performance for the conducting polymer actuator’s step and dynamic displacement responses, especially under a disturbance, without needing a physical feedback loop, but using a simulated feedback loop. The primary contribution of this study is to propose and experimentally evaluate the simulated feedback control scheme for a class of the conducting polymer actuators known as tri-layer polymer actuators, which can operate both in dry and wet media. This control approach can also be extended to other smart actuators or systems, for which the feedback control based on external sensing is impractical. (paper)

  12. Making Movies: The Next Big Thing in Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Sheila A.

    2011-01-01

    Good quality, timely feedback is a key factor to help students achieve their full potential. Increased class sizes have put significant strain on the ability to return work promptly without compromising feedback quality. In the current study, two screencasting technologies were used to produce audiovisual feedback. For essays, Jing was used,…

  13. Optimizing the Timing of Expert Feedback During Simulation-Based Spaced Practice of Endourologic Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason Young; McDougall, Elspeth M; Lineberry, Matthew; Tekian, Ara

    2016-08-01

    Provision of expert feedback is widely acknowledged to be an essential component of simulation-based training. However, little is known about the most effective and efficient ways to provide feedback to novices. Optimizing the timing of expert feedback may improve outcomes while reducing resource requirements. The main objective of this study was to determine the impact of providing early versus late expert feedback to novice learners engaged in a flexible ureteroscopy (fURS) training curriculum. Senior medical students were recruited to participate in this study. Each student participated in a comprehensive fURS training curriculum that included 3 deliberate, independent practice sessions. Baseline and postcourse fURS skill was assessed for each student using a standardized fURS test task. Each student was randomized to either an early feedback group (EFG) or late feedback group (LFG). The EFG participants were provided expert feedback immediately after the baseline skill test, whereas LFG participants were given feedback before their final deliberate, independent practice session. Eighteen senior medical students completed the study (9 EFG and 9 LFG participants). There were no discernible demographic differences between the groups at baseline. When controlling for pretest performance, early rather than late feedback was associated with both shorter postcourse time to completion of the task (19.2 vs. 21.5 minutes, P feedback when learning a novel skill. Further study is required.

  14. Validity evidence and reliability of a simulated patient feedback instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Claudia; Woermann, Ulrich; Rethans, Jan-Joost; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2012-01-27

    In the training of healthcare professionals, one of the advantages of communication training with simulated patients (SPs) is the SP's ability to provide direct feedback to students after a simulated clinical encounter. The quality of SP feedback must be monitored, especially because it is well known that feedback can have a profound effect on student performance. Due to the current lack of valid and reliable instruments to assess the quality of SP feedback, our study examined the validity and reliability of one potential instrument, the 'modified Quality of Simulated Patient Feedback Form' (mQSF). Content validity of the mQSF was assessed by inviting experts in the area of simulated clinical encounters to rate the importance of the mQSF items. Moreover, generalizability theory was used to examine the reliability of the mQSF. Our data came from videotapes of clinical encounters between six simulated patients and six students and the ensuing feedback from the SPs to the students. Ten faculty members judged the SP feedback according to the items on the mQSF. Three weeks later, this procedure was repeated with the same faculty members and recordings. All but two items of the mQSF received importance ratings of > 2.5 on a four-point rating scale. A generalizability coefficient of 0.77 was established with two judges observing one encounter. The findings for content validity and reliability with two judges suggest that the mQSF is a valid and reliable instrument to assess the quality of feedback provided by simulated patients.

  15. The Effect of Combination of Video Feedback and Audience Feedback on Social Anxiety: Preliminary Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junwen; Mak, Rebecca; Fujita, Satoko

    2015-09-01

    Although video feedback (VF) is shown to improve appraisals of social performance in socially anxious individuals, its impact on state anxiety during a social situation is mixed. The current study investigated the effect of combined video feedback and audience feedback (AF) on self-perceptions of performance and bodily sensations as well as state anxiety pertaining to a speech task. Forty-one socially anxious students were randomly allocated to combined video feedback with audience feedback (VF + AF), video feedback only (VF), audience feedback only (AF), or a control condition. Following a 3-min speech, participants in the VF + AF, VF, and AF conditions watched the videotape of their speech with cognitive preparation in the presence of three confederates who served as audience, and/or received feedback from the confederates, while the control group watched their videotaped speech without cognitive preparation. Both VF + AF and AF conditions improved distorted appraisal of performance and bodily sensations as well as state anxiety. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Learners’ preferences towards Corrective feedback in writing assignments in tertiary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horbacauskiene Jolita

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available For several decades, there has been a heated debate about the value of providing corrective feedback in writing assignments in English as a foreign language (EFL classes. Despite the fact that corrective feedback in writing has been analysed from various angles, learners’ expectations regarding feedback given by language instructors are still to be considered, especially in different learning settings. Student attitudes have been found to be associated with motivation, proficiency, learner anxiety, autonomous learning, etc. (Elwood & Bode, 2014. Thus, the aim of this paper was to compare EFL learners’ attitudes towards corrective feedback and self-evaluation of writing skills in different learning settings. Students at two technological universities in France and Lithuania were surveyed and asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire combining the Likert scale and rank order questions. The results indicate that frequency of writing assignments seems to have little or no impact on students’ self-evaluation of writing skills. Moreover, although the two groups of students showed preference for feedback on different error types (e.g., feedback on structure vs. feedback on grammar, nevertheless, indirect corrective feedback with a clue was favoured by all the respondents.

