WorldWideScience

Sample records for positive pressure coefficients

  1. Pressure-induced positive electrical resistivity coefficient in Ni-Nb-Zr-H glassy alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, M.; Gangli, C.; Matsubayashi, K.; Uwatoko, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Measurements under hydrostatic pressure of the electrical resistivity of (Ni0.36Nb0.24Zr0.40)100-xHx (x = 9.8, 11.5, and 14) glassy alloys have been made in the range of 0-8 GPa and 0.5-300 K. The resistivity of the (Ni0.36Nb0.24Zr0.40)86H14 alloy changed its sign from negative to positive under application of 2-8 GPa in the temperature range of 300-22 K, coming from electron-phonon interaction in the cluster structure under pressure, accompanied by deformation of the clusters. In temperature region below 22 K, the resistivity showed negative thermal coefficient resistance by Debye-Waller factor contribution, and superconductivity was observed at 1.5 K.

  2. Probability based calibration of pressure coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Svend Ole; Pedersen, Marie Louise; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2015-01-01

    Normally, a consistent basis for calculating partial factors focuses on a homogeneous reliability index neither depending on which material the structure is constructed of nor the ratio between the permanent and variable actions acting on the structure. Furthermore, the reliability index should n...... the characteristic shape coefficients are based on mean values as specified in background documents to the Eurocodes. Importance of hidden safeties judging the reliability is discussed for wind actions on low-rise structures....... not depend on the type of variable action. A probability based calibration of pressure coefficients have been carried out using pressure measurements on the standard CAARC building modelled on scale of 1:383. The extreme pressures measured on the CAARC building model in the wind tunnel have been fitted.......3, the Eurocode partial factor of 1.5 for variable actions agrees well with the inherent uncertainties of wind actions when the pressure coefficients are determined using wind tunnel test results. The increased bias and uncertainty when pressure coefficients mainly are based on structural codes lead to a larger...

  3. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENT Doctor Near You Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Patient Health Information ... relations staff at newsroom@entnet.org . What Is CPAP? The most common and effective nonsurgical treatment for ...

  4. Positive airway pressure treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it. After using PAP regularly, you may notice: Better concentration and memory Feeling more alert and less sleepy during the day Improved sleep for your bed partner Being more productive at ... and a better mood Normal sleep patterns Lower blood pressure (in ...

  5. Minimum wall pressure coefficient of orifice plate energy dissipater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-zheng Ai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orifice plate energy dissipaters have been successfully used in large-scale hydropower projects due to their simple structure, convenient construction procedure, and high energy dissipation ratio. The minimum wall pressure coefficient of an orifice plate can indirectly reflect its cavitation characteristics: the lower the minimum wall pressure coefficient is, the better the ability of the orifice plate to resist cavitation damage is. Thus, it is important to study the minimum wall pressure coefficient of the orifice plate. In this study, this coefficient and related parameters, such as the contraction ratio, defined as the ratio of the orifice plate diameter to the flood-discharging tunnel diameter; the relative thickness, defined as the ratio of the orifice plate thickness to the tunnel diameter; and the Reynolds number of the flow through the orifice plate, were theoretically analyzed, and their relationships were obtained through physical model experiments. It can be concluded that the minimum wall pressure coefficient is mainly dominated by the contraction ratio and relative thickness. The lower the contraction ratio and relative thickness are, the larger the minimum wall pressure coefficient is. The effects of the Reynolds number on the minimum wall pressure coefficient can be neglected when it is larger than 105. An empirical expression was presented to calculate the minimum wall pressure coefficient in this study.

  6. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of laboratory standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1996-01-01

    of the microphone. The static pressure and temperature coefficients were determined experimentally for about twenty samples of type BK 4160 and BK 4180 microphones. The results agree almost perfectly with the predictions for BK 4160, while some modifications of the lumped parameter values are called for to make......-order approximation of resonances in the back cavity. It was found that each of the coefficients, for a given type of microphone, can be expressed by a single function when the coefficients are normalized by their low-frequency value and the frequency axis normalized by the individual resonance frequency...

  7. The Yaws handbook of vapor pressure Antoine coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Yaws, Carl L

    2015-01-01

    Increased to include over 25,000 organic and inorganic compounds, The Yaws Handbook of Vapor Pressure: Antoine Coefficients, 2nd Edition delivers the most comprehensive and practical database source for today's petrochemical. Understanding antoine coefficients for vapor pressure leads to numerous critical engineering applications such as pure components in storage vessels, pressure relief valve design, flammability limits at the refinery, as well as environmental emissions from exposed liquids, making data to efficiently calculate these daily challenges a fundamental need. Written by the world's leading authority on chemical and petrochemical data, The Yaws Handbook of Vapor Pressure simplifies the guesswork for the engineer and reinforces the credibility of the engineer's calculations with a single trust-worthy source. This data book is a must-have for the engineer's library bookshelf. Increase compound coverage from 8,200 to over 25,000 organic and inorganic compounds, including sulfur and hydrocarbons Sol...

  8. Pressure drop coefficient of laminar Newtonian flow in axisymmetric diffusers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, S.; Pinho, F.T.

    2006-01-01

    The laminar flow of Newtonian fluids in axisymmetric diffusers has been numerically investigated to evaluate the pressure-loss coefficient as a function of Reynolds number, diffusion angle and expansion ratio. The numerical simulations were carried out with a finite-volume based code using non-orthogonal collocated grids and second order accurate differencing schemes to discretize all terms of the transport equations. The calculations were carried out for Reynolds numbers between 2 and 200, diffusion angles from 0 deg. to 90 deg. and expansion ratios of 1.5 and 2 and the data are presented in tabular form and as correlations. A simplified 1D theoretical analysis helped explain the various contributions to the loss coefficient and its difference relative to the reversible pressure variation due to differences between the actual and fully developed friction losses, distortions of the velocity profiles and pressure non-uniformity upstream and downstream of the expansion section

  9. Pressure drop coefficient of laminar Newtonian flow in axisymmetric diffusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, S. [Escola Superior de Tecnologia e Gestao, Instituto Politecnico, Campus de Santa Apolonia, 5301-857 Braganca (Portugal)]. E-mail: srosa@ipb.pt; Pinho, F.T. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, DEM, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Azurem, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal)]. E-mail: fpinho@fe.up.pt

    2006-04-15

    The laminar flow of Newtonian fluids in axisymmetric diffusers has been numerically investigated to evaluate the pressure-loss coefficient as a function of Reynolds number, diffusion angle and expansion ratio. The numerical simulations were carried out with a finite-volume based code using non-orthogonal collocated grids and second order accurate differencing schemes to discretize all terms of the transport equations. The calculations were carried out for Reynolds numbers between 2 and 200, diffusion angles from 0 deg. to 90 deg. and expansion ratios of 1.5 and 2 and the data are presented in tabular form and as correlations. A simplified 1D theoretical analysis helped explain the various contributions to the loss coefficient and its difference relative to the reversible pressure variation due to differences between the actual and fully developed friction losses, distortions of the velocity profiles and pressure non-uniformity upstream and downstream of the expansion section.

  10. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Lamwers, Stephanie; Tepel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is linked to increased cardiovascular risk. This risk can be reduced by nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) treatment. As OSA is associated with an increase of several vasoconstrictive factors, we investigated whether nCPAP influences the digital volume...... pulse wave. We performed digital photoplethysmography during sleep at night in 94 consecutive patients who underwent polysomnography and 29 patients treated with nCPAP. Digital volume pulse waves were obtained independently of an investigator and were quantified using an algorithm for continuous.......01; n = 94) and the arousal index (Spearman correlation, r = 0.21; p CPAP treatment, the AHI was significantly reduced from 27 ± 3 events · h(-1) to 4 ± 2 events · h(-1) (each n = 29; p

  11. The coefficient of restitution of pressurized balls: a mechanistic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgallas, Alex; Landry, Gaëtan

    2016-01-01

    Pressurized, inflated balls used in professional sports are regulated so that their behaviour upon impact can be anticipated and allow the game to have its distinctive character. However, the dynamics governing the impacts of such balls, even on stationary hard surfaces, can be extremely complex. The energy transformations, which arise from the compression of the gas within the ball and from the shear forces associated with the deformation of the wall, are examined in this paper. We develop a simple mechanistic model of the dependence of the coefficient of restitution, e, upon both the gauge pressure, P_G, of the gas and the shear modulus, G, of the wall. The model is validated using the results from a simple series of experiments using three different sports balls. The fits to the data are extremely good for P_G > 25 kPa and consistent values are obtained for the value of G for the wall material. As far as the authors can tell, this simple, mechanistic model of the pressure dependence of the coefficient of restitution is the first in the literature. *%K Coefficient of Restitution, Dynamics, Inflated Balls, Pressure, Impact Model

  12. Pressure coefficient evolutions on the blades of a Savonius rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvin, A.; Guignard, S. [UMRR 7343, Marseilles (France). Lab. IUSTI; Kamoun, B. [Faculte des Sciences de Sfax (Tunisia). Lab. de Physique

    2012-07-01

    Measurements of the pressure field distribution on the blades of a vertical axis Savonius wind machine are presented. The rotor used in the wind tunnel is a two blades cylindrical shape with a central gap. Pressure gauges are placed on each side of a blade, so the pressure jumps between intrados and extrados of a blade during a whole rotation are drawn. In the static configuration, the machine is disposed at various incidences. The determination of pressure jumps allows to calculate the static torque of the machine versus the incidence angle. In the dynamic situation the machine is rotating at various frequencies and gauges signals are varying dynamically of course with the incidence. The dynamic torque coefficient is calculated. Evolutions of the starting torque and starting conditions are then described and dynamic effects on torque evolution are presented. (orig.)

  13. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, R; Wung, J T

    1998-01-01

    Progress in neonatal intensive care is closely linked to improvements in the management of respiratory failure in small infants. This applies to the care of the preterm infants with immature lungs, and also to treatment of the preterm or full term infants with specific diseases that are associated with respiratory failure. Respiratory distress of the newborn continues to account for significant morbidity in the intensive care unit. The spectrum of disease ranges from mild distress to severe respiratory failure requiring varying degrees of support. The current modalities of ventilatory assistance range from the more benign continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to conventional mechanical ventilation, and on to high frequency ventilation. It is a reasonable supposition that the type of ventilatory assistance provided to these infants should be graded according to the severity of the disease. However, the principal objective in selecting the mode of respiratory support should be to use a modality which results in minimal volo- or barotrauma to the infant. The following detailed description on CPAP explains its physiological effects, delivery system, indications for use, application, maintenance, and associated complications. The equipment described is simple to use, has a greater cost benefit, and has a more universal application, which is of help to smaller units including those in the developing parts of the world. We have also included our institutional clinical experience of CPAP usage in very low birth weight infants from the periods before and after commercial availability of surfactant in the United States.

  14. Automatic estimation of pressure-dependent rate coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Joshua W; Goldsmith, C Franklin; Green, William H

    2012-01-21

    A general framework is presented for accurately and efficiently estimating the phenomenological pressure-dependent rate coefficients for reaction networks of arbitrary size and complexity using only high-pressure-limit information. Two aspects of this framework are discussed in detail. First, two methods of estimating the density of states of the species in the network are presented, including a new method based on characteristic functional group frequencies. Second, three methods of simplifying the full master equation model of the network to a single set of phenomenological rates are discussed, including a new method based on the reservoir state and pseudo-steady state approximations. Both sets of methods are evaluated in the context of the chemically-activated reaction of acetyl with oxygen. All three simplifications of the master equation are usually accurate, but each fails in certain situations, which are discussed. The new methods usually provide good accuracy at a computational cost appropriate for automated reaction mechanism generation.

  15. Improvised bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvised bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP) device at the National Hospital Abuja gives immediate improvement in respiratory rate and oxygenation in neonates with respiratory distress.

  16. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep Apnea? Lifestyle change including weight loss and exercise can help to improve sleep apnea and its related health problems. Sleep positioning and oral appliances have also been found to be effective. In cases when non-invasive treatments fail, a ...

  17. Automatic estimation of pressure-dependent rate coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Joshua W.; Goldsmith, C. Franklin; Green, William H.

    2012-01-01

    A general framework is presented for accurately and efficiently estimating the phenomenological pressure-dependent rate coefficients for reaction networks of arbitrary size and complexity using only high-pressure-limit information. Two aspects of this framework are discussed in detail. First, two methods of estimating the density of states of the species in the network are presented, including a new method based on characteristic functional group frequencies. Second, three methods of simplifying the full master equation model of the network to a single set of phenomenological rates are discussed, including a new method based on the reservoir state and pseudo-steady state approximations. Both sets of methods are evaluated in the context of the chemically-activated reaction of acetyl with oxygen. All three simplifications of the master equation are usually accurate, but each fails in certain situations, which are discussed. The new methods usually provide good accuracy at a computational cost appropriate for automated reaction mechanism generation. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  18. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of working standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Torras Rosell, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    be a significant contribution to the uncertainty of the measurement. Determining the environmental coefficients of individual specimens of measurement microphones can be a straightforward though time-consuming procedure provided the appropriate facilities are available. An alternative is to determine them using...... coefficients. For this purpose, the environmental coefficients of some commercially available microphones have been determined experimentally, and whenever possible, compared with the coefficients determined numerically using the Boundary Element Method....... for these coefficients which are used for calibration purposes. Working standard microphones are not exempt of these influences. However, manufacturers usually provide a low frequency value of the environmental coefficient. While in some applications the influence of this coefficient may be negligible, in others it may...

  19. The static pressure and temperature coefficients of laboratory standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1999-01-01

    , for a given type of microphone, can be described by a single function when the coefficients are normalized by their low-frequency value and the frequency is normalized with respect to the individual resonance frequency of the microphone. The theoretical results are supported by experimentally determined...... on an extended lumped parameter representation of the mechanical and acoustic elements of the microphone. The extension involves the frequency dependency of the dynamic diaphragm mass and stiffness as well as a first-order approximation of resonances in the back cavity. It was found that each coefficient...... coefficients for about twenty samples of microphone types B&K 4160 and B&K 4180....

  20. Improvised bubble continuous positive airway pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2014-08-15

    Aug 15, 2014 ... Abstract: Background: Prematur- ity accounts for 25% of Neonatal mortality in Nigeria and Respira- tory Distress Syndrome is respon- sible for half of these deaths. Introducing continuous positive airway pressure for the treatment of RDS in Nigeria where health care financing is predominantly out-of-pocket ...

  1. Line positions, intensities and self-broadening coefficients for the ν5 band of methyl chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbouchi Ramchani, A.; Jacquemart, D.; Dhib, M.; Aroui, H.

    2013-01-01

    High resolution Fourier transform spectra have been recorded around 6.9 μm at room temperature using a rapid scan Bruker IFS 120 HR interferometer (unapodized Bruker resolution=0.005 cm −1 ). Transitions of both 12 CH 3 35 Cl and 12 CH 3 37 Cl isotopologues belonging to the ν 5 perpendicular band have been studied. Line positions, intensities, and self-broadening coefficients have been retrieved using a multispectrum fitting procedure that allowed to fit simultaneously the whole set of experimental spectra recorded at various pressures of CH 3 Cl. The wavenumber calibration has been performed using the frequencies of CO 2 transitions. The transition dipole moments squared have been determined for each measured line and the whole set of measurements has been compared with previous measurements and with values from HITRAN and GEISA databases. The rotational J and K dependencies of the self-broadening coefficients have been clearly observed and modeled using empirical polynomial expansions. The average accuracy of the line parameters obtained in this work has been estimated to be between 0.1×10 −3 and 1×10 −3 cm −1 for line positions, between 2% and 5% for line intensities and between 5% and 10% for self-broadening coefficients depending on the transitions. -- Highlights: ► Fourier-transform spectra of the ν 5 band of CH 3 Cl at room temperature. ► Measurements of line positions, intensities and self-broadening coefficients. ► Analysis of the J- and K-rotational dependences of self-widths. ► Comparisons with literature

  2. The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the anomalous sign reversal of the Hall coefficient in tellurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balynas, V.; Dobrovolskis, Z.; Krotkus, A.; Hoerstel, W.

    1981-01-01

    In order to obtain information about the pressure behaviour of the higher lying second conduction band the dependences of the Hall coefficient of single crystalline tellurium on temperature (300 to 500 K) have been measured at atmospheric pressure and hydrostatic pressures of 500 and 800 MPa. The separation between the two conduction bands in Te decreases with increasing pressure. The anomalous sign reversal of the Hall coefficient can be well explained by a double-conduction band model

  3. Atmospheric pressure loading effects on Global Positioning System coordinate determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandam, Tonie M.; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Heflin, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Earth deformation signals caused by atmospheric pressure loading are detected in vertical position estimates at Global Positioning System (GPS) stations. Surface displacements due to changes in atmospheric pressure account for up to 24% of the total variance in the GPS height estimates. The detected loading signals are larger at higher latitudes where pressure variations are greatest; the largest effect is observed at Fairbanks, Alaska (latitude 65 deg), with a signal root mean square (RMS) of 5 mm. Out of 19 continuously operating GPS sites (with a mean of 281 daily solutions per site), 18 show a positive correlation between the GPS vertical estimates and the modeled loading displacements. Accounting for loading reduces the variance of the vertical station positions on 12 of the 19 sites investigated. Removing the modeled pressure loading from GPS determinations of baseline length for baselines longer than 6000 km reduces the variance on 73 of the 117 baselines investigated. The slight increase in variance for some of the sites and baselines is consistent with expected statistical fluctuations. The results from most stations are consistent with approximately 65% of the modeled pressure load being found in the GPS vertical position measurements. Removing an annual signal from both the measured heights and the modeled load time series leaves this value unchanged. The source of the remaining discrepancy between the modeled and observed loading signal may be the result of (1) anisotropic effects in the Earth's loading response, (2) errors in GPS estimates of tropospheric delay, (3) errors in the surface pressure data, or (4) annual signals in the time series of loading and station heights. In addition, we find that using site dependent coefficients, determined by fitting local pressure to the modeled radial displacements, reduces the variance of the measured station heights as well as or better than using the global convolution sum.

  4. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy: new generations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Garvey, John F

    2010-02-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the treatment of choice for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). However, CPAP is not tolerated by all patients with OSAS and alternative modes of pressure delivery have been developed to overcome pressure intolerance, thereby improving patient comfort and adherence. Auto-adjustable positive airway pressure (APAP) devices may be utilised for the long-term management of OSAS and may also assist in the initial diagnosis of OSAS and titration of conventional CPAP therapy. Newer modalities such as C-Flex and A-Flex also show promise as treatment options in the future. However, the evidence supporting the use of these alternative modalities remains scant, in particular with regard to long-term cardiovascular outcomes. In addition, not all APAP devices use the same technological algorithms and data supporting individual APAP devices cannot be extrapolated to support all. Further studies are required to validate the roles of APAP, C-Flex and A-Flex. In the interim, standard CPAP therapy should continue as the mainstay of OSAS management.

  5. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy: new generations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Garvey, John F

    2012-02-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the treatment of choice for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). However, CPAP is not tolerated by all patients with OSAS and alternative modes of pressure delivery have been developed to overcome pressure intolerance, thereby improving patient comfort and adherence. Auto-adjustable positive airway pressure (APAP) devices may be utilised for the long-term management of OSAS and may also assist in the initial diagnosis of OSAS and titration of conventional CPAP therapy. Newer modalities such as C-Flex and A-Flex also show promise as treatment options in the future. However, the evidence supporting the use of these alternative modalities remains scant, in particular with regard to long-term cardiovascular outcomes. In addition, not all APAP devices use the same technological algorithms and data supporting individual APAP devices cannot be extrapolated to support all. Further studies are required to validate the roles of APAP, C-Flex and A-Flex. In the interim, standard CPAP therapy should continue as the mainstay of OSAS management.

  6. Research of fuel temperature control in fuel pipeline of diesel engine using positive temperature coefficient material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As fuel temperature increases, both its viscosity and surface tension decrease, and this is helpful to improve fuel atomization and then better combustion and emission performances of engine. Based on the self-regulated temperature property of positive temperature coefficient material, this article used a positive temperature coefficient material as electric heating element to heat diesel fuel in fuel pipeline of diesel engine. A kind of BaTiO3-based positive temperature coefficient material, with the Curie temperature of 230°C and rated voltage of 24 V, was developed, and its micrograph and element compositions were also analyzed. By the fuel pipeline wrapped in six positive temperature coefficient ceramics, its resistivity–temperature and heating characteristics were tested on a fuel pump bench. The experiments showed that in this installation, the surface temperature of six positive temperature coefficient ceramics rose to the equilibrium temperature only for 100 s at rated voltage. In rated power supply for six positive temperature coefficient ceramics, the temperature of injection fuel improved for 21°C–27°C within 100 s, and then could keep constant. Using positive temperature coefficient material to heat diesel in fuel pipeline of diesel engine, the injection mass per cycle had little change, approximately 0.3%/°C. This study provides a beneficial reference for improving atomization of high-viscosity liquids by employing positive temperature coefficient material without any control methods.

  7. Variable pattern contamination control under positive pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippi, H.M.

    1997-01-01

    Airborne contamination control in nuclear and biological laboratories is traditionally achieved by directing the space ventilation air at subatmospheric pressures in one fixed flow pattern. However, biological and nuclear contamination flow control in the new Biological Research Facility, to be commissioned at the Chalk River Laboratories in 1996, will have the flexibility to institute a number of contamination control patterns, all achieved at positive (above atmospheric) pressures. This flexibility feature, made possible by means of a digitally controlled ventilation system, changes the facility ventilation system from being a relatively rigid building service operated by plant personnel into a flexible building service which can be operated by the facility research personnel. This paper focuses on and describes the application of these unique contamination control features in the design of the new Biological Research Facility. 3 refs., 7 figs

  8. Variable pattern contamination control under positive pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippi, H.M. [Chalk River Labs., Ontario (Canada)

    1997-08-01

    Airborne contamination control in nuclear and biological laboratories is traditionally achieved by directing the space ventilation air at subatmospheric pressures in one fixed flow pattern. However, biological and nuclear contamination flow control in the new Biological Research Facility, to be commissioned at the Chalk River Laboratories in 1996, will have the flexibility to institute a number of contamination control patterns, all achieved at positive (above atmospheric) pressures. This flexibility feature, made possible by means of a digitally controlled ventilation system, changes the facility ventilation system from being a relatively rigid building service operated by plant personnel into a flexible building service which can be operated by the facility research personnel. This paper focuses on and describes the application of these unique contamination control features in the design of the new Biological Research Facility. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Preliminary Experimental Study on Pressure Loss Coefficients of Exhaust Manifold Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-lu Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow characteristic of exhaust system has an important impact on inlet boundary of the turbine. In this paper, high speed flow in a diesel exhaust manifold junction was tested and simulated. The pressure loss coefficient of the junction flow was analyzed. The steady experimental results indicated that both of static pressure loss coefficients L13 and L23 first increased and then decreased with the increase of mass flow ratio of lateral branch and public manifold. The total pressure loss coefficient K13 always increased with the increase of mass flow ratio of junctions 1 and 3. The total pressure loss coefficient K23 first increased and then decreased with the increase of mass flow ratio of junctions 2 and 3. These pressure loss coefficients of the exhaust pipe junctions can be used in exhaust flow and turbine inlet boundary conditions analysis. In addition, simulating calculation was conducted to analyze the effect of branch angle on total pressure loss coefficient. According to the calculation results, total pressure loss coefficient was almost the same at low mass flow rate of branch manifold 1 but increased with lateral branch angle at high mass flow rate of branch manifold 1.

  10. Calculation of the net emission coefficient of an air thermal plasma at very high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billoux, T; Cressault, Y; Teulet, Ph; Gleizes, A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an accurate evaluation of the phenomena appearing for high pressure air plasmas supposed to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). In the past, we already calculated the net emission coefficient for air mixtures at atmospheric pressure and for temperatures up to 30kK (molecular contribution being restricted to 10kK). Unfortunately, the existence of high pressures does not allow us to use this database due to the non-ideality of the plasma (Viriel and Debye corrections, energy cut-off ...), and due to the significant shifts of molecular reactions towards upper temperatures. Consequently, this paper proposes an improvement of our previous works with a consideration of high pressure corrections in the composition algorithm in order to take into account the pressure effects, and with a new calculation of all the contributions of the plasma radiation (atomic lines and continuum, molecular continuum, and molecular bands) using an updated database. A particular attention is paid to calculate the contribution of all the major molecular band systems to the radiation: O 2 (Schumann–Runge), N 2 (VUV, 1st and 2nd positive), NO (IR, β, γ, δ, element of ) and N 2 + (1st negative and Meinel). The discrete atomic lines and molecular bands radiation including the overlapping are calculated by a line-by-line method up to 30kK and 100 bar. This updated database is validated in the case of optically thin plasmas and pressure of 1bar by the comparison of our integrated emission strength with the published results. Finally, this work shows the necessity to extend the molecular radiation database up to 15kK at high pressure (bands and continuum) since their corresponding contributions could not be neglected at high temperature.

  11. Large scale steam flow test: Pressure drop data and calculated pressure loss coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadows, J.B.; Spears, J.R.; Feder, A.R.; Moore, B.P.; Young, C.E.

    1993-12-01

    This report presents the result of large scale steam flow testing, 3 million to 7 million lbs/hr., conducted at approximate steam qualities of 25, 45, 70 and 100 percent (dry, saturated). It is concluded from the test data that reasonable estimates of piping component pressure loss coefficients for single phase flow in complex piping geometries can be calculated using available engineering literature. This includes the effects of nearby upstream and downstream components, compressibility, and internal obstructions, such as splitters, and ladder rungs on individual piping components. Despite expected uncertainties in the data resulting from the complexity of the piping geometry and two-phase flow, the test data support the conclusion that the predicted dry steam K-factors are accurate and provide useful insight into the effect of entrained liquid on the flow resistance. The K-factors calculated from the wet steam test data were compared to two-phase K-factors based on the Martinelli-Nelson pressure drop correlations. This comparison supports the concept of a two-phase multiplier for estimating the resistance of piping with liquid entrained into the flow. The test data in general appears to be reasonably consistent with the shape of a curve based on the Martinelli-Nelson correlation over the tested range of steam quality

  12. OSCILLATION FOR NEUTRAL DELAY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION WITH POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE COEFFICIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a new oscillating result is established for the first order neutral delay differential equation with positive and negative coefficients, which improves and generalizes several results in the literatures.

  13. Positive Temperature Coefficient of Breakdown Voltage in 4H-SiC PN Junction Rectifiers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neudeck, Philip

    1998-01-01

    ...-suited SiC polytype for power device implementation. This paper reports the first experimental measurements of stable positive temperature coefficient behavior observed in 4H-SiC pn junction rectifiers...

  14. Application of noise analysis technique for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, D.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Sweeney, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique, based on the noise analysis of neutron detector and core-exit coolant temperature signals, is developed for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). A detailed multinodal model is developed and evaluated for the reactor core subsystem of the loss-of-fluid test (LOFT) reactor. This model is used to study the effect of changing the sign of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity on the low-frequency phase angle relationship between the neutron detector and the core-exit temperature noise signals. Results show that the phase angle near zero frequency approaches - 180 deg for negative coefficients and 0 deg for positive coefficients when the perturbation source for the noise signals is core coolant flow, inlet coolant temperature, or random heat transfer

  15. Anomalous composition dependence of the band gap pressure coefficients in In-containing nitride semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Kamińska, A.; Staszczak, G.

    2010-01-01

    The pressure-induced changes in the electronic band structures of In-containing nitride alloys, InxGa1-xN and InxAl1-xN are examined experimentally as well as by ab initio calculations. It is found that the band gap pressure coefficients, dEg/dp, exhibit very large bowing with x, and calculations...

  16. Experimental study on the minimum drag coefficient of supercritical pressure water in horizontal tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Xianliang; Li, Huixiong; Guo, YuMeng; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Weiqiang; Zhang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The minimum drag coefficient phenomenon (MDC) has been observed and further investigated. • Effects of heat flux, mass flux and pressure to MDC have been discussed. • A series of comparisons between existing correlations and data have been conducted. • Two correlations of drag coefficient are proposed for isothermal and nonisothermal flow. - Abstract: Hydraulic resistance and its components are of great importance for understanding the turbulence nature of supercritical fluid and establishing prediction methods. Under supercritical pressures, the hydraulic resistance of the fluid exhibits a “pit” in the regions near its pseudo-critical point, which is hereafter called the minimum drag coefficient phenomenon. However, this special phenomenon was paid a little attention before. Hence systematical experiments have been carried out to investigate the hydraulic resistance of supercritical pressure water in both adiabatic and heated horizontal tubes. Parametric effects of heat flux, pressure and mass fluxes to drag coefficient are further compared. It is found that almost all of the existing correlations don’t agree well with the experimental data due to the insufficient consideration of thermal-properties near the pseudocritical point. Two correlations of the drag coefficients are finally proposed by introducing the new variable of the derivative of density with respect to temperature or Prandtl number, which can better predict the drag coefficient of isothermal and nonisothermal flow respectively.

  17. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation in unplanned extubation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eryuksel, Emel; Sait, Karakurt; Celikel, Turgay [Dept. of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Marmara Univ. Hospital, (Turkey)

    2009-07-01

    Unplanned extubation is quite common in intensive care unit (ICU) patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support. The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) in patients with unplanned extubation. A total of 15 patients (12 male, age: 57 + - 24 years, APACHE II score: 19 + - 7) monitored at the medical ICU during the year 2004 who developed unplanned extubation were included in the study. NPPV was tried in all of them following unplanned extubation. Indications for admission to the ICU were as follows: nine patients with pneumonia, three with status epilepticus, one with gastrointestinal bleeding, one with cardiogenic pulmonary edema and one with diffuse alveolar bleeding. Eleven of the patients (74%) were at the weaning period at the time of unplanned extubation. Among these 11 patients, NPPV was successful in 10 (91%) and only one (9%) was reintubated due to the failure of NPPV. The remaining four patients (26%) had pneumonia and none of them were at the weaning period at the time of extubation, but their requirement for mechanical ventilation was gradually decreasing. Unfortunately, an NPPV attempt for 6-8 h failed and these patients were reintubated. Patients with unplanned extubation before the weaning criteria are met should be intubated immediately. On the other hand, when extubation develops during the weaning period, NPPV may be an alternative. The present study was conducted with a small number of patients, and larger studies on the effectiveness of NPPV in unplanned extubation are warranted for firm conclusions. (author)

  18. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation in unplanned extubation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eryuksel, Emel; Karakurt Sait; Celikel, Turgay

    2009-01-01

    Unplanned extubation is quite common in intensive care unit (ICU) patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support. The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) in patients with unplanned extubation. A total of 15 patients (12 male, age: 57 + - 24 years, APACHE II score: 19 + - 7) monitored at the medical ICU during the year 2004 who developed unplanned extubation were included in the study. NPPV was tried in all of them following unplanned extubation. Indications for admission to the ICU were as follows: nine patients with pneumonia, three with status epilepticus, one with gastrointestinal bleeding, one with cardiogenic pulmonary edema and one with diffuse alveolar bleeding. Eleven of the patients (74%) were at the weaning period at the time of unplanned extubation. Among these 11 patients, NPPV was successful in 10 (91%) and only one (9%) was reintubated due to the failure of NPPV. The remaining four patients (26%) had pneumonia and none of them were at the weaning period at the time of extubation, but their requirement for mechanical ventilation was gradually decreasing. Unfortunately, an NPPV attempt for 6-8 h failed and these patients were reintubated. Patients with unplanned extubation before the weaning criteria are met should be intubated immediately. On the other hand, when extubation develops during the weaning period, NPPV may be an alternative. The present study was conducted with a small number of patients, and larger studies on the effectiveness of NPPV in unplanned extubation are warranted for firm conclusions. (author)

  19. Effect of interfacial turbulence and accommodation coefficient on CFD predictions of pressurization and pressure control in cryogenic storage tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Kartuzova, Olga

    2016-03-01

    Pressurization and pressure control in cryogenic storage tanks are to a large extent affected by heat and mass transport across the liquid-vapor interface. These mechanisms are, in turn, controlled by the kinetics of the phase change process and the dynamics of the turbulent recirculating flows in the liquid and vapor phases. In this paper, the effects of accommodation coefficient and interfacial turbulence on tank pressurization and pressure control simulations are examined. Comparison between numerical predictions and ground-based measurements in two large liquid hydrogen tank experiments, performed in the K-site facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Multi-purpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) facility at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), are used to show the impact of accommodation coefficient and interfacial and vapor phase turbulence on evolution of pressure and temperatures in the cryogenic storage tanks. In particular, the self-pressurization comparisons indicate that: (1) numerical predictions are essentially independent of the magnitude of the accommodation coefficient; and (2) surprisingly, laminar models sometimes provide results that are in better agreement with experimental self-pressurization rates, even in parametric ranges where the bulk flow is deemed fully turbulent. In this light, shortcomings of the present CFD models, especially, numerical treatments of interfacial mass transfer and turbulence, as coupled to the Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) interface capturing scheme, are underscored and discussed.

  20. Effective stresses and shear failure pressure from in situ Biot's coefficient, Hejre Field, North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regel, Jeppe Bendix; Orozova-Bekkevold, Ivanka; Andreassen, Katrine Alling

    2017-01-01

    , is significantly different from 1. The log-derived Biot's coefficient is above 0.8 in the Shetland Chalk Group and in the Tyne Group, and 0.6-0.8 in the Heno Sandstone Formation. We show that the effective vertical and horizontal stresses obtained using the log-derived Biot's coefficient result in a drilling......We propose a combination of Biot's equations for effective stress and the expression for shear failure in a rock to obtain an expression for minimum pore pressure in a stable vertical well bore. We show that a Biot's coefficient calculated from logging data in the Hejre Field, North Sea...

  1. Integral linear momentum balance in combining flows for calculating the pressure drop coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollmann, A.

    1983-01-01

    Equations for calculating the loss coefficient in combining flows in tee functions are obtained by an integral linear momentum balance. It is a practice, when solving this type of problem, to neglect the pressure difference in the upstream location as well as the wall-fluid interaction in the lateral branch of the junction. In this work it is demonstrated the influence of the above parameters on the loss coefficient based on experimental values and by apropriate algebraic manipulation of the loss coefficient values published by previous investigators. (Author) [pt

  2. Irrecoverable pressure loss coefficients for two out-of-plane piping elbows at high Reynolds number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffield, R.D.; Hammond, R.B.; McKeown, P.T.

    1999-02-08

    Pressure drops of multiple piping elbows were experimentally determined for high Reynolds number flows. The testing described has been performed in order to reduce uncertainties in the currently used methods for predicting irrecoverable pressure losses and also to provide a qualification database for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer codes. The earlier high Reynolds number correlations had been based on extrapolations over several orders of magnitude in Reynolds number from where the original database existed. Recent single elbow test data shows about a factor of two lower elbow pressure loss coefficient (at 40x 106 Reynolds number) than those from current correlations. This single piping elbow data has been extended in this study to a multiple elbow configuration of two elbows that are 90o out-of-plane relative to each other. The effects of separation distance and Reynolds number have been correlated and presented in a form that can be used for design application. Contrary to earlier extrapolations from low Reynolds numbers (Re c 1.0x 106), a strong Reynolds number dependence was found to exist. The combination of the high Reynolds number single elbow data with the multiple elbow interaction effects measured in this study shows that earlier design correlations are conservative by significant margins at high Reynolds numbers. Qualification of CFD predictions with this new high Reynolds number database will help guide the need for additional high Reynolds number testing of other piping configurations. The study also included velocity measurements at several positions downstream of the first and second test elbows using an ultrasonic flowmeter. Reasonable agreement after the first test elbow was found relative to flow fields that are known to exist from low Reynolds number visual tests and also from CFD predictions. This data should help to qualify CFD predictions of the three-dimensional flow stream downstream of the second test elbow.

  3. Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation or Conventional Mechanical Ventilation for Neonatal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Badiee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to assess the success rate of nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV for treatment of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP failure and prevention of conventional ventilation (CV in preterm neonates. Methods: Since November 2012 to April 2013, a total number of 55 consecutive newborns with gestational ages of 26-35 weeks who had CPAP failure were randomly assigned to one of the two groups. The NIPPV group received NIPPV with the initial peak inspiratory pressure (PIP of 16-20 cmH 2 O and frequency of 40-60 breaths/min. The CV group received PIP of 12-20 cmH 2 O and frequency of 40-60 breaths/min. Results: About 74% of newborns who received NIPPV for management of CPAP failure responded to NIPPV and did not need intubation and mechanical ventilation. Newborns with lower postnatal age at entry to the study and lower 5 min Apgar score more likely had NIPPV failure. In addition, treatment failure was higher in newborns who needed more frequent doses of surfactant. Duration of oxygen therapy was 9.28 days in CV group and 7.77 days in NIPPV group (P = 0.050. Length of hospital stay in CV group and NIPPV groups were 48.7 and 41.7 days, respectively (P = 0.097. Conclusions: NIPPV could decrease the need for intubation and mechanical ventilation in preterm infants with CPAP failure.

  4. Noise analysis method for monitoring the moderator temperature coefficient of pressurized water reactors: Neural network calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.R. Jr.; Adams, J.T.

    1994-01-01

    A neural network was trained with data for the frequency response function between in-core neutron noise and core-exit thermocouple noise in a pressurized water reactor, with the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) as target. The trained network was subsequently used to predict the MTC at other points in the same fuel cycle. Results support use of the method for operating pressurized water reactors provided noise data can be accumulated for several fuel cycles to provide a training base

  5. The determination of the pressure-viscosity coefficient of two traction oils using film thickness measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van H.J.

    2010-01-01

    The pressure-viscosity coefficients of two commercial traction fluids are determined by fitting calculation results on accurate film thickness measurements, obtained at a wide range of speeds, and different temperatures. Film thickness values are calculated using a numerical method and approximation

  6. A Simple Student Laboratory on Osmotic Flow, Osmotic Pressure, and the Reflection Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feher, Joseph J.; Ford, George D.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise containing a practical series of experiments that novice students can perform within two hours. The exercise provides a confirmation of van't Hoff's law while placing more emphasis on osmotic flow than pressure. Students can determine parameters such as the reflection coefficient which stress the interaction of both…

  7. The effect of positive end-expiratory pressure on pulse pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of positive end-expiratory pressure on pulse pressure variation. FJ Smith, M Geyser, I Schreuder, PJ Becker. Abstract. Objectives: To determine the effect of different levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on pulse pressure variation (PPV). Design: An observational study. Setting: Operating theatres of a ...

  8. Evaluation of heat transfer coefficient of tungsten filaments at low pressures and high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chondrakis, N.G.; Topalis, F.V.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents an experimental method for the evaluation of the heat transfer coefficient of tungsten filaments at low pressures and high temperatures. For this purpose an electrode of a T5 fluorescent lamp was tested under low pressures with simultaneous heating in order to simulate the starting conditions in the lamp. It was placed in a sealed vessel in which the pressure was varied from 1 kM (kilo micron) to 760 kM. The voltage applied to the electrode was in the order of the filament's voltage of the lamp at the normal operation with the ballast during the preheating process. The operating frequency ranged from DC to 50 kHz. The experiment targeted on estimating the temperature of the electrode at the end of the first and the ninth second after initiating the heating process. Next, the heat transfer coefficient was calculated at the specific experimental conditions. A mathematical model based on the results was developed that estimates the heat transfer coefficient. The experiments under different pressures confirm that the filament's temperature strongly depends on the pressure.

  9. Vapor Pressure and Evaporation Coefficient of Silicon Monoxide over a Mixture of Silicon and Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Frank T.; Nuth, Joseph A., III

    2012-01-01

    The evaporation coefficient and equilibrium vapor pressure of silicon monoxide over a mixture of silicon and vitreous silica have been studied over the temperature range (1433 to 1608) K. The evaporation coefficient for this temperature range was (0.007 plus or minus 0.002) and is approximately an order of magnitude lower than the evaporation coefficient over amorphous silicon monoxide powder and in general agreement with previous measurements of this quantity. The enthalpy of reaction at 298.15 K for this reaction was calculated via second and third law analyses as (355 plus or minus 25) kJ per mol and (363.6 plus or minus 4.1) kJ per mol respectively. In comparison with previous work with the evaporation of amorphous silicon monoxide powder as well as other experimental measurements of the vapor pressure of silicon monoxide gas over mixtures of silicon and silica, these systems all tend to give similar equilibrium vapor pressures when the evaporation coefficient is correctly taken into account. This provides further evidence that amorphous silicon monoxide is an intimate mixture of small domains of silicon and silica and not strictly a true compound.

  10. Vapour pressures and osmotic coefficients of binary mixtures containing alcohol and pyrrolidinium-based ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvar, N.; Domínguez, Á.; Macedo, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Osmotic coefficients of alcohols with pyrrolidinium ILs are determined. • Experimental data were correlated with extended Pitzer model of Archer and MNRTL. • Mean molal activity coefficients and excess Gibbs free energies were calculated. • The results have been interpreted in terms of interactions. -- Abstract: The osmotic and activity coefficients and vapour pressures of mixtures containing primary (1-propanol, 1-butanol and 1-pentanol) and secondary (2-propanol and 2-butanol) alcohols with pyrrolidinium-based ionic liquids (1-butyl-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, C 4 MpyrNTf 2 , and 1-butyl-1-methyl pyrrolidinium trifluoromethanesulfonate, C 4 MpyrTFO) have been experimentally determined at T = 323.15 K. For the experimental measurements, the vapour pressure osmometry technique has been used. The results on the influence of the structure of the alcohol and of the anion of the ionic liquid on the determined properties have been discussed and compared with literature data. For the correlation of the osmotic coefficients obtained, the Extended Pitzer model of Archer and the Modified Non-Random Two Liquids model were applied. The mean molal activity coefficients and the excess Gibbs energy for the studied mixtures were calculated from the parameters obtained in the correlation

  11. Experimental and numerical characterization of wind-induced pressure coefficients on nuclear buildings and chimney exhausts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricciardi, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.ricciardi@irsn.fr; Gélain, Thomas; Soares, Sandrine

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Experiments on scale models of nuclear buildings and chimney exhausts were performed. • Pressure coefficient fields on buildings are shown for various wind directions. • Evolution of pressure coefficient vs U/W ratio is given for various chimney exhausts. • RANS simulations using SST k–ω turbulence model were performed on most studied cases. • A good agreement is overall observed, with Root Mean Square Deviation lower than 0.15. - Abstract: Wind creates pressure effects on different surfaces of buildings according to their exposure to the wind, in particular at external communications. In nuclear facilities, these effects can change contamination transfers inside the building and can even lead to contamination release into the environment, especially in damaged (ventilation stopped) or accidental situations. The diversity of geometries of facilities requires the use of a validated code for predicting pressure coefficients, which characterize the wind effect on the building walls and the interaction between the wind and chimney exhaust. The first aim of a research program launched by the French Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), was therefore to acquire experimental data of the mean pressure coefficients for different geometries of buildings and chimneys through wind tunnel tests and then to validate a CFD code (ANSYS CFX) from these experimental results. The simulations were performed using a steady RANS approach and a two-equation SST k–ω turbulence model. After a mesh sensitivity study for one configuration of building and chimney, a comparison was carried out between the numerical and experimental values for other studied configurations. This comparison was generally satisfactory, averaged over all measurement points, with values of Root Mean Square Deviations lower than 0.15 for most cases.

  12. Branching of positive discharge streamers in air at varying pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briels, T.M.P.; Veldhuizen, van E.M.; Ebert, U.M.

    2005-01-01

    The formation of positive streamers in a 17-mm gap in air is studied at pressures varying in the range from 1010 to 100 mbar. An intensified charge coupled device camera is used to image the discharge. At high pressures, the discharge shows many branches, while at low pressure, fewer branches arise.

  13. Control rod position and temperature coefficients in HTTR power-rise tests. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Nojiri, Naoki; Takada, Eiji; Saito, Kenji; Kobayashi, Shoichi; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Kokusen, Sigeru

    2001-03-01

    Power-rise tests of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) have been carried out aiming to achieve 100% power. So far, 50% of power operation and many tests have been carried out. In the HTTR, temperature change in core is so large to achieve the outlet coolant temperature of 950degC. To improve the calculation accuracy of the HTTR reactor physics characteristics, control rod positions at criticality and temperature coefficients were measured at each step to achieve 50% power level. The calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo code and diffusion theory with temperature distributions in the core obtained by reciprocal calculation of thermo-hydraulic code and diffusion theory. Control rod positions and temperature coefficients were calculated by diffusion theory and Monte Carlo method. The test results were compared to calculation results. The control rod positions at criticality showed good agreement with calculation results by Monte Carlo method with error of 50 mm. The control position at criticality at 100% was predicted around 2900mm. Temperature coefficients showed good agreement with calculation results by diffusion theory. The improvement of calculation will be carried out comparing the measured results up to 100% power level. (author)

  14. Determination of air and hydrofoil pressure coefficient by laser doppler anemometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Slavica S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Some results of experiments performed in water cavitation tunnel are presented. Pressure coefficient (Cp was experimentally determined by Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA measurements. Two models were tested: model of airplane G4 (Super Galeb and hydrofoil of high speed axial pump. These models are not prepared for conventional pressure measurements, so that LDA is applied for Cp determination. Numerical results were obtained using a code for average Navier-Stokes equations solutions. Comparisons between computational and experimental results prove the effectiveness of the LDA. The advantages and disadvantages of LDA application are discussed. Flow visualization was made by air bubbles.

  15. A study on improvement of analytical prediction model for spacer grid pressure loss coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jonh Seon

    2002-02-01

    Nuclear fuel assemblies used in the nuclear power plants consist of the nuclear fuel rods, the control rod guide tubes, an instrument guide tube, spacer grids,a bottom nozzle, a top nozzle. The spacer grid is the most important component of the fuel assembly components for thermal hydraulic and mechanical design and analyses. The spacer grids fixed with the guide tubes support the fuel rods and have the very important role to activate thermal energy transfer by the coolant mixing caused to the turbulent flow and crossflow in the subchannels. In this paper, the analytical spacer grid pressure loss prediction model has been studied and improved by considering the test section wall to spacer grid gap pressure loss independently and applying the appropriate friction drag coefficient to predict pressure loss more accurately at the low Reynolds number region. The improved analytical model has been verified based on the hydraulic pressure drop test results for the spacer grids of three types with 5x5, 16x16, 17x17 arrays, respectively. The pressure loss coefficients predicted by the improved analytical model are coincident with those test results within ±12%. This result shows that the improved analytical model can be used for research and design change of the nuclear fuel assembly

  16. Positive temperature coefficient of magnetic anisotropy in polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)-based magnetic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yiwei; Wang, Baomin; Zhan, Qingfeng; Tang, Zhenhua; Yang, Huali; Liu, Gang; Zuo, Zhenghu; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Xie, Yali; Zhu, Xiaojian; Chen, Bin; Wang, Junling; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic anisotropy is decreased with increasing temperature in normal magnetic materials, which is harmful to the thermal stability of magnetic devices. Here, we report the realization of positive temperature coefficient of magnetic anisotropy in a novel composite combining β-phase polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) with magnetostrictive materials (magnetostrictive film/PVDF bilayer structure). We ascribe the enhanced magnetic anisotropy of the magnetic film at elevated temperature to the st...

  17. Comparison of boiling heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop correlations for evaporators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskin, N.; Arslan, G.

    2009-01-01

    Evaporator design is an important aspect for the HVAC industry. As the demand for more efficient and compact heat exchangers increase, researches on estimation of two-phase flow heat transfer and pressure drop gain importance. Due to complexity of the hydrodynamic and heat transfer of the two-phase flow, there are many experimental studies available for refrigerants int he literature. In this study, a model for boiling heat transfer in a horizontal tube has been developed and the simulation results are compared with experimental ones published in the literature. In these comparisons, heat transfer coefficient is calculated by using Kattan-Thome-Favrat (1998), Shah (1982), Kandilikar (1990), Chaddock and Brunemann (1967) correlations under different operational conditions such as saturation pressure, mass flux, the type of refrigerant and two phase flow pattern. Besides that flow pattern has also been considered in the simulation by using Thome and El Hajal (2002) model. For pressure drop Lockhart-Martinelli (1949), Mueller-Steinhagen-Hack (1986) and Groennerund (1979) correlations are used in simulations. Local vapor quality change at each experimental condition through the model is determined. Roughness is an important parameter for frictional pressure drop. Friction coefficient is determined by using Churchill (1977) model. (author)

  18. Giant Pressure-Induced Enhancement of Seebeck Coefficient and Thermoelectric Efficiency in SnTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Jason; Kumar, Ravhi; Park, Changyong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Cornelius, Andrew; Velisavljevic, Nenad (CIW); (LANL); (UNLV)

    2017-10-30

    The thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline SnTe have been measured up to 4.5 GPa at 330 K. SnTe shows an enormous enhancement in Seebeck coefficient, greater than 200 % after 3 GPa, which correlates to a known pressure-induced structural phase transition that is observed through simultaneous in situ X-ray diffraction measurement. Electrical resistance and relative changes to the thermal conductivity were also measured, enabling the determination of relative changes in the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT), which increases dramatically after 3 GPa, reaching 350 % of the lowest pressure ZT value. The results demonstrate a fundamental relationship between structure and thermoelectric behaviours and suggest that pressure is an effective tool to control them.

  19. Evaluation of a continuous-positive pressure generating system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera N

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nestor Herrera,1,2 Roberto Regnícoli,1,2 Mariel Murad1,2 1Neonatology Unit, Italian Hospital Garibaldi, Rosario, Argentina; 2Experimental Medicine and Surgery Unit, Italian University Institute of Rosario, Argentina Abstract: The use of systems that apply continuous-positive airway pressure by means of noninvasive methods is widespread in the neonatal care practice and has been associated with a decrease in the use of invasive mechanical ventilation, less administration of exogenous surfactant, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Few experimental studies on the functioning of the neonatology systems that generate continuous-positive airway pressure have been reported. A flow resistor system associated with an underwater seal resistor in a lung test model was described, and it was compared with an underwater seal threshold resistor system. Important differences in the pressures generated in the different systems studied were verified. The generation of pressure was associated with the immersion depth and the diameter of the bubble tubing. The flow resistor associated with an underwater seal, with small bubble tubing, showed no important differences in the evaluated pressures, exerting a stabilizing effect on the generated pressures. The importance of measuring the pressure generated by the different systems studied was verified, due to the differences between the working pressures set and the pressures measured. Keywords: continuous-positive pressure, flow and threshold resistor, BCPAP

  20. Basic data generation and pressure loss coefficient evaluation for HANARO core thermal-hydraulic analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Hee Taek; Lee, Kye Hong

    1999-06-01

    MATRA-h, a HANARO subchannel analysis computer code, is used to evaluate thermal margin of the HANARO fuel. It's capability includes the assessments of CHF, ONB margin, and fuel temperature. In this report, basic input data and core design parameters required to perform the subchannel analysis with MATRA-h code are collected. These data include the subchannel geometric data, thermal-hydraulic correlations, empirical constants and material properties. The friction and form loss coefficients of the fuel assemblies were determined based on the results of the pressure drop test. At the same time, different form loss coefficients at the end plates and spacers are evaluated for various subchannels. The adequate correlations are applied to the evaluation of the form loss coefficients for various subchannels, which are corrected by measured values in order to have a same pressure drop at each flow channel. These basic input data and design parameters described in this report will be applied usefully to evaluate the thermal margin of the HANARO fuel. (author). 11 refs., 13 tabs., 11 figs

  1. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järnberg, P O; de Villota, E D; Eklund, J; Granberg, P O

    1978-01-01

    The effects were studied positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on renal function in eight patients with acute respiratory failure, requiring mechanical ventilation. On application of PEEP + 10 cm H2O, central venous pressure increased, systolic blood pressure decreased, urine flow and PAH-clearance were reduced, while inulin clearance remained stable. There was a marked increase in fractional sodium reabsorption and a concurrent decrease in fractional osmolal excretion. Fractional free-water clearance and the ratio UOsm/POsm did change.

  2. Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilatory Support Begins During Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, John R

    2017-12-01

    The goal of sleep doctors has been to titrate away apneas and hypopneas using noninvasive ventilation, a term that has become synonymous with continuous positive airway pressure and bilevel positive airway pressure at the lowest effective bilevel settings. It is now time to appreciate noninvasive ventilatory support as an alternative to invasive mechanical ventilation. This article discusses mechanisms of action, two paradigms, and ancillary techniques for noninvasive ventilatory support. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The position of the arm during blood pressure measurement in sitting position.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adiyaman, A.; Verhoeff, R.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Deinum, J.; Thien, Th.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Determining the influence of the position of the arm on blood pressure measurement in the sitting position. METHODS: Blood pressure of 128 individuals (the majority being treated hypertensive patients) visiting the outpatient clinic was measured simultaneously on both arms with arms in

  4. Determination of diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in water between 268 and 473 K in a high-pressure capillary optical cell with in situ Raman spectroscopic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wanjun; Guo, Huirong; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.; Li, Lanlan

    2013-01-01

    Accurate values of diffusion coefficients for carbon dioxide in water and brine at reservoir conditions are essential to our understanding of transport behavior of carbon dioxide in subsurface pore space. However, the experimental data are limited to conditions at low temperatures and pressures. In this study, diffusive transfer of carbon dioxide in water at pressures up to 45 MPa and temperatures from 268 to 473 K was observed within an optical capillary cell via time-dependent Raman spectroscopy. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by the least-squares method for the measured variations in carbon dioxide concentration in the cell at various sample positions and time. At the constant pressure of 20 MPa, the measured diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in water increase with increasing temperature from 268 to 473 K. The relationship between diffusion coefficient of carbon dioxide in water [D(CO2) in m2/s] and temperature (T in K) was derived with Speedy–Angell power-law approach as: D(CO2)=D0[T/Ts-1]m where D0 = 13.942 × 10−9 m2/s, Ts = 227.0 K, and m = 1.7094. At constant temperature, diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in water decrease with pressure increase. However, this pressure effect is rather small (within a few percent).

  5. The position of the arm during blood pressure measurement in sitting position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiyaman, Ahmet; Verhoeff, Rutger; Lenders, Jacques W M; Deinum, Jaap; Thien, Theo

    2006-12-01

    Determining the influence of the position of the arm on blood pressure measurement in the sitting position. Blood pressure of 128 individuals (the majority being treated hypertensive patients) visiting the outpatient clinic was measured simultaneously on both arms with arms in two different positions. First, both arms were placed at the chair support level and blood pressure was measured three times on both arms after 10 min of rest. Subsequently, while still remaining in the same sitting position, five blood pressure measurements were made simultaneously at both arms with one arm placed on the desk and one arm placed and supported at heart level (mid-sternal). The arm placed at heart level served as the reference arm. The choice of which arm was placed at desk level and which arm was placed at heart level was randomized. Both at desk level and at chair support level, mean (+/-SD) systolic and diastolic blood pressures were higher than blood pressure at heart level by 6.1/5.7+/-4.6/3.1 and 9.3/9.4+/-5.4/3.4 mmHg, respectively. The effect of the height differences between the arm positions on the blood pressure readings was smaller than predicted (0.49 mmHg/cm systolic and 0.47 mmHg/cm diastolic). No significant correlation was found between blood pressure difference in the different arm positions (desk and heart level) and age, sex, weight or baseline blood pressure. Different arm positions below heart level have significant effects on blood pressure readings. The leading guidelines about arm position during blood pressure measurement are not in accordance with the arm position used in the Framingham study, the most frequently used study for risk estimations.

  6. An analytical approach to the positive reactivity void coefficient of TRIGA Mark-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgue, Erdinc; Yarman, Tolga

    1988-01-01

    Previous calculations of reactivity void coefficient of I.T.U. TRIGA Mark-II Reactor was done by the second author et al. The theoretical predictions were afterwards, checked in this reactor experimentally. In this work an analytical approach is developed to evaluate rather quickly the reactivity void coefficient of I.T.U. TRIGA Mark-II, versus the size of the void inserted into the reactor. It is thus assumed that the reactor is a cylindrical, bare nuclear system. Next a belt of water of 2πrΔrH is introduced axially at a distance r from the center line of the system. r here, is the thickness of the belt, and H is the height of the reactor. The void is described by decreasing the water density in the belt region. A two group diffusion theory is adopted to determine the criticality of our configuration. The space dependency of the group fluxes are, thereby, assumed to be J 0 (2.405 r / R) cos (π Z / H), the same as that associated with the original bare reactor uniformly loaded prior to the change. A perturbation type of approach, thence, furnishes the effect of introducing a void in the belt region. The reactivity void coefficient can, rather surprisingly, be indeed positive. To our knowledge, this fact had not been established, by the supplier. The agreement of our predictions with the experimental results is good. (author)

  7. Effect of pressure on heat transfer coefficient at the metal/mold interface of A356 aluminum alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fardi Ilkhchy, A.; Jabbari, Masoud; Davami, P.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to correlate interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) to applied external pressure, in which IHTC at the interface between A356 aluminum alloy and metallic mold during the solidification of casting under different pressures were obtained using the inverse heat...... conduction problem (IHCP) method. The method covers the expedient of comparing theoretical and experimental thermal histories. Temperature profiles obtained from thermocouples were used in a finite difference heat flow program to estimate the transient heat transfer coefficients. The new simple formula...... was presented for correlation between external pressure and heat transfer coefficient. Acceptable agreement with data in literature shows the accuracy of the proposed formula....

  8. Interaction between intra-abdominal pressure and positive-end expiratory pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamili Anbar Torquato

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to quantify the interaction between increased intra-abdominal pressure and Positive-End Expiratory Pressure. METHODS: In 30 mechanically ventilated ICU patients with a fixed tidal volume, respiratory system plateau and abdominal pressure were measured at a Positive-End Expiratory Pressure level of zero and 10 cm H2O. The measurements were repeated after placing a 5 kg weight on the patients' belly. RESULTS: After the addition of 5 kg to the patients' belly at zero Positive-End Expiratory Pressure, both intra-abdominal pressure (p<0.001 and plateau pressures (p=0.005 increased significantly. Increasing the Positive-End Expiratory Pressure levels from zero to 10 cm H2O without weight on the belly did not result in any increase in intra-abdominal pressure (p=0.165. However, plateau pressures increased significantly (p< 0.001. Increasing Positive-End Expiratory Pressure from zero to 10 cm H2O and adding 5 kg to the belly increased intra-abdominal pressure from 8.7 to 16.8 (p<0.001 and plateau pressure from 18.26 to 27.2 (p<0.001. Maintaining Positive-End Expiratory Pressure at 10 cm H2O and placing 5 kg on the belly increased intra-abdominal pressure from 12.3 +/- 1.7 to 16.8 +/- 1.7 (p<0.001 but did not increase plateau pressure (26.6+/-1.2 to 27.2 +/-1.1 -p=0.83. CONCLUSIONS: The addition of a 5kg weight onto the abdomen significantly increased both IAP and the airway plateau pressure, confirming that intra-abdominal hypertension elevates the plateau pressure. However, plateau pressure alone cannot be considered a good indicator for the detection of elevated intra-abdominal pressure in patients under mechanical ventilation using PEEP. In these patients, the intra-abdominal pressure must also be measured.

  9. Rate Coefficient Determinations for H + NO2 → OH + NO from High Pressure Flow Reactor Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Francis M; Dryer, Frederick L

    2015-07-16

    Rate coefficients for the reaction H + NO2 → OH + NO (R1) have been determined over the nominal temperature and pressure ranges of 737-882 K and 10-20 atm, respectively, from measurements in two different flow reactor facilities: one laminar and one turbulent. Considering the existing database of experimental k1 measurements, the present conditions add measurements of k1 at previously unconsidered temperatures between ∼820-880 K, as well as at pressures that exceed existing measurements by over an order of magnitude. Experimental measurements of NOx-perturbed H2 oxidation have been interpreted by a quasi-steady state NOx plateau (QSSP) method. At the QSSP conditions considered here, overall reactivity is sensitive only to the rates of R1 and H + O2 + M → HO2 + M (R2.M). Consequently, the ratio of k1 to k2.M may be extracted as a simple algebraic function of measured NO2, O2, and total gas concentrations with only minimal complication (within measurement uncertainty) due to treatment of overall gas composition M that differs slightly from pure bath gas B. Absolute values of k1 have been determined with reference to the relatively well-known, pressure-dependent rate coefficients of R2.B for B = Ar and N2. Rate coefficients for the title reaction determined from present experimental interpretation of both laminar and turbulent flow reactor results appear to be in very good agreement around a representative value of 1.05 × 10(14) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) (1.74 × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)). Further, the results of this study agree both with existing low pressure flash photolysis k1 determinations of Ko and Fontijn (J. Phys. Chem. 95 3984) near 760 K as well as a present fit to the theoretical expression of Su et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 106 8261). These results indicate that, over the temperature range considered in this study and up to at least 20 atm, net chemistry due to stabilization of the H-NO2 reaction intermediate to form isomers of HNO2 may proceed at

  10. Thermodiffusion Coefficient Analysis of n-Dodecane /n-Hexane Mixture at Different Mass Fractions and Pressure Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarraga, Ion; Bou-Ali, M. Mounir; Santamaría, C.

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the thermodiffusion coefficient of n-dodecane/n-hexane binary mixture at 25 ∘C mean temperature was determined for several pressure conditions and mass fractions. The experimental technique used to determine the thermodiffusion coefficient was the thermograviational column of cylindrical configuration. In turn, thermophysical properties, such as density, thermal expansion, mass expansion and dynamic viscosity up to 10 MPa were also determined. The results obtained in this work showed a linear relation between the thermophysical properties and the pressure. Thermodiffusion coefficient values confirm a linear effect when the pressure increases. Additionally, a new correlation based on the thermodiffusion coefficient for n C12/n C6 binary mixture at 25 ∘C temperature for any mass fraction and pressures, which reproduces the data within the experimental error, was proposed.

  11. Blood flow vs. venous pressure effects on filtration coefficient in oleic acid-injured lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglade, D; Corboz, M; Menaouar, A; Parker, J C; Sanou, S; Bayat, S; Benchetrit, G; Grimbert, F A

    1998-03-01

    On the basis of changes in capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) in 24 rabbit lungs, we determined whether elevations in pulmonary venous pressure (Ppv) or blood flow (BF) produced differences in filtration surface area in oleic acid-injured (OA) or control (Con) lungs. Lungs were cyclically ventilated and perfused under zone 3 conditions by using blood and 5% albumin with no pharmacological modulation of vascular tone. Pulmonary arterial, venous, and capillary pressures were measured by using arterial, venous, and double occlusion. Before and during each Kfc-measurement maneuver, microvascular/total vascular compliance was measured by using venous occlusion. Kfc was measured before and 30 min after injury, by using a Ppv elevation of 7 cmH2O or a BF elevation from 1 to 2 l . min-1 . 100 g-1 to obtain a similar double occlusion pressure. Pulmonary arterial pressure increased more with BF than with Ppv in both Con and OA lungs [29 +/- 2 vs. 19 +/- 0.7 (means +/- SE) cmH2O; P Kfc (200 +/- 40 vs. 83 +/- 14%, respectively; P < 0.01) and microvascular/total vascular compliance ratio (86 +/- 4 vs. 68 +/- 5%, respectively; P < 0.01) increased more with BF than with Ppv. In conclusion, for a given OA-induced increase in hydraulic conductivity, BF elevation increased filtration surface area more than did Ppv elevation. The steep pulmonary pressure profile induced by increased BF could result in the recruitment of injured capillaries and could also shift downstream the compression point of blind (zone 1) and open injured vessels (zone 2).

  12. Duration of continuous positive airway pressure in premature infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamat, Nicolas; Jensen, Erik A.; Kirpalani, Haresh

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been used for respiratory support in premature infants for more than 40 years and is now a cornerstone of modern neonatal care. Clinical research on CPAP has primarily focused on understanding which devices and pressure sources best implement this therapy. In contrast, less research has examined the optimal duration over which CPAP is administered. We review this aspect of CPAP therapy. PMID:26948885

  13. Duration of continuous positive airway pressure in premature infants

    OpenAIRE

    Bamat, Nicolas; Jensen, Erik A.; Kirpalani, Haresh

    2016-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been used for respiratory support in premature infants for more than 40 years and is now a cornerstone of modern neonatal care. Clinical research on CPAP has primarily focused on understanding which devices and pressure sources best implement this therapy. In contrast, less research has examined the optimal duration over which CPAP is administered. We review this aspect of CPAP therapy.

  14. Comparison of Efficacy and Tolerance of Automatic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Devices With the Optimum Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommi, George; Aronow, Wilbert S; Sheehan, John C; McCleay, Matthew T; Meyers, Patrick G

    Patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome were randomly placed on automatic continuous positive airway pressure (ACPAP) for 2 hours followed by manual titration for the rest of the night. One hundred sixty-one patients entered the study, with at least 50 patients titrated with each of 3 ACPAP devices. The optimum continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was defined as the lowest pressure with an apnea-hypoxia index of ≤5/hr, which ranged from 4 cm to 18 cm. Success with ACPAP was approximately 60%-80% when the optimum CPAP was 4-6 cm but fell to below 30% if the optimum CPAP was ≥8 cm (P = 0.001). Average ACPAP ranged from 2 to 10 cm below the optimum level if the optimum CPAP was ≥8 cm. Patients who responded to a low CPAP but deteriorated on higher pressures failed to respond to any of the automatic devices. We recommend that CPAP titration be performed manually before initiation of ACPAP in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The basal pressure for ACPAP should be the optimum pressure obtained by manual titration. Limits on the upper level of ACPAP may be necessary for patients who deteriorate on higher positive pressures.

  15. Osmotic pressure and virial coefficients of star and comb polymer solutions: dissipative particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tzu-Yu; Fang, Che-Ming; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2009-03-28

    The effects of macromolecular architecture on the osmotic pressure pi and virial coefficients (B(2) and B(3)) of star and comb polymers in good solvents are studied by dissipative particle dynamics simulations for both dilute and semiconcentrated regimes. The dependence of the osmotic pressure on polymer concentration is directly calculated by considering two reservoirs separated by a semipermeable, fictitious membrane. Our simulation results show that the ratios A(n+1) identical with B(n+1)/R(g)(3n) are essentially constant and A(2) and A(3) are arm number (f) dependent, where R(g) is zero-density radius of gyration. The value of dimensionless virial ratio g = A(3)/A(2)(2) increases with arm number of stars whereas it is essentially arm number independent for comb polymers. In semiconcentrated regime the scaling relation between osmotic pressure and volume fraction, pi proportional to phi(lambda), still holds for both star and comb polymers. For comb polymers, the exponent lambda is close to lambda(*) (approximately = 2.73 for linear chains) and is independent of the arm number. However, for star polymers, the exponent lambda deviates from lambda(*) and actually grows with increasing the arm number. This may be attributed to the significant ternary interactions near the star core in the many-arm systems.

  16. Running on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Peter C; Hovgaard-Hansen, Line; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) and time to exhaustion while running on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill (LBPPT) at normal body weight (BW) as well as how BW support affects respiratory responses, ground reaction forces, and stride characteristics.......This study investigated maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) and time to exhaustion while running on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill (LBPPT) at normal body weight (BW) as well as how BW support affects respiratory responses, ground reaction forces, and stride characteristics....

  17. A study on the stem friction coefficient with differential pressure conditions for the motor operated flexible wedge gate valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Woong; Park, Sung Keun; Kim, Yang Seok; Lee, Do Hwan

    2008-01-01

    Stem friction coefficient is very important parameter for the evaluation of valve performance. In this study, the characteristics of stem friction coefficient is analyzed, and the bounding value is determined. The hydraulic testing is performed for flexible wedge gate valves in the plant and statistical method is applied to the determination of bounding value. According to the results of this study, stem friction coefficient is not effected in low differential pressure condition, but it is showed different distribution in medium and high differential pressure condition. And the bounding value of closing stroke is higher than that of opening stroke

  18. Pressure-induced absorption coefficients for radiative transfer calculations in Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtin, Regis

    1988-01-01

    The semiempirical theory of Birnbaum and Cohen (1976) is used to calculate the FIR pressure-induced absorption (PIA) spectra of N2, CH4, N2 + Ar, N2 + CH4, and N2 + H2 under conditions like those in the Titan troposphere. The results are presented graphically and compared with published data from laboratory measurements of PIA in the same gases and mixtures (Dagg et al., 1986; Dore et al., 1986). Good agreement is obtained, with only a slight underestimation of PIA at 300-400/cm in the case of CH4. The absorption coefficients are presented in tables, and it is suggested that the present findings are of value for evaluating the effects of tropospheric clouds on the Titan FIR spectrum and studying the greenhouse effect near the Titan surface.

  19. Visual evoked potentials show strong positive association with intracranial pressure in patients with cryptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Adriano da Cunha Silva Vieira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To verify the relationship between intracranial pressure and flash visual evoked potentials (F-VEP in patients with cryptococcal meningitis. Method The sample included adults diagnosed with cryptococcal meningitis admitted at a reference hospital for infectious diseases. The patients were subjected to F-VEP tests shortly before lumbar puncture. The Pearson’s linear correlation coefficient was calculated and the linear regression analysis was performed. Results : Eighteen individuals were subjected to a total of 69 lumbar punctures preceded by F-VEP tests. At the first lumbar puncture performed in each patient, N2 latency exhibited a strong positive correlation with intracranial pressure (r = 0.83; CI = 0.60 - 0.94; p < 0.0001. The direction of this relationship was maintained in subsequent punctures. Conclusion : The intracranial pressure measured by spinal tap manometry showed strong positive association with the N2 latency F-VEP in patients with cryptococcal meningitis.

  20. Thermodynamics of aqueous electrolytes at various temperatures, pressures, and compositions. [Virial coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitzer, K.S.

    1979-09-01

    It is shown that the properties of fully ionized aqueous electrolyte systems can be represented by relatively simple equations over wide ranges of composition. There are only a few systems for which data are available over the full range to fused salt. A simple equation commonly used for nonelectrolytes fits the measured vapor pressure of water reasonably well and further refinements are clearly possible. Over the somewhat more limited composition range up to saturation of typical salts such as NaCl, the equations representing thermodynamic properties with a Debye-Hueckel term plus second and third virial coefficients are very successful and these coefficients are known for nearly 300 electrolytes at room temperature. These same equations effectively predict the properties of mixed electrolytes. A stringent test is offered by the calculation of all of the solubility relationships of the system Na-K-Mg-Ca-Cl-So{sub 4}-H{sub 2}0 and the calculated results of Harvie and Weare show excellent agreement with

  1. Continuous positive airway pressure: Physiology and comparison of devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Samir; Donn, Steven M

    2016-06-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is increasingly used for respiratory support in preterm babies at birth and after extubation from mechanical ventilation. Various CPAP devices are available for use that can be broadly grouped into continuous flow and variable flow. There are potential physiologic differences between these CPAP systems and the choice of a CPAP device is too often guided by individual expertise and experience rather than by evidence. When interpreting the evidence clinicians should take into account the pressure generation sources, nasal interface, and the factors affecting the delivery of pressure, such as mouth position and respiratory drive. With increasing use of these devices, better monitoring techniques are required to assess the efficacy and early recognition of babies who are failing and in need of escalated support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Positive muon diffusion in iron and nickel pressure dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Butz, T; Dufresne, J F; Hartmann, O; Karlsson, E; Lindgren, B; Longobardi, R; Norlin, L O; Pezzetti, J P; Yaouanc, A

    1980-01-01

    The hyperfine field B/sub hf/ at positive muon ( mu /sup +/) in iron and nickel was previously found. Exhibits marked deviations from the bulk magnetization as a function of temperature. For substitutional impurities in Fe and Ni matrices the volume dependence of B/sub hf/ has been considered as a possible reason for such deviations. Therefore the authors have measured at CERN the local magnetic field at mu /sup +/, B/sub mu /, in high purity polycrystalline Fe and Ni samples at room temperature and at pressures up to 7 kbar by the positive muon spin rotation ( mu /sup +/ SR) technique. To their knowledge, this is the first mu /sup +/SR experiment performed under hydrostatic pressure. The authors observe a linear pressure dependence for both samples but slopes are of opposite signs. (12 refs).

  3. Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure for weaning with tracheostomy tubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieperink, Willem; Aarts, Leon P. H. J.; Rodgers, Michael G. G.; Delwig, Hans; Nijsten, Maarten W. N.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In patients who are weaned with a tracheostomy tube ( TT), continuous positive airway pressure ( CPAP) is frequently used. Dedicated CPAP systems or ventilators with bulky tubing are usually applied. However, CPAP can also be effective without a ventilator by the disposable Bous-signac

  4. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure: does bubbling improve gas exchange?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, C J; Lau, R; De Paoli, A; Davis, P G

    2005-07-01

    In a randomised crossover trial, 26 babies, treated with Hudson prong continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) from a bubbling bottle, received vigorous, high amplitude, or slow bubbling for 30 minutes. Pulse oximetry, transcutaneous carbon dioxide, and respiratory rate were recorded. The bubbling rates had no effect on carbon dioxide, oxygenation, or respiratory rate.

  5. Multiple applications of the Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieperink, Willem

    2008-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure, (CPAP) is a form of treatment to support patients with dyspnea. For the application of CPAP a mechanical ventilator or complex CPAP apparatus is mostly used. The Boussignac CPAP (BCPAP) system developed by George Boussignac does not need such apparatus. The BCPAP

  6. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Strategies with Bubble Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: Not All Bubbling Is the Same: The Seattle Positive Airway Pressure System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Stephen E

    2016-12-01

    Premature neonates are predisposed to complications, including bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). BPD is associated with long-term pulmonary and neurodevelopmental consequences. Noninvasive respiratory support with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been recommended strongly by the American Academy of Pediatrics. However, CPAP implementation has shown at least a 50% failure rate. Enhancing nasal CPAP effectiveness may decrease the need for mechanical ventilation and reduce the incidence of BPD. Bubble nasal CPAP is better than nasal CPAP using mechanical devices and the bubbling provides air exchange in distal respiratory units. The Seattle PAP system reduces parameters that assess work of breathing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A new kind of shape-stabilized PCMs with positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-long; Wu, Wan-fan; Song, Jia-liang; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Shuai; Liu, Na

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new kind of shape-stabilized PCMs with PTC effect is first prepared. • It provides a potential means for the thermal control of the electronic devices. • The switching temperature of the materials is about 25 °C. • The most appropriate component of the material is found out by experimental study. • The NTC effect of the new PCMs is eliminated effectively by heat treatment. - Abstract: A new kind of shape-stabilized phase change materials (PCMs) with positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect was prepared in this paper. The materials were prepared by adding graphite powder (GP) to the paraffin/low density polyethylene (LDPE) composite and the PTC characteristic was found by adjusting the component ratio of the material. Then the physical structures and thermal properties of the materials were investigated and the effect of various GP mass fractions and paraffin/LDPE mass proportions on the PTC behavior of the materials was studied experimentally. The results showed that the switching temperature of the materials was about 25 °C (room temperature) which approached to the first phase change temperature of paraffin dispersed in the materials. The PTC behavior of the materials was the best when the GP mass fraction and the mass proportion of LDPE/paraffin were 40 wt% and 30:70, respectively. Furthermore, the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) effect of the materials could be eliminated effectively with heat treatment. This new kind of materials is different from the former PTC materials which the switching temperatures focus on high temperature ranges. It makes up for the defect of previous materials that the switching temperatures only range in high temperature rather than room temperature and provides a potential means for the thermal control of the electronic devices or other room temperature thermal control applications

  8. Measurement of subcooled boiling pressure drop and local heat transfer coefficient in horizontal tube under LPLF conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baburajan, P.K.; Bisht, G.S.; Gupta, S.K.; Prabhu, S.V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Measured subcooled boiling pressure drop and local heat transfer coefficient in horizontal tubes. ► Infra-red thermal imaging is used for wall temperature measurement. ► Developed correlations for pressure drop and local heat transfer coefficient. -- Abstract: Horizontal flow is commonly encountered in boiler tubes, refrigerating equipments and nuclear reactor fuel channels of pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR). Study of horizontal flow under low pressure and low flow (LPLF) conditions is important in understanding the nuclear core behavior during situations like LOCA (loss of coolant accidents). In the present work, local heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop are measured in a horizontal tube under LPLF conditions of subcooled boiling. Geometrical parameters covered in this study are diameter (5.5 mm, 7.5 mm and 9.5 mm) and length (550 mm, 750 mm and 1000 mm). The operating parameters varied are mass flux (450–935 kg/m 2 s) and inlet subcooling (29 °C, 50 °C and 70 °C). Infra-red thermography is used for the measurement of local wall temperature to estimate the heat transfer coefficient in single phase and two phase flows with water as the working medium at atmospheric pressure. Correlation for single phase diabatic pressure drop ratio (diabatic to adiabatic) as a function of viscosity ratio (wall temperature to fluid temperature) is presented. Correlation for pressure drop under subcooled boiling conditions as a function of Boiling number (Bo) and Jakob number (Ja) is obtained. Correlation for single phase heat transfer coefficient in the thermal developing region is presented as a function of Reynolds number (Re), Prandtl number (Pr) and z/d (ratio of axial length of the test section to diameter). Correlation for two phase heat transfer coefficient under subcooled boiling condition is developed as a function of boiling number (Bo), Jakob number (Ja) and Prandtl number (Pr)

  9. Existence of positive solutions for multi-term non-autonomous fractional differential equations with polynomial coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizollah Babakhani

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we discuss the existence of positive solutions in the case of multi-term non-autonomous fractional differential equations with polynomial coefficients; the constant coefficient case has been studied in [2]. We consider the equation $$ Big(D^{alpha_n} -sum_{j = 1}^{n - 1} p_j(xD^{alpha_{n - j}}Bigy = f(x, y. $$ We state various conditions on $f$ and $p_j$'s under which this equation has: positive solutions, a unique solution which is positive, and a unique solution which may not be positive.

  10. Optimum position for wells producing at constant wellbore pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho-Velazquez, R.; Rodriguez de la Garza, F. [Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Galindo-Nava, A. [Inst. Mexicanos del Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico)]|[Univ. Nacional de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Prats, M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper deals with the determination of the optimum position of several wells, producing at constant different wellbore pressures from a two-dimensional closed-boundary reservoirs, to maximize the cumulative production or the total flow rate. To achieve this objective they authors use an improved version of the analytical solution recently proposed by Rodriguez and Cinco-Ley and an optimization algorithm based on a quasi-Newton procedure with line search. At each iteration the algorithm approximates the negative of the objective function by a cuadratic relation derived from a Taylor series. The improvement of rodriguez and Cinco`s solution is attained in four ways. First, an approximation is obtained, which works better at earlier times (before the boundary dominated period starts) than the previous solution. Second, the infinite sums that are present in the solution are expressed in a condensed form, which is relevant for reducing the computer time when the optimization algorithm is used. Third, the solution is modified to take into account the possibility of having wells starting to produce at different times. This point allows them to deal with the problem of getting the optimum position for an infill drilling program. Last, the solution is extended to include the possibility of changing the value of wellbore pressure or being able to stimulate any of the wells at any time. When the wells are producing at different wellbore pressures it is found that the optimum position is a function of time, otherwise the optimum position is fixed.

  11. Positron annihilation lifetime study of positive temperature coefficient BaTiO3 samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling Chen; Mingkang Teng; Guanghou Wang; Xiaoyun Li; Tianchang Lu

    1989-01-01

    In order to investigate the doped vacancies in BaTiO 3 samples as well as their influence on the positive temperature coefficient (PTC) the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was applied. Two groups of BaTiO 3 samples with BaO excess were prepared by doping different concentrations of La 2 O 3 and Nb 2 O 5 , respectively in the range from 0.1 to 3 at%. A third group of samples of two Sb-doped PTC BaTiO 3 semiconductors with excess BaO or TiO 2 were studied by the aid of positron technique before and after being reduced. It is shown that the positron lifetime parameters are sensitive to changes in the vacancy concentration in BaTiO 3 ceramics near the 0.1 mol% region. But they are almost unchanged during reduction processing; the resistivity of samples changed by one to two orders of magnitude through the reduction. It can be concluded that the PTC effect is due to oxygen on the grain boundary rather than vacancies, and that the Heywang-Jonker model is more reasonable

  12. Mapping grain boundary heterogeneity at the nanoscale in a positive temperature coefficient of resistivity ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsgrove, Kristina M.; Kepaptsoglou, Demie M.; Douglas, Alan M.; Ramasse, Quentin M.; Prestat, Eric; Haigh, Sarah J.; Ward, Michael B.; Kumar, Amit; Gregg, J. Marty; Arredondo, Miryam

    2017-06-01

    Despite being of wide commercial use in devices, the orders of magnitude increase in resistance that can be seen in some semiconducting BaTiO3-based ceramics, on heating through the Curie temperature (TC), is far from well understood. Current understanding of the behavior hinges on the role of grain boundary resistance that can be modified by polarization discontinuities which develop in the ferroelectric state. However, direct nanoscale resistance mapping to verify this model has rarely been attempted, and the potential approach to engineer polarization states at the grain boundaries, that could lead to optimized positive temperature coefficient (PTC) behavior, is strongly underdeveloped. Here we present direct visualization and nanoscale mapping in a commercially optimized BaTiO3-PbTiO3-CaTiO3 PTC ceramic using Kelvin probe force microscopy, which shows that, even in the low resistance ferroelectric state, the potential drop at grain boundaries is significantly greater than in grain interiors. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy reveal new evidence of Pb-rich grain boundaries symptomatic of a higher net polarization normal to the grain boundaries compared to the purer grain interiors. These results validate the critical link between optimized PTC performance and higher local polarization at grain boundaries in this specific ceramic system and suggest a novel route towards engineering devices where an interface layer of higher spontaneous polarization could lead to enhanced PTC functionality.

  13. Mapping grain boundary heterogeneity at the nanoscale in a positive temperature coefficient of resistivity ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Holsgrove

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite being of wide commercial use in devices, the orders of magnitude increase in resistance that can be seen in some semiconducting BaTiO3-based ceramics, on heating through the Curie temperature (TC, is far from well understood. Current understanding of the behavior hinges on the role of grain boundary resistance that can be modified by polarization discontinuities which develop in the ferroelectric state. However, direct nanoscale resistance mapping to verify this model has rarely been attempted, and the potential approach to engineer polarization states at the grain boundaries, that could lead to optimized positive temperature coefficient (PTC behavior, is strongly underdeveloped. Here we present direct visualization and nanoscale mapping in a commercially optimized BaTiO3–PbTiO3–CaTiO3 PTC ceramic using Kelvin probe force microscopy, which shows that, even in the low resistance ferroelectric state, the potential drop at grain boundaries is significantly greater than in grain interiors. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy reveal new evidence of Pb-rich grain boundaries symptomatic of a higher net polarization normal to the grain boundaries compared to the purer grain interiors. These results validate the critical link between optimized PTC performance and higher local polarization at grain boundaries in this specific ceramic system and suggest a novel route towards engineering devices where an interface layer of higher spontaneous polarization could lead to enhanced PTC functionality.

  14. Measurement procedure for the determination of thermal exchange coefficient for subsea pipelines at elevated pressure levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Luis Fernando A.; Farias, Paula S.C.; Martins, Fabio J.W.A.; Rabello, Pedro C.; Barros Junior, Julio M. [Pontificia Universidade Catolica (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Lopes Junior, Fernando M.; Silva Junior, Jose Fernando; Castro, Adriana M.; Santos, Augusto A.; Pessanha, Maikon C.R. [Technip, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-12-19

    The present paper describes a methodology successfully employed to determine the Thermal Exchange Coefficient - TEC - for insulated sub sea flexible lines up to a pressure level of 200 bar. In this methodology, controlled internal electrical heating was employed, together with temperature sensors installed at the inner and outer surfaces of the line. The instrumented line sample was placed in a hyperbaric chamber filled with water. Two methods were employed in parallel to determine the line TEC value. In the first method, the TEC value was determined by direct measurement of the radial heat flux by the use of heat flux sensors. The readings of these sensors, together with the inner-to-outer surface temperature difference and geometric parameters, yielded the desired TEC value. In the second method, the radial heat flux was obtained as the difference between the total energy generated by the electrical heater installed in the interior of the sample and the heat losses through the end connectors, evaluated by the readings of temperature sensors installed in covers that surrounded the end connectors. The knowledge of the cover geometry, thermal properties and the temperature readings allowed for an accurate estimate of the heat lost through the covers. Both measuring methods were backed by a detailed uncertainty analysis. A calibration procedure of the second method was performed from zero to 100 bar, the pressure range where the calibration of the heat flux sensor is valid. Beyond 100 bar and up to 200 bar, the TEC values were obtained by the second method, corrected by the calibration procedure extrapolated from the 0-100 bar range. The TEC values obtained were valid under an uncertainty level of {+-} 5%. (author)

  15. Inspiratory time and tidal volume during intermittent positive pressure ventilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Field, D; Milner, A D; Hopkin, I E

    1985-01-01

    We measured the tidal volume achieved during intermittent positive pressure ventilation using various inspiratory times with a minimum of 0.2 seconds. Results indicate that tidal volume shows no reduction with inspiratory times down to 0.4 seconds. An inspiratory time of 0.3 seconds, however, is likely to reduce tidal volume by 8%, and at 0.2 seconds a 22% fall may be anticipated.

  16. Cardiovascular regulation during body unweighting by lower body positive pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Joyce M; Mohney, Lindsay; Wang, Siqi; Moore, Rachel K; Elayi, Samy-Claude; Stenger, Michael B; Moore, Fritz B; Knapp, Charles F

    2013-11-01

    We hypothesized that human cardiovascular responses to standing in reduced gravity environments, as on the Moon or Mars, could be modeled using a lower body positive pressure (LBPP) chamber. Heart rate, blood pressure, body segment fluid shifts, ECG, indexes of sympathetic, parasympathetic balance, and baroreflex control of the heart and periphery plus echocardiographic measures of cardiac function were recorded from seven men and seven women supine and standing at 100% (Earth), 40% (-Mars), and 20% (-Moon) bodyweights (BW). The fluid shifted from the chest was greater when standing at 100% BW than at 20% and 40% BW, while fluid pooled in the abdomen was similar at all BWs. Compared to moving from supine to standing at 100% BW, moving to 20% and 40% BW resulted in smaller decreases in stroke volume and pulse pressure, smaller increases in heart rate and smaller decreases in parasympathetic control of heart rate, baroreflex slope, numbers of blood pressure ramps, and much reduced indexes of sympathetic drive to the heart and periphery. However, peripheral vascular resistance, systolic pressure, and baroreflex effectiveness were elevated during 20% and 40% BW, compared to supine and standing at 100% BW. Standing at reduced bodyweight suppressed indexes of sympathetic control of heart rate and peripheral vasomotion. Regulatory responses indicated a combination of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control: mean heart rate, vasomotion, and baroreflex sensitivity appeared to be more under cardiopulmonary control while baroreflex effectiveness appeared to be driven more by the arterial baroreflex.

  17. The effect of surface roughness on the heat exchange and pressure-drop coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malherbe, J.M.

    1963-02-01

    The effect of various types of roughness on the wall of an axial tube in an annular space of 15-25 mm cooled by an air-flow has been studied in the case of steady turbulence. Roughness of the type 'disrupter of the boundary layer' was set up using triangular threads of 0.2 to 0.4 mm thickness machined in the tube itself, or brass or glass wire wound on a smooth tube. Tests were also carried out using the roughness provided by regularly spaced pyramids 0.4 mm high. The results obtained showed that the heat exchange increased because of the presence of this roughness. A maximum in the heat exchange and pressure-drop coefficients was observed when the pitch equals about eight times the height of the thread. An analytical method has been developed and experiments have been carried out in which the two walls of the annular space were heated in such a way as to transmit unequal heat flows. The region considered is limited to Reynolds's numbers of between 5 X 10 3 and 5 x 10 4 and wall temperatures of under 250 deg C. (author) [fr

  18. Impact of External Pressure on the Heat Transfer Coefficient during Solidification of Al-A356 Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud; Ilkhchy, A.Fardi; Moumani, E.

    In this paper the interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) is correlated to applied external pressure, in which IHTC at the interface between A356 aluminum alloy and metallic mold during the solidification of the casting under different pressures were obtained using the Inverse Heat Conduction...... Problem (IHCP) method. The method covers the expedient of comparing theoretical and experimental thermal histories. Temperature profiles obtained from thermocouples were used in a finite difference heat flow program to estimate the transient heat transfer coefficients. The new simple formula was presented...

  19. The Merkel coefficient and its dependence on the temperature position of the cooling tower process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klenke, W.

    1977-01-01

    The Merkel coefficient, or evaporation coefficient, is still being used as a characteristic factor for the cooling tower process. Its dependence on the cooling range or on the warm water temperature of the process is often considered a disadvantage of the theory of evaporation cooling. This is also the reason for the suggestion to change the theory in such a way that the Merkel coefficient becomes independent of the temperature. The present investigation, however, leads to the result that the dependence of the Merkel coefficient on the temperature must be considered as a remarkable confirmation for the evidence of the theory of heat and mass transfer, as the experimental statements agree fully with the results of the theoretical considerations. (orig.) [de

  20. [Preventing Facial Pressure Injuries in Patients Who Use Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilators: The Efficiency of Dressings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Chia-Hua; Hsu, Mei-Yu

    2016-10-01

    Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) provides ventilation without tracheal intubation. Facial pressure injury is a recognized complication of this technique, making the prevention of facial pressure injuries an important issue for NPPV patients. The present study compared the effects of foam dressing and hydrocolloid dressing in preventing facial pressure injuries in NPPV patients. A randomized clinical trial was used to evaluate participants that were referred from the intensive care unit of a medical center in eastern Taiwan. Participants were randomized into two groups: the foam dressing group and the hydrocolloid dressing group. Statistics used in analysis were: analysis mean, standard deviation, chi-square, independent t-test, and the generalized estimating equation. Sixty participants were enrolled as participants. The incidence rate of facial pressure injury was 11.7% (7/60). No significant difference was found between the two groups in terms of duration of NPPV use, incidence of facial pressure injury, and occurrence time of facial pressure injury. However, the hydrocolloid dressing group had a higher usage amount than the foam dressing group (p < .05). Foam and hydrocolloid dressings are both helpful in preventing facial pressure injury when used in conjunction with regular skin assessments.

  1. Water absorption lines, 931-961 nm - Selected intensities, N2-collision-broadening coefficients, self-broadening coefficients, and pressure shifts in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giver, L. P.; Gentry, B.; Schwemmer, G.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    Intensities were measured for 97 lines of H2O vapor between 932 and 961 nm. The lines were selected for their potential usefulness for remote laser measurements of H2O vapor in the earth's atmosphere. The spectra were obtained with several different H2O vapor abundances and N2 broadening gas pressures; the spectral resolution was 0.046/cm FWHM. Measured H2O line intensities range from 7 x 10 to the -25th to 7 x 10 to the -22nd/cm per (molecules/sq cm). H2O self-broadening coefficients were measured for 13 of these strongest lines; the mean value was 0.5/cm per atm. N2-collision-broadening coefficients were measured for 73 lines, and the average was 0.11 cm per atm HWHM. Pressure shifts in air were determined for a sample of six lines between 948 and 950 nm; these lines shift to lower frequency by an amount comparable to 0.1 of the collision-broadened widths measured in air or N2. The measured intensities of many lines of 300-000 band are much larger than expected from prior computations, in some cases by over an order of magnitude. Coriolis interactions with the stronger 201-000 band appear to be the primary cause of the enhancement of these line intensities.

  2. Paradoxical reaction of blood pressure on sleep apnoea patients treated with Positive Airway Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chaves Loureiro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome (OSAS patients may develop hypertension and Positive Airway Pressure (PAP is an effective treatment in blood pressure (BP control. Objectives: Analyse a hypertensive OSAS population with unexpected BP rise after PAP usage and verify correlations between BP rise, either with OSAS severity index or nocturnal ventilatory support compliance. Methods: Descriptive, retrospective analysis of 30 patients with PAP treated OSA, for one year, on average, and with previous controlled hypertension, who developed a rise in BP, defined as augmentation of > 5 mmHg in systolic (SBP and/or diastolic BP (DBP, after PAP usage. Co-relational analysis of BP increase, with OSAS severity indexes and therapy compliance, using Pearson coefficient. Results: Of 508 consecutive patients followed in our Department, treated with nocturnal ventilatory support, 30 evolved with BP rise after initiating treatment (age 58 ± 10.8 years; Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index [AHI], 46.1 ± 18.68. After PAP usage, mean blood pressure (MBP, Systolic BP (SBP and Diastolic BP (DBP variation was 16 ± 15 mmHg, 20 ± 25 mmHg and 6 ± 19.4 mmHg, respectively. No patient showed significant BMI increase. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS value decreased 8.9 ± 5.48 points. MBP, SBP and DBP variations were not correlated with P90/P95, residual AHI, leaks or PAP compliance. Conclusions: No specific characteristics were identified in the group who developed a rise in BP with PAP usage. No correlations were found between rises in BP and OSAS severity indexes or PAP compliance. Neither BMI nor variation in wakefulness status explained the rise in BP. Studies relate polymorphisms of b1-adrenoreceptors with different BP responses to ventilatory support. More studies are needed to clarify the cause of this paradoxical response. Resumo: Introdução: Doentes com síndrome de Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono (SAOS podem desenvolver hipertensão arterial (HTA sendo a

  3. EFFECT OF BODY POSITIONS ON INTRA OCULAR PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intra Ocular Pressure (IOP can be altered by changing body position. Very few studies are available in the Indian subjects. AIM: To study the effect of changes in the body position from upright posture to supine to head down tilt of - 60 0 . MATERIALS AND M ETHODS: The study group consisted of 60 subjects, 35 boys and 25 girls in the age group of 18 to 24 years, with no ocular pathology were chosen. Independent measurements of the IOP of each eye were obtained. Keelar Pulsair air impulse tonometer was used in all the subjects for IOP measurement. IOP was measured in the department of Ophthalmology, Teaching Hospital between 10AM to 12 Noon. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS : were done using Student’s paired ‘t’ test. RESULTS: The change of IOP (Increased induced by the change of position between the means of IOP’s for the sitting and supine positions was 2.789±1.03 mm Hg of all subjects, 2.825±0.226 mm Hg in males and 2.739±0.089 mm Hg in females and between the supine and in clined - 60 ⁰ position was 4.971±0.914 mm Hg of all subjects, 4.703±0.816mm Hg in males and 5.346±1.098 mm Hg in females. CONCLUSION: It is apparent that, the IOP is significantly higher in the supine than in the sitting and in the inclined than in the supin e positions. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.001.

  4. Effect of oxyfluorinated multi-walled carbon nanotube additives on positive temperature coefficient/negative temperature coefficient behavior in high-density polyethylene polymeric switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Byong Chol; Kang, Seok Chang; Im, Ji Sun; Lee, Se Hyun; Lee, Young-Seak

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The electrical properties of MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches and their effect on oxyfluorination. Highlights: → Oxyfluorinated MWCNTs were used to reduce the PTC/NTC phenomenon in MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches. → Electron mobility is difficult in MWCNT particles when the number of oxygen functional groups (C-O, C=O) increases by oxyfluorination. → A mechanism of improved electrical properties of oxyfluorinated MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches was suggested. -- Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were embedded into high-density polyethylene (HDPE) to improve the electrical properties of HDPE polymeric switches. The MWCNT surfaces were modified by oxyfluorination to improve their positive temperature coefficient (PTC) and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behaviors in HDPE polymeric switches. HDPE polymeric switches exhibit poor electron mobility between MWCNT particles when the number of oxygen functional groups is increased by oxyfluorination. Thus, the PTC intensity of HDPE polymeric switches was increased by the destruction of the electrical conductivity network. The oxyfluorination of MWCNTs also leads to weak NTC behavior in the MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches. This result is attributed to the reduction of the mutual attraction between the MWCNT particles at the melting temperature of HDPE, which results from a decrease in the surface free energy of the C-F bond in MWCNT particles.

  5. Studies on preparation and adaptive thermal control performance of novel PTC (positive temperature coefficient) materials with controllable Curie temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-long; Yuan, Shuai; Song, Jia-liang

    2014-01-01

    PTC (positive temperature coefficient) material is a kind of thermo-sensitive material. In this study, a series of novel PTC materials adapted to thermal control of electron devices are prepared. By adding different low-melting-point blend matrixes into GP (graphite powder)/LDPE (low density polyethylene) composite, the Curie temperatures are adjusted to 9 °C, 25 °C, 34 °C and 41 °C, and the resistance–temperature coefficients are enhanced to 1.57/°C–2.15/°C. These PTC materials remain solid in the temperature region of PTC effect, which makes it possible to be used as heating element to achieve adaptive temperature control. In addition, the adaptive thermal control performances of this kind of materials are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The result shows that the adaptive effect becomes more significant while the resistance–temperature coefficient increases. A critical heating power defined as the initial heating power which makes the equilibrium temperature reach terminal temperature is presented. The adaptive temperature control will be effective only if the initial power is below this value. The critical heating power is determined by the Curie temperature and resistance–temperature coefficient of PTC materials, and a higher Curie temperature or resistance–temperature coefficient will lead to a larger critical heating power. - Highlights: • A series of novel PTC (positive temperature coefficient) materials were prepared. • The Curie point of PTC material can be adjusted by choosing different blend matrixes. • The resistance–temperature coefficient of PTC materials is enhanced to 2.15/°C. • The material has good adaptive temperature control ability with no auxiliary method. • A mathematical model is established to analyze the performance and applicability

  6. Spatial dispersion effects in spectral line broadening by pressure. I. The Bouguer Law and absorption coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkasov, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Based on the general principles of semiclassical electrodynamics, the Bouguer law is derived, and the expression for the absorption coefficient is obtained, formally including all effects related to the phenomenon of spatial dispersion

  7. Is aerobic workload positively related to ambulatory blood pressure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshøj, Mette; Clays, Els; Lidegaard, Mark

    2016-01-01

    workload and ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) are lacking. The aim was to explore the relationship between objectively measured relative aerobic workload and ABP. METHODS: A total of 116 cleaners aged 18-65 years were included after informed consent was obtained. A portable device (Spacelabs 90217......) was mounted for 24-h measurements of ABP, and an Actiheart was mounted for 24-h heart rate measurements to calculate relative aerobic workload as percentage of relative heart rate reserve. A repeated-measure multi-adjusted mixed model was applied for analysis. RESULTS: A fully adjusted mixed model...... of measurements throughout the day showed significant positive relations (p ABP and 0.30 ± 0.04 mmHg (95 % CI 0.22-0.38 mmHg) in diastolic ABP. Correlations between...

  8. Positive expiratory pressure - Common clinical applications and physiological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagevik Olsén, Monika; Lannefors, Louise; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2015-03-01

    Breathing out against resistance, in order to achieve positive expiratory pressure (PEP), is applied by many patient groups. Pursed lips breathing and a variety of devices can be used to create the resistance giving the increased expiratory pressure. Effects on pulmonary outcomes have been discussed in several publications, but the expected underlying physiology of the effect is seldom discussed. The aim of this article is to describe the purpose, performance, clinical application and underlying physiology of PEP when it is used to increase lung volumes, decrease hyperinflation or improve airway clearance. In clinical practice, the instruction how to use an expiratory resistance is of major importance since it varies. Different breathing patterns during PEP increase or reduce expiratory flow, result in movement of EPP centrally or peripherally and can increase or decrease lung volume. It is therefore necessary to give the right instructions to obtain the desired effects. As the different PEP techniques are being used by diverse patient groups it is not possible to give standard instructions. Based on the information given in this article the instructions have to be adjusted to give the optimal effect. There is no consensus regarding optimal treatment frequency and number of cycles included in each treatment session and must also be individualized. In future research, more precise descriptions are needed about physiological aims and specific instructions of how the treatments have been performed to assure as good treatment quality as possible and to be able to evaluate and compare treatment effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Estimation of internal heat transfer coefficients and detection of rib positions in gas turbine blades from transient surface temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidrich, P; Wolfersdorf, J v; Schmidt, S; Schnieder, M

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a non-invasive, non-destructive, transient inverse measurement technique that allows one to determine internal heat transfer coefficients and rib positions of real gas turbine blades from outer surface temperature measurements after a sudden flow heating. The determination of internal heat transfer coefficients is important during the design process to adjust local heat transfer to spatial thermal load. The detection of rib positions is important during production to fulfill design and quality requirements. For the analysis the one-dimensional transient heat transfer problem inside of the turbine blade's wall was solved. This solution was combined with the Levenberg-Marquardt method to estimate the unknown boundary condition by an inverse technique. The method was tested with artificial data to determine uncertainties with positive results. Then experimental testing with a reference model was carried out. Based on the results, it is concluded that the presented inverse technique could be used to determine internal heat transfer coefficients and to detect rib positions of real turbine blades.

  10. Use of positive pressure in preoperative and intraoperative of bariatric surgery and its effect on the time of extubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Baltieri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of intraoperative and preoperative positive pressure in the time of extubation in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. METHOD: Randomized clinical trial, in which 40 individuals with a body mass index between 40 and 55 kg/m2, age between 25 and 55 years, nonsmokers, underwent bariatric surgery type Roux-en-Y gastric bypass by laparotomy and with normal preoperative pulmonary function were randomized into the following groups: G-pre (n = 10: individuals who received treatment with noninvasive positive pressure before surgery for 1 h; G-intra (n = 10: individuals who received positive end-expiratory pressure of 10 cm H2O throughout the surgical procedure; and G-control (n = 20: not received any preoperative or intraoperative intervention. Following were recorded: time between induction of anesthesia and extubation, between the end of anesthesia and extubation, duration of mechanical ventilation, and time between extubation and discharge from the post-anesthetic recovery. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference between groups. However, when applied to the Cohen coefficient, the use of positive end-expiratory pressure of 10 cm H2O during surgery showed a large effect on the time between the end of anesthesia and extubation. About this same time, the treatment performed preoperatively showed moderate effect. CONCLUSION: The use of positive end-expiratory pressure of 10 cm H2O in the intraoperative and positive pressure preoperatively, influenced the time of extubation of patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

  11. Positive pressure ventilation and cranial volume in newborn infants.

    OpenAIRE

    Milligan, D W

    1981-01-01

    The relationship between changes in airways pressure, pleural pressure, and cranial volume was studied in a group of sick newborn infants requiring ventilatory assistance. Cranial volume increased appreciably only when lung compliance was such that more than 20% of the applied airways pressure was transmitted to the pleural space, or if the absolute pleural pressure was greater than 4 cmH2O above atmospheric pressure. The findings stress the need for more-critical monitoring during periods of...

  12. Evaluation of Pressure Generated by Resistors From Different Positive Expiratory Pressure Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagevik Olsén, Monika; Carlsson, Maria; Olsén, Erik; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    Breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure (PEP) are used to improve pulmonary function and airway clearance. Different PEP devices are available, but there have been no studies that describe the pressure generated by different resistors. The purpose of this study was to compare pressures generated from the proprietary resistor components of 4 commercial flow-dependent PEP valves with all other parameters kept constant. Resistors from 4 flow-regulated PEP devices (Pep/Rmt system, Wellspect HealthCare; Pipe P breathing exerciser, Koo Medical Equipment; Mini-PEP, Philips Respironics [including resistors by Rüsch]; and 15-mm endo-adapter, VBM Medizintechnik) were tested randomly by a blinded tester at constant flows of 10 and 18 L/min from an external gas system. All resistors were tested 3 times. Resistors with a similar diameter produced statistically significant different pressures at the same flow. The differences were smaller when the flow was 10 L/min compared with 18 L/min. The differences were also smaller when the diameter of the resistor was increased. The pressures produced by the 4 resistors of the same size were all significantly different when measuring 1.5- and 2.0-mm resistors at a flow of 10 L/min and 2.0-mm resistors at a flow of 18 L/min (P < .001). There were no significant differences between any of the resistors when testing sizes of 4.5 and 5.0 mm at either flow. The Mini-PEP and adapter resistors gave the highest pressures. Pressures generated by the different proprietary resistor components of 4 commercial PEP devices were not comparable, even though the diameter of the resistors is reported to be the same. The pressures generated were significantly different, particularly when using small-diameter resistors at a high flow. Therefore, the resistors may not be interchangeable. This is important information for clinicians, particularly when considering PEP for patients who do not tolerate higher pressures. Copyright © 2015 by

  13. The determination of the pressure viscosity coefficient of a lubricant through an accurate film thickness formula and accurate film thickness measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van H.J.

    2009-01-01

    The pressure viscosity coefficient is an indispensable property in the EHD lubrication of hard contacts, but often not known. A guess will easily lead to enormous errors in the film thickness. This paper describes a method to deduct this coefficient by adapting the value of the pressure viscosity

  14. Pressure loss coefficient evaluation based on CFD analysis for simple geometries and PWR reactor vessel without geometry simplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko II, B.; Park, J. P.; Jeong, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear vendors and utilities perform lots of simulations and analyses in order to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). In general, the simulations are carried out using vendor-specific design codes and best-estimate system analysis codes and most of them were developed based on 1-dimensional lumped parameter models. These thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes require user input for pressure loss coefficient, k-factor; since they numerically solve Euler-equation. In spite of its high impact on the safety analysis results, there has not been good validation method for the selection of loss coefficient. During the past decade, however; computers, parallel computation methods, and 3-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes have been dramatically enhanced. It is believed to be beneficial to take advantage of advanced commercial CFD codes in safety analysis and design of NPP5. The present work aims to validate pressure loss coefficient evaluation for simple geometries and k-factor calculation for PWR based on CFD. The performances of standard k-ε model, RNG k-ε model, Reynolds stress model (RSM) on the simulation of pressure drop for simple geometry such as, or sudden-expansion, and sudden-contraction are evaluated. The calculated value was compared with pressure loss coefficient in handbook of hydraulic resistance. Then the present work carried out analysis for flow distribution in downcomer and lower plenum of Korean standard nuclear power plants (KSNPs) using STAR-CD. The lower plenum geometry of a PWR is very complicated since there are so many reactor internals, which hinders in CFD analysis for real reactor geometry up to now. The present work takes advantage of 3D CAD model so that real geometry of lower plenum is used. The results give a clear figure about flow fields in the reactor vessel, which is one of major safety concerns. The calculated pressure drop across downcomer and lower plenum appears to be in good agreement

  15. Contrastive Analysis and Research on Negative Pressure Beam Tube System and Positive Pressure Beam Tube System for Mine Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyi; Shen, Jialong; Liu, Xinbo

    2018-01-01

    Against the technical defects of universally applicable beam tube monitoring system at present, such as air suction in the beam tube, line clogging, long sampling time, etc., the paper analyzes the current situation of the spontaneous combustion fire disaster forecast of mine in our country and these defects one by one. On this basis, the paper proposes a research thought that improving the positive pressure beam tube so as to substitute the negative pressure beam tube. Then, the paper introduces the beam tube monitoring system based on positive pressure technology through theoretical analysis and experiment. In the comparison with negative pressure beam tube, the paper concludes the advantage of the new system and draws the conclusion that the positive pressure beam tube is superior to the negative pressure beam tube system both in test result and test time. At last, the paper proposes prospect of the beam tube monitoring system based on positive pressure technology.

  16. Evaluation of a new pediatric positive airway pressure mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushida, Clete A; Halbower, Ann C; Kryger, Meir H; Pelayo, Rafael; Assalone, Valerie; Cardell, Chia-Yu; Huston, Stephanie; Willes, Leslee; Wimms, Alison J; Mendoza, June

    2014-09-15

    The choice and variety of pediatric masks for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is limited in the US. Therefore, clinicians often prescribe modified adult masks. Until recently a mask for children aged mask for children aged 2-7 years (Pixi; ResMed Ltd, Sydney, Australia). Patients aged 2-7 years were enrolled and underwent in-lab baseline polysomnography (PSG) using their previous mask, then used their previous mask and the VPAP III ST-A flow generator for ≥ 10 nights at home. Thereafter, patients switched to the Pixi mask for ≥ 2 nights before returning for a PSG during PAP therapy via the Pixi mask. Patients then used the Pixi mask at home for ≥ 21 nights. Patients and their parents/guardians returned to the clinic for follow-up and provided feedback on the Pixi mask versus their previous mask. AHI with the Pixi mask was 1.1 ± 1.5/h vs 2.6 ± 5.4/h with the previous mask (p = 0.3538). Parents rated the Pixi mask positively for: restfulness of the child's sleep, trouble in getting the child to sleep, and trouble in having the child stay asleep. The Pixi mask was also rated highly for leaving fewer or no marks on the upper lip and under the child's ears, and being easy to remove. The Pixi mask is suitable for children aged 2-7 years and provides an alternative to other masks available for PAP therapy in this age group. © 2014 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  17. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation in acute asthmatic attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Soroksky

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is characterised by reversible airway obstruction. In most patients, control of disease activity is easily achieved. However, in a small minority, asthma may be fatal. Between the two extremes lie patients with severe asthmatic attacks, refractory to standard treatment. These patients are at an increased risk of recurrent severe attacks, with respiratory failure, and mechanical ventilation. Invasive mechanical ventilation of the asthmatic patient is associated with a higher risk of complications and, therefore, is a measure of last resort. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV is another treatment modality that may be beneficial in patients with severe asthmatic attack who are at an increased risk of developing respiratory failure. These patients have the potential to benefit from early respiratory support in the form of NPPV. However, reports of NPPV in asthmatic patients are scarce, and its usage in asthmatic attacks is, therefore, still controversial. Only a few reports of NPPV in asthma have been published over the last decade. These studies mostly involve small numbers of patients and those who have problematic methodology. In this article we review the available evidence for NPPV in asthma and try to formulate our recommendations for NPPV application in asthma based on the available evidence and reports.

  18. Routine use of humidification with nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsnop, C J; Miseski, S; Rochford, P D

    2010-09-01

    Heated humidification can reduce nasal symptoms caused by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment, but its routine use has not been studied over the medium term in a randomized controlled trial. The aim of this study is to determine if heated humidification would reduce nasal symptoms and improve adherence with CPAP treatment in all patients with sleep apnoea irrespective of whether they had nasal symptoms initially. A randomized, parallel group design. Patients were treated for 3 months with a Fisher & Paykel HC201 pump with built-in heated humidification, or with the heater disabled and without water. Adherence was measured with a timer built into the pumps. Nasal symptoms were measured with a 10-cm visual analogue scale. There were 25 in the humidification group and 29 in the non-humidification group. After 12 weeks mean (standard deviation) adherence with CPAP was 4.7 (2.4) and 4.5 (2.2) hours per night respectively. Nasal symptoms that were reduced were nose blocked* 6 (12), 18 (26); sneezing* 4 (8), 15 (25); dry nose* 8 (12), 24 (33); stuffy nose* 7 (14), 22(31); dry mouth* 13 (18), 33(36); and runny nose* 6 (17), 14 (29). Parameters marked with an asterisk '*' had P humidification with CPAP in all patients with sleep apnoea reduced nasal symptoms, but did not improve adherence. © 2010 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2010 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  19. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment: current realities and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthon-Jones, M; Lawrence, S; Sullivan, C E; Grunstein, R

    1996-11-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a highly effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) is reduced 10-fold, but the patient dropout rate is up to 30%, and usage is typically 20/hour were recruited, with written informed consent. Subjects slept for a diagnostic night, followed by a treatment night, in the laboratory, using the AutoSet system with full polysomnographic monitoring of respiratory and sleep variables. Arousals were scored using ASDA criteria. Hypopneas were scored when there was a 50% reduction in ventilation for > 10 seconds, associated with a 4% drop in oxygen saturation. For comparison, the ASDA arousal index in 16 normal subjects (without nasal CPAP) is provided. Results are given as mean +/- standard error of the mean. AHI was reduced from 55 +/- 3 to 1.5 +/- 0.35 events/hour (p < 0.0001). The arousal index was reduced from 65 +/- 3 to 18 +/- 2 events/hour (p < 0.0001), identical to the value in the 16 healthy normal subjects. There was a 158% +/- 21% increase in slow-wave sleep (p = 0.01) and a 186% +/- 27% increase in rapid eye movement sleep (p = 0.013). The AutoSet self-adjusting nasal CPAP system adequately treats obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on the first night under laboratory conditions.

  20. Determination of oral mucosal Poisson's ratio and coefficient of friction from in-vivo contact pressure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junning; Suenaga, Hanako; Hogg, Michael; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Despite their considerable importance to biomechanics, there are no existing methods available to directly measure apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient of oral mucosa. This study aimed to develop an inverse procedure to determine these two biomechanical parameters by utilizing in vivo experiment of contact pressure between partial denture and beneath mucosa through nonlinear finite element (FE) analysis and surrogate response surface (RS) modelling technique. First, the in vivo denture-mucosa contact pressure was measured by a tactile electronic sensing sheet. Second, a 3D FE model was constructed based on the patient CT images. Third, a range of apparent Poisson's ratios and the coefficients of friction from literature was considered as the design variables in a series of FE runs for constructing a RS surrogate model. Finally, the discrepancy between computed in silico and measured in vivo results was minimized to identify the best matching Poisson's ratio and coefficient of friction. The established non-invasive methodology was demonstrated effective to identify such biomechanical parameters of oral mucosa and can be potentially used for determining the biomaterial properties of other soft biological tissues.

  1. Airway pressure release ventilation and biphasic positive airway pressure: a systematic review of definitional criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Louise; Hawkins, Martyn

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the definitional criteria for the pressure-limited and time-cycled modes: airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) and biphasic positive airway pressure (BIPAP) available in the published literature. Systematic review. Medline, PubMed, Cochrane, and CINAHL databases (1982-2006) were searched using the following terms: APRV, BIPAP, Bilevel and lung protective strategy, individually and in combination. Two independent reviewers determined the paper eligibility and abstracted data from 50 studies and 18 discussion articles. Of the 50 studies, 39 (78%) described APRV, and 11 (22%) described BIPAP. Various study designs, populations, or outcome measures were investigated. Compared to BIPAP, APRV was described more frequently as extreme inverse inspiratory:expiratory ratio [18/39 (46%) vs. 0/11 (0%), P = 0.004] and used rarely as a noninverse ratio [2/39 (5%) vs. 3/11 (27%), P = 0.06]. One (9%) BIPAP and eight (21%) APRV studies used mild inverse ratio (>1:1 to branding may further add to confusion. Generic naming of modes and consistent definitional parameters may improve consistency of patient response for a given mode and assist with clinical implementation.

  2. [Domiciliary noninvasive positive pressure ventilation in chronic alveolar hypoventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, J P; Robles, A M; Pereyra, M A; Abbona, H L; López, A M

    2000-01-01

    Effectiveness of treatment with domiciliary nocturnal noninvasive positive pressure ventilation is analyzed in a group of patients with chronic alveolar hypoventilation of different etiologies. It was applied with two levels of pressure (BiPAP) via nasal mask. Criteria for evaluation were symptomatology and improvement in gas exchange. Data were analyzed by Student t tests. A total of 13 patients were included, mean age 55.7 range 20 to 76 years (5 male 8 female). Main diagnosis was tuberculosis in 6, four of them having had surgical procedure (thoracoplasty 2, frenicectomy 1 and neumonectomy 1), myopathy 3 (myasthenia gravis 1, muscular dystrophy 1 and diaphragmatic paralysis 1), obesity-hypoventilation syndrome 1, escoliosis 1, bronchiectasis 1 and cystic fibrosis 1. These last two patients were on waiting list for lung transplantation. At the moment of consultation, the symptoms were: dysnea 13/13 (100%), astenia 13/13 (100%), hypersomnolency 10/13 (77%), cephalea 9/13 (69%), leg edema 6/13 (46%), loss of memory 6/13 (46%). Regarding gas exchange, they showed hypoxemia and hypercapnia. Mean follow up was of 2.2 years (range 6 months to 4 years). Within the year, all 13 patients became less dyspneic. Astenia, hypersomnolency, cephalea, leg edema and memory loss disappeared. Improvement in gas exchange was: PaO2/FiO2 from 269 +/- 65.4 (basal) to 336.7 +/- 75.3 post-treatment (p = 0.0018). PaCO2 from 70.77 +/- 25.48 mmHg (basal) to 46.77 +/- 8.14 mmHg (p = 0.0013). Ventilatory support was discontinued en 5 patients: three because of pneumonia requiring intubation and conventional mechanical ventilation, two of them died and one is still with tracheostomy; One patient with bronchiectasis and one with cystic fibrosis were transplanted. The remaining eight patients are stable. In conclusion, chronic alveolar hypoventilation can be effectively treated with domiciliary nocturnal noninvasive ventilation. Long term improvement in symptomatology and arterial blood gases

  3. Coefficient of Friction Measurements for Thermoplastics and Fibre Composites Under Low Sliding Velocity and High Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Svendsen, Gustav Winther; Hiller, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    that friction materials which are untypical for brake applications, like thermoplastics and fibre composites, can offer superior performance in terms of braking torque, wear resistance and cost than typical brake linings. In this paper coefficient of friction measurements for various thermoplastic and fibre......Friction materials for typical brake applications are normally designed considering thermal stability as the major performance criterion. There are, however, brake applications with very limited sliding velocities, where the generated heat is insignificant. In such cases it is possible...... in order to interpret the changes of friction observed during the running-in phase....

  4. Comparison of photon organ and effective dose coefficients for PIMAL stylized phantom in bent positions in standard irradiation geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewji, Shaheen; Hiller, Mauritius [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Reed, K.L. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Nuclear and Radiological Engineering Program, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Computational phantoms with articulated arms and legs have been constructed to enable the estimation of radiation dose in different postures. Through a graphical user interface, the Phantom wIth Moving Arms and Legs (PIMAL) version 4.1.0 software can be employed to articulate the posture of a phantom and generate a corresponding input deck for the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. In this work, photon fluence-to-dose coefficients were computed using PIMAL to compare organ and effective doses for a stylized phantom in the standard upright position with those for phantoms in realistic work postures. The articulated phantoms represent working positions including fully and half bent torsos with extended arms for both the male and female reference adults. Dose coefficients are compared for both the upright and bent positions across monoenergetic photon energies: 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 MeV. Additionally, the organ doses are compared across the International Commission on Radiological Protection's standard external radiation exposure geometries: antero-posterior, postero-anterior, left and right lateral, and isotropic (AP, PA, LLAT, RLAT, and ISO). For the AP and PA irradiation geometries, differences in organ doses compared to the upright phantom become more profound with increasing bending angles and have doses largely overestimated for all organs except the brain in AP and bladder in PA. In LLAT and RLAT irradiation geometries, energy deposition for organs is more likely to be underestimated compared to the upright phantom, with no overall change despite increased bending angle. The ISO source geometry did not cause a significant difference in absorbed organ dose between the different phantoms, regardless of position. Organ and effective fluence-to-dose coefficients are tabulated. In the AP geometry, the effective dose at the 45 bent position is overestimated compared to the upright phantom below 1 MeV by as much as 27% and 82% in the

  5. Oscillation for equations with positive and negative coefficients and with distributed delay I: General results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Berezansky

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available We study a scalar delay differential equation with a bounded distributed delay, $$ dot{x}(t+ int_{h(t}^t x(s,d_s R(t,s - int_{g(t}^t x(s,d_s T(t,s=0, $$ where $R(t,s$, $T(t,s$ are nonnegative nondecreasing in $s$ for any $t$, $$ R(t,h(t=T(t,g(t=0, quad R(t,s geq T(t,s. $$ We establish a connection between non-oscillation of this differential equation and the corresponding differential inequalities, and between positiveness of the fundamental function and the existence of a nonnegative solution for a nonlinear integral inequality that constructed explicitly. We also present comparison theorems, and explicit non-oscillation and oscillation results. In a separate publication (part II, we will consider applications of this theory to differential equations with several concentrated delays, integrodifferential, and mixed equations.

  6. Extubation success in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome treated with bi-level nasal continuous positive airway pressure versus nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Patricia E; LeFlore, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Infants born prematurely with respiratory distress syndrome are at high risk for complications from mechanical ventilation. Strategies are needed to minimize their days on the ventilator. The purpose of this study was to compare extubation success rates in infants treated with 2 different types of continuous positive airway pressure devices. A retrospective cohort study design was used. Data were retrieved from electronic medical records for patients in a large, metropolitan, level III neonatal intensive care unit. A sample of 194 premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome was selected, 124 of whom were treated with nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation and 70 with bi-level variable flow nasal continuous positive airway pressure (bi-level nasal continuous positive airway pressure). Infants in both groups had high extubation success rates (79% of nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation group and 77% of bi-level nasal continuous positive airway pressure group). Although infants in the bi-level nasal continuous positive airway pressure group were extubated sooner, there was no difference in duration of oxygen therapy between the 2 groups. Promoting early extubation and extubation success is a vital strategy to reduce complications of mechanical ventilation that adversely affect premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome.

  7. Comparison of intermittent positive pressure breathing and temporary positive expiratory pressure in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Antonello; Mollar, Elena; Grecchi, Bruna; Landucci, Norma

    2014-01-01

    Results supporting the use and the effectiveness of positive expiratory, pressure devices in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are still controversial, We have tested the hypothesis that adding TPEP or IPPB to standard pharmacological therapy may provide additional clinical benefit over, pharmacological therapy only in patients with severe COPD. Fourty-five patients were randomized in three groups: a group was treated; with IPPB,a group was treated with TPEP and a group with pharmacological; therapy alone (control group). Primary outcome measures included the measurement of scale or, questionnaire concerning dyspnea (MRC scale),dyspnea,cough, and, sputum (BCSS) and quality of life (COPD assessment test) (CAT). Secondary, outcome measures were respiratory function testing,arterial blood gas,analysis,and hematological examinations. Both patients in the IPPB group and in the TPEP group showed a significant, improvement in two of three tests (MRC,CAT) compared to the control, group.However,in the group comparison analysis for, the same variables between IPPB group and TPEP group we observed a, significant improvement in the IPPB group (P≤.05 for MRC and P≤.01 for, CAT). The difference of action of the two techniques are evident in the results of, pulmonary function testing: IPPB increases FVC, FEV1, and MIP; this reflects, its capacity to increase lung volume. Also TPEP increases FVC and FEV1 (less, than IPPB), but increases MEP, while decreasing total lung capacity and, residual volume. The two techniques (IPPB and TPEP) improves significantly dyspnea; quality of; life tools and lung function in patients with severe COPD. IPPB demonstrated a greater effectiveness to improve dyspnea and quality of life tools (MRC, CAT) than TPEP. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of the Contact Pressure on the Friction Loss Coefficient in a Micro Gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Ho Yun; Kim, Jong Man; Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Yong Bum

    2010-01-01

    As one way to improve the reliability of a steam generator for a sodium-cooled fast reactor, a double-wall tube steam generator is being developed. The current development of the DWTSG focuses on the improvement of heat transfer capability for a double-wall tube and the development of a proper leak detection method for the double-wall tube during the operation of a reactor. In the conventional double wall tubes(DWT), the inner tube and the outer tube are made of the same material. When the temperature difference between the inner tube and the outer tube increases, the heat transfer efficiency decreases. To improve the heat transfer capability of a double wall tube, the inner tube is made of a material with a thermal expansion coefficient which is about 10 to 15% greater than that of the outer tube . For the on-line and real-time detection of whether the heat transfer tube is damaged or not, a detection method was developed by combining the heat transfer tube gaps and the detection holes meeting with a one-to-one correspondence in the lower tubesheet. In the pre-stressed DWT, there is a very small space due to the surface roughness of the inner wall and outer wall. Thus, if the outer wall is broken, the helium gas (2MPa) in the very narrow space is ejected into the sodium (0.1MPa), and if the inner wall is broken, the superheated gas (16.5MPa) is ejected into the space filled with helium gas. If the four grooves with 0.2-04mm depths are dug in the inner surface of the outer wall in order for the helium gas to flow easily, we can detect the leakage by checking the change of gas volume in the online groove

  9. Impact of Polysomnographic Parameters on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Mozafari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives : O bstructive sleep apnea is a preventable and prevalent major health hazard with serious health consequences including excessive daytime sleepiness, cognitive disturbances, depression, cardiovascular diseases and hypertension. Obstructive sleep apnea is a disorder affecting 2 to 4% of the adult population. The continuous positive airway pressur e (CPAP i s the most efficacious therapy and is often the first option for these patients. The pressure titration during laboratory polysomnography is required for treatment by CPAP.   Methods: The patients with obstructive sleep apnea requiring continuous positive airway pressure treatment were selected . CPAP titration was done according to American Academy of Sleep Medicine protocol. Comparison among continuous positive airway pressure with polysomnographic parameters was performed and analyzed with Pearson correlation coefficient. For analysis of qualitative parameters, we used chi-square and then checked with SPSS version 18 software.   Results: From 125 patients with obstructive sleep apnea, there were 112 cases with inclusion criteria. Mean age of participants was 55.07 ± 12, male frequency was 59.2%, apnea hypopnea index was 43.62 and mean continuous positive airway pressure was 12.50 . There was significant relationship among the pressure of continuous positive airway pressure with apnea hypopnea index (P=0.028, arousal index (P=0.011, body mass index (P=0.041 and O2 desaturation index (P=0.022, although age was not significantly related.   Conclusion: In accordance to this data, we found out a prediction equation for optimal CPAP in our patients

  10. Mandibular Advancing Positive Pressure Apnea Remediation Device (MAPPARD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    also medical prosthesis design as well. ArtiSynth is currently working on a study, described in Chapter V, to predict whether a patient with OSA is...deformable mesh, and is measured by the fluid-solid interface. This is due to the fact that the mesh faces feel the pressure predicted from the fluid

  11. Distinct positive temperature coefficient effect of polymer-carbon fiber composites evaluated in terms of polymer absorption on fiber surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Zheng, Shaodi; Zheng, Xiaofang; Liu, Zhengying; Yang, Wei; Yang, Mingbo

    2016-03-21

    In this article, the positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect was studied for high-density polyethylene (HDPE)/carbon fiber (CF) composites. All of the samples showed a significant PTC effect during the heating processes without a negative temperature coefficient (NTC) effect, even at a temperature much higher than the melting point of the polymer matrix. An ever-increasing PTC intensity with increasing thermal cycles was observed in our study that had never been reported in previous research. The absence of a NTC effect resulted from the increased binding force between the matrix and fillers that contributed to the very special structure of CF surface. We incorporated thermal expansion theory and quantum tunneling effects to explain PTC effect. From the SEM micrographs for the HDPE/CF composites before and after the different thermal cycles, we found that the surface of CF was covered with a layer of polymer which resulted in a change in the gap length between CF and HDPE and its distribution. We believed that the gap change induced by polymer absorption on the fiber surface had a great effect on the PTC effect.

  12. Proportional positive airway pressure: a new concept to treat obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, J; Becker, H; Cassel, W; Rostig, S; Peter, J H

    2001-03-01

    Proportional positive airway pressure (PPAP) was designed to optimize airway pressure for the therapy of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). In a randomized crossover prospective study, the clinical feasibility of PPAP and its immediate effects on the breathing disorder and sleep in comparison with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was evaluated. Twelve patients requiring CPAP therapy underwent CPAP and PPAP titration in a random order. Obstructive and mixed respiratory events could be completely abolished with both forms of treatment. This efficacy could be achieved at a significantly lower mean mask pressure during PPAP titration (8.45+/-2.42 cmH2O) compared to CPAP (9.96+/-2.7 cmH2O) (p=0.002). The mean minimal arterial oxygen saturation (Sa,O2) (82.8+/-6.5%) on the diagnostic night increased significantly (pPPAP titration. Total sleep time, slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep increased significantly by the same amount during both CPAP and PPAP titration (pPPAP titration night, four patients did not have a preference, and two patients preferred CPAP. The present data show that proportional positive airway pressure is as effective as continuous positive airway pressure in eliminating obstructive events and has the same immediate effect on sleep. The lower average mask pressure during proportional positive airway pressure implies potential advantages compared to continuous positive airway pressure. Proportional positive airway pressure presents a new effective therapeutic approach to obstructive sleep apnoea.

  13. Insomnia complaints in lean patients with obstructive sleep apnea negatively affect positive airway pressure treatment adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysteinsdottir, Bjorg; Gislason, Thorarinn; Pack, Allan I; Benediktsdottir, Bryndís; Arnardottir, Erna S; Kuna, Samuel T; Björnsdottir, Erla

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the determinants of long-term adherence to positive airway pressure treatment among patients with obstructive sleep apnea, with special emphasis on patients who stop positive airway pressure treatment within 1 year. This is a prospective long-term follow-up of subjects in the Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort who were diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea between 2005 and 2009, and started on positive airway pressure treatment. In October 2014, positive airway pressure adherence was obtained by systematically evaluating available clinical files (n = 796; 644 males, 152 females) with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index ≥15 events per h). The mean follow-up time was 6.7 ± 1.2 years. In total, 123 subjects (15.5%) returned their positive airway pressure device within the first year, 170 (21.4%) returned it later and 503 (63.2%) were still using positive airway pressure. The quitters within the first year had lower body mass index, milder obstructive sleep apnea, less sleepiness, and more often had symptoms of initial and late insomnia compared with long-term positive airway pressure users at baseline. Both initial and late insomnia were after adjustment still significantly associated with being an early quitter among subjects with body mass index insomnia are associated with early quitting on positive airway pressure among non-obese subjects. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  14. Effect of nasal continuous and biphasic positive airway pressure on lung volume in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, Martijn; van der Burg, Pauline S.; Beuger, Sabine; de Jongh, Frans H.; Frerichs, Inez; van Kaam, Anton H.

    2013-01-01

    To monitor regional changes in end-expiratory lung volume (EELV), tidal volumes, and their ventilation distribution during different levels of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) and nasal biphasic positive airway pressure (BiPAP) in stable preterm infants. By using electrical

  15. Early nasal continuous positive airway pressure in a cohort of the smallest infants in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bo M; Esbjørn, Barbara Hoff; Greisen, G

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate neurodevelopmental outcome at age 5 y of age in a cohort of preterm children treated mainly with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in the neonatal period.......To evaluate neurodevelopmental outcome at age 5 y of age in a cohort of preterm children treated mainly with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in the neonatal period....

  16. Positioning bedridden patients to reduce interface pressures over the sacrum and great trochanter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Y; Maeshige, N; Sugimoto, M; Uemura, M; Noguchi, M; Terashi, H

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of hip-joint rotation on the interface pressure over the sacrum and greater trochanter with a new protocol for positioning of bedridden elderly patients. The interface pressure values over the sacrum and greater trochanter in bedridden patients were evaluated. These were collected in the supine position, 90° lateral position, and 30° and 40° laterally inclined positions with external rotation or neutral positioning of the hip joint. Each interface pressure was assessed with a device measuring pressure distribution, after which, the peak pressure index (PPI) was calculated. In the 17 patients examined, the PPI over the sacrum in the supine position was significantly greater than that in other positions. In the 30° and 40° laterally inclined positions, the PPIs over the greater trochanter were significantly lower in the neutral position of the hip joint compared with those in the external rotation position. Our findings revealed the effects of hip-joint rotation on the interface pressure for the greater trochanter, possibly due to the increased distance between the greater trochanter and the sacrum caused by neutral position of the hip joint. The results demonstrate that it is to best place the hip joint in a neutral position when the legs are in contact with the bed in order to distribute the pressure over the greater trochanter in the 30° and 40° laterally inclined positions. These results can be applied to the clinical setting to improve patient positioning and decrease pressure ulcers. The authors declare that they have no competing financial interests.

  17. Asystole following positive pressure insufflation of right pleural cavity: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konia Mojca R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Adverse hemodynamic effects with severe bradycardia have been previously reported during positive pressure insufflation of the right thoracic cavity in humans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of asystole during thoracoscopic surgery with positive pressure insufflation. Case presentation A 63-year-old Caucasian woman developed asystole at the onset of positive pressure insufflation of her right hemithorax during a thoracoscopic single-lung ventilation procedure. Immediate deflation of pleural cavity, intravenous glycopyrrolate and atropine administration returned her heart rhythm to normal sinus rhythm. The surgery proceeded in the absence of positive pressure insufflation without any further complications. Conclusions We discuss the proposed mechanisms of hemodynamic instability with positive pressure thoracic insufflation, and anesthetic and insufflation techniques that decrease the likelihood of adverse hemodynamic events.

  18. Does the Position or Contact Pressure of the Stethoscope Make Any Difference to Clinical Blood Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fan; Zheng, Dingchang; He, Peiyu; Murray, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the effect of stethoscope position and contact pressure on auscultatory blood pressure (BP) measurement. Thirty healthy subjects were studied. Two identical stethoscopes (one under the cuff, the other outside the cuff) were used to simultaneously and digitally record 2 channels of Korotkoff sounds during linear cuff pressure deflation. For each subject, 3 measurements with different contact pressures (0, 50, and 100 mm Hg) on the stethoscope outside the cuff were each recorded at 3 repeat sessions. The Korotkoff sounds were replayed twice on separate days to each of 2 experienced listeners to determine systolic and diastolic BPs (SBP and DBP). Variance analysis was performed to study the measurement repeatability and the effect of stethoscope position and contact pressure on BPs. There was no significant BP difference between the 3 repeat sessions, between the 2 determinations from each listener, between the 2 listeners and between the 3 stethoscope contact pressures (all P > 0.06). There was no significant SBP difference between the 2 stethoscope positions at the 2 lower stethoscope pressures (P = 0.23 and 0.45), but there was a small (0.4 mm Hg, clinically unimportant) significant difference (P = 0.005) at the highest stethoscope pressure. The key result was that, DBP from the stethoscope under the cuff was significantly lower than that from outside the cuff by 2.8 mm Hg (P stethoscope outside the cuff, tends to give a higher DBP than the true intra-arterial pressure, this study could suggest that the stethoscope position under the cuff, and closer to the arterial occlusion, might yield measurements closer to the actual invasive DBP. PMID:25546675

  19. Does the position or contact pressure of the stethoscope make any difference to clinical blood pressure measurements: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fan; Zheng, Dingchang; He, Peiyu; Murray, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of stethoscope position and contact pressure on auscultatory blood pressure (BP) measurement. Thirty healthy subjects were studied. Two identical stethoscopes (one under the cuff, the other outside the cuff) were used to simultaneously and digitally record 2 channels of Korotkoff sounds during linear cuff pressure deflation. For each subject, 3 measurements with different contact pressures (0, 50, and 100 mm Hg) on the stethoscope outside the cuff were each recorded at 3 repeat sessions. The Korotkoff sounds were replayed twice on separate days to each of 2 experienced listeners to determine systolic and diastolic BPs (SBP and DBP). Variance analysis was performed to study the measurement repeatability and the effect of stethoscope position and contact pressure on BPs. There was no significant BP difference between the 3 repeat sessions, between the 2 determinations from each listener, between the 2 listeners and between the 3 stethoscope contact pressures (all P > 0.06). There was no significant SBP difference between the 2 stethoscope positions at the 2 lower stethoscope pressures (P = 0.23 and 0.45), but there was a small (0.4 mm Hg, clinically unimportant) significant difference (P = 0.005) at the highest stethoscope pressure. The key result was that, DBP from the stethoscope under the cuff was significantly lower than that from outside the cuff by 2.8 mm Hg (P stethoscope outside the cuff, tends to give a higher DBP than the true intra-arterial pressure, this study could suggest that the stethoscope position under the cuff, and closer to the arterial occlusion, might yield measurements closer to the actual invasive DBP.