  17. Factors affecting learning of vector math from computer-based practice: Feedback complexity and prior knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F. Heckler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In experiments including over 450 university-level students, we studied the effectiveness and time efficiency of several levels of feedback complexity in simple, computer-based training utilizing static question sequences. The learning domain was simple vector math, an essential skill in introductory physics. In a unique full factorial design, we studied the relative effects of “knowledge of correct response” feedback and “elaborated feedback” (i.e., a general explanation both separately and together. A number of other factors were analyzed, including training time, physics course grade, prior knowledge of vector math, and student beliefs about both their proficiency in and the importance of vector math. We hypothesize a simple model predicting how the effectiveness of feedback depends on prior knowledge, and the results confirm this knowledge-by-treatment interaction. Most notably, elaborated feedback is the most effective feedback, especially for students with low prior knowledge and low course grade. In contrast, knowledge of correct response feedback was less effective for low-performing students, and including both kinds of feedback did not significantly improve performance compared to elaborated feedback alone. Further, while elaborated feedback resulted in higher scores, the learning rate was at best only marginally higher because the training time was slightly longer. Training time data revealed that students spent significantly more time on the elaborated feedback after answering a training question incorrectly. Finally, we found that training improved student self-reported proficiency and that belief in the importance of the learned domain improved the effectiveness of training. Overall, we found that computer based training with static question sequences and immediate elaborated feedback in the form of simple and general explanations can be an effective way to improve student performance on a physics essential skill

  18. MicroRNA-Mediated Positive Feedback Loop and Optimized Bistable Switch in a Cancer Network Involving miR-17-92

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yichen; Li, Yumin; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Yong

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that play an important role in many key biological processes, including development, cell differentiation, the cell cycle and apoptosis, as central post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Recent studies have shown that miRNAs can act as oncogenes and tumor suppressors depending on the context. The present work focuses on the physiological significance of miRNAs and their role in regulating the switching behavior. We illustrate an abstract model of the Myc/E2F/miR-17-92 network presented by Aguda et al. (2008), which is composed of coupling between the E2F/Myc positive feedback loops and the E2F/Myc/miR-17-92 negative feedback loop. By systematically analyzing the network in close association with plausible experimental parameters, we show that, in the presence of miRNAs, the system bistability emerges from the system, with a bistable switch and a one-way switch presented by Aguda et al. instead of a single one-way switch. Moreover, the miRNAs can optimize the switching process. The model produces a diverse array of response-signal behaviors in response to various potential regulating scenarios. The model predicts that this transition exists, one from cell death or the cancerous phenotype directly to cell quiescence, due to the existence of miRNAs. It was also found that the network involving miR-17-92 exhibits high noise sensitivity due to a positive feedback loop and also maintains resistance to noise from a negative feedback loop. PMID:22022595

  19. Does Automated Feedback Improve Writing Quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Joshua; Olinghouse, Natalie G.; Andrada, Gilbert N.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines data from students in grades 4-8 who participated in a statewide computer-based benchmark writing assessment that featured automated essay scoring and automated feedback. We examined whether the use of automated feedback was associated with gains in writing quality across revisions to an essay, and with transfer effects…

  20. Evaluation of a 2 to 1 peer placement supervision model by physiotherapy students and their educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpine, Lucy M; Caldas, Francieli Tanji; Barrett, Emer M

    2018-04-02

    The objective of the study was to investigate student and practice educator evaluations of practice placements using a structured 2 to 1 supervision and implementation model. Cross-sectional pilot study set in clinical sites providing placements for physiotherapy students in Ireland. Students and practice educators completing a 2.1 peer placement between 2013 and 2015 participated. A self-reported questionnaire which measured indicators linked to quality assured placements was used. Three open-ended questions captured comments on the benefits and challenges associated with the 2 to 1 model. Ten students (10/20; 50% response rate) and 10 practice educators (10/10; 100% response rate) responded to the questionnaire. Student responses included four pairs of students and one student from a further two pairs. There was generally positive agreement with the questionnaire indicating that placements using the 2 to 1 model were positively evaluated by participants. There were no significant differences between students and practice educators. The main benefits of the 2 to 1 model were shared learning experiences, a peer supported environment, and the development of peer evaluation and feedback skills by students. A key component of the model was the peer scripting process which provided time for reflection, self-evaluation, and peer review. 2 to 1 placements were positively evaluated by students and educators when supported by a structured supervision model. Clear guidance to students on the provision of peer feedback and support for educators providing feedback to two different students is recommended.

  1. Physical limits of feedback noise-suppression in biological networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jiajun; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2009-01-01

    Feedback is a ubiquitous control mechanism of biological networks, and has also been identified in a variety of regulatory systems and organisms. It has been shown that, for a given gain and with negligible intrinsic noise, negative feedback impairs noise buffering whereas positive feedback enhances noise buffering. We further investigate the influence of negative and positive feedback on noise in output signals by considering both intrinsic and extrinsic noise as well as operator noise. We find that, while maintaining the system sensitivity, either there exists a minimum of the output noise intensity corresponding to a biologically feasible feedback strength, or the output noise intensity is a monotonic function of feedback strength bounded by both biological and dynamical constraints. In both cases, feedback noise-suppression is physically limited. In other words, noise suppressed by negative or positive feedback cannot be reduced without limitation even in the case of slow transcription

  2. Mentoring Matters: Finding the Golden Mean--Mentors and Student Teachers Working for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The cooperating teachers who make the greatest positive impact on interns allow student teachers to make mistakes and learn from them, offer constructive feedback, invest in their student teachers' success, practice current pedagogy in their own classrooms, and remain positive throughout the experience. In this article, the author suggests that…

  3. Beyond Content, Deeper than Delivery: What Critique Feedback Reveals about Communication Expectations in Design Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannels, Deanna; Gaffney, Amy Housley; Martin, Kelly Norris

    2008-01-01

    In design education, the critique is a communication event in which students present their design and critics provide feedback. Presumably, the feedback gives the students information about their progress on the design. Yet critic feedback also serves a socializing function--providing students information about what it means to communicate well in…

  4. Evaluation of School of health students' ethics position in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Emine; Dal, Nursel Alp; Üstün, Çağatay; Okursoy, Algın