  20. Effects of recruitment maneuver and positive end-expiratory pressure on respiratory mechanics and transpulmonary pressure during laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinnella, Gilda; Grasso, Salvatore; Spadaro, Savino; Rauseo, Michela; Mirabella, Lucia; Salatto, Potito; De Capraris, Antonella; Nappi, Luigi; Greco, Pantaleo; Dambrosio, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that during laparoscopic surgery, Trendelenburg position and pneumoperitoneum may worsen chest wall elastance, concomitantly decreasing transpulmonary pressure, and that a protective ventilator strategy applied after pneumoperitoneum induction, by increasing transpulmonary pressure, would result in alveolar recruitment and improvement in respiratory mechanics and gas exchange. In 29 consecutive patients, a recruiting maneuver followed by positive end-expiratory pressure 5 cm H(2)O maintained until the end of surgery was applied after pneumoperitoneum induction. Respiratory mechanics, gas exchange, blood pressure, and cardiac index were measured before (T(BSL)) and after pneumoperitoneum with zero positive end-expiratory pressure (T(preOLS)), after recruitment with positive end-expiratory pressure (T(postOLS)), and after peritoneum desufflation with positive end-expiratory pressure (T(end)). Esophageal pressure was used for partitioning respiratory mechanics between lung and chest wall (data are mean ± SD): on T(preOLS), chest wall elastance (E(cw)) and elastance of the lung (E(L)) increased (8.2 ± 0.9 vs. 6.2 ± 1.2 cm H(2)O/L, respectively, on T(BSL); P = 0.00016; and 11.69 ± 1.68 vs. 9.61 ± 1.52 cm H(2)O/L on T(BSL); P = 0.0007). On T(postOLS), both chest wall elastance and E(L) decreased (5.2 ± 1.2 and 8.62 ± 1.03 cm H(2)O/L, respectively; P = 0.00015 vs. T(preOLS)), and Pao(2)/inspiratory oxygen fraction improved (491 ± 107 vs. 425 ± 97 on T(preOLS); P = 0.008) remaining stable thereafter. Recruited volume (the difference in lung volume for the same static airway pressure) was 194 ± 80 ml. Pplat(RS) remained stable while inspiratory transpulmonary pressure increased (11.65 + 1.37 cm H(2)O vs. 9.21 + 2.03 on T(preOLS); P = 0.007). All respiratory mechanics parameters remained stable after abdominal desufflation. Hemodynamic parameters remained stable throughout the study. In patients submitted to laparoscopic surgery in

  1. Vapour pressures, osmotic and activity coefficients for binary mixtures containing (1-ethylpyridinium ethylsulfate + several alcohols) at T = 323.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvar, Noelia; Gomez, Elena; Dominguez, Angeles; Macedo, Eugenia A.

    2010-01-01

    Osmotic coefficients of binary mixtures containing several primary and secondary alcohols (1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-butanol, and 1-pentanol) and the pyridinium-based ionic liquid 1-ethylpyridinium ethylsulfate were determined at T = 323.15 K using the vapour pressure osmometry technique. From the experimental results, vapour pressure and activity coefficients can be determined. For the correlation of osmotic coefficients, the extended Pitzer model modified by Archer, and the modified NRTL (MNRTL) model were used, obtaining deviations lower than 0.017 and 0.047, respectively. The mean molal activity coefficients and the excess Gibbs free energy for the binary mixtures studied were determined from the parameters obtained with the extended Pitzer model modified by Archer.

  2. [Possibilities of bi-level positive pressure ventilation in chronic hypoventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaresranta, Tarja; Anttalainen, Ulla; Polo, Olli

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, noninvasive bi-level positive pressure ventilation has enabled respiratory support in inpatient wards and at home. In many cases, a bi-level airway pressure ventilator can be used to avoid artificial airway and respirator therapy, and may shorten hospital stay and save costs. The treatment alleviates the patient's dyspnea and fatigue, whereby the quality of life improves, and in certain situations also the life span increases. The implementation of bi-level positive pressure ventilation by the physician requires knowledge of the basics of respiratory physiology and familiarization with the bi-level airway pressure ventilator.

  3. A new consideration for the heat transfer coefficient and an analysis of the thermal stress of the high-interim pressure turbine casing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Um, Dall Sun

    2004-01-01

    In real design of the high and interim pressure turbine casing, it is one of the important things to figure out its thermal strain exactly. In this paper, with the establishment of the new concept for the heat transfer coefficient of steam that is one of the factors in analysis of the thermal stress for turbine casing, an analysis was done for one of the high and interim pressure turbine casings in operating domestically. The sensitivity analysis of the heat transfer coefficient of steam to the thermal strain of the turbine casing was done with a 2-D simple model. The analysis was also done with switching of the material properties of the turbine casing and resulted in that the thermal strain of the turbine casing was not so sensitive to the heat transfer coefficient of steam. On the basis of this, 3-D analysis of the thermal strain for the high and interim pressure turbine casing was done

  4. Measurements of heat transfer coefficients at low contact pressures for actively cooled bolted armour concepts in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipa, M.; Chappuis, Ph.; Dufayet, A.

    2000-01-01

    For the future upgrade of inner vessel components (CIEL project) a guard limiter for plasma ramp-up and disruption protection will be installed on the high field side of the vacuum vessel. Among transient heat loads, this structure has to sustain a moderate heat flux in the range of ≤0.5 MW/m 2 during quasi steady state operation (1000 s). A bolted carbon-carbon (C-C) tile is preferred compared with a brazed tile solution due to the expected moderate heat fluxes, costs and the possibility of rapid replacement of individual tiles. Large flat tile assemblies require a sufficient soft and conductive compliant layer enclosed between tile and heat sink in order to avoid thermal contact loss of the assembly during heat loads and therefore minimising the tile surface temperature. The global heat transfer coefficient (H gl ) under vacuum at low contact pressures (0.5-1.5 MPa) between C-C and CuCrZr heat sink substrata has been measured in the experimental device, installation of contact heat transfer measurements (ITTAC), using different compliant materials. It appears that the best compliant layer is a graphite sheet (PAPYEX), compared with copper-felt/foam material. As an example, a H gl number of ∼10 4 W/m 2 K at an average contact pressure of 0.5 MPa has been measured near room temperature between C-C (SEP N11) and CuCrZr substrata using a 0.5-mm thick PAPYEX layer. Thermohydraulic calculations (2D) of the guard limiter design show an expected tile surface temperature of about 550 deg. C in steady state regime for an incident heat flux of 0.5 MW/m 2

  5. The importance of clinical monitoring for compliance with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Lucas B; Silveira, Mariana L C; Eckeli, Alan L; Chayamiti, Emilia M P C; Almeida, Leila A; Sander, Heidi H; Küpper, Daniel S; Valera, Fabiana C P

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is currently a public health problem of great importance. When misdiagnosed or improperly treated, it can lead to serious consequences on patients' quality of life. The gold standard treatment for cases of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, especially in mild to severe and symptomatic cases, is continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Compliance with continuous positive airway pressure therapy is directly dependent on the active participation of the patient, which can be influenced by several factors. The objective of this study is to describe the factors related to compliance with continuous positive airway pressure therapy, and to analyze which associated factors directly influence the efficiency of the treatment. Patients who received continuous positive airway pressure therapy through the Municipal Health Department of the city of Ribeirão Preto were recruited. A structured questionnaire was administered to the patients. Compliance with continuous positive airway pressure therapy was assessed by average hours of continuous positive airway pressure therapy usage per night. Patients with good compliance (patients using continuous positive airway pressure therapy ≥4h/night) were compared to those with poor compliance (patients using <4h/night). 138 patients were analyzed: 77 (55.8%) were considered compliant while 61 (44.2%) were non-compliant. The comparison between the two groups showed that regular monitoring by a specialist considerably improved compliance with continuous positive airway pressure therapy (odds ratio, OR=2.62). Compliance with continuous positive airway pressure therapy is related to educational components, which can be enhanced with continuous and individualized care to patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of upper body position on middle cerebral artery blood velocity during continuous positive airway pressure breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund Rasmussen, J; Mantoni, T; Belhage, B

    2007-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a treatment modality for pulmonary oxygenation difficulties. CPAP impairs venous return to the heart and, in turn, affects cerebral blood flow (CBF) and augments cerebral blood volume (CBV). We considered that during CPAP, elevation of the upper body ...

  7. Spatial dependence of the void coefficient in the interstitial coolant channel positions of a stainless steel-clad TRIGA Mark I core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spriggs, Gregory D.; Nelson, George W.; Doane, Harry J.

    1982-01-01

    A new top grid plate was manufactured and installed in the U of A TRIGA. The new grid plate was identical to the old grid plate with respect to the fuel element array, but included two minor modifications; 1) 3/8'' holes were drilled in six interstitial positions between fuel element rings to allow for insertion of a small diameter void rod for void coefficient measurements in the coolant channels, and 2) flux wire holes were drilled in all remaining interstitial positions. The purpose of this report is to update the previously reported void coefficient measurements with data taken in one of the coolant channel positions

  8. Computational estimation of logarithm of octanol/air partition coefficients and subcooled vapour pressures for each of 75 chloronaphtalene congeners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puzyn, T.; Falandysz, J.; Rostkowski, P.; Piliszek, S.; Wilczyniska, A. [Univ. of Gdansk (Poland)

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs, CNs) are known persistent organic pollutants, contaminating natural ecosystems in effect of technical human activity. Toxic effects induced by individual congers of PCNs are reported elsewhere. Great risk of these chemical compounds is additionally connected with theirs excellent ability to be transported via atmosphere from a source to the remote regions on the Glob. Chloronaphthalene congeners had been found in Arctic regions at significant level in spite of the fact, that they had never been synthesized there, and also thermal processes like municipal waste incineration or domestic heating (other possible sources of PCNs in the environment) were not so intensive there. In 1996 F. Wania and D. Mackay have formulated some empirical rules, which have been very useful in estimation and modeling of environmental transport processes of persistent organic pollutants like PCNs. Two very important physico-chemical parameters in the theory of global distillation and cold condensation are: logarithm of n-octanol/air partition coefficient (log K{sub OA}) and logarithm of subcooled vapour pressure (log P{sub L}). Values of log K{sub OA} and log P{sub L} in standard procedures are determined by means of chromatographic methods. In order to reduce costs and number of experiments, we have proposed simple computational method of estimation log K{sub OA} and log P{sub L}.

  9. Vapour pressures and osmotic coefficients of binary mixtures of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate and 1-ethyl-3-methylpyridinium ethylsulfate with alcohols at T = 323.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvar, Noelia; Gonzalez, Begona; Dominguez, Angeles; Macedo, Eugenia A.

    2009-01-01

    Osmotic coefficients of binary mixtures containing alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, and 2-propanol) and the ionic liquids 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate and 1-ethyl-3-methylpyridinium ethylsulfate were determined at T = 323.15 K. Vapour pressure and activity coefficients of the studied systems were calculated from experimental data. The extended Pitzer model modified by Archer, and the modified NRTL model (MNRTL) were used to correlate the experimental data, obtaining standard deviations lower than 0.012 and 0.031, respectively. The mean molal activity coefficients and the excess Gibbs free energy of the studied binary mixtures were calculated from the parameters obtained with the extended Pitzer model of Archer.

  10. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgiana Dediu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a disease with increasing prevalence nowadays, being associated with multiple cardiovascular diseases, such as arterial hypertension. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP on blood pressure values. Materials and methods. We performed a prospective interventional study on 52 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The patients were divided into 2 groups: Group A (who received both pharmacological and CPAP treatment and Group B (who received only pharmacological treatment, and were followed up at 3 and 6 months. The statistical analysis was made with SPSS and Microsoft Excel. At the same time, using the surrogate marker –RDW, we tried to evaluate the persistence of systemic inflammation, knowing that OSAS is associated with inflammation. Results. The systolic blood pressure values decreased at 6 months in all OSAS patients who have used CPAP, including patients with normal values of blood pressure. At the same time, the lack of OSAS treatment led to increased values of blood pressure by approximately 10 mmHg. We noticed a link between RDW, age and blood pressure values, respectively the increase of RDW and age may result in an increase in blood pressure. Conclusions. The OSAS treatment can decrease the blood pressure values. A higher RDW may be considered a negative prognostic factor for these patients, reflecting the role of systemic inflammation in the appearance of cardiovascular disorders.

  11. Experiments and correlations of pressure loss coefficients for hexagonal arranged rod bundles (P/D > 1.02) with helical wire spacers in laminar and turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, K.; Yonekawa, S.; Hoffmann, H.

    1987-05-01

    Advanced pressurized water reactors as well as sodium cooled fast reactors, in their breeding and absorber elements, use tightly packed rod bundles with hexagonally arranged rods. Helical wires or helical fins serve as spacers. The pressure loss coefficients of twelve bundles with helical wires were determined systematically in water experiments. High measuring accuracy was achieved by very precise fabrication of the bundles and the shroud as well as by investigations of the proper measuring techniques. The results show a dependency of the loss coefficients on the Reynolds number and on the P/D and H/D ratios of the bundles. These results together with available systematic experimental results of investigations at P/D > 1.1 were used to develop a correlation to determine the pressure loss coefficients of tightly and widely packed hexagonally arranged rod bundles with helical wire spacers. These correlations were used to recalculate and compare results of pressure loss investigations found in the literature; good agreement was demonstrated. Hence, calculation methods exist for a broad range of applications to determine the pressure loss coefficients of hexagonally arranged rod bundles with helical wires for spacers. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Simultaneous effects of hydrostatic pressure and spin–orbit coupling on linear and nonlinear intraband optical absorption coefficients in a GaAs quantum ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mughnetsyan, V.N.; Manaselyan, A.Kh.; Barseghyan, M.G.; Kirakosyan, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the simultaneous effect of hydrostatic pressure and Rashba spin–orbit interaction on intraband linear and nonlinear light absorption has been investigated in cylindrical quantum ring. The one electron energy spectrum has been found using the effective mass approximation and diagonalization procedure. We have found that the Rashba interaction can lead both to the blue- or to the red-shift of the absorption spectrum depending on the transitions character, while the only red-shift is observed due to the hydrostatic pressure. - Highlights: ► The effects of hydrostatic pressure and spin–orbit coupling are investigated for quantum ring. ► The non-linear absorption coefficient is calculated. ► The hydrostatic pressure leads to the decrease in the absorption coefficient. ► Spin–orbit coupling weakens some transitions and strengthens others.

  13. Backrest position in prevention of pressure ulcers and ventilator-associated pneumonia: Conflicting recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Burk, Ruth Srednicki; Jo Grap, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcers and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) are both common in acute and critical care settings and are considerable sources of morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. To prevent pressure ulcers, guidelines limit bed backrest elevation to less than 30 degrees, whereas recommendations to reduce VAP include use of backrest elevations of 30 degrees or more. Although a variety of risk factors beyond patient position have been identified for both pressure ulcers and VAP, this ar...

  14. Randomized trial of prongs or mask for nasal continuous positive airway pressure in preterm infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kieran, Emily A

    2012-11-01

    To determine whether nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) given with nasal prongs compared with nasal mask reduces the rate of intubation and mechanical ventilation in preterm infants within 72 hours of starting therapy.

  15. Reduced local immune response with continuous positive airway pressure during one-lung ventilation for oesophagectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhage, R. J. J.; Boone, J.; Rijkers, G. T.; Cromheecke, G. J.; Kroese, A. C.; Weijs, T. J.; Borel Rinkes, I. H. M.; van Hillegersberg, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Transthoracic oesophagectomy requires prolonged one-lung ventilation causing systemic and local inflammatory responses. Application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to the collapsed lung potentially reduces pulmonary damage, hypoxia, and consequent inflammation. This

  16. Effect of upper body position on arterial stiffness: influence of hydrostatic pressure and autonomic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Elizabeth C; Rosenberg, Alexander J; Hilgenkamp, Thessa I M; White, Daniel W; Baynard, Tracy; Fernhall, Bo

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate changes in arterial stiffness with positional change and whether the stiffness changes are due to hydrostatic pressure alone or if physiological changes in vasoconstriction of the conduit arteries play a role in the modulation of arterial stiffness. Thirty participants' (male = 15, 24 ± 4 years) upper bodies were positioned at 0, 45, and 72° angles. Pulse wave velocity (PWV), cardio-ankle vascular index, carotid beta-stiffness index, carotid blood pressure (cBP), and carotid diameters were measured at each position. A gravitational height correction was determined using the vertical fluid column distance (mmHg) between the heart and carotid artery. Carotid beta-stiffness was calibrated using three methods: nonheight corrected cBP of each position, height corrected cBP of each position, and height corrected cBP of the supine position (theoretical model). Low frequency systolic blood pressure variability (LFSAP) was analyzed as a marker of sympathetic activity. PWV and cardio-ankle vascular index increased with position (P hydrostatic pressure. Arterial stiffness indices based on Method 2 were not different from Method 3 (P = 0.65). LFSAP increased in more upright positions (P pressure did not (P > 0.05). Arterial stiffness increases with a more upright body position. Carotid beta-stiffness needs to be calibrated accounting for hydrostatic effects of gravity if measured in a seated position. It is unclear why PWV increased as this increase was independent of blood pressure. No difference between Methods 2 and 3 presumably indicates that the beta-stiffness increases are only pressure dependent, despite the increase in vascular sympathetic modulation.

  17. An indigenous economic technique of positive pressure retrograde urethrography in female patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Singh

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Usually double balloon catheter is required forpositive pressure retrograde urethrography in females. We describe a technique of positive pressure retrograde urethrography using Foley catheter and rubber stopper, inexpensive and could be adopted in any hospital or radiological suite.

  18. The determination of the pressure-viscosity coefficient of a lubricant through an accurate film thickness formula and accurate film thickness measurements : part 2 : high L values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van H.J.

    2011-01-01

    The pressure-viscosity coefficient of a traction fluid is determined by fitting calculation results on accurate film thickness measurements, obtained at different speeds, loads, and temperatures. Through experiments, covering a range of 5.6

  19. Effects of body position and sex group on tongue pressure generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietsch, Angela M; Cirstea, Carmen M; Auer, Ed T; Searl, Jeff P

    2013-11-01

    Fine control of orofacial musculature is necessary to precisely accelerate and decelerate the articulators across exact distances for functional speech and coordinated swallows (Amerman & Parnell, 1990; Benjamin, 1997; Kent, Duffy, Slama, Kent, & Clift, 2001). Enhanced understanding of neural control for such movements could clarify the nature of and potential remediation for some dysarthrias and other orofacial myofunctional impairments. Numerous studies have measured orolingual force and accuracy during speech and nonspeech tasks, but have focused on young adults, maximum linguapalatal pressures, and upright positioning (O'Day, Frank, Montgomery, Nichols, & McDade, 2005; Solomon & Munson, 2004; Somodi, Robin, & Luschei, 1995; Youmans, Youmans, & Stierwalt, 2009). Patients' medical conditions or testing procedures such as concurrent neuroimaging may preclude fully upright positioning during oral motor assessments in some cases. Since judgments about lingual strength and coordination can influence clinical decisions regarding the functionality of swallowing and speech, it is imperative to understand any effects of body positioning differences. In addition, sex differences in the control of such tasks are not well defined. Therefore, this study evaluated whether pressures exerted during tongue movements differ in upright vs. supine body position in healthy middle-aged men and women. Twenty healthy middle-aged adults compressed small air-filled plastic bulbs in the oral cavity at predetermined fractions of task-specific peak pressure in a randomized block design. Tasks including phoneme repetitions and nonspeech isometric contractions were executed in upright and supine positions. Participants received continuous visual feedback regarding targets and actual exerted pressures. Analyses compared average pressure values for each subject, task, position, and effort level. Speech-like and nonspeech tongue pressures did not differ significantly across body position or sex

  20. Effect of Filters on the Noise Generated by Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Delivered via a Helmet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Hernández-Molina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the problems that the delivery of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP via a helmet poses is the generation of noise. The objective of our study was to assess the effect that the use of filter has on sound pressure levels generated by the delivery of positive airway pressure at different gas flow rates. Materials and Methods: Sound pressure levels generated by neonatal helmet CPAP delivery were measured at different gas flows (20, 30, and 40 l/min with and without a breathing filter. Noise intensity was measured by installing microphones in the inner ear of dummy heads wearing helmets. Results: The sound pressure level increased by 38% at a gas flow of 40 l/min, as compared to a gas flow of 20 l/min {74 dBA [interquartile range (IQR 2,2] vs 52 dBA (IQR 5,9, respectively}. Using the breathing filter as a diffuser has a variety of effects on sound pressure levels according to the gas flow rate. Conclusion: The intensity of the noise generated by helmet delivery of positive airway pressure depends on the type of helmet used, gas flow, and use or not of a diffuser filter. Breathing filters with gas flows over 30 l/min might not be recommended since they would not attenuate but will rather amplify sound pressure.

  1. Vapor pressures, osmotic and activity coefficients for (LiBr + acetonitrile) between the temperatures (298.15 and 343.15) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasirzadeh, Karamat E-mail: karamat.nasirzadeh@chemie.uni-regensburg.de; Neueder, Roland; Kunz, Werner

    2004-06-01

    Precise vapor pressure data for pure acetonitrile and (LiBr + acetonitrile) are given for temperatures ranging from T=(298.15 to 343.15) K. The molality range is from m=(0.0579 to 0.8298) mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}. The osmotic coefficients are calculated by taking into account the second virial coefficient of acetonitrile. The parameters of the extended Pitzer ion interaction model of Archer and the mole fraction-based thermodynamic model of Clegg-Pitzer are evaluated. These models accurately reproduce the available osmotic coefficients. The parameters of the extended Pitzer ion interaction model of Archer are used to calculate the mean molal activity coefficients.

  2. The vascular basis of the positional influence of the intraocular pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieglstein, G K; Waller, W K; Leydhecker, W

    1978-05-02

    By measuring intraocular pressure in different body positions from 60 degrees semiupright to 30 degrees head down, a nonlinear relationship between IOP increase and body position was confirmed. IOP postural response in individual subjects was roughly correlated to ophthalmic arterial pressure and to the episcleral venous pressure postural response. In one series of subjects, the episcleral venous pressure increments due to posture wa; parallel to the applanation-indentation disparity in the same individual eyes. Differential tonometry with applanation or indentation procedures under blind conditions gave significantly low indentation readings. It is concluded that IOP postural response depends on arterial and venous vascular changes when subjects move from an erect to a horizontal body position. Blood expulsion from the choroid by indentation tonometry might be the reason that this tonometric procedure does not measure IOP changes based on vascular changes.

  3. [A novel ship-borne positive pressure solid phase extraction device to enrich organo chlorinated and pyrethroid pesticides in seawater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jianglei

    2017-09-08

    A novel solid phase extraction (SPE) device driven by positive pressure was developed instead of negative pressure from a vacuum pump, in order to enrich organo chlorinated and pyrethroid pesticides in seawater. The water sampling bottles and the pipelines which touch water samples were made of plastic material without chlorine. In order to ensure the sealing and firmness, the whole device were tightened with nut and bolt. The inner pressure (0.1-0.3 MPa) in the water sampling bottle was provided by the small air pump (powered by 12 V cell) controlled by a microprogrammed control unit (MCU) and pressure sensor to keep the water flow rate (4.0-6.0 mL/min). The pre-conditioned SPE column can be used for the enrichment of pesticides within four weeks, and the loaded SPE column can be eluted for detection within six weeks with recoveries greater than 80%. The linearity of the method was good with the correlation coefficient more than 0.9. The limits of quantification (LOQs) were 0.8-6 ng/L. The recoveries of the pesticides at three spiked levels (3 parallel samples) were 86.1%-95.5% with the relative standard deviations less than 10%. The benzene hexachlorides (BHCs) and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethanes (DDTs) were detected in seawater samples. The device has good application in enriching organo chlorinated and pyrethroid pesticides in seawater.

  4. Severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia improved by noninvasive positive pressure ventilation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Christian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This is the first report to describe the feasibility and effectiveness of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation in the secondary treatment of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Case presentation A former male preterm of Caucasian ethnicity delivered at 29 weeks gestation developed severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia. At the age of six months he was in permanent tachypnea and dyspnea and in need of 100% oxygen with a flow of 2.0 L/minute via a nasal cannula. Intermittent nocturnal noninvasive positive pressure ventilation was then administered for seven hours daily. The ventilator was set at a positive end-expiratory pressure of 6 cmH2O, with pressure support of 4 cmH2O, trigger at 1.4 mL/second, and a maximum inspiratory time of 0.7 seconds. Over the course of seven weeks, the patient's maximum daytime fraction of inspired oxygen via nasal cannula decreased from 1.0 to 0.75, his respiratory rate from 64 breaths/minute to 50 breaths/minute and carbon dioxide from 58 mmHg to 44 mmHg. Conclusion Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation may be a novel therapeutic option for established severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In the case presented, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation achieved sustained improvement in ventilation and thus prepared our patient for safe home oxygen therapy.

  5. Asymmetric Fuzzy Control of a Positive and Negative Pneumatic Pressure Servo System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Du, Jing-Min; Fu, Xiao-Yun; Li, Bao-Ren

    2017-11-01

    The pneumatic pressure control systems have been used in some fields. However, the researches on pneumatic pressure control mainly focus on constant pressure regulation. Poor dynamic characteristics and strong nonlinearity of such systems limit its application in the field of pressure tracking control. In order to meet the demand of generating dynamic pressure signal in the application of the hardware-in-the-loop simulation of aerospace engineering, a positive and negative pneumatic pressure servo system is provided to implement dynamic adjustment of sealed chamber pressure. A mathematical model is established with simulation and experiment being implemented afterwards to discuss the characteristics of the system, which shows serious asymmetry in the process of charging and discharging. Based on the analysis of the system dynamics, a fuzzy proportional integral derivative (PID) controller with asymmetric fuzzy compensator is proposed. Different from conventional adjusting mechanisms employing the error and change in error of the controlled variable as input parameters, the current chamber pressure and charging or discharging state are chosen as inputs of the compensator, which improves adaptability. To verify the effectiveness and performance of the proposed controller, the comparison experiments tracking sinusoidal and square wave commands are conducted. Experimental results show that the proposed controller can obtain better dynamic performance and relatively consistent control performance across the scope of work (2-140 kPa). The research proposes a fuzzy control method to overcome asymmetry and enhance adaptability for the positive and negative pneumatic pressure servo system.

  6. Reproducibility of wrist home blood pressure measurement with position sensor and automatic data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uen, Sakir; Fimmers, Rolf; Brieger, Miriam; Nickenig, Georg; Mengden, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background Wrist blood pressure (BP) devices have physiological limits with regards to accuracy, therefore they were not preferred for home BP monitoring. However some wrist devices have been successfully validated using etablished validation protocols. Therefore this study assessed the reproducibility of wrist home BP measurement with position sensor and automatic data storage. Methods To compare the reproducibility of three different(BP) measurement methods: 1) office BP, 2) home BP (Omron wrist device HEM- 637 IT with position sensor), 3) 24-hour ambulatory BP(24-h ABPM) (ABPM-04, Meditech, Hun)conventional sphygmomanometric office BP was measured on study days 1 and 7, 24-h ABPM on study days 7 and 14 and home BP between study days 1 and 7 and between study days 8 and 14 in 69 hypertensive and 28 normotensive subjects. The correlation coeffcient of each BP measurement method with echocardiographic left ventricular mass index was analyzed. The schedule of home readings was performed according to recently published European Society of Hypertension (ESH)- guidelines. Results The reproducibility of home BP measurement analyzed by the standard deviation as well as the squared differeces of mean individual differences between the respective BP measurements was significantly higher than the reproducibility of office BP (p ABPM (p ABPM was not significantly different (p = 0.80 systolic BP, p = 0.1 diastolic BP). The correlation coefficient of 24-h ABMP (r = 0.52) with left ventricular mass index was significantly higher than with office BP (r = 0.31). The difference between 24-h ABPM and home BP (r = 0.46) was not significant. Conclusion The short-term reproducibility of home BP measurement with the Omron HEM-637 IT wrist device was superior to the reproducibility of office BP and 24- h ABPM measurement. Furthermore, home BP with the wrist device showed similar correlations to targed organ damage as recently reported for upper arm devices. Although wrist devices have

  7. The impact of arm position on the measurement of orthostatic blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guss, David A; Abdelnur, Diego; Hemingway, Thomas J

    2008-05-01

    Blood pressure is a standard vital sign in patients evaluated in an Emergency Department. The American Heart Association has recommended a preferred position of the arm and cuff when measuring blood pressure. There is no formal recommendation for arm position when measuring orthostatic blood pressure. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of different arm positions on the measurement of postural changes in blood pressure. This was a prospective, unblinded, convenience study involving Emergency Department patients with complaints unrelated to cardiovascular instability. Repeated blood pressure measurements were obtained using an automatic non-invasive device with each subject in a supine and standing position and with the arm parallel and perpendicular to the torso. Orthostatic hypotension was defined as a difference of >or= 20 mm Hg systolic or >or= 10 mm Hg diastolic when subtracting standing from supine measurements. There were four comparisons made: group W, arm perpendicular supine and standing; group X, arm parallel supine and standing; group Y, arm parallel supine and perpendicular standing; and group Z, arm perpendicular supine and parallel standing. There were 100 patients enrolled, 55 men, mean age 44 years. Four blood pressure measurements were obtained on each patient. The percentage of patients meeting orthostatic hypotension criteria in each group was: W systolic 6% (95% CI 1%, 11%), diastolic 4% (95% CI 0%, 8%), X systolic 8% (95% CI 3%, 13%), diastolic 9% (95% CI 3%, 13%), Y systolic 19% (95% CI 11%, 27%), diastolic 30% (95% CI 21%, 39%), Z systolic 2% (95% CI 0%, 5%), diastolic 2% (95% CI 0%, 5%). Comparison of Group Y vs. X, Z, and W was statistically significant (p postural changes in blood pressure. The combination of the arm parallel when supine and perpendicular when standing may significantly overestimate the orthostatic change. Arm position should be held constant in supine and standing positions when assessing for orthostatic

  8. Choking under Pressure: When an Additional Positive Stereotype Affects Performance for Domain Identified Male Mathematics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Harriet E. S.; Crisp, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    This research aimed to establish if the presentation of two positive stereotypes would result in choking under pressure for identified male mathematics students. Seventy-five 16 year old men, who had just commenced their AS-level study, were either made aware of their gender group membership (single positive stereotype), their school group…

  9. Variations of Blood Pressure in Stroke Unit Patients May Result from Alternating Body Positions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aries, M.J.H.; Elting, Jan Willem; Stewart, Roy E.; de Keyser, Jacques; Thien, Theo; Kremer, Berry P.; Vroomen, Patrick C. A. J.

    Background: Blood pressure (BP) is one of the major vital parameters monitored in the stroke unit. The accuracy of indirect BP measurement is strongly influenced by the position of both patient and arm during the measurement. Acute stroke patients are often nursed in lateral decubitus positions. The

  10. High-pressure (vapour + liquid) equilibria for ternary systems composed by {(E)-2-hexenal or hexanal + carbon dioxide + water}: Partition coefficient measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bejarano, Arturo; López, Pablo I.; Valle, José M. del; Fuente, Juan C. de la

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new apparatus based on a static–analytic method was assembled in this work. • This work reports high-pressure VLE data of (E)-2-hexenal or hexanal + CO 2 + water. • Data includes (CO 2 + water) partition coefficients of (E)-2-hexenal and hexanal. • High separation factors from water (∼10 4 ) were found especially for (E)-2-hexenal. • The data were obtained at T = (313, 323, and 333) K and pressures from (8 to 19) MPa. - Abstract: A new apparatus based on a static–analytic method assembled in this work was utilised to perform high-pressure (vapour + liquid) equilibria measurements of aqueous ternary systems. This work includes values of isothermal partition coefficients between CO 2 and water of two apple aroma constituents, (E)-2-hexenal and hexanal. Additionally, this work reports new experimental (vapour + liquid) equilibria measurements for the ternary systems (CO 2 + (E)-2-hexenal + water) and (CO 2 + hexanal + water), at fixed liquid phase composition (600 mg · kg −1 ), at temperatures of (313, 323 and 333) K and at pressures from (8 to 19) MPa. Vapour liquid interphase was checked and monitored visually for all the systems studied in this work. No liquid immiscibility was observed at the composition, temperatures and pressures studied. In order to suggest reasonable operation conditions for fractionation of aromas with dense carbon dioxide, partition coefficients of the aroma compounds between CO 2 and water along with their separation factors from water were calculated. Partition coefficients of (E)-2-hexenal between CO 2 and water were in the range of (6 to 91) and where found to be near six times higher than those of hexanal (9 to 17). Very high separation factors from water were observed (∼10 4 ) especially for (E)-2-hexenal. The highest separation factor, for both compounds, was found at a temperature of 313 K and pressures from (12 to 14) MPa

  11. Effect of patient position and PEEP on hepatic, portal and central venous pressures during liver resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, L; Rizell, M; Houltz, E; Karlsen, K; Wiklund, J; Odenstedt Hergès, H; Stenqvist, O; Lundin, S

    2011-10-01

    It has been suggested that blood loss during liver resection may be reduced if central venous pressure (CVP) is kept at a low level. This can be achieved by changing patient position but it is not known how position changes affect portal (PVP) and hepatic (HVP) venous pressures. The aim of the study was to assess if changes in body position result in clinically significant changes in these pressures. We studied 10 patients undergoing liver resection. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and CVP were measured using fluid-filled catheters, PVP and HVP with tip manometers. Measurements were performed in the horizontal, head up and head down tilt position with two positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels. A 10° head down tilt at PEEP 5 cm H(2) O significantly increased CVP (11 ± 3 to 15 ± 3 mmHg) and MAP (72 ± 8 to 76 ± 8 mmHg) while head up tilt at PEEP 5 cm H(2) O decreased CVP (11 ± 3 to 6 ± 4 mmHg) and MAP (72 ± 8 to 63 ± 7 mmHg) with minimal changes in transhepatic venous pressures. Increasing PEEP from 5 to 10 resulted in small increases, around 1 mmHg in CVP, PVP and HVP. There was no significant correlation between changes in CVP vs. PVP and HVP during head up tilt and only a weak correlation between CVP and HVP by head down tilt. Changes of body position resulted in marked changes in CVP but not in HVPs. Head down or head up tilt to reduce venous pressures in the liver may therefore not be effective measures to reduce blood loss during liver surgery. 2011 The Authors Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 2011 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  12. [A comparative study between inflation and deflation pressure-volume curve in determining the optimal positive end-expiratory pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Li; Sun, Xiao-yi; Xu, Jin-quan; Zhang, Xin-li; Kou, Lu-xin; Jiang, Zhi-hong; Zhang, Lei

    2012-02-01

    To determine the optimal positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) according to inflation and deflation pressure-volume curve (P-V curve) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). ARDS models were reproduced in 20 dogs, and they were randomly divided into two groups. In both groups, Levenberg-Marquardt iterative algorithm was employed using software to explore parameters fitting with Boltzmann formula, by which the real inflection point of pressure (Pinf d) in deflation limb or lower inflection point pressure (PLip) in inflation limb on P-V curve were defined. For the control group (inflation curve) P-V curve of PLip + 2 cm H(2)O [1 cm H(2)O = 0.098 kPa] was applied as the best PEEP value. In the experimental group (deflation curve) the Pinf d was taken as the best PEEP value. The heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), fingertip pulse oxygen saturation [SpO(2)], static lung compliance (Cst), arterial partial pressure of oxygen [PaO(2)] and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide [PaCO(2)] were monitored at 0, 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours. Oxygenation index increased significantly both in control and experimental groups. In experimental group, oxygenation index (mm Hg, 1 mm Hg = 0.133 kPa) of 12, 24 and 48 hours was respectively significantly higher than that of the control group (12 hours: 177.63 ± 8.94 vs. 165.60 ± 8.90, 24 hours: 194.19 ± 10.67 vs. 168.70 ± 10.60, 48 hours: 203.15 ± 13.21 vs. 171.26 ± 9.21, all P deflation P-V curve was better than that of inflation curve.

  13. CFD Modeling of the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) Self-Pressurization and Spray Bar Mixing Experiments in Normal Gravity: Effect of the Accommodation Coefficient on the Tank Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartuzova, Olga; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    A CFD model for simulating the self-pressurization of a large scale liquid hydrogen storage tank is utilized in this paper to model the MHTB self-pressurization experiment. The kinetics-based Schrage equation is used to account for the evaporative and condensi ng interfacial mass flows in this model. The effect of the accommodation coefficient for calculating the interfacial mass transfer rate on the tank pressure during tank selfpressurization is studied. The values of the accommodation coefficient which were considered in this study vary from 1.0e-3 to 1.0e-1 for the explicit VOF model and from 1.0e-4 to 1.0e-3 for the implicit VOF model. The ullage pressure evolutions are compared against experimental data. A CFD model for controlling pressure in cryogenic storage tanks by spraying cold liquid into the ullage is also presented. The Euler-Lagrange approach is utilized for tracking the spray droplets and for modeling the interaction between the droplets and the continuous phase (ullage). The spray model is coupled with the VOF model by performing particle tracking in the ullage, removing particles from the ullage when they reach the interface, and then adding their contributions to the liquid. Droplet-ullage heat and mass transfer are modeled. The flow, temperature, and interfacial mass flux, as well as droplets trajectories, size distribution and temperatures predicted by the model are presented. The ul lage pressure and vapor temperature evolutions are compared with experimental data obtained from the MHTB spray bar mixing experiment. The effect of the accommodation coefficient for calculating the interfacial and droplet mass transfer rates on the tank pressure during mixing of the vapor using spray is studied. The values used for the accommodation coefficient at the interface vary from 1.0e-5 to 1.0e-2. The droplet accommodation coefficient values vary from 2.0e-6 to 1.0e-4.

  14. Backrest position in prevention of pressure ulcers and ventilator-associated pneumonia: conflicting recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Ruth Srednicki; Grap, Mary Jo

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcers and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) are both common in acute and critical care settings and are considerable sources of morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. To prevent pressure ulcers, guidelines limit bed backrest elevation to less than 30 degrees, whereas recommendations to reduce VAP include use of backrest elevations of 30 degrees or more. Although a variety of risk factors beyond patient position have been identified for both pressure ulcers and VAP, this article will focus on summarizing the major evidence for each of these apparently conflicting positioning strategies and discuss implications for practice in managing mechanically ventilated patients with risk factors for both pressure ulcers and VAP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A switched energy saving position controller for variable-pressure electro-hydraulic servo systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivay, Ali; Zareinejad, Mohammad; Rezaei, S Mehdi; Baghestan, Keivan

    2014-07-01

    The electro-hydraulic servo system (EHSS) demonstrates a relatively low level of efficiency compared to other available actuation methods. The objective of this paper is to increase this efficiency by introducing a variable supply pressure into the system and controlling this pressure during the task of position tracking. For this purpose, an EHSS structure with controllable supply pressure is proposed and its dynamic model is derived from the basic laws of physics. A switching control structure is then proposed to control both the supply pressure and the cylinder position at the same time, in a way that reduces the overall energy consumption of the system. The stability of the proposed switching control system is guaranteed by proof, and its performance is verified by experimental testing. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on Central Venous Pressure in Patients under Mechanical Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaee, Majid; Sabzghabaei, Anita; Alimohammadi, Hossein; Derakhshanfar, Hojjat; Amini, Afshin; Esmailzadeh, Bahareh

    2017-01-01

    Finding the probable governing pattern of PEEP and CVP changes is an area of interest for in-charge physicians and researchers. Therefore, the present study was designed with the aim of evaluating the relationship between the mentioned pressures. In this quasi-experimental study, patients under mechanical ventilation were evaluated with the aim of assessing the effect of PEEP change on CVP. Non-trauma patients, over 18 years of age, who were under mechanical ventilation and had stable hemodynamics, with inserted CV line were entered. After gathering demographic data, patients underwent 0, 5, and 10 cmH 2 O PEEPs and the respective CVPs of the mentioned points were recorded. The relationship of CVP and PEEP in different cut points were measured using SPSS 21.0 statistical software. 60 patients with the mean age of 73.95 ± 11.58 years were evaluated (68.3% male). The most frequent cause of ICU admission was sepsis with 45.0%. 5 cmH 2 O increase in PEEP led to 2.47 ± 1.53 mean difference in CVP level. If the PEEP baseline is 0 at the time of 5 cmH 2 O increase, it leads to a higher raise in CVP compared to when the baseline is 5 cmH 2 O (2.47 ± 1.53 vs. 1.57 ± 1.07; p = 0.039). The relationship between CVP and 5 cmH 2 O (p = 0.279), and 10 cmH 2 O (p = 0.292) PEEP changes were not dependent on the baseline level of CVP. The findings of this study revealed the direct relationship between PEEP and CVP. Approximately, a 5 cmH 2 O increase in PEEP will be associated with about 2.5 cmH 2 O raise in CVP. When applying a 5 cmH 2 O PEEP increase, if the baseline PEEP is 0, it leads to a significantly higher raise in CVP compared to when it is 5 cmH 2 O (2.5 vs. 1.6). It seems that sex, history of cardiac failure, baseline CVP level, and hypertension do not have a significant effect in this regard.

  17. Effect of Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on Central Venous Pressure in Patients under Mechanical Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Shojaee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Finding the probable governing pattern of PEEP and CVP changes is an area of interest for in-charge physicians and researchers. Therefore, the present study was designed with the aim of evaluating the relationship between the mentioned pressures. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, patients under mechanical ventilation were evaluated with the aim of assessing the effect of PEEP change on CVP. Non-trauma patients, over 18 years of age, who were under mechanical ventilation and had stable hemodynamics, with inserted CV line were entered. After gathering demographic data, patients underwent 0, 5, and 10 cmH2O PEEPs and the respective CVPs of the mentioned points were recorded. The relationship of CVP and PEEP in different cut points were measured using SPSS 21.0 statistical software. Results: 60 patients with the mean age of 73.95 ± 11.58 years were evaluated (68.3% male. The most frequent cause of ICU admission was sepsis with 45.0%. 5 cmH2O increase in PEEP led to 2.47 ± 1.53 mean difference in CVP level. If the PEEP baseline is 0 at the time of 5 cmH2O increase, it leads to a higher raise in CVP compared to when the baseline is 5 cmH2O (2.47 ± 1.53 vs. 1.57 ± 1.07; p = 0.039. The relationship between CVP and 5 cmH2O (p = 0.279, and 10 cmH2O (p = 0.292 PEEP changes were not dependent on the baseline level of CVP. Conclusion: The findings of this study revealed the direct relationship between PEEP and CVP. Approximately, a 5 cmH2O increase in PEEP will be associated with about 2.5 cmH2O raise in CVP. When applying a 5 cmH2O PEEP increase, if the baseline PEEP is 0, it leads to a significantly higher raise in CVP compared to when it is 5 cmH2O (2.5 vs. 1.6. It seems that sex, history of cardiac failure, baseline CVP level, and hypertension do not have a significant effect in this regard.

  18. A new device for administration of continuous positive airway pressure in preterm infants: comparison with a standard nasal CPAP continuous positive airway pressure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisanuto, Daniele; Grazzina, Nicoletta; Doglioni, Nicoletta; Ferrarese, Paola; Marzari, Francesco; Zanardo, Vincenzo

    2005-06-01

    We compared the effectiveness of a new continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device (neonatal helmet CPAP) with a conventional nasal CPAP system in preterm neonates needing continuous distending pressure. Randomized, physiological, cross-over study in a tertiary referral, neonatal intensive care unit in a university teaching hospital. Twenty very low birth weight infants with a postnatal age greater than 24 h who were receiving nasal CPAP for apnea and/or mild respiratory distress were enrolled. CPAP delivered by neonatal helmet CPAP and nasal CPAP in random order for two subsequent 90-min periods. Were continuously measured the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS) score, oxygen requirements, respiratory rate, heart rate, oxygen saturation, transcutaneous PO(2) (tcPO(2)) and PCO(2) (tcPCO(2)), blood pressure, and desaturations. NIPS scores were significantly lower when the infants were on the neonatal helmet CPAP than when they were on nasal CPAP (0.26+/-0.07 vs. 0.63+/-0.12). The other studied parameters did not differ between the two CPAP modes. The number of desaturations was reduced during the neonatal helmet CPAP treatment (18 vs. 32), although this difference was not significant. In this short-term physiological study the neonatal helmet CPAP appears to be as good as the golden standard for managing preterm infants needing continuous distending pressure, with enhanced tolerability. Further evaluation in a randomized clinical trial is needed to confirm these findings.

  19. Pressure effect in the X-ray intrinsic position resolution in noble gases and mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Azevedo, C.D.R.

    2016-12-13

    A study of the gas pressure effect in the position resolution of an interacting X- or gamma-ray photon in a gas medium is performed. The intrinsic position resolution for pure noble gases (Argon and Xenon) and their mixtures with CO2 and CH4 were calculated for several gas pressures (1-10bar) and for photon energies between 5.4 and 60.0 keV, being possible to establish a linear match between the intrinsic position resolution and the inverse of the gas pressure in that energy range. In order to evaluate the quality of the method here described, a comparison between the available experimental data and the calculated one in this work, is done and discussed. In the majority of the cases, a strong agreement is observed.

  20. Comparison of nasal continuous positive airway pressure delivered by seven ventilators using simulated neonatal breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevhammar, Thomas; Nilsson, Kjell; Zetterström, Henrik; Jonsson, Baldvin

    2013-05-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) is an established treatment for respiratory distress in neonates. Most modern ventilators are able to provide NCPAP. There have been no large studies examining the properties of NCPAP delivered by ventilators. The aim of this study was to compare pressure stability and imposed work of breathing (iWOB) for NCPAP delivered by ventilators using simulated neonatal breathing. Experimental in vitro study. Research laboratory in Sweden. None. Neonatal breathing was simulated using a mechanical lung simulator. Seven ventilators were tested at different CPAP levels using two breath profiles. Pressure stability and iWOB were determined. Results from three ventilators revealed that they provided a slight pressure support. For these ventilators, iWOB could not be calculated. There were large differences in pressure stability and iWOB between the tested ventilators. For simulations using the 3.4-kg breath profile, the pressure swings around the mean pressure were more than five times greater, and iWOB more than four times higher, for the system with the highest measured values compared with the system with the lowest. Overall, the Fabian ventilator was the most pressure stable system. Evita XL and SERVO-i were found more pressure stable than Fabian in some simulations. The results for iWOB were in accordance with pressure stability for systems that allowed determination of this variable. Some of the tested ventilators unexpectedly provided a minor degree of pressure support. In terms of pressure stability, we have not found any advantages of ventilators as a group compared with Bubble CPAP, Neopuff, and variable flow generators that were tested in our previous study. The variation between individual systems is great within both categories. The clinical importance of these findings needs further investigation.

  1. Leakage Characteristics of Dual-Cannula Fenestrated Tracheostomy Tubes during Positive Pressure Ventilation: A Bench Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Berlet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the leakage characteristics of different types of dual-cannula fenestrated tracheostomy tubes during positive pressure ventilation. Fenestrated Portex® Blue Line Ultra®, TRACOE® twist, or Rüsch® Traceofix® tracheostomy tubes equipped with nonfenestrated inner cannulas were tested in a tracheostomy-lung simulator. Transfenestration pressures and transfenestration leakage rates were measured during positive pressure ventilation. The impact of different ventilation modes, airway pressures, temperatures, and simulated static lung compliance settings on leakage characteristics was assessed. We observed substantial differences in transfenestration pressures and transfenestration leakage rates. The leakage rates of the best performing tubes were <3.5% of the delivered minute volume. At body temperature, the leakage rates of these tracheostomy tubes were <1%. The tracheal tube design was the main factor that determined the leakage characteristics. Careful tracheostomy tube selection permits the use of fenestrated tracheostomy tubes in patients receiving positive pressure ventilation immediately after stoma formation and minimises the risk of complications caused by transfenestration gas leakage, for example, subcutaneous emphysema.

  2. Bi-level positive airway pressure ventilation for treating heart failure with central sleep apnea that is unresponsive to continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohi, Tomotaka; Kasai, Takatoshi; Narui, Koji; Ishiwata, Sugao; Ohno, Minoru; Yamaguchi, Tetsu; Momomura, Shin-Ichi

    2008-07-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration with central sleep apnea (CSR-CSA) is associated with a poor prognosis in patients with heart failure (HF). However, some patients do not respond to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), so other therapeutic modalities should be considered, such as bi-level positive airway pressure (PAP), which also assists respiration and might be effective for such patients. The 20 patients with HF because of left ventricular systolic dysfunction were assessed: 8 had ischemic etiology, and all had severe CSA according to the apnea - hypopnea index (AHI) determined by polysomnography. All diagnosed patients underwent repeat polysomnography using CPAP. The AHI improved significantly in 11 (AHI or=15). Bi-level PAP titration significantly improved the AHI in the latter group. Those who were unresponsive to CPAP had significantly lower PaCO(2), higher plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), longer mean duration of CSR and fewer obstructive episodes than CPAP responders. After 6 months of positive airway support with either CPAP (n=9) or bi-level PAP (n=7), BNP levels significantly decreased and left ventricular ejection fraction significantly increased. Bi-level PAP could be an effective alternative for patients with HF and pure CSR-CSA who are unresponsive to CPAP.

  3. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on neurocognitive function in obstructive sleep apnea patients: The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushida, Clete A; Nichols, Deborah A; Holmes, Tyson H; Quan, Stuart F; Walsh, James K; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Simon, Richard D; Guilleminault, Christian; White, David P; Goodwin, James L; Schweitzer, Paula K; Leary, Eileen B; Hyde, Pamela R; Hirshkowitz, Max; Green, Sylvan; McEvoy, Linda K; Chan, Cynthia; Gevins, Alan; Kay, Gary G; Bloch, Daniel A; Crabtree, Tami; Dement, William C

    2012-12-01

    To determine the neurocognitive effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES) was a 6-month, randomized, double-blind, 2-arm, sham-controlled, multicenter trial conducted at 5 U.S. university, hospital, or private practices. Of 1,516 participants enrolled, 1,105 were randomized, and 1,098 participants diagnosed with OSA contributed to the analysis of the primary outcome measures. Active or sham CPAP MEASUREMENTS: THREE NEUROCOGNITIVE VARIABLES, EACH REPRESENTING A NEUROCOGNITIVE DOMAIN: Pathfinder Number Test-Total Time (attention and psychomotor function [A/P]), Buschke Selective Reminding Test-Sum Recall (learning and memory [L/M]), and Sustained Working Memory Test-Overall Mid-Day Score (executive and frontal-lobe function [E/F]) The primary neurocognitive analyses showed a difference between groups for only the E/F variable at the 2 month CPAP visit, but no difference at the 6 month CPAP visit or for the A/P or L/M variables at either the 2 or 6 month visits. When stratified by measures of OSA severity (AHI or oxygen saturation parameters), the primary E/F variable and one secondary E/F neurocognitive variable revealed transient differences between study arms for those with the most severe OSA. Participants in the active CPAP group had a significantly greater ability to remain awake whether measured subjectively by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale or objectively by the maintenance of wakefulness test. CPAP treatment improved both subjectively and objectively measured sleepiness, especially in individuals with severe OSA (AHI > 30). CPAP use resulted in mild, transient improvement in the most sensitive measures of executive and frontal-lobe function for those with severe disease, which suggests the existence of a complex OSA-neurocognitive relationship. Registered at clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier: NCT00051363. Kushida CA; Nichols DA; Holmes

  4. Evaluation of evaporation coefficient for micro-droplets exposed to low pressure: A semi-analytical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Prodyut R., E-mail: pchakraborty@iitj.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Jodhpur, 342011 (India); Hiremath, Kirankumar R., E-mail: k.r.hiremath@iitj.ac.in [Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology Jodhpur, 342011 (India); Sharma, Manvendra, E-mail: PG201283003@iitj.ac.in [Defence Laboratory Jodhpur, Defence Research & Development Organisation, 342011 (India)

    2017-02-05

    Evaporation rate of water is strongly influenced by energy barrier due to molecular collision and heat transfer limitations. The evaporation coefficient, defined as the ratio of experimentally measured evaporation rate to that maximum possible theoretical limit, varies over a conflicting three orders of magnitude. In the present work, a semi-analytical transient heat diffusion model of droplet evaporation is developed considering the effect of change in droplet size due to evaporation from its surface, when the droplet is injected into vacuum. Negligible effect of droplet size reduction due to evaporation on cooling rate is found to be true. However, the evaporation coefficient is found to approach theoretical limit of unity, when the droplet radius is less than that of mean free path of vapor molecules on droplet surface contrary to the reported theoretical predictions. Evaporation coefficient was found to reduce rapidly when the droplet under consideration has a radius larger than the mean free path of evaporating molecules, confirming the molecular collision barrier to evaporation rate. The trend of change in evaporation coefficient with increasing droplet size predicted by the proposed model will facilitate obtaining functional relation of evaporation coefficient with droplet size, and can be used for benchmarking the interaction between multiple droplets during evaporation in vacuum.

  5. Evaluation of evaporation coefficient for micro-droplets exposed to low pressure: A semi-analytical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Prodyut R.; Hiremath, Kirankumar R.; Sharma, Manvendra

    2017-01-01

    Evaporation rate of water is strongly influenced by energy barrier due to molecular collision and heat transfer limitations. The evaporation coefficient, defined as the ratio of experimentally measured evaporation rate to that maximum possible theoretical limit, varies over a conflicting three orders of magnitude. In the present work, a semi-analytical transient heat diffusion model of droplet evaporation is developed considering the effect of change in droplet size due to evaporation from its surface, when the droplet is injected into vacuum. Negligible effect of droplet size reduction due to evaporation on cooling rate is found to be true. However, the evaporation coefficient is found to approach theoretical limit of unity, when the droplet radius is less than that of mean free path of vapor molecules on droplet surface contrary to the reported theoretical predictions. Evaporation coefficient was found to reduce rapidly when the droplet under consideration has a radius larger than the mean free path of evaporating molecules, confirming the molecular collision barrier to evaporation rate. The trend of change in evaporation coefficient with increasing droplet size predicted by the proposed model will facilitate obtaining functional relation of evaporation coefficient with droplet size, and can be used for benchmarking the interaction between multiple droplets during evaporation in vacuum.

  6. Study on interfacial heat transfer coefficient at metal/die interface during high pressure die casting process of AZ91D alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Zhi-peng

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The high pressure die casting (HPDC process is one of the fastest growing and most efficient methods for the production of complex shape castings of magnesium and aluminum alloys in today’s manufacturing industry.In this study, a high pressure die casting experiment using AZ91D magnesium alloy was conducted, and the temperature profiles inside the die were Measured. By using a computer program based on solving the inverse heat problem, the metal/die interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC was calculated and studied. The results show that the IHTC between the metal and die increases right after the liquid metal is brought into the cavity by the plunger,and decreases as the solidification process of the liquid metal proceeds until the liquid metal is completely solidified,when the IHTC tends to be stable. The interfacial heat transfer coefficient shows different characteristics under different casting wall thicknesses and varies with the change of solidification behavior.

  7. A new method to calculate pressure drop and shell-side heat transfer coefficient in a shell-and-tube heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista Filho, B.D.; Konuk, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    A new method to calculate pressure drop (Δp) and shell-side heat transfer coefficient (h sub(c)) in a shell-and-tube heat exchanger with segmental baffles is presented. The method is based on the solution of the equations of conservation of mass and momentum between two baffles. The calculated distributions of pressure and velocities given respectively, Δp and h sub(c). The values of Δp and h sub(c) are correlated for a given geometry whit the shell side fluid properties and flow rate. The calculated and experimental results agree very well for a U-Tube heat exchanger. (Author) [pt

  8. Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients in GaAs/Ga1−xAlxAs concentric double quantum rings: Effects of hydrostatic pressure and aluminum concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baghramyan, H.M.; Barseghyan, M.G.; Kirakosyan, A.A.; Restrepo, R.L.; Duque, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    The linear and nonlinear intra-band optical absorption coefficients in GaAs/Ga 1−x Al x As two-dimensional concentric double quantum rings are investigated. Taking into account the combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and aluminum concentration the energies of the ground (n=1,l=0) and the first excited state (n=2,l=1) have been found using the effective mass approximation and the transfer matrix formalism. The energies of these states and the corresponding threshold energy of the intra-band optical transitions are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure and aluminum concentration for different sizes of the structure. We also investigated the dependencies of the linear, nonlinear, and total optical absorption coefficients as functions of the incident photon energy for different values of hydrostatic pressure, aluminum concentration, sizes of the structure, and incident optical intensity. Its is found that the effects of the hydrostatic pressure and the aluminum concentration lead to a shifting of the resonant peaks of the intra-band optical spectrum. - Highlights: ► Linear and nonlinear intra-band absorption in quantum rings. ► Threshold energy strongly depends on the hydrostatic pressure. ► Threshold energy strongly depends on the stoichiometry and sizes of structure. ► Optical absorption is affected by the incident optical intensity.

  9. Pars-plana fluid aspiration for positive vitreous cavity pressure in anterior segment surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kuriakose

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive vitreous pressure due to misdirection of aqueous or choroidal effusion leads to shallowing of the anterior chamber (AC before or during anterior segment surgeries. This shallow AC if not addressed makes surgery difficult and increases the risk of surgical complications. Methods to prevent and manage this condition described in literature are not without problems. We describe a minimally invasive technique of passing a 30G needle through the pars-plana to aspirate misdirected fluid from vitreous cavity either as a prophylaxis just before surgery or during it, thereby decreasing positive vitreous pressure. This technique, used in 12 eyes, seems to be effective in patients with angle-closure glaucoma, malignant glaucoma, and per-operative sudden increase in vitreous pressure during surgery. Small-incision surgeries are ideally suited for this procedure. This minimally invasive technique is simple to perform and complications are unlikely to be more than what is seen with intravitreal injections.

  10. Pharmacologic Interventions to Improve Splanchnic Oxygenation During Ventilation with Positive End-Expiratory Pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fournell, A.; Scheeren, T. W. L.; Picker, O.; Schwarte, L. A.; Wolf, M; Bucher, HU; Rudin, M; VanHuffel, S; Wolf, U; Bruley, DF; Harrison, DK

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is an indispensable tool in the management of respiratory failure to preserve or improve lung function and systemic oxygenation. However, PEEP per se may also, as has been shown in experimental animals, impair regional

  11. Impact of ultrasound probe pressure on uterine positional displacement in gynecologic cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Mariwan; Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine; Behrens, Claus F.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to quantify the uterine positional displacement induced by ultrasound probe pressure on a phantom and address the daily uterine motion in a healthy volunteer. Materials & methods: The phantom mimics the female pelvic region. The incorporated organs were subjected to...

  12. Nap-titration : An effective alternative for continuous positive airway pressure titration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, A; Stegenga, B; Meinesz, AF; van der Hoeven, JH; Wijkstra, PJ

    When treating Obstructive Steep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS) several alternatives for standard (manual) continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) titration are feasible. A practical alternative is titration without polysomnography during an afternoon nap (Nap-titration). The aim of the present

  13. Positive airway pressure adherence and mask interface in the setting of sinonasal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Amy E; Soose, Ryan J

    2017-10-01

    Despite reports of lower positive pressure adherence rates with oronasal masks, patients with sinonasal problems are often prescribed this interface over a nasal interface. The aim of this study was to characterize the relationship between mask type and therapy adherence in the setting of sinonasal symptoms. Retrospective case series with chart review. We reviewed 328 patients who underwent positive pressure titration between January 2012 and May 2015. Follow-up adherence data were available for 218 patients (66.5%). Multivariate analysis examined whether patients with sinonasal symptoms have improved adherence with oronasal masks compared to nasal or nasal pillow interfaces. At a median follow-up of 95 days, positive pressure adherence in patients with sinonasal symptoms was highest with the nasal pillow interface. When compared with oronasal interfaces, the odds of adequate therapy adherence were >5 times greater with nasal pillow interfaces (odds ratio [OR] = 5.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.61-16.80, P = .006) and >3 times greater with nasal interfaces (OR = 3.67, 95% CI = 1.20-11.26, P = .02) in these symptomatic patients. The presence of nasal problems does not predict the need for an oronasal mask. Positive pressure adherence rates are higher with nasal and nasal pillow interfaces compared to oronasal masks, even in patients with sinonasal complaints. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:2418-2422, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure in adults with an intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijks, K.A.; Vandenbussche, N.L.; Pevernagie, D.; Overeem, S.; Pillen, S.

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: This retrospective study evaluated the feasibility of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). METHODS: CPAP therapy of 24 obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) patients with ID were compared to age- and sex-matched adults

  15. Thomson scattering in a low-pressure argon mercury positive column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, L.P.; Kroesen, G.M.W.

    2000-01-01

    The electron density and the electron temperature in a low-pressure argon mercury positive column are determined using Thomson scattering. Special attention has been given to the stray light reduction in the Thomson scattering setup. The results are obtained in a discharge tube with a 26 mm diam, 5

  16. Thomson scattering in a low-pressure neon mercury positive column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, L.P.; Kroesen, G.M.W.

    2001-01-01

    The electron density and the electron temperature in a low-pressure neon mercury positive column are determined using Thomson scattering. Special attention has been given to the stray light reduction in the Thomson scattering setup. The results are obtained in a discharge tube with a 26 mm diam, 10

  17. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Ayşın; Çakırgöz, Mensure; Ervatan, Zekeriya; Kıran, Özlem; Türkmen, Aygen; Esenyel, Cem Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Our study is a prospective, randomized study on patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery in the beach-chair position to evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on hemodynamic stability, providing a bloodless surgical field and surgical satisfaction. Fifty patients were divided into two groups. Group I (n=25) had zero end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP) administered under general anesthesia, and group II (n=25) had +5 PEEP administered. During surgery, intraarticular hemorrhage and surgical satisfaction were evaluated on a scale of 0-10. During surgery, at the 5th, 30th, 60th, and 90th minutes and at the end of surgery, heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and positive inspiratory pressure were recorded. At the end of the surgery, the amount of bleeding and duration of the operation were recorded. In group I, the duration of operation and amount of bleeding were found to be significantly greater than those in group II (pshoulder surgery in the beach-chair position reduces the amount of hemorrhage in the surgical field and thus increases surgical satisfaction without requiring the creation of controlled hypotension.

  18. Treatment of sleep-disordered breathing with positive airway pressure devices: technology update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karin Gardner; Johnson, Douglas Clark

    2015-01-01

    Many types of positive airway pressure (PAP) devices are used to treat sleep-disordered breathing including obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea, and sleep-related hypoventilation. These include continuous PAP, autoadjusting CPAP, bilevel PAP, adaptive servoventilation, and volume-assured pressure support. Noninvasive PAP has significant leak by design, which these devices adjust for in different manners. Algorithms to provide pressure, detect events, and respond to events vary greatly between the types of devices, and vary among the same category between companies and different models by the same company. Many devices include features designed to improve effectiveness and patient comfort. Data collection systems can track compliance, pressure, leak, and efficacy. Understanding how each device works allows the clinician to better select the best device and settings for a given patient. This paper reviews PAP devices, including their algorithms, settings, and features.

  19. Sibutramine versus continuous positive airway pressure in obese obstructive sleep apnoea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, A; Poirier, P; Sériès, F

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of 1 yr of sibutramine-induced weight loss versus continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on sleep-disordered breathing, cardiac autonomic function and systemic blood pressure in obese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea. Subjects with a body mass index of > or =30 kg.m(-2) without previous treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea underwent either sibutramine (n = 22) or CPAP (n = 18) treatment for 1 yr. Sibutramine induced a 5.4+/-1.4 kg decrease in body weight compared to the CPAP group, in which no changes in anthropometric variables were observed. The CPAP treatment improved all sleep and respiratory variables, whereas sibutramine-induced weight loss improved only nocturnal arterial oxygen saturation profile. Only CPAP treatment improved night-time systolic and diastolic blood pressure and 24-h and daytime ambulatory diastolic blood pressure. Sibutramine-induced weight loss had no impact on indices of heart rate variability, whereas CPAP treatment increased daytime time domain indices. CPAP treatment for 1 yr had beneficial impacts on nocturnal breathing disturbances, and improved nocturnal oxygenation, night-time systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and daytime cardiac parasympathetic modulation. Sibutramine did not improve sleep-disordered breathing, systemic blood pressure or heart rate variability. There were no adverse effects, such as increment in blood pressure or arrhythmias, associated with this treatment regimen.

  20. [A project to reduce the incidence of facial pressure ulcers caused by prolonged surgery with prone positioning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Yi; Lin, Pao-Chen; Weng, Chia-Hsing; Lin, Yi-Lin; Tsai, Wen-Lin

    2012-06-01

    We observed in our institute a 13.6% incidence of prolonged surgery (>4 hours) induced facial pressure ulcers that required prone positioning. Causes identified included: (1) customized silicon face pillows used were not suited for every patient; (2) our institute lacked a standard operating procedure for prone positioning; (3) our institute lacked a postoperative evaluation and audit procedure for facial pressure ulcers. We designed a strategy to reduce post-prolonged surgery facial pressure ulcer incidence requiring prone positioning by 50% (i.e., from 13.6% to 6.8%). We implemented the following: (1) Created a new water pillow to relieve facial pressure; (2) Implemented continuing education pressure ulcer prevention and evaluation; (3) Established protocols on standard care for prone-position patients and proper facial pressure ulcer identification; (4) Established a face pressure ulcers accident reporting mechanism; and (5) Established an audit mechanism facial pressure ulcer cases. After implementing the resolution measures, 116 patients underwent prolonged surgery in a prone position (mean operating time: 298 mins). None suffered from facial pressure ulcers. The measures effectively reduced the incidence of facial pressure ulcers from 13.6% to 0.0%. The project used a water pillow to relieve facial pressure and educated staff to recognize and evaluate pressure ulcers. These measures were demonstrated effective in reducing the incidence of facial pressure ulcers caused by prolonged prone positioning.