    2017-03-01

    The advances in science and technology increasingly lead to the appearance of ethical issues and to the complexity of care. Therefore, it is important to define the ethics position of students studying in health departments so that high quality patient care can be achieved. The aim of this study was to examine the ethics position of the students at Shool of Health of an University in western Turkey. The study design was descriptive and cross-sectional. The study population included 540 first, second, third, and fourth year students from the Departments of Nursing, Midwifery, and Rescue and Disaster Management in the 2013-2014 academic year. Data were collected with a Personal Identification Form and The Ethics Position Questionnaire. Obtained data were analyzed with Chi-square test, Confirmatory Factor Analysis, and Nested Analysis of Variance. Ethical considerations: Before conducting the research, approval was obtained from Ege University Clinical Research Ethics Committee in İzmir and written informed consent was taken from all the participants. There was no significant difference in the mean scores for the Ethics Position Questionnaire between the students in terms of years and fields of study. Although the mean scores for the subscale idealism did not differ between fields of study, the mean scores significantly differed between years of study. However, the mean scores for the subscale relativism did not differ in terms of years and fields of study. Whether students are idealistic or relativistic in terms of ethical judgment will be effective in ethical decision-making skills during patient care. Therefore, we need to define the factors that influence students' ethics position in the future. It is suggested that the courses and practices that teach students to be aware of their ethics position to create an ethical outlook can be placed in the curriculum in health schools.

  5. Multisource feedback analysis of pediatric outpatient teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiao, Mao-Meng; Huang, Li-Tung; Huang, Ying-Hsien; Tang, Kuo-Shu; Chen, Chih-Jen

    2013-11-01

    This study aims to evaluate the outpatient communication skills of medical students via multisource feedback, which may be useful to map future directions in improving physician-patient communication. Family respondents of patients, a nurse, a clinical teacher, and a research assistant evaluated video-recorded medical students' interactions with outpatients by using multisource feedback questionnaires; students also assessed their own skills. The questionnaire was answered based on the video-recorded interactions between outpatients and the medical students. A total of 60 family respondents of the 60 patients completed the questionnaires, 58 (96.7%) of them agreed with the video recording. Two reasons for reluctance were "personal privacy" issues and "simply disagree" with the video recording. The average satisfaction score of the 58 students was 85.1 points, indicating students' performance was in the category between satisfied and very satisfied. The family respondents were most satisfied with the "teacher"s attitude," followed by "teaching quality". In contrast, the family respondents were least satisfied with "being open to questions". Among the 6 assessment domains of communication skills, the students scored highest on "explaining" and lowest on "giving recommendations". In the detailed assessment by family respondents, the students scored lowest on "asking about life/school burden". In the multisource analysis, the nurses' mean score was much higher and the students' mean self-assessment score was lower than the average scores on all domains. The willingness and satisfaction of family respondents were high in this study. Students scored the lowest on giving recommendations to patients. Multisource feedback with video recording is useful in providing more accurate evaluation of students' communication competence and in identifying the areas of communication that require enhancement.

  6. Feedback for relatedness and competence : Can feedback in blended learning contribute to optimal rigor, basic needs, and motivation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bombaerts, G.; Nickel, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    We inquire how peer and tutor feedback influences students' optimal rigor, basic needs and motivation. We analyze questionnaires from two courses in two subsequent years. We conclude that feedback in blended learning can contribute to rigor and basic needs, but it is not clear from our data what

  7. The Art of Giving Online Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibold, Nancyruth; Schwarz, Laura Marie

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of providing online feedback that is positive, effective, and enhances the learning experience is a valuable educator skill. Acquisition of the art of providing feedback is through education, practice, and faculty development. This article provides information about the best practices for delivering online feedback to learners. An…

  8. Clinical workplace learning: perceived learning value of individual and group feedback in a collectivistic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhoyo, Yoyo; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Emilia, Ova; Kuks, Jan B M; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2018-04-19

    Feedback is essential for workplace learning. Most papers in this field concern individual feedback. In collectivistic cultures, however, group feedback is common educational practice. This study was conducted to investigate the perceived learning value and characteristics of individual and group feedback in a collectivistic culture. During two weeks, on a daily basis, clerkship students (n = 215) from 12 clinical departments at Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, recorded individual and group feedback moments by using a structured form: the providers, focus and perceived learning value of feedback. Data were analysed with logistic regression and multilevel techniques. Students reported 2687 group and 1535 individual feedback moments. Group feedback more often focused on history taking, clinical judgment, patient management, patient counselling, and professional behaviour (OR ranging from 1.232, p cultures, group feedback may add to the array of educational measures that optimize student learning. Congruence between culture and type of feedback may be important for the effectiveness of feedback.

  9. Rethinking Feedback Practices in Higher Education: A Peer Review Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David; Thomson, Avril; Breslin, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Peer review is a reciprocal process whereby students produce feedback reviews on the work of peers and receive feedback reviews from peers on their own work. Prior research has primarily examined the learning benefits that result from the receipt of feedback reviews, with few studies specifically exploring the merits of producing feedback reviews…

  10. A Content Analysis of Peer Feedback in Triadic Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avent, Janeé R.; Wahesh, Edward; Purgason, Lucy L.; Borders, L. DiAnne; Mobley, A. Keith

    2015-01-01

    There is limited research on the types of peer feedback exchanged during triadic supervision. Through a content analysis, the authors found that students provided feedback about counseling performance and cognitive counseling skills most often in supervision sessions. However, there were differences in the types of feedback exchanged across three…

  11. Haptic seat for fuel economy feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobbitt, III, John Thomas

    2016-08-30

    A process of providing driver fuel economy feedback is disclosed in which vehicle sensors provide for haptic feedback on fuel usage. Such sensors may include one or more of a speed sensors, global position satellite units, vehicle pitch/roll angle sensors, suspension displacement sensors, longitudinal accelerometer sensors, throttle position in sensors, steering angle sensors, break pressure sensors, and lateral accelerometer sensors. Sensors used singlely or collectively can provide enhanced feedback as to various environmental conditions and operating conditions such that a more accurate assessment of fuel economy information can be provided to the driver.

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Compare e-Feedback Versus "Standard" Face-to-Face Verbal Feedback to Improve the Acquisition of Procedural Skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jundi, Wissam; Elsharif, Mohamed; Anderson, Melanie; Chan, Phillip; Beard, Jonathan; Nawaz, Shah

    Constructive feedback plays an important role in learning during surgical training. Standard feedback is usually given verbally following direct observation of the procedure by a trained assessor. However, such feedback requires the physical presence of expert faculty members who are usually busy and time-constrained by clinical commitments. We aim to evaluate electronic feedback (e-feedback) after video observation of surgical suturing in comparison with standard face-to-face verbal feedback. A prospective, blinded, randomized controlled trial comparing e-feedback with standard verbal feedback was carried out in February 2015 using a validated pro formas for assessment. The study participants were 38 undergraduate medical students from the University of Sheffield, UK. They were recorded on video performing the procedural skill, completed a self-evaluation form, and received e-feedback on the same day (group 1); observed directly by an assessor, invited to provide verbal self-reflection, and then received standard verbal feedback (group 2). In both groups, the feedback was provided after performing the procedure. The participants returned 2 days later and performed the same skill again. Poststudy questionnaire was used to assess the acceptability of each feedback among the participants. Overall, 19 students in group 1 and 18 students in group 2 completed the study. Although there was a significant improvement in the overall mean score on the second performance of the task for all participants (first performance mean 11.59, second performance mean 15.95; p ≤ 0.0001), there was no difference in the overall mean improvement score between group 1 and group 2 (4.74 and 3.94, respectively; p = 0.49). The mean overall scores for the e-feedback group at baseline recorded by 2 independent investigators showed good agreement (mean overall scores of 12.84 and 11.89; Cronbach α = 0.86). Poststudy questionnaire demonstrated that both e-feedback and standard verbal feedback

  13. How does culture affect experiential training feedback in exported Canadian health professional curricula?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, Kerry; Mousa Bacha, Rasha; Abdelaziz, Somaia

    2017-03-17

    To explore feedback processes of Western-based health professional student training curricula conducted in an Arab clinical teaching setting. This qualitative study employed document analysis of in-training evaluation reports (ITERs) used by Canadian nursing, pharmacy, respiratory therapy, paramedic, dental hygiene, and pharmacy technician programs established in Qatar. Six experiential training program coordinators were interviewed between February and May 2016 to explore how national cultural differences are perceived to affect feedback processes between students and clinical supervisors. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and coded according to a priori cultural themes. Document analysis found all programs' ITERs outlined competency items for students to achieve. Clinical supervisors choose a response option corresponding to their judgment of student performance and may provide additional written feedback in spaces provided. Only one program required formal face-to-face feedback exchange between students and clinical supervisors. Experiential training program coordinators identified that no ITER was expressly culturally adapted, although in some instances, modifications were made for differences in scopes of practice between Canada and Qatar.  Power distance was recognized by all coordinators who also identified both student and supervisor reluctance to document potentially negative feedback in ITERs. Instances of collectivism were described as more lenient student assessment by clinical supervisors of the same cultural background. Uncertainty avoidance did not appear to impact feedback processes. Our findings suggest that differences in specific cultural dimensions between Qatar and Canada have implications on the feedback process in experiential training which may be addressed through simple measures to accommodate communication preferences.

  14. Peer-teaching in the food chemistry laboratory: student-produced experiments, peer and audio feedback, and integration of employability skills

    OpenAIRE

    Julie Lisa Dunne

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the author’s experience over the last several years of implementing an alternative Food Chemistry laboratory practical model for a group of third-year BSc Nutraceuticals students. The initial main objectives were to prepare students for the more independent final-year research project; to incorporate innovative approaches to feedback; and to integrate key employability skills into the curriculum. These were achieved through building the skills required to ultimately allow...

  15. READING COMPREHENSION EXERCISES ONLINE: THE EFFECTS OF FEEDBACK, PROFICIENCY AND INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Murphy

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an ongoing project to create an online version of a reading programme, a custom-designed English language proficiency course at a university in Japan. Following an interactionist view of second language acquisition, it was hypothesised that comprehension of a reading passage could be enhanced by online materials promoting interaction between students as they completed a multiple-choice reading comprehension exercise. Interaction was promoted: (a through pair work at a single computer and (b by providing Elaborative feedback in the form of hints about incorrect answers as a means of stimulating discussion about corrections. Students were randomly selected from upper and lower levels of English proficiency, as determined by the Kanda English Proficiency Test (Bonk & Ockey, 2003, to receive either Elaborative feedback or Knowledge of Correct Response feedback (which supplies the correct answers. Within these groups, some students worked in pairs and some alone. Quantitative results show that the interaction between Type of feedback and Manner of study (individual or pair work was statistically significant; students performed best on a follow-up comprehension exercise when in pairs and having been provided with Elaborative feedback. Furthermore, qualitative analysis of transcribed interactions also shows that Elaborative feedback was conducive to quality interaction.

  16. Feedback effects on students' writing motivation, process, and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnhouwer, H.