  1. Treatment of sleep-disordered breathing with positive airway pressure devices: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson KG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Karin Gardner Johnson, Douglas Clark Johnson Department of Medicine, Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA, USA Abstract: Many types of positive airway pressure (PAP devices are used to treat sleep-disordered breathing including obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea, and sleep-related hypoventilation. These include continuous PAP, autoadjusting CPAP, bilevel PAP, adaptive servoventilation, and volume-assured pressure support. Noninvasive PAP has significant leak by design, which these devices adjust for in different manners. Algorithms to provide pressure, detect events, and respond to events vary greatly between the types of devices, and vary among the same category between companies and different models by the same company. Many devices include features designed to improve effectiveness and patient comfort. Data collection systems can track compliance, pressure, leak, and efficacy. Understanding how each device works allows the clinician to better select the best device and settings for a given patient. This paper reviews PAP devices, including their algorithms, settings, and features. Keywords: BiPAP, CPAP, iVAPS, AVAPS, ASV, positive pressure respiration, instrumentation, treatment algorithm

  2. Development and evaluation of a self-efficacy instrument for Japanese sleep apnea patients receiving continuous positive airway pressure treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ayako Saito,1 Shigeko Kojima,2 Fumihiko Sasaki,3 Masamichi Hayashi,4 Yuki Mieno,4 Hiroki Sakakibara,5 Shuji Hashimoto1 1Department of Hygiene, School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Japan; 2Department of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences, Nihon Fukushi University, Handa, Japan; 3SDB Research Laboratory, Takaoka Clinic, Nagoya, Japan; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine and Clinical Allergy, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Japan; 5Tokushige Kokyuki Clinic, Nagoya, Japan Abstract: The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a self-efficacy instrument for Japanese obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP. Analyzed subjects were 653 Japanese OSA patients (619 males and 34 females treated with CPAP at a sleep laboratory in a respiratory clinic in a Japanese city. Based on Bandura's social cognitive theory, the CPAP Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Sleep Apnea in Japanese (CSESA-J was developed by a focus group of experts, using a group interview of OSA patients for the items of two previous self-efficacy scales for Western sleep apnea patients receiving CPAP treatment. CSESA-J has two subscales, one for self-efficacy and the other for outcome expectancy, and consists of a total of 15 items. Content validity was confirmed by the focus group. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the factor loadings of self-efficacy and outcome expectancy were 0.47–0.76 and 0.41–0.92, respectively, for the corresponding items. CSESA-J had a significant but weak positive association with the General Self-Efficacy Scale, and a strong positive association with “Self-efficacy scale on health behavior in patients with chronic disease.” Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.85 for the self-efficacy subscale and 0.89 for the outcome expectancy subscale. The intraclass correlation coefficient using data from the first and second measurements with

  3. Generalized time evolution of the homogeneous cooling state of a granular gas with positive and negative coefficient of normal restitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Nagi

    2018-04-01

    The homogeneous cooling state (HCS) of a granular gas described by the inelastic Boltzmann equation is reconsidered. As usual, particles are taken as inelastic hard disks or spheres, but now the coefficient of normal restitution α is allowed to take negative values , which is a simple way of modeling more complicated inelastic interactions. The distribution function of the HCS is studied at the long-time limit, as well as intermediate times. At the long-time limit, the relevant information of the HCS is given by a scaling distribution function , where the time dependence occurs through a dimensionless velocity c. For , remains close to the Gaussian distribution in the thermal region, its cumulants and exponential tails being well described by the first Sonine approximation. In contrast, for , the distribution function becomes multimodal, its maxima located at , and its observable tails algebraic. The latter is a consequence of an unbalanced relaxation–dissipation competition, and is analytically demonstrated for , thanks to a reduction of the Boltzmann equation to a Fokker–Plank-like equation. Finally, a generalized scaling solution to the Boltzmann equation is also found . Apart from the time dependence occurring through the dimensionless velocity, depends on time through a new parameter β measuring the departure of the HCS from its long-time limit. It is shown that describes the time evolution of the HCS for almost all times. The relevance of the new scaling is also discussed.

  4. The effects of different lying positions on interface pressure, skin temperature, and tissue blood flow in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källman, Ulrika; Engström, Maria; Bergstrand, Sara; Ek, Anna-Christina; Fredrikson, Mats; Lindberg, Lars-Göran; Lindgren, Margareta

    2015-03-01

    Although repositioning is considered an important intervention to prevent pressure ulcers, tissue response during loading in different lying positions has not been adequately explored. To compare the effects of different lying positions on interface pressure, skin temperature, and tissue blood flow in nursing home residents. From May 2011 to August 2012, interface pressure, skin temperature, and blood flow at three tissue depths were measured for 1 hr over the sacrum in 30° supine tilt and 0° supine positions and over the trochanter major in 30° lateral and 90° lateral positions in 25 residents aged 65 years or older. Measurement of interface pressure was accomplished using a pneumatic pressure transmitter connected to a digital manometer, skin temperature using a temperature sensor, and blood flow using photoplethysmography and laser Doppler flowmetry. Interface pressure was significantly higher in the 0° supine and 90° lateral positions than in 30° supine tilt and 30° lateral positions. The mean skin temperature increased from baseline in all positions. Blood flow was significantly higher in the 30° supine tilt position compared to the other positions. A hyperemic response in the post pressure period was seen at almost all tissue depths and positions. The 30° supine tilt position generated less interface pressure and allowed greater tissue perfusion, suggesting that this position is the most beneficial. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Pressure-modulated differential scanning calorimetry. An approach to the continuous, simultaneous determination of heat capacities and expansion coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, K; Rösgen, J; Hinz, H-J

    2006-02-15

    A new method is described that permits the continuous and synchronous determination of heat capacity and expansibility data. We refer to it as pressure-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (PMDSC), as it involves a standard DSC temperature scan and superimposes on it a pressure modulation of preselected format. The power of the method is demonstrated using salt solutions for which the most accurate heat capacity and expansibility data exist in the literature. As the PMDSC measurements could reproduce the parameters with high accuracy and precision, we applied the method also to an aqueous suspension of multilamellar DSPC vesicles for which no expansibility data had been reported previously for the transition region. Excellent agreement was obtained between data from PMDSC and values from independent direct differential scanning densimetry measurements. The basic theoretical background of the method when using sawtooth-like pressure ramps is given under Supporting Information, and a complete statistical thermodynamic derivation of the general equations is presented in the accompanying paper.

  6. Randomized controlled trial comparing nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation and nasal continuous positive airway pressure in premature infants after tracheal extubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Franco Rizzo Komatsu

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: To analyze the frequency of extubation failure in premature infants using conventional mechanical ventilation (MV after extubation in groups subjected to nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (nIPPV and continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP. Method: Seventy-two premature infants with respiratory failure were studied, with a gestational age (GA ≤ 36 weeks and birth weight (BW > 750 g, who required tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. The study was controlled and randomized in order to ensure that the members of the groups used in the research were chosen at random. Randomization was performed at the time of extubation using sealed envelopes. Extubation failure was defined as the need for re-intubation and mechanical ventilation during the first 72 hours after extubation. Results: Among the 36 premature infants randomized to nIPPV, six (16.6% presented extubation failure in comparison to 11 (30.5% of the 36 premature infants randomized to nCPAP. There was no statistical difference between the two study groups regarding BW, GA, classification of the premature infant, and MV time. The main cause of extubation failure was the occurrence of apnea. Gastrointestinal and neurological complications did not occur in the premature infants participating in the study. Conclusion: We found that, despite the extubation failure of the group of premature infants submitted to nIPPV being numerically smaller than in premature infants submitted to nCPAP, there was no statistically significant difference between the two modes of ventilatory support after extubation.

  7. Expert judgment study on wind pressure coefficients. Part 2 : Unprocessed data: Expert rationales Wind tunnel data. Final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wit, S.

    1999-01-01

    In the design of low-rise buildings, wind tunnel experiments are scarcely employed to assess the wind-induced pressures, which are required e.g. for the simulation of ventilation flows or for the evaluation of the structural integrity. Instead, techniques are used, which predominandy rely on inter-

  8. Liquid phase PVTx properties of (water + tert-butanol) binary mixtures at temperatures from 278.15 to 323.15 K and pressures from 0.1 to 100 MPa. II. Molar isothermal compressions, molar isobaric expansions, molar thermal pressure coefficients, and internal pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, Gennadiy I.; Makarov, Dmitriy M.; Kolker, Arkadiy M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Molar isothermal compressions and molar isobaric expansions were evaluated. ► Coefficients of thermal pressure and internal pressure were obtained. ► Concentration dependences of coefficients under study display extremes. ► Temperature and pressure dependences of internal pressure of the mixture were linear. -- Abstract: Molar isothermal compressions, molar isobaric expansions, molar coefficients of thermal pressure, and internal pressure were calculated over the whole concentration range of {water (1) + tert-butanol (2)} mixture at pressures from 0.1 to 100 MPa and temperatures from 278.15 to 323.15 K. It was revealed that the extremes, observed on concentration dependences of molar isothermal compression K T,m and molar isobaric expansion E P,m of the mixture, became more pronounced with pressure growth and temperature lowering. Values of molar thermal pressure coefficients of the mixture sharply rose at compositions with small TBA mole fraction and then decreased practically linearly with the alcohol content increasing. Temperature and pressure dependences of the mixture internal pressure were almost linear, and at low TBA concentrations changed significantly from the dependences of water, tert-butanol and their mixtures at large alcohol content

  9. Friction pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient of two-phase flow in helically coiled tube once-through steam generator for integrated type marine water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hideki; Kobayashi, Michiyuki; Matsuoka, Takeshi.

    1982-01-01

    Two-phase friction pressure drop and heat transfer coefficients in a once-through steam generator with helically coiled tubes were investigated with the model test rig of an integrated type marine water reactor. As the dimensions of the heat transfer tubes and the thermal-fluid conditions are almost the same as those of real reactors, the data applicable directly to the real reactor design were obtained. As to the friction pressure drop, modified Kozeki's prediction which is based on the experimental data by Kozeki for coiled tubes, agreed the best with the experimental data. Modified Martinelli-Nelson's prediction which is based on Martinelli-Nelson's multiplier using Ito's equation for single-phase flow in coiled tube, agreed within 30%. The effect of coiled tube on the average heat transfer coefficients at boiling region were small, and the predictions for straight tube could also be applied to coiled tube. Schrock-Grossman's correlation agreed well with the experimental data at the pressures of lower than 3.5 MPa. It was suggested that dryout should be occurred at the quality of greater than 90% within the conditions of this report. (author)

  10. A Numerical Procedure for Flow Distribution and Pressure Drops for U and Z Type Configurations Plate Heat Exchangers with Variable Coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López, R; Lecuona, A; Ventas, R; Vereda, C

    2012-01-01

    In Plate Heat Exchangers it is important to determine the flow distribution and pressure drops, because they affect directly the performance of a heat exchanger. This work proposes an incompressible, one-dimensional, steady state, discrete model allowing for variable overall momentum coefficients to determine these magnitudes. The model consists on a modified version of the Bajura and Jones model for dividing and combining flow manifolds. The numerical procedure is based on the finite differences approximation approach proposed by Datta and Majumdar. A linear overall momentum coefficient distribution is used in the dividing manifold, but the model is not limited to linear distributions. Comparisons are made with experimental, numerical and analytical data, yielding good results.

  11. Short-term effects of positive expiratory airway pressure in patients being weaned from mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Mello Rieder

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility and the cardiorespiratory effects of using positive expiratory airway pressure, a physiotherapeutic tool, in comparison with a T-tube, to wean patients from mechanical ventilation. METHODS/DESIGN: A prospective, randomized, cross-over study. SETTING: Two intensive care units. PATIENTS AND INTERVENTIONS: We evaluated forty patients who met weaning criteria and had been mechanically-ventilated for more than 48 hours, mean age 59 years, including 23 males. All patients were submitted to the T-tube and Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure devices, at 7 cm H2O, during a 30-minute period. Cardiorespiratory variables including work of breathing, respiratory rate (rr, peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2, heart rate (hr, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures (SAP, DAP, MAP were measured in the first and thirtieth minutes. The condition was analyzed as an entire sample set (n=40 and was also divided into subconditions: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=14 and non-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (non- chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=26 categories. Comparisons were made using a t-test and Analysis of Variance. The level of significance was p < 0.05. RESULTS: Our data showed an increase in work of breathing in the first and thirtieth minutes in the EPAP condition (0.86+ 0.43 and 1.02+1.3 as compared with the T-tube condition (0.25+0.26 and 0.26+0.35 (p<0.05, verified by the flow-sensor monitor (values in J/L. No statistical differences were observed when comparing the Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure and T-tube conditions with regard to cardiorespiratory measurements. The same result was observed for both chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and non- chronic obstructive pulmonary disease subconditions. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrated that, in weaning patients from mechanical ventilation, the use of a fixed level of Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure caused an increase in work of

  12. [Comparison of different continuous positive airway pressure titration methods for obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjing; Ye, Jingying; Zhang, Peng; Kang, Dan; Cao, Xin; Zhang, Yuhuan; Ding, Xiu; Zheng, Li; Li, Hongguang; Bian, Qiuli

    2014-10-01

    To explore whether there were differences between the results of automatic titration and the results of manual titration for positive airway pressure treatment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and its influencing factors, the results might provide a theoretical basis for the rational use of two pressure titration methods. Sixty one patients with OSAHS were included in this study. All patients underwent a manual titration and an automatic titration within one week. The clinical informations, polysomnography data, and the results of both two titration of all patients were obtained for analysis. The overall apnea/hypopnea index was (63.1 ± 17.7)/h, with a range of 14.9/h to 110.4/h. The treatment pressure of manual titration was (8.4 ± 2.1) cmH(2)O, which was significantly lower than the treatment pressure of automatic titration, (11.5 ± 2.7) cmH(2)O (t = -9.797, P titration and manual titration), it was found that the pressure of automatic titration was significantly higher in patients with a ΔP > 3 cmH(2)O than in patients with a ΔP ≤ 3 cmH(2)O, which was (13.3 ± 2.3) cmH(2)O vs (10.0 ± 2.0) cmH(2)O (t = -6.159, P titration between these two groups, which was (8.6 ± 2.4) cmH(2)O vs (8.3 ± 2.0)cmH(2)O (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference in age, body mass index, neck circumference, abdomen circumference, apnea hypopnea index, and arterial oxygen saturation between these two groups. The treatment pressure of automatic titration is usually higher than that of manual titration. For patients with a high treatment pressure which is derived from automatic titration, a suggestion about manual titration could be given to decrease the potential treatment pressure of continuous positive airway pressure, which may be helpful in improving the comfortableness and the compliance of this treatment.

  13. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation for acute asthma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korang, Steven Kwasi; Feinberg, Joshua; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    (age independently screened titles and abstracts. We retrieved all relevant full-text study reports, independently screened the full text, identified trials for inclusion and identified and recorded...... reasons for exclusion of ineligible trials. We resolved disagreements through discussion or, if required, consulted a third review author. We recorded the selection process in sufficient detail to complete a PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) flow diagram...... both studies as having high risk of bias; both trials assessed effects of bilateral positive airway pressure (BiPAP). Neither trial used continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Controls received standard care. Investigators reported no deaths and no serious adverse events (Grades of Recommendation...

  14. Early predictors of success of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in hypercapnic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, D; Prasad, Bnbm; Tampi, P S; Ramprasad, R

    2011-10-01

    Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) has emerged as a significant advancement in the management of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure requiring ventilation therapy (respiratory rate [RR] of > 30 breaths per minutes, PaCO2 > 55 mmHg and arterial pH success group and these parameters continued to improve even after four and 24 hours of NIPPV treatment. Out of 24 (24%) patients who failed to respond, 13 (54%) needed endotracheal intubation within one hour. The failure group had higher baseline HR than the success group. Improvement in HR, RR, pH, and PCO2 one hour after putting the patient on NIPPV predicts success of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in hypercapnic respiratory failure.

  15. Hemodynamic differences between continual positive and two types of negative pressure ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhat, D; Langleben, D; Zidulka, A

    1992-09-01

    In seven anesthetized dogs, ventilated with matching lung volumes, tidal volumes, and respiratory rates, we compared the effects on cardiac output (CO), arterial venous oxygen saturation difference (SaO2 - SVO2), and femoral and inferior vena cava pressure (1) intermittent positive pressure ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure (CPPV); (2) iron-lung ventilation with negative end-expiratory pressure (ILV-NEEP); (3) grid and wrap ventilation with NEEP applied to the thorax and upper abdomen (G&W-NEEP). The values of CO and SaO2 - SVO2 with ILV-NEEP were similar to those with CPPV. However, with G&W-NEEP as compared with ILV-NEEP, mean CO was greater (2.9 versus 2.6 L/min, p = 0.02) and mean (SaO2 - SVO2) was lower (26.6% versus 28.3%, p = NS). Mean PFEM-IVC was higher with G&W-NEEP than with the other types of ventilation. We conclude that (1) ILV-NEEP is hemodynamically equivalent to CPPV and (2) G&W-NEEP has less adverse hemodynamic consequences. has less adverse hemodynamic consequences.

  16. Clinical predictors of central sleep apnea evoked by positive airway pressure titration

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchi, Matt; Gannon,Karen; Lovell,Kathy; Merlino,Margaret; Mojica,James; Moro,Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    Marilyn Moro,1 Karen Gannon,1 Kathy Lovell,1 Margaret Merlino,1 James Mojica,2 Matt T Bianchi,1,3 1Neurology Department, 2Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 3Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Purpose: Treatment-emergent central sleep apnea (TECSA), also called complex apnea, occurs in 5%–15% of sleep apnea patients during positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy, but the clinical predictors are not w...

  17. Body Composition Response to Lower Body Positive Pressure Training in Obese Children

    OpenAIRE

    Basant H. El-Refay; Nabeel T. Faiad

    2014-01-01

    Background: The high prevalence of obesity in Egypt has a great impact on the health care system, economic and social situation. Evidence suggests that even a moderate amount of weight loss can be useful. Aim of the study: To analyze the effects of lower body positive pressure supported treadmill training, conducted with hypocaloric diet, on body composition of obese children. Methods: Thirty children aged between 8 and 14 years, were randomly assigned into two groups: intervention group (15 ...

  18. Detecting Output Pressure Change of Positive-Displacement Pump by Phase Trajectory Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Stojek

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of hydraulic system condition change during its exploitation ran its complex problem. The main task is to identifyearly phase damage of hydraulic system elements (pumps, valves, ect. in order to take decision which can avoid hydraulic system breakdown. This paper presents the possibility of phase trajectories use in detecting output pressure change of hydraulic system causedby positive-displacement pump wear.

  19. Randomised trial of elective continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compared with rescue CPAP after extubation

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, N; Hamilton, P

    1998-01-01

    AIM—To determine if a weaning regimen on flow driver continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) would decrease the number of ventilator days but increase the number of CPAP days when compared with a rescue regimen.
METHODS—Fifty eight babies of 24-32 weeks gestation with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) were studied prospectively. After extubation they were randomly allocated to receive CPAP for 72 hours (n=29) according to a weaning regimen, or were placed in headbox ...

  20. Pressure support ventilation vs Continuous positive airway pressure for treating of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Antonio; Numis, Fabio G; Rosato, Valerio; Russo, Teresa; Porta, Giovanni; Bosso, Giorgio; Serra, Claudia; Masarone, Mario; Visone, Giuseppe; Paladino, Fiorella

    2018-04-24

    Non-invasive ventilation is usually adopted as a support to medical therapy in patients with acute pulmonary edema, but which modality between Pressure Support Ventilation (PSV) and Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) has better favourable effects is not been yet well known. Aim of this observational study was to provide data on these different non-invasive ventilation modalities in the management of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema. One-hundred-fifty-three patients consecutively admitted to the Emergency Room of two different Center were enrolled and randomly assigned to CPAP or PSV. Data relative to mortality, need of endotracheal intubation, sequential blood gas analysis were compared. Furthermore, there were no significant differences regarding mortality in the two groups, but patients treated with PSV had a significant lower rate of endotracheal intubation and a higher improvement of blood gas analyses parameters. In conclusion, our data support only a slight advantage in favour to PSV versus CPAP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation of effect of blood pressure and heart rate changes in different positions (lying and sitting on hypotension incidence rate after spinal anesthesia in patients undergoing caesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Manouchehrian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the relatively high prevalence of hypotension (20% -40% after spinal anesthesia as well as the adverse effects of hypotension on mother and baby, it is better to prevent hypotension as much as possible. Therefore, this study is aimed to determine the relationship between postural blood pressure and heart rate changes and hypotension incidence rate after spinal anesthesia in cesarean section.63 women aging18 to 45years old with fullterm pregnancy, who were candidate for caesarean section with spinal anesthesia, entered the study. Afterwards, the diastolic, systolic, and mean arterial pressures as well as the heart rate (pulse in different positions (sitting, lying, and left lateral were measured. After spinal anesthesia, the patients' blood pressure was measured and recorded every minute until the10thmin, then every 3 minute until the15thmin, and then every 5 minute until the end of cesarean section. Data analysis was performed using SPSS (ver. 19 software, descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA, and post hoc Bonferroni test. In this study, the hypotension incidence rate was 30% and the orthostatic variation rate of the systolic blood pressure in more than half of the people was between 4.39 to 13.49psi, which showed the highest variation compared to the diastolic pressure, mean arterial blood pressure (or: mean arterial pressure [MAP], and heart(pulse. Considering the correlation coefficient of 0.27, the systolic blood pressure in the lateral position has the highest relationship with the incidence of hypotension. The postural systolic blood pressure changes in patients prior to the spinal anesthesia can be a predictive factor for the post-spinal hypotension incidence.

  2. Nitroglycerine and patient position effect on central, hepatic and portal venous pressures during liver surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, L; Lundin, S; Rizell, M; Wiklund, J; Stenqvist, O; Houltz, E

    2014-09-01

    To reduce blood loss during liver surgery, a low central venous pressure (CVP) is recommended. Nitroglycerine (NG) with its rapid onset and offset can be used to reduce CVP. In this study, the effect of NG on portal and hepatic venous pressures (PVP and HVP) in different body positions was assessed. Thirteen patients undergoing liver resection were studied. Cardiac output (CO), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and CVP were measured. PVP and HVP were measured using tip manometer catheters at baseline (BL) in horizontal position; during NG infusion, targeting a MAP of 60 mmHg, with NG infusion and the patient placed in 10 head-down position. NG infusion reduced HVP from 9.7 ± 2.4 to 7.2 ± 2.4, PVP from 12.3 ± 2.2 to 9.7 ± 3.0 and CVP from 9.8 ± 1.9 to 7.2 ± 2.1 mmHg at BL. Head-down tilt during ongoing NG resulted in increases in HVP to 8.2 ± 2.1, PVP to 10.7 ± 3 and CVP to 11 ± 1.9 mmHg. CO at BL was 6.3 ± 1.1, which was reduced by NG to 5.8 ± 1.2. Head-down tilt together with NG infusion restored CO to 6.3 ± 1.0 l/min. NG infusion leads to parallel reductions in CVP, HVP and PVP at horizontal body position. Thus, CVP can be used to guide NG dosage and fluid administration at horizontal position. NG infusion can be used to reduce HVP. Head-down tilt can be used during NG infusion to improve both blood pressure and CO without substantial increase in liver venous pressure. In head-down tilt, CVP dissociates from HVP and PVP. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Investigation on low room-temperature resistivity Cr/(Ba0.85Pb0.15)TiO3 positive temperature coefficient composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Zeming; Ma, J.; Qu, Yuanfang

    2009-01-01

    discussed. Using these special processes, the prepared composite with 20 wt% Cr possessed low room-temperature resistivity (2.96 Ω cm at 25 °C) and exhibited PTC effect (resistivity jump of 10), which is considered as a promising candidate for over-current protector when working at low voltage. The grain......Low room-temperature resistivity positive temperature coefficient (PTC) Cr/(Ba0.85Pb0.15)TiO3 composites were produced via a reducing sintering and a subsequent oxidation treatment. The effects of metallic content and processing conditions on materials resistivity–temperature properties were...

  4. Association of an adult obesity, blood pressure adulthood socio-economic position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siadat, Zahra Dana; Abdoli, Aminreza; Shahsanaee, Armindokht

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate an effect of childhood and adulthood socio-economic position on selected cardiovascular risk factors including obesity, blood pressure level and smoking behavior. This is a cross-sectional study performed on 479 individuals, randomly selected by random clustered sampling from men and women aged 30-50 years, living in Esfahan. Their demographic characteristics, education, occupation and smoking behavior were questioned. Their weight, height and blood pressure were also measured, and their BMI (Body Mass Index) was calculated. The data were analyzed by SPSS 19 software. In men, the odds ratio for ever smoking to never smoking at higher levels of education in comparison with the lower levels was 6.08 (2.65-14.11). For manual occupation to non-manual occupation, it was 3.55 (1.88-6.68). The odds ratio for obesity and overweight vs no overweight, for manual occupation to non-manual occupation was 3.12 (1.81-5.40) in men and for father's occupation it was 2.03 (1.10-3.74). In women, their education with the odds ratio of 2.11 (1.17-3.82) and father's occupation with the odds ratio of 6.63 (3.50-12.58) altered their chance of being obese or overweight. Also, in women, the mean systolic blood pressure was significantly lower at higher educational levels and in those whose fathers' occupation were manual but lower in manual workers. The current socio-economic position in individuals is associated with an obesity and smoking behavior, particularly in men. Childhood socio-economic position increases the chance of an obesity and higher blood pressure, particularly in women.

  5. Development of a noise-based method for the determination of the moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity (MTC) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaziere, C.

    2002-01-01

    The Moderator Temperature Coefficient of reactivity (MTC) is an important safety parameter of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). In most countries, the so-called at-power MTC has to be measured a few months before the reactor outage, in order to determine if the MTC will not become too negative. Usually, the at-power MTC is determined by inducing a change in the moderator temperature, which has to be compensated for by other means, such as a change in the boron concentration. An MTC measurement using the boron dilution method is analysed in this thesis. It is demonstrated that the uncertainty of such a measurement technique is so large, that the measured MTC could become more negative than what the Technical Specifications allow. Furthermore, this technique incurs a disturbance of the plant operation. For this reason, another technique relying on noise analysis was proposed a few years ago. In this technique, the MTC is inferred from the neutron noise measured inside the core and the moderator temperature noise measured at the core-exit, in the same or in a neighbouring fuel assembly. This technique does not require any perturbation of the reactor operation, but was nevertheless proven to underestimate the MTC by a factor of 2 to 5. In this thesis, it is shown, both theoretically and experimentally, that the reason of the MTC underestimation by noise analysis is the radially loosely coupled character of the moderator temperature noise throughout the core. A new MTC noise estimator, accounting for this radially non-homogeneous moderator temperature noise is proposed and demonstrated to give the correct MTC value. This new MTC noise estimator relies on the neutron noise measured in a single point of the reactor and the radially averaged moderator temperature noise measured inside the core. In the case of the Ringhals-2 PWR in Sweden, Gamma-Thermometers (GTs) offer such a possibility since in dynamic mode they measure the moderator temperature noise, whereas in static

  6. Clinical predictors of central sleep apnea evoked by positive airway pressure titration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Marilyn; Gannon, Karen; Lovell, Kathy; Merlino, Margaret; Mojica, James; Bianchi, Matt T

    2016-01-01

    Treatment-emergent central sleep apnea (TECSA), also called complex apnea, occurs in 5%-15% of sleep apnea patients during positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy, but the clinical predictors are not well understood. The goal of this study was to explore possible predictors in a clinical sleep laboratory cohort, which may highlight those at risk during clinical management. We retrospectively analyzed 728 patients who underwent PAP titration (n=422 split-night; n=306 two-night). Demographics and self-reported medical comorbidities, medications, and behaviors as well as standard physiological parameters from the polysomnography (PSG) data were analyzed. We used regression analysis to assess predictors of binary presence or absence of central apnea index (CAI) ≥5 during split-night PSG (SN-PSG) versus full-night PSG (FN-PSG) titrations. CAI ≥5 was present in 24.2% of SN-PSG and 11.4% of FN-PSG patients during titration. Male sex, maximum continuous positive airway pressure, and use of bilevel positive airway pressure were predictors of TECSA, and rapid eye movement dominance was a negative predictor, for both SN-PSG and FN-PSG patients. Self-reported narcotics were a positive predictor of TECSA, and the time spent in stage N2 sleep was a negative predictor only for SN-PSG patients. Self-reported history of stroke and the CAI during the diagnostic recording predicted TECSA only for FN-PSG patients. Clinical predictors of treatment-evoked central apnea spanned demographic, medical history, sleep physiology, and titration factors. Improved predictive models may be increasingly important as diagnostic and therapeutic modalities move away from the laboratory setting, even as PSG remains the gold standard for characterizing primary central apnea and TECSA.

  7. Auto-trilevel versus bilevel positive airway pressure ventilation for hypercapnic overlap syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Mei; Huai, De; Cao, Juan; Ning, Ding; Xue, Rong; Xu, Meijie; Huang, Mao; Zhang, Xilong

    2018-03-01

    Although bilevel positive airway pressure (Bilevel PAP) therapy is usually used for overlap syndrome (OS), there is still a portion of OS patients in whom Bilevel PAP therapy could not simultaneously eliminate residual apnea events and hypercapnia. The current study was expected to explore whether auto-trilevel positive airway pressure (auto-trilevel PAP) therapy with auto-adjusting end expiratory positive airway pressure (EEPAP) can serve as a better alternative for these patients. From January of 2014 to June of 2016, 32 hypercapnic OS patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) and moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) were recruited. Three variable modes of positive airway pressure (PAP) from the ventilator (Prisma25ST, Weinmann Inc., Germany) were applicated for 8 h per night. We performed the design of each mode at each night with an interval of two nights with no PAP treatment as a washout period among different modes. In Bilevel-1 mode (Bilevel-1), the expiratory positive airway pressure (EPAP) delivered from Bilevel PAP was always set as the lowest PAP for abolishment of snoring. For each patient, the inspiratory positive airway pressure (IPAP) was constantly set the same as the minimal pressure for keeping end-tidal CO 2 (ETCO 2 ) ≤45 mmHg for all three modes. However, the EPAP issued by Bilevel PAP in Bilevel-2 mode (Bilevel-2) was kept 3 cmH 2 O higher than that in Bilevel-1. In auto-trilevel mode (auto-trilevel) with auto-trilevel PAP, the initial part of EPAP was fixed at the same PAP as that in Bilevel-1 while the EEPAP was automatically regulated to rise at a range of ≤4 cmH 2 O based on nasal airflow wave changes. Comparisons were made for parameters before and during or following treatment as well as among different PAP therapy modes. The following parameters were compared such as nocturnal apnea hypopnea index (AHI), minimal SpO 2 (minSpO 2 ), arousal index, sleep structure and efficiency

  8. Successful use of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in a complicated flail chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ansari, Mariam A.

    2006-01-01

    The current advanced trauma life support manual states that patients with significant hypoxia (namely, SaO2<90% on room air) as a result of pulmonary contusion should be intubated and ventilated within the first hour of injury. Recently, several researchers have shown improved outcomes when patients with acute respiratory failure are managed with noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV). Trauma patients may also benefit from this therapy. We report a case of 15-year-old boy who isolated flail chest and pulmonary contusion, who was intubated in the emergency room, and was managed successfully with the NIPPV in the intensive care unit (ICU) despite, having had aspiration pneumonia early in the course of her stay. After initial stabilization, he failed a spontaneous breathing trial. Due to absence of contraindications to the use of NIPPV, the patient was extubated on day 7 (from pressure ventilation of 15 cmH2O and positive end expiratory pressure of 8 cm H2O) to immediate NIPPV use. Three days later (after a total of 50 hours of NIPPV use in the ICU) the patient was successfully discharged home. (author)

  9. Positional change in blood pressure and 8-year risk of hypertension: the CARDIA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Randal J; Liu, Kiang; Jacobs, David R; Bild, Diane E; Kiefe, Catarina I; Hulley, Stephen B

    2003-08-01

    To assess the relationship between positional blood pressure change and 8-year incidence of hypertension in a biracial cohort of young adults. Participants from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study with complete data from year 2 (1987-1988), year 5 (1990-1991), year 7 (1992-1993), and year 10 (1995-1996) examinations were included (N = 2781). Participants were classified into 3 groups based on their year 2 systolic blood pressure response to standing: drop, a decrease in systolic blood pressure of more than 5 mm Hg; same, a change of between -5 and +5 mm Hg; and rise, more than 5-mm Hg increase. The number of participants in each group was as follows: drop, 741; same, 1590; and rise, 450. The 8-year incidence of hypertension was 8.4% in the drop group, 6.8% in the same group, and 12.4% in the rise group (P women, 2.47 (95% CI, 1.19-5.11), in white men, 2.17 (95% CI, 1.00-4.73), and in white women, 4.74 (95% CI, 1.11-20.30). A greater than 5-mm Hg increase in blood pressure on standing identified a group of young adults at increased risk of developing hypertension within 8 years. These findings support a physiologic link between sympathetic nervous system reactivity and risk of hypertension in young adults.

  10. Control of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP for small animal ventilators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leão Nunes Marcelo V

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP for the mechanical ventilation of small animals is frequently obtained with water seals or by using ventilators developed for human use. An alternative mechanism is the use of an on-off expiratory valve closing at the moment when the alveolar pressure is equal to the target PEEP. In this paper, a novel PEEP controller (PEEP-new and the PEEP system of a commercial small-animal ventilator, both based on switching an on-off valve, are evaluated. Methods The proposed PEEP controller is a discrete integrator monitoring the error between the target PEEP and the airways opening pressure prior to the onset of an inspiratory cycle. In vitro as well as in vivo experiments with rats were carried out and the PEEP accuracy, settling time and under/overshoot were considered as a measure of performance. Results The commercial PEEP controller did not pass the tests since it ignores the airways resistive pressure drop, resulting in a PEEP 5 cmH2O greater than the target in most conditions. The PEEP-new presented steady-state errors smaller than 0.5 cmH2O, with settling times below 10 s and under/overshoot smaller than 2 cmH2O. Conclusion The PEEP-new presented acceptable performance, considering accuracy and temporal response. This novel PEEP generator may prove useful in many applications for small animal ventilators.

  11. Influence of water vapour on the height distribution of positive ions, effective recombination coefficient and ionisation balance in the quiet lower ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barabash

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mesospheric water vapour concentration effects on the ion composition and electron density in the lower ionosphere under quiet geophysical conditions were examined. Water vapour is an important compound in the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere that affects ion composition due to hydrogen radical production and consequently modifies the electron number density. Recent lower-ionosphere investigations have primarily concentrated on the geomagnetic disturbance periods. Meanwhile, studies on the electron density under quiet conditions are quite rare. The goal of this study is to contribute to a better understanding of the ionospheric parameter responses to water vapour variability in the quiet lower ionosphere. By applying a numerical D region ion chemistry model, we evaluated efficiencies for the channels forming hydrated cluster ions from the NO+ and O2+ primary ions (i.e. NO+.H2O and O2+.H2O, respectively, and the channel forming H+(H2On proton hydrates from water clusters at different altitudes using profiles with low and high water vapour concentrations. Profiles for positive ions, effective recombination coefficients and electrons were modelled for three particular cases using electron density measurements obtained during rocket campaigns. It was found that the water vapour concentration variations in the mesosphere affect the position of both the Cl2+ proton hydrate layer upper border, comprising the NO+(H2On and O2+(H2On hydrated cluster ions, and the Cl1+ hydrate cluster layer lower border, comprising the H+(H2On pure proton hydrates, as well as the numerical cluster densities. The water variations caused large changes in the effective recombination coefficient and electron density between altitudes of 75 and 87 km. However, the effective recombination coefficient, αeff, and electron number density did not respond even to large water vapour concentration variations occurring at other altitudes in the mesosphere. We determined the water

  12. Reverse Trendelenburg position is a safer technique for lowering central venous pressure without decreasing blood pressure than clamping of the inferior vena cava below the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Godai; Katagiri, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2015-06-01

    Bleeding remains an important intraoperative complication in patients who undergo hepatectomy. It is generally believed that a reduction in central venous pressure will decrease bleeding from the hepatic venous system. To our knowledge, however, no study has compared the effectiveness of these techniques for controlling bleeding. So we compared the effectiveness of central venous pressure control techniques, such as infrahepatic inferior vena cava clamping, changes in surgical position of the patient, and hypoventilation anesthesia, for lowering central venous pressure. The study group comprised 50 patients who underwent hepatectomy in our department from 2012 through 2013. A central venous catheter was inserted into the right internal jugular vein, and the tip was placed in the superior vena cava. A transducer was placed along the mid-axillary line of the left side of the chest. After opening the abdomen, changes in central venous pressure were measured during inferior vena cava clamping, the reverse Trendelenburg position, the Trendelenburg position, and hypoventilation anesthesia. The inclination relative to the transducer, as measured with an inclinometer, was -10 degrees for the Trendelenburg position and +10 degrees for the reverse Trendelenburg position. The tidal volume was set at 10 mL/kg during conventional anesthesia and 5 mL/kg during hypoventilation anesthesia. The mean central venous pressure was 8.0 cm H(2)O in the supine position during conventional anesthesia, 5.0 cm H(2)O during inferior vena cava clamping, 5.6 cm H(2)O during reverse Trendelenburg position, 10.6 cm H(2)O during Trendelenburg position, and 7.6 cm H(2)O during hypoventilation anesthesia. The mean central venous pressure during inferior vena cava clamping and reverse Trendelenburg position was significantly lower than that during supine position (P = 0.0017 and P = 0.0231, respectively). The mean central venous pressure during hypoventilation

  13. Inhibitory Effect of Nasal Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation on Gastroesophageal Reflux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Cantin

    Full Text Available Non-invasive intermittent positive pressure ventilation can lead to esophageal insufflations and in turn to gastric distension. The fact that the latter induces transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter implies that it may increase gastroesophageal refluxes. We previously reported that nasal Pressure Support Ventilation (nPSV, contrary to nasal Neurally-Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (nNAVA, triggers active inspiratory laryngeal closure. This suggests that esophageal insufflations are more frequent in nPSV than in nNAVA. The objectives of the present study were to test the hypotheses that: i gastroesophageal refluxes are increased during nPSV compared to both control condition and nNAVA; ii esophageal insufflations occur more frequently during nPSV than nNAVA. Polysomnographic recordings and esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance pHmetry were performed in nine chronically instrumented newborn lambs to study gastroesophageal refluxes, esophageal insufflations, states of alertness, laryngeal closure and respiration. Recordings were repeated without sedation in control condition, nPSV (15/4 cmH2O and nNAVA (~ 15/4 cmH2O. The number of gastroesophageal refluxes recorded over six hours, expressed as median (interquartile range, decreased during both nPSV (1 (0, 3 and nNAVA [1 (0, 3] compared to control condition (5 (3, 10, (p < 0.05. Meanwhile, the esophageal insufflation index did not differ between nPSV (40 (11, 61 h-1 and nNAVA (10 (9, 56 h-1 (p = 0.8. In conclusion, nPSV and nNAVA similarly inhibit gastroesophageal refluxes in healthy newborn lambs at pressures that do not lead to gastric distension. In addition, the occurrence of esophageal insufflations is not significantly different between nPSV and nNAVA. The strong inhibitory effect of nIPPV on gastroesophageal refluxes appears identical to that reported with nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

  14. Prevention of Hypoxemia During Apnea Testing: A Comparison of Oxygen Insufflation And Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Andreas H; Couillard, Philippe; Bader, Ryan; Dhillon, Peter; Kutsogiannis, Demetrios J; Doig, Christopher J

    2017-08-01

    Apnea testing is an essential step in the clinical diagnosis of brain death. Current international guidelines recommend placement of an oxygen (O 2 ) insufflation catheter into the endotracheal tube to prevent hypoxemia, but use of a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) valve may be more effective at limiting arterial partial pressure of O 2 (PO 2 ) reduction. We performed a multicenter study assessing consecutive apnea tests in 14 intensive care units (ICUs) in two cities utilizing differing protocols. In one city, O 2 catheters are placed and arterial blood gases (ABGs) performed at intervals determined by the attending physician. In the other city, a resuscitation bag with CPAP valve is attached to the endotracheal tube, and ABGs performed every 3-5 min. We assessed arterial PO 2 , partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO 2 ), pH, and blood pressure at the beginning and termination of each apnea test. Thirty-six apnea tests were performed using an O 2 catheter and 50 with a CPAP valve. One test per group was aborted because of physiological instability. There were no significant differences in the degree of PO 2 reduction (-59 vs. -32 mmHg, p = 0.72), rate of PCO 2 rise (3.2 vs. 3.9 mmHg per min, p = 0.22), or pH decline (-0.02 vs. -0.03 per min, p = 0.06). Performance of ABGs at regular intervals was associated with shorter test duration (10 vs. 7 min, p pressure decline (p = 0.006). Both methods of O 2 supplementation are associated with similar changes in arterial PO 2 and PCO 2 . Performance of ABGs at regular intervals shortens apnea test duration and may avoid excessive pH reduction and consequent hemodynamic effects.

  15. Effect of changes in PCO2 and body positions on intraocular pressure during general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvidberg, A; Kessing, S V; Fernandes, A

    1981-08-01

    Elevated arterial carbon dioxide tension, induced by the administration of CO2 via the respiratory air or by hypoventilation, entailed a gradual increase in the IOP in patients without eye diseases under general anaesthesia. A sudden cessation of CO2 administration or hyperventilation caused such a rapid, simultaneous fall in IOP to values below the initial level that the pressure variations must be of vascular nature, presumably related to changes in choroidal blood volume. The above-mentioned procedures always cause a change in the central venous pressure (CVP) simultaneously with the IOP changes. Alterations of the CVP induced by hydrostatic factors in postural changes, placing the head 15 degrees above or below the horizontal level while keeping the PaCO2 constant, caused IOP changes of the same configuration and magnitude as described above. It is concluded, therefore, that presumably the CO2-conditioned IOP changes are due predominantly to changes in central venous pressure, being one link in a CO2-conditioned action upon the general circulation, entailing passive secondary changes in the choroidal venous blood volume and thereby an influence upon the IOP. On the basis of the present results it appears rational to recommend hyperventilation to keep the PaCO2 between 25 and 30 mm and a 15 degree anti-Trendelenburg position in operations on the eye under general anaesthesia, since both procedures afford a low central venous pressure and consequently a low pressure in the posterior segment of the eye, with its attendant advantages as regards vitreous complications and the insertion of intraocular lenses. Owing to the risk of an unacceptable fall in BP in the combined procedure, a frequent checking of the BP is needed.

  16. Type of mask may impact on continuous positive airway pressure adherence in apneic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, Jean Christian; Tamisier, Renaud; Dias-Domingos, Sonia; Sapene, Marc; Martin, Francis; Stach, Bruno; Grillet, Yves; Muir, Jean François; Levy, Patrick; Series, Frederic; Pepin, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    In obstructive sleep apnea patients (OSA), continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence is crucial to improve symptoms and cardiometabolic outcomes. The choice of mask may influence CPAP adherence but this issue has never been addressed properly. To evaluate the impact of nasal pillows, nasal and oronasal masks on CPAP adherence in a cohort of OSA. Newly CPAP treated OSA participating in "Observatoire Sommeil de la Fédération de Pneumologie", a French national prospective cohort, were included between March 2009 and December 2011. Anthropometric data, medical history, OSA severity, sleepiness, depressive status, treatment modalities (auto-CPAP versus fixed pressure, pressure level, interface type, use of humidifiers) and CPAP-related side effects were included in multivariate analysis to determine independent variables associated with CPAP adherence. 2311 OSA (age = 57(12) years, apnea+hypopnea index = 41(21)/h, 29% female) were included. Nasal masks, oronasal masks and nasal pillows were used by 62.4, 26.2 and 11.4% of the patients, respectively. In univariate analysis, oronasal masks and nasal pillows were associated with higher risk of CPAP non-adherence. CPAP non-adherence was also associated with younger age, female gender, mild OSA, gastroesophageal reflux, depression status, low effective pressure and CPAP-related side effects. In multivariate analysis, CPAP non-adherence was associated with the use of oronasal masks (OR = 2.0; 95%CI = 1.6; 2.5), depression, low effective pressure, and side effects. As oronasal masks negatively impact on CPAP adherence, a nasal mask should be preferred as the first option. Patients on oronasal masks should be carefully followed.

  17. Type of mask may impact on continuous positive airway pressure adherence in apneic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Christian Borel

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: In obstructive sleep apnea patients (OSA, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP adherence is crucial to improve symptoms and cardiometabolic outcomes. The choice of mask may influence CPAP adherence but this issue has never been addressed properly. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of nasal pillows, nasal and oronasal masks on CPAP adherence in a cohort of OSA. METHODS: Newly CPAP treated OSA participating in "Observatoire Sommeil de la Fédération de Pneumologie", a French national prospective cohort, were included between March 2009 and December 2011. Anthropometric data, medical history, OSA severity, sleepiness, depressive status, treatment modalities (auto-CPAP versus fixed pressure, pressure level, interface type, use of humidifiers and CPAP-related side effects were included in multivariate analysis to determine independent variables associated with CPAP adherence. RESULTS: 2311 OSA (age = 57(12 years, apnea+hypopnea index = 41(21/h, 29% female were included. Nasal masks, oronasal masks and nasal pillows were used by 62.4, 26.2 and 11.4% of the patients, respectively. In univariate analysis, oronasal masks and nasal pillows were associated with higher risk of CPAP non-adherence. CPAP non-adherence was also associated with younger age, female gender, mild OSA, gastroesophageal reflux, depression status, low effective pressure and CPAP-related side effects. In multivariate analysis, CPAP non-adherence was associated with the use of oronasal masks (OR = 2.0; 95%CI = 1.6; 2.5, depression, low effective pressure, and side effects. CONCLUSION: As oronasal masks negatively impact on CPAP adherence, a nasal mask should be preferred as the first option. Patients on oronasal masks should be carefully followed.

  18. Lung-protective ventilation in intensive care unit and operation room : Tidal volume size, level of positive end-expiratory pressure and driving pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serpa Neto, A.

    2017-01-01

    Several investigations have shown independent associations between three ventilator settings – tidal volume size, positive end–expiratory pressure (PEEP) and driving pressure – and outcomes in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). There is an increasing notion that similar

  19. Relationship between pre-extubation positive endexpiratory pressure and oxygenation after coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reijane Oliveira Lima

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction After removal of endotracheal tube and artificial ventilation, ventilatory support should be continued, offering oxygen supply to ensure an arterial oxygen saturation close to physiological. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of positive-end expiratory pressure before extubation on the oxygenation indices of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: A randomized clinical trial with seventy-eight patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting divided into three groups and ventilated with different positive-end expiratory pressure levels prior to extubation: Group A, 5 cmH2O (n=32; Group B, 8 cmH2O (n=26; and Group C, 10 cmH2O (n=20. Oxygenation index data were obtained from arterial blood gas samples collected at 1, 3, and 6 h after extubation. Patients with chronic pulmonary disease and those who underwent off-pump, emergency, or combined surgeries were excluded. For statistical analysis, we used Shapiro-Wilk, G, Kruskal-Wallis, and analysis of variance tests and set the level of significance at P<0.05. Results Groups were homogenous with regard to demographic, clinical, and surgical variables. There were no statistically significant differences between groups in the first 6 h after extubation with regard to oxygenation indices and oxygen therapy utilization. Conclusion: In this sample of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, the use of different positive-end expiratory pressure levels before extubation did not affect gas exchange or oxygen therapy utilization in the first 6 h after endotracheal tube removal.

  20. Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after cardiac surgery: ventilatory assistance by nasal mask continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, B; Zschocke, A; Barth, H; Leonhardt, A

    2001-01-01

    The case of an 8-month-old boy with bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after surgical reoperation for congenital heart disease is presented. In order to avoid repeated intubation and long-term mechanical ventilation or tracheotomy, we used nasal mask continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) as an alternative method for assisted ventilation. Within 24 hours the boy accepted the nasal mask and symptoms such as dyspnea and sweating disappeared. Respiratory movements became regular and oxygen saturation increased. Nasal mask CPAP may serve as an alternative treatment of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis in infants, thereby avoiding tracheotomy or long-term mechanical ventilation.

  1. Nasal continuous positive airways pressure immediately after extubation for preventing morbidity in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, P G; Henderson-Smart, D J

    2003-01-01

    Preterm infants being extubated following a period of intermittent positive pressure ventilation via an endotracheal tube are at risk of developing respiratory failure as a result of apnea, respiratory acidosis and hypoxia. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure appears to stabilise the upper airway, improve lung function and reduce apnea and may therefore have a role in facilitating extubation in this population. In preterm infants having their endotracheal tube removed following a period of intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV), does management with nasal continuous positive airways pressure (NCPAP) lead to an increased proportion remaining free of additional ventilatory support, compared to extubation directly to headbox oxygen? Searches were made of the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, MEDLINE up to November 2002, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2002), previous reviews including cross references, abstracts of conferences and symposia proceedings, expert informants and journal handsearching mainly in the English language. All trials utilising random or quasi-random patient allocation, in which NCPAP (delivered by any method) was compared with headbox oxygen for post-extubation care were included. Methodological quality was assessed independently by the two authors. Data were extracted independently by the two authors. Prespecified subgroup analysis to determine the impact of different levels of NCPAP, differences in duration of IPPV and use of aminophylline were also performed using the same package. Data were analysed using relative risk (RR), risk difference (RD) and number needed to treat (NNT). Nasal CPAP, when applied to preterm infants being extubated following IPPV, reduces the incidence of adverse clinical events (apnea, respiratory acidosis and increased oxygen requirements) indicating the need for additional ventilatory support [RR 0.62 (0.49, 0.77), RD -0.17 (-0.24,-0.10), NNT 6 (4,10)]. nasal

  2. Increased airway reactivity in a neonatal mouse model of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Catherine A.; Martin, Richard J.; MacFarlane, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a primary form of respiratory support used in the intensive care of preterm infants, but its long-term effects on airway (AW) function are unknown. Methods We developed a neonatal mouse model of CPAP treatment to determine whether it modifies later AW reactivity. Un-anesthetized spontaneously breathing mice were fitted with a mask to deliver CPAP (6cmH2O, 3hrs/day) for 7 consecutive days starting at postnatal day 1. Airway reactivity to...

  3. Oral continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) following nasal injury in a preterm infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, H R; Kamlin, C O F; Owen, L S; Davis, P G; Morley, C J

    2010-03-01

    Non-invasive respiratory support is increasingly popular but is associated with complications including nasal trauma. The present report describes a novel method of oral continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) delivery in an extremely premature infant with severe nasal septum erosion. The distal end of a cut down endotracheal tube was passed through a small hole made in the teat of a dummy (infant pacifier) and sutured in place. The dummy was secured in the infant's mouth and CPAP was delivered to the pharynx. The device was well tolerated and the infant was successfully managed using this technique for 48 days, avoiding endotracheal intubation and ventilation.

  4. [Management of patients receiving home respiratory care with tracheostomy and positive-pressure ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masashi

    2013-01-01

    On March 11, 2011, the Great East Japan Earthquake occurred and a massive tsunami hit the northeastern coast of Japan. In Miyagi prefecture in Tokoku district, 49 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis were supported by home respiratory care with tracheostomy and positive-pressure ventilation at that time. Among them, two patients were died in the tsunami and 25 patients were forced to evacuate to hospitals. We should hurry to submit a guideline for medical transportation for patients with neuromuscular diseases requiring artificial ventilation. We also should research the disaster medicine in the field of neurology.

  5. Predicting uptake of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, Timothy; McNeil, Lindsay; Olaithe, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    diagnosed with OSA. Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS), Fatigue Severity Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale and Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised (IPQ-R) were administered at time of sleep study. These, patient demographics and sleep study variables were used to determine factors predicting patient......Purpose: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a common disorder, for which continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is a standard treatment. Despite its well-established efficacy, many patients choose not to initiate CPAP treatment. The present study investigated the degree to which...

  6. Changes in cardiac index and blood pressure on positioning children prone for scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Z E; Görges, M; Cooke, E; Malherbe, S; Dumont, G A; Ansermino, J M

    2013-07-01

    In this prospective observational study we investigated the changes in cardiac index and mean arterial pressure in children when positioned prone for scoliosis correction surgery. Thirty children (ASA 1-2, aged 13-18 years) undergoing primary, idiopathic scoliosis repair were recruited. The cardiac index and mean arterial blood pressure (median (IQR [range])) were 2.7 (2.3-3.1 [1.4-3.7]) l.min(-1).m(-2) and 73 (66-80 [54-91]) mmHg, respectively, at baseline; 2.9 (2.5-3.2 [1.7-4.4]) l.min(-1).m(-2) and 73 (63-81 [51-96]) mmHg following a 5-ml.kg(-1) fluid bolus; and 2.5 (2.2-2.7 [1.4-4.8]) l.min(-1).m(-2) and 69 (62-73 [46-85]) mmHg immediately after turning prone. Turning prone resulted in a median reduction in cardiac index of 0.5 l.min(-1).m(-2) (95% CI 0.3-0.7 l.min(-1).m(-2), p=0.001), or 18.5%, with a large degree of inter-subject variability (+10.3% to -40.9%). The changes in mean arterial blood pressure were not significant. Strategies to predict, prevent and treat decreases in cardiac index need to be developed. © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  7. Flow-synchronized nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation in the preterm infant: development of a project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Moretti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript describes the experience of our team in developing a flow-triggered nasal respiratory support for the neonate and its related clinical applications. Although mechanical ventilation (MV via an endotracheal tube has undoubtedly led to improvement in neonatal survival in the last 40 years, the prolonged use of this technique may predispose the infant to the development of many possible complications, first of all, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD. Avoiding mechanical ventilation is thought to be a critical goal, and different modes of non invasive respiratory support may reduce the intubation rate: nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP, nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV and its more advantageous form, synchronized nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (SNIPPV. SNIPPV was initially performed by a capsule placed on the baby’s abdomen. To overcome the disadvantages of the abdominal capsule, our team decided to create a flow-sensor that could be interposed between the nasal prongs and the Y piece. Firstly we developed a hot-wire flow-sensor to trigger the ventilator and we showed that flow-SNIPPV can support the inspiratory effort in the post-extubation period more effectively than NCPAP. But, although accurate, the proper functioning of the hot-wire flow-sensor was easily compromised by secretions or moisture, and therefore we started to use as flow-sensor a simpler differential pressure transducer. In a following trial using the new device, we were able to demonstrate that flow-SNIPPV was more effective than conventional NCPAP in decreasing extubation failure in preterm infants who had been ventilated for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS. More recently we used flow-SNIPPV as the primary mode of ventilation, after surfactant replacement, reducing MV need and favorably affecting short-term morbidities of treated premature infants. We also successfully applied SNIPPV to treat apnea of

  8. Chest physiotherapy with positive expiratory pressure breathing after abdominal and thoracic surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orman, J; Westerdahl, E

    2010-03-01

    A variety of chest physiotherapy techniques are used following abdominal and thoracic surgery to prevent or reduce post-operative complications. Breathing techniques with a positive expiratory pressure (PEP) are used to increase airway pressure and improve pulmonary function. No systematic review of the effects of PEP in surgery patients has been performed previously. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the effect of PEP breathing after an open upper abdominal or thoracic surgery. A literature search of randomised-controlled trials (RCT) was performed in five databases. The trials included were systematically reviewed by two independent observers and critically assessed for methodological quality. We selected six RCT evaluating the PEP technique performed with a mechanical device in spontaneously breathing adult patients after abdominal or thoracic surgery via thoracotomy. The methodological quality score varied between 4 and 6 on the Physiotherapy Evidence Database score. The studies were published between 1979 and 1993. Only one of the included trials showed any positive effects of PEP compared to other breathing techniques. Today, there is scarce scientific evidence that PEP treatment is better than other physiotherapy breathing techniques in patients undergoing abdominal or thoracic surgery. There is a lack of studies investigating the effect of PEP over placebo or no physiotherapy treatment.

  9. Positive expiratory pressure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagevik Olsén, Monika; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Breathing exercises against a resistance during expiration are often used as treatment for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Controversy still exists regarding the clinical application and efficacy. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effects of chest physiotherapy techniques with positive expiratory pressure (PEP) for the prevention and treatment of pulmonary impairment in adults with COPD. The review was conducted on randomised, controlled clinical trials in which breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure were compared with other chest physical therapy techniques or with no treatment, in adult patients with COPD. A computer-assisted literature search of available databases from 1970 to January 2008 was performed. Two reviewers extracted data independently and assessed the trials systematically with an instrument for measuring methodological quality. In total, 11 trials met the inclusion criteria, of which 5 reached an adequate level of internal validity. Several kinds of PEP techniques with a diversity of intensities and durations of treatment have been evaluated with different outcome measures and follow-up periods. Benefits of PEP were found in isolated outcome measures in separate studies with a follow-up period <1 month. Concerning long-term effects, the results are contradictory. Prior to widespread prescription of long-term PEP treatment, more research is required to establish the benefit of the technique in patients with COPD. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Efficacy of daytime continuous positive airway pressure titration in severe obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkowski, J C; Verschelden, P; Kimoff, R J

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate manual nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) titration during daytime polysomnography compared with conventional overnight titration for patients with severe obstructive sleep apnoea. Thirty-two patients who underwent daytime titration were retrospectively matched (for age, sex, body mass index and apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI)) to a group titrated overnight during the same period. Successful titration was defined as the identification of the nCPAP level (effective nCPAP (Peff)) required to eliminate respiratory events during all sleep stages. After 3 months of therapy on nCPAP at Peff, nCPAP utilization history was obtained and a group of patients underwent a repeat polysomnogram (PSG) and completed a follow-up Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score. Initial titration was successful in 91% of daytime patients and 91% of overnight patients. The success of daytime titration was not related to diagnostic AHI or ESS score. Subjective nCPAP utilization was statistically similar in both groups. On the follow-up PSG, there were no significant differences between daytime (n=11) and overnight (n=11) patients in measures of sleep quality or respiratory disturbance. Both groups demonstrated similar and significant improvements in ESS score. These findings suggest that the effective nasal continuous positive airway pressure can be accurately established during daytime titration in a substantial proportion of severe, symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea patients.

  11. Bilateral parotitis in a patient under continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullayev, Ruslan; Saral, Filiz Cosku; Kucukebe, Omer Burak; Sayiner, Hakan Sezgin; Bayraktar, Cem; Akgun, Sadik

    Many conditions such as bacterial and viral infectious diseases, mechanical obstruction due to air and calculi and drugs can cause parotitis. We present a case of unusual bilateral parotitis in a patient under non-invasive continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation in intensive care unit. A 36-year-old patient was admitted to intensive care unit with the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation. Antibiotherapy, bronchodilator therapy and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation were applied as treatment regimen. Painless swellings developed on the 3rd day of admission on the right and a day after this on the left parotid glands. Amylase levels were increased and ultrasonographic evaluation revealed bilateral parotitis. No intervention was made and the therapy was continued. The patient was discharged on the 6th day with clinical improvement and regression of parotid swellings without any complications. Parotitis may have occurred after retrograde air flow in the Stensen duct during CPAP application. After the exclusion of possible viral and bacteriological etiologies and possible drug reactions we can focus on this diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Delivery room continuous positive airway pressure and early pneumothorax in term newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenger, L; Britton, J R

    2017-01-01

    To assess the association between delivery room (DR) continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and pneumothorax (PT) in term newborns. Two studies performed in community hospitals used data extracted from computerized records of term newborns. Infants receiving positive pressure ventilation in the DR were excluded. Tabulated data included receipt of DR CPAP, PT on the day of birth, and gestational age (GA). In a case-control study from 2001-2013, infants with PT were compared to controls without PT but with respiratory distress or hypoxia persisting from birth for receipt of DR CPAP. In a cohort study from 2014-2016, infants receiving and not receiving DR CPAP were compared for the incidence of PT. In the case-control study, data were obtained for 169 cases and 850 controls. Compared to controls, PT infants were more likely to have received DR CPAP (16.8% vs. 40.2%, respectively, P CPAP (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 3.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.31, 4.72, P CPAP and 4.8% of 228 infants receiving DR CPAP (P CPAP significantly predicted PT (OR = 59.59, 95% CI = 23.34, 147.12, P CPAP in delivery rooms are associated with increased risk of PT. A cause-and-effect relationship between CPAP and PT cannot be claimed in this study. Further research is needed to better understand this relationship.

  13. Deep breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure in patients with multiple sclerosis - a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerdahl, Elisabeth; Wittrin, Anna; Kånåhols, Margareta; Gunnarsson, Martin; Nilsagård, Ylva

    2016-11-01

    Breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure are often recommended to patients with advanced neurological deficits, but the potential benefit in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with mild and moderate symptoms has not yet been investigated in randomized controlled trials. To study the effects of 2 months of home-based breathing exercises for patients with mild to moderate MS on respiratory muscle strength, lung function, and subjective breathing and health status outcomes. Forty-eight patients with MS according to the revised McDonald criteria were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial. Patients performing breathing exercises (n = 23) were compared with a control group (n = 25) performing no breathing exercises. The breathing exercises were performed with a positive expiratory pressure device (10-15 cmH 2 O) and consisted of 30 slow deep breaths performed twice a day for 2 months. Respiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure at the mouth), spirometry, oxygenation, thoracic excursion, subjective perceptions of breathing and self-reported health status were evaluated before and after the intervention period. Following the intervention, there was a significant difference between the breathing group and the control group regarding the relative change in lung function, favoring the breathing group (vital capacity: P < 0.043; forced vital capacity: P < 0.025). There were no other significant differences between the groups. Breathing exercises may be beneficial in patients with mild to moderate stages of MS. However, the clinical significance needs to be clarified, and it remains to be seen whether a sustainable effect in delaying the development of respiratory dysfunction in MS can be obtained. © 2015 The Authors. The Clinical Respiratory Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Update: Non-Invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation in Chronic Respiratory Failure Due to COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Nejat

    2016-01-01

    Long-term non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) has widely been accepted to treat chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure arising from different etiologies. Although the survival benefits provided by long-term NPPV in individuals with restrictive thoracic disorders or stable, slowly-progressing neuromuscular disorders are overwhelming, the benefits provided by long-term NPPV in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remain under question, due to a lack of convincing evidence in the literature. In addition, long-term NPPV reportedly failed in the classic trials to improve important physiological parameters such as arterial blood gases, which might serve as an explanation as to why long-term NPPV has not been shown to substantially impact on survival. However, high intensity NPPV (HI-NPPV) using controlled NPPV with the highest possible inspiratory pressures tolerated by the patient has recently been described as a new and promising approach that is well-tolerated and is also capable of improving important physiological parameters such as arterial blood gases and lung function. This clearly contrasts with the conventional approach of low-intensity NPPV (LI-NPPV) that uses considerably lower inspiratory pressures with assisted forms of NPPV. Importantly, HI-NPPV was very recently shown to be superior to LI-NPPV in terms of improved overnight blood gases, and was also better tolerated than LI-NPPV. Furthermore, HI-NPPV, but not LI-NPPV, improved dyspnea, lung function and disease-specific aspects of health-related quality of life. A recent study showed that long-term treatment with NPPV with increased ventilatory pressures that reduced hypercapnia was associated with significant and sustained improvements in overall mortality. Thus, long-term NPPV seems to offer important benefits in this patient group, but the treatment success might be dependent on effective ventilatory strategies.

  15. Clinical predictors of central sleep apnea evoked by positive airway pressure titration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moro M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Marilyn Moro,1 Karen Gannon,1 Kathy Lovell,1 Margaret Merlino,1 James Mojica,2 Matt T Bianchi,1,3 1Neurology Department, 2Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 3Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Purpose: Treatment-emergent central sleep apnea (TECSA, also called complex apnea, occurs in 5%–15% of sleep apnea patients during positive airway pressure (PAP therapy, but the clinical predictors are not well understood. The goal of this study was to explore possible predictors in a clinical sleep laboratory cohort, which may highlight those at risk during clinical management.Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 728 patients who underwent PAP titration (n=422 split night; n=306 two-night. Demographics and self-reported medical comorbidities, medications, and behaviors as well as standard physiological parameters from the polysomnography (PSG data were analyzed. We used regression analysis to assess predictors of binary presence or absence of central apnea index (CAI ≥5 during split PSG (SN-PSG versus full-night PSG (FN-PSG titrations.Results: CAI ≥5 was present in 24.2% of SN-PSG and 11.4% of FN-PSG patients during titration. Male sex, maximum continuous positive airway pressure, and use of bilevel positive airway pressure were predictors of TECSA, and rapid eye movement dominance was a negative predictor, for both SN-PSG and FN-PSG patients. Self-reported narcotics were a positive predictor of TECSA, and the time spent in stage N2 sleep was a negative predictor only for SN-PSG patients. Self-reported history of stroke and the CAI during the diagnostic recording predicted TECSA only for FN-PSG patients.Conclusion: Clinical predictors of treatment-evoked central apnea spanned demographic, medical history, sleep physiology, and titration factors. Improved predictive models may be increasingly important as diagnostic and therapeutic modalities move away from the

  16. The effect of surface roughness on the heat exchange and pressure-drop coefficients; Influence des rugosites de paroi sur les coefficients d'echange thermique et de perte de charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malherbe, J M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-02-15

    The effect of various types of roughness on the wall of an axial tube in an annular space of 15-25 mm cooled by an air-flow has been studied in the case of steady turbulence. Roughness of the type 'disrupter of the boundary layer' was set up using triangular threads of 0.2 to 0.4 mm thickness machined in the tube itself, or brass or glass wire wound on a smooth tube. Tests were also carried out using the roughness provided by regularly spaced pyramids 0.4 mm high. The results obtained showed that the heat exchange increased because of the presence of this roughness. A maximum in the heat exchange and pressure-drop coefficients was observed when the pitch equals about eight times the height of the thread. An analytical method has been developed and experiments have been carried out in which the two walls of the annular space were heated in such a way as to transmit unequal heat flows. The region considered is limited to Reynolds's numbers of between 5 X 10{sup 3} and 5 x 10{sup 4} and wall temperatures of under 250 deg C. (author) [French] L'effet de diverses rugosites sur la paroi du tube central d'un espace annulaire de diametre 15-25 mm refroidi par un ecoulement d'air a ete etudie en regime turbulent etabli. Des rugosites du type 'interrupteur de couche limite' etaient realisees au moyen de filets triangulaires, de 0,2 a 0,4 mm de hauteur usines dans l'epaisseur du tube ou de fils de laiton, ou de verre, enroules sur un tube lisse. Les essais ont porte egalement sur des rugosites constituees par des pyramides de 0,4 mm de hauteur et regulierement espacees. Les resultats obtenus ont mis en evidence une augmentation de transfert de chaleur due a la presence des elements rugueux. L'existence d'un maximum pour les coefficients d'echange thermique et de perte de charge a ete constate lorsque le pas atteint huit fois la hauteur des rugosites. Une methode analytique a ete etablie et des experiences ont ete realisees au cours desquelles les deux parois de l

  17. Comparison of distributed vortex receptivity coefficients at excitation of 3D TS-waves in presence and absence of surface waviness and pressure gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodulin, V. I.; Ivanov, A. V.; Kachanov, Y. S.; Mischenko, D. A.; Fedenkova, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper is devoted to quantitative experimental investigation of effective mechanisms of excitation of 3D TS instability waves due to distributed boundary layer receptivity to free-stream vortices. Experiments carried out in a self-similar boundary layer with Hartree parameter βH = -0.115 and concentrated on studying two receptivity mechanisms connected with distributed scattering of 3D unsteady free-stream vortices both on the natural boundary layer nonuniformity (smooth surface) and on 2D surface nonuniformity (waviness). Obtained quantitative characteristics (distributed receptivity coefficients) are compared directly with those obtained in Blasius boundary layer. It is found that the adverse pressure gradient leads to reduction of efficiency of the vortex-roughness receptivity mechanism.

  18. Echocardiographic assessment of systolic pulmonary arterial pressure in HIV-positive patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Rasoulinejad

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension is rare but is one of the complications that occur due to HIV infection. Symptoms of HIV-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension are often non-specific but the main symptom of the disease is dyspnea. In this cross-sectional study, we measured systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (SPAP by echocardiographic methods among HIV-positive patients who received ART. This research is a descriptive, cross-sectional study of 170 HIV-positive patients that was conducted in Imam-Khomeini hospital, Tehran, Iran during 2011-2013. All patients regularly received antiretroviral therapy at least for recent 2 years. There were not any cardiopulmonary symptoms (cough, dyspnea, exertional fatigue and chest discomfort in these patients. All participants underwent echocardiography to estimate SPAP. The participants comprised 108 males (63.5% and 62 females (46.5%. The mean age of patients was 41 years old, and the mean duration of HIV infection was 5.5 years. The mean CD4 cell count was 401 cell/µl. The principal regimen of antiretroviral therapy included two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI and one non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI in the hospital. The mean of systolic pulmonary arterial pressure was 25 mmHg in the participants; 156 (93.4% of them had SPAP ≤ 30 mmHg (normal, six (3.6% had SPAP: 31-35 mmHg (borderline and five (3% had SPAP > 35 mmHg (pulmonary hypertension. Our results indicated a significant increase of pulmonary hypertension in asymptomatic HIV-positive patients that had no association with any other risk factor. Also, antiretroviral therapy was not a risk factor for pulmonary hypertension in this study.