    2010-01-01

    Many students’ writing capacities remain insufficient during college years (Kellogg & Whiteford, 2009). Teachers try to improve students’ writing skills by providing them with feedback on their texts. Remarkably, research on the effects of feedback provided on written products is scarce (Graham &

  17. Evaluation of a multi-methods approach to the collection and dissemination of feedback on OSCE performance in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardman, M J; Yorke, V C; Hallam, J L

    2018-05-01

    Feedback is an essential part of the learning process, and students expect their feedback to be personalised, meaningful and timely. Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) assessments allow examiners to observe students carefully over the course of a number of varied station types, across a number of clinical knowledge and skill domains. They therefore present an ideal opportunity to record detailed feedback which allows students to reflect on and improve their performance. This article outlines two methods by which OSCE feedback was collected and then disseminated to undergraduate dental students across 2-year groups in a UK dental school: (i) Individual written feedback comments made by examiners during the examination, (ii) General audio feedback recorded by groups of examiners immediately following the examination. Evaluation of the feedback was sought from students and staff examiners. A multi-methods approach utilising Likert questionnaire items (quantitative) and open-ended feedback questions (qualitative) was used. Data analysis explored student and staff perceptions of the audio and written feedback. A total of 131 students (response rate 68%) and 52 staff examiners (response rate 83%) completed questionnaires. Quantitative data analysis showed that the written and audio formats were reported as a meaningful source of feedback for learning by both students (93% written, 89% audio) and staff (96% written, 92% audio). Qualitative data revealed the complementary nature of both types of feedback. Written feedback gives specific, individual information whilst audio shares general observations and allows students to learn from others. The advantages, limitations and challenges of the feedback methods are discussed, leading to the development of an informed set of implementation guidelines. Written and audio feedback methods are valued by students and staff. It is proposed that these may be very easily applied to OSCEs running in other dental schools.

  18. Stand-Alone Personalized Normative Feedback for College Student Drinkers: A Meta-Analytic Review, 2004 to 2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keri B Dotson

    Full Text Available Norms clarification has been identified as an effective component of college student drinking interventions, prompting research on norms clarification as a single-component intervention known as Personalized Normative Feedback (PNF. Previous reviews have examined PNF in combination with other components but not as a stand-alone intervention.To investigate the degree to which computer-delivered stand-alone personalized normative feedback interventions reduce alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harms among college students and to compare gender-neutral and gender-specific PNF.Electronic databases were searched systematically through November 2014. Reference lists were reviewed manually and forward and backward searches were conducted.Outcome studies that compared computer-delivered, stand-alone PNF intervention with an assessment only, attention-matched, or active treatment control and reported alcohol use and harms among college students.Between-group effect sizes were calculated as the standardized mean difference in change scores between treatment and control groups divided by pooled standard deviation. Within-group effect sizes were calculated as the raw mean difference between baseline and follow-up divided by pooled within-groups standard deviation.Eight studies (13 interventions with a total of 2,050 participants were included. Compared to control participants, students who received gender-neutral (dbetween = 0.291, 95% CI [0.159, 0.423] and gender-specific PNF (dbetween = 0.284, 95% CI [0.117, 0.451] reported greater reductions in drinking from baseline to follow-up. Students who received gender-neutral PNF reported 3.027 (95% CI [2.171, 3.882] fewer drinks per week at first follow-up and gender-specific PNF reported 3.089 (95% CI [0.992, 5.186] fewer drinks. Intervention effects were small for harms (dbetween = 0.157, 95% CI [0.037, 0.278].Computer-delivered PNF is an effective stand-alone approach for reducing college student

  19. Stand-Alone Personalized Normative Feedback for College Student Drinkers: A Meta-Analytic Review, 2004 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Keri B; Dunn, Michael E; Bowers, Clint A

    2015-01-01

    Norms clarification has been identified as an effective component of college student drinking interventions, prompting research on norms clarification as a single-component intervention known as Personalized Normative Feedback (PNF). Previous reviews have examined PNF in combination with other components but not as a stand-alone intervention. To investigate the degree to which computer-delivered stand-alone personalized normative feedback interventions reduce alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harms among college students and to compare gender-neutral and gender-specific PNF. Electronic databases were searched systematically through November 2014. Reference lists were reviewed manually and forward and backward searches were conducted. Outcome studies that compared computer-delivered, stand-alone PNF intervention with an assessment only, attention-matched, or active treatment control and reported alcohol use and harms among college students. Between-group effect sizes were calculated as the standardized mean difference in change scores between treatment and control groups divided by pooled standard deviation. Within-group effect sizes were calculated as the raw mean difference between baseline and follow-up divided by pooled within-groups standard deviation. Eight studies (13 interventions) with a total of 2,050 participants were included. Compared to control participants, students who received gender-neutral (dbetween = 0.291, 95% CI [0.159, 0.423]) and gender-specific PNF (dbetween = 0.284, 95% CI [0.117, 0.451]) reported greater reductions in drinking from baseline to follow-up. Students who received gender-neutral PNF reported 3.027 (95% CI [2.171, 3.882]) fewer drinks per week at first follow-up and gender-specific PNF reported 3.089 (95% CI [0.992, 5.186]) fewer drinks. Intervention effects were small for harms (dbetween = 0.157, 95% CI [0.037, 0.278]). Computer-delivered PNF is an effective stand-alone approach for reducing college student drinking and

  20. Hybrid PD and effective multi-mode positive position feedback control for slewing and vibration suppression of a smart flexible manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, Jun-qiang; Wei, Yan-ding; Yang, Yi-ling; Xie, Feng-ran

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid control strategy for slewing and vibration suppression of a smart flexible manipulator is presented in this paper. It consists of a proportional derivative controller to realize motion control, and an effective multi-mode positive position feedback (EMPPF) controller to suppress the multi-mode vibration. Rather than treat each mode equally as the standard multi-mode PPF, the essence of the EMPPF is that control forces of different modes are applied according to the mode parameters of the respective modes, so the vibration modes with less vibration energy receive fewer control forces. Stability conditions for the close loop system are established through stability analysis. Optimal parameters of the EMPPF controller are obtained using the method of root locus analysis. The performance of the proposed strategy is demonstrated by simulation and experiments. Experimental results show that the first two vibration modes of the manipulator are effectively suppressed. The setting time of the setup descends approximately 55%, reaching 3.12 s from 5.67 s. (paper)

  1. Hybrid PD and effective multi-mode positive position feedback control for slewing and vibration suppression of a smart flexible manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jun-qiang; Wei, Yan-ding; Yang, Yi-ling; Xie, Feng-ran

    2015-03-01

    A hybrid control strategy for slewing and vibration suppression of a smart flexible manipulator is presented in this paper. It consists of a proportional derivative controller to realize motion control, and an effective multi-mode positive position feedback (EMPPF) controller to suppress the multi-mode vibration. Rather than treat each mode equally as the standard multi-mode PPF, the essence of the EMPPF is that control forces of different modes are applied according to the mode parameters of the respective modes, so the vibration modes with less vibration energy receive fewer control forces. Stability conditions for the close loop system are established through stability analysis. Optimal parameters of the EMPPF controller are obtained using the method of root locus analysis. The performance of the proposed strategy is demonstrated by simulation and experiments. Experimental results show that the first two vibration modes of the manipulator are effectively suppressed. The setting time of the setup descends approximately 55%, reaching 3.12 s from 5.67 s.

  2. Immediate elaborated feedback personalization in online assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasilyeva, E.; De Bra, P.M.E.; Pechenizkiy, M.; Dillenbourg, P.; Specht, M.

    2008-01-01

    Providing a student with feedback that is timely, most suitable and useful for her personality and the performed task is a challenging problem of online assessment within Web-based Learning Systems (WBLSs). In our recent work we suggested a general approach of feedback adaptation in WBLS and through

  3. Increasing generic engineering competences using coaching and personal feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Marker-Villumsen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    problem solving methodology. In order to create an environment for the students to practice their generic engineering competences they are throughout the course provided personal feedback by the teacher using a four step feedback model. The course was evaluated using the Course Evaluation Questionnaire...... objective, teaching activities and the assessment are presented and it is demonstrated how coaching and personal feedback – often used in the industry – is used to improve the generic engineering competences of the students in alignment with CDIO. The course is conducted as if it was a project in a company...

  4. Stress, positive psychology and the National Student Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbons, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to explore the predictive ability of sources of stress and a range of dispositional and coping behaviours on student satisfaction and motivation. Most research exploring sources of stress and coping in students construes stress as psychological distress, with little attempt to consider positive experiences of stress. A questionnaire was administered to 120 first-year UK psychology students. Questions were asked which measured sources of stress when rated as likely to contribute to...

  5. The quality of feedback during formative OSCEs depends on the tutors’ profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelle Junod Perron

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During their pre-clinical years, medical students are given the opportunity to practice clinical skills with simulated patients. During these formative objective structured clinical encounters (OSCEs, tutors from various backgrounds give feedback on students’ history taking, physical exam, and communication skills. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether the content and process of feedback varied according to the tutors’ profile. Methods During 2013, all 2nd and 3rd year medical students and tutors involved in three formative OSCEs were asked to fill in questionnaires, and their feedback sessions were audiotaped. Tutors were divided into two groups: 1 generalists: primary care, general internist and educationalist physicians 2 specialists involved in the OSCE related to their field of expertise. Outcome measures included the students’ perceptions of feedback quality and utility and objective assessment of feedback quality. Results Participants included 251 medical students and 38 tutors (22 generalists and 16 specialists. Students self-reported that feedback was useful to improve history taking, physical exam and communication skills. Objective assessment showed that feedback content essentially focused on history taking and physical exam skills, and that elaboration on clinical reasoning or communication/professionalism issues was uncommon. Multivariate analyses showed that generalist tutors used more learner-centered feedback skills than specialist tutors (stimulating student’s self-assessment (p < .001; making the student active in finding solutions, p < .001; checking student’s understanding, p < .001 and elaborated more on communication and professionalism issues (p < 0.001. Specialists reported less training in how to provide feedback than generalists. Conclusion These findings suggest that generalist tutors are more learner-centered and pay more attention to communication and

  6. Peer teaching experience of the first year medical students from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansever, Zeliha; Avsar, Zeynep; Cayir, Yasemin; Acemoglu, Hamit

    2015-02-01

    To document peer teaching activity performed by first-year medical students and their views on the teaching activity. Survey. Medical Education Department, Ataturk University, Erzurum, Turkey, in the 2012 - 2013 academic year. Volunteer students were selected for peer teaching model by an academician from the Medical Education Department. Students were taught subjects selected from classes such as biochemistry and microbiology in the same way as the academicians do. Following each class activity, the teaching student was assessed by the other students on a 5-point rating scale. Written and verbal feedback was also obtained from both teaching students and participated students. Verbal feedbacks were noted by a faculty member and similar opinions were categorized. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 20 statistical program. Eleven students took part in the program. Feedback was received from students 171 times. The mean number of students participated was 24.4 ± 14.3 in each program. Statistical analysis revealed that mean value for teaching materials, peer instructors and teaching environment were 4.62 ± 0.49, 4.63 ± 0.47 and 3.88 ± 1. 27 respectively. Peer teaching method is a pretty good way of teaching for medical students. It is a practicable technique that can be used in medical training. Taking part in this program as a lecturer, student increased students' self-confidence in the learning and teaching activities. Quite positive feedbacks were received.

  7. Computer-based formative assessment: variables influencing feedback behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, C.F.