  19. [Effectiveness of nasal positive pressure ventilation in the management of acute refractory left ventricular insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesi, G; Pinelli, G; Galimberti, D; Navazio, A; Montanari, P

    1994-04-01

    Ehen refractory to optimal medical treatment cardiogenic pulmonary edema requires mechanical ventilation as a last therapeutic resource. In recent years an increasing number of authors reported their experience in the management of acute or subacute respiratory failure with non-invasive mechanical ventilation by nasal mask. Encouraged by the first promising results reported in literature we experimented this new therapeutic tool in a first group of seven elderly patients (mean age: 76.57--range: 65-89); they all had been admitted for severe cardiogenic pulmonary edema unresponsive to maximal doses of the conventional drugs available for treating acute decompensated heart failure. The enrolled patients were treated with intermittent ventilation administered by nasal mask at selected values of inspiratory positive airway pressure (IPAP) that were comprised between 10 and 20 cm H2O. At the same time an expiratory positive airway pressure (EPAP) at values comprised between 3 and 8 cm H2O was applied. Ventilation was continued for variable periods of 3-24 hours until acceptable values of PaO2 and PaCO2 were obtained. The ventilation modality was spontaneous, spontaneous-time or timed depending on the patients' level of consciousness at starting time. A good short-term outcome was achieved in all the patients regardless of the ventilation modality applied. The main blood gas alteration was severe hypercapnia with acidosis in three patients, while the other four presented critical hypoxemia unresponsive to simple oxygen supply even if delivered by high-flow Venturi mask. Four of our seven patients were discharged from hospital in satisfactory haemodynamic conditions; the remaining three died during hospitalization from refractory heart failure. In this our preliminary experience the therapeutic approach with nasal positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) and EPAP proved to be very effective to improve the signs and symptoms of acute refractory cardiogenic pulmonary edema as

  20. Magnetosphere and ionosphere response to a positive-negative pulse pair of solar wind dynamic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, A.; Degeling, A. W.

    2017-12-01

    Simulations and observations had shown that single positive/negative solar wind dynamic pressure pulse would excite geomagnetic impulsive events along with ionosphere and/or magnetosphere vortices which are connected by field aligned currents(FACs). In this work, a large scale ( 9min) magnetic hole event in solar wind provided us with the opportunity to study the effects of positive-negative pulse pair (△p/p 1) on the magnetosphere and ionosphere. During the magnetic hole event, two traveling convection vortices (TCVs, anti-sunward) first in anticlockwise then in clockwise rotation were detected by geomagnetic stations located along the 10:30MLT meridian. At the same time, another pair of ionospheric vortices azimuthally seen up to 3 MLT first in clockwise then in counter-clockwise rotation were also appeared in the afternoon sector( 14MLT) and centered at 75 MLAT without obvious tailward propagation feature. The duskside vortices were also confirmed in SuperDARN radar data. We simulated the process of magnetosphere struck by a positive-negative pulse pair and it shows that a pair of reversed flow vortices in the magnetosphere equatorial plane appeared which may provide FACs for the vortices observed in ionosphere. Dawn dusk asymmetry of the vortices as well as the global geomagnetism perturbation characteristics were also discussed.

  1. Temporal evolution of atmosphere pressure plasma jets driven by microsecond pulses with positive and negative polarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Tao; Yang, Wenjin; Zhang, Cheng; Fang, Zhi; Zhou, Yixiao; Schamiloglu, Edl

    2014-09-01

    Current-voltage characteristics, discharge images, and optical spectra of atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are studied using a microsecond pulse length generator producing repetitive output pulses with different polarities. The experimental results show that the APPJs excited by the pulses with positive polarity have longer plume, faster propagation speed, higher power, and more excited species, such as \\text{N}2 , O, He, \\text{N}2+ , than that with the negatively excited APPJs. The images taken using an intensified charge-coupled device show that the APPJs excited by pulses with positive polarity are characterized by a bullet-like structure, while the APPJs excited by pulses with negative polarity are continuous. The propagation speed of the APPJs driven by a microsecond pulse length generator is about tens of km/s, which is similar to the APPJs driven by a kHz frequency sinusoidal voltage source. The analysis shows that the space charge accumulation effect plays an important role during the discharge. The transient enhanced electric field induced by the accumulated ions between the needle-like electrode and the nozzle in the APPJs excited by pulses with negative polarity enhances electron field emission from the cathode, which is illustrated by the bright line on the time-integrated images. This makes the shape of the APPJ excited using pulses with negative polarity different from the bullet-like shape of the APPJs excited by pulses with positive polarity.

  2. The measurement of intraocular pressure over positive soft contact lenses by rebound tonometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeri, Fabrizio; De Cusatis, Mario; Lupelli, Luigi; Swann, Peter Graham

    2016-01-01

    To investigate if the accuracy of intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements using rebound tonometry over disposable hydrogel (etafilcon A) contact lenses (CL) is affected by the positive power of the CLs. The experimental group comprised 26 subjects, (8 male, 18 female). IOP measurements were undertaken on the subjects' right eyes in random order using a Rebound Tonometer (ICare). The CLs had powers of +2.00D and +6.00D. Measurements were taken over each contact lens and also before and after the CLs had been worn. The IOP measure obtained with both CLs was significantly lower compared to the value without CLs (t test; p<0.001) but no significant difference was found between the two powers of CLs. Rebound tonometry over positive hydrogel CLs leads to a certain degree of IOP underestimation. This result did not change for the two positive lenses used in the experiment, despite their large difference in power and therefore in lens thickness. Optometrists should bear this in mind when measuring IOP with the rebound tonometer over plus power contact lenses. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Espana.. All rights reserved.

  3. The NOFLO trial: low-flow nasal prongs therapy in weaning nasal continuous positive airway pressure in preterm infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Sinéad M

    2013-07-01

    To determine if low-flow nasal prongs therapy with room air, compared with no treatment, facilitates weaning from nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) in very low birth weight (VLBW, birth weight <1500 g) infants.

  4. Continuous positive airway pressure breathing increases cranial spread of sensory blockade after cervicothoracic epidural injection of lidocaine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, W.A.; Eerd, M.J. van; Seventer, R. van; Gielen, M.J.M.; Giele, J.L.P.; Scheffer, G.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) increases the caudad spread of sensory blockade after low-thoracic epidural injection of lidocaine. We hypothesized that CPAP would increase cephalad spread of blockade after cervicothoracic epidural injection. METHODS: Twenty patients with an

  5. Intersubband optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a graded quantum well under intense laser field: Effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature and electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungan, F.; Restrepo, R.L.; Mora-Ramos, M.E.; Morales, A.L.; Duque, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, and electric field on the optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes associated with intersubband transition in a typical GaAs/Ga 0.7 Al 0.3 As graded quantum well under intense laser field have been investigated theoretically. The electron energy eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenfunctions of the graded quantum well are calculated within the effective mass approximation and envelope wave function approach. The analytical expressions of the optical properties are obtained using the compact density-matrix approach and the iterative method. The numerical results show that the linear and nonlinear optical properties depend strongly on the intense laser field and electric field but weakly on the hydrostatic pressure and temperature. Additionally, it has been found that the electronic and optical properties in a GaAs/Ga 0.7 Al 0.3 As graded quantum well under the intense laser field can be tuned by changing these external inputs. Thus, these results give a new degree of freedom in the devices applications

  6. Intersubband optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a graded quantum well under intense laser field: Effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature and electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ungan, F., E-mail: fungan@cumhuriyet.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Cumhuriyet University, 58140 Sivas (Turkey); Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Restrepo, R.L. [Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Escuela de Ingeniería de Antioquia AA 7516, Medellín (Colombia); Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Ave. Universidad 1001, CP 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Morales, A.L.; Duque, C.A. [Grupo de Materia Condensade-UdeA, Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia)

    2014-02-01

    The effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, and electric field on the optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes associated with intersubband transition in a typical GaAs/Ga{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}As graded quantum well under intense laser field have been investigated theoretically. The electron energy eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenfunctions of the graded quantum well are calculated within the effective mass approximation and envelope wave function approach. The analytical expressions of the optical properties are obtained using the compact density-matrix approach and the iterative method. The numerical results show that the linear and nonlinear optical properties depend strongly on the intense laser field and electric field but weakly on the hydrostatic pressure and temperature. Additionally, it has been found that the electronic and optical properties in a GaAs/Ga{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}As graded quantum well under the intense laser field can be tuned by changing these external inputs. Thus, these results give a new degree of freedom in the devices applications.

  7. Ventilation Positive Pressure Intervention Effect on Indoor Air Quality in a School Building with Moisture Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vornanen-Winqvist, Camilla; Järvi, Kati; Toomla, Sander; Ahmed, Kaiser; Andersson, Maria A.; Mikkola, Raimo; Marik, Tamás; Salonen, Heidi

    2018-01-01

    This case study investigates the effects of ventilation intervention on measured and perceived indoor air quality (IAQ) in a repaired school where occupants reported IAQ problems. Occupants’ symptoms were suspected to be related to the impurities leaked indoors through the building envelope. The study’s aim was to determine whether a positive pressure of 5–7 Pa prevents the infiltration of harmful chemical and microbiological agents from structures, thus decreasing symptoms and discomfort. Ventilation intervention was conducted in a building section comprising 12 classrooms and was completed with IAQ measurements and occupants’ questionnaires. After intervention, the concentration of total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) decreased, and occupants’ negative perceptions became more moderate compared to those for other parts of the building. The indoor mycobiota differed in species composition from the outdoor mycobiota, and changed remarkably with the intervention, indicating that some species may have emanated from an indoor source before the intervention. PMID:29385772

  8. Playing with Positive Feedback: External Pressure-triggering of a Star-forming Disk Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Rebekka; Dubois, Yohan; Silk, Joseph; Mamon, Gary A.

    2015-10-01

    In massive galaxies, the currently favored method for quenching star formation is via active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback, which ejects gas from the galaxy using a central supermassive black hole. At high redshifts however, explanation of the huge rates of star formation often found in galaxies containing AGNs may require a more vigorous mode of star formation than is attainable by simply enriching the gas content of galaxies in the usual gravitationally driven mode that is associated with the nearby universe. Using idealized hydrodynamical simulations, we show that AGN-pressure-driven star formation potentially provides the positive feedback that may be required to generate the accelerated star formation rates observed in the distant universe.

  9. Continuous positive airway pressure and conventional mechanical ventilation in the treatment of meconium aspiration syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, J P

    2008-12-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a complex syndrome that ranges in severity from mild respiratory distress to severe respiratory failure, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn and sometimes death. Understanding of the syndrome's complicated pathophysiology will help determine the appropriate treatment strategy, including the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) and other therapies. Approximately 30 to 50% of infants diagnosed with MAS will require CPAP or mechanical ventilation. The optimum modes of ventilation for MAS are not known. Very few studies have been conducted to determine 'best' ventilatory strategies. Despite the introduction, over the last two decades, of innovative ventilatory treatments for this disease (for example, surfactant, high-frequency ventilation, inhaled nitric oxide, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation), the majority of infants can be successfully managed with CPAP or mechanical ventilation alone.

  10. Continuous positive airway pressure for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Susanto, Agus Dwi; Juzar, Dafsah A; Kobayashi, Isao; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a recurrent episode of partial or complete upper airway obstruction during sleep despite ongoing respiratory efforts and is implicated as the risk factor of cardiovascular disease. The OSA syndrome is typified by recurring partial or total occlusion of the pharynx, sleep fragmentation, episodes of gasping, and, eventually, daytime sleepiness. If it is left untreated, OSA syndrome can cause hypertension, coronary artery disease congestive heart disease, insulin resistance and death. In this review, we describe the pathogenesis and diagnosis of OSA. We also focused on the continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) as the main therapy for OSA. CPAP has been shown to provide benefit for not only respiratory system, but also for cardiovascular system and metabolic system. Finally, we discussed briefly about the issue of adherence of using CPAP that could contribute to lower compliant in patient with OSA.

  11. Ventilation Positive Pressure Intervention Effect on Indoor Air Quality in a School Building with Moisture Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vornanen-Winqvist, Camilla; Järvi, Kati; Toomla, Sander; Ahmed, Kaiser; Andersson, Maria A; Mikkola, Raimo; Marik, Tamás; Kredics, László; Salonen, Heidi; Kurnitski, Jarek

    2018-01-30

    This case study investigates the effects of ventilation intervention on measured and perceived indoor air quality (IAQ) in a repaired school where occupants reported IAQ problems. Occupants' symptoms were suspected to be related to the impurities leaked indoors through the building envelope. The study's aim was to determine whether a positive pressure of 5-7 Pa prevents the infiltration of harmful chemical and microbiological agents from structures, thus decreasing symptoms and discomfort. Ventilation intervention was conducted in a building section comprising 12 classrooms and was completed with IAQ measurements and occupants' questionnaires. After intervention, the concentration of total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) and fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) decreased, and occupants' negative perceptions became more moderate compared to those for other parts of the building. The indoor mycobiota differed in species composition from the outdoor mycobiota, and changed remarkably with the intervention, indicating that some species may have emanated from an indoor source before the intervention.

  12. Cardiovascular risk in patients with sleep apnoea with or without continuous positive airway pressure therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberts, Morten; Nielsen, O W; Lip, G Y H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prognostic significance of age and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on cardiovascular disease in patients with sleep apnoea has not been assessed previously. METHODS: Using nationwide databases, the entire Danish population was followed from 2000 until 2011. First......-time sleep apnoea diagnoses and use of CPAP therapy were determined. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of ischaemic stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) were analysed using Poisson regression models. RESULTS: Amongst 4.5 million individuals included in the study, 33 274 developed sleep apnoea (mean age 53, 79......% men) of whom 44% received persistent CPAP therapy. Median time to initiation of CPAP therapy was 88 days (interquartile range 34-346). Patients with sleep apnoea had more comorbidities compared to the general population. Crude rates of MI and ischaemic stroke were increased for sleep apnoea patients...

  13. Two-Dimensional Electron Density Measurement of Positive Streamer Discharge in Atmospheric-Pressure Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Yuki; Ono, Ryo; Kumada, Akiko; Hidaka, Kunihiko; Maeyama, Mitsuaki

    2016-09-01

    The electron density of streamer discharges propagating in atmospheric-pressure air is crucially important for systematic understanding of the production mechanisms of reactive species utilized in wide ranging applications such as medical treatment, plasma-assisted ignition and combustion, ozone production and environmental pollutant processing. However, electron density measurement during the propagation of the atmospheric-pressure streamers is extremely difficult by using the conventional localized type measurement systems due to the streamer initiation jitters and the irreproducibility in the discharge paths. In order to overcome the difficulties, single-shot two-dimensional electron density measurement was conducted by using a Shack-Hartmann type laser wavefront sensor. The Shack-Hartmann sensor with a temporal resolution of 2 ns was applied to pulsed positive streamer discharges generated in an air gap between pin-to-plate electrodes. The electron density a few ns after the streamer initiation was 7*1021m-3 and uniformly distributed along the streamer channel. The electron density and its distribution profile were compared with a previous study simulating similar streamers, demonstrating good agreement. This work was supported in part by JKA and its promotion funds from KEIRIN RACE. The authors like to thank Mr. Kazuaki Ogura and Mr. Kaiho Aono of The University of Tokyo for their support during this work.

  14. Aerosol delivery and humidification with the Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thille, Arnaud W; Bertholon, Jean-François; Becquemin, Marie-Hélène; Roy, Monique; Lyazidi, Aissam; Lellouche, François; Pertusini, Esther; Boussignac, Georges; Maître, Bernard; Brochard, Laurent

    2011-10-01

    A simple method for effective bronchodilator aerosol delivery while administering continuing continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) would be useful in patients with severe bronchial obstruction. To assess the effectiveness of bronchodilator aerosol delivery during CPAP generated by the Boussignac CPAP system and its optimal humidification system. First we assessed the relationship between flow and pressure generated in the mask with the Boussignac CPAP system. Next we measured the inspired-gas humidity during CPAP, with several humidification strategies, in 9 healthy volunteers. We then measured the bronchodilator aerosol particle size during CPAP, with and without heat-and-moisture exchanger, in a bench study. Finally, in 7 patients with acute respiratory failure and airway obstruction, we measured work of breathing and gas exchange after a β(2)-agonist bronchodilator aerosol (terbutaline) delivered during CPAP or via standard nebulization. Optimal humidity was obtained only with the heat-and-moisture exchanger or heated humidifier. The heat-and-moisture exchanger had no influence on bronchodilator aerosol particle size. Work of breathing decreased similarly after bronchodilator via either standard nebulization or CPAP, but P(aO(2)) increased significantly only after CPAP aerosol delivery. CPAP bronchodilator delivery decreases the work of breathing as effectively as does standard nebulization, but produces a greater oxygenation improvement in patients with airway obstruction. To optimize airway humidification, a heat-and-moisture exchanger could be used with the Boussignac CPAP system, without modifying aerosol delivery.

  15. European Society of Hypertension position paper on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Eoin; Parati, Gianfranco; Stergiou, George; Asmar, Roland; Beilin, Laurie; Bilo, Grzegorz; Clement, Denis; de la Sierra, Alejandro; de Leeuw, Peter; Dolan, Eamon; Fagard, Robert; Graves, John; Head, Geoffrey A; Imai, Yutaka; Kario, Kazuomi; Lurbe, Empar; Mallion, Jean-Michel; Mancia, Giuseppe; Mengden, Thomas; Myers, Martin; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Omboni, Stefano; Palatini, Paolo; Redon, Josep; Ruilope, Luis M; Shennan, Andrew; Staessen, Jan A; vanMontfrans, Gert; Verdecchia, Paolo; Waeber, Bernard; Wang, Jiguang; Zanchetti, Alberto; Zhang, Yuqing

    2013-09-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is being used increasingly in both clinical practice and hypertension research. Although there are many guidelines that emphasize the indications for ABPM, there is no comprehensive guideline dealing with all aspects of the technique. It was agreed at a consensus meeting on ABPM in Milan in 2011 that the 34 attendees should prepare a comprehensive position paper on the scientific evidence for ABPM.This position paper considers the historical background, the advantages and limitations of ABPM, the threshold levels for practice, and the cost-effectiveness of the technique. It examines the need for selecting an appropriate device, the accuracy of devices, the additional information and indices that ABPM devices may provide, and the software requirements.At a practical level, the paper details the requirements for using ABPM in clinical practice, editing considerations, the number of measurements required, and the circumstances, such as obesity and arrhythmias, when particular care needs to be taken when using ABPM.The clinical indications for ABPM, among which white-coat phenomena, masked hypertension, and nocturnal hypertension appear to be prominent, are outlined in detail along with special considerations that apply in certain clinical circumstances, such as childhood, the elderly and pregnancy, and in cardiovascular illness, examples being stroke and chronic renal disease, and the place of home measurement of blood pressure in relation to ABPM is appraised.The role of ABPM in research circumstances, such as pharmacological trials and in the prediction of outcome in epidemiological studies is examined and finally the implementation of ABPM in practice is considered in relation to the issue of reimbursement in different countries, the provision of the technique by primary care practices, hospital clinics and pharmacies, and the growing role of registries of ABPM in many countries.

  16. Continuous positive airway pressure treatment increases bronchial reactivity in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczynski, Piotr; Gorska, Katarzyna; Przybylowski, Tadeusz; Bielicki, Piotr; Zielinski, Jan; Chazan, Ryszarda

    2009-01-01

    The effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on the function of the lower airways are poorly understood. One of the methods used to determine the influence of positive pressure breathing on lower airways is the bronchial hyperreactivity test. Some authors report that CPAP increases bronchial hyperreactivity, while others report decreases. To assess the influence of CPAP treatment on bronchial reactivity and the effects of bronchial hyperreactivity on compliance to CPAP treatment. The study group consisted of 101 obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients (88 men and 13 women) with a mean age of 51 ± 11 years, mean apnea-hypopnea index of 53 ± 20 and mean body mass index of 32.6 ± 5.4. Patients were randomly assigned to a treatment group that received 3 weeks of CPAP therapy (group 1) or to a nontreatment control group (group 2). Pulmonary function tests and the methacholine bronchial provocation test were performed at baseline and 3 weeks later. There were no statistically significant differences between treated and control groups in anthropometry and polysomnography variables. At baseline, bronchial hyperreactivity was found in 6 patients from group 1 and 5 patients from group 2. A significant increase in bronchial reactivity was observed after CPAP treatment. Log PC20M decreased from 1.38 ± 0.30 at baseline to 1.26 ± 0.50 (p bronchial hyperreactivity during CPAP treatment were characterized by significantly lower FEV1, FVC and MEF50 values. CPAP produces statistically significant bronchial hyperreactivity. However, there were no clinical symptoms and it is not necessary to withdraw previous therapies. Copyright © 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Sleep architecture, insulin resistance and the nasal cycle: Implications for positive airway pressure therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A.P. Crofts

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The global pandemic of metabolic disease is worsening. The metabolic theory of obesity proposes that hormonal changes, especially hyperinsulinaemia, precede metabolic disease development. Although quality sleep is recognised as a key factor for good health, less is known about disrupted sleep as a risk factor for hyperinsulinaemia.   Aim: To explore the relationship between sleep, especially sleep architecture and the nasal cycle, on insulin secretion in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA with comorbid metabolic disease. This review includes a discussion of the potential role of Rest-Activity-Cycler positive airway pressure (RACer-PAP, a novel non-pharmacological OSA treatment strategy.   Methods: A narrative review of all the relevant papers known to the authors was conducted. This review also included results from a polysomnographic sleep clinic pilot study (n = 3 comparing sleep efficiency of RACer-PAP to nasal continuous positive airways pressure (n-CPAP in OSA patients.   Results: Metabolic disease is strongly associated with disturbed sleep. Sleep architecture influences cerebral hormonal secretion, lateral shifts in the autonomic nervous system and nasal airflow dominance. Disturbed sleep shortens short-wave sleep periods, decreasing insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. Improvements to metabolic function during n-CPAP treatment are inconsistent. If RACer-PAP demonstrates superior effects on sleep architecture and autonomic function, it may offer advantages in OSA patients with comorbid metabolic disease.   Conclusion: Improving sleep architecture by maintaining the nasal cycle proposes a novel non-pharmacological treatment paradigm for treating OSA with comorbid metabolic disease. Research is required to demonstrate if RACer-PAP therapy influences whole night sleep architecture, sympathovagal balance and markers of metabolic disease.

  18. Donor impurity-related linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients in GaAs/Ga{sub 1−x}Al{sub x}As concentric double quantum rings: Effects of geometry, hydrostatic pressure, and aluminum concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baghramyan, H.M.; Barseghyan, M.G.; Kirakosyan, A.A. [Department of Solid State Physics, Yerevan State University, Al. Manookian 1, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Restrepo, R.L. [Física Teórica y Aplicada, Escuela de Ingeniería de Antioquia, AA 7516, Medellín (Colombia); Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultadde Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21,Medellín (Colombia); Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultadde Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21,Medellín (Colombia); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, CP 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Duque, C.A., E-mail: cduque@fisica.udea.edu.co [Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultadde Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21,Medellín (Colombia)

    2014-01-15

    The linear and nonlinear optical absorption associated with the transition between 1s and 2s states corresponding to the electron-donor-impurity complex in GaAs/Ga{sub 1−x}Al{sub x}As three-dimensional concentric double quantum rings are investigated. Taking into account the combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and the variation of the aluminum concentration, the energies of the ground and first excited s-like states of a donor impurity in such a system have been calculated using the effective mass approximation and a variational method. The energies of these states and the corresponding threshold energy of the optical transitions are examined as functions of hydrostatic pressure, aluminum concentration, radial impurity position, as well as the geometrical dimensions of the structure. The dependencies of the linear, nonlinear and total optical absorption coefficients as functions of the incident photon energy are investigated for different values of those mentioned parameters. It is found that the influences mentioned above lead to either redshifts or blueshifts of the resonant peaks of the optical absorption spectrum. It is particularly discussed the unusual property exhibited by the third-order nonlinear of becoming positive for photon energies below the resonant transition one. It is shown that this phenomenon is associated with the particular features of the system under study, which determine the values of the electric dipole moment matrix elements. -- Highlights: • Intra-band optical absorption associated to impurity states in double quantum rings. • Combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and aluminum concentration are studied. • The influences mentioned above lead to shifts of resonant peaks. • It is discussed an unusual property exhibited by the third-order nonlinear absorption.

  19. Donor impurity-related linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients in GaAs/Ga1−xAlxAs concentric double quantum rings: Effects of geometry, hydrostatic pressure, and aluminum concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baghramyan, H.M.; Barseghyan, M.G.; Kirakosyan, A.A.; Restrepo, R.L.; Mora-Ramos, M.E.; Duque, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    The linear and nonlinear optical absorption associated with the transition between 1s and 2s states corresponding to the electron-donor-impurity complex in GaAs/Ga 1−x Al x As three-dimensional concentric double quantum rings are investigated. Taking into account the combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and the variation of the aluminum concentration, the energies of the ground and first excited s-like states of a donor impurity in such a system have been calculated using the effective mass approximation and a variational method. The energies of these states and the corresponding threshold energy of the optical transitions are examined as functions of hydrostatic pressure, aluminum concentration, radial impurity position, as well as the geometrical dimensions of the structure. The dependencies of the linear, nonlinear and total optical absorption coefficients as functions of the incident photon energy are investigated for different values of those mentioned parameters. It is found that the influences mentioned above lead to either redshifts or blueshifts of the resonant peaks of the optical absorption spectrum. It is particularly discussed the unusual property exhibited by the third-order nonlinear of becoming positive for photon energies below the resonant transition one. It is shown that this phenomenon is associated with the particular features of the system under study, which determine the values of the electric dipole moment matrix elements. -- Highlights: • Intra-band optical absorption associated to impurity states in double quantum rings. • Combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and aluminum concentration are studied. • The influences mentioned above lead to shifts of resonant peaks. • It is discussed an unusual property exhibited by the third-order nonlinear absorption

  20. Positive airway pressure adherence and subthreshold adherence in posttraumatic stress disorder patients with comorbid sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krakow BJ

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Barry J Krakow,1–3 Jessica J Obando,2 Victor A Ulibarri,1,2 Natalia D McIver1,2 1Sleep & Human Health Institute, 2Maimonides Sleep Arts & Sciences, Albuquerque, 3Los Alamos Medical Center, Los Alamos, NM, USA Study objectives: Patients with comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA manifest low adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP due to fixed, pressure-induced expiratory pressure intolerance (EPI, a subjective symptom and objective sign aggravated by anxiety sensitivity and somatosensory amplification. As advanced PAP therapy modes (ie, auto-bilevel PAP [ABPAP] or adaptive servo-ventilation [ASV] may address these side effects, we hypothesized such treatment would be associated with decreased expiratory intolerance and increased adherence in posttraumatic stress patients with co-occurring OSA.Methods: We reviewed charts of 147 consecutive adult patients with moderately severe posttraumatic stress symptoms and objectively diagnosed OSA. All patients failed or rejected CPAP and were manually titrated on auto-adjusting, dual-pressure ABPAP or ASV modes in the sleep laboratory, a technique to eliminate flow limitation breathing events while resolving EPI. Patients were then prescribed either mode of therapy. Follow-up encounters assessed patient use, and objective data downloads (ODDs measured adherence.Results: Of 147 charts reviewed, 130 patients were deemed current PAP users, and 102 provided ODDs: 64 used ASV and 38 used ABPAP. ODDs yielded three groups: 59 adherent per insurance conventions, 19 subthreshold compliant partial users, and 24 noncompliant. Compliance based on available downloads was 58%, notably higher than recently reported rates in PTSD patients with OSA. Among the 19 partial users, 17 patients were minutes of PAP use or small percentages of nights removed from meeting insurance compliance criteria for PAP devices.Conclusion: Research is warranted on advanced PAP modes in

  1. Pressure loss coefficient and flow rate of side hole in a lower end plug for dual-cooled annular nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chang-Hwan, E-mail: shinch@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Ju-Yong, E-mail: juyong@kaeri.re.kr; In, Wang-Kee, E-mail: wkin@kaeri.re.kr

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • A lower end plug with side flow holes is suggested to provide alternative flow paths of the inner channel. • The inlet loss coefficient of the lower end plug is estimated from the experiment. • The flow rate through the side holes is estimated in a complete entrance blockage of inner channel. • The consequence in the reactor core condition is evaluated with a subchannel analysis code. - Abstract: Dual-cooled annular nuclear fuel for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) has been introduced for a significant increase in reactor power. KAERI has been developing a dual-cooled annular fuel for a power uprate of 20% in an optimized PWR in Korea, the OPR1000. This annular fuel can help decrease the fuel temperature substantially relative to conventional cylindrical fuel at a power uprate. Annular fuel has dual flow channels around itself; however, the inner flow channel has a weakness in that it is isolated unlike the outer flow channel, which is open to other neighbouring outer channels for a coolant exchange in the reactor core. If the entrance of the inner channel is, as a hypothetical event, completely blocked by debris, the inner channel will then experience a rapid increase in coolant temperature such that a departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) may occur. Therefore, a remedy to avoid such a postulated accident is indispensable for the safety of annular fuel. A lower end plug with side flow holes was suggested to provide alternative flow paths in addition to the central entrance of the inner channel. In this paper, the inlet loss coefficient of the lower end plug and the flow rate through the side holes were estimated from the experimental results even in a complete entrance blockage of the inner channel. An optimization for the side hole was also performed, and the results are applied to a subchannel analysis to evaluate the consequence in the reactor core condition.

  2. Reproducibility of wrist home blood pressure measurement with position sensor and automatic data storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickenig Georg

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wrist blood pressure (BP devices have physiological limits with regards to accuracy, therefore they were not preferred for home BP monitoring. However some wrist devices have been successfully validated using etablished validation protocols. Therefore this study assessed the reproducibility of wrist home BP measurement with position sensor and automatic data storage. Methods To compare the reproducibility of three different(BP measurement methods: 1 office BP, 2 home BP (Omron wrist device HEM- 637 IT with position sensor, 3 24-hour ambulatory BP(24-h ABPM (ABPM-04, Meditech, Hunconventional sphygmomanometric office BP was measured on study days 1 and 7, 24-h ABPM on study days 7 and 14 and home BP between study days 1 and 7 and between study days 8 and 14 in 69 hypertensive and 28 normotensive subjects. The correlation coeffcient of each BP measurement method with echocardiographic left ventricular mass index was analyzed. The schedule of home readings was performed according to recently published European Society of Hypertension (ESH- guidelines. Results The reproducibility of home BP measurement analyzed by the standard deviation as well as the squared differeces of mean individual differences between the respective BP measurements was significantly higher than the reproducibility of office BP (p Conclusion The short-term reproducibility of home BP measurement with the Omron HEM-637 IT wrist device was superior to the reproducibility of office BP and 24- h ABPM measurement. Furthermore, home BP with the wrist device showed similar correlations to targed organ damage as recently reported for upper arm devices. Although wrist devices have to be used cautious and with defined limitations, the use of validated devices with position sensor according to recently recommended measurement schedules might have the potential to be used for therapy monitoring.

  3. Clinical assessment of auto-positive end-expiratory pressure by diaphragmatic electrical activity during pressure support and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellani, Giacomo; Coppadoro, Andrea; Patroniti, Nicolò; Turella, Marta; Arrigoni Marocco, Stefano; Grasselli, Giacomo; Mauri, Tommaso; Pesenti, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    Auto-positive end-expiratory pressure (auto-PEEP) may substantially increase the inspiratory effort during assisted mechanical ventilation. Purpose of this study was to assess whether the electrical activity of the diaphragm (EAdi) signal can be reliably used to estimate auto-PEEP in patients undergoing pressure support ventilation and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) and whether NAVA was beneficial in comparison with pressure support ventilation in patients affected by auto-PEEP. In 10 patients with a clinical suspicion of auto-PEEP, the authors simultaneously recorded EAdi, airway, esophageal pressure, and flow during pressure support and NAVA, whereas external PEEP was increased from 2 to 14 cm H2O. Tracings were analyzed to measure apparent "dynamic" auto-PEEP (decrease in esophageal pressure to generate inspiratory flow), auto-EAdi (EAdi value at the onset of inspiratory flow), and IDEAdi (inspiratory delay between the onset of EAdi and the inspiratory flow). The pressure necessary to overcome auto-PEEP, auto-EAdi, and IDEAdi was significantly lower in NAVA as compared with pressure support ventilation, decreased with increase in external PEEP, although the effect of external PEEP was less pronounced in NAVA. Both auto-EAdi and IDEAdi were tightly correlated with auto-PEEP (r = 0.94 and r = 0.75, respectively). In the presence of auto-PEEP at lower external PEEP levels, NAVA was characterized by a characteristic shape of the airway pressure. In patients with auto-PEEP, NAVA, compared with pressure support ventilation, led to a decrease in the pressure necessary to overcome auto-PEEP, which could be reliably monitored by the electrical activity of the diaphragm before inspiratory flow onset (auto-EAdi).

  4. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP after lung resection: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia dos Santos Roceto

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Noninvasive mechanical ventilation during the postoperative period (PO following lung resection can restore residual functional capacity, improve oxygenation and spare the inspiratory muscles. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP associated with physiotherapy, compared with physiotherapy alone after lung resection. DESIGN AND SETTING: Open randomized clinical trial conducted in the clinical hospital of Universidade Estadual de Campinas. METHOD: Sessions were held in the immediate postoperative period (POi and on the first and second postoperative days (PO1 and PO2, and the patients were reassessed on the discharge day. CPAP was applied for two hours and the pressure adjustment was set between 7 and 8.5 cmH2O. The oxygenation index (OI, Borg scale, pain scale and presence of thoracic drains and air losses were evaluated. RESULTS : There was a significant increase in the OI in the CPAP group in the POi compared to the Chest Physiotherapy (CP group, P = 0.024. In the CP group the OI was significantly lower on PO1 (P = 0,042, than CPAP group. The air losses were significantly greater in the CPAP group in the POi and on PO1 (P = 0.001, P = 0.028, but there was no significant difference between the groups on PO2 and PO3. There was a statistically significant difference between the groups regarding the Borg scale in the POi (P < 0.001, but there were no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding the pain score. CONCLUSION: CPAP after lung resection is safe and improves oxygenation, without increasing the air losses through the drains. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01285648

  5. Positive end-expiratory pressure improves gas exchange and pulmonary mechanics during partial liquid ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmse, M; Fujino, Y; Hess, D; Kacmarek, R M

    1998-11-01

    Partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with perflubron (PFB) has been proposed as an adjunct to the current therapies for the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Because PFB has been also referred to as "liquid PEEP," distributing to the most gravity-dependent regions of the lung, less attention has been paid to the amount of applied positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). We hypothesized that higher PEEP levels than currently applied are needed to optimize gas exchange, and that the lower inflection point (LIP) of the pressure-volume curve could be used to estimate the amount of PEEP needed when the lung is filled with PFB. Lung injury was induced in 23 sheep by repeated lung lavage with warmed saline until the PaO2/FIO2 ratio fell below 150. Five sheep were used to investigate the change of the LIP when the lung was filled with PFB in increments of 5 ml/kg/body weight to a total of 30 ml/kg/body weight. To evaluate the impact of PEEP set at LIP +1 cm H2O we randomized an additional 15 sheep to three groups with different doses (7.5 ml, 15 ml, 30 ml/kg/body weight) of PFB. In random order a PEEP of 5 cm H2O or PEEP at LIP +1 cm H2O was applied. The LIP decreased with incremental filling of PFB to a minimum at 10 ml (p PFB shifts the LIP to the left, and that setting PEEP at LIP +1 cm H2O improves gas exchange at moderate to high doses of PFB.

  6. Impact of heated humidification with automatic positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnea therapy.

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    Salgado, Sara Moreira da Silva Trindade; Boléo-Tomé, José Pedro Correia Fernandes; Canhão, Cristina Maria Sardinha; Dias, Ana Rita Tavares; Teixeira, Joana Isaac; Pinto, Paula Maria Gonçalves; Caetano, Maria Cristina de Brito Eusébio Bárbara Prista

    2008-09-01

    To study the impact that heated humidification instituted in the beginning of automatic positive airway pressure (APAP) therapy has on compliance with and the side effects of the treatment. Thirty-nine treatment-naïve patients with obstructive sleep apnea were randomized into two groups to receive APAP using one of two modalities: with heated humidification (APAPwith group); and without heated humidification (APAPw/o group).Patients were evaluated at 7 and 30 days after APAP initiation. The following parameters were analyzed: compliance with treatment (mean number of hours/night); side effects (dry nose or mouth, nasal obstruction and rhinorrhea); daytime sleepiness (Epworth sleepiness scale score) and subjective comfort (visual analog scale score). Patients were also evaluated in terms of residual apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), as well as mean pressures and leaks registered in the ventilators. There were no differences between the two groups in terms of mean age (APAPwith: 57.4 +/- 9.2; APAPw/o: 56.5 +/- 10.7 years), AHI (APAPwith: 28.1 +/- 14.0; APAPw/o: 28.8 +/- 20.5 events/hour of sleep), baseline Epworth score (APAPwith: 11.2 +/- 5.8; APAPw/o: 11.9 +/- 6.3) and initial nasal symptoms. Compliance was similar in both groups (APAPwith: 5.3 +/- 2.4; APAPw/o: 5.2 +/- 2.3 h/night). There were no differences in any of the other parameters analyzed. The introduction of heated humidification at the beginning of APAP therapy provided no advantage in terms of treatment compliance or side effects of treatment.

  7. Is the Relationship between Race and Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Adherence Mediated by Sleep Duration?

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    Billings, Martha E.; Rosen, Carol L.; Wang, Rui; Auckley, Dennis; Benca, Ruth; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Iber, Conrad; Zee, Phyllis; Redline, Susan; Kapur, Vishesh K.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Black race has been associated with decreased continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence. Short sleep duration, long sleep latency, and insomnia complaints may affect CPAP adherence as they affect sleep and opportunity to use CPAP. We assessed whether self-reported sleep measures were associated with CPAP adherence and if racial variations in these sleep characteristics may explain racial differences in CPAP adherence. Design: Analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial (HomePAP), which investigated home versus laboratory-based diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. Setting: Seven American Academy of Sleep Medicine-accredited sleep centers in five cities in the United States. Patients or Participants: Enrolled subjects (n = 191) with apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 15 and sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale > 12). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Multivariable regression was used to assess if subjective sleep measures and symptoms predicted 3-mo CPAP use. Mediation analysis was used to assess if sleep measures mediated the association of race with CPAP adherence. Black participants reported shorter sleep duration and longer sleep latency at baseline than white and Hispanic participants. Shorter sleep duration and longer sleep latency predicted worse CPAP adherence. Sleep duration mediated the association of black race with lower CPAP adherence. However, insomnia symptoms were not associated with race or CPAP adherence. Conclusions: Among subjects with similar severity of obstructive sleep apnea and sleepiness, baseline self-reported sleep duration and latency, but not perceived insomnia, predicted CPAP adherence over 3 mo. Sleep duration explains some of the observed differences in CPAP use by race. Sleep duration and latency should be considered when evaluating poor CPAP adherence. Clinical Trial Information: Portable Monitoring for Diagnosis and Management of Sleep Apnea (HomePAP) URL: http

  8. Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Stroke Rehabilitation: A Pilot Randomized Sham-Controlled Trial

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    Khot, Sandeep P.; Davis, Arielle P.; Crane, Deborah A.; Tanzi, Patricia M.; Li Lue, Denise; Claflin, Edward S.; Becker, Kyra J.; Longstreth, W.T.; Watson, Nathaniel F.; Billings, Martha E.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) predicts poor functional outcome after stroke and increases the risk for recurrent stroke. Less is known about continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on stroke recovery. Methods: In a pilot randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled trial, adult stroke rehabilitation patients were assigned to auto-titrating or sham CPAP without diagnostic testing for OSA. Change in Functional Independence Measure (FIM), a measure of disability, was assessed between rehabilitation admission and discharge. Results: Over 18 months, 40 patients were enrolled and 10 withdrew from the study: 7 from active and 3 from sham CPAP (p > 0.10). For the remaining 30 patients, median duration of CPAP use was 14 days. Average CPAP use was 3.7 h/night, with at least 4 h nightly use among 15 patients. Adherence was not influenced by treatment assignment or stroke severity. In intention-to-treat analyses (n = 40), the median change in FIM favored active CPAP over sham but did not reach statistical significance (34 versus 26, p = 0.25), except for the cognitive component (6 versus 2.5, p = 0.04). The on-treatment analyses (n = 30) yielded similar results (total FIM: 32 versus 26, p = 0.11; cognitive FIM: 6 versus 2, p = 0.06). Conclusions: A sham-controlled CPAP trial among stroke rehabilitation patients was feasible in terms of recruitment, treatment without diagnostic testing and adequate blinding—though was limited by study retention and CPAP adherence. Despite these limitations, a trend towards a benefit of CPAP on recovery was evident. Tolerance and adherence must be improved before the full benefits of CPAP on recovery can be assessed in larger trials. Citation: Khot SP, Davis AP, Crane DA, Tanzi PM, Li Lue D, Claflin ES, Becker KJ, Longstreth WT, Watson NF, Billings ME. Effect of continuous positive airway pressure on stroke rehabilitation: a pilot randomized sham-controlled trial. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(7):1019–1026. PMID

  9. Does personality play a role in continuous positive airway pressure compliance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L. Maschauer

    2017-03-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP adherence is low among individuals with obstructive sleep apnoea. Type D personality and high scores on the depression and hypochondriasis scales on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI have been identified as factors contributing to non-compliance with CPAP. Further research into personality type may assist in understanding why some people adhere to CPAP, while others fail. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA is a condition characterised by repetitive, intermittent partial or complete collapse/obstruction of the upper airway during sleep. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP is highly efficacious in treating OSA but its effectiveness is limited due to suboptimal acceptance and adherence rates, with as many as 50% of OSA patients discontinuing CPAP treatment within the first year. Until recently, research has focused on examining mechanistic and demographic factors that could explain nonadherence (e.g. age, sex, race and education level with limited applicability in a prospective or clinical manner. More recent research has focused on personality factors or types of patients with OSA who comply and do not comply with CPAP adherence in an attempt to enhance the accuracy of predicting treatment compliance. Type D personality has been found to be prevalent in one third of patients with OSA. The presence of Type D personality increases noncompliance and poor treatment outcomes due to negative affectivity, social inhibition, unhealthy lifestyle, and a reluctance to consult and/or follow medical advice. Conversely, individuals who are more likely to adhere to CPAP treatment tend to have a high internal locus of control and high self-efficacy, self-refer for treatment, and have active coping skills. By assessing personality and coping skills, the clinician may gain insight into the likelihood of a patient’s adherence to treatment. If the patient displays potential risk factors for CPAP noncompliance, the

  10. The Effect of Body Position on Pain Due to Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP in Premature Neonates: A Cross-Over Clinical Trial Study

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    Mahnaz Jabraeili

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The most common cause of admission to neonatal intensive care units (NICU is respiratory distress syndrome. One of the respiratory assistance methods is using nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP. Regarding the importance of pain control which is one of the major priorities in neonatal nursing care, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of body position on pain due to nasal CPAP in premature neonates. Materials and Methods In this cross-over clinical trial, 50 premature neonates who were receiving nasal CPAP admitted to the NICU of Imam Reza Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran, were included. The neonates were randomly placed at three body positions (fetal, supine, and prone positions. Pain was measured by Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital Pain Scale Neonates (ALPS-Neo pain assessment scale. The collected data were analyzed using the SPSS software (Version 22.0. Results Significant difference existed regarding pain of nasal CPAP among body positions (p< 0.001. Mean (SD pain was 5.15 (0.822 in fetal position, 6.260 (0.747 in prone position and 7.326 (0.792 in supine position. Conclusion Body positioning in premature neonates under nasal CPAP in NICU can be effective as a non-pharmacologic method in alleviating pain due to nasal CPAP. Among the studied positions, the lowest pain score was seen in fetal position.

  11. Association between temporal mean arterial pressure and brachial noninvasive blood pressure during shoulder surgery in the beach chair position during general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplet, Jacob J; Lonetta, Christopher M; Everding, Nathan G; Moor, Molly A; Levy, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of cerebral perfusion pressure during elective shoulder surgery in the beach chair position is regularly performed by noninvasive brachial blood pressure (NIBP) measurements. The relationship between brachial mean arterial pressure and estimated temporal mean arterial pressure (eTMAP) is not well established and may vary with patient positioning. Establishing a ratio between eTMAP and NIBP at varying positions may provide a more accurate estimation of cerebral perfusion using noninvasive measurements. This prospective study included 57 patients undergoing elective shoulder surgery in the beach chair position. All patients received an interscalene block and general anesthesia. After the induction of general anesthesia, values for eTMAP and NIBP were recorded at 0°, 30°, and 70° of incline. A statistically significant, strong, and direct correlation between NIBP and eTMAP was found at 0° (r = 0.909, P ≤ .001), 30° (r = 0.874, P Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Self-Efficacy and Short-Term Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthopoulos, Melissa S; Kim, Ji Young; Blechner, Michael; Chang, Ming-Yu; Menello, Mary Kate; Brown, Christina; Matthews, Edward; Weaver, Terri E; Shults, Justine; Marcus, Carole L

    2017-07-01

    Infants, children, and adolescents are increasingly being prescribed continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), yet adherence is often poor. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between caregiver and patient-reported health cognitions about CPAP prior to starting CPAP and CPAP adherence at 1 month. We hypothesized that greater caregiver-reported self-efficacy would be positively associated with CPAP adherence in children. We also evaluated patient-reported self-efficacy and caregiver- and patient-reported risk perception and outcome expectations as they related to adherence, as well as how demographic factors influenced these relationships. A pediatric modification of the Self-Efficacy Measure for Sleep Apnea Questionnaire was administered to children and adolescents with OSAS-prescribed CPAP and their caregivers during the clinical CPAP-initiation visit. The primary outcome variable for adherence was the average total minutes of CPAP usage across all days from the date that CPAP was initiated to 31 days later. Unadjusted ordinary least-square regression showed a significant association between caregiver-reported self-efficacy and adherence (p = .007), indicating that mean daily CPAP usage increased by 48.4 minutes when caregiver-reported self-efficacy increased by one point (95% confidence interval 13.4-83.4 minutes). No other caregiver- or patient-reported cognitive health variables were related to CPAP use. This study indicates that caregiver CPAP-specific self-efficacy is an important factor to consider when starting youth on CPAP therapy for OSAS. Employing strategies to improve caregiver self-efficacy, beginning at CPAP initiation, may promote CPAP adherence. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with nasal positive airway pressure improves golf performance.

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    Benton, Marc L; Friedman, Neil S

    2013-12-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with impairment of cognitive function, and improvement is often noted with treatment. Golf is a sport that requires a range of cognitive skills. We evaluated the impact of nasal positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy on the handicap index (HI) of golfers with OSAS. Golfers underwent a nocturnal polysomnogram (NPSG) to determine whether they had significant OSAS (respiratory disturbance index > 15). Twelve subjects with a positive NPSG were treated with PAP. HI, an Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and sleep questionnaire (SQ) were submitted upon study entry. After 20 rounds of golf on PAP treatment, the HI was recalculated, and the questionnaires were repeated. A matched control group composed of non-OSAS subjects was studied to assess the impact of the study construct on HI, ESS, and SQ. Statistical comparisons between pre- and post-PAP treatment were calculated. The control subjects demonstrated no significant change in HI, ESS, or SQ during this study, while the OSAS group demonstrated a significant drop in average HI (11.3%, p = 0.01), ESS, (p = 0.01), and SQ (p = 0.003). Among the more skilled golfers (defined as HI ≤ 12), the average HI dropped by an even greater degree (31.5%). Average utilization of PAP was 91.4% based on data card reporting. Treatment of OSAS with PAP enhanced performance in golfers with this condition. Treatment adherence was unusually high in this study. Non-medical performance improvement may be a strong motivator for selected subjects with OSAS to seek treatment and maximize adherence.

  14. Accuracy of Administrative Codes for Distinguishing Positive Pressure Ventilation from High-Flow Nasal Cannula.

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    Good, Ryan J; Leroue, Matthew K; Czaja, Angela S

    2018-06-07

    Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) is increasingly used in critically ill pediatric patients, despite limited data on safety and efficacy. Administrative data may be a good resource for observational studies. Therefore, we sought to assess the performance of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision procedure code for NIPPV. Patients admitted to the PICU requiring NIPPV or heated high-flow nasal cannula (HHFNC) over the 11-month study period were identified from the Virtual PICU System database. The gold standard was manual review of the electronic health record to verify the use of NIPPV or HHFNC among the cohort. The presence or absence of a NIPPV procedure code was determined by using administrative data. Test characteristics with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were generated, comparing administrative data with the gold standard. Among the cohort ( n = 562), the majority were younger than 5 years, and the most common primary diagnosis was bronchiolitis. Most (82%) required NIPPV, whereas 18% required only HHFNC. The NIPPV code had a sensitivity of 91.1% (95% CI: 88.2%-93.6%) and a specificity of 57.6% (95% CI: 47.2%-67.5%), with a positive likelihood ratio of 2.15 (95% CI: 1.70-2.71) and negative likelihood ratio of 0.15 (95% CI: 0.11-0.22). Among our critically ill pediatric cohort, NIPPV procedure codes had high sensitivity but only moderate specificity. On the basis of our study results, there is a risk of misclassification, specifically failure to identify children who require NIPPV, when using administrative data to study the use of NIPPV in this population. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Prediction of supercooled liquid vapor pressures and n-octanol/air partition coefficients for polybrominated diphenyl ethers by means of molecular descriptors from DFT method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zunyao; Zeng Xiaolan; Zhai Zhicai

    2008-01-01

    The molecular geometries of 209 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G* level with Gaussian 98 program. The calculated structural parameters were taken as theoretical descriptors to establish two novel QSPR models for predicting supercooled liquid vapor pressures (P L ) and octanol/air partition coefficients (K OA ) of PBDEs based on the theoretical linear solvation energy relationship (TLSER) model, respectively. The two models achieved in this work both contain three variables: most negative atomic partial charge in molecule (q - ), dipole moment of the molecules (μ) and mean molecular polarizability (α), of which R 2 values are both as high as 0.997, their root-mean-square errors in modeling (RSMEE) are 0.069 and 0.062 respectively. In addition, the F-value of two models are both evidently larger than critical values F 0.05 and the variation inflation factors (VIF) of variables herein are all less than 5.0, suggesting obvious statistic significance of the P L and K OA predicting models. The results of Leave-One-Out (LOO) cross-validation for training set and validation with external test set both show that the two models obtained exhibited optimum stability and good predictive power. We suggest that the QSPRs derived here can be used to predict accurately P L and K OA for non-tested PBDE congeners from Mono-BDEs to Hepta-BDEs and from Mono-BDEs to Hexa-BDEs, respectively

  16. Thermal plasma properties for Ar–Al, Ar–Fe and Ar–Cu mixtures used in welding plasmas processes: I. Net emission coefficients at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cressault, Y; Gleizes, A

    2013-01-01

    This article is devoted to the calculation of the net emission coefficient (NEC) of Ar–Al, Ar–Fe and Ar–Cu mixtures at atmospheric pressure for arc welding processes. The results are given in data tables for temperatures between 3 kK and 30 kK, for five plasma thicknesses (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5 mm) and ten concentrations of metallic vapours (pure gas, 0.01%, 0.1%, 1%, 5%, 10%, 25%, 50%, 75% and pure metal vapours in mass proportions). The results are in good agreement with most of the works published on the subject for such mixtures. They highlight the influence of three parameters on the radiation of the plasma: the NEC is directly related to temperature and inversely related to plasma radius and is highly sensitive to the presence of metal vapours. Finally, numerical data are supplied in tables in order to develop accurate computational modelling of welding arc and to estimate both qualitatively and quantitatively the influence of each metallic vapour on the size and on the shape of the weld pool. (paper)

  17. Successful management of drug-induced hypercapnic acidosis with naloxone and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrafiotis, Michalis; Tryfon, Stavros; Siopi, Demetra; Chassapidou, Georgia; Galanou, Artemis; Tsara, Venetia

    2015-02-01

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to deteriorating level of consciousness and desaturation. His Glasgow Coma Scale was 6, and his pupils were constricted but responded to light. Chest radiograph was negative for significant findings. Arterial blood gas evaluation on supplemental oxygen revealed severe acute on chronic respiratory acidosis: pH 7.15; PCO2, 133 mm Hg; PO2,64 mm Hg; and HCO3, 31 mmol/L. He regained full consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale, 15) after receiving a 0.4 mg dose of naloxone, but because of persistent severe respiratory acidosis (pH 7.21; PCO2, 105 mm Hg), he was immediately commenced on noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIV) displaying a remarkable improvement in arterial blood gas values within the next few hours. However, in the days that followed, he remained dependent on NIV, and he was finally discharged on a home mechanical ventilation prescription. In cases of drug-induced respiratory depression, NIV should be regarded as an acceptable treatment, as it can provide ventilatory support without the increased risks associated with invasive mechanical ventilation.

  18. Asthma outcomes improve with continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea.

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    Serrano-Pariente, J; Plaza, V; Soriano, J B; Mayos, M; López-Viña, A; Picado, C; Vigil, L

    2017-05-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in asthma patients with concomitant obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) seems to have a favorable impact on asthma, but data are inconsistent due to methodological limitations of previous studies. Prospective, multicenter study. We examined asthma outcomes after 6 months of CPAP in 99 adult asthma patients (mean age 57 years) with OSAS (respiratory disturbance index ≥20). Asthma control and quality of life were assessed with the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) and the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (MiniAQLQ), respectively. Data were analyzed by intention-to-treat basis. The mean ± SD score of the ACQ decreased from 1.39 ± 0.91 at baseline to 1.0 ± 0.78 at 6 months (P = 0.003), the percentage of patients with uncontrolled asthma from 41.4% to 17.2% (P = 0.006), and the percentage of patients with asthma attacks in the 6 months before and after treatment from 35.4% to 17.2% (P = 0.015). The score of the mAQLQ increased from 5.12 ± 1.38 to 5.63 ± 1.17 (P = 0.009). There were also significant improvements in symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and rhinitis, bronchial reversibility, and exhaled nitric oxide values (all P obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. © 2016 The Authors. Allergy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Sleep apnea is associated with bronchial inflammation and continuous positive airway pressure-induced airway hyperresponsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devouassoux, Gilles; Lévy, Patrick; Rossini, Eliane; Pin, Isabelle; Fior-Gozlan, Michèle; Henry, Mireille; Seigneurin, Daniel; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2007-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is associated with systemic and upper airway inflammation. Pharyngeal inflammation has a potential role in upper airway collapse, whereas systemic inflammation relates to cardiovascular morbidity. However, the presence of an inflammatory involvement of lower airway has been poorly investigated. The aim of the study was to demonstrate an inflammatory process at the bronchial level in patients with OSA and to analyze effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) application and humidification on bronchial mucosa. The study was conducted by using sequential induced sputum for cell analysis and IL-8 production, nitric oxide exhalation measurement, and methacholine challenge before and after CPAP. Bronchial neutrophilia and a high IL-8 concentration were observed in untreated OSA compared with controls (75% +/- 20% vs 43% +/- 12%, P Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is associated with bronchial inflammation. Our data demonstrate CPAP effect on the development of AHR, possibly facilitated by the pre-existing inflammation. Both issues should be evaluated during long-term CPAP use. Results showing a spontaneous bronchial inflammation in OSA and the development of a CPAP-related AHR require a long-term follow-up to evaluate consequences on chronic bronchial obstruction.

  20. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Device Time to Procurement in a Disadvantaged Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes M. DelRosso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The management of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA in patients who cannot afford a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP device is challenging. In this study we compare time to CPAP procurement in three groups of patients diagnosed with OSA: uninsured subsidized by a humanitarian grant (Group 1, uninsured unsubsidized (Group 2, and those with Medicare or Medicaid (Group 3. We evaluate follow-up and adherence in Group 1. We hypothesize that additional factors, rather than just the ability to obtain CPAP, may uniquely affect follow-up and adherence in uninsured patients. Methods. 30 patients were in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. 12 patients were in Group 3. Time of CPAP procurement from OSA diagnosis to CPAP initiation was assessed in all groups. CPAP adherence data was collected for Group 1 patients at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months. Results. There were no significant differences between groups in gender, age, body mass index, or apnea hypopnea index. The mean time to procurement in Group 1 was shorter compared to Group 2 but not significant. Compared to both Group 1 and Group 2, Group 3 patients had significantly shorter times to device procurement. Conclusion. Time to procurement of CPAP was significantly shorter in those with Medicaid/Medicare insurance compared to the uninsured.

  1. Impact of continuous positive airway pressure on the pulmonary changes promoted by immersion in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danize Aparecida Rizzetti

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To determine whether different levels of CPAP improve the lung volumes and capacities of healthy subjects immersed in water. Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial, conducted between April and June of 2016, involving healthy female volunteers who were using oral contraceptives. Three 20-min immersion protocols were applied: control (no CPAP; CPAP5 (CPAP at 5 cmH2O; and CPAP10 (CPAP at 10 cmH2O. We evaluated HR, SpO2, FVC, FEV1, the FEV1/FVC ratio, peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR, and FEF25-75% at three time points: pre-immersion; 10 min after immersion; and 10 min after the end of each protocol. Results: We evaluated 13 healthy volunteers. The CPAP10 protocol reversed the restrictive pattern of lung function induced by immersion in water, maintaining pulmonary volumes and capacities for a longer period than did the CPAP5 protocol. Conclusions: When the hemodynamic change causing a persistent lung disorder, only the application of higher positive pressures is effective in maintaining long-term improvements in the pulmonary profile.

  2. Impact of continuous positive airway pressure on the pulmonary changes promoted by immersion in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzetti, Danize Aparecida; Quadros, Janayna Rodembuch Borba; Ribeiro, Bruna Esmerio; Callegaro, Letícia; Veppo, Aline Arebalo; Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra; Peçanha, Franck Maciel

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether different levels of CPAP improve the lung volumes and capacities of healthy subjects immersed in water. This was a randomized clinical trial, conducted between April and June of 2016, involving healthy female volunteers who were using oral contraceptives. Three 20-min immersion protocols were applied: control (no CPAP); CPAP5 (CPAP at 5 cmH2O); and CPAP10 (CPAP at 10 cmH2O). We evaluated HR, SpO2, FVC, FEV1, the FEV1/FVC ratio, peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), and FEF25-75%) at three time points: pre-immersion; 10 min after immersion; and 10 min after the end of each protocol. We evaluated 13 healthy volunteers. The CPAP10 protocol reversed the restrictive pattern of lung function induced by immersion in water, maintaining pulmonary volumes and capacities for a longer period than did the CPAP5 protocol. When the hemodynamic change causing a persistent lung disorder, only the application of higher positive pressures is effective in maintaining long-term improvements in the pulmonary profile.

  3. Hyperinflation and intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure: less room to breathe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Bruce P

    2009-01-01

    Clinically, the symptoms and limited exercise capabilities of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) correlate better with changes in lung volumes than with airflow measurements. The realization of the clinical importance of hyperinflation has been overshadowed for decades by the use of forced expiratory volume during 1 s (FEV(1)) and the ratio of the FEV(1) to the forced expiratory vital capacity (FEV(1)/FVC) to categorize the severity and progression of COPD. Hyperinflation is defined as an elevation in the end-expiratory lung volume or functional residual capacity. When severe hyperinflation encroaches upon inspiratory capacity and limits vital capacity, it results in elevated intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEPi) that places the diaphragm at a mechanical disadvantage and increases the work of breathing. Severe hyperinflation is the major physiologic cause of the resulting hypercarbic respiratory failure and patients' inability to transition (i.e. wean) from mechanical ventilatory support to spontaneous breathing. This paper reviews the basic physiologic principles of hyperinflation and its clinical manifestations as demonstrated by PEEPi. Also reviewed are the adverse effects of hyperinflation and PEEPi in critically ill patients with COPD, and methods for minimizing or counterbalancing these effects. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Systematic review of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation for chronic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Liam M; Dominelli, Giulio S; Chen, Yi-Wen; Darlene Reid, W; Road, Jeremy

    2014-02-01

    This systematic review examined the effect of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) on patient reported outcomes (PROs) and survival for individuals with or at risk of chronic respiratory failure (CRF). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective non-randomised studies in those treated with NIPPV for CRF were identified from electronic databases, reference lists and grey literature. Diagnostic groups included in the review were amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease (ALS/MND), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), restrictive thoracic disease (RTD) and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). Eighteen studies were included and overall study quality was weak. Those with ALS/MND had improved somnolence and fatigue as well as prolonged survival with NIPPV. For OHS, improvements in somnolence and fatigue, dyspnoea and sleep quality were demonstrated, while for RTD, measures of dyspnoea, sleep quality, physical function and health, mental and emotional health and social function improved. There was insufficient evidence to form conclusions regarding the effect of NIPPV for those with DMD. This review has demonstrated that NIPPV influences PROs differently depending on the underlying cause of CRF. These findings may provide assistance to patients and clinicians to determine the relative costs and benefits of NIPPV therapy and also highlight areas in need of further research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ventilation Positive Pressure Intervention Effect on Indoor Air Quality in a School Building with Moisture Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Vornanen-Winqvist

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This case study investigates the effects of ventilation intervention on measured and perceived indoor air quality (IAQ in a repaired school where occupants reported IAQ problems. Occupants’ symptoms were suspected to be related to the impurities leaked indoors through the building envelope. The study’s aim was to determine whether a positive pressure of 5–7 Pa prevents the infiltration of harmful chemical and microbiological agents from structures, thus decreasing symptoms and discomfort. Ventilation intervention was conducted in a building section comprising 12 classrooms and was completed with IAQ measurements and occupants’ questionnaires. After intervention, the concentration of total volatile organic compounds (TVOC and fine particulate matter (PM2.5 decreased, and occupants’ negative perceptions became more moderate compared to those for other parts of the building. The indoor mycobiota differed in species composition from the outdoor mycobiota, and changed remarkably with the intervention, indicating that some species may have emanated from an indoor source before the intervention.

  6. Determinants of compliance with nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment applied in a community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, E M.; Banks, M B.

    2001-05-01

    Objectives: To assess determinants of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compliance when applied in a community setting.Background: One-third of obstructive sleep apnea patients eventually refuse CPAP therapy. Treatment outcomes may be improved by identifying predictors of CPAP failure, including whether management by primary care physicians without sleep consultation affects results.Methods: Polysomnogram, chart review, and questionnaire results for regular CPAP users (n=123) were compared with those returning the CPAP machine (n=26).Results: Polysomnographic data and the presence of multiple sleep disorders were only modestly predictive of CPAP compliance. Striking differences in questionnaire responses separated CPAP users from non-users, who reported less satisfaction with all phases of their diagnosis and management. Rates of CPAP use were not significantly different between patients managed solely by their primary care physician or by a sleep consultant.Conclusions: Polysomnographic findings are unlikely to identify eventual CPAP non-compliers in a cost-effective fashion. Improvements in sleep apnea management may result from addressing the role of personality factors and multiple sleep disorders in determining compliance. In this practice setting, management by primary care physicians did not significantly degrade CPAP compliance.

  7. Increased airway reactivity in a neonatal mouse model of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Catherine A.; Martin, Richard J.; MacFarlane, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a primary form of respiratory support used in the intensive care of preterm infants, but its long-term effects on airway (AW) function are unknown. Methods We developed a neonatal mouse model of CPAP treatment to determine whether it modifies later AW reactivity. Un-anesthetized spontaneously breathing mice were fitted with a mask to deliver CPAP (6cmH2O, 3hrs/day) for 7 consecutive days starting at postnatal day 1. Airway reactivity to methacholine was assessed using the in vitro living lung slice preparation. Results One week of CPAP increased AW responsiveness to methacholine in male, but not female mice, compared to untreated control animals. The AW hyper-reactivity of male mice persisted for 2 weeks (at P21) after CPAP treatment ended. 4 days of CPAP, however, did not significantly increase AW reactivity. Females also exhibited AW hyper-reactivity at P21, suggesting a delayed response to early (7 days) CPAP treatment. The effects of 7 days of CPAP on hyper-reactivity to methacholine were unique to smaller AWs whereas larger ones were relatively unaffected. Conclusion These data may be important to our understanding of the potential long-term consequences of neonatal CPAP therapy used in the intensive care of preterm infants. PMID:25950451

  8. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: Is it a route for infection in those with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Mercieca

    Full Text Available Introduction: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP is the standard treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA, with limited data about the prevalence of respiratory infections and microbial colonization in these patients. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine if CPAP use is associated with respiratory infections and to identify the organisms that colonize or infect these patients. Method: A retrospective, case-controlled study in patients diagnosed with OSA was carried out. 137 patients were recruited and interviewed using a questionnaire. A nasal swab was taken from each patient. Patients using CPAP machines had swabs taken from masks and humidifiers. Results: 66 (48.2% patients received CPAP treatment with 60.6% of them having a heated humidifier. 78.8% were male, with the majority using a full face mask (63.6%. No significant difference was seen in the prevalence of rhinosinusitis, lower respiratory tract infections and hospital admissions for pneumonia between CPAP and non-CPAP treated patients. The presence of a humidifier did not influence the prevalence of infections. Commensal flora was predominantly cultured from nasal swabs from both patient groups. Coagulase Negative Staphylococci and Diphtheroids were the main organisms cultured from masks and humidifiers respectively. Conclusions: This study shows that the use of CPAP, choice of mask and humidifier have no significant impact on the prevalence of infections and micro-organisms isolated. This is very reassuring to the physician prescribing CPAP therapy and users.

  9. Medical hypnosis as a tool to acclimatize children to noninvasive positive pressure ventilation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delord, Vincent; Khirani, Sonia; Ramirez, Adriana; Joseph, Erick Louis; Gambier, Clotilde; Belson, Maryse; Gajan, Francis; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2013-07-01

    Patient cooperation is crucial for the success of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV). This study evaluated the efficacy of medical hypnosis to reduce anticipatory anxiety and acclimatization time in children who are candidates for long-term NPPV. Medical hypnosis was performed by a trained nurse. The acclimatization time and long-term compliance with NPPV were evaluated. Hypnosis was performed in nine children aged 2 to 15 years. Seven children had a high level of anticipatory anxiety because of a tracheotomy since birth (n=2), a history of maxillofacial surgery (n=2), severe dyspnea because of lung disease (n=2), and morbid obesity and depression (n=1), and two children with obstructive sleep apnea failed standard NPPV initiation. The hypnosis techniques were based on distraction in the youngest patient and indirect or direct hypnotic suggestions in the older children to obtain a progressive psychocorporal relaxation. All patients accepted the interface and the NPPV after the first hypnosis session. A median of three sessions was needed for overnight (>6 h) NPPV acceptance. The 6-month compliance with NPPV was excellent, with a median use of 7.5 h per night. Medical hypnosis is an effective, safe, noninvasive, and inexpensive tool for reducing the anticipatory distress and acclimatization time for NPPV. This therapy is particularly useful in children with traumatic experiences, such as a tracheotomy or facial surgical procedures.

  10. Improvement in Physical Activity in Persons With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treated With Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Raymonde E; Duttuluri, Manideep; Gibson, Charlisa D; Mir, Sadaf; Fuhrmann, Katherine; Eden, Edward; Supariwala, Azhar

    2017-03-01

    Exercise improves sleep quality, yet people with untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may engage in less physical activity (PA) due to fatigue and daytime sleepiness. We examined changes in PA and sleep quality before and after treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in OSA patients. In this prospective longitudinal study, persons with a primary diagnosis of OSA were enrolled at a community-based hospital in New York City. At 3 time intervals pre- and post-CPAP (3-8 months), we measured sleep quality using validated questionnaires, perceived PA using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), and actual PA using pedometer steps per day. We sought to investigate how CPAP use and changes in sleep quality impacted the number of steps taken, as recorded in pedometer steps. In total, 62 patients were enrolled in the study from March 2012 to July 2014. In all, patients averaged 53 years of age, and 26 patients (42%) were female. Among all participants, 86% of persons had moderate to severe sleep apnea (AHI ≥15). Approximately 73% of participants were compliant with CPAP use. Poor sleep quality correlated with lower actual PA (P = .004) at baseline. At 3 and 7 months, there was significant improvement in sleep quality (Δ -2.63 ± 3.4 and Δ -3.5 ± 3.8; P improvement in sleep quality and actual PA.

  11. Continuous positive airway pressure with helmet versus mask in infants with bronchiolitis: an RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidini, Giovanna; Piastra, Marco; Marchesi, Tiziana; De Luca, Daniele; Napolitano, Luisa; Salvo, Ida; Wolfler, Andrea; Pelosi, Paolo; Damasco, Mirco; Conti, Giorgio; Calderini, Edoardo

    2015-04-01

    Noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is usually applied with a nasal or facial mask to treat mild acute respiratory failure (ARF) in infants. A pediatric helmet has now been introduced in clinical practice to deliver CPAP. This study compared treatment failure rates during CPAP delivered by helmet or facial mask in infants with respiratory syncytial virus-induced ARF. In this multicenter randomized controlled trial, 30 infants with respiratory syncytial virus-induced ARF were randomized to receive CPAP by helmet (n = 17) or facial mask (n = 13). The primary endpoint was treatment failure rate (defined as due to intolerance or need for intubation). Secondary outcomes were CPAP application time, number of patients requiring sedation, and complications with each interface. Compared with the facial mask, CPAP by helmet had a lower treatment failure rate due to intolerance (3/17 [17%] vs 7/13 [54%], P = .009), and fewer infants required sedation (6/17 [35%] vs 13/13 [100%], P = .023); the intubation rates were similar. In successfully treated patients, CPAP resulted in better gas exchange and breathing pattern with both interfaces. No major complications due to the interfaces occurred, but CPAP by mask had higher rates of cutaneous sores and leaks. These findings confirm that CPAP delivered by helmet is better tolerated than CPAP delivered by facial mask and requires less sedation. In addition, it is safe to use and free from adverse events, even in a prolonged clinical setting. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Primate body temperature and sleep responses to lower body positive pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, D. M.; Fuller, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Cephalic fluid shifts, induced by lower body positive pressure (LBPP) are known to influence various physiological systems (i.e., cardiovascular and renal). In earlier experiments, an apparent change in the arousal state of primates in such LBPP conditions was observed. This study was designed to examine the effects of LBPP on arousal state and body temperature level which is normally correlated with sleep. Chair-restrained male squirrel monkeys were exposed to 40 mmHg LBPP for 90-100 minutes between the daytime hours of 13:00-15:00. Each monkey was placed in a specially modified restraint chair to which they were highly trained. Deep body temperature (DBT) was collected from 10 animals. Sleep parameters were obtained from six animals chronically implanted for sleep recording. A video camera was used to observe each animal's apparent state of arousal. LBPP resulted in an approximate 0.9 C decrease in DBT. During video observation, some animals appeared drowsy during LBPP; however, sleep recording revealed no significant changes in the state of arousal. Thus, LBPP is capable of inducing a mild hyperthermia. Further, the mechanisms underlying the observed lowering of body temperature appear to be independent of arousal state.

  13. [Clinical research of using optimal compliance to determine positive end-expiratory pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Feng, Quan-sheng; Lian, Fu; Shao, Xin-hua; Li, Zhi-bo; Wang, Zhi-yong; Li, Jun

    2012-07-01

    To observe the availability and security of optimal compliance strategy to titrate the optimal positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), compared with quasi-static pressure-volume curve (P-V curve) traced by low-flow method. Fourteen patients received mechanical ventilation with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) of Tianjin Third Central Hospital from November 2009 to December 2010 were divided into two groups(n = 7). The quasi-static P-V curve method and the optimal compliance titration were used to set the optimal PEEP respectively, repeated 3 times in a row. The optimal PEEP and the consistency of repeated experiments were compared between groups. The hemodynamic parameters, oxygenation index (OI), lung compliance (C), cytokines and pulmonary surfactant-associated protein D (SP-D) concentration in plasma before and 2, 4, and 6 hours after the experiment were observed in each group. (1) There were no significant differences in gender, age and severity of disease between two groups. (2)The optimal PEEP [cm H(2)O, 1 cm H(2)O=0.098 kPa] had no significant difference between quasi-static P-V curve method group and the optimal compliance titration group (11.53 ± 2.07 vs. 10.57 ± 0.87, P>0.05). The consistency of repeated experiments in quasi-static P-V curve method group was poor, the slope of the quasi-static P-V curve in repeated experiments showed downward tendency. The optimal PEEP was increasing in each measure. There was significant difference between the first and the third time (10.00 ± 1.58 vs. 12.80 ± 1.92, P vs. 93.71 ± 5.38, temperature: 38.05 ± 0.73 vs. 36.99 ± 1.02, IL-6: 144.84 ± 23.89 vs. 94.73 ± 5.91, TNF-α: 151.46 ± 46.00 vs. 89.86 ± 13.13, SP-D: 33.65 ± 8.66 vs. 16.63 ± 5.61, MAP: 85.47 ± 9.24 vs. 102.43 ± 8.38, CCI: 3.00 ± 0.48 vs. 3.81 ± 0.81, OI: 62.00 ± 21.45 vs. 103.40 ± 37.27, C: 32.10 ± 2.92 vs. 49.57 ± 7.18, all P safety and usability.

  14. Choking under the pressure of a positive stereotype: gender identification and self-consciousness moderate men's math test performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagler, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Choking under pressure occurs when an individual underperforms due to situational pressure. The present study examined whether being the target of a positive social stereotype regarding math ability causes choking among men. Gender identification and self-consciousness were hypothesized to moderate the effect of math-gender stereotypes on men's math test performance. Men high in self-consciousness but low in gender identification significantly underperformed when exposed to gender-relevant test instructions. No significant effects were found under a gender-irrelevant condition. These findings are discussed in the contexts of research on stereotype threat, stereotype lift, and choking under pressure.

  15. Understanding the use of continuous oscillating positive airway pressure (bubble CPAP) to treat neonatal respiratory disease: an engineering approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manilal-Reddy, P I; Al-Jumaily, A M

    2009-01-01

    A continuous oscillatory positive airway pressure with pressure oscillations incidental to the mean airway pressure (bubble CPAP) is defined as a modified form of traditional continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) delivery where pressure oscillations in addition to CPAP are administered to neonates with lung diseases. The mechanical effect of the pressure oscillations on lung performance is investigated by formulating mathematical models of a typical bubble CPAP device and a simple representation of a neonatal respiratory system. Preliminary results of the respiratory system's mechanical response suggest that bubble CPAP may improve lung performance by minimizing the respiratory system impedance and that the resonant frequency of the respiratory system may be a controlling factor. Additional steps in terms of clinical trials and a more complex respiratory system model are required to gain a deeper insight into the mechanical receptiveness of the respiratory system to pressure oscillations. However, the current results are promising in that they offer a deeper insight into the trends of variations that can be expected in future extended models as well as the model philosophies that need to be adopted to produce results that are compatible with experimental verification.

  16. Response of Preterm Infants to 2 Noninvasive Ventilatory Support Systems: Nasal CPAP and Nasal Intermittent Positive-Pressure Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Carmen Salum Thomé; Leonardi, Kamila Maia; Melo, Ana Paula Carvalho Freire; Zaia, José Eduardo; Brunherotti, Marisa Afonso Andrade

    2015-12-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in preterm infants is currently applied using intermittent positive pressure (2 positive-pressure levels) or in a conventional manner (one pressure level). However, there are no studies in the literature comparing the chances of failure of these NIV methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of failure of 2 noninvasive ventilatory support systems in preterm neonates over a period of 48 h. A randomized, prospective, clinical study was conducted on 80 newborns (gestational age CPAP and 40 infants with nasal intermittent positive-pressure ventilation (NIPPV). The occurrence of apnea, progression of respiratory distress, nose bleeding, and agitation was defined as ventilation failure. The need for intubation and re-intubation after failure was also observed. There were no significant differences in birth characteristics between groups. Ventilatory support failure was observed in 25 (62.5%) newborns treated with nasal CPAP and in 12 (30%) newborns treated with NIPPV, indicating an association between NIV failure and the absence of intermittent positive pressure (odds ratio [OR] 1.22, P CPAP failure. After failure, 25% (OR 0.33) of the newborns receiving nasal CPAP and 12.5% (OR 0.14) receiving NIPPV required invasive mechanical ventilation. Ventilatory support failure was significantly more frequent when nasal CPAP was used. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  17. Effectiveness of prehospital continuous positive airway pressure in the management of acute pulmonary edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubble, Michael W; Richards, Michael E; Jarvis, Roger; Millikan, Tori; Young, Dwayne

    2006-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) with standard pharmacologic treatment in the management of prehospital acute pulmonary edema. Using a nonrandomized control group design, all consecutive patients presenting to two participating emergency medical services (EMS) systems with a field impression of acute pulmonary edema between July 1, 2004, and June 30, 2005, were included in the study. The control EMS system patients received standard treatment with oxygen, nitrates, furosemide, morphine, and, if indicated, endotracheal intubation. The intervention EMS system patients received CPAP via face mask at 10 cm H2O in addition to standard therapy. Ninety-five patients received standard therapy, and 120 patients received CPAP and standard therapy. Intubation was required in 8.9% of CPAP-treated patients compared with 25.3% in the control group (p = 0.003), and mortality was lower in the CPAP group than in the control group (5.4% vs. 23.2%; p = 0.000). When compared with the control group, the CPAP group had more improvement in respiratory rate (-4.55 vs. -1.81; p = 0.001), pulse rate (-4.77 vs. 0.82; p = 0.013), and dyspnea score (-2.11 vs. -1.36; p = 0.008). Using logistic regression to control for potential confounders, patients receiving standard treatment were more likely to be intubated (odds ratio, 4.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.64 to 9.95) and more likely to die (odds ratio, 7.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.96 to 28.54) than those receiving standard therapy and CPAP. The prehospital use of CPAP is feasible, may avert the need for endotracheal intubation, and may reduce short-term mortality.

  18. Home continuous positive airway pressure for cardiopulmonary indications in infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Iede, Montaha; Kumaran, Radhagini; Waters, Karen

    2018-04-30

    A number of reports exist regarding the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to manage obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in children, which we term 'conventional CPAP'. In contrast, there are few reports of home CPAP use for other indications, which we have grouped under the term 'cardiopulmonary'. The aims of this study were to (1) document cardiopulmonary indications for CPAP use in a cohort of infants and children, and (2) evaluate its effectiveness in this group. Hospital records were reviewed for 645 patients who were commenced on long-term CPAP over a 10-year period at a single-tertiary hospital (Children's Hospital at Westmead). This study evaluated the group where the primary indication for CPAP was not OSA ('cardiopulmonary CPAP'). Data evaluated included: demographics, diagnoses, indications for CPAP, hours of use (compliance) and sleep study results at baseline and on CPAP. Of 645 children, 148 (23%) used home CPAP for cardiopulmonary indications; and 130 (87.8%) of these were included. For this group, mean age at CPAP initiation was 18.6 ± 33.6 months (range one week to 16.8 years). Cardiopulmonary indications for CPAP use included: primary airway diseases 65 (50%), chronic lung diseases 33 (25.4%), congenital heart disease (CHD) 20 (15.4%), and both CHD and airway malacia 12 (9.2%). All sleep study variables improved on CPAP relative to the diagnostic sleep study (p 4 h/night). Interstitial lung diseases and other cardiorespiratory disorders, often of congenital origin, can be effectively treated with home CPAP whether they are associated with OSA or not. Sleep studies demonstrated improved gas exchange, sleep and reduced work of breathing with CPAP use. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Natural history of treatment-emergent central sleep apnea on positive airway pressure: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Gaurav; Riaz, Muhammad; Chang, Edward T; Camacho, Macario

    2018-01-01

    Treatment-emergent central sleep apnea (TECSA) is observed in some patients when they are treated with positive airway pressure (PAP) after significant resolution of the preexisting obstructive events in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The objective of this study was to systematically review the literature for studies describing the natural history of TECSA. PubMed, Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochran Library databases were searched through June 29, 2017. Five studies were identified that discussed the natural history of TECSA. TECSA developed in 3.5%-19.8% of PAP-treated patients. Treatment-persistent central sleep apnea (TPCSA), representing protracted periods of PAP therapy-related central apneas, was noted in 14.3%-46.2% of patients with TECSA. Delayed-TECSA (D-TECSA) represents an anomalous TECSA entity appearing weeks to months after initial PAP therapy. D-TECSA was observed in 0.7%-4.2% of OSA patients undergoing PAP treatment (after at least 1 month). In patients with TECSA, a higher apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and central apnea index at their baseline study or a higher residual AHI at their titration study may be associated with an increased likelihood of conversion to TPCSA. Overall, TECSA developed in 3.5%-19.8% of PAP-treated patients with OSA. The vast majority will experience complete resolution of central apneas over a few weeks to months. Unfortunately, about a third of patients with TECSA may continue to exhibit persistence of central sleep apnea on reevaluation. A small proportion may experience D-TECSA after few weeks to several months of initial exposure to PAP therapy.

  20. Plasma apelin levels in obstructive sleep apnea and the effect of continuous positive airway pressure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, David E; Buchanan, Fiona; Gibson, Rosemary; Douthwaite, Jennie A; Wood, Susan A; Woltersdorf, Wolfram W; Catterall, James R; Lightman, Stafford L

    2009-10-01

    Apelin is a peptide hormone with cardiovascular and glucose homeostasis properties, and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is complicated by cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities. Plasma apelin has not been previously assessed in OSA. We investigated the response of plasma apelin to a 2-h 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and the effect of 3 months compliant continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in 15 obese males with newly diagnosed OSA. Plasma apelin and serum cortisol were recorded 10 minutely, while serum insulin and glucose were measured 30 minutely. Ten subjects had plasma apelin measured at intervals across a 24-h period to investigate for circadian variation in apelin levels, and this was repeated following 3 months compliant CPAP therapy. Fasting (0.342+/-0.038 vs 0.288+/-0.024 ng/ml, P=0.04), 30 min (0.399+/-0.035 vs 0.312+/-0.036 ng/ml, P=0.007) and 120 min (0.402+/-0.030 vs 0.259+/-0.024 ng/ml, P<0.001) apelin levels were reduced following CPAP. The area under curve for apelin OGTT response was lower post-CPAP (44.1+/-3.3 vs 35.8+/-2.3 ng/ml per min, P<0.001). Mean OGTT apelin levels showed a significant treatment effect (P=0.006) and a time effect (P<0.001), and the effect of time was different pre- versus post-CPAP (P=0.005). No significant variability in apelin levels existed across the 24-h period at diagnosis. Lower levels were evident overnight following treatment (P=0.004). Improvements in insulin and glucose parameters and reduced cortisol levels were found post-CPAP. In summary, untreated OSA was associated with elevated plasma apelin levels, altered apelin secretory dynamics in response to oral glucose and lack of an apparent circadian variability, which was restored following CPAP.

  1. Aerosol Drug Delivery During Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation: Effects of Intersubject Variability and Excipient Enhanced Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walenga, Ross L; Longest, P Worth; Kaviratna, Anubhav; Hindle, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Nebulized aerosol drug delivery during the administration of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) is commonly implemented. While studies have shown improved patient outcomes for this therapeutic approach, aerosol delivery efficiency is reported to be low with high variability in lung-deposited dose. Excipient enhanced growth (EEG) aerosol delivery is a newly proposed technique that may improve drug delivery efficiency and reduce intersubject aerosol delivery variability when coupled with NPPV. A combined approach using in vitro experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to characterize aerosol delivery efficiency during NPPV in two new nasal cavity models that include face mask interfaces. Mesh nebulizer and in-line dry powder inhaler (DPI) sources of conventional and EEG aerosols were both considered. Based on validated steady-state CFD predictions, EEG aerosol delivery improved lung penetration fraction (PF) values by factors ranging from 1.3 to 6.4 compared with conventional-sized aerosols. Furthermore, intersubject variability in lung PF was very high for conventional aerosol sizes (relative differences between subjects in the range of 54.5%-134.3%) and was reduced by an order of magnitude with the EEG approach (relative differences between subjects in the range of 5.5%-17.4%). Realistic in vitro experiments of cyclic NPPV demonstrated similar trends in lung delivery to those observed with the steady-state simulations, but with lower lung delivery efficiencies. Reaching the lung delivery efficiencies reported with the steady-state simulations of 80%-90% will require synchronization of aerosol administration during inspiration and reducing the size of the EEG aerosol delivery unit. The EEG approach enabled high-efficiency lung delivery of aerosols administered during NPPV and reduced intersubject aerosol delivery variability by an order of magnitude. Use of an in-line DPI device that connects to the NPPV mask appears to be a

  2. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Adherence In Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea & Symptomatic BPH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metta, Ramesh V V S; Zaka, Awais; Lee, Vincent C; Mador, M Jeffery

    2017-04-01

    Purpose To determine the short-term and long-term adherence rates with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in sleep apnea patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) compared to matched controls. Methods A case-control retrospective analysis was performed in a veterans affairs hospital. All symptomatic patients with BPH (n = 107) ever started on CPAP therapy between 2006 and 2012 were compared with controls matched for severity of sleep apnea (AHI). Adherence measures were obtained at the third and twelfth month visits. The cases included symptomatic BPH patients on active medical therapy. Diuretic use among cases and controls, and severity of nocturia among the cases were also analyzed. Results The mean AHI among cases and controls was 35.6 ± 27.3 and 35.5 ± 31 (p = 0.96). The population was male and predominantly Caucasian. There was no statistically significant difference in percent days CPAP device use ≥4 h. between symptomatic BPH patients and controls at 3-month (51.6 ± 38 vs. 47.2 ± 36; p = 0.43) and 1-year (64 ± 40.5 vs. 64.7 ± 31.3; p = 0.90) visits. The use of diuretics in the cases and controls, and the severity of nocturia in the cases did not influence adherence with CPAP therapy. Conclusions BPH or diuretic use did not affect adherence with CPAP therapy in obstructive sleep apnea. Severity of nocturia did not have any influence on adherence among the cases. BPH, regardless of the severity of nocturia, and diuretic use does not influence CPAP adherence in patients with OSA.

  3. Position-dependency of Fuel Pin Homogenization in a Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Woong; Kim, Yonghee [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technolgy, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    By considering the multi-physics effects more comprehensively, it is possible to acquire precise local parameters which can result in a more accurate core design and safety assessment. A conventional approach of the multi-physics neutronics calculation for the pressurized water reactor (PWR) is to apply nodal methods. Since the nodal methods are basically based on the use of assembly-wise homogenized parameters, additional pin power reconstruction processes are necessary to obtain local power information. In the past, pin-by-pin core calculation was impractical due to the limited computational hardware capability. With the rapid advancement of computer technology, it is now perhaps quite practical to perform the direct pin-by-pin core calculation. As such, fully heterogeneous transport solvers based on both stochastic and deterministic methods have been developed for the acquisition of exact local parameters. However, the 3-D transport reactor analysis is still challenging because of the very high computational requirement. Position-dependency of the fuel pin homogenized cross sections in a small PWR core has been quantified via comparison of infinite FA and 2-D whole core calculations with the use of high-fidelity MC simulations. It is found that the pin environmental affect is especially obvious in FAs bordering the baffle reflector regions. It is also noted that the downscattering cross section is rather sensitive to the spectrum changes of the pins. It is expected that the pinwise homogenized cross sections need to be corrected somehow for accurate pin-by-pin core calculations in the peripheral region of the reactor core.

  4. Financial Analysis of an Intensive Pediatric Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, E Brooks; Fieldston, Evan S; Xanthopoulos, Melissa S; Beck, Suzanne E; Menello, Mary Kate; Matthews, Edward; Marcus, Carole L

    2017-02-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is effective in treating obstructive sleep apnea in children, but adherence to therapy is low. Our center created an intensive program that aimed to improve adherence. Our objective was to estimate the program's efficacy, cost, revenue and break-even point in a generalizable manner relative to a standard approach. The intensive program included device consignment, behavioral psychology counseling, and follow-up telephone calls. Economic modeling considered the costs, revenue and break-even point. Costs were derived from national salary reports and the Pediatric Health Information System. The 2015 Medicare reimbursement schedule provided revenue estimates. Prior to the intensive CPAP program, only 67.6% of 244 patients initially prescribed CPAP appeared for follow-up visits and only 38.1% had titration polysomnograms. In contrast, 81.4% of 275 patients in the intensive program appeared for follow-up visits (p break-even points would need to be 1.29-2.08 times higher to cover the costs. An intensive CPAP program leads to substantially higher follow-up and CPAP titration rates, but costs are higher. While affordable at our institution due to the local payer mix and revenue, Medicare reimbursement levels would not cover estimated costs. This study highlights the need for enhanced funding for pediatric CPAP programs, due to the special needs of this population and the long-term health risks of suboptimally treated obstructive sleep apnea. © Sleep Research Society 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Overspeed HIIT in Lower-Body Positive Pressure Treadmill Improves Running Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojanovic, Boris; Shultz, Rebecca; Feihl, Francois; Matheson, Gordon

    2015-12-01

    Optimal high-intensity interval training (HIIT) regimens for running performance are unknown, although most protocols result in some benefit to key performance factors (running economy (RE), anaerobic threshold (AT), or maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max)). Lower-body positive pressure (LBPP) treadmills offer the unique possibility to partially unload runners and reach supramaximal speeds. We studied the use of LBPP to test an overspeed HIIT protocol in trained runners. Eleven trained runners (35 ± 8 yr, VO2max, 55.7 ± 6.4 mL·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) were randomized to an LBPP (n = 6) or a regular treadmill (CON, n = 5), eight sessions over 4 wk of HIIT program. Four to five intervals were run at 100% of velocity at VO2max (vVO2max) during 60% of time to exhaustion at vVO2max (Tlim) with a 1:1 work:recovery ratio. Performance outcomes were 2-mile track time trial, VO2max, vVO2max, vAT, Tlim, and RE. LBPP sessions were carried out at 90% body weight. Group-time effects were present for vVO2max (CON, 17.5 vs. 18.3, P = 0.03; LBPP, 19.7 vs. 22.3 km·h⁻¹; P HIIT protocol at 100% vVO2max improves field performance, vVO2max, VO2max and submaximal HR in trained runners. Improvements are similar if intervals are run on a regular treadmill or at higher speeds on a LPBB treadmill with 10% body weight reduction. LBPP could provide an alternative for taxing HIIT sessions.

  6. The protracted demise of medical technology. The case of intermittent positive pressure breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, S Q; Farley, D E

    1992-08-01

    In this study, the effects of hospital, staff, and patient characteristics on the rates of use and abandonment of an outmoded medical technology, intermittent positive pressure breathing (IPPB) are analyzed. The study focuses specifically on the use of IPPB to treat inpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a national sample of more than 500 community hospitals from 1980 to 1987. Cross-sectionally, hospitals with shorter case-mix-adjusted lengths of stay, private nonprofit or investor-owned hospitals, and hospitals located outside of the north central United States were more likely to abandon IPPB by 1980. Teaching status, location, ownership, volume, and source of payment all appeared to affect rates of IPPB use in 1980. The longitudinal analysis examines both the probability a hospital abandoned IPPB and declines in rates of IPPB use over the study period, conditioned on the availability of IPPB in 1980. The results show that changes in the characteristics of hospitals, patients, and physicians all help to explain variations in the abandonment of IPPB. These findings contrast with previous studies of technological change, which find hospital size to be the most important variable. Size is important in explaining the rate of use in 1980, but it has no effect on the rate of decline in use or abandonment after 1980. In general, the analysis demonstrates that a combination of factors, economic incentives as well as information, contribute to the abandonment of outmoded medical technologies. Given the surprisingly long time periods required for this process to occur, the analysis underscores the need to strengthen financial incentives that encourage appropriate medical decisions and to disseminate information about the efficacy of specific procedures more widely and effectively.

  7. Continuous positive airway pressure improves gait control in severe obstructive sleep apnoea: A prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Baillieul

    Full Text Available Severe obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA can lead to neurocognitive alterations, including gait impairments. The beneficial effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP on improving excessive daytime sleepiness and daily functioning have been documented. However, a demonstration of CPAP treatment efficacy on gait control is still lacking. This study aims to test the hypothesis that CPAP improves gait control in severe OSA patients.In this prospective controlled study, twelve severe OSA patients (age = 57.2±8.9 years, body mass index = 27.4±3.1 kg·m-2, apnoea-hypopnoea index = 46.3±11.7 events·h-1 and 10 healthy matched subjects were included. Overground gait parameters were recorded at spontaneous speed and stride time variability, a clinical marker of gait control, was calculated. To assess the role of executive functions in gait and postural control, a dual-task paradigm was applied using a Stroop test as secondary cognitive task. All assessments were performed before and after 8 weeks of CPAP treatment.Before CPAP treatment, OSA patients had significantly larger stride time variability (3.1±1.1% vs 2.1±0.5% and lower cognitive performances under dual task compared to controls. After CPAP treatment, stride time variability was significantly improved and no longer different compared to controls. Cognitive performance under dual task also improved after CPAP treatment.Eight weeks of CPAP treatment improves gait control of severe OSA patients, suggesting morphological and functional cerebral improvements. Our data provide a rationale for further mechanistic studies and the use of gait as a biomarker of OSA brain consequences.

  8. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (n-CPAP) does not change cardiac output in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Barbara; Fritz, Michael; Mann, Christian; Simma, Burkhard

    2008-02-01

    Our objective was to study how invasive mechanical ventilation impairs cardiac output (CO) in children and adults. Although the application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is widely practiced in neonatal intensive care, its hemodynamic consequences have not yet been investigated. A prospective study to assess the hemodynamic effects was conducted in 21 preterm infants CPAP (n-CPAP). Gestational age was 28.0 +/- 1.9 weeks (mean +/- standard deviation); birthweight, 1000 +/- 238 g; age at study entry, 200 +/- 155 hours; total maintenance fluid, 154 +/- 42 mL/kg/day; and n-CPAP level, 4.4 +/- 0.9 cm H(2)O. None of the infants received inotropic support, and n-CPAP did not cause any significant difference in the parameters measured: stroke volume, 3.1 +/- 1.0 mL (with n-CPAP) versus 3.1 +/- 1.0 mL (without n-CPAP); cardiac output, 487 +/- 156 mL/minute versus 500 +/- 176 mL/minute; left ventricular diastolic diameter, 1.22 +/- 0.15 cm versus 1.24 +/- 0.14 cm; fractional shortening, 0.30 +/- 0.05% versus 0.29 +/- 0.04%; and aortic velocity-time integral, 8.64 +/- 1.80 cm versus 8.70 +/- 1.65 cm. The n-CPAP level did not influence CO; n-CPAP (up to 7 cm H (2)O) has no echocardiographically detectable hemodynamic effect in preterm infants. Our data imply there is no need to withhold n-CPAP support to prevent circulatory compromise in these infants.

  9. Quality Improvement of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Chou, An-Kuo; Chen, Yu-Lien; Chou, Hung-Chieh; Tsao, Po-Nien; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun

    2017-06-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) therapy is widely used in neonates, but the clinical practice varies. However, nursing practice differs among individuals, and an inappropriate application method may delay the respiratory therapy, influence the beneficial effect of NCPAP, and increase complications. We introduced a quality improvement project to expedite the application of NCPAP therapy and decrease the incidence of nasal trauma. A new strategy of mobile NCPAP cart with prepacked fixation kits and a written protocol was implemented from April 2006. All medical staff answered a questionnaire to assess their basic knowledge before and after intensive training. The records of the patients who were treated with NCPAP from October 2005 to November 2006 were reviewed. Fifty-nine medical staff were involved in the project, and their mean score for the questionnaire improved from 69.2 points to 98.3 points after training. From October 2005 to November 2006, 113 infants were recruited in total and 82 of them were admitted after the protocol was implemented. The NCPAP cart dramatically shortened the preparation time (from 520 seconds to 72 seconds) and the application time (from 468 seconds to 200 seconds). The use of the nursing protocol significantly decreased the incidence of nasal trauma in the study population (45.2% vs. 19.6%, p = 0.006), but not in infants with a birth weight of < 1000 g. Risk factors for nasal skin trauma included lower gestational age and birth weight, longer duration of NCPAP use, and lack of standardized nursing care. The mobile NCPAP cart with prepacked fixation kits is a practical way of expediting the initiation of NCPAP therapy. The written nursing protocol decreased the incidence of nasal trauma in infants, except for those with an extremely low birth weight. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation enhances the effects of aerobic training on cardiopulmonary function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Moriki

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of aerobic training under noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV on maximal oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text].Ten healthy young male volunteers participated in the study. Before the training, stroke volume (SV and cardiac output (CO were measured in all subjects under 0, 4, 8, and 12 cmH2O NPPV at rest. Then, the subjects exercised on a cycle ergometer at 60% of pre-training [Formula: see text] for 30 min daily for 5 consecutive days with/without NPPV. The 5-day exercise protocol was repeated after a three-week washout period without/with NPPV. The primary endpoint was changes in [Formula: see text]. The secondary endpoints were changes in SV, CO, maximum heart rate (HRmax, maximum respiratory rate (RRmax, maximum expiratory minute volume (VEmax and the percent change in plasma volume (PV.NPPV at 12 cmH2O significantly reduced SV and CO at rest. [Formula: see text] significantly increased after 5 days training with and without NPPV, but the magnitude of increase in [Formula: see text] after training under 12 cmH2O NPPV was significantly higher than after training without NPPV. VEmax significantly increased after training under NPPV, but not after training without NPPV. HRmax and RRmax did not change during training irrespective of NPPV. The percent change in PV was similar between training with and without NPPV. The 5-day training program with NPPV resulted in greater improvement in [Formula: see text] than without NPPV.Aerobic training under NPPV has add-on effects on [Formula: see text] and exercise-related health benefits in healthy young men.

  11. Continuous positive air pressure improves orthonasal olfactory function of patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walliczek-Dworschak, Ute; Cassel, Werner; Mittendorf, Luisa; Pellegrino, Robert; Koehler, Ulrich; Güldner, Christian; Dworschak, Philipp Otto Georg; Hildebrandt, Olaf; Daniel, Hanna; Günzel, Thomas; Teymoortash, Afshin; Hummel, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies have suggested that patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) might be affected by olfactory impairment. However, more evidence is needed on the effect that OSA has on the chemical senses (olfaction and gustatory) of these patients, and whether continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment might help to reverse possible impairment. A prospective study was conducted with 44 OSA patients (17 female and 27 male, mean age 54 ± 9.9 years) who were diagnosed via polysomnography and eligible for CPAP treatment. Orthonasal olfactory and gustatory function was measured with the extended Sniffin' Sticks test battery and "taste strips," respectively, before and after CPAP treatment. Baseline olfaction was decreased in OSA patients and after CPAP therapy olfactory scores (odor threshold-discrimination-identification score [TDI]: baseline 29.4 ± 4.11 after CPAP 32.3 ± 4.82; p = 0.001; odor threshold [THR]: baseline 5.28 ± 1.69 after CPAP 6.78 ± 2.61; p = 0.000; odor identification [ID]: baseline 12.9 ± 1.95 after CPAP 13.6 ± 1.33; p = 0.013) improved significantly. In contrast, neither baseline taste function in OSA patients nor gustatory function after treatment seemed to be affected. Orthonasal olfactory function in patients with OSA improves under CPAP therapy; however, gustatory function is not impaired in OSA patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. COMPARISON OF THE OCTANOL-AIR PARTITION COEFFICIENT AND LIQUID-PHASE VAPOR PRESSURE AS DESCRIPTORS FOR PARTICLE/GAS PARTITIONING USING LABORATORY AND FIELD DATA FOR PCBS AND PCNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The conventional Junge-Pankow adsorption model uses the sub-cooled liquid vapor pressure (pLo) as a correlation parameter for gas/particle interactions. An alternative is the octanol-air partition coefficient (Koa) absorption model. Log-log plots of the particle-gas partition c...

  13. Effects of Modes, Obesity, and Body Position on Non-invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation Success in the Intensive Care Unit: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türk, Murat; Aydoğdu, Müge; Gürsel, Gül

    2018-01-01

    Different outcomes and success rates of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) in patients with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure (AHRF) still pose a significant problem in intensive care units. Previous studies investigating different modes, body positioning, and obesity-associated hypoventilation in patients with chronic respiratory failure showed that these factors may affect ventilator mechanics to achieve a better minute ventilation. This study tried to compare pressure support (BiPAP-S) and average volume targeted pressure support (AVAPS-S) modes in patients with acute or acute-on-chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure. In addition, short-term effects of body position and obesity within both modes were analyzed. We conducted a randomized controlled study in a 7-bed intensive care unit. The course of blood gas analysis and differences in ventilation variables were compared between BiPAP-S (n=33) and AVAPS-S (n=29), and between semi-recumbent and lateral positions in both modes. No difference was found in the length of hospital stay and the course of PaCO2, pH, and HCO3 levels between the modes. There was a mean reduction of 5.7±4.1 mmHg in the PaCO2 levels in the AVAPS-S mode, and 2.7±2.3 mmHg in the BiPAP-S mode per session (ppositioning had no notable effect in both modes. Although the decrease in the PaCO2 levels in the AVAPS-S mode per session was remarkably high, the course was similar in both modes. Furthermore, obesity and body positioning had no prominent effect on the PaCO2 response and ventilator mechanics. Post hoc power analysis showed that the sample size was not adequate to detect a significant difference between the modes.

  14. Device for positioning ultrasonic probes and/or television cameras on the outer surface of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipser, R.; Dose, G.F.

    1977-01-01

    The device makes possible periodical in-service inspections of welding seams and material of a reactor pressure vessel without local human presence. A 'support ring' encloses the pressure vessel in a horizontal plane with free space. It is vertically moved up and down in the space between pressure vessel and thermal shield by means of tackles. At a control desk placed in a protected area its movement is controlled and its vertical position is indicated. A 'rotating track' with its own drive is rotating remote-controlled on the 'support ring'. By a combination of the vertical with the rotating movement, an ultrasonic probe placed removably on the 'rotating hack', or a television camera will be brought to any position on the cylindrical circumference of the pressure vessel. Special devices extend the radius of action, in upward direction for inspecting the welding seams of the coolant nozzles, and in downward direction for the inspection of welds on the hemispherical bottom of the pressure vessel or on the outlet pipe nozzle placed there. The device remains installed during reactor operation, but is moved down to the lower horizontal surface of the thermal shield. Parts which are sensible to radiation like probes or television cameras and special devices will then be removed respectively mounted before beginning an inspection compaign. This position may be reached by the lower access in the biological shield and through an opening in the horizontal surface of the thermal shield. (HP) [de

  15. The influence of body position on cerebrospinal fluid pressure gradient and movement in cats with normal and impaired craniospinal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarica, Marijan; Radoš, Milan; Erceg, Gorislav; Petošić, Antonio; Jurjević, Ivana; Orešković, Darko

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a severe therapeutic problem, as there is insufficient knowledge about the physiology of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. In this paper a new CSF pressure regulation hypothesis is proposed. According to this hypothesis, the CSF pressure depends on the laws of fluid mechanics and on the anatomical characteristics inside the cranial and spinal space, and not, as is today generally believed, on CSF secretion, circulation and absorption. The volume and pressure changes in the newly developed CSF model, which by its anatomical dimensions and basic biophysical features imitates the craniospinal system in cats, are compared to those obtained on cats with and without the blockade of craniospinal communication in different body positions. During verticalization, a long-lasting occurrence of negative CSF pressure inside the cranium in animals with normal cranio-spinal communication was observed. CSF pressure gradients change depending on the body position, but those gradients do not enable unidirectional CSF circulation from the hypothetical site of secretion to the site of absorption in any of them. Thus, our results indicate the existence of new physiological/pathophysiological correlations between intracranial fluids, which opens up the possibility of new therapeutic approaches to intracranial hypertension.

  16. The influence of body position on cerebrospinal fluid pressure gradient and movement in cats with normal and impaired craniospinal communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijan Klarica

    Full Text Available Intracranial hypertension is a severe therapeutic problem, as there is insufficient knowledge about the physiology of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure. In this paper a new CSF pressure regulation hypothesis is proposed. According to this hypothesis, the CSF pressure depends on the laws of fluid mechanics and on the anatomical characteristics inside the cranial and spinal space, and not, as is today generally believed, on CSF secretion, circulation and absorption. The volume and pressure changes in the newly developed CSF model, which by its anatomical dimensions and basic biophysical features imitates the craniospinal system in cats, are compared to those obtained on cats with and without the blockade of craniospinal communication in different body positions. During verticalization, a long-lasting occurrence of negative CSF pressure inside the cranium in animals with normal cranio-spinal communication was observed. CSF pressure gradients change depending on the body position, but those gradients do not enable unidirectional CSF circulation from the hypothetical site of secretion to the site of absorption in any of them. Thus, our results indicate the existence of new physiological/pathophysiological correlations between intracranial fluids, which opens up the possibility of new therapeutic approaches to intracranial hypertension.

  17. A direct method for determining complete positive and negative capillary pressure curves for reservoir rock using the centrifuge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinler, E.A.; Baldwin, B.A. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1997-08-01

    A method is being developed for direct experimental determination of capillary pressure curves from saturation distributions produced during centrifuging fluids in a rock plug. A free water level is positioned along the length of the plugs to enable simultaneous determination of both positive and negative capillary pressures. Octadecane as the oil phase is solidified by temperature reduction while centrifuging to prevent fluid redistribution upon removal from the centrifuge. The water saturation is then measured via magnetic resonance imaging. The saturation profile within the plug and the calculation of pressures for each point of the saturation profile allows for a complete capillary pressure curve to be determined from one experiment. Centrifuging under oil with a free water level into a 100 percent water saturated plug results in the development of a primary drainage capillary pressure curve. Centrifuging similarly at an initial water saturation in the plug results in the development of an imbibition capillary pressure curve. Examples of these measurements are presented for Berea sandstone and chalk rocks.

  18. Gel pillow designed specifically for obstructive sleep apnea treatment with continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvaggio, Adriana; Lo Bue, Anna; Isidoro, Serena Iacono; Romano, Salvatore; Marrone, Oreste; Insalaco, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether the use of a gel pillow with side cutouts designed to accommodate a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask and reduce head temperature improves the efficacy of and adherence to auto-CPAP therapy. Twenty-three consecutive CPAP-naïve patients with obstructive sleep apnea were enrolled in the study. Patients were given an auto-CPAP machine with an appropriate CPAP mask and were instructed to use CPAP for 15 nights. They were instructed to sleep with their own pillow (the control pillow) from nights 1 to 5 and with either a foam pillow or a gel pillow, both of which had side cutouts, for 5 consecutive nights each, in random order. After night 15, auto-CPAP machine data were downloaded and patients rated their satisfaction with each pillow on a visual analog scale. Twenty-two patients completed the protocol. The pressures administered, residual apnea-hypopnea index, air leaks, and mean duration of CPAP use did not differ among the periods during which each pillow was used. Patients were significantly more satisfied with the gel pillow than with the control pillow and the foam pillow (p = 0.022 and p = 0.004, respectively), their level of satisfaction with the gel pillow correlating significantly with excessive daytime sleepiness (r2 = 0.19; p = 0.0443). Among obstructive sleep apnea patients treated with nasal CPAP, the use of a gel pillow with side cutouts appears to have no impact on treatment effectiveness. Nevertheless, such patients seem to prefer a gel pillow over other types of pillows. Determinar se o uso de um travesseiro de gel com recortes laterais para acomodar a máscara de continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP, pressão positiva contínua nas vias aéreas) e diminuir a temperatura em torno da cabeça melhora a eficácia do tratamento com auto-CPAP e a adesão dos pacientes ao tratamento. Foram incluídos no estudo 23 pacientes consecutivos com apneia obstrutiva do sono que nunca haviam recebido tratamento com CPAP. Os

  19. Improved oxygenation during standing performance of deep breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure after cardiac surgery: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Henrik; Faager, Gun; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2015-09-01

    Breathing exercises after cardiac surgery are often performed in a sitting position. It is unknown whether oxygenation would be better in the standing position. The aim of this study was to evaluate oxygenation and subjective breathing ability during sitting vs standing performance of deep breathing exercises on the second day after cardiac surgery. Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (n = 189) were randomized to sitting (controls) or standing. Both groups performed 3 × 10 deep breaths with a positive expiratory pressure device. Peripheral oxygen saturation was measured before, directly after, and 15 min after the intervention. Subjective breathing ability, blood pressure, heart rate, and pain were assessed. Oxygenation improved significantly in the standing group compared with controls directly after the breathing exercises (p < 0.001) and after 15 min rest (p = 0.027). The standing group reported better deep breathing ability compared with controls (p = 0.004). A slightly increased heart rate was found in the standing group (p = 0.047). After cardiac surgery, breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure, performed in a standing position, significantly improved oxygenation and subjective breathing ability compared with sitting performance. Performance of breathing exercises in the standing position is feasible and could be a valuable treatment for patients with postoperative hypoxaemia.

  20. Positive end-expiratory pressure improves survival in a rodent model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation using high-dose epinephrine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCaul, Conán

    2009-10-01

    Multiple interventions have been tested in models of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to optimize drug use, chest compressions, and ventilation. None has studied the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on outcome. We hypothesized that because PEEP can reverse pulmonary atelectasis, lower pulmonary vascular resistance, and potentially improve cardiac output, its use during CPR would increase survival.

  1. Muscle activation and estimated relative joint force during running with weight support on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente Rona; Hovgaard-Hansen, Line; Cappelen, Katrine Louise

    2016-01-01

    Running on a lower-body positive pressure (LBPP) treadmill allows effects of weight support on leg muscle activation to be assessed systematically, and has the potential to facilitate rehabilitation and prevent overloading. The aim was to study the effect of running with weight support on leg mus...

  2. Treatment of presumed acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema in an ambulance system by nurses using Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieperink, Willem; Weelink, E. E. M.; van der Horst, I. C. C.; de Vos, R.; Jaarsma, T.; Aarts, L. P. H. J.; Zijlstra, F.; Nijsten, M. W. N.

    Background: Early initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) applied by face mask benefits patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema (ACPE). The simple disposable Boussignac CPAP (BCPAP) has been used in ambulances by physicians. In the Netherlands, ambulances are manned by

  3. Lung recruitment during mechanical positive pressure ventilation in the PICU: what can be learned from the literature?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halbertsma, F.J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2005-01-01

    A literature review was conducted to assess the evidence for recruitment manoeuvres used in conventional mechanical positive pressure ventilation. A total of 61 studies on recruitment manoeuvres were identified: 13 experimental, 31 ICU, 6 PICU and 12 anaesthesia studies. Recruitment appears to be a

  4. Simulated driving in obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea : effects of oral appliances and continuous positive airway pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, Aarnoud; Stegenga, Boudewijn; Bakker, Marije; Brouwer, Wiebo H.; de Bont, Lambert G. M.; Wijkstra, Peter J.; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.

    Impaired simulated driving performance has been demonstrated in obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) patients. Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) generally improves simulated driving performance, the effects of oral-appliance (OA) therapy are unknown. The aims of this

  5. Nebulized hypertonic saline via positive expiratory pressure versus via jet nebulizer in patients with severe cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, Oisin J

    2011-06-01

    Nebulized hypertonic saline is a highly effective therapy for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), yet 10% of patients are intolerant of hypertonic saline administered via jet nebulizer. Positive expiratory pressure (PEP) nebulizers splint open the airways and offers a more controlled rate of nebulization.

  6. Work of breathing using different interfaces in spontaneous positive pressure ventilation: helmet, face-mask, and endotracheal tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Shinya; Otaki, Kei; Yashima, Nozomi; Kurota, Misato; Matsushita, Sachiko; Kumasaka, Airi; Kurihara, Hutaba; Kawamae, Kaneyuki

    2016-08-01

    Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) using a helmet is expected to cause inspiratory trigger delay due to the large collapsible and compliant chamber. We compared the work of breathing (WOB) of NPPV using a helmet or a full face-mask with that of invasive ventilation by tracheal intubation. We used a lung model capable of simulating spontaneous breathing (LUNGOO; Air Water Inc., Japan). LUNGOO was set at compliance (C) = 50 mL/cmH2O and resistance (R) = 5 cmH2O/L/s for normal lung simulation, C = 20 mL/cmH2O and R = 5 cmH2O/L/s for restrictive lung, and C = 50 mL/cmH2O and R = 20 cmH2O/L/s for obstructive lung. Muscle pressure was fixed at 25 cmH2O and respiratory rate at 20 bpm. Pressure support ventilation and continuous positive airway pressure were performed with each interface placed on a dummy head made of reinforced plastic that was connected to LUNGOO. We tested the inspiratory WOB difference between the interfaces with various combinations of ventilator settings (positive end-expiratory pressure 5 cmH2O; pressure support 0, 5, and 10 cmH2O). In the normal lung and restrictive lung models, WOB decreased more with the face-mask than the helmet, especially when accompanied by the level of pressure support. In the obstructive lung model, WOB with the helmet decreased compared with the other two interfaces. In the mixed lung model, there were no significant differences in WOB between the three interfaces. NPPV using a helmet is more effective than the other interfaces for WOB in obstructive lung disease.

  7. Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, BR

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) evidentiary framework, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding treatment strategies for patients with COPD. This project emerged from a request by the Health System Strategy Division of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that MAS provide them with an evidentiary platform on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of COPD interventions. After an initial review of health technology assessments and systematic reviews of COPD literature, and consultation with experts, MAS identified the following topics for analysis: vaccinations (influenza and pneumococcal), smoking cessation, multidisciplinary care, pulmonary rehabilitation, long-term oxygen therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure, hospital-at-home for acute exacerbations of COPD, and telehealth (including telemonitoring and telephone support). Evidence-based analyses were prepared for each of these topics. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed where appropriate. In addition, a review of the qualitative literature on patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on living and dying with COPD was conducted, as were reviews of the qualitative literature on each of the technologies included in these analyses. The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mega-Analysis series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: http://www.hqontario.ca/en/mas/mas_ohtas_mn.html. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Evidentiary Framework Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Community-Based Multidisciplinary Care for Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive

  8. Effect of Pneumoperitoneum and Lateral Position on Oropharyngeal Seal Pressures of Proseal LMA in Laparoscopic Urological Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Preeti; Patkar, Geeta A; Ourasang, Anil Kumar; Tendolkar, Bharati A

    2017-02-01

    A sustained and effective oropharyngeal sealing with supraglottic airway is required to maintain the ventilation during laparoscopic surgery. Previous studies have observed the Oropharyngeal Seal Pressure (OSP) for Proseal Laryngeal Mask Airway (PLMA) after pneumoperitoneum in supine and trendelenburg position, where PLMA was found to be an effective airway device. This study was conducted with ProSeal LMA, for laparoscopic Urologic procedures done in lateral position. To measure OSP in supine and lateral position and to observe the effect of pneumoperitoneum in lateral position on OSP. Secondary objectives were to assess adequacy of ventilation and incidence of adverse events. A total number of 25 patients of American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) physical status II and I were enrolled. After induction of anaesthesia using a standardized protocol, PLMA was inserted. Ryle's tube was inserted through drain tube. The position of PLMA was confirmed with ease of insertion of Ryle's tube and fibreoptic grading of vocal cords. Patients were then put in lateral position. The OSP was measured in supine position. This value was baseline comparison for OSP in lateral position and that after pneumoperitoneum. We assessed the efficacy of PLMA for ventilation, after carboperitoneum in lateral position (peak airway pressure, End Tidal Carbon dioxide (EtCO 2 ), SPO 2 ). Incidence of adverse effects (displacement of device, gastric insufflation, regurgitation, coughing, sore throat, blood on device, trauma) was also noted. The OSP was above Peak Airway Pressure (PAP) in supine (22.1±5.4 and 15.4±4.49cm of H 2 O) and lateral position (22.6±5.3 and 16.1±4.6). After pneumoperitoneum, which was in lateral position, there was statistically significant (p-value <0.05) increase in both PAP (19.96±4.015) and OSP (24.32±4.98, p-value 0.03). There was no intraoperative displacement of PLMA. There was no event of suboptimal oxygenation. EtCO 2 was always within normal limits

  9. Continuous positive airway pressure reduces blood pressure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea; a systematic review and meta-analysis with 1000 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Andressa S O; Kerkhoff, Alessandra C; Coronel, Christian C; Plentz, Rodrigo D M; Sbruzzi, Graciele

    2014-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may lead to the development of hypertension and therapy with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) can promote reduction in blood pressure. The objective of this study is to review systematically the effects of CPAP on blood pressure in patients with OSA. The search was conducted in the following databases, from their beginning until February 2013: MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL, Lilacs and PEDro. In addition, a manual search was performed on references of published studies. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that used CPAP compared with placebo CPAP or subtherapeutic CPAP for treatment of patients with OSA and that evaluated office SBP and DBP and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure were selected. Sixteen RCTs were included among 3409 publications, totaling 1166 patients. The use of CPAP resulted in reductions in office SBP [-3.20  mmHg; 95% confidence interval (CI) -4.67 to -1.72] and DBP (-2.87  mmHg; 95% CI -5.18 to -0.55); in night-time SBP (-4.92  mmHg; 95% CI -8.70 to -1.14); in mean 24-h blood pressure (-3.56  mmHg; 95% CI -6.79 to -0.33), mean night-time blood pressure (-2.56  mmHg; 95% CI -4.43 to -0.68) and 24-h DBP (-3.46  mmHg; 95% CI -6.75 to -0.17). However, no significant change was observed in daytime SBP (-0.74  mmHg; 95% CI -3.90 to 2.41) and daytime DBP (-1.86  mmHg; 95% CI -4.55 to 0.83). Treatment with CPAP promoted significantly but small reductions in blood pressure in individuals with OSA. Further studies should be performed to evaluate the effects of long-term CPAP and the impact on cardiovascular risk.

  10. Finite element modeling for predicting the contact pressure between a foam mattress and the human body in a supine position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wookjin; Won, Byeong Hee; Cho, Seong Wook

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we generated finite element (FE) models to predict the contact pressure between a foam mattress and the human body in a supine position. Twenty-year-old males were used for three-dimensional scanning to produce the FE human models, which was composed of skin and muscle tissue. A linear elastic isotropic material model was used for the skin, and the Mooney-Rivlin model was used for the muscle tissue because it can effectively represent the nonlinear behavior of muscle. The contact pressure between the human model and the mattress was predicted by numerical simulation. The human models were validated by comparing the body pressure distribution obtained from the same human subject when he was lying on two different mattress types. The experimental results showed that the slope of the lower part of the mattress caused a decrease in the contact pressure at the heels, and the effect of bone structure was most pronounced in the scapula. After inserting a simple structure to function as the scapula, the contact pressure predicted by the FE human models was consistent with the experimental body pressure distribution for all body parts. These results suggest that the models proposed in this paper will be useful to researchers and designers of products related to the prevention of pressure ulcers.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of Out-of-Hospital Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry; Perkins, Gavin D

    2015-05-01

    We determine the cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compared with standard care for adults presenting to emergency medical services with acute respiratory failure. We developed an economic model using a United Kingdom health care system perspective to compare the costs and health outcomes of out-of-hospital CPAP to standard care (inhospital noninvasive ventilation) when applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. The model assigned each patient a probability of intubation or death, depending on the patient's characteristics and whether he or she had out-of-hospital CPAP or standard care. The patients who survived accrued lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and health care costs according to their age and sex. Costs were accrued through intervention and hospital treatment costs, which depended on patient outcomes. All results were converted into US dollars, using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development purchasing power parities rates. Out-of-hospital CPAP was more effective than standard care but was also more expensive, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £20,514 per QALY ($29,720/QALY) and a 49.5% probability of being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold. The probability of out-of-hospital CPAP's being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold depended on the incidence of eligible patients and varied from 35.4% when a low estimate of incidence was used to 93.8% with a high estimate. Variation in the incidence of eligible patients also had a marked influence on the expected value of sample information for a future randomized trial. The cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital CPAP is uncertain. The incidence of patients eligible for out-of-hospital CPAP appears to be the key determinant of cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  12. Aerosol Drug Delivery During Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation: Effects of Intersubject Variability and Excipient Enhanced Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walenga, Ross L.; Kaviratna, Anubhav; Hindle, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Nebulized aerosol drug delivery during the administration of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) is commonly implemented. While studies have shown improved patient outcomes for this therapeutic approach, aerosol delivery efficiency is reported to be low with high variability in lung-deposited dose. Excipient enhanced growth (EEG) aerosol delivery is a newly proposed technique that may improve drug delivery efficiency and reduce intersubject aerosol delivery variability when coupled with NPPV. Materials and Methods: A combined approach using in vitro experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to characterize aerosol delivery efficiency during NPPV in two new nasal cavity models that include face mask interfaces. Mesh nebulizer and in-line dry powder inhaler (DPI) sources of conventional and EEG aerosols were both considered. Results: Based on validated steady-state CFD predictions, EEG aerosol delivery improved lung penetration fraction (PF) values by factors ranging from 1.3 to 6.4 compared with conventional-sized aerosols. Furthermore, intersubject variability in lung PF was very high for conventional aerosol sizes (relative differences between subjects in the range of 54.5%–134.3%) and was reduced by an order of magnitude with the EEG approach (relative differences between subjects in the range of 5.5%–17.4%). Realistic in vitro experiments of cyclic NPPV demonstrated similar trends in lung delivery to those observed with the steady-state simulations, but with lower lung delivery efficiencies. Reaching the lung delivery efficiencies reported with the steady-state simulations of 80%–90% will require synchronization of aerosol administration during inspiration and reducing the size of the EEG aerosol delivery unit. Conclusions: The EEG approach enabled high-efficiency lung delivery of aerosols administered during NPPV and reduced intersubject aerosol delivery variability by an order of magnitude. Use of an in

  13. Acute Effects of Positive Airway Pressure on Functional Mitral Regurgitation in Patients with Systolic Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Kato

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute effects of positive airway pressure (PAP [including continuous PAP (CPAP and adaptive servo-ventilation, an advanced form of bi-level PAP] on functional mitral regurgitation (fMR in patients with heart failure (HF with left ventricular (LV systolic dysfunction remain unclear. Thus, whether PAP therapy reduces fMR in such patients with HF was investigated.Methods and Results: Twenty patients with HF and LV systolic dysfunction defined as LV ejection fraction (LVEF <50% (14 men; mean LVEF, 35.0 ± 11.5% with fMR underwent echocardiography during 10-min CPAP (4 and 8 cm H2O and adaptive servo-ventilation. For fMR assessment, MR jet area fraction, defined as the ratio of MR jet on color Doppler to the left atrial area, was measured. The forward stroke volume (SV index (fSVI was calculated from the time-velocity integral, cross-sectional area of the aortic annulus, and body surface area. fMR significantly reduced on CPAP at 8 cm H2O (0.30 ± 0.12 and adaptive servo-ventilation (0.29 ± 0.12, compared with the baseline phase (0.37 ± 0.12 and CPAP at 4 cm H2O (0.34 ± 0.12 (P < 0.001. The fSVI did not change in any of the PAP sessions (P = 0.888. However, significant differences in fSVI responses to PAP were found between sexes (P for interaction, 0.006, with a significant reduction in fSVI in women (P = 0.041 and between patients with baseline fSVI ≥ and < the median value (27.8 ml/m2, P for interaction, 0.018, with a significant fSVI reduction in patients with high baseline fSVI (P = 0.028. In addition, significant differences were found in fSVI responses to PAP between patients with LV end-systolic volume (LVESV index ≥ and < the median value (62.0 ml/m2, P for interaction, 0.034, with a significant fSVI increase in patients with a high LVESV index (P = 0.023.Conclusion: In patients with HF, LV systolic dysfunction, and fMR, PAP can alleviate fMR without any overall changes in forward SV. However, MR alleviation due to PAP

  14. Added sugars in the diet are positively associated with diastolic blood pressure and triglycerides in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Kenneth P; Cardel, Michelle I; Bohan Brown, Michelle M; Fernández, José R

    2014-07-01

    Hypertension and dyslipidemia have traditionally been associated with dietary sodium and fat intakes, respectively; however, they have recently been associated with the consumption of added sugars in adults and older adolescents, but there is no clear indication of how early in the life span this association manifests. This study explored the cross-sectional association between added sugar (sugars not naturally occurring in foods) consumption in children, blood pressure (BP), and fasting blood lipids [triglycerides and total, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol]. BP, blood lipids, and dietary intakes were obtained in a multiethnic pediatric sample aged 7-12 y of 122 European American (EA), 106 African American (AA), 84 Hispanic American (HA), and 8 mixed-race children participating in the Admixture Mapping of Ethnic and Racial Insulin Complex Outcomes (AMERICO) study-a cross-sectional study conducted in the Birmingham, AL, metro area investigating the effects of racial-ethnic differences on metabolic and health outcomes. Multiple regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relations of added sugars and sodium intakes with BP and of added sugars and dietary fat intakes with blood lipids. Models were controlled for sex, race-ethnicity, socioeconomic status, Tanner pubertal status, percentage body fat, physical activity, and total energy intake. Added sugars were positively associated with diastolic BP (P = 0.0462, β = 0.0206) and serum triglycerides (P = 0.0206, β = 0.1090). Sodium was not significantly associated with either measure of BP nor was dietary fat with blood lipids. HA children had higher triglycerides but lower added sugar consumption than did either the AA or EA children. The AA participants had higher BP and HDL but lower triglycerides than did either the EA or HA children. These data suggest that increased consumption of added sugars may be associated with adverse cardiovascular health factors in children

  15. Improvement in headaches with continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karin G; Ziemba, Alexis M; Garb, Jane L

    2013-02-01

    We aimed to identify clinical features in patients with severe headaches that predicted obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and determine clinical and sleep study characteristics that predicted headache improvement with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Many patients with headaches complain of sleep symptoms and have OSA. There is often improvement of headaches with CPAP treatment. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients referred to adult neurology clinic for headaches and sent for polysomnography between January 2008 and December 2009. Follow-up ranged from 18 to 42 months. Eighty-two headache patients (70 females, 12 males) were studied. Mean age was 45±13 years (females 45±13, males 43±11) and mean body mass index was 32±9. Headache types included 17% chronic migraine without aura, 22% episodic migraine without aura, 32% migraine with aura, 21% tension-type headache, 6% chronic post-traumatic headache, 11% medication overuse headache, and 7% other types. All patients were receiving standard treatment for their headaches by their neurologist. Fifty-two patients (63%) had OSA. Increasing age, female gender, and chronic migraine without aura were predictive of OSA. Of the patients with OSA, 33 (63%) used CPAP and 27 (82%) were adherent to CPAP. Headache improvement was reported by 40 patients (49%) due to either standard medical therapy or CPAP. Patients with OSA who were CPAP adherent (21/27) were more likely to have improvement in headaches than patients intolerant of CPAP (2/6), those that did not try CPAP (8/19), and those who did not have OSA (16/30) (P=.045). Of the 33 patients who used CPAP, 13 reported improvement in headaches specifically due to CPAP therapy and 10 additional patients noted benefit in sleep symptoms. The presence of witnessed apneas (P=.045) and male gender (P=.021) predicted improvement in headaches due to CPAP. Headache patients should be evaluated for the presence of OSA. Treating OSA improves headaches in some

  16. Effects of a short course of eszopiclone on continuous positive airway pressure adherence: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettieri, Christopher J; Shah, Anita A; Holley, Aaron B; Kelly, William F; Chang, Audrey S; Roop, Stuart A

    2009-11-17

    Adherence to short-term continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may predict long-term use. Unfortunately, initial CPAP intolerance may lead to poor adherence or abandonment of therapy. To determine whether a short course of eszopiclone at the onset of therapy improves long-term CPAP adherence more than placebo in adults with obstructive sleep apnea. Parallel randomized, placebo-controlled trial from March 2007 to December 2008. Randomization, maintained and concealed centrally by pharmacy personnel, was computer-generated using fixed blocks of 10. Referring physicians, investigators, and patients were blinded to the treatment assignment until after the final data were collected. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00612157). Academic sleep disorder center. 160 adults (mean age, 45.7 years [SD, 7.3]; mean apnea-hypopnea index, 36.9 events/h [SD, 23]) with newly diagnosed obstructive sleep apnea initiating CPAP. Eszopiclone, 3 mg (n = 76), or matching placebo (n = 78) for the first 14 nights of CPAP. Use of CPAP was measured weekly for 24 weeks. Adherence to CPAP (primary outcome) and the rate of CPAP discontinuation and improvements in symptoms (secondary outcomes) were compared. Follow-up at 1, 3, and 6 months was completed by 150, 136, and 120 patients, respectively. Patients in the eszopiclone group used CPAP for 20.8% more nights (95% CI, 7.2% to 34.4%; P = 0.003), 1.3 more hours per night for all nights (CI, 0.4 to 2.2 hours; P = 0.005), and 1.1 more hours per night of CPAP use (CI, 0.2 to 2.1 hours; P = 0.019). The hazard ratio for discontinuation of CPAP was 1.90 (CI, 1.1 to 3.4; P = 0.033) times higher in the placebo group. Side effects were reported in 7.1% of patients and did not differ between groups. Patients had severe obstructive sleep apnea treated at a specialized sleep center with frequent follow-up; results may not be generalizable to different settings. Patients' tolerance to CPAP and their reasons for discontinuation were not assessed

  17. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in a ventilator-induced injury mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Cagle

    Full Text Available Positive-pressure mechanical ventilation is an essential therapeutic intervention, yet it causes the clinical syndrome known as ventilator-induced lung injury. Various lung protective mechanical ventilation strategies have attempted to reduce or prevent ventilator-induced lung injury but few modalities have proven effective. A model that isolates the contribution of mechanical ventilation on the development of acute lung injury is needed to better understand biologic mechanisms that lead to ventilator-induced lung injury.To evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in reducing lung injury in a ventilator-induced lung injury murine model in short- and longer-term ventilation.5-12 week-old female BALB/c mice (n = 85 were anesthetized, placed on mechanical ventilation for either 2 hrs or 4 hrs with either low tidal volume (8 ml/kg or high tidal volume (15 ml/kg with or without positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers.Alteration of the alveolar-capillary barrier was noted at 2 hrs of high tidal volume ventilation. Standardized histology scores, influx of bronchoalveolar lavage albumin, proinflammatory cytokines, and absolute neutrophils were significantly higher in the high-tidal volume ventilation group at 4 hours of ventilation. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure resulted in significantly decreased standardized histology scores and bronchoalveolar absolute neutrophil counts at low- and high-tidal volume ventilation, respectively. Recruitment maneuvers were essential to maintain pulmonary compliance at both 2 and 4 hrs of ventilation.Signs of ventilator-induced lung injury are evident soon after high tidal volume ventilation (as early as 2 hours and lung injury worsens with longer-term ventilation (4 hrs. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers are protective against worsening VILI across all time points. Dynamic compliance can be used guide

  18. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in a ventilator-induced injury mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzi, Lisa M.; Linderholm, Angela L.; Last, Jerold A.; Adams, Jason Y.; Harper, Richart W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Positive-pressure mechanical ventilation is an essential therapeutic intervention, yet it causes the clinical syndrome known as ventilator-induced lung injury. Various lung protective mechanical ventilation strategies have attempted to reduce or prevent ventilator-induced lung injury but few modalities have proven effective. A model that isolates the contribution of mechanical ventilation on the development of acute lung injury is needed to better understand biologic mechanisms that lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Objectives To evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in reducing lung injury in a ventilator-induced lung injury murine model in short- and longer-term ventilation. Methods 5–12 week-old female BALB/c mice (n = 85) were anesthetized, placed on mechanical ventilation for either 2 hrs or 4 hrs with either low tidal volume (8 ml/kg) or high tidal volume (15 ml/kg) with or without positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers. Results Alteration of the alveolar-capillary barrier was noted at 2 hrs of high tidal volume ventilation. Standardized histology scores, influx of bronchoalveolar lavage albumin, proinflammatory cytokines, and absolute neutrophils were significantly higher in the high-tidal volume ventilation group at 4 hours of ventilation. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure resulted in significantly decreased standardized histology scores and bronchoalveolar absolute neutrophil counts at low- and high-tidal volume ventilation, respectively. Recruitment maneuvers were essential to maintain pulmonary compliance at both 2 and 4 hrs of ventilation. Conclusions Signs of ventilator-induced lung injury are evident soon after high tidal volume ventilation (as early as 2 hours) and lung injury worsens with longer-term ventilation (4 hrs). Application of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers are protective against worsening VILI across all time points

  19. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in a ventilator-induced injury mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagle, Laura A; Franzi, Lisa M; Linderholm, Angela L; Last, Jerold A; Adams, Jason Y; Harper, Richart W; Kenyon, Nicholas J

    2017-01-01

    Positive-pressure mechanical ventilation is an essential therapeutic intervention, yet it causes the clinical syndrome known as ventilator-induced lung injury. Various lung protective mechanical ventilation strategies have attempted to reduce or prevent ventilator-induced lung injury but few modalities have proven effective. A model that isolates the contribution of mechanical ventilation on the development of acute lung injury is needed to better understand biologic mechanisms that lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. To evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers in reducing lung injury in a ventilator-induced lung injury murine model in short- and longer-term ventilation. 5-12 week-old female BALB/c mice (n = 85) were anesthetized, placed on mechanical ventilation for either 2 hrs or 4 hrs with either low tidal volume (8 ml/kg) or high tidal volume (15 ml/kg) with or without positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers. Alteration of the alveolar-capillary barrier was noted at 2 hrs of high tidal volume ventilation. Standardized histology scores, influx of bronchoalveolar lavage albumin, proinflammatory cytokines, and absolute neutrophils were significantly higher in the high-tidal volume ventilation group at 4 hours of ventilation. Application of positive end-expiratory pressure resulted in significantly decreased standardized histology scores and bronchoalveolar absolute neutrophil counts at low- and high-tidal volume ventilation, respectively. Recruitment maneuvers were essential to maintain pulmonary compliance at both 2 and 4 hrs of ventilation. Signs of ventilator-induced lung injury are evident soon after high tidal volume ventilation (as early as 2 hours) and lung injury worsens with longer-term ventilation (4 hrs). Application of positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers are protective against worsening VILI across all time points. Dynamic compliance can be used guide the frequency

  20. Utility of formulas predicting the optimal nasal continuous positive airway pressure in a Greek population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiza, Sophia E; Bouloukaki, Izolde; Mermigkis, Charalampos; Panagou, Panagiotis; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Moniaki, Violeta; Tzortzaki, Eleni; Siafakas, Nikolaos M

    2011-09-01

    There have been reports that optimal CPAP pressure can be predicted from a previously derived formula, with the Hoffstein formula being the most accurate and accepted in the literature so far. However, the validation of this predictive model has not been applied in different clinical settings. Our aim was to compare both the Hoffstein prediction formula and a newly derived formula to the CPAP pressure setting assessed during a formal CPAP titration study. We prospectively studied 1,111 patients (871 males/240 females) with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) undergoing a CPAP titration procedure. In this large population sample, we tested the Hoffstein formula, utilizing body mass index (BMI), neck circumference and apnea/hypopnea index (AHI), and we compared it with our new formula that included not only AHI and BMI but also smoking history and gender adjustment. We found that using the Hoffstein prediction formula, successful prediction (predicted CPAP pressure within ±2 cm H(2)O compared to the finally assessed optimum CPAP pressure during titration) was accomplished in 873 patients (79%), with significant correlation between CPAP predicted pressure (CPAPpred(1)) and the optimum CPAP pressure (CPAPopt) [r = 0.364, p history and gender adjustment, successful prediction was accomplished in 1,057 patients (95%), with significant correlation between CPAP predicted pressure (CPAPpred(2)) and the CPAPopt (r = 0.392, p titration. It may also be possible to shorten CPAP titration and perhaps in selected cases to combine it with the initial diagnostic study.

  1. Methodology and technology for peripheral and central blood pressure and blood pressure variability measurement: current status and future directions - Position statement of the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on blood pressure monitoring and cardiovascular variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou, George S; Parati, Gianfranco; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Achimastos, Apostolos; Andreadis, Emanouel; Asmar, Roland; Avolio, Alberto; Benetos, Athanase; Bilo, Grzegorz; Boubouchairopoulou, Nadia; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Castiglioni, Paolo; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Dolan, Eamon; Head, Geoffrey; Imai, Yutaka; Kario, Kazuomi; Kollias, Anastasios; Kotsis, Vasilis; Manios, Efstathios; McManus, Richard; Mengden, Thomas; Mihailidou, Anastasia; Myers, Martin; Niiranen, Teemu; Ochoa, Juan Eugenio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Omboni, Stefano; Padfield, Paul; Palatini, Paolo; Papaioannou, Theodore; Protogerou, Athanasios; Redon, Josep; Verdecchia, Paolo; Wang, Jiguang; Zanchetti, Alberto; Mancia, Giuseppe; O'Brien, Eoin

    2016-09-01

    Office blood pressure measurement has been the basis for hypertension evaluation for almost a century. However, the evaluation of blood pressure out of the office using ambulatory or self-home monitoring is now strongly recommended for the accurate diagnosis in many, if not all, cases with suspected hypertension. Moreover, there is evidence that the variability of blood pressure might offer prognostic information that is independent of the average blood pressure level. Recently, advancement in technology has provided noninvasive evaluation of central (aortic) blood pressure, which might have attributes that are additive to the conventional brachial blood pressure measurement. This position statement, developed by international experts, deals with key research and practical issues in regard to peripheral blood pressure measurement (office, home, and ambulatory), blood pressure variability, and central blood pressure measurement. The objective is to present current achievements, identify gaps in knowledge and issues concerning clinical application, and present relevant research questions and directions to investigators and manufacturers for future research and development (primary goal).

  2. Determination and modelling of osmotic coefficients and vapour pressures of binary systems 1- and 2-propanol with CnMimNTf2 ionic liquids (n = 2, 3, and 4) at T = 323.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvar, Noelia; Gomez, Elena; Dominguez, Angeles; Macedo, Eugenia A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Osmotic coefficients of 1- and 2-propanol with C n MimNTf 2 (n = 2, 3, and 4) are determined. → Experimental data were correlated with extended Pitzer model of Archer and MNRTL. → Mean molal activity coefficients and excess Gibbs free energies were calculated. → Effect of the anion is studied comparing these results with literature. - Abstract: The osmotic and activity coefficients and vapour pressures of binary mixtures containing 1-propanol, or 2-propanol and imidazolium-based ionic liquids with bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide as anion (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, C 2 MimNTf 2 , 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, C 3 MimNTf 2 , and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, C 4 MimNTf 2 ) were determined at T = 323.15 K using the vapour pressure osmometry technique. The experimental osmotic coefficients were correlated using the extended Pitzer model modified by Archer and the MNRTL model, obtaining standard deviations lower than 0.033 and 0.064, respectively. The mean molal activity coefficients and the excess Gibbs free energy for the mixtures studied were calculated from the parameters of the extended Pitzer model modified by Archer. Besides the effect of the alkyl-chain of the cation, the effect of the anion can be assessed comparing the experimental results with those previously obtained for imidazolium ionic liquids with sulphate anions.

  3. The Change of the Seebeck Coefficient Due to Neutron Irradiation and Thermal Fatigue of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel and its Application to the Monitoring of Material Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niffenegger, M.; Reichlin, K.; Kalkhof, D.

    2002-05-01

    The monitoring of material degradation, that might be caused by neutron irradiation and thermal fatigue, is an important topic in lifetime extension of nuclear power plants. We therefore investigated the application of the Seebeck effect for determining material degradation of common reactor pressure vessel steel. The Seebeck coefficient (SC) of several irradiated Charpy specimens made from Japanese JRQ-steel were measured. The specimens suffered a fluence from 0 up to 4.5 x 10 19 neutrons per cm 2 with energies higher than 1 MeV. The measured changes of the SC within this range were about 500 nV, increasing continuously in the range under investigation. Some indications of saturation appeared at fluencies larger than 4.55 x 10 19 neutrons per cm 2 . We obtained a linear dependency between the SC and the temperature shift ΔT 41 of the Charpy-Energy- Temperature curve which is widely used to characterize material embrittlement. Similar measurements were performed on specimens made from the widely used austenitic steel X6CrNiTi18-10 (according to DIN 1.4541) that were fatigued by applying a cyclic strain amplitude of 0.28%. For this kind of fatigue the observed change of SC was somewhat smaller than for the irradiated specimens. Further investigations were made to quantify the size of the gage volume in which the thermoelectric power is generated. It appeared that the information gathered from a Thermo Electric Power (TEP) measurement is very local. To overcome this problem we propose a novel TEP-method using a Thermoelectric Scanning Microscope (TSM). We finally conclude that the change of the SC has a potential for monitoring of material degradation due to neutron irradiation and thermal fatigue, but it has to be taken into account that several influencing parameters could contribute to the TEP in either an additional or extinguishing manner. A disadvantage of the method is the requirement of a clean surface without any oxide layer. A part of this disadvantage can

  4. Nasal bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in preterm infants ≤32 weeks: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Zhi-Hui; Li, Wen-Bin; Liu, Wei; Cai, Bao-Huan; Wang, Jing; Yang, Min; Li, Wei; Chang, Li-Wen

    2016-05-01

    To investigate whether Bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP), compared with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), is a more effective therapeutic strategy in preterm infants ≤32 weeks. All inborn infants between 26(+1) and 32(+6) weeks' gestation, admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU ) of Tongji Medical Hospital between 1 January, 2010 and 31 December, 2011 (the 2010-2011 cohort or CPAP cohort) and between 1 January, 2012 and 31 December, 2013 (the 2012-2013 cohort or BiPAP cohort), were retrospectively identified. The primary outcome was intubation in infants CPAP were subsequently intubated (P CPAP, reduced the need for intubation within the first 72 h of age. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  5. Symptoms of insomnia among patients with obstructive sleep apnea before and after two years of positive airway pressure treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsdóttir, Erla; Janson, Christer; Sigurdsson, Jón F; Gehrman, Philip; Perlis, Michael; Juliusson, Sigurdur; Arnardottir, Erna S; Kuna, Samuel T; Pack, Allan I; Gislason, Thorarinn; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndis

    2013-12-01

    To assess the changes of insomnia symptoms among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) from starting treatment with positive airway pressure (PAP) to a 2-y follow-up. Longitudinal cohort study. Landspitali--The National University Hospital of Iceland. There were 705 adults with OSA who were assessed prior to and 2 y after starting PAP treatment. PAP treatment for OSA. All patients underwent a medical examination along with a type 3 sleep study and answered questionnaires on health and sleep before and 2 y after starting PAP treatment. The change in prevalence of insomnia symptoms by subtype was assessed by questionnaire and compared between individuals who were using or not using PAP at follow-up. Symptoms of middle insomnia were most common at baseline and improved significantly among patients using PAP (from 59.4% to 30.7%, P insomnia tended to persist regardless of PAP treatment, and symptoms of late insomnia were more likely to improve among patients not using PAP. Patients with symptoms of initial and late insomnia at baseline were less likely to adhere to PAP (odds ratio [OR] 0.56, P = 0.007, and OR 0.53, P insomnia. Symptoms of initial and late insomnia, however, tended to persist regardless of positive airway pressure treatment and had a negative effect on adherence. Targeted treatment for insomnia may be beneficial for patients with obstructive sleep apnea comorbid with insomnia and has the potential to positively affect adherence to positive airway pressure.

  6. Control rod position fault diagnosis and its software realization of pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Zhengke; Shao Dinghong

    2004-11-01

    PLC software is adopted in the Rod Position Monitoring System of QS2NPS. By this software, the position of control rods can be monitored in real time, the abnormal phenomena can be identified immediately, the correctness and timeliness of fault diagnosis are improved remarkably. the identification and recordance of rod position fault, the performance validation of measure channel are realized also. The function and effect of this software are introduced. (authors)

  7. The impact of arm position and pulse pressure on the validation of a wrist-cuff blood pressure measurement device in a high risk population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Khoshdel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ali Reza Khoshdel1,2, Shane Carney2, Alastair Gillies21Faculty of Medicine, Aja University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran; 2John Hunter Hospital, Faculty of Health, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NS W, AustraliaAbstract: Despite the increasing popularity of blood pressure (BP wrist monitors for self-BP measurement at home, device validation and the effect of arm position remains an issue. This study focused on the validation of the Omron HEM-609 wrist BP device, including an evaluation of the impact of arm position and pulse pressure on BP measurement validation. Fifty patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease were selected (age 65 ± 10 years. Each patient had two measurements with a mercury sphygmomanometer and three measurements with the wrist BP device (wrist at the heart level while the horizontal arm supported [HORIZONTAL], hand supported on the opposite shoulder [SHOULDER], and elbow placed on a desk [DESK], in random order. The achieved systolic BP (SBP and diastolic BP (DBP wrist-cuff readings were compared to the mercury device and the frequencies of the readings within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg of the gold standard were computed and compared with the British Hypertension Society (BHS and Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI protocols. The results showed while SBP readings with HORIZONTAL and SHOULDER positions were significantly different from the mercury device (mean difference = 7.1 and 13.3 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05, the DESK position created the closest reading to mercury (mean difference = 3.8, P > 0.1. Approximately 71% of SBP readings with the DESK position were within ±10 mmHg, whereas it was 62.5% and 34% for HORIZONTAL and SHOULDER positions, respectively. Wrist DBP attained category D with BHS criteria with all three arm positions. Bland–Altman plots illustrated that the wrist monitor systematically underestimated SBP and DBP values. However a reading adjustment of 5 and 10 mm

  8. High frequency jet ventilation and intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Effect of cerebral blood flow in patients after open heart surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittet, J.F.; Forster, A.; Suter, P.M.

    1990-01-01

    Attenuation of ventilator-synchronous pressure fluctuations of intracranial pressure has been demonstrated during high frequency ventilation in animal and human studies, but the consequences of this effect on cerebral blood flow have not been investigated in man. We compared the effects of high frequency jet ventilation and intermittent positive pressure ventilation on CBF in 24 patients investigated three hours after completion of open-heart surgery. The patients were investigated during three consecutive periods with standard sedation (morphine, pancuronium): a. IPPV; b. HFJV; c. IPPV. Partial pressure of arterial CO 2 (PaCO 2 : 4.5-5.5 kPa) and rectal temperature (35.5 to 37.5 degree C) were maintained constant during the study. The CBF was measured by intravenous 133 Xe washout technique. The following variables were derived from the cerebral clearance of 133 Xe: the rapid compartment flow, the initial slope index, ie, a combination of the rapid and the slow compartment flows, and the ratio of fast compartment flow over total CBF (FF). Compared to IPPV, HFJV applied to result in the same mean airway pressure did not produce any change in pulmonary gas exchange, mean systemic arterial pressure, and cardiac index. Similarly, CBF was not significantly altered by HFJV. However, important variations of CBF values were observed in three patients, although the classic main determinants of CBF (PaCO 2 , cerebral perfusion pressure, Paw, temperature) remained unchanged. Our results suggest that in patients with normal systemic hemodynamics, the effects of HFJV and IPPV on CBF are comparable at identical levels of mean airway pressure

  9. European society of hypertension position paper on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Brien, Eoin; Parati, Gianfranco; Stergiou, George; Asmar, Roland; Beilin, Laurie; Bilo, Grzegorz; Clement, Denis; de la Sierra, Alejandro; de Leeuw, Peter; Dolan, Eamon; Fagard, Robert; Graves, John; Head, Geoffrey A.; Imai, Yutaka; Kario, Kazuomi; Lurbe, Empar; Mallion, Jean-Michel; Mancia, Giuseppe; Mengden, Thomas; Myers, Martin; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Omboni, Stefano; Palatini, Paolo; Redon, Josep; Ruilope, Luis M.; Shennan, Andrew; Staessen, Jan A.; vanMontfrans, Gert; Verdecchia, Paolo; Waeber, Bernard; Wang, Jiguang; Zanchetti, Alberto; Zhang, Yuqing

    2013-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is being used increasingly in both clinical practice and hypertension research. Although there are many guidelines that emphasize the indications for ABPM, there is no comprehensive guideline dealing with all aspects of the technique. It was agreed at a

  10. Effect of tubing condensate on non-invasive positive pressure ventilators tested under simulated clinical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Diana Elizabeth; Forman, Mark; Veale, Andrew G

    2011-09-01

    Water condensate in the humidifier tubing can affect bi-level ventilation by narrowing tube diameter and increasing airflow resistance. We investigated room temperature and tubing type as ways to reduce condensate and its effect on bi-level triggering and pressure delivery. In this bench study, the aim was to test the hypothesis that a relationship exists between room temperature and tubing condensate. Using a patient simulator, a Res-med bi-level device was set to 18/8 cm H(2)O and run for 6 h at room temperatures of 16°C, 18°C and 20°C. The built-in humidifier was set to a low, medium or high setting while using unheated or insulated tubing or replaced with a humidifier using heated tubing. Humidifier output, condensate, mask pressure and triggering delay of the bi-level were measured at 1 and 6 h using an infrared hygrometer, metric weights, Honeywell pressure transducer and TSI pneumotach. When humidity output exceeded 17.5 mg H(2)O/L, inspiratory pressure fell by 2-15 cm H(2)O and triggering was delayed by 0.2-0.9 s. Heating the tubing avoided any such ventilatory effect whereas warmer room temperatures or insulating the tubing were of marginal benefit. Users of bi-level ventilators need to be aware of this problem and its solution. Bi-level humidifier tubing may need to be heated to ensure correct humidification, pressure delivery and triggering.

  11. The measurement of intraocular pressure over positive soft contact lenses by rebound tonometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Zeri

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: Rebound tonometry over positive hydrogel CLs leads to a certain degree of IOP underestimation. This result did not change for the two positive lenses used in the experiment, despite their large difference in power and therefore in lens thickness. Optometrists should bear this in mind when measuring IOP with the rebound tonometer over plus power contact lenses.

  12. Intra-arterial blood pressure reading in intensive care unit patients in the lateral position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aries, M.J.H.; Aslan, A.; Elting, J.W.J.; Stewart, R.E.; Zijlstra, Jan G.; de Keyser, J.; Vroomen, P.C.A.J.

    Background. Routine lateral turning of patients has become an accepted standard of care to prevent complications of immobility. The haemodynamic and oxygenation effects for patients in both lateral positions (45 degrees) are still a matter of debate. We aimed to study the effect of these positions

  13. Self-broadening coefficients and positions of acetylene around 1.533 μm studied by high-resolution diode laser absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jingsong; Durry, Georges; Cousin, Julien; Joly, Lilian; Parvitte, Bertrand; Zeninari, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    The self-broadening coefficients of acetylene at room temperature have been measured for 10 lines in the P branch of the ν 1 +ν 3 (Σ u + )-0(Σ g + ) bands of 12 C 2 H 2 and 13 C 12 CH 2 near 1.533 μm, using a high resolution tunable diode laser spectrometer developed for the Martian space mission PHOBOS-Grunt. The collisional widths are obtained by fitting each recorded line with the Voigt profile as well as the Rautian profile accounting for the collisional Dicke narrowing effect. The standard Voigt model provides slightly smaller broadening coefficients than the Rautian model. Our data are thoroughly compared to the main atmospheric molecule database HITRAN and previous values in various bands of acetylene. Moreover, it is worth noting that a large number of new transitions not listed in the latest HITRAN08 were measured and identified for the first time.

  14. Two Methods for Turning and Positioning and the Effect on Pressure Ulcer Development: A Comparison Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated 2 methods for patient positioning on the development of pressure ulcers; specifically, standard of care (SOC) using pillows versus a patient positioning system (PPS). The study also compared turning effectiveness as well as nursing resources related to patient positioning and nursing injuries. A nonrandomized comparison design was used for the study. Sixty patients from a trauma/neurointensive care unit were included in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 teams per standard bed placement practices at the institution. Patients were identified for enrollment in the study if they were immobile and mechanically ventilated with anticipation of 3 days or more on mechanical ventilation. Patients were excluded if they had a preexisting pressure ulcer. Patients were evaluated daily for the presence of pressure ulcers. Data were collected on the number of personnel required to turn patients. Once completed, the angle of the turn was measured. The occupational health database was reviewed to determine nurse injuries. The final sample size was 59 (SOC = 29; PPS = 30); there were no statistical differences between groups for age (P = .10), body mass index (P = .65), gender (P = .43), Braden Scale score (P = .46), or mobility score (P = .10). There was a statistically significant difference in the number of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers between turning methods (6 in the SOC group vs 1 in the PPS group; P = .042). The number of nurses needed for the SOC method was significantly higher than the PPS (P ≤ 0.001). The average turn angle achieved using the PPS was 31.03°, while the average turn angle achieved using SOC was 22.39°. The difference in turn angle from initial turn to 1 hour after turning in the SOC group was statistically significant (P patients to prevent development of pressure ulcers.

  15. Low pulmonary artery flush perfusion pressure combined with high positive end-expiratory pressure reduces oedema formation in isolated porcine lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, Stefan; Schließmann, Stephan J; Wagner, Giskard; Goebel, Ulrich; Priebe, Hans-Joachim; Guttmann, Josef; Kirschbaum, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Flush perfusion of the pulmonary artery with organ protection solution is a standard procedure before lung explantation. However, rapid flush perfusion may cause pulmonary oedema which is deleterious in the lung transplantation setting. In this study we tested the hypotheses that high pulmonary perfusion pressure contributes to the development of pulmonary oedema and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) counteracts oedema formation. We expected oedema formation to increase weight and decrease compliance of the lungs on the basis of a decrease in alveolar volume as fluid replaces alveolar air spaces. The pulmonary artery of 28 isolated porcine lungs was perfused with a low-potassium dextrane solution at low (mean 27 mmHg) or high (mean 40 mmHg) pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) during mechanical ventilation at low (4 cmH 2 O) or high (8 cmH 2 O) PEEP, respectively. Following perfusion and storage, relative increases in lung weight were smaller (p < 0.05) during perfusion at low PAP (62 ± 32% and 42 ± 26%, respectively) compared to perfusion at high PAP (133 ± 54% and 87 ± 30%, respectively). Compared to all other PAP–PEEP combinations, increases in lung weight were smallest (44 ± 9% and 27 ± 12%, respectively), nonlinear intratidal lung compliance was largest (46% and 17% respectively, both p < 0.05) and lung histology showed least infiltration of mononuclear cells in the alveolar septa, and least alveolar destruction during the combination of low perfusion pressure and high PEEP. The findings suggest that oedema formation during pulmonary artery flush perfusion in isolated and ventilated lungs can be reduced by choosing low perfusion pressure and high PEEP. PAP–PEEP titration to minimize pulmonary oedema should be based on lung mechanics and PAP monitoring

  16. A Randomized Trial of Low-Flow Oxygen versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Preterm Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiring, Christian; Steensberg, Jesper; Bjerager, Mia

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) stabilizes the residual volume and may decrease the risk of 'atelectotrauma', potentially promoting lung development in neonates. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether replacing nCPAP by low-flow O2 by nasal cannula affects lung function...... the a/A pO2 ratio or weight gain negatively. Thus, prolonged nCPAP seems not to have a positive effect on lung function at 28 days of life and replacement by low-flow O2 could reduce the cost of equipment and increase the ease of nursing....

  17. Cardiac effects of positive pressure ventilation in ARDS assessed by NT-proBNP, Troponin T and Troponin I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Sadek Nassar

    2013-01-01

    Although the increase in cardiac markers are insignificant, yet they point to the potentially harmful role played by high PEEP, low PH and low PaO2/FiO2 ratio on the heart. Currently, no clinically relevant conclusion can be drawn apart from the recommendation to attempt to lower PEEP and shorten the duration of positive pressure ventilation, even in patients with structurally normal hearts.

  18. The Role of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in the Management of Respiratory Distress in Extremely Premature Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Sekar, Kris

    2006-01-01

    The use of mechanical ventilation for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in low birth weight infants may cause barotrauma, volutrauma, and chronic lung disease. Different continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) delivery systems exist, each with its own practical and clinical advantages and disadvantages. CPAP can be used as either a primary or an adjunctive respiratory support for RDS. Research demonstrates that CPAP decreases the incidence of respiratory failure after ex...

  19. Lower body positive pressure application with an antigravity suit in acute carotid occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthet, Karine; Lukaszewicz, Anne Claire; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Payen, Didier

    2010-04-01

    The challenge in acute stroke is still to reperfuse as early as possible the ischemic territory. Since fibrinolytic therapies have a limited window with potential risk of bleeding, having a nonpharmacologic mean to recruit vessels in area surrounding necrosis might be useful. We propose here to use antigravity suit inflated at "venous" pressure levels to shift blood towards thoracic and brain territories. We report two cases of spectacular clinical recovery after acute carotid occlusion.

  20. Lower Body Positive Pressure Application with an Antigravity Suit in Acute Carotid Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Berthet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The challenge in acute stroke is still to reperfuse as early as possible the ischemic territory. Since fibrinolytic therapies have a limited window with potential risk of bleeding, having a nonpharmacologic mean to recruit vessels in area surrounding necrosis might be useful. We propose here to use antigravity suit inflated at “venous” pressure levels to shift blood towards thoracic and brain territories. We report two cases of spectacular clinical recovery after acute carotid occlusion.

  1. The effect of positive and negative message framing on short term continuous positive airway pressure compliance in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengo, Martino F; Czaban, Marcin; Berry, Marc P; Nirmalan, Prajeshan; Brown, Richard; Birdseye, Adam; Woroszyl, Asia; Chapman, Julia; Kent, Brian D; Hart, Nicholas; Rossi, Gian Paolo; Steier, Joerg

    2018-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), the best available treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), requires long-term compliance to be effective. Behavioral interventions may be used to improve adherence to CPAP. We aimed to investigate whether positive or negative message framing impacts on CPAP compliance in patients with OSA, when compared to standard care. Consenting patients with confirmed OSA were randomly allocated to receive along with their CPAP either positively or negatively framed messages (Pos; Neg), or standard care (Con). Standardized motivational messages were read out to patients during an initial teaching session and through weekly telephone calls. Patients' compliance data were reviewed 2 and 6 weeks following CPAP initiation. We randomized 112 patients to groups that were matched for age, BMI, and OSA severity. The positively framed group (Pos) showed greater CPAP usage after 2 weeks (total use 53.7±31.4 hours) as compared to the negatively framed and the control group (35.6±27.4 and 40.8±33.5 hours, Pframed groups (Pos n=5; Neg n=8; Con n=11; Pframed messages can improve CPAP adherence in patients with OSA in the short-term; however, strategies for implementing its long-term use need to be developed.

  2. Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients in GaAs/Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}As concentric double quantum rings: Effects of hydrostatic pressure and aluminum concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baghramyan, H.M. [Department of Solid State Physics, Yerevan State University, Al. Manookian 1, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Barseghyan, M.G., E-mail: mbarsegh@ysu.am [Department of Solid State Physics, Yerevan State University, Al. Manookian 1, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Kirakosyan, A.A. [Department of Solid State Physics, Yerevan State University, Al. Manookian 1, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Restrepo, R.L. [Escuela de Ingenieria de Antioquia, AA 7516 Medellin (Colombia); Duque, C.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226 Medellin (Colombia)

    2013-02-15

    The linear and nonlinear intra-band optical absorption coefficients in GaAs/Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}As two-dimensional concentric double quantum rings are investigated. Taking into account the combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and aluminum concentration the energies of the ground (n=1,l=0) and the first excited state (n=2,l=1) have been found using the effective mass approximation and the transfer matrix formalism. The energies of these states and the corresponding threshold energy of the intra-band optical transitions are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure and aluminum concentration for different sizes of the structure. We also investigated the dependencies of the linear, nonlinear, and total optical absorption coefficients as functions of the incident photon energy for different values of hydrostatic pressure, aluminum concentration, sizes of the structure, and incident optical intensity. Its is found that the effects of the hydrostatic pressure and the aluminum concentration lead to a shifting of the resonant peaks of the intra-band optical spectrum. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Linear and nonlinear intra-band absorption in quantum rings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Threshold energy strongly depends on the hydrostatic pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Threshold energy strongly depends on the stoichiometry and sizes of structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical absorption is affected by the incident optical intensity.

  3. High positive end-expiratory pressure levels promote bacterial translocation in experimental pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lachmann, Robert A.; van Kaam, Anton H.; Haitsma, Jack J.; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2007-01-01

    A previous study in piglets with experimental pneumonia showed that reducing atelectasis by means of open lung ventilation attenuated bacterial translocation compared to conventional ventilation settings. This study examined the effect of open lung ventilation with higher than necessary positive

  4. Use of dynamic CT in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with comparison of positive and negative pressure ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helm, Emma; Babyn, Paul [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Talakoub, Omid; Alirezaie, Javad [Ryerson University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Toronto, ON (Canada); Grasso, Francesco; Engelberts, Doreen; Kavanagh, Brian P. [Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Toronto, Departments of Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine and the Program in Pulmonary and Experimental Medicine, Toronto (Canada)

    2009-01-15

    Negative pressure ventilation via an external device ('iron lung') has the potential to provide better oxygenation with reduced barotrauma in patients with ARDS. This study was designed to see if oxygenation differences between positive and negative ventilation could be explained by CT. Six anaesthetized rabbits had ARDS induced by repeated saline lavage. Rabbits were ventilated with positive pressure ventilation (PPV) and negative pressure ventilation (NPV) in turn. Dynamic CT images were acquired over the respiratory cycle. A computer-aided method was used to segment the lung and calculate the range of CT densities within each slice. Volumes of ventilated lung and atelectatic lung were measured over the respiratory cycle. NPV was associated with an increased percentage of ventilated lung and decreased percentage of atelectatic lung. The most significant differences in ventilation and atelectasis were seen at mid-inspiration and mid-expiration (ventilated lung NPV=61%, ventilated lung PPV=47%, p<0.001; atelectatic lung NPV=10%, atelectatic lung PPV 19%, p<0.001). Aeration differences were not significant at end-inspiration. Dynamic CT can show differences in lung aeration between positive and negative ventilation in ARDS. These differences would not be appreciated if only static breath-hold CT was used. (orig.)

  5. Novel application of lower body positive-pressure in the rehabilitation of an individual with multiple lower extremity fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Judit; Leiter, Jeff R S; Peeler, Jason D

    2011-06-01

    Lower extremity fractures, if not treated appropriately, can increase the risk of morbidity. Partial weight-bearing after surgical repair is recommended; however, current methods of partial weight-bearing may cause excessive loads through the lower extremity. A new rehabilitation tool that uses lower body positive-pressure is described, that may allow partial weight-bearing while preventing excessive loads, thereby improving functional outcomes. A patient with multiple lower extremity fractures underwent a 6-month rehabilitation programme using bodyweight support technology 3 times per week, post-surgery. The patient experienced a reduction in pain and an improvement in ankle range of motion (p=0.002), walking speed (p>0.05) and physical function (p=0.004), as assessed by the Foot and Ankle Module of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Lower Limb Outcomes Assessment Instrument. Training did not appear to affect fracture healing, as was evident on radiograph. The effect of lower body positive-pressure on effusion, which has not previously been reported in the literature, was also investigated. No significant difference in effusion of the foot and ankle when using lower body positive-pressure was found. Initial results suggest that this new technology may be a useful rehabilitation tool that allows partial weight-bearing during the treatment of lower extremity injuries.

  6. Positive pressure ventilation in the management of acute and chronic cardiac failure: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadar, Sunil; Prasad, Neeraj; Taylor, Rod S; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2005-03-18

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a common condition and is associated with excess morbidity and mortality, in spite of the many advances in its treatment. Chronic stable heart failure is also associated with an increased incidence of sleep-related breathing disorders, such as central sleep apnoea (CSA) and Cheyne Stokes respiration (CSR). Continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) has been shown to alleviate the symptoms of CHF, improve left ventricular function and oxygenation. To a certain extent, CPAP also abolishes sleep-related breathing disorders in patients with chronic heart failure. In patients with acute pulmonary oedema, the use of positive pressure ventilation improves cardiac haemodynamic indices, as well as symptoms and oxygenation, and is associated with a lower need for intubation. However, some studies have cast doubts about its safety and suggest a higher rate of myocardial infarction associated with its use. In our opinion, non-invasive positive pressure ventilation and CPAP offers an adjunctive mode of therapy in patients with acute pulmonary oedema and chronic heart failure, who may not be suitable for intubation and in those not responsive to conventional therapies. Non-invasive ventilation also helps to improve oxygenation in those patients with exhaustion and respiratory acidosis. Many trials are still ongoing and the results of these studies would throw more light on the present role of non-invasive ventilation in the management of CHF.

  7. Early nasal continuous positive airway pressure versus INSURE in VLBW neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Saianda

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence suggests the INSURE strategy (INtubate-SURfactant administration and Extubate to nasal continuous positive airway pressure [nCPAP] is superior to mechanical ventilation (MV with rescue surfactant for the management of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS in very low birth weight (VLBW neonates. There is limited data, however, to assess whether INSURE is superior to nCPAP alone. We aimed to compare these two strategies regarding early and late outcomes. Methods: Retrospective cohort study from Jan/2002 to Aug/2008. We included VLBW neonateswith gestational age (GA ≤ 30 weeks registered in the Vermont Oxford Network that used either nCPAP alone (nCPAP group, N = 40, or with INSURE (INSURE group, N = 56. We assessed early (RDS, need for rescue surfactant, and CPAP failure with MV and late outcomes (chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD, mortality, and composite outcome of mortality and/or CLD. Results: Neonates in the INSURE group had lower mean GA, while other baseline variables were comparable. The proportion of RDS was significantly superior in the nCPAP group (53% vs. 30%; adjusted OR [95% CI] – 0.2 [0.1-0.6]. Therapeutic surfactant was administered to all cases with RDS in the nCPAP group, but to none from the INSURE group. MV was more frequently required in the nCPAP group (11/ 40, 28% vs. 9/ 56, 12%; p = 0.04. No statistically significant differences were found in either of the late outcomes. Conclusion: The use of nCPAP alone in VLBW neonates with GA ≤ 30 weeks may be associated with slightly poorer early outcomes than the INSURE strategy, but there were no significant differences in CLD or mortality. Resumo: Introdução: Pretende-se determinar se a utilização do método INSURE em recém-nascidos de muito baixo peso, com idade gestacional (IG ≤ 30 semanas se associa a menor morbilidade e mortalidade quando comparado com uso de nCPAP isolado. Métodos: Estudo de

  8. Positive expiratory pressure therapy versus other airway clearance techniques for bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Annemarie L; Burge, Angela T; Holland, Anne E

    2017-09-27

    People with bronchiectasis experience chronic cough and sputum production and require the prescription of airway clearance techniques (ACTs). A common type of ACT prescribed is positive expiratory pressure (PEP) therapy. A previous review has suggested that ACTs including PEP therapy are beneficial compared to no treatment in people with bronchiectasis. However, the efficacy of PEP therapy in a stable clinical state or during an acute exacerbation compared to other ACTs in bronchiectasis is unknown. The primary aim of this review was to determine the effects of PEP therapy compared with other ACTs on health-related quality of life (HRQOL), rate of acute exacerbations, and incidence of hospitalisation in individuals with stable or an acute exacerbation of bronchiectasis.Secondary aims included determining the effects of PEP therapy upon physiological outcomes and clinical signs and symptoms compared with other ACTs in individuals with stable or an acute exacerbation of bronchiectasis. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of Trials, PEDro and clinical trials registries from inception to February 2017 and we handsearched relevant journals. Randomised controlled parallel and cross-over trials that compared PEP therapy versus other ACTs in participants with bronchiectasis. We used standard methodological procedures as outlined by Cochrane. Nine studies involving 213 participants met the inclusion criteria, of which seven were cross-over in design. All studies included adults with bronchiectasis, with eight including participants in a stable clinical state and one including participants experiencing an acute exacerbation. Eight studies used oscillatory PEP therapy, using either a Flutter or Acapella device and one study used Minimal PEP therapy. The comparison intervention differed between studies. The methodological quality of studies was poor, with cross-over studies including suboptimal or no washout period, and a lack of blinding of

  9. Pressure shift coefficient measurements in an RF discharge for Ar 4s[3/2]2—5p[3/2]3 transition with the help of diodelaser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshov, A. K.; Mikheyev, P. A.; Lunev, N. N.; Azyazov, V. N.

    2018-04-01

    Optically pumped all-rare-gas laser (OPRGL) with unique properties were recently proposed with a possibility to obtain the laser power on the order of hundreds of Watts from a cubic centimeter. To provide high laser efficiency, the pumping radiation has to match the absorption spectrum of the rare gas metastables. To meet this condition a reliable diagnostics of the key parameters of the active medium is required and knowledge of the broadening and shift coefficients for corresponding transitions of rare gases is necessary. In this paper, the diode-laser absorption spectroscopy was employed to determine the pressure shift coefficient for 811.5 nm Ar line. The value of obtained coefficient in pure argon reduced to 300 K is -(2.1 ± 0.1) × 10-10 s-1cm3. In the course of the study the pressure broadening coefficient was also evaluated and found to be (2.4 ± 0.5) × 10-10 s-1cm3.

  10. Pressure to cooperate: is positive reward interdependence really needed in cooperative learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchs, Céline; Gilles, Ingrid; Dutrévis, Marion; Butera, Fabrizio

    2011-03-01

    BACKGROUND. Despite extensive research on cooperative learning, the debate regarding whether or not its effectiveness depends on positive reward interdependence has not yet found clear evidence. AIMS. We tested the hypothesis that positive reward interdependence, as compared to reward independence, enhances cooperative learning only if learners work on a 'routine task'; if the learners work on a 'true group task', positive reward interdependence induces the same level of learning as reward independence. SAMPLE. The study involved 62 psychology students during regular workshops. METHOD. Students worked on two psychology texts in cooperative dyads for three sessions. The type of task was manipulated through resource interdependence: students worked on either identical (routine task) or complementary (true group task) information. Students expected to be assessed with a Multiple Choice Test (MCT) on the two texts. The MCT assessment type was introduced according to two reward interdependence conditions, either individual (reward independence) or common (positive reward interdependence). A follow-up individual test took place 4 weeks after the third session of dyadic work to examine individual learning. RESULTS. The predicted interaction between the two types of interdependence was significant, indicating that students learned more with positive reward interdependence than with reward independence when they worked on identical information (routine task), whereas students who worked on complementary information (group task) learned the same with or without reward interdependence. CONCLUSIONS. This experiment sheds light on the conditions under which positive reward interdependence enhances cooperative learning, and suggests that creating a real group task allows to avoid the need for positive reward interdependence. © 2010 The British Psychological Society.

  11. Halogenated methyl-phenyl ethers (anisoles) in the environment: determination of vapor pressures, aqueous solubilities, Henry's law constants, and gas/water- (Kgw), n-octanol/water- (Kow) and gas/n-octanol (Kgo) partition coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, O; Lohmann, U; Ballschmiter, K

    2001-11-01

    Halogenated methyl-phenyl ethers (methoxybenzenes, anisoles) are ubiquitous organics in the environment although they are not produced in industrial quantities. Modelling the fate of organic pollutants such as halogenated anisoles requires a knowledge of the fundamental physico-chemical properties of these compounds. The isomer-specific separation and detection of 60 of the 134 possible congeners allowing an environmental fingerprinting are reported in this study. The vapor pressure p0(L) of more than 60 and further physico-chemical properties of 26 available congeners are given. Vapor pressures p0(L), water solubilities S(L)W, and n-octanol/water partition coefficients Kow were determined by capillary HR-GC (High Resolution Gas Chromatography) on a non-polar phase and by RP-HPLC (Reversed Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography) on a C18 phase with chlorobenzenes as reference standards. From these experimental data the Henry's law constants H, and the gas/water Kgw and gas/n-octanol Kgo partition coefficients were calculated. We found that vapor pressures, water solubilities, and n-octanol/water partition coefficients of the halogenated anisoles are close to those of the chlorobenzenes. A similar environmental fate of both groups can, therefore, be predicted.

  12. Effects of respiratory rate, plateau pressure, and positive end-expiratory pressure on PaO2 oscillations after saline lavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardner, James E; Markstaller, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Birgit; Doebrich, Marcus; Otto, Cynthia M

    2002-12-15

    One of the proposed mechanisms of ventilator-associated lung injury is cyclic recruitment of atelectasis. Collapse of dependent lung regions with every breath should lead to large oscillations in PaO2 as shunt varies throughout the respiratory cycle. We placed a fluorescence-quenching PO2 probe in the brachiocephalic artery of six anesthetized rabbits after saline lavage. Using pressure-controlled ventilation with oxygen, ventilator settings were varied in random order over three levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), respiratory rate (RR), and plateau pressure minus PEEP (Delta). Dependence of the amplitude of PaO2 oscillations on PEEP, RR, and Delta was modeled by multiple linear regression. Before lavage, arterial PO2 oscillations varied from 3 to 22 mm Hg. After lavage, arterial PO2 oscillations varied from 5 to 439 mm Hg. Response surfaces showed markedly nonlinear dependence of amplitude on PEEP, RR, and Delta. The large PaO2 oscillations observed provide evidence for cyclic recruitment in this model of lung injury. The important effect of RR on the magnitude of PaO2 oscillations suggests that the static behavior of atelectasis cannot be accurately extrapolated to predict dynamic behavior at realistic breathing frequencies.

  13. The effect of lateral decubitus position on nocturnal intraocular pressure over a habitual 24-hour period in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jie; Zhen, Yi; Wang, Hao; Yang, Diya; Wang, Ningli

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of lateral decubitus position (LDP) on nocturnal intraocular pressure (IOP) and the effect of LDP on 24-hour habitual IOP pattern in healthy subjects. Intraocular pressure was measured every 2-hours using an Accupen Applanation Tonometer (Accutome, USA). During the diurnal period (7:30 am, 9:30 am, 11:30 am, 1:30 pm, 3:30 pm, 5:30 pm, 7:30 pm, and 9:30 pm), IOP was measured in the sitting position under bright light (500-1000 lux) after the subjects had been seated for 5 min. The nocturnal IOP was measured in the supine position, right LDP, and left LDP, with randomized sequences, under dim light (hour habitual IOP patterns were obtained according to the nocturnal position (supine, right LDP and left LDP) for either eye. Phour period, the effect of LDP on habitual IOP pattern was not statistically significant, although the mean nocturnal IOP and the diurnal-nocturnal IOP change for the right and the left eye in the LDP pattern was slightly higher than that in the sitting-supine pattern. Significant nocturnal IOP differences existed between the dependent eye and the supine, but did not occur consistently for all time points. Over a 24-hour period, the effect of LDP on habitual IOP pattern was not statistically significant in healthy subjects.

  14. Temperature and pressure effects on the properties of positive streamers in air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huiskamp, T.; Heesch, van E.J.M.; Beckers, F.J.C.M.; Hoeben, W.F.L.M.; Pemen, A.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present experimental results on how the properties of positive, pulsed streamers in air depend on E/n (E is the applied electric field and n is the gas density). Streamers are generated in a wire-cylinder reactor at constant voltage (so constant E). The density is changed either by

  15. The Ambivalence of Challenge Stressors: Time Pressure Associated with Both Negative and Positive Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, Pascale S.; Semmer, Norbert K.; Kalin, Wolfgang; Jacobshagen, Nicola; Meier, Laurenz L.

    2012-01-01

    According to the challenge-hindrance model, challenge stressors contain both stressful and challenging aspects, hindrance stressors only stressful aspects. Typically, negative outcomes of challenge stressors refer to well-being (strain), positive outcomes to so-called work outcomes (e.g., productivity, intention to quit). As both effects occur…

  16. Comparison of manual versus automatic continuous positive airway pressure titration and the development of a predictive equation for therapeutic continuous positive airway pressure in Chinese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiaying; Xiao, Sichang; Qiu, Zhihui; Song, Ning; Luo, Yuanming

    2013-04-01

    Whether the therapeutic nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) derived from manual titration is the same as derived from automatic titration is controversial. The purpose of this study was to compare the therapeutic pressure derived from manual titration with automatic titration. Fifty-one patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) (mean apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) = 50.6 ± 18.6 events/h) who were newly diagnosed after an overnight full polysomnography and who were willing to accept CPAP as a long-term treatment were recruited for the study. Manual titration during full polysomnography monitoring and unattended automatic titration with an automatic CPAP device (REMstar Auto) were performed. A separate cohort study of one hundred patients with OSA (AHI = 54.3 ± 18.9 events/h) was also performed by observing the efficacy of CPAP derived from manual titration. The treatment pressure derived from automatic titration (9.8 ± 2.2 cmH(2)O) was significantly higher than that derived from manual titration (7.3 ± 1.5 cmH(2)O; P titration (54.3 ± 18.9 events/h before treatment and 3.3 ± 1.7 events/h after treatment; P titration pressure derived from REMstar Auto is usually higher than the pressure derived from manual titration. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  17. Effect of different levels of continuous positive airway pressure on the 99mTc-DTPA lung clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulciane Nunes Paiva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Positive airway pressure continues (CPAP produces significant hemodynamic changes that may influence the variability of breathing pattern and heart rate, acting as an additional therapy to prevent atelectasis and to combat hypoxia. The rate of inhaled 99 m Technetiumdiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA, along with changes in the lung epithelium cause an increase in the rate of clearance of this compound. The aim of this study was evaluate the pulmonary clearance rate of 99mTechnetium Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA through the use of different levels of CPAP. Methods: It was a quasi-experimental study involving 17 healthy individuals with normal lung functional. 99mTc-DTPA, as aerosol, was nebulized for 3 minutes with the individual in a sitting position. The pulmonary clearance rate was assessed through pulmonary scintigraphy under spontaneous breathing and under 20 and 10 cmH2 O CPAP in the sitting position. The clearance rate was expressed as the half-time (T½ that is the time for the activity to decrease to 50% of the peak value. Results: 20 cmH2 O CPAP produced significant reduction of the T½ of 99mTc-DTPA in the sitting position (p=0.005. However, 10 cmH2 O CPAP did not alter the T½ of DTPA in the same positions. Conclusion: High levels of continuos positive pressure in normal lungs resulted in faster 99mTc-DTPA clearance moreover, 10 cmH2 O did not alter its clearance rate. KEYWORDS: Noninvasive ventilation. Technetium Tc 99m Pentetate. Radionuclide Imaging.

  18. Form of multicomponent Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambui Mutoru, J.; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Irreversible thermodynamics establishes form of multicomponent diffusion coefficients. → Phenomenological coefficients and thermodynamic factors affect sign of diffusion coefficients. → Negative diagonal elements of diffusion coefficients matrix can occur in non-ideal mixtures. → Eigenvalues of the matrix of Fickian diffusion coefficients may not be all real. - Abstract: The form of multicomponent Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix in thermodynamically stable mixtures is established based on the form of phenomenological coefficients and thermodynamic factors. While phenomenological coefficients form a symmetric positive definite matrix, the determinant of thermodynamic factors matrix is positive. As a result, the Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix has a positive determinant, but its elements - including diagonal elements - can be negative. Comprehensive survey of reported diffusion coefficients data for ternary and quaternary mixtures, confirms that invariably the determinant of the Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix is positive.

  19. Respiratory System Mechanics During Low Versus High Positive End-Expiratory Pressure in Open Abdominal Surgery: A Substudy of PROVHILO Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Antini, Davide; Huhle, Robert; Herrmann, Jacob; Sulemanji, Demet S.; Oto, Jun; Raimondo, Pasquale; Mirabella, Lucia; Hemmes, Sabrine N. T.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Pelosi, Paolo; Kaczka, David W.; Vidal Melo, Marcos Francisco; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Cinnella, Gilda

    2018-01-01

    In the 2014 PROtective Ventilation using HIgh versus LOw positive end-expiratory pressure (PROVHILO) trial, intraoperative low tidal volume ventilation with high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP = 12 cm H2O) and lung recruitment maneuvers did not decrease postoperative pulmonary complications

  20. Treatment of sleep central apnea with non-invasive mechanical ventilation with 2 levels of positive pressure (bilevel in a patient with myotonic dystrophy type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Tera Akamine

    2014-06-01

    Bi-level positive airway pressure treatment at spontaneous/timed mode showed an improvement in snoring, apneas, and Epworth sleepiness scale decreased from 20 to 10. This case illustrates the beneficial effects of Bi-level positive airway pressure support in central sleep apnea syndrome of a patient with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

  1. Titration effectiveness of two autoadjustable continuous positive airway pressure devices driven by different algorithms in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Mario Francesco; Quaranta, Vitaliano Nicola; Tedeschi, Ersilia; Drigo, Riccardo; Ranieri, Teresa; Carratù, Pierluigi; Resta, Onofrio

    2013-08-01

    Nocturnal application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the standard treatment for patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Determination of the therapeutic pressure (CPAP titration) is usually performed by a technician in the sleep laboratory during attended polysomnography. One possible alternative to manual titration is automated titration. Indeed, during the last 15 years, devices have been developed that deliver autoadjustable CPAP (A-CPAP). The aim of the present study was to compare the titration effectiveness of two A-CPAP devices using different flow-based algorithms in patients with OSA. This is a randomized study; 79 subjects underwent two consecutive unattended home A-CPAP titration nights with two different devices (Autoset Resmed; Remstar Auto Respironics); during the third and the fourth night, patients underwent portable monitoring in the sleep laboratory during fixed CPAP at the A-CPAP recommended pressure. Bland Altman plots showed good agreement between the recommended median and maximal pressure levels obtained with the two devices. A significant improvement was observed in all the sleep parameters by both A-CPAP machines to a similar degree. It was observed that the two A-CPAP devices using different algorithms are equally effective in initial titration of CPAP. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  2. Dynamic characteristics of positive hollow needle to plate atmospheric pressure discharge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Khun, J.; Šimek, Milan; Pekárek, S.; Schmidt, Jiří

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 56, suppl.B (2006), s. 830-836 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology/22nd./. Praha, 26.6.2006-29.6.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1043403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : positive corona discharge * streamer * mean repetition frequency * mean propagation velocity Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.568, year: 2006

  3. Determination of diffusion coefficients of hydrogen and deuterium in Zr–2.5%Nb pressure tube material using hot vacuum extraction-quadrupole mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, Komal Chandra, E-mail: komal@barc.gov.in [Radioanalytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kulkarni, A.S.; Ramanjaneyulu, P.S. [Radioanalytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sunil, Saurav [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Saxena, M.K. [Radioanalytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Singh, R.N. [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Tomar, B.S.; Ramakumar, K.L. [Radioanalytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-06-15

    The diffusion coefficients of hydrogen and deuterium in Zr–2.5%Nb alloy were measured in the temperature range 523 to 673 K, employing hot vacuum extraction-quadrupole mass spectrometry (HVE-QMS). One end of the Zr–2.5%Nb alloy specimens was charged electrolytically with the desired hydrogen isotope. After annealing at different temperatures for a predetermined time, the specimens were cut into thin slices, which were analyzed for their H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} content using the HVE-QMS technique. The depth profile data were fitted into the equation representing the solution of Fick’s second law of diffusion. The activation energy of hydrogen/deuterium diffusion was obtained from the Arrhenius relation between the diffusion coefficient and temperature. The temperature dependent diffusion coefficient can be represented as D{sub H} = 1.41 × 10{sup −7} exp(−36,000/RT) and D{sub D} = 6.16 × 10{sup −8} exp(−35,262/RT) for hydrogen and deuterium, respectively.

  4. Elongated dust clouds in a uniform DC positive column of low pressure gas discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usachev, A D; Zobnin, A V; Petrov, O F; Fortov, V E; Thoma, M H; Pustylnik, M Y; Fink, M A; Morfill, G E

    2016-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the formation of elongated dust clouds and their influence on the plasma glow intensity of the uniform direct current (DC) positive column (PC) have been performed under microgravity conditions. For the axial stabilization of the dust cloud position a polarity switching DC gas discharge with a switching frequency of 250 Hz was used. During the experiment, a spontaneous division of one elongated dust cloud into two smaller steady state dust clouds has been observed. Quantitative data on the dust cloud shape, size and dust number density distribution were obtained. Axial and radial distributions of plasma emission within the 585.2 nm and 703.2 nm neon spectral lines were measured over the whole discharge volume. It has been found that both spectral line intensities at the dust cloud region grew 1.7 times with respect to the undisturbed positive column region; in this the 585.2 nm line intensity increased by 10% compared to the 703.2 nm line intensity. For a semi-quantitative explanation of the observed phenomena the Schottky approach based on the equation of diffusion was used. The model reasonably explains the observed glow enhancement as an increasing of the ionization rate in the discharge with dust cloud, which compensates ion-electron recombination on the dust grain surfaces. In this, the ionization rate increases due to the growing of the DC axial electric field, and the glow grows directly proportional to the electric field. It is shown that the fundamental condition of the radial stability of the dusty plasma cloud is equal to the ionization and recombination rates within the cloud volume that is possible only when the electron density is constant and the radial electric field is absent within the dust cloud. (paper)

  5. EXTUBATE: A randomised controlled trial of nasal biphasic positive airway pressure vs. nasal continuous positive airway pressure following extubation in infants less than 30 weeks' gestation: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Suresh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory distress syndrome remains a significant problem among premature infants. Mechanical ventilation through an endotracheal tube remains the mainstay of respiratory support but may be associated with lung injury and the development of chronic lung disease of prematurity. Efforts are needed to reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation in favour of less invasive forms of respiratory support and to improve rates of successful extubation. Non-invasive respiratory support has been demonstrated to be less injurious to the premature lung. Standard practice is to use nasal continuous positive airway pressure (n-CPAP following extubation to support the baby's breathing. Many clinicians also use nasal biphasic positive airway pressure (n-BiPAP in efforts to improve rates of successful extubation. However, there is currently no evidence that this confers any advantage over conventional nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Methods We propose an unblinded multi-centre randomised trial comparing n-CPAP with n-BiPAP in babies born before 30 weeks' gestation and less than two weeks old. Babies with congenital abnormalities and severe intra-ventricular haemorrhage will be excluded. 540 babies admitted to neonatal centres in England will be randomised at the time of first extubation attempt. The primary aim of this study is to compare the rate of extubation failure within 48 hours following the first attempt at extubation. The secondary aims are to compare the effect of n-BiPAP and n-CPAP on the following outcomes: 1. Maintenance of successful extubation for 7 days post extubation 2. Oxygen requirement at 28 days of age and at 36 weeks' corrected gestational age 3. Total days on ventilator, n-CPAP/n-BiPAP 4. Number of ventilator days following first extubation attempt 5. pH and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the first post extubation blood gas 6. Duration of hospital stay 7. Rate of abdominal distension requiring

  6. Influence of second kind collisions on the electron distribution function in the positive column of low pressure nitrogen discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohlena, K.; Ruzicka, T.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation for the electron gas in the positive column of a DC discharge in nitrogen is presented. The Boltzmann equation was solved with the inclusion of the second-kind (superelastic) collisions proceeding from the first six excited vibrational levels of molecular nitrogen. The vibrational level population is supposed to follow the Boltzmann distribution for the given vibrational temperature Tsub(v), with a possible deviation of the ground level, which can be overpopulated in the given ratio γ. Apart from the electron distribution functions, which were gained for various values of E/p 0 , Tsub(v) and γ, the values of some production frequencies and kinetic coefficients are presented in form of tables and plots. It is found that the electron distribution (and also the corresponding production rates) only above a certain energy limit depends on Tsub(v) and γ through the normalization constant. (author)

  7. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on energy intake in obstructive sleep apnea: A pilot sham-controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Shechter, Ari; Kovtun, Kyle; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is among the leading risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). A reciprocal relationship between obesity and OSA has been proposed, which may be due to excessive food intake. We conducted a pilot study to test the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on energy intake (EI) in OSA patients using a sham-controlled crossover design. In-laboratory total daily EI was assessed after 2 mo of active and sham CPAP. Four men were enrolled (age ± SEM: 51.8 ± 2.1 y; body mas...

  8. A primary scintillation gated high pressure position sensitive gas scintillation proportional counter (HPGSPC) for applications to x-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giarrusso, S.; Manzo, G.; Re, S.

    1985-01-01

    The authors describe a new instrument for x-ray astronomy. The instrument, based on a high pressure (5 atm.), xenon filled, position sensitive Gas Scintillation Proportional counter (HPGSPC) is expected to feature an energy resolution better than 4% at 60 keV, an angular resolution of approximately 20 arc-minutes over the full energy range (4 to 100 keV) and a field of view (FOV) of up to 30x30 degrees. A prototype flight unit of the gas cell on which the instrument is based is presently under technological development in the framework of the SAX project

  9. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Prevents Hypoxia in Dental Patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome under Intravenous Sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasatkin, Anton A; Reshetnikov, Aleksei P; Urakov, Aleksandr L; Baimurzin, Dmitrii Y

    2017-01-01

    Use of sedation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in dentistry is limited. Hypoxia may develop during medication sleep in dental patients with OSA because of repetitive partial or complete obstruction of the upper airway. In this regard, anesthesiologists prefer not to give any sedative to surgical patients with OSA or support the use of general anesthesia due to good airway control. We report a case where we could successfully sedate a dental patient with OSA using intraoperative continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) without hypoxia. Use of sedation and intraoperative CPAP in patients with OSA may be considered only if the effectiveness at home CPAP therapy is proven.

  10. Intraocular pressure measurements in relation to head position and through soft contact lenses: comparison of three portable instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Ainat; Shemesh, Gabi; Loewenstein, Anat; Kurtz, Shimon

    2011-01-01

    to compare the reproducibility of three portable instruments-the Tono-Pen tonometer (Reichert Ophthalmic Instruments, Depew, NY), the Phosphene tonometer (Bausch & Lomb, Rochester, NY), and the TERT (Through Eyelid Russian Tonometer; Rjazan State Instrument Making, Rjazan, Russia)-in the measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP) with and without soft contact lenses and in different head positions. twenty-six eyes of healthy volunteers were examined by the three instruments while the subjects were sitting, recumbent, and hyperextending their heads, and with and without contact lenses. IOP measurements were compared and the effects of head position and presence of contact lenses on the resultant values were analyzed. the average difference between the recumbent and sitting positions was 3.56, 2.68, and 2.62 mm Hg for the Tono-Pen tonometer, Phosphene tonometer, and TERT, respectively. There was an increase of 5.60, 2.78, and 2.63 mm Hg in hyperextension compared to sitting for the Tono-Pen tonometer, Phosphene tonometer, and TERT, respectively. The difference in the IOP values obtained in the presence and absence of therapeutic contact lens for the three instruments in the three positions was between -1.23 and +1.47 mm Hg. IOP measurements of bedridden patients are only slightly higher than those of sitting patients except for the Tono-Pen tonometer in the hyperextension position. The presence of contact lenses does not affect IOP values obtained by the three evaluated instruments.

  11. [Compliance with continuous positive airway pressure therapy in patients with sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Claudio W; Dibur, Eduardo; Salomone, César; Di Bartolo, Carlos G

    2004-01-01

    Predictive factors and compliance level were evaluated in a group of patients with sleep apnea syndrome under CPAP treatment, assessing side effects and equipment condition: silicone interface (SI), mask-conectors (M-C), air tube (AT) and head strap (HS). Patients with >3mo treatment were included, clock counter reading was registered at the beginning, 2 and 4 mo. Patients were considered compliant (C+) when usage was >4h/day and >5day/week. Of 46 patients (male 34; age 62 +/- 9years; BMI 33 +/- 7kg/m2; AHI 38 +/- 18/h; time of therapy 2.1 +/- 1.7years; CPAP 9 +/- 1.4 cmH2O), 34 had a clock counter and 24 (71%) were C+. Initial symptoms included: somnolence (65%), snoring (39%), bed-partner witnessed apneas (28%). Comparing C+ and C- we didn't find significant difference in age, BMI, CPAP pressure, length of therapy, AHI and pre-treatment Epworth classification. Referred vs. measured time of use in C+ and C- were 6.6 +/- 1 vs. 6.1 +/- 1 h/d (p=0.02) and 5.6 +/- 1 vs. 2.4 +/- 1 h/d (pcongestion 27%, sleep disruption 11%, CPAP noisy 9%, dry nose, rhinorrhea and skin irritation 7%. Twenty seven percent of patients reduced the CPAP use because of the SE. Correction strategies included: humidifier, nasal steroid, surgery or infiltration of turbinates. Comparing the condition of SI, M-C, AT and HS between 1year of use, we observed a lower percentage of fine elements (87 to 44%, 74 to 44%, 83 to 44%, 91 to 78%, respectively). Most common defects included stiffness of SI, cracks in SI, M-C and AT, loose conexions. The study confirms the importance of objective monitoring in patients with CPAP. Side effects and equipment condition require special attention because this could affect an effective treatment.

  12. Positioning and tail rotor of a small horizontal axis wind turbine of due to the influence of drag coefficient and lift affecting vane cola

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farinnas Wong, E. Y.; Jauregui Rigo, S.; Betancourt Mena, J.

    2009-01-01

    In the present investigation was carried out an assessment on the state of technology on guidance systems and tail protection when used in small horizontal axis wind turbines, work was improved methodological approach for the development of guidance systems queue by time of these machines, to incorporate the use of coefficients of lift and drag behavior varies according to the aspect ratio, using the principles of continuum mechanics and CFD methods. Two versions are analyzed , original and updated, the wind turbine CEET-01, on which the author would have been granted a Certificate of Patent of Invention and one of Industrial Model, the updated version was derived from the procedure proposed by the author, this presents a holder for the longest vane and a larger area in the vane. In addition to analyzing the amount and cost of power generated and the capacity factor at three locations in the province of Villa Clara it was concluded that the updated variant of the turbine CEET-01 is superior to the original

  13. Choosing an Oronasal Mask to Deliver Continuous Positive Airway Pressure May Cause More Upper Airway Obstruction or Lead to Higher Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Requirements than a Nasal Mask in Some Patients: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Justin R; Aiyappan, Vinod; Mercer, Jeremy; Catcheside, Peter G; Chai-Coetzer, Ching Li; McEvoy, R Doug; Antic, Nick

    2016-09-15

    The choice of mask interface used with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy can affect the control of upper airway obstruction (UAO) in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We describe a case series of four patients with paradoxical worsening of UAO with an oronasal mask and the effect of changing to a nasal mask. We retrospectively reviewed the case histories of 4 patients and recorded patient demographics, in-laboratory and ambulatory CPAP titration data, CPAP therapy data, type of mask interface used and potential confounding factors. The 4 cases (mean ± SD: age = 59 ± 16 y; BMI = 30.5 ± 4.5 kg/m(2)) had a high residual apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI) (43 ± 14.2 events/h) and high CPAP pressure requirements (14.9 ± 6.6 cmH2O) with an oronasal mask. Changing to a nasal mask allowed adequate control of UAO with a significant reduction in the average residual AHI (3.1 ± 1.5 events/h). In two of the four cases, it was demonstrated that control of UAO was obtained at a much lower CPAP pressure compared to the oronasal mask (Case one = 17.5 cmH2O vs 12cmH2O; Case two = 17.9 cmH2O vs 7.8 cmH2O). Other potential confounding factors were unchanged. There are various physiological observations that may explain these findings but it is uncertain which individuals are susceptible to these mechanisms. If patients have OSA incompletely controlled by CPAP with evidence of residual UAO and/or are requiring surprisingly high CPAP pressure to control OSA with an oronasal mask, the choice of mask should be reviewed and consideration be given to a trial of a nasal mask. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1209. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  14. Effects of hip joint position and intra-capsular volume on hip joint intra-capsular pressure: a human cadaveric model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tse Paul

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increase in hip intra-capsular pressure has been implicated in various hip pathologies, such as avascular necrosis complicating undisplaced femoral neck fracture. Our study aimed at documenting the relationship between intra-capsular volume and pressure in various hip positions. Methods Fifty-two cadaveric hips were studied. An electronic pressure-monitoring catheter recorded the intra-capsular hip pressure after each instillation of 2 ml of normal saline and in six hip positions. Results In neutral hip position, the control position for investigation, intra-capsular pressure remained unchanged when its content was below 10 ml. Thereafter, it increased exponentially. When the intra-capsular volume was 12 ml, full abduction produced a 2.1-fold increase (p = 0.028 of the intra-capsular hip joint pressure; full external rotation and full internal rotation increased the pressure by at least 4-fold (p Conclusion Intra-capsular pressure increases with its volume, but with a wide variation with different positions. It would be appropriate to recommend that hips with haemarthrosis or effusion should be positioned in 45-degree flexion.

  15. Optimal level of continuous positive airway pressure: auto-adjusting titration versus titration with a predictive equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Ho; Jun, Young Joon; Oh, Jeong In; Jung, Jong Yoon; Hwang, Gyu Ho; Kwon, Soon Young; Lee, Heung Man; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Sang Hag; Lee, Seung Hoon

    2013-05-01

    The aims of the present study were twofold. We sought to compare two methods of titrating the level of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) - auto-adjusting titration and titration using a predictive equation - with full-night manual titration used as the benchmark. We also investigated the reliability of the two methods in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Twenty consecutive adult patients with OSAS who had successful, full-night manual and auto-adjusting CPAP titration participated in this study. The titration pressure level was calculated with a previously developed predictive equation based on body mass index and apnea-hypopnea index. The mean titration pressure levels obtained with the manual, auto-adjusting, and predictive equation methods were 9.0 +/- 3.6, 9.4 +/- 3.0, and 8.1 +/- 1.6 cm H2O,respectively. There was a significant difference in the concordance within the range of +/- 2 cm H2O (p = 0.019) between both the auto-adjusting titration and the titration using the predictive equation compared to the full-night manual titration. However, there was no significant difference in the concordance within the range of +/- 1 cm H2O (p > 0.999). When compared to full-night manual titration as the standard method, auto-adjusting titration appears to be more reliable than using a predictive equation for determining the optimal CPAP level in patients with OSAS.

  16. Retrospective, nonrandomized controlled study on autoadjusting, dual-pressure positive airway pressure therapy for a consecutive series of complex insomnia disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krakow B

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Barry Krakow,1–3 Natalia D McIver,1,2 Victor A Ulibarri,1,2 Michael R Nadorff4,5 1Sleep & Human Health Institute, 2Maimonides Sleep Arts & Sciences, Ltd, Albuquerque, 3Los Alamos Medical Center, Los Alamos, NM, 4Department of Psychology, Mississippi State University, Mississippi, MS, 5Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA Purpose: Emerging evidence shows that positive airway pressure (PAP treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS in chronic insomnia patients (proposed “complex insomnia” disorder leads to substantial decreases in insomnia severity. Although continuous PAP (CPAP is the pressure mode most widely researched, intolerance to fixed pressurized air is rarely investigated or described in comorbidity patients. This retrospective study examined dual pressure, autoadjusting PAP modes in chronic, complex insomnia disorder patients.Patients and methods: Chronic insomnia disorder patients (mean [SD] insomnia severity index [ISI] =19.11 [3.34] objectively diagnosed with OSA or UARS and using either autobilevel PAP device or adaptive servoventilation (ASV device after failing CPAP therapy (frequently due to intolerance to pressurized air, poor outcomes, or emergence of CSA were divided into PAP users (≥20 h/wk and partial users (<20 h/wk for comparison. Subjective and objective baseline and follow-up measures were analyzed.Results: Of the 302 complex insomnia patients, PAP users (n=246 averaged 6.10 (1.78 nightly hours and 42.71 (12.48 weekly hours and partial users (n=56 averaged 1.67 (0.76 nightly hours and 11.70 (5.31 weekly hours. For mean (SD decreases in total ISI scores, a significant (group × time interaction was observed (F[1,300]=13.566; P<0.0001 with PAP users (–7.59 [5.92]; d=1.63 showing superior results to partial users (-4.34 [6.13]; d=0.81. Anecdotally, patients reported better tolerability with advanced PAP

  17. Nasal pillows as an alternative interface in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome initiating continuous positive airway pressure therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Silke

    2012-02-01

    Side-effects directly due to the nasal mask are common in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) commencing continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Recently, nasal pillows have been designed to overcome these issues. Limited evidence exists of the benefits and effectiveness of these devices. Twenty-one patients (19 male, 49+\\/-10years) with the established diagnosis of OSAS [apnoea\\/hypopnoea index (AHI): 52+\\/-22] and who had a successful CPAP titration were commenced on CPAP therapy (10+\\/-2cmH2O), and randomized to 4weeks of a nasal pillow (P) and a standard nasal mask (M) in a crossover design. Outcome measures were objective compliance, AHI, quality of life, Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS) and CPAP side-effects. There was no difference in compliance (M versus P: 5.1+\\/-1.9h versus 5.0+\\/-1.7h; P=0.701) and AHI (2.6+\\/-2.7 versus 3.0+\\/-2.9; P=0.509). Quality of life and ESS improved with CPAP, but there was no difference in the extent of improvement between both devices. Usage of nasal pillows resulted in less reported pressure on the face and more subjects found the nasal pillow the more comfortable device. However, there was no clear overall preference for either device at the end of the study (mask=57%, pillow=43%; P=0.513). The applied CPAP pressure did not correlate with compliance, AHI and ESS. Furthermore, no differences in outcome parameters were noted comparing groups with CPAP pressure <10 and >\\/=10cm H(2) O. Nasal pillows are equally effective in CPAP therapy, but do not generally lead to improved compliance.

  18. The effect of lateral decubitus position on nocturnal intraocular pressure over a habitual 24-hour period in healthy adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Hao

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of lateral decubitus position (LDP on nocturnal intraocular pressure (IOP and the effect of LDP on 24-hour habitual IOP pattern in healthy subjects. METHODS: Intraocular pressure was measured every 2-hours using an Accupen Applanation Tonometer (Accutome, USA. During the diurnal period (7:30 am, 9:30 am, 11:30 am, 1:30 pm, 3:30 pm, 5:30 pm, 7:30 pm, and 9:30 pm, IOP was measured in the sitting position under bright light (500-1000 lux after the subjects had been seated for 5 min. The nocturnal IOP was measured in the supine position, right LDP, and left LDP, with randomized sequences, under dim light (<10 lux at 11:30 pm, 1:30 am, 3:30 am, and 5:30 am. The subjects were awakened and maintained each position for 5 min before the measurement. The 24-hour habitual IOP patterns were obtained according to the nocturnal position (supine, right LDP and left LDP for either eye. P<0.05 was considered to be significant. RESULTS: Nineteen healthy subjects were included with a mean age of 51.3±5.8 years. During the nocturnal period, a significant IOP difference was found between the dependent eye (the eye on the lower side of LDP and the supine position, but not for all the nocturnal time points. Over a 24-hour period, the effect of LDP on habitual IOP pattern was not statistically significant, although the mean nocturnal IOP and the diurnal-nocturnal IOP change for the right and the left eye in the LDP pattern was slightly higher than that in the sitting-supine pattern. CONCLUSION: Significant nocturnal IOP differences existed between the dependent eye and the supine, but did not occur consistently for all time points. Over a 24-hour period, the effect of LDP on habitual IOP pattern was not statistically significant in healthy subjects.

  19. [Predictive factors for failure of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in immunosuppressed patients with acute respiratory failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiangli; Yan, Ci; Xu, Sicheng; Gu, Xingli; Wan, Qiufeng; Hu, Xinying; Li, Jingwen; Liu, Guangming; Caikai, Shareli; Guo, Zhijin

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the predictive factors for failure of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) in immunosuppressed patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). The clinical data of 118 immuno-deficient patients treated with NIPPV in the respiratory and intensive care unit (RICU) of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University from January 2012 to August 2017 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into a non-endotracheal intubation (ETI) group (n = 62) and ETI group (n = 56) according to whether ETI was performed during the hospitalization period or not. Each observed indicator was analyzed by univariate analysis, and factors leading to failure of NIPPV were further analyzed by Logistic regression. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted to evaluate the predictive value of risk factors for failure of NIPPV in immunosuppressed patients with ARF. The non-intubation rate for NIPPV in immunosuppressed patients was 50.8% (60/118). Compared with the non-ETI group, the body temperature, pH value in the ETI group were significantly increased, the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO 2 ) was significantly decreased, the ratio of oxygenation index (PaO 2 /FiO 2 ) failure of NIPPV. ROC curve analysis showed that the APACHE II score ≥ 20 and PaO 2 /FiO 2 failure of NIPPV, the area under ROC curve (AUC) of the APACHE II score ≥ 20 was 0.787, the sensitivity was 83.93%, the specificity was 69.35%, the positive predict value (PPV) was 71.21%, the negative predict value (NPV) was 82.69%, the positive likelihood ratio (PLR) was 2.74, the negative likelihood ratio (NLR) was 0.23, and Youden index was 0.53; the AUC of PaO 2 /FiO 2 failure of NIPPV in immunocompromised patients.

  20. Multiple positive solutions of nonlinear singular m-point boundary value problem for second-order dynamic equations with sign changing coefficients on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyi Xu

    2010-04-01

    \\end{array}\\right.$$ where $1\\leq k\\leq s\\leq m-2, a_i, b_i\\in(0,+\\infty$ with $0<\\sum_{i=1}^{k}b_{i}-\\sum_{i=k+1}^{s}b_{i}<1, 0<\\sum_{i=1}^{m-2}a_{i}<1, 0<\\xi_1<\\xi_2<\\cdots<\\xi_{m-2}<\\rho(T$, $f\\in C( [0,+\\infty,[0,+\\infty$, $a(t$ may be singular at $t=0$. We show that there exist two positive solutions by using two different fixed point theorems respectively. As an application, some examples are included to illustrate the main results. In particular, our criteria extend and improve some known results.

  1. Setting individualized positive end-expiratory pressure level with a positive end-expiratory pressure decrement trial after a recruitment maneuver improves oxygenation and lung mechanics during one-lung ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Carlos; Mugarra, Ana; Gutierrez, Andrea; Carbonell, Jose Antonio; García, Marisa; Soro, Marina; Tusman, Gerardo; Belda, Francisco Javier

    2014-03-01

    We investigated whether individualized positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) improves oxygenation, ventilation, and lung mechanics during one-lung ventilation compared with standardized PEEP. Thirty patients undergoing thoracic surgery were randomly allocated to the study or control group. Both groups received an alveolar recruitment maneuver at the beginning and end of one-lung ventilation. After the alveolar recruitment maneuver, the control group had their lungs ventilated with a 5 cm·H2O PEEP, while the study group had their lungs ventilated with an individualized PEEP level determined by a PEEP decrement trial. Arterial blood samples, lung mechanics, and volumetric capnography were recorded at multiple timepoints throughout the procedure. The individualized PEEP values in study group were higher than the standardized PEEP values (10 ± 2 vs 5 cm·H2O; P decrement trial than with a standardized 5 cm·H2O of PEEP.

  2. Effects of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Cognitive and Functional Outcome of Stroke Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea : A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaronson, J.A.; Hofman, W.F.; van Bennekom, C.A.M.; van Bezeij, T.; van den Aardweg, J.G.; Groet, E.; Kylstra, W.A.; Schmand, B.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in stroke patients is associated with worse functional and cognitive status during inpatient rehabilitation. We hypothesized that a four-week period of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment would improve cognitive and functional

  3. A randomised controlled trial on the effect of mask choice on residual respiratory events with continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebben, Matthew R; Narizhnaya, Mariya; Segal, Alan Z; Barone, Daniel; Krieger, Ana C

    2014-06-01

    It has been found that mask style can affect the amount of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) required to reduce an apnoea/hyponoea index (AHI) to mask style to another post titration could affect the residual AHI with CPAP. The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in residual AHI with CPAP treatment between oronasal and nasal masks. Twenty-one subjects (age mean (M)=62.9, body mass index (BMI) M=29.6 kg/m2) were randomised (14 subjects completed the protocol) to undergo an in-laboratory CPAP titration with either a nasal mask or an oronasal mask. Subjects were then assigned this mask for 3weeks of at-home CPAP use with the optimal treatment pressure determined on the laboratory study (CPAP M=8.4 cm of H2O). At the end of this 3-week period, data were collected from the CPAP machine and the subject was given the other mask to use with the same CPAP settings for the next 3weeks at home (if the nasal mask was given initially, the oronasal one was given later and vice versa). On completion of the second 3-week period, data on residual AHI were again collected and compared with the first 3-week period on CPAP. A Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test (two-tailed) revealed that residual AHI with CPAP treatment was significantly higher with the oronasal compared with the nasal mask (z = -3.296, pmask, and 50% of the subjects had a residual AHI >10/h in the oronasal mask condition, even though all of these subjects were titrated to an AHI of mask compared with a nasal mask. Switching to an oronasal mask post titration results in an increase in residual AHI with CPAP treatment, and pressure adjustment may be warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Influence of nasal continuous positive airway pressure on response to exercise in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyłowski, Tadeusz; Bielicki, Piotr; Kumor, Marta; Hildebrand, Katarzyna; Maskey-Warzechowska, Marta; Wiwała, Joanna; Kościuch, Justyna; Korczyński, Piotr; Chazan, Ryszarda

    2006-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients are at risk of cardiovascular complications. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on the response to symptom limited exercise test. twenty nine OSAS patients (1 F, 28 M), mean age 50.7+/-9.7 yrs with body mass index of 32.6+/-4.5 kg/m2 participated in the study. OSAS was diagnosed by overnight polysomnography. Incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) on a treadmill was performed twice: before and after 2-3 weeks of regular treatment with CPAP. mean apnea + hypopnea index (AHI) before therapy was 57.6+/-12 h(-1). CPAP treatment did not change peak oxygen consumption (VO2max) (38.3+/-9.0 vs. 38.9+/-6.9 mlO2/kg/min, p=ns) or peak heart rate (153.4+/-21 min- vs. 155.5+/-22 min(-1), p=ns). There were no significant changes in ventilation or gas exchange variables. However, a decrease in peak systolic blood pressure from 194.5+/-24 mmHg to 186.7+/-27.9 mmHg (prate (at 1st minute and minutes 3 - 6) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) (minutes 4-7) with CPAP treatment was observed. Significant correlations between VO2max and AHI (r=-0,38, p<0,05); MAP at peak exercise and: AHI, mean oxygen saturation (SaO2) during sleep, minutes of sleep with SaO2<90% (T90); MAP at recovery (minutes 3-8) and T90 before CPAP treatment were also noted. OSAS patients are not limited on exercise. Treatment with nasal CPAP attenuates circulatory response to incremental exercise on a treadmill.

  5. Approximations to the electron energy distribution and positive column models for low-pressure discharge light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, G G; Sheverev, V A; Uhrlandt, D

    2002-01-01

    The applicability of 'fluid' models based on analytic approximations of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and of kinetic models for low-pressure discharge light sources is discussed. Traditionally, 'fluid' models of fluorescent lamps assume that the EEDF is Maxwellian up to the energy of the first excited state. It is shown that such an approach is sufficiently accurate in most cases of conventional as well as of 'highly loaded' fluorescent lamps. However, this assumption is strongly violated for many rare gas glow discharges for mercury free light sources. As an example, a neon dc discharge is studied. The densities of the four lowest excited states and the electric field have been measured. The experimental results can be fairly well reproduced by a kinetic positive column model. This article was scheduled to appear in issue 14 of J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. To access this special issue please follow this link: http://stacks.iop.org/0022-3727/35/i=14/

  6. Dynamic Characteristics of Mechanical Ventilation System of Double Lungs with Bi-Level Positive Airway Pressure Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongkai Shen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent studies on the dynamic characteristics of ventilation system, it was considered that human had only one lung, and the coupling effect of double lungs on the air flow can not be illustrated, which has been in regard to be vital to life support of patients. In this article, to illustrate coupling effect of double lungs on flow dynamics of mechanical ventilation system, a mathematical model of a mechanical ventilation system, which consists of double lungs and a bi-level positive airway pressure (BIPAP controlled ventilator, was proposed. To verify the mathematical model, a prototype of BIPAP system with a double-lung simulators and a BIPAP ventilator was set up for experimental study. Lastly, the study on the influences of key parameters of BIPAP system on dynamic characteristics was carried out. The study can be referred to in the development of research on BIPAP ventilation treatment and real respiratory diagnostics.

  7. Differential Effects of Intraoperative Positive End-expiratory Pressure (PEEP) on Respiratory Outcome in Major Abdominal Surgery Versus Craniotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jong, Myrthe A C; Ladha, Karim S; Melo, Marcos F Vidal

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this study, we examined whether (1) positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has a protective effect on the risk of major postoperative respiratory complications in a cohort of patients undergoing major abdominal surgeries and craniotomies, and (2) the effect of PEEP is differed......: Within the entire study population (major abdominal surgeries and craniotomies), we found an association between application of PEEP ≥5 cmH2O and a decreased risk of postoperative respiratory complications compared with PEEP 5 cmH2O was associated with a significant lower...... undergoing major abdominal surgery. Our data suggest that default mechanical ventilator settings should include PEEP of 5-10 cmH2O during major abdominal surgery....

  8. Homeostasis in Primates in the Hyperdynamic Environment. [circadian timekeeping and effects of lower body positive pressure on sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of chronic centrifugation upon the homestatic regulation of the circadian timekeeping system was examined. The interactions of body temperature regulation and the behavioral state of arousal were studied by evaluating the influence of cephalic fluid shifts induced by lower body positive air pressure (LBPP), upon these systems. The small diurnal squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) was used as the non-human primate model. Results show that the circadian timekeeping system of these primates is functional in the hyperdynamic environment, however, some of its components appear to be regulated at different homeostatic levels. The LBPP resulted in an approximate 0.7 C decrease in DBT (p 0.01). However, although on video some animals appeared drowsy during LBPP, sleep recording revealed no significant changes in state of arousal. Thus, the physiological mechanisms underlying this lowering of body temperature can be independent of the arousal state.

  9. Effect of continuous positive airway pressure ventilation on prethrombotic state in patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Dianbao; Chen Xiangkun; Sheng Chunyong; Zhang Yingying

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the prethrombotic state (PTS) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OS-AS) and the effect of continuous positive airway pressure ventilation (CPAP) on their PTS, the blood samples of 49 patients with OSAS were taken before treatment and on day 30 after treatment respectively. The platelet aggregation ( PAG), P-selections, endothdlin-1 (ET-1) and plasma vom willebrand factor (vWF) in 49 patients and 42 health controls were detected by radioimmunoassay and enzyme-immunoassay. The results showed that the PAG, P-selections, ET-1 and vWF in patients with OSAS before treatment were significantly higher than those after treatment and in control group (P 0.05). The results indicate that there were PTS in most patients with OSAS before treatment. The activity of platelet could be corrected, and the function of endotheliocyte could be repaired after CPAP treatment. It had certain effect in lightening the clinical symptoms. (authors)

  10. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to treat respiratory distress in newborns in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewez, Juan Emmanuel; van den Broek, Nynke

    2017-01-01

    Severe respiratory distress is a serious complication common to the three major causes of neonatal mortality and morbidity (prematurity, intra-partum-related hypoxia and infections). In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), 20% of babies presenting with severe respiratory distress die.Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), is an effective intervention for respiratory distress in newborns and widely used in high-income countries. Following the development of simple, safe and relatively inexpensive CPAP devices, there is potential for large-scale implementation in the developing world.In this article, we describe existing CPAP systems and present a review of the current literature examining the effectiveness of CPAP compared to standard care (oxygen) in newborns with respiratory distress. We also discuss the evidence gap which needs to be addressed prior to its integration into health systems in LMICs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. The effect of consumer pressure and abiotic stress on positive plant interactions are mediated by extreme climatic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filazzola, Alessandro; Liczner, Amanda Rae; Westphal, Michael; Lortie, Christopher J

    2018-01-01

    Environmental extremes resulting from a changing climate can have profound implications for plant interactions in desert communities. Positive interactions can buffer plant communities from abiotic stress and consumer pressure caused by climatic extremes, but limited research has explored this empirically. We tested the hypothesis that the mechanism of shrub facilitation on an annual plant community can change with precipitation extremes in deserts. During years of extreme drought and above-average rainfall in a desert, we measured plant interactions and biomass while manipulating a soil moisture gradient and reducing consumer pressure. Shrubs facilitated the annual plant community at all levels of soil moisture through reductions in microclimatic stress in both years and herbivore protection in the wet year only. Shrub facilitation and the high rainfall year contributed to the dominance of a competitive annual species in the plant community. Precipitation patterns in deserts determine the magnitude and type of facilitation mechanisms. Moreover, shrub facilitation mediates the interspecific competition within the associated annual community between years with different rainfall amounts. Examining multiple drivers during extreme climate events is a challenging area of research, but it is a necessary consideration given forecasts predicting that these events will increase in frequency and magnitude. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Bi-level positive pressure ventilation and adaptive servo ventilation in patients with heart failure and Cheyne-Stokes respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietze, Ingo; Blau, Alexander; Glos, Martin; Theres, Heinz; Baumann, Gert; Penzel, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    Nocturnal positive pressure ventilation (PPV) has been shown to be effective in patients with impaired left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). We investigated the effect of a bi-level PPV and adaptive servo ventilation on LVEF, CSR, and quantitative sleep quality. Thirty-seven patients (New York heart association [NYHA] II-III) with LVEFCSR were investigated by electrocardiography (ECG), echocardiography and polysomnography. The CSR index (CSRI) was 32.3+/-16.2/h. Patients were randomly treated with bi-level PPV using the standard spontaneous/timed (S/T) mode or with adaptive servo ventilation mode (AutoSetCS). After 6 weeks, 30 patients underwent control investigations with ECG, echocardiography, and polysomnography. The CSRI decreased significantly to 13.6+/-13.4/h. LVEF increased significantly after 6 weeks of ventilation (from 25.1+/-8.5 to 28.8+/-9.8%, plevel PPV and adaptive servo ventilation: the CSRI decreased more in the AutoSetCS group while the LVEF increased more in the bi-level PPV group. Administration of PPV can successfully attenuate CSA. Reduced CSA may be associated with improved LVEF; however, this may depend on the mode of PPV. Changed LVEF is evident even in the absence of significant changes in blood pressure.

  13. A real-world comparison of apnea-hypopnea indices of positive airway pressure device and polysomnography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritwick Agrawal

    Full Text Available The apnea hypopnea index (AHI reported by positive airway pressure (PAP device is widely used in clinical practice, yet its correlation with standardized AHI obtained during the sleep study is not established. The current study was conducted to investigate the correlation between AHI estimated by the PAP device and reported on the smart card with the AHI found during the PAP polysomnography (PSG in the "real world" setting at an academic sleep center. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 280 patients who underwent a PAP titration PSG at Drexel sleep center, and were later prescribed a PAP device. The AHI was categorized in clinically relevant subgroups (as AHI ≤5 and AHI >5. The AHI at the final pressure on the PSG and the average AHI from the prescribed PAP device were compared. The results showed that in the majority (77.3% of patients (126 of 163, the AHI from both PAP device and PSG correlated well and were in the same category (AHI ≤5 and AHI >5 respectively. The majority of patients (80.7% with PSG AHI of 5, 61.5% patients reported good control, with AHI <5 on PAP device AHI. We conclude that in a majority of patients who were optimally titrated in the sleep laboratory, the PAP device continued to show optimal control at home.

  14. Efficacy of the addition of positive airway pressure to conventional chest physiotherapy in resolution of pleural effusion after drainage: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elinaldo da Conceição dos Santos

    2015-04-01

    Discussion: Conventional chest physiotherapy and intermittent positive airway pressure breathing are widely indicated for people with pleural effusion and chest drains; however, no studies have evaluated the real benefit of this type of treatment. Our hypothesis is that optimised lung expansion achieved through the application of intermittent positive airway pressure will accelerate the reabsorption of pleural effusion, decrease the duration of chest drainage and respiratory system impairment, reduce the length of hospital stay, and reduce the incidence of pulmonary complications.

  15. Experience of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (cpap) by infant flow driver in a neonatal unit of a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, A.; Waqar, T.; Safdar, C.A.; Iqbal, T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the safety and efficacy of nasal continuous positive airways pressure by infant flow drivers in neonates admitted with respiratory problems. Study Design: Quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted at CMH Lahore from April 2012 to March 2013. Subjects and Methods: All infants who were treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) for various indications at neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of CMH Lahore were evaluated for gestational, age, weight, gender, indications and duration on nCPAP, pre-defined outcomes, complications and length of hospital stay. Efficacy was defined as the ability to manage an infant on nCPAP alone thus avoiding the need for mechanical ventilation. Results: During the study period, 343 neonates were admitted in NICU, forty five neonates were placed on nCPAP. Mean gestational age was 33.85+ 3 weeks. Mean weight was 2043 + 770 grams. Main indications for applying nCPAP were respiratory distress syndrome (48.9%) and neonatal pneumonia (17.8%). Most common complication was abdominal distension (6.7%). Out of 45 infants placed on nCPAP, 32 (71.1%) were managed on nCPAP alone while 13 (28.9%) needed mechanical ventilation after nCPAP failure. Conclusion: Nasal CPAP by an infant flow driver is a useful method to manage respiratory distress in neonates. It reduces the need for mechanical ventilation and can be used as first line respiratory support before mechanical ventilation. (author)

  16. Role of spousal involvement in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP adherence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batool-Anwar S

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Little is known about the impact of spousal involvement on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP adherence. The aim of this study was to determine whether spouse involvement affects adherence with CPAP therapy, and how this association varies with gender. Methods: 194 subjects recruited from Apnea Positive Pressure Long Term Efficacy Study (APPLES completed the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS. The majority of participants were Caucasian (83%, and males (73%, with mean age of 56 years, mean BMI of 31 kg/m2. & 62% had severe OSA. The DAS is a validated 32-item self-report instrument measuring dyadic consensus, satisfaction, cohesion, and affectional expression. A high score in the DAS is indicative of a person’s adjustment to the marriage. Additionally, questions related to spouse involvement with general health and CPAP use were asked. CPAP use was downloaded from the device and self-report, and compliance was defined as usage > 4 h per night. Results: There were no significant differences in overall marital quality between the compliant and noncompliant subjects. However, level of spousal involvement was associated with increased CPAP adherence at 6 months (p=0.01. After stratifying for gender these results were significant only among males (p=0.03. Three years after completing APPLES, level of spousal involvement was not associated with CPAP compliance even after gender stratification. Conclusion: Spousal involvement is important in determining CPAP compliance in males in the 1st 6 months after initiation of therapy but is not predictive of longer-term adherence. Involvement of the spouse should be considered an integral part of CPAP initiation procedures.

  17. Influence of Head and Neck Position on Oropharyngeal Leak Pressure and Cuff Position with the ProSeal Laryngeal Mask Airway and the I-Gel: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was designed to assess and compare the effect of head and neck position on the oropharyngeal leak pressures and cuff position (employing fibreoptic view of the glottis and ventilation scores between ProSeal LMA and the I-gel. Material and Methods. After induction of anesthesia, the supraglottic device was inserted and ventilation confirmed. The position of the head was randomly changed from neutral to flexion, extension, and lateral rotation (left. The oropharyngeal leak pressures, fibreoptic view of glottis, ventilation scores, and delivered tidal volumes and end tidal CO2 were noted in all positions. Results. In both groups compared with neutral position, oropharyngeal leak pressures were significantly higher with flexion and lower with extension but similar with rotation of head and neck. However the oropharyngeal leak pressure was significantly higher for ProSeal LMA compared with the I-gel in all positions. Peak airway pressures were significantly higher with flexion in both groups (however this did not affect ventilation, lower with extension in ProSeal group, and comparable in I-gel group but did not change significantly with rotation of head and neck in both groups. Conclusion. Effective ventilation can be done with both ProSeal LMA and I-gel with head in all the above positions. ProSeal LMA has a better margin of safety than I-gel due to better sealing pressures except in flexion where the increase in airway pressure is more with the former. Extreme precaution should be taken in flexion position in ProSeal LMA.

  18. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on intraoperative core temperature in patients undergoing posterior spine surgery: prospective randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyungseok; Do Son, Je; Lee, Hyung-Chul; Oh, Hyung-Min; Jung, Chul-Woo; Park, Hee-Pyoung

    2018-03-01

    Objective Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) causes carotid baroreceptor unloading, which leads to thermoregulatory peripheral vasoconstriction. However, the effects of PEEP on intraoperative thermoregulation in the prone position remain unknown. Methods Thirty-seven patients undergoing spine surgery in the prone position were assigned at random to receive either 10 cmH 2 O PEEP (Group P) or no PEEP (Group Z). The primary endpoint was core temperature 180 minutes after intubation. Secondary endpoints were delta core temperature (difference in core temperature between 180 minutes and immediately after tracheal intubation), incidence of intraoperative hypothermia (core temperature of peripheral vasoconstriction-related data. Results The median [interquartile range] core temperature 180 minutes after intubation was 36.1°C [35.9°C-36.2°C] and 36.0°C [35.9°C-36.4°C] in Groups Z and P, respectively. The delta core temperature and incidences of intraoperative hypothermia and peripheral vasoconstriction were not significantly different between the two groups. The peripheral vasoconstriction threshold (36.2°C±0.5°C vs. 36.7°C±0.6°C) was lower and the onset of peripheral vasoconstriction (66 [60-129] vs. 38 [28-70] minutes) was slower in Group Z than in Group P. Conclusions Intraoperative PEEP did not reduce the core temperature decrease in the prone position, although it resulted in an earlier onset and higher threshold of peripheral vasoconstriction.

  19. Isopiestic determination of the osmotic coefficient and vapour pressure of N-R-4-(N,N-dimethylamino)pyridinium tetrafluoroborate (R = C4H9, C5H11, C6H13) in the ethanol solution at T = 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardroodi, Jaber Jahanbin; Atabay, Maryam; Azamat, Jafar

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The osmotic coefficients of the solutions of ionic liquid in ethanol have been measured. ► Measured osmotic coefficients were correlated using Pitzer, e-NRTL and NRF models and polynomial equation. ► Vapour pressures were evaluated from the correlated osmotic coefficients. - Abstract: Osmotic coefficients of the solutions of room temperature ionic liquid N-R-4-(N,N-dimethylamino)pyridinium tetrafluoroborate (R = C 4 H 9 , C 5 H 11 , C 6 H 13 ) in ethanol have been measured at T = 298.15 K by the isopiestic method. The experimental osmotic coefficients have been correlated using the ion interaction model of Pitzer, electrolyte non-random two liquid (e-NRTL) model of Chen, non-random factor (NRF) and a fourth-order polynomial in terms of molality. The vapour pressures of the solutions studied have been evaluated from the osmotic coefficients.

  20. Laser-based air data system for aircraft control using Raman and elastic backscatter for the measurement of temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraczek, Michael; Behrendt, Andreas; Schmitt, Nikolaus

    2012-01-10

    Flight safety in all weather conditions demands exact and reliable determination of flight-critical air parameters. Air speed, temperature, density, and pressure are essential for aircraft control. Conventional air data systems can be impacted by probe failure caused by mechanical damage from hail, volcanic ash, and icing. While optical air speed measurement methods have been discussed elsewhere, in this paper, a new concept for optically measuring the air temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter is presented, being independent on assumptions on the atmospheric state and eliminating the drawbacks of conventional aircraft probes by providing a different measurement principle. The concept is based on a laser emitting laser pulses into the atmosphere through a window and detecting the signals backscattered from a fixed region just outside the disturbed area of the fuselage flows. With four receiver channels, different spectral portions of the backscattered light are extracted. The measurement principle of air temperature and density is based on extracting two signals out of the rotational Raman (RR) backscatter signal of air molecules. For measuring the water vapor mixing ratio-and thus the density of the moist air-a water vapor Raman channel is included. The fourth channel serves to detect the elastic backscatter signal, which is essential for extending the measurements into clouds. This channel contributes to the detection of aerosols, which is interesting for developing a future volcanic ash warning system for aircraft. Detailed and realistic optimization and performance calculations have been performed based on the parameters of a first prototype of such a measurement system. The impact and correction of systematic error sources, such as solar background at daytime and elastic signal cross talk appearing in optically dense clouds, have been investigated. The results of the simulations show the high potential of the proposed system for

  1. [Effect of oxygen tubing connection site on percutaneous oxygen partial pressure and percutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during noninvasive positive pressure ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, S; Zhang, L M

    2017-04-12

    Objective: We evaluated the effects of administering oxygen through nasal catheters inside the mask or through the mask on percutaneous oxygen partial pressure (PcO(2))and percutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressure (PcCO(2)) during noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) to find a better way of administering oxygen, which could increase PcO(2) by increasing the inspired oxygen concentration. Methods: Ten healthy volunteers and 9 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease complicated by type Ⅱ respiratory failure were included in this study. Oxygen was administered through a nasal catheter inside the mask or through the mask (oxygen flow was 3 and 5 L/min) during NPPV. PcO(2) and PcCO(2) were measured to evaluate the effects of administering oxygen through a nasal catheter inside the mask or through the mask, indirectly reflecting the effects of administering oxygen through nasal catheter inside the mask or through the mask on inspired oxygen concentration. Results: Compared to administering oxygen through the mask during NPPV, elevated PcO(2) was measured in administering oxygen through the nasal catheter inside the mask, and the differences were statistically significant ( P 0.05). Conclusion: Administering oxygen through a nasal catheter inside the mask during NPPV increased PcO(2) by increasing the inspired oxygen concentration but did not increase PcCO(2). This method of administering oxygen could conserve oxygen and be suitable for family NPPV. Our results also provided theoretical basis for the development of new masks.

  2. Beat-by-beat analysis of cardiac output and blood pressure responses to short-term barostimulation in different body positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Wulf; Schütze, Harald; Stegemann, J.

    Rapid quantification of the human baro-reflex control of heart rate has been achieved on a beat-by-beat basis using a neck-chamber with quick ECG-triggered pressure changes. Referring to recent findings on heart rate and stroke volume, the present study uses this technique to compare cardiac output as well as blood pressure changes in supine and upright position to investigate feedback effects and to confirm postural reflex modifications not revealed by RR-interval changes. A suction profile starting at +40 mmHg and running 7 steps of pressure decrease down to -65 mmHg was examined in 0° and 90° tilting position while beat-by-beat recordings were done of heart rate, stroke volume (impedance-cardiography) and blood pressure (Finapres tm) (n=16). The percentual heart rate decrease failed to be significantly different between positions. A suction-induced stroke volume increase led to a cardiac output almost maintained when supine and significantly increased when upright. A decrease in all blood pressure values was found during suction, except for systolic values in upright position which increased. Conclusively, (a) it is confirmed that different inotropy accounts for the seen gravitational effect on the cardiac output not represented by heart rate; (b) identical suction levels in different positions lead to different stimuli at the carotid receptor. This interference has to be considered in microgravity studies by beat-by-beat measurement of cardiac output and blood pressure.

  3. Can we measure the intraocular pressure when the eyeball is against the pillow in the lateral decubitus position?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Soong; Park, Ki Ho; Jeoung, Jin Wook

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the amount of intraocular pressure (IOP) change in the eye against the pillow in the lateral decubitus position (LDP). Thirty eyes from 15 healthy volunteers (12 men and three women) aged 29 ± 3 (range 25-37) years participated in this study. Using the rebound tonometer (Icare PRO, Icare Finland Oy, Helsinki, Finland), the IOP of both eyes was checked in sitting, supine, right and left LDPs. In the LDP, the additional IOP measurements were taken with the lower eyeball against the latex pillow. Baseline IOP in the sitting position was 12.7 ± 1.9 mmHg in the right eye and 12.8 ± 2.2 mmHg in the left eye. Ten minutes after shifting from the sitting to the supine position, IOP increased significantly (right eye: +1.4 ± 1.4 mmHg, p = 0.006; left eye: +1.8 ± 1.5 mmHg, p = 0.001). Changing from the supine to the right and left LDP increased significantly the IOP of dependent eye (right eye: +2.3 ± 1.8 mmHg, p = 0.001; left eye: +1.5 ± 1.8 mmHg, p = 0.011). When the dependent eye was compressed against the pillow in the LDP, the IOP of the dependent eyes increased significantly after 10 min (right eye in the right LDP: +4.1 ± 4.9 mmHg, p = 0.011; left eye in the left LDP: +3.4 ± 3.7 mmHg, p = 0.006). The IOP was significantly elevated when the eyeball was against the pillow in the LDP. © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. The effect of spherical hub-nose position on pressure drop in an oscillating water column system for wave energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taha, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ghazilla, R.A.R.; Yap, H.J.; Ya, T.Y.T.; Passarella, R.; Hasanuddin, I.; Yunus, M. [Malaya Univ. (Malaysia). Centre for Product Design and Manufacturing; Sugiyono [Malaya Univ., (Malaysia). Centre for Product Design and Manufacturing; Gadjah Mada Univ. (Indonesia). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    2009-07-01

    The use of renewable energy sources as an alternative to conventional fuels was discussed with particular reference to ocean wave energy and its potential to contribute to the energy requirements of coastal nations. Ocean wave energy has been harnessed and converted into electricity using processes and technologies that are environmentally sound. The oscillating water column (OWC) system is considered to be among the most promising technology for harnessing wave energy. This paper presented the results of a study that investigated the pressure drop in an OWC system and the effect of spherical hub-nose position in an annular duct. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was used under steady flow conditions for several hub-nose positions to determine the characteristic of pressure drop. The study showed that the hub-nose position influenced the pressure drop in the OWC system. The highest value of the pressure drop in this study occurred when the hub-nose was at the position of 0.0 m relative to the end of the converging cone. The pressure drop decreased when the hub-nose position moved away from the end of converging cone. The lowest value occurred at the position of -0.5 m. It was concluded that despite the numerically small change in pressure drop, this phenomenon should be considered in the design process of the OWC system because of the operational condition of the system at low-pressure pneumatic power. The pressure drop actually reduces the amount of energy that will be converted by the air turbine. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  5. The effect of obstructive sleep apnea and treatment with continuous positive airway pressure on stroke rehabilitation: rationale, design and methods of the TOROS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaronson, Justine A.; van Bennekom, Coen A. M.; Hofman, Winni F.; van Bezeij, Tijs; van den Aardweg, Joost G.; Groet, Erny; Kylstra, Wytske A.; Schmand, Ben A.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder in stroke patients. Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with stroke severity and poor functional outcome. Continuous positive airway pressure seems to improve functional recovery in stroke rehabilitation. To date, the effect of continuous positive

  6. Transfer coefficients for plate fin and elliptical tube heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saboya, S.M.; Saboya, F.E.M.

    1981-01-01

    In order to determine transfer coefficients for plate fin and elliptical tube exchangers, mass transfer experiments have been performed using the naphthalene sublimation technique. By means of the heat-mass transfer analogy, the results can be converted to heat transfer results. The transfer coefficients were compared with those for circular tube exchangers and the comparison revealed no major differences. This is a positive outcome, since the use of elliptical tubes may reduce substantially the pressure drop, without affecting the transfer characteristics.(Author) [pt

  7. Effects of nasal positive expiratory pressure on dynamic hyperinflation and 6-minute walk test in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibmer, Thomas; Rüdiger, Stefan; Heitner, Claudia; Kropf-Sanchen, Cornelia; Blanta, Ioanna; Stoiber, Kathrin M; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Schumann, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation is an important target in the treatment of COPD. There is increasing evidence that positive expiratory pressure (PEP) could reduce dynamic hyperinflation during exercise. PEP application through a nasal mask and a flow resistance device might have the potential to be used during daily physical activities as an auxiliary strategy of ventilatory assistance. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of nasal PEP on lung volumes during physical exercise in patients with COPD. Twenty subjects (mean ± SD age 69.4 ± 6.4 years) with stable mild-to-severe COPD were randomized to undergo physical exercise with nasal PEP breathing, followed by physical exercise with habitual breathing, or vice versa. Physical exercise was induced by a standard 6-min walk test (6 MWT) protocol. PEP was applied by means of a silicone nasal mask loaded with a fixed-orifice flow resistor. Body plethysmography was performed immediately pre-exercise and post-exercise. Differences in mean pre- to post-exercise changes in total lung capacity (-0.63 ± 0.80 L, P = .002), functional residual capacity (-0.48 ± 0.86 L, P = .021), residual volume (-0.56 ± 0.75 L, P = .004), S(pO2) (-1.7 ± 3.4%, P = .041), and 6 MWT distance (-30.8 ± 30.0 m, P = .001) were statistically significant between the experimental and the control interventions. The use of flow-dependent expiratory pressure, applied with a nasal mask and a PEP device, might promote significant reduction of dynamic hyperinflation during walking exercise. Further studies are warranted addressing improvements in endurance performance under regular application of nasal PEP during physical activities.

  8. Application of dead space fraction to titrate optimal positive end-expiratory pressure in an ARDS swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Weishuai; Chen, Wei; Chao, Yangong; Wang, Lan; Li, Liming; Guan, Jian; Zang, Xuefeng; Zhen, Jie; Sheng, Bo; Zhu, Xi

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to apply the dead space fraction [ratio of dead space to tidal volume (VD/VT)] to titrate the optimal positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in a swine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Twelve swine models of ARDS were constructed. A lung recruitment maneuver was then conducted and the PEEP was set at 20 cm H 2 O. The PEEP was reduced by 2 cm H 2 O every 10 min until 0 cm H 2 O was reached, and VD/VT was measured after each decrement step. VD/VT was measured using single-breath analysis of CO 2 , and calculated from arterial CO 2 partial pressure (PaCO 2 ) and mixed expired CO 2 (PeCO 2 ) using the following formula: VD/VT = (PaCO 2 - PeCO 2 )/PaCO 2 . The optimal PEEP was identified by the lowest VD/VT method. Respiration and hemodynamic parameters were recorded during the periods of pre-injury and injury, and at 4 and 2 cm H 2 O below and above the optimal PEEP (Po). The optimal PEEP in this study was found to be 13.25±1.36 cm H 2 O. During the Po period, VD/VT decreased to a lower value (0.44±0.08) compared with that during the injury period (0.68±0.10) (P<0.05), while the intrapulmonary shunt fraction reached its lowest value. In addition, a significant change of dynamic tidal respiratory compliance and oxygenation index was induced by PEEP titration. These results indicate that minimal VD/VT can be used for PEEP titration in ARDS.

  9. Differing responses in right and left ventricular filling, loading and volumes during positive end-expiratory pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulman, D.S.; Biondi, J.W.; Matthay, R.A.; Zaret, B.L.; Soufer, R.

    1989-01-01

    Using a combined hemodynamic and radionuclide technique, 20 patients with varied ventricular function were evaluated during positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) application. Left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) ejection fractions and cardiac output were measured, and ventricular volumes were derived. Seven patients (group 1) who had an increase in LV end-diastolic volume with PEEP and 13 patients (group 2) who had the more typical response, a decrease in LV end-diastolic volume with PEEP, were identified. Compared with group 2, group 1 patients had a higher incidence of coronary artery disease (5 of 7 vs 1 of 13, p less than 0.005) and lower cardiac output (3.9 +/- 1.6 vs 9.1 +/- 3.2 liters/min, p less than 0.005), LV ejection fraction (27 +/- 13 vs 51 +/- 21%, p less than 0.05), RV ejection fraction (15 +/- 6 vs 32 +/- 8%, p less than 0.005) and peak filling rate (1.32 +/- 0.43 vs 3.51 +/- 1.70 end-diastolic volumes/s, p less than 0.05). LV and RV volumes increased and peak filling rate decreased with PEEP in group 1, whereas in group 2 LV volume decreased and RV volume and peak filling rate remained unchanged. Using stepwise regression analysis, the change in LV volume with PEEP was related directly to baseline systemic vascular resistance and inversely to baseline blood pressure. Similarly, the change in peak filling rate with PEEP was inversely related to the change in RV end-diastolic volume. Thus, the hemodynamic response to PEEP is heterogeneous and may be related to LV ischemia

  10. Sleep Apnea Related Risk of Motor Vehicle Accidents is Reduced by Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: Swedish Traffic Accident Registry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mahssa; Hedner, Jan; Häbel, Henrike; Nerman, Olle; Grote, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with an increased risk of motor vehicle accidents (MVAs). The rate of MVAs in patients suspected of having OSA was determined and the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was investigated. Design: MVA rate in patients referred for OSA was compared to the rate in the general population using data from the Swedish Traffic Accident Registry (STRADA), stratified for age and calendar year. The risk factors for MVAs, using demographic and polygraphy data, and MVA rate before and after CPAP were evaluated in the patient group. Setting: Clinical sleep laboratory and population based control (n = 635,786). Patients: There were 1,478 patients, male sex 70.4%, mean age 53.6 (12.8) y. Interventions: CPAP. Measurements and Results: The number of accidents (n = 74) among patients was compared with the expected number (n = 30) from a control population (STRADA). An increased MVA risk ratio of 2.45 was found among patients compared with controls (P accident risk was most prominent in the elderly patients (65–80 y, seven versus two MVAs). In patients, driving distance (km/y), EDS (Epworth Sleepiness score ≥ 16), short habitual sleep time (≤ 5 h/night), and use of hypnotics were associated with increased MVA risk (odds ratios 1.2, 2.1, 2.7 and 2.1, all P ≤ 0.03). CPAP use ≥ 4 h/night was associated with a reduction of MVA incidence (7.6 to 2.5 accidents/1,000 drivers/y). Conclusions: The motor vehicle accident risk in this large cohort of unselected patients with obstructive sleep apnea suggests a need for accurate tools to identify individuals at risk. Sleep apnea severity (e.g., apnea-hypopnea index) failed to identify patients at risk. Citation: Karimi M, Hedner J, Häbel H, Nerman O, Grote L. Sleep apnea related risk of motor vehicle accidents is reduced by continuous positive airway pressure: Swedish traffic accident registry data. SLEEP 2015;38(3):341–349. PMID:25325460

  11. Role of Positive Airway Pressure Therapy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Patients With Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anupama; Shukla, Garima; Afsar, Mohammed; Poornima, Shivani; Pandey, Ravindra M.; Goyal, Vinay; Srivastava, Achal; Vibha, Deepti; Behari, Madhuri

    2018-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an independent risk factor for stroke. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on prevention of new vascular events among patients with stroke and OSA. Methods: Consecutive conscious patients presenting with first imaging-confirmed arterial stroke were included, 6 weeks or more after ictus. All patients underwent clinical and polysomnography (PSG) testing. Patients with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of > 15 events/h were randomized to posttitration nightly CPAP treatment and non-CPAP (received best medical treatment) groups. On follow-up at 3, 6, and 12 months from randomization, evaluation was carried out for any new vascular events as the primary outcome measure, and for clinical stroke outcomes (using the Barthel Index and modified Rankin scale) and neuropsychological parameters as the secondary outcome measures. Results: Among the 679 patients with stroke who were screened, 116 reported for PSG, 83 had AHI > 15 events/h, and 70 (34 in CPAP and 36 in non-CPAP) were randomized. Thirteen patients could not be randomized because of a lack of CPAP devices. Four patients crossed over from the CPAP to the non-CPAP group. Age (mean age 53.41 ± 9.85 in CPAP versus 52.69 ± 13.23 years in non-CPAP, P = .81) and sex distribution (24 males in CPAP versus 33 males in non-CPAP, P = .79) were similar in both groups. At 12-month follow-up, there was 1 vascular event (3.33%) in the CPAP group and 6 events (15%) in the non-CPAP group (P = .23). Modified Rankin scale score improvement by ≥ 1 at 12-month follow-up was found in significantly more patients in the CPAP group than in the non-CPAP group (53% versus 27%). Conclusions: These findings suggest significantly better stroke outcomes and statistically nonsignificant favorable outcomes in terms of recurrence of vascular events for patients with stroke and OSA who use CPAP treatment. Clinical Trial

  12. Apparent diffusion coefficient measurements in diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the anterior mediastinum: inter-observer reproducibility of five different methods of region-of-interest positioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priola, Adriano Massimiliano; Priola, Sandro Massimo; Parlatano, Daniela; Gned, Dario; Veltri, Andrea [San Luigi Gonzaga University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Regione Gonzole 10, Orbassano, Torino (Italy); Giraudo, Maria Teresa [University of Torino, Department of Mathematics ' ' Giuseppe Peano' ' , Torino (Italy); Giardino, Roberto; Ardissone, Francesco [San Luigi Gonzaga University Hospital, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Regione Gonzole 10, Orbassano, Torino (Italy); Ferrero, Bruno [San Luigi Gonzaga University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Regione Gonzole 10, Orbassano, Torino (Italy)

    2017-04-15

    To investigate inter-reader reproducibility of five different region-of-interest (ROI) protocols for apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements in the anterior mediastinum. In eighty-one subjects, on ADC mapping, two readers measured the ADC using five methods of ROI positioning that encompassed the entire tissue (whole tissue volume [WTV], three slices observer-defined [TSOD], single-slice [SS]) or the more restricted areas (one small round ROI [OSR], multiple small round ROI [MSR]). Inter-observer variability was assessed with interclass correlation coefficient (ICC), coefficient of variation (CoV), and Bland-Altman analysis. Nonparametric tests were performed to compare the ADC between ROI methods. The measurement time was recorded and compared between ROI methods. All methods showed excellent inter-reader agreement with best and worst reproducibility in WTV and OSR, respectively (ICC, 0.937/0.874; CoV, 7.3 %/16.8 %; limits of agreement, ±0.44/±0.77 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s). ADC values of OSR and MSR were significantly lower compared to the other methods in both readers (p < 0.001). The SS and OSR methods required less measurement time (14 ± 2 s) compared to the others (p < 0.0001), while the WTV method required the longest measurement time (90 ± 56 and 77 ± 49 s for each reader) (p < 0.0001). All methods demonstrate excellent inter-observer reproducibility with the best agreement in WTV, although it requires the longest measurement time. (orig.)

  13. Physiologic Evaluation of Ventilation Perfusion Mismatch and Respiratory Mechanics at Different Positive End-expiratory Pressure in Patients Undergoing Protective One-lung Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadaro, Savino; Grasso, Salvatore; Karbing, Dan Stieper; Fogagnolo, Alberto; Contoli, Marco; Bollini, Giacomo; Ragazzi, Riccardo; Cinnella, Gilda; Verri, Marco; Cavallesco, Narciso Giorgio; Rees, Stephen Edward; Volta, Carlo Alberto

    2018-03-01

    Arterial oxygenation is often impaired during one-lung ventilation, due to both pulmonary shunt and atelectasis. The use of low tidal volume (VT) (5 ml/kg predicted body weight) in the context of a lung-protective approach exacerbates atelectasis. This study sought to determine the combined physiologic effects of positive end-expiratory pressure and low VT during one-lung ventilation. Data from 41 patients studied during general anesthesia for thoracic surgery were collected and analyzed. Shunt fraction, high V/Q and respiratory mechanics were measured at positive end-expiratory pressure 0 cm H2O during bilateral lung ventilation and one-lung ventilation and, subsequently, during one-lung ventilation at 5 or 10 cm H2O of positive end-expiratory pressure. Shunt fraction and high V/Q were measured using variation of inspired oxygen fraction and measurement of respiratory gas concentration and arterial blood gas. The level of positive end-expiratory pressure was applied in random order and maintained for 15 min before measurements. During one-lung ventilation, increasing positive end-expiratory pressure from 0 cm H2O to 5 cm H2O and 10 cm H2O resulted in a shunt fraction decrease of 5% (0 to 11) and 11% (5 to 16), respectively (P ventilation, high positive end-expiratory pressure levels improve pulmonary function without increasing high V/Q and reduce driving pressure.

  14. Effects of positive airway pressure therapy on cardiovascular and metabolic markers in males with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, A; Oliveira, M J; Cysneiros, A; Martinho, C; Reis, R P; Penque, D; Pinto, P; Bárbara, C

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with cardiovascular/metabolic complications. Some analytical parameters (homocysteine, glycemic and lipidic profiles) are recognized markers of these consequences. Limited data is available on the association of these markers and OSAS's severity/response to positive airway pressure therapy (PAP). In this prospective study we analyzed polysomnographic and analytical data of male patients admitted to sleep laboratory. The aim was to evaluate metabolic/cardiovascular markers in snorers and OSAS patients, to relate with sleep parameters and PAP response. One-hundred and three patients were included, and 73 (71%) were OSAS patients. OSAS patients were similar to snorers except for higher body mass index (BMI) and dyslipidemia. Severe OSAS patients showed higher glycemia, HbA1c, insulin, and insulin resistance, and lower HDL cholesterol in comparison to mild-moderate (pprofile and triglycerides were slightly correlated with OSAS severity. 46 OSAS patients were submitted to 6 months of PAP, with a statistical decrease in mean values of homocysteine, glycemia, total and LDL cholesterol (pprofiles changed significantly after 6 months of PAP therapy in OSAS, supporting its cardiovascular and metabolic protective effect. Our study has reinforced the importance of analytical cardiovascular/metabolic evaluation as complementary tool of diagnosis/treatment response in OSAS. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Estimates of cost-effectiveness of prehospital continuous positive airway pressure in the management of acute pulmonary edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubble, Michael W; Richards, Michael E; Wilfong, Denise A

    2008-01-01

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in managing prehospital acute pulmonary edema in an urban EMS system. Using estimates from published reports on prehospital and emergency department CPAP, a cost-effectiveness model of implementing CPAP in a typical urban EMS system was derived from the societal perspective as well as the perspective of the implementing EMS system. To assess the robustness of the model, a series of univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses was performed on the input variables. The cost of consumables, equipment, and training yielded a total cost of $89 per CPAP application. The theoretical system would be expected to use CPAP 4 times per 1000 EMS patients and is expected to save 0.75 additional lives per 1000 EMS patients at a cost of $490 per life saved. CPAP is also expected to result in approximately one less intubation per 6 CPAP applications and reduce hospitalization costs by $4075 per year for each CPAP application. Through sensitivity analyses the model was verified to be robust across a wide range of input variable assumptions. Previous studies have demonstrated the clinical effectiveness of CPAP in the management of acute pulmonary edema. Through a theoretical analysis which modeled the costs and clinical benefits of implementing CPAP in an urban EMS system, prehospital CPAP appears to be a cost-effective treatment.

  16. Effects of 12 months continuous positive airway pressure on sympathetic activity related brainstem function and structure in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Anthony Henderson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA is greatly elevated in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA during normoxic daytime wakefulness. Increased MSNA is a precursor to hypertension and elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the mechanisms underlying the high MSNA in OSA are not well understood. In this study we used concurrent microneurography and magnetic resonance imaging to explore MSNA-related brainstem activity changes and anatomical changes in 15 control and 15 subjects with OSA prior to and following 6 and 12 months of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP treatment. We found that 6 and 12 months of CPAP treatment significantly reduced the elevated resting MSNA in individuals with OSA. Furthermore, this MSNA reduction was associated with restoration of MSNA-related activity and structural changes in the medullary raphe, rostral ventrolateral medulla, dorsolateral pons and ventral midbrain. This restoration occurred after 6 months of CPAP treatment and was maintained following 12 months CPAP. These findings show that continual CPAP treatment is an effective long-term treatment for elevated MNSA likely due to its effects on restoring brainstem structure and function.

  17. Influence of continuous positive airway pressure on outcomes of rehabilitation in stroke patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Clodagh M; Bayley, Mark; Green, Robin; Murray, Brian J; Bradley, T Douglas

    2011-04-01

    In stroke patients, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with poorer functional outcomes than in those without OSA. We hypothesized that treatment of OSA by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in stroke patients would enhance motor, functional, and neurocognitive recovery. This was a randomized, open label, parallel group trial with blind assessment of outcomes performed in stroke patients with OSA in a stroke rehabilitation unit. Patients were assigned to standard rehabilitation alone (control group) or to CPAP (CPAP group). The primary outcomes were the Canadian Neurological scale, the 6-minute walk test distance, sustained attention response test, and the digit or spatial span-backward. Secondary outcomes included Epworth Sleepiness scale, Stanford Sleepiness scale, Functional Independence measure, Chedoke McMaster Stroke assessment, neurocognitive function, and Beck depression inventory. Tests were performed at baseline and 1 month later. Patients assigned to CPAP (n=22) experienced no adverse events. Regarding primary outcomes, compared to the control group (n=22), the CPAP group experienced improvement in stroke-related impairment (Canadian Neurological scale score, PStroke assessment of upper and lower limb motor recovery test of the leg (P=0.001), and the affective component of depression (P=0.006), but not neurocognitive function. Treatment of OSA by CPAP in stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation improved functional and motor, but not neurocognitive outcomes. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00221065.

  18. Intratidal recruitment/derecruitment persists at low and moderate positive end-expiratory pressure in paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Steffen; Artner, Lisa; Broß, Tobias; Lozano-Zahonero, Sara; Spaeth, Johannes; Schumann, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    In paediatric patients positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is traditionally set lower than in adults. We investigated whether moderately higher PEEP improves respiratory mechanics and regional ventilation. Therefore, 40 children were mechanically ventilated with PEEP 2 and 5cmH 2 O. Volume-dependent compliance profiles were analysed as a measure of intratidal recruitment/derecruitment. Regional ventilation was assessed using electrical impedance tomography. Mean compliance was 17.9±9.9mLcmH 2 O -1 (PEEP 2cmH 2 O), and 19.0±10.9mLcmH 2 O -1 (PEEP 5 cmH 2 O, pventilation. In conclusion, mechanically ventilated paediatric patients undergo intratidal recruitment/derecruitment which occurs more prominently in younger than in older children. A PEEP of 5cmH 2 O does not fully prevent intratidal recruitment/derecruitment but homogenizes regional ventilation in comparison to 2cmH 2 O. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Intraabdominal fat redistribution in long-term continuous positive airway pressure treatment in obstructive sleep apnea patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Català, Raquel; Ferré, Raimón; Sangenís, Sandra; Cabré, Anna; Hernández-Flix, Salvador; Masana, Lluís

    2016-06-03

    Obesity is the main risk factor for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The aim was to evaluate the long-term effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on intraabdominal fat distribution in OSA patients. Fifty OSA patients with and 35 without CPAP treatment criteria were followed-up for 2 years. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue (VAT and SAT) and preaortic intraabdominal fat (PIF) were assessed by sonography. In the non CPAP treated group, SAT and VAT mean values didn't change, while a significantly PIF growth was observed (55.19 [23.44] vs. 63.45 [23.94] mm, P=.021). In the CPAP treated group, VAT and PIF mean were not changed, while SAT decreased significantly (11.29 [5.69] vs. 10.47 [5.71] mm, P=.012). Long-term CPAP treatment produces intraabdominal fat redistribution and is associated with an anthropometric profile of lower cardiovascular risk in OSA patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Kinetic theory of the positive column of a low-pressure discharge in a transverse magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Londer, Ya. I.; Ul’yanov, K. N.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of a transverse magnetic field on the characteristics of the positive column of a planar low-pressure discharge is studied theoretically. The motion of magnetized electrons is described in the framework of a continuous-medium model, while the ion motion in the ambipolar electric field is described by means of a kinetic equation. Using mathematical transformations, the problem is reduced to a secondorder ordinary differential equation, from which the spatial distribution of the potential is found in an analytic form. The spatial distributions of the plasma density, mean plasma velocity, and electric potential are calculated, the ion velocity distribution function at the plasma boundary is found, and the electron energy as a function of the magnetic field is determined. It is shown that, as the magnetic field rises, the electron energy increases, the distributions of the plasma density and mean plasma velocity become asymmetric, the maximum of the plasma density is displaced in the direction of the Ampère force, and the ion flux in this direction becomes substantially larger than the counter-directed ion flux.

  1. Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Adiponectin in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Meta-Analysis.

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    Li-Da Chen

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA has been suggested to be associated with low levels of adiponectin. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP is the gold standard treatment for OSA; however, previous studies assessing the effect of CPAP on adiponectin in patients with OSA yielded conflicting results. The present meta-analysis was performed to determine whether CPAP therapy could increase adiponectin levels.Two reviewers independently searched PubMed, Cochrane library, Embase and Web of Science before February 2015. Information on characteristics of subjects, study design and pre- and post-CPAP treatment of serum adiponectin was extracted for analysis. Standardized mean difference (SMD was used to analyze the summary estimates for CPAP therapy.Eleven studies involving 240 patients were included in this meta-analysis, including ten observational studies and one randomized controlled study. The meta-analysis showed that there was no change of adiponectin levels before and after CPAP treatment in OSA patients (SMD = 0.059, 95% confidence interval (CI = -0.250 to 0.368, z = 0.37, p = 0.710. Subgroup analyses indicated that the results were not affected by age, baseline body mass index, severity of OSA, CPAP therapy duration, sample size and racial differences.This meta-analysis suggested that CPAP therapy has no impact on adiponectin in OSA patients, without significant changes in body weight. Further large-scale, well-designed long-term interventional investigations are needed to clarify this issue.

  2. Oxidative stress mediated arterial dysfunction in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea and the effect of continuous positive airway pressure treatment

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    Del Ben Maria

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies suggest an increase of oxidative stress and a reduction of endothelial function in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS. We assessed the association between OSAS, endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Further aim was to evaluate the effect of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP on oxidative stress and arterial dysfunction. Methods We studied 138 consecutive patients with heavy snoring and possible OSAS. Patients underwent unattended overnight home polysomnography. Ten patients with severe OSAS were revaluated after 6 months of nCPAP therapy. To assess oxidative stress in vivo, we measured urinary 8-iso-PGF2α and serum levels of soluble NOX2-derived peptide (sNOX2-dp. Serum levels of nitrite/nitrate (NOx were also determined. Flow-mediated brachial artery dilation (FMD was measured to asses endothelial function. Results Patients with severe OSAS had higher urinary 8-iso-PGF2α (p Conclusions The results of our study indicate that patients with OSAS and cardiometabolic comorbidities have increased oxidative stress and arterial dysfunction that are partially reversed by nCPAP treatment.

  3. Self-Reported Napping Behavior Change After Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment in Older Adults with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Cheng-Fang; Riha, Renata L; Morrison, Ian; Hsu, Chung-Yao

    2016-08-01

    To assess the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on napping behavior in adults aged 60 and older with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Retrospective cohort study using questionnaires. Sleep center. Individuals starting CPAP treatment between April 2010 and March 2012 (mean age 65.2 ± 4.7; M:F = 3.9:1; N = 107). All subjects underwent sleep studies, clinical reviews, and CPAP adherence checks and completed a questionnaire regarding CPAP adherence, current employment status, sleep patterns before and after CPAP, and factors affecting their current sleep patterns. CPAP treatment duration was 82.7 ± 30.0 weeks, and objective adherence was 5.4 ± 2.0 hours per night overall. Daytime nap frequency before CPAP treatment was higher in those with a history of stroke or cardiovascular disease. Both sexes had a significant reduction in daytime napping (men, P napping (men, P nap duration (men, P nap duration was associated with younger age (odds ratio (OR) = 0.86, P = .04), a decrease in ESS score (OR = 1.20, P = .03), and longer self-reported daily nap duration at baseline (OR = 31.52, P nap frequency and daily nap duration. Aging or shorter baseline daily nap duration may attenuate this effect. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  4. Comparison of sprinting vs non-sprinting to wean nasal continuous positive airway pressure off in very preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, N; Murphy, D; Dhar, V; Rehan, V K

    2018-02-01

    Though nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) is commonly used for non-invasive neonatal respiratory support, the optimal method of weaning NCPAP is not established. In this prospective, two-center randomized control trial we hypothesize that gradually increasing spontaneous breathing time off NCPAP increases successful weaning from NCPAP in infants born 0.05). It took 1.3 (1 to 1.75) (median (IQR)) attempts and 7 (7 to 7) days to wean NCPAP off in the sprinting group vs 1.3 (1 to 1.75) attempts and 7 (7 to 10) days in the non-sprinting group (P>0.05). Additionally, no differences in the secondary outcomes of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, severe retinopathy of prematurity (⩾stage 3), periventricular leukomalacia and length of stay were noted between the two groups. Weaning NCPAP via sprinting or non-sprinting protocol is comparable, not only for successful weaning but also for the occurrence of common neonatal morbidities that impact the long-term outcome in premature infants (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02819050).

  5. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on hemorheology and serum inflammatory factors in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye-Jun Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP on hemorheology and serum inflammatory factors in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS. Methods: A total of 87 patients with moderate and severe OSAHS from Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery of South Central Hospital of Wuhan University and Qianjiang Central Hospital were selected as research objects in the treatment group, while 37 healthy individuals were chosen as objects in the control group. The changes of hemorheology indexes including hematocrit (HCT, whole blood viscosity, platelet aggregation (PAG and endothelin (ET as well as serum inflammatory factors including interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-18 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α were measured in the control group and the treatment group, and comparisons involving these indexes were made between the two groups. Results: Before treatment, the hemorheology indexes HCT, whole blood viscosity (high, medium and low sheer rates, PAG and ET as well as the inflammatory factors IL-6, IL-18 and TNF-α levels were significantly higher than those in the control group; after CPAP treatment, all these indexed mentioned above in the treatment group were significantly decreased compared with before treatment. Conclusion: CPAP treatment has a reliable therapeutic effect on OSAHS patients, which can obviously improve the hemorheology and largely reduce the inflammatory response.

  6. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure versus Mechanical Ventilation on the Fist Day of Life in Very Low-Birth-Weight Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Dustin D.; O’Donnell, Elizabeth; Kornhauser, Mike; Dysart, Kevin; Greenspan, Jay; Aghai, Zubair H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine differences in the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or death in very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants managed successfully on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) versus mechanical ventilation on the first day of life (DOL). Study Design This is a retrospective analysis of the Alere neonatal database for infants born between January 2009 and December 2014, weighing ≤ 1,500 g. Baseline demographics, clinical characteristics, and outcomes were compared between the two groups. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to control the variables that differ in bivariate analysis. Results In this study, 4,629 infants (birth weight 1,034 ± 290 g, gestational age 28.1 ± 2.5 weeks) met the inclusion criteria. The successful use of early CPAP was associated with a significant reduction in BPD or death (p CPAP on the first DOL in VLBW infants is associated with a reduced risk of BPD or death. PMID:27057767

  7. Losing a winner: thermal stress and local pressures outweigh the positive effects of ocean acidification for tropical seagrasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Catherine J; Langlois, Lucas; Ow, Yan; Johansson, Charlotte; Giammusso, Manuela; Adams, Matthew P; O'Brien, Katherine R; Uthicke, Sven

    2018-06-01

    Seagrasses are globally important coastal habitat-forming species, yet it is unknown how seagrasses respond to the combined pressures of ocean acidification and warming of sea surface temperature. We exposed three tropical species of seagrass (Cymodocea serrulata, Halodule uninervis, and Zostera muelleri) to increasing temperature (21, 25, 30, and 35°C) and pCO 2 (401, 1014, and 1949 μatm) for 7 wk in mesocosms using a controlled factorial design. Shoot density and leaf extension rates were recorded, and plant productivity and respiration were measured at increasing light levels (photosynthesis-irradiance curves) using oxygen optodes. Shoot density, growth, photosynthetic rates, and plant-scale net productivity occurred at 25°C or 30°C under saturating light levels. High pCO 2 enhanced maximum net productivity for Z. muelleri, but not in other species. Z. muelleri was the most thermally tolerant as it maintained positive net production to 35°C, yet for the other species there was a sharp decline in productivity, growth, and shoot density at 35°C, which was exacerbated by pCO 2 . These results suggest that thermal stress will not be offset by ocean acidification during future extreme heat events and challenges the current hypothesis that tropical seagrass will be a 'winner' under future climate change conditions. © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Influence of mouth opening on oropharyngeal humidification and temperature in a bench model of neonatal continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Hendrik S; Ullrich, Tim L; Bührer, Christoph; Czernik, Christoph; Schmalisch, Gerd

    2017-02-01

    Clinical studies show that non-invasive respiratory support by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) affects gas conditioning in the upper airways, especially in the presence of mouth leaks. Using a new bench model of neonatal CPAP, we investigated the influence of mouth opening on oropharyngeal temperature and humidity. The model features the insertion of a heated humidifier between an active model lung and an oropharyngeal head model to simulate the recurrent expiration of heated, humidified air. During unsupported breathing, physiological temperature and humidity were attained inside the model oropharynx, and mouth opening had no significant effect on oropharyngeal temperature and humidity. During binasal CPAP, the impact of mouth opening was investigated using three different scenarios: no conditioning in the CPAP circuit, heating only, and heated humidification. Mouth opening had a strong negative impact on oropharyngeal humidification in all tested scenarios, but heated humidification in the CPAP circuit maintained clinically acceptable humidity levels regardless of closed or open mouths. The model can be used to test new equipment for use with CPAP, and to investigate the effects of other methods of non-invasive respiratory support on gas conditioning in the presence of leaks. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. A new positive pressure ventilation delivery system: its impact on lung ventilation studies that are technically inadequate or non diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui, C.; Leiper, C.; Lee, K.; Saunders, C.; Dixson, H.; Elison, B.; Bennett, G.; Gibian, T.; Rutland, J.; Tse, V.; Elzein, H.; Babicheva, R.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an improved Positive Pressure Ventilation Delivery System (PVDS) in the investigation of Pulmonary Embolism (PE). The major component of PVDS is a commercially available, self-inflating 1.6L Hudson Resuscitator Bag, filled with either oxygen or air (if the patient has CO 2 retention), which is squeezed by the operator to push Technegas from the Technegas Generator Chamber to the patient via the Patient Administration Set synchronously with patient inspiration. 27 spontaneously breathing in-patients (12 males, 15 females, age range 64-89, 21 with chronic airflow limitation), whose conventional lung ventilation images were technically inadequate or non diagnostic, were re-scanned using PVDS within four days after the conventional ventilation study. Randomised blinded visual interpretation of conventional ventilation/perfusion scan vs. PVDS-assisted ventilation/perfusion scan was performed by consensus reading with two experienced observers. In conclusion PVDS was safe and well tolerated. PVDS improved the image quality of the lung ventilation scans in this cohort of patients. This technique has the potential to improve the accuracy of lung scanning in patients with severe lung disease. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  10. Influence of Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on Myocardial Strain Assessed by Speckle Tracking Echocardiography in Mechanically Ventilated Patients

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    Federico Franchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The effects of mechanical ventilation (MV on speckle tracking echocardiography- (STE-derived variables are not elucidated. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP ventilation on 4-chamber longitudinal strain (LS analysis by STE. Methods. We studied 20 patients admitted to a mixed intensive care unit who required intubation for MV and PEEP titration due to hypoxia. STE was performed at three times: (T1 PEEP = 5 cmH2O; (T2 PEEP = 10 cmH2O; and (T3 PEEP = 15 cmH2O. STE analysis was performed offline using a dedicated software (XStrain MyLab 70 Xvision, Esaote. Results. Left peak atrial-longitudinal strain (LS was significantly reduced from T1 to T2 and from T2 to T3 (. Right peak atrial-LS and right ventricular-LS showed a significant reduction only at T3 (. Left ventricular-LS did not change significantly during titration of PEEP. Cardiac chambers’ volumes showed a significant reduction at higher levels of PEEP (. Conclusions. We demonstrated for the first time that incremental PEEP affects myocardial strain values obtained with STE in intubated critically ill patients. Whenever performing STE in mechanically ventilated patients, care must be taken when PEEP is higher than 10 cmH2O to avoid misinterpreting data and making erroneous decisions.

  11. COMPARATIVE STUDY THROUGH FINITE ELEMENT METHOD OF LIDS USED IN CYLINDRICAL VESSEL IN HORIZONTAL POSITION SUBJECT TO INTERNAL PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eusebio V. Ibarra-Hernández

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work a study of the cylindrical vessels in horizontal position and subject to internal pressure is carried out, where lids are one of the main components of this equipment. The Autodesk Inventor pro. 2016 is used to make the geometrical characterization of these elements: parametric solid modeler, assembles and surfaces for the mechanical design of complex parts. The different geometric forms of the lids and bottoms analyzed in this work are: flat-circular with or without flange, elliptical with different values of the K factor, torispherical with different values of the M factor and the hemispherical bottoms. Using the Finate Element Method (FEM, a comparative study is made about the behavior of the stress and strain in the different geometrical forms mentioned before, being demonstrated that although the best resistance and rigidity values are presented by the hemispherical bottoms and the best options of production by the flat-circulars, they are not the bottoms used the most in this vessels, being the elliptic bottoms those of more use. The results obtained allow optimizing the design and knowing the thickness limit in the most requested areas.

  12. [Reduction of pressure sores during prone positioning of ventilated intensive care patients by the prone-head support system: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prebio, Michael; Katz-Papatheophilou, Elfriede; Heindl, Werner; Gelbmann, Herbert; Burghuber, Otto C

    2005-02-01

    Prone positioning in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome is a well-known method to improve oxygenation. The aim of our study was to evaluate a new device for prone positioning, the prone-head support system (PHS system), with regard to reduction of cutaneous pressure sores. In a pilot study we randomized 8 patients with ARDS in two groups: 180 degrees standard prone positioning (group without mask) and prone positioning with the PHS system (group with mask). The PHS system consists of a facemask support, which is connected to an adapted air suspension bed. The patients of both groups were intermittently proned for several days. We evaluated the pressure sores on head and neck before turning the patients prone for the first time and after each period of prone positioning. We documented the quantity, the size, the type and the localization of the pressure sores. There was no significant difference in the mean duration of prone positioning (27.1+/-14.7 hours in the group with mask versus 24.5+/-18.7 h in the group without mask). In the group with mask there were 1.5+/-0.8 new pressure sores by each proning, whereas in the group without mask there were 2.37+/-1.6 new pressure sores, which was lower, but not significantly. The overall area of pressure sores (798 mm2 versus 3184 mm2, p=0.004), the area of pressure sores per patient (199.5+/-104.7 mm2 versus 796+/-478 mm2, p=0.03) and the increase of the area of pressure sores per proning (79.8+/-52.0 mm2 versus 398.0+/-214.3 mm2, p=0.004) were significantly lower in the group with mask in comparison to the group without mask. The lips were the most effected localization in both groups. The pressure sores in the group with mask were less severe and showed a homogenous distribution in comparison to the group without mask. Blisters dominated in the group with mask in comparison to erosions, necrosis and ulcers in the group without mask. The PHS system with its face mask is able to reduce the extent and the

  13. Analysis of the effects of non-supine sleeping positions on the stress, strain, deformation and intraocular pressure of the human eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Peter A.

    This thesis presents analytical models, finite element models and experimental data to investigate the response of the human eye to loads that can be experienced when in a non-supine sleeping position. The hypothesis being investigated is that non-supine sleeping positions can lead to stress, strain and deformation of the eye as well as changes in intraocular pressure (IOP) that may exacerbate vision loss in individuals who have glaucoma. To investigate the quasi-static changes in stress and internal pressure,