    2013-01-01

    Assessment can be used to stimulate and direct student learning. This refers to the formative function of assessment. Formative assessments contribute to learning by generating feedback. Here, feedback is conceptualised as information about learners actual state of performance intended to modify

  8. False feedback and beliefs influence name recall in younger and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland-Hughes, Carla M; West, Robin Lea; Smith, Kimberly A; Ebner, Natalie C

    2017-09-01

    Feedback is an important self-regulatory process that affects task effort and subsequent performance. Benefits of positive feedback for list recall have been explored in research on goals and feedback, but the effect of negative feedback on memory has rarely been studied. The current research extends knowledge of memory and feedback effects by investigating face-name association memory and by examining the potential mediation of feedback effects, in younger and older adults, through self-evaluative beliefs. Beliefs were assessed before and after name recognition and name recall testing. Repeated presentation of false positive feedback was compared to false negative feedback and a no feedback condition. Results showed that memory self-efficacy declined over time for participants in the negative and no feedback conditions but was sustained for those receiving positive feedback. Furthermore, participants who received negative feedback felt older after testing than before testing. For name recall, the positive feedback group outperformed the negative feedback and no feedback groups combined, with no age interactions. The observed feedback-related effects on memory were fully mediated by changes in memory self-efficacy. These findings advance our understanding of how beliefs are related to feedback in memory and inform future studies examining the importance of self-regulation in memory.

  9. Improving the Effectiveness of Feedback by Use of Assessed Reflections and Withholding of Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Maria; Marks, Leah

    2016-01-01

    We wished to improve levels of student engagement with feedback within the context of our postgraduate masters-level programme, and therefore evaluated the use of two interventions: assessed reflections on feedback and grade-withholding. In questionnaires students reported more engagement with feedback after the interventions, with 77% in favour…

  10. Self-regulated learning: A key learning effect of feedback in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Problem-based learning (PBL) has been adopted across many health professions training institutions. Small-group student tutorials are a major component of PBL. Facilitator feedback during a tutorial is a key activity to promote self-regulated learning. Objective. To explore ways in which students use feedback ...

  11. A Web-Based Telehealth Training Platform Incorporating Automated Nonverbal Behavior Feedback for Teaching Communication Skills to Medical Students: A Randomized Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunfeng; Lim, Renee L; McCabe, Kathryn L; Taylor, Silas; Calvo, Rafael A

    2016-09-12

    In the interests of patient health outcomes, it is important for medical students to develop clinical communication skills. We previously proposed a telehealth communication skills training platform (EQClinic) with automated nonverbal behavior feedback for medical students, and it was able to improve medical students' awareness of their nonverbal communication. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of EQClinic to improve clinical communication skills of medical students. We conducted a 2-group randomized crossover trial between February and June 2016. Participants were second-year medical students enrolled in a clinical communication skills course at an Australian university. Students were randomly allocated to complete online EQClinic training during weeks 1-5 (group A) or to complete EQClinic training during weeks 8-11 (group B). EQClinic delivered an automated visual presentation of students' nonverbal behavior coupled with human feedback from a standardized patient (SP). All students were offered two opportunities to complete face-to-face consultations with SPs. The two face-to-face consultations were conducted in weeks 6-7 and 12-13 for both groups, and were rated by tutors who were blinded to group allocation. Student-Patient Observed Communication Assessment (SOCA) was collected by blinded assessors (n=28) at 2 time points and also by an SP (n=83). Tutor-rated clinical communications skill in face-to-face consultations was the primary outcome and was assessed with the SOCA. We used t tests to examine the students' performance during face-to-face consultations pre- and postexposure to EQClinic. We randomly allocated 268 medical students to the 2 groups (group A: n=133; group B: n=135). SOCA communication skills measures (score range 4-16) from the first face-to-face consultation were significantly higher for students in group A who had completed EQClinic training and reviewed the nonverbal behavior feedback, compared with group B, who had completed

  12. Feedback Seeking in Early Adolescence: Self-Enhancement or Self-Verification?

    OpenAIRE

    Rosen, Lisa H.; Principe, Connor P.; Langlois, Judith H.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined whether early adolescents (N = 90) solicit self-enhancing feedback (i.e., positive feedback) or self-verifying feedback (i.e., feedback congruent with self-views, even when these views are negative). Sixth, seventh, and eighth graders first completed a self-perception measure and then selected whether to receive positive or negative feedback from an unknown peer in different domains of self. Results were consistent with self-verification theory; adolescents who perceived ...

  13. Regional feedbacks under changing climate and land-use conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batlle Bayer, L.; van den Hurk, B. J. J. M.; Strengers, B. J.; van Minnen, J. G.

    2012-04-01

    Ecosystem responses to a changing climate and human-induced climate forcings (e.g. deforestation) might amplify (positive feedback) or dampen (negative feedback) the initial climate response. Feedbacks may include the biogeochemical (e.g. carbon cycle) and biogeophysical feedbacks (e.g. albedo and hydrological cycle). Here, we first review the most important feedbacks and put them into the context of a conceptual framework, including the major processes and interactions between terrestrial ecosystems and climate. We explore potential regional feedbacks in four hot spots with pronounced potential changes in land-use/management and local climate: sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), Europe, the Amazon Basin and South and Southeast Asia. For each region, the relevant human-induced climate forcings and feedbacks were identified based on published literature. When evapotranspiration is limited by a soil water deficit, heat waves in Europe are amplified (positive soil moisture-temperature feedback). Drought events in the Amazon lead to further rainfall reduction when water recycling processes are affected (positive soil moisture-precipitation feedback). In SSA, the adoption of irrigation in the commonly rainfed systems can modulate the negative soil moisture-temperature feedback. In contrast, future water shortage in South and Southeast Asia can turn the negative soil moisture-temperature feedback into a positive one. Further research including advanced modeling strategies is needed to isolate the dominant processes affecting the strength and sign of the feedbacks. In addition, the socio-economic dimension needs to be considered in the ecosystems-climate system to include the essential role of human decisions on land-use and land-cover change (LULCC). In this context, enhanced integration between Earth System (ES) and Integrated Assessment (IA) modeling communities is strongly recommended.

  14. Feasibility and outcomes of paid undergraduate student nurse positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamroth, Lucia; Budgen, Claire; Lougheed, Mary

    2006-09-01

    An Undergraduate Nurse Employment Demonstration Project (UNDP) was implemented in four Health Service Areas in British Columbia with a concurrent evaluation study. This demonstration project comprised the development and implementation of a new position in the BC healthcare system. The position enabled third- and fourth-year nursing students to be employed at their level of education. The purposes of the evaluation were to explore the feasibility and outcomes of this type of paid undergraduate student nurse employment. The three-year project and evaluation included both implementation and outcome analysis. The implementation evaluation design was descriptive and prospective, involving multiple data sources. The outcome evaluation design was quasi-experimental, with intervention and comparison groups. Learning outcomes for undergraduate nurses were increased confidence, organizational ability, competency and ability to work with a team. Workplace outcomes were increased unit morale, help with workload and improved patient care. New graduates with undergraduate nurse experience reported less time required for orientation and transition than other graduates who did not have this experience, and workplace nurses viewed these new graduates as more job-ready than other new graduates. After 21 months, new graduates with undergraduate nurse experience were less likely to move to other employment than other new graduates. Results from the four Health Service Areas indicated that the paid undergraduate nurse position was feasible and that outcomes benefited students, new graduates and workplaces. The undergraduate nurse position is now being implemented throughout all Health Service Areas in British Columbia.By 2000, concerns in British Columbia about the nursing workforce, workplace and patient safety had escalated to the point where diverse stakeholder groups were prepared to work together in new ways to prepare nursing graduates to be more job-ready, to recruit and retain

  15. Peer feedback on college students’ writing : exploring the relation between students’ ability match, feedback quality and essay performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, B.A.; Saab, N.; Van, Driel J.H.; Van, den Broek P.W.

    2017-01-01

    There does not appear to be consensus on how to optimally match students during the peer feedback process: with same-ability peers (homogeneously) or different-ability peers (heterogeneously). In fact, there appears to be no empirical evidence that either homogeneous or heterogeneous student

  16. Instructor feedback versus no instructor feedback on performance in a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator: a randomized educational trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestergaard, Jeanett; Bjerrum, Flemming; Maagaard, Mathilde; Winkel, Per; Larsen, Christian Rifbjerg; Ringsted, Charlotte; Gluud, Christian; Grantcharov, Teodor; Ottesen, Bent; Soerensen, Jette Led

    2012-02-28

    Several studies have found a positive effect on the learning curve as well as the improvement of basic psychomotor skills in the operating room after virtual reality training. Despite this, the majority of surgical and gynecological departments encounter hurdles when implementing this form of training. This is mainly due to lack of knowledge concerning the time and human resources needed to train novice surgeons to an adequate level. The purpose of this trial is to investigate the impact of instructor feedback regarding time, repetitions and self-perception when training complex operational tasks on a virtual reality simulator. The study population consists of medical students on their 4th to 6th year without prior laparoscopic experience. The study is conducted in a skills laboratory at a centralized university hospital. Based on a sample size estimation 98 participants will be randomized to an intervention group or a control group. Both groups have to achieve a predefined proficiency level when conducting a laparoscopic salpingectomy using a surgical virtual reality simulator. The intervention group receives standardized instructor feedback of 10 to 12 min a maximum of three times. The control group receives no instructor feedback. Both groups receive the automated feedback generated by the virtual reality simulator. The study follows the CONSORT Statement for randomized trials. Main outcome measures are time and repetitions to reach the predefined proficiency level on the simulator. We include focus on potential sex differences, computer gaming experience and self-perception. The findings will contribute to a better understanding of optimal training methods in surgical education. NCT01497782.

  17. A Case for Direct and Indirect Feedback: The Other Side of Coin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemnezhad, Hossein; Mohammadnejad, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    The use of WCF is a striking necessity in learning of English as a foreign language. If teachers and students can manipulate well the use of written feedback, both parties will benefit. This research looked at the types of feedback given to EFL students during a 16-week study. For the purpose of the current survey eighty students enrolled freely…

  18. Effects of Feedback on Collaborative Writing in an Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasch, Teresa; Espasa, Anna; Alvarez, Ibis M.; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    The need for supporting student writing has received much attention in writing research. One specific type of support is feedback--including peer feedback--on the writing process. Despite the wealth of literature on both feedback and academic writing, there is little empirical evidence on what type of feedback best promotes writing in online…

  19. Students who developed logical reasoning skills reported improved confidence in drug dose calculation: Feedback from remedial maths classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Chris

    2016-06-01

    The safe administration of drugs is a focus of attention in healthcare. It is regarded as acceptable that a formula card or mnemonic can be used to find the correct dose and fill a prescription even though this removes any requirement for performing the underlying computation. Feedback and discussion in class reveal that confidence in arithmetic skills can be low even when students are able to pass the end of semester drug calculation exam. To see if confidence in the understanding and performance of arithmetic for drug calculations can be increased by emphasising student's innate powers of logical reasoning after reflection. Remedial classes offered for students who have declared a dislike or lack of confidence in arithmetic have been developed from student feedback adopting a reasoning by logical step methodology. Students who gave up two hours of their free learning time were observed to engage seriously with the learning methods, focussing on the innate ability to perform logical reasoning necessary for drug calculation problems. Working in small groups allowed some discussion of the route to the answer and this was followed by class discussion and reflection. The results were recorded as weekly self-assessment scores for confidence in calculation. A self-selecting group who successfully completed the end of semester drug calculation exam reported low to moderate confidence in arithmetic. After four weeks focussing on logical skills a significant increase in self-belief was measured. This continued to rise in students who remained in the classes. Many students hold a negative belief regarding their own mathematical abilities. This restricts the learning of arithmetic skills making alternate routes using mnemonics and memorised steps an attractive alternative. Practising stepwise logical reasoning skills consolidated by personal reflection has been effective in developing student's confidence and awareness of their innate powers of deduction supporting an

  20. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R.

    1995-01-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies