WorldWideScience

Sample records for positive learning outcomes

  1. Both preparing to teach and teaching positively impact learning outcomes for peer teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Alexander; Walker, Ian; McLaughlin, Kevin; Peets, Adam D

    2011-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the independent effects of preparing to teach and teaching on peer teacher learning outcomes. To evaluate the independent contributions of both preparing to teach and teaching to the learning of peer teachers in medical education. In total, 17 third-year medical students prepared to teach second-year students Advanced Cardiac Life Support algorithms and electrocardiogram (ECG) interpretation. Immediately prior to teaching they were randomly allocated to not teach, to teach algorithms, or to teach ECG. Peer teachers were tested on both topics prior to preparation, immediately after teaching and 60 days later. Compared to baseline, peer teachers' mean examination scores (±SD) demonstrated the greatest gains for content areas they prepared for and then taught (43.0% (13.9) vs. 66.3% (8.8), p teach but did not teach, less dramatic gains were evident (43.6% (8.3) vs. 54.7% (9.4), p teaching were greater than those for preparation (23.3% (10.9) vs. 8% (9.6), p teach and actively teaching may have independent positive effects on peer teacher learning outcomes.

  2. Can Cooperative Learning Achieve the Four Learning Outcomes of Physical Education? A Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Ashley; Goodyear, Victoria A.

    2015-01-01

    Physical learning, cognitive learning, social learning, and affective learning are positioned as the legitimate learning outcomes of physical education. It has been argued that these four learning outcomes go toward facilitating students' engagement with the physically active life (Bailey et al., 2009; Kirk, 2013). With Cooperative Learning…

  3. Feedback-related negativity codes outcome valence, but not outcome expectancy, during reversal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Borries, A K L; Verkes, R J; Bulten, B H; Cools, R; de Bruijn, E R A

    2013-12-01

    Optimal behavior depends on the ability to assess the predictive value of events and to adjust behavior accordingly. Outcome processing can be studied by using its electrophysiological signatures--that is, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P300. A prominent reinforcement-learning model predicts an FRN on negative prediction errors, as well as implying a role for the FRN in learning and the adaptation of behavior. However, these predictions have recently been challenged. Notably, studies so far have used tasks in which the outcomes have been contingent on the response. In these paradigms, the need to adapt behavioral responses is present only for negative, not for positive feedback. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of positive as well as negative violations of expectancy on FRN amplitudes, without the usual confound of behavioral adjustments. A reversal-learning task was employed in which outcome value and outcome expectancy were orthogonalized; that is, both positive and negative outcomes were equally unexpected. The results revealed a double dissociation, with effects of valence but not expectancy on the FRN and, conversely, effects of expectancy but not valence on the P300. While FRN amplitudes were largest for negative-outcome trials, irrespective of outcome expectancy, P300 amplitudes were largest for unexpected-outcome trials, irrespective of outcome valence. These FRN effects were interpreted to reflect an evaluation along a good-bad dimension, rather than reflecting a negative prediction error or a role in behavioral adaptation. By contrast, the P300 reflects the updating of information relevant for behavior in a changing context.

  4. Learning Outcomes Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoyanov, Slavi; Spoelstra, Howard; Burgoyne, Louise; O’Tuathaigh, Colm

    2018-01-01

    Aim of the study The learning outcomes study, conducted as part of WP3 of the BioApp project, has as objectives: (a) generating a comprehensive list of the learning outcomes; (b) reaching an agreement on the scope and priority of the learning outcomes, and (c) making suggestions for the further

  5. Circle Solutions, a philosophy and pedagogy for learning positive relationships: What promotes and inhibits sustainable outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence McCarthy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Educators are increasingly aware that the efficacy of social and emotional learning (SEL is dependent on implementation factors, not just program content. These include the philosophy underpinning an intervention, the beliefs as well as the skills of facilitators, and the classroom/whole school context in which the intervention takes place. This article outlines the philosophy and pedagogy of Circle Solutions and presents findings from research where 18 undergraduate students supported and developed ‘Circle Time’ in 8 Greater Western Sydney primary schools for a university module on community service. The study indicates that when there is full teacher participation within the principles of the Circle philosophy, together with activeschool support that promotes relational values, the learning outcomes for positive relationship building are more sustainable.

  6. Comparing Virtual and Location-Based Augmented Reality Mobile Learning: Emotions and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Jason M.; Poitras, Eric G.; Jarrell, Amanda; Duffy, Melissa C.; Lajoie, Susanne P.

    2016-01-01

    Research on the effectiveness of augmented reality (AR) on learning exists, but there is a paucity of empirical work that explores the role that positive emotions play in supporting learning in such settings. To address this gap, this study compared undergraduate students' emotions and learning outcomes during a guided historical tour using mobile…

  7. Implementing Collaborative Learning in Prelicensure Nursing Curricula: Student Perceptions and Learning Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoening, Anne M; Selde, M Susan; Goodman, Joely T; Tow, Joyce C; Selig, Cindy L; Wichman, Chris; Cosimano, Amy; Galt, Kimberly A

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated learning outcomes and student perceptions of collaborative learning in an undergraduate nursing program. Participants in this 3-phase action research study included students enrolled in a traditional and an accelerated nursing program. The number of students who passed the unit examination was not significantly different between the 3 phases. Students had positive and negative perceptions about the use of collaborative learning.

  8. Outcomes of an Academic Service-Learning Project on Four Urban Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Debra Abston

    2015-01-01

    Service-learning has a rich history in higher education, with a multitude of studies indicating positive learning, community engagement, and moral development outcomes of student participants. The majority of the research findings, however, have represented four-year colleges. And while there are limited outcome studies of service-learning in…

  9. The better you feel the better you learn: do warm colours and rounded shapes enhance learning outcome in multimedia learning?

    OpenAIRE

    Münchow, Hannes; Mengelkamp, Christoph; Bannert, Maria

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether fostering positive activating affect during multimedia learning enhances learning outcome. University students were randomly assigned to either a multimedia learning environment designed to induce positive activating affect through the use of “warm” colours and rounded shapes (n=61) or an affectively neutral environment that used achromatic colours and sharp edges (n=50). Participants learned about the topic of functional neuroanatomy for 20...

  10. Integration of e-learning outcomes into work processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Grundén

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Three case studies of in-house developed e-learning education in public organizations with different pedagogical approaches are used as a starting point for discussion regarding the implementation challenges of e-learning at work. The aim of this article is to contribute to the understanding of integrating mechanisms of e-learning outcomes into work processes in large, public organizations. The case studies were analyzed from a socio-cultural perspective using the MOA-model as a frame of reference. Although the pedagogical approaches for all of the cases seemed to be relevant and most of the learners showed overall positive attitudes towards the courses, there were problems with integration of the e-learning outcomes into work processes. There were deficiencies in the adaption of the course contents to the local educational needs. There was also a lack of adjusting the local work organization and work routines in order to facilitate the integration of the e-learning outcomes into the work processes. A lack of local management engagement affected the learners’ motivation negatively. Group discussions in local work groups facilitated the integration of the e-learning outcomes. Much of the difficulties of integrating e-learning outcomes into work processes in big organizations are related to the problems with adjusting centrally developed e-learning courses to local needs and a lack of co-operation among among the developers (often IT-professionals and the Human Resources Department of the organizations.

  11. Fostering Positive Attitude in Probability Learning Using Graphing Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Choo-Kim; Harji, Madhubala Bava; Lau, Siong-Hoe

    2011-01-01

    Although a plethora of research evidence highlights positive and significant outcomes of the incorporation of the Graphing Calculator (GC) in mathematics education, its use in the teaching and learning process appears to be limited. The obvious need to revisit the teaching and learning of Probability has resulted in this study, i.e. to incorporate…

  12. EFFECT OF INQUIRY LEARNING MODEL AND MOTIVATION ON PHYSICS OUTCOMES LEARNING STUDENTS

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    Dahlia Megawati Pardede

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of the research are: (a to determine differences in learning outcomes of students with Inquiry Training models and conventional models, (b to determine differences in physics learning outcomes of students who have high motivation and low motivation, (c to determine the interaction between learning models with the level of motivation in improving student Physics learning outcomes. The results were found: (a there are differences in physical students learning outcomes are taught by Inquiry Training models and conventional models. (b learning outcomes of students who are taught by Inquiry Learning Model Training better than student learning outcomes are taught with conventional model. (c there is a difference in student's learning outcomes that have high motivation and low motivation. (d Student learning outcomes that have a high motivation better than student learning outcomes than have a low motivation. (e there is interaction between learning and motivation to student learning outcomes. Learning outcomes of students who are taught by the model is influenced also by the motivation, while learning outcomes of students who are taught with conventional models are not affected by motivation.

  13. The Better You Feel the Better You Learn: Do Warm Colours and Rounded Shapes Enhance Learning Outcome in Multimedia Learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Münchow

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine whether fostering positive activating affect during multimedia learning enhances learning outcome. University students were randomly assigned to either a multimedia learning environment designed to induce positive activating affect through the use of “warm” colours and rounded shapes (n=61 or an affectively neutral environment that used achromatic colours and sharp edges (n=50. Participants learned about the topic of functional neuroanatomy for 20 minutes and had to answer several questions for comprehension and transfer afterwards. Affective states as well as achievement goal orientations were investigated before and after the learning phase using questionnaires. The results show that participants in the affectively positive environment were superior in comprehension as well as transfer when initial affect was strong. Preexperimental positive affect was therefore a predictor of comprehension and a moderator for transfer. Goal orientations did not influence these effects. The findings support the idea that positive affect, induced through the design of the particular multimedia learning environment, can facilitate performance if initial affective states are taken into account.

  14. Event-related potential studies of outcome processing and feedback-guided learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René eSan Martín

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to control behavior in an adaptive manner the brain has to learn how some situations and actions predict positive or negative outcomes. During the last decade cognitive neuroscientists have shown that the brain is able to evaluate and learn from outcomes within a few hundred milliseconds of their occurrence. This research has been primarily focused on the feedback-related negativity (FRN and the P3, two event-related potential (ERP components that are elicited by outcomes. The FRN is a frontally distributed negative-polarity ERP component that typically reaches its maximal amplitude 250 ms after outcome presentation and tends to be larger for negative than for positive outcomes. The FRN has been associated with activity in the anterior cingulate cortex. The P3 (~300-600 ms is a parietally distributed positive-polarity ERP component that tends to be larger for large magnitude than for small magnitude outcomes. The neural sources of the P3 are probably distributed over different regions of the cortex. This paper examines the theories that have been proposed to explain the functional role of these two ERP components during outcome processing. Special attention is paid to extant literature addressing how these ERP components are modulated by outcome valence (negative vs. positive, outcome magnitude (large vs. small, outcome probability (unlikely vs. likely and behavioral adjustment. The literature offers few generalizable conclusions, but is beset with a number of inconsistencies across studies. This paper discusses the potential reasons for these inconsistencies and points out some challenges that will shape the field over the next decade.

  15. Developing Autonomous Learning in First Year University Students Using Perspectives from Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaskill, Ann; Denovan, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous learning is a commonly occurring learning outcome from university study, and it is argued that students require confidence in their own abilities to achieve this. Using approaches from positive psychology, this study aimed to develop confidence in first-year university students to facilitate autonomous learning. Psychological character…

  16. Analysis of learners’ behaviors and learning outcomes in a massive open online course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Liang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a massive open online course (MOOC on educational technology, and studies the factors that may influence learners’ participation and performance in the MOOC. Students’ learning records captured in the course management system and students’ feedback collected from a questionnaire survey are explored. Regression analysis is adopted to examine the correlation among perceived learning experience, learning activities and learning outcomes; data mining is applied to optimize the correlation models. The findings suggest that learners’ perceived usefulness rather than perceived ease of use of the MOOC, positively influences learners’ use of the system, and consequentially, the learning outcome. In addition, learners’ previous MOOC experience is not found to have a significant impact on their learning behavior and learning outcome in general. However, the performance of less active learners is found to be influenced by their prior MOOC experience.

  17. Effects of Cooperative E-Learning on Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shang-Pao; Fu, Hsin-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to discuss the effects of E-Learning and cooperative learning on learning outcomes. E-Learning covers the dimensions of Interpersonal communication, abundant resources, Dynamic instruction, and Learning community; and, cooperative learning contains three dimensions of Cooperative motive, Social interaction, and Cognition…

  18. Network position and related power : how they affect and are affected by network management and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oukes, Tamara

    2018-01-01

    In network position and related power you learn more about how network position and related power affect and are affected by network management and outcomes. First, I expand our present understanding of how startups with a fragile network position manage business relationships by taking an

  19. An Intentional Approach to Achieving Learning Outcomes during a Youth Leadership Residential Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Green

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The High Desert Leadership Retreat (HDLR is an annual four-day youth conference which incorporates positive youth development practices to build life skills and increase youth leadership capacity. There are numerous examples in youth development literature of program models and associated outcomes. However, few studies have articulated which aspects of a conference contribute to the achievement of learning outcomes. By utilizing proven program evaluation methods, the achievement of learning outcomes was measured during both formal and informal conference sessions.

  20. Effect Of Inquiry Learning Model And Motivation On Physics Outcomes Learning Students

    OpenAIRE

    Pardede, Dahlia Megawati; Manurung, Sondang Rina

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the research are: (a) to determine differences in learning outcomes of students with Inquiry Training models and conventional models, (b) to determine differences in physics learning outcomes of students who have high motivation and low motivation, (c) to determine the interaction between learning models with the level of motivation in improving student Physics learning outcomes. The results were found: (a) there are differences in physical students learning outcomes are taugh...

  1. Impairments in action-outcome learning in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard W; Cyrzon, Chad; Green, Melissa J; Le Pelley, Mike E; Balleine, Bernard W

    2018-03-03

    Learning the causal relation between actions and their outcomes (AO learning) is critical for goal-directed behavior when actions are guided by desire for the outcome. This can be contrasted with habits that are acquired by reinforcement and primed by prevailing stimuli, in which causal learning plays no part. Recently, we demonstrated that goal-directed actions are impaired in schizophrenia; however, whether this deficit exists alongside impairments in habit or reinforcement learning is unknown. The present study distinguished deficits in causal learning from reinforcement learning in schizophrenia. We tested people with schizophrenia (SZ, n = 25) and healthy adults (HA, n = 25) in a vending machine task. Participants learned two action-outcome contingencies (e.g., push left to get a chocolate M&M, push right to get a cracker), and they also learned one contingency was degraded by delivery of noncontingent outcomes (e.g., free M&Ms), as well as changes in value by outcome devaluation. Both groups learned the best action to obtain rewards; however, SZ did not distinguish the more causal action when one AO contingency was degraded. Moreover, action selection in SZ was insensitive to changes in outcome value unless feedback was provided, and this was related to the deficit in AO learning. The failure to encode the causal relation between action and outcome in schizophrenia occurred without any apparent deficit in reinforcement learning. This implies that poor goal-directed behavior in schizophrenia cannot be explained by a more primary deficit in reward learning such as insensitivity to reward value or reward prediction errors.

  2. Embedding Affective Learning Outcomes in Library Instruction

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    Ellysa Stern Cahoy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available While information literacy in higher education has long been focused on cognitive learning outcomes, attention must be paid to students’ affective, emotional needs throughout the research process. This article identifies models for embedding affective learning outcomes within information literacy instruction, and provides strategies to help librarians discover, articulate, and address students’ self-efficacy, motivation, emotions and attitudes. Worksheets to assist in creating affective learning outcomes are included to bring structure to an area of learning that is often challenging to articulate and measure. Also included in the article are the results of a recent survey of instruction librarians’ familiarity and inclusion of affective learning outcomes within teaching and learning initiatives.

  3. The antecedents of e-learning outcome: an examination of system quality, technology readiness, and learning behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Li-An

    2009-01-01

    The rapid advancement of Internet and computer technology has not only influenced the way we live, but also the way we learn. Due to the implementation of e-learning in urban junior high schools in Taiwan, it has become essential to find out how external and internal factors affect junior high school students' online learning behavior, which consequently affects their learning outcome. The present study aims to propose a conceptual structural equation model to investigate the relationships among e-Learning system quality (eLSQ), technology readiness (TR), learning behavior (LB), and learning outcome (LO), and to demonstrate the direct and indirect effect of eLSQ and TR on LO from the perspectives of LB. Data collected from 10 urban junior high schools in Taiwan (N = 376) were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Results reveal that both eLSQ and TR have a direct and significant impact on LB. However, eLSQ and TR influence LO indirectly through LB. In addition, LB has a direct and positive significant influence on LO. Managerial implications are proposed and research limitations are discussed.

  4. A Blended Learning Solution and the Impacts on Attendance and Learning Outcomes

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    Ismo Hakala

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Blended learning based on lecture videos and face-to-face teaching provides good opportunities for students for participation in education, regardless of time or place. The article describes a blended learning solution that is based on face-to-face teaching and the use of streaming lecture videos as it has developed in connection with master studies in mathematical information technology. The particular focus of this article is on the use of lecture videos and the impacts of blended learning on participation in education and on learning outcomes. According to the results, lecture videos have become very popular among students. Moreover the use of lecture videos increases participation activeness, and the increase in participation has a positive impact on completion of courses. However, the use of lecture videos does not seem to have any clear-cut effect on grades obtained.

  5. A tribute to Charlie Chaplin: Induced positive affect improves reward-based decision-learning in Parkinson’s Disease

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    K. Richard eRidderinkhof

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Reward-based decision-learning refers to the process of learning to select those actions that lead to rewards while avoiding actions that lead to punishments. This process, known to rely on dopaminergic activity in striatal brain regions, is compromised in Parkinson’s disease (PD. We hypothesized that such decision-learning deficits are alleviated by induced positive affect, which is thought to incur transient boosts in midbrain and striatal dopaminergic activity. Computational measures of probabilistic reward-based decision-learning were determined for 51 patients diagnosed with PD. Previous work has shown these measures to rely on the nucleus caudatus (outcome evaluation during the early phases of learning and the putamen (reward prediction during later phases of learning. We observed that induced positive affect facilitated learning, through its effects on reward prediction rather than outcome evaluation. Viewing a few minutes of comedy clips served to remedy dopamine-related problems in putamen-based frontostriatal circuitry and, consequently, in learning to predict which actions will yield reward.

  6. Effects of reviewing routine practices on learning outcomes in continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamede, Silvia; Loyens, Sofie; Ezequiel, Oscarina; Tibiriçá, Sandra; Penaforte, Júlio; Schmidt, Henk

    2013-07-01

    Conventional continuing medical education (CME) has been shown to have modest effects on doctor performance. New educational approaches based on the review of routine practices have brought better results. Little is known about factors that affect the outcomes of these approaches, especially in middle-income countries. This study aimed to investigate factors that influence the learning and quality of clinical performance in CME based on reflection upon experiences. A questionnaire and a clinical performance test were administered to 165 general practitioners engaged in a CME programme in Brazil. The questionnaire assessed behaviours related to four input variables (individual reflection on practices, peer review of experiences, self-regulated learning and learning skills) and two mediating variables (identification of learning needs and engagement in learning activities, the latter consisting of self-study of scientific literature, consultations about patient problems, and attendance at courses). Structural equation modelling was used to test a hypothesised model of relationships between these variables and the outcome variable of clinical performance, measured by the clinical performance test. After minor adjustments, the hypothesised model fit the empirical data well. Individual reflection fostered identification of learning needs, but also directly positively influenced the quality of clinical performance. Peer review did not affect identification of learning needs, but directly positively affected clinical performance. Learning skills and self-regulation did not help in identifying learning needs, but self-regulation enhanced study of the scientific literature, the learning activity that most positively influenced clinical performance. Consultation with colleagues, the activity most frequently triggered by the identification of learning needs, did not affect performance, and attendance of courses had only limited effect. This study shed light on the factors

  7. ANALYSIS LEARNING MODEL OF DISCOVERY AND UNDERSTANDING THE CONCEPT PRELIMINARY TO PHYSICS LEARNING OUTCOMES SMA

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    Sri Rosepda Sebayang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims: 1 to determine whether the student learning outcomes using discovery learning is better than conventional learning 2 To determine whether the learning outcomes of students who have a high initial concept understanding better then of low initial concept understanding, and 3 to determine the effect of interaction discovery learning and understanding of the initial concept of the learning outcomes of students. The samples in this study was taken by cluster random sampling two classes where class X PIA 3 as a class experiment with applying discovery learning and class X PIA 2 as a control class by applying conventional learning. The instrument used in this study is a test of learning outcomes in the form of multiple-choice comprehension test initial concept description form. The results of research are: 1 learning outcomes of students who were taught with discovery learning is better than the learning outcomes of students who are taught by conventional learning, 2 student learning outcomes with high initial conceptual understanding better than the learning outcomes of students with low initial conceptual understanding, and 3 there was no interaction between discovery learning and understanding of initial concepts for the student learning outcomes.

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL LEARNING APPROACHES IN IMPROVING LEARNING OUTCOMES IN ACID-BASE SUBJECT

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    Rachmat Sahputra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Learning in the understanding of acid-base chemistry in schools needs to be improved so research to determine differences in learning outcomes between students taught using environmental approaches and methods lectures in class XI SMA on acid-base subject needs to be done. In this study, using a quasi-experimental method using a data collection tool achievement test essay form. The test statistic results of the post-test learning has been obtained Asymp value. Sig (2-tailed 0,026 that showed the differences between students' learning outcomes with a control experimental class with effect size of 0.63 or much influence difference with the percentage 23.57% which indicated that the learning environment approach can improve learning outcomes of high school students.

  9. The Implementation of Discovery Learning Method to Increase Learning Outcomes and Motivation of Student in Senior High School

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    Nanda Saridewi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on data from the observation of high school students grade XI that daily low student test scores due to a lack of role of students in the learning process. This classroom action research aims to improve learning outcomes and student motivation through discovery learning method in colloidal material. This study uses the approach developed by Lewin consisting of planning, action, observation, and reflection. Data collection techniques used the questionnaires and ability tests end. Based on the research that results for students received a positive influence on learning by discovery learning model by increasing the average value of 74 students from the first cycle to 90.3 in the second cycle and increased student motivation in the form of two statements based competence (KD categories (sometimes on the first cycle and the first statement KD category in the second cycle. Thus the results of this study can be used to improve learning outcomes and student motivation

  10. The relationship between emotional intelligence and learning outcomes, and the mediating role of emotional conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Hjertø, Kjell B.

    2010-01-01

    A field sample of 1100 employees in the army was investigated to study the relationship between the individuals’ self reported emotional intelligence and learning outcomes in work groups, with two dimensions of emotional conflict as mediators, emotional person conflict and emotional task conflict. Most importantly, emotional intelligence predicted positively learning outcomes and emotional task conflict, and predicted negatively emotional person conflict. Further, emotional task ...

  11. Naturally Acquired Mentoring Relationships and Young Adult Outcomes among Adolescents with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Kym; DuBois, David Lane; Lozano, Paula; Richardson, Laura P.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated whether having a naturally acquired mentor during adolescence was associated with improved adult outcomes among youth with learning disabilities (YLD). Mentored youth were more likely to have graduated from high school, reported a higher level of self-esteem, and reported a higher overall number of positive outcomes than nonmentored…

  12. An e-learning course in medical immunology: does it improve learning outcome?

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    Boye, Sondre; Moen, Torolf; Vik, Torstein

    2012-01-01

    E-learning is used by most medical students almost daily and several studies have shown e-learning to improve learning outcome in small-scale interventions. However, few studies have explored the effects of e-learning in immunology. To study the effect of an e-learning package in immunology on learning outcomes in a written integrated examination and to examine student satisfaction with the e-learning package. All second-year students at a Norwegian medical school were offered an animated e-learning package in basic immunology as a supplement to the regular teaching. Each student's log-on-time was recorded and linked with the student's score on multiple choice questions included in an integrated end-of-the-year written examination. Student satisfaction was assessed through a questionnaire. The intermediate-range students (interquartile range) on average scored 3.6% better on the immunology part of the examination per hour they had used the e-learning package (p = 0.0046) and log-on-time explained 17% of the variance in immunology score. The best and the less skilled students' examination outcomes were not affected by the e-learning. The e-learning was well appreciated among the students. Use of an e-learning package in immunology in addition to regular teaching improved learning outcomes for intermediate-range students.

  13. EFFECTS OF THE INQUIRY TRAINING AND MOTIVATION LEARNING AGAINST LEARNING OUTCOMES IN HIGH SCHOOL PHYSICS STUDENTS

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    Vika Andini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to: determine the significance of differences in physics learning outcomes of students with learning models Inquiry Training and conventional models, knowing the significance of differences in physics learning outcomes of students who have learning motivation high and low, low motivation, the interaction model of learning and motivation to learn physics in improving student learning outcomes. The sample in this study conducted in a cluster random sampling of two classes, where the first class as a class experiment applied learning models and Inquiry Training as a second grade class learning model Conventional control applied. The instrument used in this study is the result of learning physics instruments in the form of 20 multiple-choice questions and motivation questionnaire  by 25 statements has been declared valid and reliable. From the results of this study concluded that the learning outcomes of students who are taught by Training Inquiry learning model is better than conventional models of learning outcomes. Learning outcomes of students who have high motivation to learn is better than the learning outcomes of students who have a low learning motivation. Inquiry learning model training and motivation interact in affecting student learning outcomes.

  14. Learning in Educational Computer Games for Novices: The Impact of Support Provision Types on Virtual Presence, Cognitive Load, and Learning Outcomes

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    Claudia Schrader

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Embedding support devices in educational computer games has been asserted to positively affect learning outcomes. However, there is only limited direct empirical evidence on which design variations of support provision influence learning. In order to better understand the impact of support design on novices’ learning, the current study investigates how support devices and their type of provision (intrinsic vs. extrinsic determine games’ effectiveness on learning outcomes. This effectiveness is also related to how the design-type of provision influences learners’ virtual presence and cognitive load. Compared to an educational adventure game without additional support, the results indicate that the game equipped with support devices enhances learning outcomes, although no differences in cognitive load were found. A variation in the design of provision shows no effect. In order to gain a more thorough understanding of support devices and their design for games, additional learner characteristics (e.g., interest should be considered in future research.

  15. Motivating students through positive learning experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Coto Chotto, Mayela; Jantzen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Based on the assumption that wellbeing, positive emotions and engagement influence motivation for learning, the aim of this paper is to provide insight into students’ emotional responses to and engagement in different learning designs. By comparing students’ reports on the experiential qualities...... of three different learning designs, their respective influence on students’ motivation for learning is discussed with the purpose of exploring the relationship between positive emotions, engagement and intrinsic motivation for learning. Our study thus aims at evaluating the motivational elements...

  16. Relationship between Learning Outcomes and Online Accesses

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    Suanpang, Pannee; Petocz, Peter; Reid, Anna

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on a study carried out in Thailand investigating the relationship between students' use of an e-learning system and their learning outcomes in a course on Business Statistics. The results show a clear relationship between accesses to the e-learning system, as measured by number of "hits", and outcomes, as measured by…

  17. Implementation of learning outcome attainment measurement system in aviation engineering higher education

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    Salleh, I. Mohd; Mat Rani, M.

    2017-12-01

    This paper aims to discuss the effectiveness of the Learning Outcome Attainment Measurement System in assisting Outcome Based Education (OBE) for Aviation Engineering Higher Education in Malaysia. Direct assessments are discussed to show the implementation processes that become a key role in the successful outcome measurement system. A case study presented in this paper involves investigation on the implementation of the system in Aircraft Structure course for Bachelor in Aircraft Engineering Technology program in UniKL-MIAT. The data has been collected for five semesters, starting from July 2014 until July 2016. The study instruments used include the report generated in Learning Outcomes Measurements System (LOAMS) that contains information on the course learning outcomes (CLO) individual and course average performance reports. The report derived from LOAMS is analyzed and the data analysis has revealed that there is a positive significant correlation between the individual performance and the average performance reports. The results for analysis of variance has further revealed that there is a significant difference in OBE grade score among the report. Independent samples F-test results, on the other hand, indicate that the variances of the two populations are unequal.

  18. Serial position learning in honeybees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randolf Menzel

    Full Text Available Learning of stimulus sequences is considered as a characteristic feature of episodic memory since it contains not only a particular item but also the experience of preceding and following events. In sensorimotor tasks resembling navigational performance, the serial order of objects is intimately connected with spatial order. Mammals and birds develop episodic(-like memory in serial spatio-temporal tasks, and the honeybee learns spatio-temporal order when navigating between the nest and a food source. Here I examine the structure of the bees' memory for a combined spatio-temporal task. I ask whether discrimination and generalization are based solely on simple forms of stimulus-reward learning or whether they require sequential configurations. Animals were trained to fly either left or right in a continuous T-maze. The correct choice was signaled by the sequence of colors (blue, yellow at four positions in the access arm. If only one of the possible 4 signals is shown (either blue or yellow, the rank order of position salience is 1, 2 and 3 (numbered from T-junction. No learning is found if the signal appears at position 4. If two signals are shown, differences at positions 1 and 2 are learned best, those at position 3 at a low level, and those at position 4 not at all. If three or more signals are shown these results are corroborated. This salience rank order again appeared in transfer tests, but additional configural phenomena emerged. Most of the results can be explained with a simple model based on the assumption that the four positions are equipped with different salience scores and that these add up independently. However, deviations from the model are interpreted by assuming stimulus configuration of sequential patterns. It is concluded that, under the conditions chosen, bees rely most strongly on memories developed during simple forms of associative reward learning, but memories of configural serial patterns contribute, too.

  19. EFFECTS OF INQUIRY TRAINING LEARNING MODEL BASED MULTIMEDIA AND MOTIVATION OF PHYSICS STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

    OpenAIRE

    Hayati .; Retno Dwi Suyanti

    2013-01-01

    The objective in this research: (1) Determine a better learning model to improve learning outcomes physics students among learning model Inquiry Training based multimedia and Inquiry Training learning model. (2) Determine the level of motivation to learn in affects physics student learning outcomes. (3) Knowing the interactions between the model of learning and motivation in influencing student learning outcomes. This research is a quasi experimental. The population in this research was all s...

  20. Improving Information Technology Curriculum Learning Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick L Anderson

    2017-06-01

    The case study research methodology has been selected to conduct the inquiry into this phenomenon. This empirical inquiry facilitates exploration of a contemporary phenomenon in depth within its real-life context using a variety of data sources. The subject of analysis will be two Information Technology classes composed of a combination of second year and third year students; both classes have six students, the same six students. Contribution It is the purpose of this research to show that the use of improved approaches to learning will produce more desirable learning outcomes. Findings The results of this inquiry clearly show that the use of the traditional behaviorist based pedagogic model to achieve college and university IT program learning outcomes is not as effective as a more constructivist based andragogic model. Recommendations Instruction based purely on either of these does a disservice to the typical college and university level learner. The correct approach lies somewhere in between them; the most successful outcome attainment would be the product of incorporating the best of both. Impact on Society Instructional strategies produce learning outcomes; learning outcomes demonstrate what knowledge has been acquired. Acquired knowledge is used by students as they pursue professional careers and other ventures in life. Future Research Learning and teaching approaches are not “one-size-fits-all” propositions; different strategies are appropriate for different circumstances and situations. Additional research should seek to introduce vehicles that will move learners away from one the traditional methodology that has been used throughout much of their educational careers to an approach that is better suited to equip them with the skills necessary to meet the challenges awaiting them in the professional world.

  1. Measuring Learning Outcomes in Auditing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Steenholdt, Niels

    2003-01-01

    The ability to provide sensible measures for learning outcomes in accounting education is under increased scrutiny. In this paper we use a learner perspective in auditing education, which reflects that some students taking accounting classes also are provided with on-the-job training in accounting...... firms. Hence knowledge about learning outcomes for different groups of students is essential information for educators as well as the accounting profession. This paper extends prior research on the role of declarative and procedural knowledge in performing auditing tasks. Measuring learning outcomes......). The study provides evidence, which confirms an interrelationship between declarative and procedural knowledge in auditing, and the findings also suggest that students with auditing experience perform better than students without experience on procedural questions....

  2. Lessons learned from women in leadership positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Eileen

    2018-01-01

    Eileen Elias has decades of experience in leadership positions within government and nongovernmental organizations. As the first female Commissioner for Mental Health in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the US in the early 1990s, Elias gained experience on navigating gender-based challenges to attain recognized performance outcomes. From lessons learned from women leaders, educate young women entering their careers on attaining leadership positions. Comprehensive research of literature from 2012 through 2017 and interviews with women leaders representing non-Fortune 500 companies including academia, research, non-profit, for-profit, and primary and secondary education. Interviewees included:1.Gail Bassin, Co-Chief Executive Officer and Treasurer, JBS International Inc.2.Jeri Epstein, Executive Director, The Ambit Foundation3.Valerie Fletcher, Executive Director, Institute for Human Centered Design4.Christine James-Brown, President and CEO, Child Welfare League of America5.Daria Mochly-Rosen, PhD, Professor and Fellow, Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine6.Eileen O'Keefe, MD, MPH, Clinical Associate Professor and Director, Boston University Health Sciences7.Jeri Shaw, President and Co-Chief Executive Officer, JBS International Inc. A comprehensive understanding of key women leaders' lessons learned and recommendations targeting young women as they assess leadership opportunities in the public or private sectors.

  3. Learning in educational computer games for novices: the impact of implementation and delivery of support devices on virtual presence, cognitive load and learning outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrader, Claudia; Bastiaens, Theo

    2018-01-01

    Embedding support devices in educational computer games has been asserted to positively affect learning outcomes. However, there is only limited direct empirical evidence on which design variations of support provision influence learning. In order to better understand the impact of support design on

  4. Physics Education: Desired outcomes, minds, and learning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heuvelen, Alan

    2000-11-01

    Recent studies and surveys indicate that the workplace is looking for different outcomes than are emphasized in traditional physics instruction. Cognitive science has learned much about the operation of our minds. Physicists have now systematically studied student learning in physics for about 30 years. What has been learned from these different studies that can help us achieve the desired outcomes in our large (and small) introductory physics courses? The talk will focus on these three ideas: the desired outcomes, student minds (very brief), and pedagogical strategies and activities that help achieve these outcomes.

  5. From Process to Outcome: The Effect of Portfolio Assessment on Student Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Agnes; Tang, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Three findings emerged from 12 Hong Kong student nurses' descriptions of their experiences of portfolio assessment: (1) despite initial anxiety, all favored portfolio use; (2) portfolios had positive academic and affective outcomes; and (3) unexpectedly, spontaneous collaborative learning and increased motivation resulted. (Contains 35…

  6. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Achievement Outcomes Based on Family History of Learning Disabilities Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbeli, Florina; Hart, Sara A; Taylor, Jeanette

    2018-05-01

    A risk to develop a learning disability has been shown to run in families. Having a positive family history of learning disability seems to account for mean differences in achievement outcomes (reading, math) in that children with a positive family history score significantly lower compared to their peers with no such family history. However, the role of family history status in explaining etiological (genetic and environmental) differences among these subgroups of children has yet to be established. The present study of 872 twins ( M age = 13.30, SD age = 1.40) from the Florida Twin Project on Reading, Behavior, and Environment utilized a multigroup approach to examine etiological differences on reading, spelling, and math among two subgroups defined by family history status. Results showed significant mean differences on all achievement outcomes, aside from math; however, no significant etiological differences on any achievement outcome were found among the two subgroups. Results support previous literature that the risk for developing a learning disability is transmitted through a family, but this is seemingly not manifested by differential etiology.

  7. Feasibility and outcomes of paid undergraduate student nurse positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamroth, Lucia; Budgen, Claire; Lougheed, Mary

    2006-09-01

    An Undergraduate Nurse Employment Demonstration Project (UNDP) was implemented in four Health Service Areas in British Columbia with a concurrent evaluation study. This demonstration project comprised the development and implementation of a new position in the BC healthcare system. The position enabled third- and fourth-year nursing students to be employed at their level of education. The purposes of the evaluation were to explore the feasibility and outcomes of this type of paid undergraduate student nurse employment. The three-year project and evaluation included both implementation and outcome analysis. The implementation evaluation design was descriptive and prospective, involving multiple data sources. The outcome evaluation design was quasi-experimental, with intervention and comparison groups. Learning outcomes for undergraduate nurses were increased confidence, organizational ability, competency and ability to work with a team. Workplace outcomes were increased unit morale, help with workload and improved patient care. New graduates with undergraduate nurse experience reported less time required for orientation and transition than other graduates who did not have this experience, and workplace nurses viewed these new graduates as more job-ready than other new graduates. After 21 months, new graduates with undergraduate nurse experience were less likely to move to other employment than other new graduates. Results from the four Health Service Areas indicated that the paid undergraduate nurse position was feasible and that outcomes benefited students, new graduates and workplaces. The undergraduate nurse position is now being implemented throughout all Health Service Areas in British Columbia.By 2000, concerns in British Columbia about the nursing workforce, workplace and patient safety had escalated to the point where diverse stakeholder groups were prepared to work together in new ways to prepare nursing graduates to be more job-ready, to recruit and retain

  8. Transferring an Outcome-Oriented Learning Architecture to an IT Learning Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Birgit; Klemke, Roland; Totschnig, Michael; Czauderna, André; Specht, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Schmitz, B., Klemke, R., Totschnig, M., Czauderna, A., & Specht, M. (2011, 23 September). Transferring an outcome-oriented learning architecture to an IT learning game. Presented at the 6th European conference on Technology enhanced learning: towards ubiquitous learning (EC-TEL 2011), Palermo,

  9. Action-outcome learning and prediction shape the window of simultaneity of audiovisual outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desantis, Andrea; Haggard, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    To form a coherent representation of the objects around us, the brain must group the different sensory features composing these objects. Here, we investigated whether actions contribute in this grouping process. In particular, we assessed whether action-outcome learning and prediction contribute to audiovisual temporal binding. Participants were presented with two audiovisual pairs: one pair was triggered by a left action, and the other by a right action. In a later test phase, the audio and visual components of these pairs were presented at different onset times. Participants judged whether they were simultaneous or not. To assess the role of action-outcome prediction on audiovisual simultaneity, each action triggered either the same audiovisual pair as in the learning phase ('predicted' pair), or the pair that had previously been associated with the other action ('unpredicted' pair). We found the time window within which auditory and visual events appeared simultaneous increased for predicted compared to unpredicted pairs. However, no change in audiovisual simultaneity was observed when audiovisual pairs followed visual cues, rather than voluntary actions. This suggests that only action-outcome learning promotes temporal grouping of audio and visual effects. In a second experiment we observed that changes in audiovisual simultaneity do not only depend on our ability to predict what outcomes our actions generate, but also on learning the delay between the action and the multisensory outcome. When participants learned that the delay between action and audiovisual pair was variable, the window of audiovisual simultaneity for predicted pairs increased, relative to a fixed action-outcome pair delay. This suggests that participants learn action-based predictions of audiovisual outcome, and adapt their temporal perception of outcome events based on such predictions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Comparative Study on the Relationship Between Learning Motivations and Outcomes of College Students in Taiwan and Shenzhen Region of Mainland China: Learning Modes as Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Shi-Huei Ho

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in the relationship of learning motivation and outcome were mostly conducted on research samples in Asia from the perspective of oriental culture; however, under the same cultural background, different social systems might lead to different teaching and learning outcomes. Therefore, this study examines the learning motivation patterns of Taiwan and Mainland China college students from the perspectives on psychological motivation, and investigates the relationship between learning modes and learning outcomes. Adopting judgmental sampling, a total of 651 valid questionnaires were collected from cross-strait business college sophomore, junior, and senior students. The measurement scales were developed by Li et al. (2007, Nasir et al. (2009, Philip et al. (2008, Pike et al. (2011, White et al. (2008, and all measures were 5-point Likert-type scales. The path relationship of the two groups was examined through structural equation modeling (SEM using AMOS. The results showed that exploitative learning was perceived as more effective by the college students in Taiwan as compared to those in Mainland China. In terms of academic identity, the contrary is the case. However, in path analysis, Taiwanese students were superior to Chinese students in regard to the positive influence of role identity on exploitative and explorative learning and the positive influence of exploitative learning on cognitive and non-cognitive gains.

  11. EFFECTS OF INQUIRY TRAINING LEARNING MODEL BASED MULTIMEDIA AND MOTIVATION OF PHYSICS STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayati .

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective in this research: (1 Determine a better learning model to improve learning outcomes physics students among learning model Inquiry Training based multimedia and Inquiry Training learning model. (2 Determine the level of motivation to learn in affects physics student learning outcomes. (3 Knowing the interactions between the model of learning and motivation in influencing student learning outcomes. This research is a quasi experimental. The population in this research was all students in class XI SMA Negeri 1 T.P Sunggal Semester I 2012/2013. The sample of this research was consisted of two classes with a sample of 70 peoples who are determined by purposive sampling, the IPA XI-2 as a class experiment using a model-based multimedia learning Training Inquiry as many as 35 peoples and XI IPA-3 as a control class using learning model Inquiry Training 35 peoples. Hypotheses were analyzed using the GLM at significant level of 0.05 using SPSS 17.0 for Windows. Based on data analysis and hypothesis testing conducted found that: (1 Training Inquiry-based multimedia learning model in improving student learning outcomes rather than learning model physics Inquiry Training. (2 The results of studying physics students who have high motivation to learn better than students who have a low learning motivation. (3 From this research there was an interaction between learning model inquiry-based multimedia training and motivation to study on learning outcomes of students.

  12. Vicarious neural processing of outcomes during observational learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Monfardini

    Full Text Available Learning what behaviour is appropriate in a specific context by observing the actions of others and their outcomes is a key constituent of human cognition, because it saves time and energy and reduces exposure to potentially dangerous situations. Observational learning of associative rules relies on the ability to map the actions of others onto our own, process outcomes, and combine these sources of information. Here, we combined newly developed experimental tasks and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate the neural mechanisms that govern such observational learning. Results show that the neural systems involved in individual trial-and-error learning and in action observation and execution both participate in observational learning. In addition, we identified brain areas that specifically activate for others' incorrect outcomes during learning in the posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC, the anterior insula and the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS.

  13. Vicarious neural processing of outcomes during observational learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfardini, Elisabetta; Gazzola, Valeria; Boussaoud, Driss; Brovelli, Andrea; Keysers, Christian; Wicker, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Learning what behaviour is appropriate in a specific context by observing the actions of others and their outcomes is a key constituent of human cognition, because it saves time and energy and reduces exposure to potentially dangerous situations. Observational learning of associative rules relies on the ability to map the actions of others onto our own, process outcomes, and combine these sources of information. Here, we combined newly developed experimental tasks and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural mechanisms that govern such observational learning. Results show that the neural systems involved in individual trial-and-error learning and in action observation and execution both participate in observational learning. In addition, we identified brain areas that specifically activate for others' incorrect outcomes during learning in the posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC), the anterior insula and the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS).

  14. Expectancy-Value and Cognitive Process Outcomes in Mathematics Learning: A Structural Equation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Huy P.

    2014-01-01

    Existing research has yielded evidence to indicate that the expectancy-value theoretical model predicts students' learning in various achievement contexts. Achievement values and self-efficacy expectations, for example, have been found to exert positive effects on cognitive process and academic achievement outcomes. We tested a conceptual model…

  15. Implementation of Outcome-Based Education in Universiti Putra Malaysia: A Focus on Students' Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohayidin, Mohd Ghazali; Suandi, Turiman; Mustapha, Ghazali; Konting, Mohd. Majid; Kamaruddin, Norfaryanti; Man, Nor Azirawani; Adam, Azura; Abdullah, Siti Norziah

    2008-01-01

    The move towards applying outcome-based education in teaching and learning at tertiary education level has become an important topic in Malaysia. Apart from the three learning domains; namely, cognitive, psychomotor and affective, the Ministry of Higher Education has determined eight learning outcomes which are important in providing wholesome…

  16. Explaining Differences in Learning Outcomes in Auditing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Steenholdt, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we use a learner perspective on learning outcomes which reflects that some students taking accounting classes are also provided with on-the-job training in accounting firms. Hence knowledge about learning outcomes for different groups of students is essential information for educators...

  17. The neural coding of expected and unexpected monetary performance outcomes: dissociations between active and observational learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellebaum, C; Jokisch, D; Gizewski, E R; Forsting, M; Daum, I

    2012-02-01

    Successful adaptation to the environment requires the learning of stimulus-response-outcome associations. Such associations can be learned actively by trial and error or by observing the behaviour and accompanying outcomes in other persons. The present study investigated similarities and differences in the neural mechanisms of active and observational learning from monetary feedback using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Two groups of 15 subjects each - active and observational learners - participated in the experiment. On every trial, active learners chose between two stimuli and received monetary feedback. Each observational learner observed the choices and outcomes of one active learner. Learning performance as assessed via active test trials without feedback was comparable between groups. Different activation patterns were observed for the processing of unexpected vs. expected monetary feedback in active and observational learners, particularly for positive outcomes. Activity for unexpected vs. expected reward was stronger in the right striatum in active learning, while activity in the hippocampus was bilaterally enhanced in observational and reduced in active learning. Modulation of activity by prediction error (PE) magnitude was observed in the right putamen in both types of learning, whereas PE related activations in the right anterior caudate nucleus and in the medial orbitofrontal cortex were stronger for active learning. The striatum and orbitofrontal cortex thus appear to link reward stimuli to own behavioural reactions and are less strongly involved when the behavioural outcome refers to another person's action. Alternative explanations such as differences in reward value between active and observational learning are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Active Learning Innovations in Knowledge Management Education Generate Higher Quality Learning Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Shelley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovations in how a postgraduate course in knowledge management is delivered have generated better learning outcomes and made the course more engaging for learners. Course participant feedback has shown that collaborative active learning is preferred and provides them with richer insights into how knowledge is created and applied to generate innovation and value. The course applies an andragogy approach in which students collaborate in weekly dialogue of their experiences of the content, rather than learn the content itself. The approach combines systems thinking, learning praxis, and active learning to explore the interdependencies between topics and how they impact outcomes in real world situations. This has stimulated students to apply these ideas in their own workplaces.

  19. The Effect of Guided Inquiry Learning with Mind Map to Science Process Skills and Learning Outcomes of Natural Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilman .

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pengaruh Pembelajaran Inkuiri Terbimbing dengan Mind Map terhadap Keterampilan Proses Sains dan Hasil Belajar IPA   Abstract: Science learning in junior high school aims to enable students conducts scientific inquiry, improves knowledge, concepts, and science skills. Organization materials for students supports learning process so that needs to be explored techniques that allows students to enable it. This study aimed to determine the effect of guided inquiry learning with mind map on science process skills and cognitive learning outcomes. This experimental quasi studey used pretest-posttest control group design and consisted eighth grade students of SMP Negeri 1 Papalang Mamuju of West Sulawesi. The results showed there where significant positive effect of guided inquiry learning with mind map on process science skills and cognitive learning outcomes. Key Words: guided inquiry, mind map, science process skills, cognitive learning outcomes   Abstrak: Pembelajaran Ilmu Pengetahuan Alam (IPA di SMP bertujuan agar siswa dapat melakukan inkuiri ilmiah, meningkatkan pengetahuan, konsep, dan keterampilan IPA. Dalam pembelajaran, organisasi materi berperan penting dalam memudahkan anak belajar sehingga perlu ditelaah teknik yang memudahkan siswa membuat organisasi materi. Penelitian ini bertujuan mengetahui pengaruh pembelajaran inkuiri terbimbing dengan mind map terhadap keterampilan proses sains dan hasil belajar kognitif. Penelitian kuasi eksperimen ini menggunakan rancangan pre test-post test control group design dengan subjek penelitian siswa kelas VIII SMP Negeri 1 Papalang. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan ada pengaruh positif yang signifikan pembelajaran inkuiri terbimbing dengan mind map terhadap kemampuan keterampilan proses sains dan hasil belajar kognitif siswa. Kata kunci:  inkuiri terbimbing, mind map, keterampilan proses sains,  hasil belajar kognitif

  20. Achievement of learning outcome after implemented physical modules based on problem based learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isna, R.; Masykuri, M.; Sukarmin

    2018-03-01

    Implementation of Problem BasedLearning (PBL) modules can grow the students' thinking skills to solve the problems in daily life and equip the students into higher education levels. The purpose of this research is to know the achievement of learning outcome after implementation physics module based on PBL in Newton,s Law of Gravity. This research method use the experimental method with posttest only group design. To know the achievement of student learning outcomes was analyzed using t test through application of SPSS 18. Based on research result, it is found that the average of student learning outcomes after appliying physics module based on PBL has reached the minimal exhaustiveness criteria. In addition, students' scientific attitudes also improved at each meeting. Presentation activities which contained at learning sync are also able to practice speaking skills and broaden their knowledge. Looking at some shortcomings during the study, it is suggested the issues raised into learning should be a problem close to the life of students so that, the students are more active and enthusiastic in following the learning of physics.

  1. Positive pregnancy outcomes in Mexican immigrants: what can we learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Robin L

    2004-01-01

    To provide an integrated review of the literature of potential explanations for better than expected pregnancy outcomes in Mexican immigrants, focusing on socioeconomics, social support, desirability of pregnancy, nutrition, substance use, religion, acculturation, and prenatal care. Computerized searches of MEDLINE and CINAHL databases, as well as reference lists from published articles on low birth weight and prematurity in immigrants and acculturation in immigrants from January 1989 to December 2002. Search terms were Mexican immigrant women, childbearing, and pregnancy outcome, and only English-language articles were reviewed. Literature was selected from refereed publications in the areas of nursing, medicine, public health, family, and sociology. Data were extracted using keywords pertinent to pregnancy outcome in Mexican immigrants. Despite having many of the risk factors for poor pregnancy outcomes, Mexican immigrants have superior birth outcomes when compared to U.S.-born women. Social support, familism, healthy diet, limited use of cigarettes and alcohol, and religion may play a role in improved outcomes. The superior outcomes diminish with the process of acculturation as the individual adapts to her new culture. Low birth weight and prematurity are public health concerns in the United States. Through further study of the factors that lead to superior birth outcomes among Mexican immigrant women, rates of low birth weight and prematurity in the United States may be reduced.

  2. The scientific learning approach using multimedia-based maze game to improve learning outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Wawan; Hafitriani, Sarah; Prabawa, Harsa Wara

    2016-02-01

    The objective of curriculum 2013 is to improve the quality of education in Indonesia, which leads to improving the quality of learning. The scientific approach and supported empowerment media is one approach as massaged of curriculum 2013. This research aims to design a labyrinth game based multimedia and apply in the scientific learning approach. This study was conducted in one of the Vocational School in Subjects of Computer Network on 2 (two) classes of experimental and control. The method used Mix Method Research (MMR) which combines qualitative in multimedia design, and quantitative in the study of learning impact. The results of a survey showed that the general of vocational students like of network topology material (68%), like multimedia (74%), and in particular, like interactive multimedia games and flash (84%). Multimediabased maze game developed good eligibility based on media and material aspects of each value 840% and 82%. Student learning outcomes as a result of using a scientific approach to learning with a multimediabased labyrinth game increase with an average of gain index about (58%) and higher than conventional multimedia with index average gain of 0.41 (41%). Based on these results the scientific approach to learning by using multimediabased labyrinth game can improve the quality of learning and increase understanding of students. Multimedia of learning based labyrinth game, which developed, got a positive response from the students with a good qualification level (75%).

  3. Cognitive load imposed by ultrasound-facilitated teaching does not adversely affect gross anatomy learning outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamniczky, Heather A; Cotton, Darrel; Paget, Michael; Ramji, Qahir; Lenz, Ryan; McLaughlin, Kevin; Coderre, Sylvain; Ma, Irene W Y

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasonography is increasingly used in medical education, but its impact on learning outcomes is unclear. Adding ultrasound may facilitate learning, but may also potentially overwhelm novice learners. Based upon the framework of cognitive load theory, this study seeks to evaluate the relationship between cognitive load associated with using ultrasound and learning outcomes. The use of ultrasound was hypothesized to facilitate learning in anatomy for 161 novice first-year medical students. Using linear regression analyses, the relationship between reported cognitive load on using ultrasound and learning outcomes as measured by anatomy laboratory examination scores four weeks after ultrasound-guided anatomy training was evaluated in consenting students. Second anatomy examination scores of students who were taught anatomy with ultrasound were compared with historical controls (those not taught with ultrasound). Ultrasound's perceived utility for learning was measured on a five-point scale. Cognitive load on using ultrasound was measured on a nine-point scale. Primary outcome was the laboratory examination score (60 questions). Learners found ultrasound useful for learning. Weighted factor score on "image interpretation" was negatively, but insignificantly, associated with examination scores [F (1,135) = 0.28, beta = -0.22; P = 0.61]. Weighted factor score on "basic knobology" was positively and insignificantly associated with scores; [F (1,138) = 0.27, beta = 0.42; P = 0.60]. Cohorts exposed to ultrasound had significantly higher scores than historical controls (82.4% ± SD 8.6% vs. 78.8% ± 8.5%, Cohen's d = 0.41, P learning and may improve learning outcomes. Anat Sci Educ 10: 144-151. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  4. Enhancing Learning Outcomes through Application Driven Activities in Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Nicole; Sutton-Brady, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces an activity used in class to allow students to apply previously acquired information to a hands-on task. As the authors have previously shown active learning is a way to effectively facilitate and improve students' learning outcomes. As a result to improve learning outcomes we have overtime developed a series of learning…

  5. The Influence Of Learning Model Guided Findings Of Student Learning Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. SaefulBahri

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study examines the influence of the learning model guided findings on student learning outcomes in subjects PAI eighth grade students of SMP Plus al Masoem. The research method used in this study is a quantitative method in the form of quasi-experiment Quasi-Experimental Design. The findings of the study are expected to demonstrate 1 the difference significant increase in learning outcomes between the experimental class using guided discovery method that uses the control class discussion of learning models 2 Constraints in the method of guided discovery activities and the limited ability of educators in the experimental class in implements the method of guided discovery and constraints faced by students while digging the information they need so we need special strategies to motivate students in the experimental class in order for them creatively find the right way to gather information that supports learning PAI.

  6. Tensor Dictionary Learning for Positive Definite Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivalingam, Ravishankar; Boley, Daniel; Morellas, Vassilios; Papanikolopoulos, Nikolaos

    2015-11-01

    Sparse models have proven to be extremely successful in image processing and computer vision. However, a majority of the effort has been focused on sparse representation of vectors and low-rank models for general matrices. The success of sparse modeling, along with popularity of region covariances, has inspired the development of sparse coding approaches for these positive definite descriptors. While in earlier work, the dictionary was formed from all, or a random subset of, the training signals, it is clearly advantageous to learn a concise dictionary from the entire training set. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for dictionary learning over positive definite matrices. The dictionary is learned by alternating minimization between sparse coding and dictionary update stages, and different atom update methods are described. A discriminative version of the dictionary learning approach is also proposed, which simultaneously learns dictionaries for different classes in classification or clustering. Experimental results demonstrate the advantage of learning dictionaries from data both from reconstruction and classification viewpoints. Finally, a software library is presented comprising C++ binaries for all the positive definite sparse coding and dictionary learning approaches presented here.

  7. Improving Student Learning Outcomes Marketing Strategy Lesson By Applying SFAE Learning Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winda Nur Rohmawati

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Research objectives for improving student learning outcomes on the subjects of marketing strategy through the implementation of model learning SFAE. This type of research this is a class action research using a qualitative approach which consists of two cycles with the subject Marketing X grade SMK YPI Darussalam 2 Cerme Gresik Regency. This research consists of four stages: (1 the Planning Act, (2 the implementation of the action, (3 observations (observation, and (4 Reflection. The result of the research shows that cognitive and affective learning outcomes of students have increased significantly.

  8. The Effect of Flipped Learning (Revised Learning) on Iranian Students' Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefzadeh, Malahat; Salimi, Asghar

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the flipped (revised) learning had effect on student learning outcome. Lage et al (2000) describes the flipped classroom as " Inverting the classroom means that events that have traditionally take place inside the classroom now take place outside the class and vice versa" (p.32). The…

  9. How Are Students' Attitudes Related to Learning Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metsärinne, Mika; Kallio, Manne

    2016-01-01

    This article is a part of a research project aimed to find out how different background variables are related to learning outcomes in technology education related to the school subject Sloyd (craft). The research question of this article is: "How are ninth grade students' attitudes towards the subject related to their learning outcomes?"…

  10. Learner differences and learning outcomes in an introductory biochemistry class: attitude toward images, visual cognitive skills, and learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Rachel E

    2014-01-01

    The practice of using images in teaching is widespread, and in science education images are used so extensively that some have argued they are now the "main vehicle of communication" (C. Ferreira, A. Arroio Problems Educ. 21st Century 2009, 16, 48-53). Although this phenomenon is especially notable in the field of biochemistry, we know little about the role and importance of images in communicating concepts to students in the classroom. This study reports the development of a scale to assess students' attitude toward biochemical images, particularly their willingness and ability to use the images to support their learning. In addition, because it is argued that images are central in the communication of biochemical concepts, we investigated three "learner differences" which might impact learning outcomes in this kind of classroom environment: attitude toward images, visual cognitive skills, and learning approach. Overall, the students reported a positive attitude toward the images, the majority agreeing that they liked images and considered them useful. However, the participants also reported that verbal explanations were more important than images in helping them to understand the concepts. In keeping with this we found that there was no relationship between learning outcomes and the students' self-reported attitude toward images or visual cognitive skills. In contrast, learning outcomes were significantly correlated with the students' self-reported approach to learning. These findings suggest that images are not necessarily the main vehicle of communication in a biochemistry classroom and that verbal explanations and encouragement of a deep learning approach are important considerations in improving our pedagogical approach. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Informal Workplace Learning among Nurses: Organisational Learning Conditions and Personal Characteristics That Predict Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyndt, Eva; Vermeire, Eva; Cabus, Shana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine which organisational learning conditions and individual characteristics predict the learning outcomes nurses achieve through informal learning activities. There is specific relevance for the nursing profession because of the rapidly changing healthcare systems. Design/Methodology/Approach: In total, 203 nurses…

  12. The Influence of Investment in Workplace Learning on Learning Outcomes and Organizational Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoonhee; Jacobs, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    Although the importance of workplace learning has been recognized in research and practice, there is little empirical support that describes how workplace learning, including both formal and informal learning, is linked to organizational performance. This study investigated the influence of investment in workplace learning on learning outcomes and…

  13. Using Student Learning and Development Outcomes to Evaluate a First-Year Undergraduate Group Video Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Murray; Mattheis, Allison; Johnson, Brady

    2012-01-01

    Students in an interdisciplinary undergraduate introductory course were required to complete a group video project focused on nutrition and healthy eating. A mixed-methods approach to data collection involved observing and rating video footage of group work sessions and individual and focus group interviews. These data were analyzed and used to evaluate the effectiveness of the assignment in light of two student learning outcomes and two student development outcomes at the University of Minnesota. Positive results support the continued inclusion of the project within the course, and recommend the assignment to other programs as a viable means of promoting both content learning and affective behavioral objectives. PMID:22383619

  14. A comparison of positive vicarious learning and verbal information for reducing vicariously learned fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Gemma; Wasely, David; Dunne, Güler; Askew, Chris

    2017-10-19

    Research with children has demonstrated that both positive vicarious learning (modelling) and positive verbal information can reduce children's acquired fear responses for a particular stimulus. However, this fear reduction appears to be more effective when the intervention pathway matches the initial fear learning pathway. That is, positive verbal information is a more effective intervention than positive modelling when fear is originally acquired via negative verbal information. Research has yet to explore whether fear reduction pathways are also important for fears acquired via vicarious learning. To test this, an experiment compared the effectiveness of positive verbal information and positive vicarious learning interventions for reducing vicariously acquired fears in children (7-9 years). Both vicarious and informational fear reduction interventions were found to be equally effective at reducing vicariously acquired fears, suggesting that acquisition and intervention pathways do not need to match for successful fear reduction. This has significant implications for parents and those working with children because it suggests that providing children with positive information or positive vicarious learning immediately after a negative modelling event may prevent more serious fears developing.

  15. Mapping Learning Outcomes and Assignment Tasks for SPIDER Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyn Brodie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern engineering programs have to address rapidly changing technical content and have to enable students to develop transferable skills such as critical evaluation, communication skills and lifelong learning. This paper introduces a combined learning and assessment activity that provides students with opportunities to develop and practice their soft skills, but also extends their theoretical knowledge base. Key tasks included self directed inquiry, oral and written communication as well as peer assessment. To facilitate the SPIDER activities (Select, Prepare and Investigate, Discuss, Evaluate, Reflect, a software tool has been implemented in the learning management system Moodle. Evidence shows increased student engagement and better learning outcomes for both transferable as well as technical skills. The study focuses on generalising the relationship between learning outcomes and assignment tasks as well as activities that drive these tasks. Trail results inform the approach. Staff evaluations and their views of assignments and intended learning outcomes also supported this analysis.

  16. The role of outcome inhibition in interference between outcomes: a contingency-learning analogue of retrieval-induced forgetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadillo, Miguel A; Orgaz, Cristina; Luque, David; Cobos, Pedro L; López, Francisco J; Matute, Helena

    2013-05-01

    Current associative theories of contingency learning assume that inhibitory learning plays a part in the interference between outcomes. However, it is unclear whether this inhibitory learning results in the inhibition of the outcome representation or whether it simply counteracts previous excitatory learning so that the outcome representation is neither activated nor inhibited. Additionally, these models tend to conceptualize inhibition as a relatively transient and cue-dependent state. However, research on retrieval-induced forgetting suggests that the inhibition of representations is a real process that can be relatively independent of the retrieval cue used to access the inhibited information. Consistent with this alternative view, we found that interference between outcomes reduces the retrievability of the target outcome even when the outcome is associated with a novel (non-inhibitory) cue. This result has important theoretical implications for associative models of interference and shows that the empirical facts and theories developed in studies of retrieval-induced forgetting might be relevant in contingency learning and vice versa. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  17. Student Activity and Learning Outcomes in a Virtual Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Kalle; Nevgi, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between degree of participation and learning outcomes in an e-learning course on medical informatics. Overall activity in using course materials and degree of participation in the discussion forums of an online course were studied among 39 medical students. Students were able to utilise the…

  18. Outcomes-Based Collaborative Teaching and Learning in Asian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, Gertina J.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explores the background and development of outcomes-based collaborative teaching and learning, and provides guidance for writing learning outcomes and engaging students in the Asian higher education context.

  19. A Comparison of Learning Outcomes in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Existential Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anders Dræby

    of the outcome of psychotherapy through qualitative research. The precise aim is to draw attention to the special characteristics of this outcome in terms of learning outcome. This regards both existential therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy and to clarify the possible differences and similarities between...... the lived experience of the learning outcomes of these approaches. The study also clarifies the differences between existential psychotherapy as an art of learning directed at existential learning of authenticity and cognitive- behavioural therapy as a learning-based medical treatment technology directed...... at behavioural and cognitive learning of adaptive and functional responses that alleviates pathological symptoms....

  20. Blended Learning Based on Schoology: Effort of Improvement Learning Outcome and Practicum Chance in Vocational High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irawan, Vincentius Tjandra; Sutadji, Eddy; Widiyanti

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine: (1) the differences in learning outcome between Blended Learning based on Schoology and Problem-Based Learning, (2) the differences in learning outcome between students with prior knowledge of high, medium, and low, and (3) the interaction between Blended Learning based on Schoology and prior knowledge to…

  1. Conception of Learning Outcomes in the Bloom's Taxonomy Affective Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savickiene, Izabela

    2010-01-01

    The article raises a problematic issue regarding an insufficient base of the conception of learning outcomes in the Bloom's taxonomy affective domain. The search for solutions introduces the conception of teaching and learning in the affective domain as well as presents validity criteria of learning outcomes in the affective domain. The…

  2. The structure of observed learning outcome (SOLO) taxonomy: a model to promote dental students' learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucander, H; Bondemark, L; Brown, G; Knutsson, K

    2010-08-01

    Selective memorising of isolated facts or reproducing what is thought to be required - the surface approach to learning - is not the desired outcome for a dental student or a dentist in practice. The preferred outcome is a deep approach as defined by an intention to seek understanding, develop expertise and relate information and knowledge into a coherent whole. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the structure of observed learning outcome (SOLO) taxonomy could be used as a model to assist and promote the dental students to develop a deep approach to learning assessed as learning outcomes in a summative assessment. Thirty-two students, participating in course eight in 2007 at the Faculty of Odontology at Malmö University, were introduced to the SOLO taxonomy and constituted the test group. The control group consisted of 35 students participating in course eight in 2006. The effect of the introduction was measured by evaluating responses to a question in the summative assessment by using the SOLO taxonomy. The evaluators consisted of two teachers who performed the assessment of learning outcomes independently and separately on the coded material. The SOLO taxonomy as a model for learning was found to improve the quality of learning. Compared to the control group significantly more strings and structured relations between these strings were present in the test group after the SOLO taxonomy had been introduced (P SOLO taxonomy is recommended as a model for promoting and developing a deeper approach to learning in dentistry.

  3. Teacher Planning in a learning outcome perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bremholm, Jesper; Skott, Charlotte Krog

    2017-01-01

    . In this study, use of participatory observation has permitted us to gain insight into the practices of two teams of teachers in mathematics and Danish, and thus to identify barriers in teachers’ planning that seem to impede a learning outcome approach. However, further analysis shows how these barriers......Like most European countries, Denmark is facing dramatic educational changes towards a focus on learning outcome. This focus enhances the importance of teachers’ planning. However, research studies highlight the plight of teachers facing severe challenges when trying to fulfil the requirements...

  4. Implementation of a Proposed Model of a Constructivist Teaching-Learning Process – A Step Towards an Outcome Based Education in Chemistry Laboratory Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Paz B. Reyes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study implemented the proposed model of a constructivist teachinglearning process and determined the extent by which the students manifested the institutional learning outcomes which include competency, credibility, commitment and collaboration. It also investigated if there was an improvement in the learning outcomes after the implementation of the constructivist teachinglearning process and determined the students’ acceptance of the constructivist teaching-learning process. Towards the end a plan of action was proposed to enhance the students’ manifestation of the institutional learning outcomes. It made use of the qualitative- quantitative method particularly the descriptive design. The results of the study revealed that the students manifest competency, credibility, commitment and collaboration as they accept positively the constructivist teaching-learning process in their chemistry laboratory subject. It can be deduced from the findings that the constructivist teaching-learning process improved the learning outcomes of the students. The use of the proposed plan of action is recommended for an effective chemistry laboratory instruction.

  5. Outcomes-Based Assessment and Learning: Trialling Change in a Postgraduate Civil Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Maaddawy, Tamer; Deneen, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to demonstrate how assessment tasks can function within an outcomes-based learning framework to evaluate student attainment of learning outcomes. An outcomes-based learning framework designed to integrate teaching, learning, and assessment activities was developed and implemented in a civil engineering master-level course. The…

  6. The Effect of Group Investigation Learning Model with Brainstroming Technique on Students Learning Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astiti Kade kAyu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the effect of group investigation (GI learning model with brainstorming technique on student physics learning outcomes (PLO compared to jigsaw learning model with brainstroming technique. The learning outcome in this research are the results of learning in the cognitive domain. The method used in this research is experiment with Randomised Postest Only Control Group Design. Population in this research is all students of class XI IPA SMA Negeri 9 Kupang year lesson 2015/2016. The selected sample are 40 students of class XI IPA 1 as the experimental class and 38 students of class XI IPA 2 as the control class using simple random sampling technique. The instrument used is 13 items description test. The first hypothesis was tested by using two tailed t-test. From that, it is obtained that H0 rejected which means there are differences of students physics learning outcome. The second hypothesis was tested using one tailed t-test. It is obtained that H0 rejected which means the students PLO in experiment class were higher than control class. Based on the results of this study, researchers recommend the use of GI learning models with brainstorming techniques to improve PLO, especially in the cognitive domain.

  7. A model of positive and negative learning : Learning demands and resources, learning engagement, critical thinking, and fake news detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dormann, Christian; Demerouti, Eva; Bakker, Arnold; Zlatkin-Troitschanskaia, O.; Wittum, G.; Dengel, A.

    2018-01-01

    This chapter proposes a model of positive and negative learning (PNL model). We use the term negative learning when stress among students occurs, and when knowledge and abilities are not properly developed. We use the term positive learning if motivation is high and active learning occurs. The PNL

  8. Learning Robotics in a Science Museum Theatre Play: Investigation of Learning Outcomes, Contexts and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Ran; Baram-Tsabari, Ayelet

    2017-12-01

    Theatre is often introduced into science museums to enhance visitor experience. While learning in museums exhibitions received considerable research attention, learning from museum theatre has not. The goal of this exploratory study was to investigate the potential educational role of a science museum theatre play. The study aimed to investigate (1) cognitive learning outcomes of the play, (2) how these outcomes interact with different viewing contexts and (3) experiential learning outcomes through the theatrical experience. The play `Robot and I', addressing principles in robotics, was commissioned by a science museum. Data consisted of 391 questionnaires and interviews with 47 children and 20 parents. Findings indicate that explicit but not implicit learning goals were decoded successfully. There was little synergy between learning outcomes of the play and an exhibition on robotics, demonstrating the effect of two different physical contexts. Interview data revealed that prior knowledge, experience and interest played a major role in children's understanding of the play. Analysis of the theatrical experience showed that despite strong identification with the child protagonist, children often doubted the protagonist's knowledge jeopardizing integration of scientific content. The study extends the empirical knowledge and theoretical thinking on museum theatre to better support claims of its virtues and respond to their criticism.

  9. Comparing Learning Outcomes of Blended Learning and Traditional Face-to-Face Learning of University Students in ESL Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Chang

    2018-01-01

    Combining elements of online and face-to-face education, blended learning is emerging as an important teaching and learning model in higher education. In order to examine the effectiveness of blended learning, as compared to the traditional face-to-face learning mode, this research investigated the learning outcomes of students following English…

  10. National Curricula in Norway and Finland: The Role of Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mølstad, Christina Elde; Karseth, Berit

    2016-01-01

    The core curricular category of "learning outcomes" has entered the educational policy scene in Europe. While content-oriented curricula have dominated the Nordic countries, a shift towards outcomes can also be observed. In this article, we describe the fundamental distinctions between "Didaktik" and learning outcomes and…

  11. Outcome Mapping Virtual Learning Community - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The first phase of the project (103520) focused on developing the Outcome ... as distance learning) and strategically communicating Outcome Mapping to key ... an organization based in India with South Asian reach, to facilitate exchange ...

  12. Explaining Differences in Learning Outcomes in Auditing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Steenholdt, Niels

    as well as the accounting profession. This paper extends prior research on the role of declarative and procedural knowledge in performing auditing tasks. Measuring learning outcomes is a complex matter requiring sensible measures for both declarative knowledge (ability to verbalize pertinent facts...... or processes) and procedural knowledge (intellectual skills). The performance of 75 graduate accounting students representing both types of schema is examined. The findings suggest that differences in learning outcomes may be attributed to differences in student background and prior knowledge (auditing...

  13. The interrupted learner: How distractions during live and video lectures influence learning outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zureick, Andrew H; Burk-Rafel, Jesse; Purkiss, Joel A; Hortsch, Michael

    2017-11-27

    New instructional technologies have been increasingly incorporated into the medical school learning environment, including lecture video recordings as a substitute for live lecture attendance. The literature presents varying conclusions regarding how this alternative experience impacts students' academic success. Previously, a multi-year study of the first-year medical histology component at the University of Michigan found that live lecture attendance was positively correlated with learning success, while lecture video use was negatively correlated. Here, three cohorts of first-year medical students (N = 439 respondents, 86.6% response rate) were surveyed in greater detail regarding lecture attendance and video usage, focusing on study behaviors that may influence histology learning outcomes. Students who reported always attending lectures or viewing lecture videos had higher average histology scores than students who employed an inconsistent strategy (i.e., mixing live attendance and video lectures). Several behaviors were negatively associated with histology performance. Students who engaged in "non-lecture activities" (e.g., social media use), students who reported being interrupted while watching the lecture video, or feeling sleepy/losing focus had lower scores than their counterparts not engaging in these behaviors. This study suggests that interruptions and distractions during medical learning activities-whether live or recorded-can have an important impact on learning outcomes. Anat Sci Educ 00: 000-000. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  14. Road Testing Graduate Attributes and Course Learning Outcomes of an Environmental Science Degree via a Work-Integrated Learning Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Graduate attributes and course learning outcomes are an integral part of higher education in Australia. Testing the performance of graduates in the workplace with regard to graduate attributes and course learning outcomes is a not a common occurrence. This study has road tested the graduate attributes and course learning outcomes of a bachelor…

  15. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF JOBSHEET-BASED STUDENT TEAMS ACHIEVEMENT DIVISION LEARNING MODEL TO IMPROVE STUDENTS LEARNING OUTCOMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadek Dodi Permana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to improve the Information and Communications Technology (ICT learning outcomes of the students in SMA N 2 Singaraja through the learning model of Job sheet-based Student Team Achievement Division (STAD. This is a classroom action research. The data analysis reveals that learning outcomes in cycle I gain a mean score of 80. 51 and a classical provisions of 15%. There are three students who pass with a minimum score of 85 in cycle I. From these categories, the students’ learning outcomes in the first cycle have not met the criterion of 85%. The mean score of cycle II is 88. 57 and the classical provisions is 90%. In the second cycle, there are 18 students who gain a minimum score of 85. Based on the success criterion, a research study is successful if the minimum completeness criterion reaches 85 and the minimum classical completeness criterion reaches 85%. From the categories, the students’ learning outcomes have been successfully improved since the percentage of classical completeness in the second cycle has reached its expected results.

  16. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LEARNING OUTCOMES ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND LEARNING OUTCOMES VOCATIONAL AUTOMOTIVE INTEREST STUDENT WORK CLASS X IN SMK MUHAMMADIYAH KARANGMOJO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Hashmy Hardhiansyah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to describe (1 correlation between automotive vocational learning with working interest; (2 correlation between entrepreneurship learning achievement with working interest of welding subject; and (3 correlation between automotive vocationallearning and entrepreneurship learning achievement with students’ working interest. This study was ex-post facto research. Data collecting methods were questionnaires and documentation. Data analyzing methods used descriptive analysis, first and second hypothesis testing used partial correlation and third hypothesis testing used double regression. This study shows that (1 there was a positive and significant correlation between automotive vocationallearning with learning achievement with the score of r obs = 0,308 with the significant score 0.015 < 0.05; (2 there was a positive and significant correlation between entrepreneurship  learning achievement  with working interest among with the score of r obs = 0,493 with the significant score 0.015 < 0.05; and (3 there was a positive and significant correlation between automotive vocationallearning and entrepreneurship  learning achievement  with working interest  with the significant score 0.000 < 0.05. The score of determinant coefficient (R2 0.252, it means that automotive vocationallearning and entrepreneurship  learning achievement  gave a positive contribution 25.2% toward working interest, while 74.8 % was influenced by other factors that were not discussed in this study. The automotive vocationallearning gave contribution 12.08% toward students’ working interest and entrepreneurship learning achievement gave contribution 13.12% toward students’ working interest.

  17. A Group-learning Approach to Academic and Transferable Skills through an Exercise in the Global Positioning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Giles H.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a project based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) that offers students a chance to design and implement a mini-research program to prepare them for an undergraduate research project. Discusses the context of the GPS exercise, teaching and learning outcomes, and advantages and evaluation of the exercise. (CMK)

  18. Analysing learning outcomes in an Electrical Engineering curriculum using illustrative verbs derived from Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meda, Lawrence; Swart, Arthur James

    2018-05-01

    Learning outcomes are essential to any curriculum in education, where they need to be clear, observable and measurable. However, some academics structure learning outcomes in a way that does not promote student learning. The purpose of this article is to present the analyses of learning outcomes of an Electrical Engineering curriculum offered at a University of Technology in South Africa, in order to determine if academics are structuring them in a way that enables student learning. A qualitative case study is used where the learning outcomes from 33 study guides are reviewed using illustrative verbs derived from Bloom's Taxonomy. Results indicate that 9% of all the learning outcomes are unclear, 10% are unobservable and 23% are unmeasurable. A key recommendation is to provide regular workshops to assist academics in reviewing their learning outcomes using the illustrative verbs derived from Bloom's Taxonomy, thereby ensuring that their learning outcomes promote student learning.

  19. Learning More than Expected: The Influence of Teachers' Attitudes on Children's Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Minjong

    2016-01-01

    This study employed the concept of teachers' sense of responsibility for students' learning to examine the extent to which the gap in math learning growth is reduced and whether such attitudes can improve children's learning outcomes to a degree that is above and beyond their expected achievement relative to their initial academic skills. Analysis…

  20. A comparison of positive vicarious learning and verbal information for reducing vicariously learned fear

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, Gemma; Wasely, David; Dunne, Guler; Askew, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Research with children has demonstrated that both positive vicarious learning (modelling) and positive verbal information can reduce children’s acquired fear responses for a particular stimulus. However, this fear reduction appears to be more effective when the intervention pathway matches the initial fear learning pathway. That is, positive verbal information is a more effective intervention than positive modelling when fear is originally acquired via negative verbal information. Research ha...

  1. Choice of outcomes and measurement instruments in randomised trials on eLearning in medical education: a systematic mapping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Gloria C; Apfelbacher, Christian; Posadzki, Pawel P; Kemp, Sandra; Tudor Car, Lorainne

    2018-05-17

    There will be a lack of 18 million healthcare workers by 2030. Multiplying the number of well-trained healthcare workers through innovative ways such as eLearning is highly recommended in solving this shortage. However, high heterogeneity of learning outcomes in eLearning systematic reviews reveals a lack of consistency and agreement on core learning outcomes in eLearning for medical education. In addition, there seems to be a lack of validity evidence for measurement instruments used in these trials. This undermines the credibility of these outcome measures and affects the ability to draw accurate and meaningful conclusions. The aim of this research is to address this issue by determining the choice of outcomes, measurement instruments and the prevalence of measurement instruments with validity evidence in randomised trials on eLearning for pre-registration medical education. We will conduct a systematic mapping and review to identify the types of outcomes, the kinds of measurement instruments and the prevalence of validity evidence among measurement instruments in eLearning randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in pre-registration medical education. The search period will be from January 1990 until August 2017. We will consider studies on eLearning for health professionals' education. Two reviewers will extract and manage data independently from the included studies. Data will be analysed and synthesised according to the aim of the review. Appropriate choice of outcomes and measurement tools is essential for ensuring high-quality research in the field of eLearning and eHealth. The results of this study could have positive implications for other eHealth interventions, including (1) improving quality and credibility of eLearning research, (2) enhancing the quality of digital medical education and (3) informing researchers, academics and curriculum developers about the types of outcomes and validity evidence for measurement instruments used in eLearning studies. The

  2. Learning science in a cooperative setting: Academic achievement and affective outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarowitz, Reuven; Hertz-Lazarowitz, Rachel; Baird, J. Hugh

    A learning unit in earth science was taught to high school students, using a jigsaw-group mastery learning approach. The sample consisted of 73 students in the experimental group and 47 students who learned the topic in an individualized mastery learning approach. The study lasted 5 weeks. Pretests and posttests on academic achievement and affective outcomes were administered. Data were treated with an analysis of covariance. The results show that students of the experimental group achieved significantly higher on academic outcomes, both normative and objective scores. On the creative essay test, the differences in number of ideas and total essay score were not significant between the groups, although the mean scores for number of words were higher for the individualized mastery learning group. On the affective domain, jigsaw-group mastery learning students scored significantly higher on self-esteem, number of friends, and involvement in the classroom. No differences were found in cohesiveness, cooperation, competition, and attitudes toward the subject learned. The results are discussed through the evaluation and comparison of the two methods of instruction used in this study.The cooperative learning movement began in junior high schools as part of the desegregation process, aiming at facilitating positive ethnic relations and increasing academic achievement and social skills among diverse students (Aronson, Stephan, Sikes, Blaney, & Snapp, 1978; Sharan & Hertz-Lazarowitz, 1980; Slavin, 1980). However, elementary teachers quickly recognized the potential of cooperative methods, and such methods were adopted freely in elementary schools before becoming widespread on the junior and senior high level. It has only been during the past few years that application of cooperative learning has been studied extensively with these older students.Cooperative learning methods generally involve heterogeneous groups working together on tasks that are deliberately structured to

  3. The development of learning material using learning cycle 5E model based stem to improve students’ learning outcomes in Thermochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    sugiarti, A. C.; suyatno, S.; Sanjaya, I. G. M.

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study is describing the feasibility of Learning Cycle 5E STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) based learning material which is appropriate to improve students’ learning achievement in Thermochemistry. The study design used 4-D models and one group pretest-posttest design to obtain the information about the improvement of sudents’ learning outcomes. The subject was learning cycle 5E based STEM learning materials which the data were collected from 30 students of Science class at 11th Grade. The techniques used in this study were validation, observation, test, and questionnaire. Some result attain: (1) all the learning materials contents were valid, (2) the practicality and the effectiveness of all the learning materials contents were classified as good. The conclution of this study based on those three condition, the Learnig Cycle 5E based STEM learning materials is appropriate to improve students’ learning outcomes in studying Thermochemistry.

  4. Learning outcomes through the cooperative learning team assisted individualization on research methodology’ course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakpahan, N. F. D. B.

    2018-01-01

    All articles must contain an abstract. The research methodology is a subject in which the materials must be understood by the students who will take the thesis. Implementation of learning should create the conditions for active learning, interactive and effective are called Team Assisted Individualization (TAI) cooperative learning. The purpose of this study: 1) improving student learning outcomes at the course research methodology on TAI cooperative learning. 2) improvement of teaching activities. 3) improvement of learning activities. This study is a classroom action research conducted at the Department of Civil Engineering Universitas Negeri Surabaya. The research subjects were 30 students and lecturer of courses. Student results are complete in the first cycle by 20 students (67%) and did not complete 10 students (33%). In the second cycle students who complete being 26 students (87%) and did not complete 4 students (13%). There is an increase in learning outcomes by 20%. Results of teaching activities in the first cycle obtained the value of 3.15 with the criteria enough well. In the second cycle obtained the value of 4.22 with good criterion. The results of learning activities in the first cycle obtained the value of 3.05 with enough criterion. In the second cycle was obtained 3.95 with good criterion.

  5. A Perspective on Student Learning Outcome Assessment at Qatar University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Thani, Shaikha Jabor; Abdelmoneim, Ali; Daoud, Khaled; Cherif, Adel; Moukarzel, Dalal

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a unique perspective on the student learning outcome assessment process as adopted and implemented at Qatar University from 2006 to 2012. The progress of the student learning outcome assessment and continuous improvement efforts at the university and the initiatives taken to establish a culture of assessment and evidence-based…

  6. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Striatal Reward Responses Relate to Approach-Avoidance Learning and Encoding of Positive-Negative Prediction Errors in Dopaminergic Midbrain Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberg, Kristoffer Carl; Doell, Kimberly C; Schwartz, Sophie

    2015-10-28

    Some individuals are better at learning about rewarding situations, whereas others are inclined to avoid punishments (i.e., enhanced approach or avoidance learning, respectively). In reinforcement learning, action values are increased when outcomes are better than predicted (positive prediction errors [PEs]) and decreased for worse than predicted outcomes (negative PEs). Because actions with high and low values are approached and avoided, respectively, individual differences in the neural encoding of PEs may influence the balance between approach-avoidance learning. Recent correlational approaches also indicate that biases in approach-avoidance learning involve hemispheric asymmetries in dopamine function. However, the computational and neural mechanisms underpinning such learning biases remain unknown. Here we assessed hemispheric reward asymmetry in striatal activity in 34 human participants who performed a task involving rewards and punishments. We show that the relative difference in reward response between hemispheres relates to individual biases in approach-avoidance learning. Moreover, using a computational modeling approach, we demonstrate that better encoding of positive (vs negative) PEs in dopaminergic midbrain regions is associated with better approach (vs avoidance) learning, specifically in participants with larger reward responses in the left (vs right) ventral striatum. Thus, individual dispositions or traits may be determined by neural processes acting to constrain learning about specific aspects of the world. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3514491-10$15.00/0.

  7. Comparison of Chemistry Learning Outcomes with Inquiry Learning Model and Learning Cycle 5E in Material Solubility and Solubility Multiplication Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Indah Firdausi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Perbandingan Hasil Belajar Kimia dengan Model Pembelajaran Inquiry dan Learning Cycle 5E pada Materi Kelarutan dan Hasil Kali Kelarutan   Abstract: This research is aimed to compare the effectiveness between inquiry and LC 5E in solubility equilibria and the solubility product for students with different prior knowledge. The effectiveness of both learning models is measured from students learning outcome. This quasi experimental research uses factorial2x2 with posttest only design. Research samples are chosen using cluster random sampling. They are two classes of XI IPA SMAN 1 Kepanjen in the 2012/2013 academic year which consist of 31 students in each class. Cognitive learning outcome is measured by test items consist of four objective items and nine subjective items. Technique of data analysis in this research is two way ANOVA. Research results show that: (1 cognitive learning outcome and higher cognitive learning outcome of students in inquiry class is higher than students in LC 5E class; (2 cognitive learning outcome and higher cognitive learning outcome of students who have upper prior knowledge is higher than students who have lower prior knowledge in both inquiry and LC 5E. Key Words: learning outcome, inquiry, learning cycle 5E, solubility equilibria and the solubility product   Abstrak: Penelitian ini bertujuan membandingkan keefektifan model inquiry dan LC 5E pada materi kelarutan dan hasil kali kelarutan untuk siswa dengan kemampuan awal berbeda. Keefektifan model pembelajaran dilihat dari hasil belajar kognitif siswa. Penelitian ini menggunakan rancangan eksperimen semu dengan desain faktorial 2x2. Subjek penelitian dipilih secara cluster random sampling yaitu dua kelas XI IPA SMAN 1 Kepanjen dengan jumlah masing-masing kelas sebanyak 31 siswa. Instrumen perlakuan yang digunakan adalah silabus dan RPP sedangkan instrumen pengukuran berupa soal tes terdiri dari empat soal objektif dan sembilan soal subjektif. Teknik analisis data

  8. Vicarious Neural Processing of Outcomes during Observational Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monfardini, Elisabetta; Gazzola, Valeria; Boussaoud, Driss; Brovelli, Andrea; Keysers, Christian; Wicker, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Learning what behaviour is appropriate in a specific context by observing the actions of others and their outcomes is a key constituent of human cognition, because it saves time and energy and reduces exposure to potentially dangerous situations. Observational learning of associative rules relies on

  9. Personality, Organizational Orientations and Self-Reported Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, David; Castka, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To identify competencies connecting personality, organizational orientations and self-reported learning outcomes (as measured by concise Likert-type scales), for individuals who are learning for their organizations. Design/methodology/approach: Five concise factor scales were constructed to represent aspects of personality. Three further…

  10. Team-Based Learning in a Community Health Nursing Course: Improving Academic Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jane M; Larson, Kim L; Swanson, Melvin

    2017-07-01

    Population health concepts, such as upstream thinking, present challenging ideas to undergraduate nursing students grounded in an acute care orientation. The purpose of this study was to describe how team-based learning (TBL) influenced academic outcomes in a community health nursing course. A descriptive correlational design examined the relationship among student scores on individual readiness assurance tests (iRATs), team readiness assurance tests (tRATs), and the final examination. The sample included 221 nursing students who had completed the course. A large positive correlation was found between iRAT and final examination scores. For all students, the mean tRAT score was higher than the mean iRAT score. A moderate positive correlation existed between tRAT and final examination scores. The study contributes to understanding the effects of TBL pedagogy on student academic outcomes in nursing education. TBL is a valuable teaching method in a course requiring the application of challenging concepts. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(7):425-429.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. The effect of learning models and emotional intelligence toward students learning outcomes on reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutiani, Ani; Silitonga, Mei Y.

    2017-08-01

    This research focused on the effect of learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes on reaction rate teaching topic. In order to achieve the objectives of the research, with 2x2 factorial research design was used. There were two factors tested, namely: the learning models (factor A), and emotional intelligence (factor B) factors. Then, two learning models were used; problem-based learning/PBL (A1), and project-based learning/PjBL (A2). While, the emotional intelligence was divided into higher and lower types. The number of population was six classes containing 243 grade X students of SMAN 10 Medan, Indonesia. There were 15 students of each class were chosen as the sample of the research by applying purposive sampling technique. The data were analyzed by applying two-ways analysis of variance (2X2) at the level of significant α = 0.05. Based on hypothesis testing, there was the interaction between learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes. Then, the finding of the research showed that students' learning outcomes in reaction rate taught by using PBL with higher emotional intelligence is higher than those who were taught by using PjBL. There was no significant effect between students with lower emotional intelligence taught by using both PBL and PjBL in reaction rate topic. Based on the finding, the students with lower emotional intelligence were quite hard to get in touch with other students in group discussion.

  12. PLANNING AND ESTIMATION OF EXPECTED COMPETENCES LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR FSES HPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Vasilev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with approach for planning and estimation of competences learning outcomes for Federal State Educational Standard of Higher Professional Education (FSES HPE in the framework of information and educational environment development of the higher education institution, based on the discipline content structuring for formation of the standard competences learning results and the principle of interdisciplinary training. Connection of FSES HPE competences learning outcomes with types and forms of students’ trainings, types and forms of their control in a discipline is analyzed. Techniques of estimation means development for the current, module and intermediate control of expected competences learning outcomes for FSES HPE are considered. Examples of the developed techniques application are given.

  13. Positivity effect in healthy aging in observational but not active feedback-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellebaum, Christian; Rustemeier, Martina; Daum, Irene

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the impact of healthy aging on the bias to learn from positive or negative performance feedback in observational and active feedback learning. In active learning, a previous study had already shown a negative learning bias in healthy seniors older than 75 years, while no bias was found for younger seniors. However, healthy aging is accompanied by a 'positivity effect', a tendency to primarily attend to stimuli with positive valence. Based on recent findings of dissociable neural mechanisms in active and observational feedback learning, the positivity effect was hypothesized to influence older participants' observational feedback learning in particular. In two separate experiments, groups of young (mean age 27) and older participants (mean age 60 years) completed an observational or active learning task designed to differentially assess positive and negative learning. Older but not younger observational learners showed a significant bias to learn better from positive than negative feedback. In accordance with previous findings, no bias was found for active learning. This pattern of results is discussed in terms of differences in the neural underpinnings of active and observational learning from performance feedback.

  14. Pregnancy, Obstetric and Neonatal Outcomes in HIV Positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While the effect of HIV infection on some maternal outcomes is well established, for some others there is conflicting information on possible association with HIV. In this study we investigated pregnancy and neonatal outcome of HIV positive women in large HIV treatment centre over a period of 84 months. They were ...

  15. Serious game design principles: The impact of game design on learning outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael W.

    This dissertation examines the research question "How do video game design principles affect learning outcomes in serious games?" This research first develops a theoretical foundation concerning the meaning of the terms "game" and "serious game". This conceptual clarification is broken down into analytic propositions, which state that games have participants, rules, goals and challenges, and synthetic propositions, which state that the games should be intrinsically compelling, provide meaningful choices, and be self encapsulated. Based on these synthetic propositions, three hypotheses were developed. The hypotheses are that games with an enhanced aesthetic presentation, more meaningful choices, or provide player competition will elicit higher learning outcomes than identical games without these factors. These hypotheses were tested via a quantitative experiment involving 172 undergraduate students in the Old Dominion University Chemistry Department. The students were asked to play a chemistry-oriented serious game entitled Element Solitaire©, which was created by the research author. The students were randomly given different treatments of the Element Solitaire© game to play, and the difference between their learning outcomes were compared. The experimental results demonstrated that the aesthetic presentation of a game can have a significant impact upon the learning outcome. The experiment was not able to discern significant effects from the choice or competition conditions, but further examination of the experimental data did reveal some insight into these aspects of serious game design. Choices need to provide the player with options that have a sufficient value that they will be considered and the application of competition within games needs to be judiciously implemented to promote a positive affect for all players. The results of the theoretical foundations and empirical evidence were then combined with additional theoretical research to develop a set of

  16. Learning by Helping? Undergraduate Communication Outcomes Associated with Training or Service-Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jennifer; DuBois, Melinda; Wigderson, Sara

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated communication outcomes after training or applied service-learning experiences. Pre-practicum trainees learned active listening skills over 10 weeks. Practicum students were successful trainees who staffed a helpline. Community interns were trained and supervised at community agencies. Undergraduate students in psychology…

  17. Didactic Experiments Suggest Enhanced Learning Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pals Svendsen, Lisbet

    2011-01-01

    and presenting material in the language studied, just as they were encouraged to systematically use evaluation processes to enhance learning outcomes. Eventually, increased grade point averages suggested that the experiment was successful. The article also mentions subsequent revisions to the original format...

  18. The effect of Using Mind Mapping and Learning Styles to Geography Learning outcomes of Junior High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigit Purwoko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pengaruh Penggunaan Peta Pikiran dan Gaya Belajar terhadap Hasil Belajar Geografi Siswa SMP Abstract: This study aimed to determine the effect of the use of mind maps, learning styles and inter-action using a mind map learning style on geography learning outcomes. This study was a quasi-experimental study, with a 2 x 3 factorial design study subject consisted of two classes of class VII G as experimental class and class VII F as a control class. Variables consisted of: (1 the dependent variable is the student learning outcomes; (2 the independent variable is the use of mind maps; and (3 is the moderator variable learning styles. Geography learning outcomes were measured using an objective test, whereas learning styles with questionnaires. Measurement data are then analyzed using ANOVA two paths with SPSS v.7. Results of data analysis using ANOVA two path showed that: (1 the use of mind maps significantly effect on learning outcomes geography; (2 learning style does not significantly affect the results of learning geography; and (3 there is no interaction between the use of mind maps and learning style on learning outcomes. Key Words: mind maps, learning styles, learning outcomes   Abstrak: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh penggunaan peta pikiran, gaya belajar dan interaksi penggunaan peta pikiran dengan gaya belajar terhadap hasil belajar geografi. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian eksperimen semu, dengan desain faktorial 2 x 3. Subjek penelitian terdiri dari dua kelas yaitu kelas VII G sebagai kelas eksperimen dan kelas VII F sebagai kelas kontrol. Variabel penelitian terdiri dari: (1 variabel terikat adalah hasil belajar siswa; (2 variabel bebas adalah pengguna-an peta pikiran; dan (3 variabel moderator adalah gaya belajar. Hasil belajar geografi diukur menggunakan tes objektif, sedangkan gaya belajar dengan angket. Data hasil pengukuran dianalisis menggunakan anova dua jalur dengan bantuan SPSS v.7. Hasil analisis data

  19. Measuring Student Learning Outcomes Using the SALG Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Kathleen; Olsen, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    U.S. higher education institutions are being called to question their central nature, priorities, and functions, with prominent and unprecedented attention being given to accountability and the measurement of student learning outcomes. As higher education evolves in how it assesses student learning and leisure studies and recreation departments…

  20. The impact of computer-based versus "traditional" textbook science instruction on selected student learning outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Alan H.

    This study reports the results of research designed to examine the impact of computer-based science instruction on elementary school level students' science content achievement, their attitude about science learning, their level of critical thinking-inquiry skills, and their level of cognitive and English language development. The study compared these learning outcomes resulting from a computer-based approach compared to the learning outcomes from a traditional, textbook-based approach to science instruction. The computer-based approach was inherent in a curriculum titled The Voyage of the Mimi , published by The Bank Street College Project in Science and Mathematics (1984). The study sample included 209 fifth-grade students enrolled in three schools in a suburban school district. This sample was divided into three groups, each receiving one of the following instructional treatments: (a) Mixed-instruction primarily based on the use of a hardcopy textbook in conjunction with computer-based instructional materials as one component of the science course; (b) Non-Traditional, Technology-Based -instruction fully utilizing computer-based material; and (c) Traditional, Textbook-Based-instruction utilizing only the textbook as the basis for instruction. Pre-test, or pre-treatment, data related to each of the student learning outcomes was collected at the beginning of the school year and post-test data was collected at the end of the school year. Statistical analyses of pre-test data were used as a covariate to account for possible pre-existing differences with regard to the variables examined among the three student groups. This study concluded that non-traditional, computer-based instruction in science significantly improved students' attitudes toward science learning and their level of English language development. Non-significant, positive trends were found for the following student learning outcomes: overall science achievement and development of critical thinking

  1. Measuring Learning Outcomes in Auditing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Steenholdt, Niels

    The ability to provide sensible measures for learning outcomes in accounting education is under increased scrutiny. In this paper we use a learner perspective in auditing education, which reflects that some students taking accounting classes also are provided with on-the-job training in accountin...

  2. e-Learning in Advanced Life Support-What factors influence assessment outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, C J; Lockey, A S; Kimani, P K; Bullock, I; Hampshire, S; Begum-Ali, S; Perkins, G D

    2017-05-01

    To establish variables which are associated with favourable Advanced Life Support (ALS) course assessment outcomes, maximising learning effect. Between 1 January 2013 and 30 June 2014, 8218 individuals participated in a Resuscitation Council (UK) e-learning Advanced Life Support (e-ALS) course. Participants completed 5-8h of online e-learning prior to attending a one day face-to-face course. e-Learning access data were collected through the Learning Management System (LMS). All participants were assessed by a multiple choice questionnaire (MCQ) before and after the face-to-face aspect alongside a practical cardiac arrest simulation (CAS-Test). Participant demographics and assessment outcomes were analysed. The mean post e-learning MCQ score was 83.7 (SD 7.3) and the mean post-course MCQ score was 87.7 (SD 7.9). The first attempt CAS-Test pass rate was 84.6% and overall pass rate 96.6%. Participants with previous ALS experience, ILS experience, or who were a core member of the resuscitation team performed better in the post-course MCQ, CAS-Test and overall assessment. Median time spent on the e-learning was 5.2h (IQR 3.7-7.1). There was a large range in the degree of access to e-learning content. Increased time spent accessing e-learning had no effect on the overall result (OR 0.98, P=0.367) on simulated learning outcome. Clinical experience through membership of cardiac arrest teams and previous ILS or ALS training were independent predictors of performance on the ALS course whilst time spent accessing e-learning materials did not affect course outcomes. This supports the blended approach to e-ALS which allows participants to tailor their e-learning experience to their specific needs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Incorporating Learning Outcomes into an Introductory Geotechnical Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegel, Gregg L.

    2013-01-01

    The article describes the process of incorporating a set of learning outcomes into a geotechnical engineering course. The outcomes were developed using Bloom's taxonomy and define the knowledge, skills, and abilities the students are expected to achieve upon completion of the course. Each outcome begins with an action-oriented verb corresponding…

  4. Learning Outcomes and Affective Factors of Blended Learning of English for Library Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentao, Chen; Jinyu, Zhang; Zhonggen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    English for Library Science is an essential course for students to command comprehensive scope of library knowledge. This study aims to compare the learning outcomes, gender differences and affective factors in the environments of blended and traditional learning. Around one thousand participants from one university were randomly selected to…

  5. The impact of project-based learning on improving student learning outcomes of sustainability concepts in transportation engineering courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Elham H.; Awadallah, Faisal; Parast, Mahour M.; Abu-Lebdeh, Taher

    2018-05-01

    This paper describes an intervention to enhance students' learning by involving students in brainstorming activities about sustainability concepts and their implications in transportation engineering. The paper discusses the process of incorporating the intervention into a transportation course, as well as the impact of this intervention on students' learning outcomes. To evaluate and compare students' learning as a result of the intervention, the Laboratory for Innovative Technology and Engineering Education survey instrument was used. The survey instrument includes five constructs: higher-order cognitive skills, self-efficacy, ease of learning subject matter, teamwork, and communication skills. Pre- and post-intervention surveys of student learning outcomes were conducted to determine the effectiveness of the intervention on enhancing students' learning outcomes. The results show that the implementation of the intervention significantly improved higher-order cognitive skills, self-efficacy, teamwork, and communication skills. Involving students in brainstorming activities related to sustainability concepts and their implications in transportation proved to be an effective teaching and learning strategy.

  6. Repository Services for Outcome-based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Totschnig, Michael; Derntl, Michael; Gutiérrez, Israel; Najjar, Jad; Klemke, Roland; Klerkx, Joris; Duval, Erik; Müller, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Totschnig, M., Derntl, M., Gutiérrez, I., Najjar, J., Klemke, R., Klerkx, J., Duval, E., & Müller, F. (2010). Repository Services for Outcome-based Learning. Fourth International Workshop on Search and Exchange of e-le@rning Materials (SE@M’10). September, 27-28, 2010, Barcelona, Spain.

  7. Integrating Culture into Language Teaching and Learning: Learner Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trang Thi Thuy

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the issue of learner outcomes in learning culture as part of their language learning. First, some brief discussion on the role of culture in language teaching and learning, as well as on culture contents in language lessons is presented. Based on a detailed review of previous literature related to culture in language teaching…

  8. An Outcome Evaluation of a Problem-Based Learning Approach with MSW Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhues, Anne; Barsen, Chia; Freymond, Nancy; Train, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we report the findings from a study exploring the effects of a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to teaching and learning on learning outcomes for master's of social work (MSW) students. Students who participated in a PBL pilot project were compared with students who did not participate in 5 outcome areas: social work…

  9. Integration of e-learning outcomes into work processes

    OpenAIRE

    Kerstin Grundén

    2011-01-01

    Three case studies of in-house developed e-learning education in public organizations with different pedagogical approaches are used as a starting point for discussion regarding the implementation challenges of e-learning at work. The aim of this article is to contribute to the understanding of integrating mechanisms of e-learning outcomes into work processes in large, public organizations. The case studies were analyzed from a socio-cultural perspective using the MOA-model as a frame of refe...

  10. Pros & Cons of Using Blackboard Collaborate for Blended Learning on Students' Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Mona M.

    2017-01-01

    Blackboard Collaborate was introduced to King Khalid University recently in the last decade; instructors and students were trained to use it in an effective way. The objective of this study is to find pros and cons of using Blackboard Collaborate for Blended Learning and its effect on students' learning outcomes. The researcher used the…

  11. The Effect of Formative Testing and Self-Directed Learning on Mathematics Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumantri, Mohamad Syarif; Satriani, Retni

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of formative testing and self-directed learning on mathematics learning outcomes. The research was conducted at an elementary school in central Jakarta during the 2014/2015 school year. Seventy-two fourth-grade students who were selected using random sampling participated in this study. Data…

  12. Effect of Mastery Learning on Senior Secondary School Students' Cognitive Learning Outcome in Quantitative Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitee, Telimoye Leesi; Obaitan, Georgina N.

    2015-01-01

    The cognitive learning outcome of Senior Secondary School chemistry students has been poor over the years in Nigeria. Poor mathematical skills and inefficient teaching methods have been identified as some of the major reasons for this. Bloom's theory of school learning and philosophy of mastery learning assert that virtually all students are…

  13. Learning Outcomes in Vocational Education: A Business Plan Development by Production-Based Learning Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumaningrum, Indrati; Hidayat, Hendra; Ganefri; Anori, Sartika; Dewy, Mega Silfia

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the development of a business plan by using production-based learning approach. In addition, this development also aims to maximize learning outcomes in vocational education. Preliminary analysis of curriculum and learning and the needs of the market and society become the basic for business plan development. To produce a…

  14. Teaching Quality and Learning Creativity in Technical and Vocational Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kembuan, D. R. E.; Rompas, P. T. D.; Mintjelungan, M.; Pantondate, T.; Kilis, B. M. H.

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to obtain information about the teacher quality of teaching and learning creativity with the outcomes of student learning in a vocational high school in Indonesia. This research is a survey research. The sample used in this research is 50 teachers, selected by simple random sampling. Data were analyzed by using correlation analysis. The findings of this study are as follows: (1) There is a significant and positive correlation between teacher quality of teaching with the outcomes of student learning at the vocational high school; (2) There is a significant and positive correlation between learning creativity with the outcomes of student learning at the vocational high school, and (3) there is a significant and positive correlation between the teacher quality of teaching and learning creativity with the outcomes of student learning at the school. That is, if the use of appropriate the teacher quality of teaching and learning creativity, then the outcomes of student learning at the school. Finally it can be concluded that to improve the outcomes of student learning, it has to be followed by an improvement of teacher quality of teaching and learning creativity.

  15. Service-Learning in Nonprofit Organizations: Motivations, Expectations, and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinger, Nancy; Bartholomew, Keith

    2006-01-01

    This article applies theories of giving from philanthropic studies to enhance understanding of service-learning relationships between students and community partners. Focusing on the participation motivations, outcome expectations, and satisfaction levels of community partners who have recently completed work with service-learning students, the…

  16. Doing Outcomes-Based Collaborative Teaching and Learning in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, Gertina J.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter focuses on applying the concepts of outcomes-based collaborative teaching and learning in an Asian context and with students coming from a Confucian heritage culture and explores examples of how to implement effective collaborative teaching and learning in an Asian higher education setting.

  17. Do E-Textbooks Impact Learning Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fike, David; Fike, Renea

    2016-01-01

    The primary focus of this study was to determine if student learning outcomes in an undergraduate Statistics course differed based upon the type of textbook used (e-textbook or hardcopy). Fifty-six students enrolled in the course were allowed to choose textbook type. After controlling for student demographics and academic preparedness, student…

  18. Teachers' Teaching Experience and Students' Learning Outcomes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    Items 1 - 6 ... Keywords: teaching experience, students' learning outcomes, teacher incentives ... revealed that experienced teachers' perception of their teaching objectives were ... African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences Vol. .... Years. English language. Mathematics Physics. Chemistry. Biology. %.

  19. Motivation Matters? The Relationship among Different Types of Learning Motivation, Engagement Behaviors and Learning Outcomes of Undergraduate Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tzu-Ling

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand predictors of different learning outcomes among various student background characteristics, types of learning motivation and engagement behaviors. 178 junior students were surveyed at a 4-year research university in Taiwan. The scales of motivation, engagement and perceived learning outcomes were adapted…

  20. The Effectiveness of KNOS-KGS Learning Model to Improve Generic Science Skill and Biology Student Learning Outcomes SMA PGRI 1 Banjarmasin

    OpenAIRE

    Nefianthi, Rezky

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effectiveness of the model KNOS-KGS, to improve the learning outcomes of Biology at the ecosystem material in class X SMA PGRI 1 Banjarmasin. This research is a classroom action research, conducted in two cycles. Each cycle is done with two meetings. This study was conducted on 25 students in class X1. The research data is the result of student learning that consists of cognitive learning outcomes such as pretest and posttest. Affective learning outcomes such ...

  1. University Student and Lecturer Perceptions of Positive Emotions in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Anna Dluzewska; Fitness, Julie; Wood, Leigh Norma

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation exploring the experience and functionality of positive feelings and emotions in learning and teaching. The role of emotions in learning is receiving increasing attention; however, few studies have researched how university students and academics experience and perceive positive emotions. A prototype…

  2. Gain and loss learning differentially contribute to life financial outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Knutson

    Full Text Available Emerging findings imply that distinct neurobehavioral systems process gains and losses. This study investigated whether individual differences in gain learning and loss learning might contribute to different life financial outcomes (i.e., assets versus debt. In a community sample of healthy adults (n = 75, rapid learners had smaller debt-to-asset ratios overall. More specific analyses, however, revealed that those who learned rapidly about gains had more assets, while those who learned rapidly about losses had less debt. These distinct associations remained strong even after controlling for potential cognitive (e.g., intelligence, memory, and risk preferences and socioeconomic (e.g., age, sex, ethnicity, income, education confounds. Self-reported measures of assets and debt were additionally validated with credit report data in a subset of subjects. These findings support the notion that different gain and loss learning systems may exert a cumulative influence on distinct life financial outcomes.

  3. Students' Characteristics, Self-Regulated Learning, Technology Self-Efficacy, and Course Outcomes in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Hsuan; Shannon, David M.; Ross, Margaret E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among students' characteristics, self-regulated learning, technology self-efficacy, and course outcomes in online learning settings. Two hundred and fifty-six students participated in this study. All participants completed an online survey that included demographic information, the modified…

  4. The Influence of Problem Based Learning Model toward Students’ Activities and Learning Outcomes on Financial Management Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Tantri Hardini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to know the influence of problem based learning model toward students’ activities and achievement on Financial Management subject for undergraduate program students of Accounting Education. It was a quantitative research that used true experimental design. Samples of this study were undergraduate program students of Accounting Education in the year of 2014. Class A were control class and class B were experimental class. Data were analyzed by using t-test in order to determine the differences of learning outcomes between control class and experimental class. Then, questionnaires were distributed to gather students’ activities information in their students’ learning model. Findings show that there is an influence of Problem Based Learning model toward students’ activities and learning outcomes on Financial Management subject for undergraduate program students of Accounting Education since t-count ≥ t-table. It is 6.120 ≥ 1.9904. Students’ learning activities with Problem Based Learning model are better than students who are taught by conventional learning model.

  5. Measuring Learning Outcomes. A Learner Perspective in Auditing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Steenholdt, Niels

    2000-01-01

    The ability to provide sensible measures for learning outcomes in accounting education is under increased scrutiny. In this paper we use a learner perspective in auditing education which reflects that some students taking accounting classes also are provided with on-the-job training in accounting...... for students taking a graduate auditing course reflect prior accounting work experience for some students and undergraduate accounting coursework experience for all students. This paper extends prior research on the role of declarative and procedural knowledge in performing auditing tasks. Measuring learning...... suggested by Robert M. Gagné. An instrument was developed to measure differences regarding learning outcomes in the context of an auditing course by posing a broad set of questions testing declarative knowledge and the full range of intellectual skills from discrimination to the use of higher...

  6. Effects of Elicited Reflections combined with Tutor or Peer Feedback on Self-Regulated Learning and Learning Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Boom, Gerard; Paas, Fred; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2009-01-01

    Van den Boom, G., Paas, F., & Van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2007). Effects of elicited reflections combined with tutor or peer feedback on self-regulated learning and learning outcomes. Learning and Instruction, 17, 532-548.

  7. Learning outcomes and tutoring in problem based-learning: how do undergraduate medical students perceive them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHaqwi, Ali I

    2014-04-01

    To explore opinions of undergraduate medical students regarding learning outcomes of the instructional strategy of Problem Based Learning (PBL). In addition their views were sought about the role of tutors and qualities of effective tutors. This was a cross-sectional, questionnaire based study which was conducted in two colleges of Medicine, Central region, Saudi Arabia during the period of 1st of April to 30(th) June 2012. One hundred seventy four undergraduate medical students participated in this study. Seventy percent of participants have indicated that PBL strategy contributed to the development of their knowledge, presentation skills, team work abilities, and accepting criticism from other colleagues. Regarding the tutors' role in PBL tutorials, majority of the participants (75%) indicated that this role is essential, nevertheless, only 58% of students indicated that this role is clear and well identified. Sixty three percent of participants preferred a member role in the PBL tutorials and 80 percent of participants preferred both content and process expert tutors in the PBL tutorials. Significant statistical difference was noted between the views of students and their schools, gender, and study phase. Majority of the participants believed that PBL had a positive impact on the development of their cognitive, personal and teamwork skills. The view of the students in this study and the available evidence suggest that tutor should have both qualities; content and process expertise, in order to have the best outcomes from the PBL tutorials.

  8. Perceived learning outcome: the relationship between experience, realism and situation awareness during simulator training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saus, Evelyn-Rose; Johnsen, Bjørn Helge; Eid, Jarle

    2010-01-01

    Navigation errors are a frequent cause of serious accidents and work-related injuries among seafarers. The present study investigated the effects of experience, perceived realism, and situation awareness (SA) on the perceived learning outcome of simulator-based navigation training. Thirty-two Norwegian Navy officer cadets were assigned to a low and a high mental workload conditions based on previous educational and navigational experience. In the low mental workload condition, experience (negatively associated), perceived realism, and subjective SA explained almost half of the total variance in perceived learning outcome. A hierarchical regression analysis showed that only subjective SA made a unique contribution to the learning outcome. In the high mental workload condition, perceived realism and subjective SA together explained almost half of the variance in perceived learning outcome. Furthermore, both perceived realism and subjective SA were shown to make an independent contribution to perceived learning outcomes. The results of this study show that in order to enhance the learning outcomes from simulator training it is necessary to design training procedures and scenarios that enable students to achieve functional fidelity and to generate and maintain SA during training. This can further improve safety and reduce the risk of maritime disasters.

  9. The Relationships between Language Learning Strategies and Positive Emotions among Malaysian ESL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadipour

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Emotions are an indispensable part of second language learning. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between the use of language learning strategies and positive emotions. The present study adopted a sequential mixed methods design. The participants were 300 Malaysian ESL undergraduates selected through stratified random sampling from 5 public universities in Malaysia. The quantitative data were collected through two sets of questionnaires: (a Oxford's (1990 Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL, and (b Fredrickson's (2009 modified Differential Emotional Scale (mDES. The qualitative data were gathered through semi-structured interviews. With regard to the quantitative data analysis, a series of t-tests and correlational analyses were used. The data from the interviews were analysed qualitatively. A positive significant correlation was found between positive emotions and overall language learning strategy use. Also, the qualitative results of the study indicated that the learners who experienced more positive emotions tended to use a greater variety of language learning strategies. The findings of the study emphasise the importance of students’ positive emotions in their use of language learning strategies. It might be suggested that teachers by designing the classroom settings and instructions which promote positive emotions can inspire learners to use language learning strategies more frequently and with a greater variety which in sequence relate to learners’ language learning proficiency.

  10. Geriatrics Curricula for Internal and Family Medicine Residents: Assessing Study Quality and Learning Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Huai Yong; Davis, Molly

    2017-02-01

    Prior reviews of geriatrics curricula for internal medicine (IM) and family medicine (FM) residents have not evaluated study quality or assessed learning objectives or specific IM or FM competencies. This review of geriatrics curricula for IM and FM residents seeks to answer 3 questions: (1) What types of learning outcomes were measured? (2) How were learning outcomes measured? and (3) What was the quality of the studies? We evaluated geriatrics curricula that reported learning objectives or competencies, teaching methods, and learning outcomes, and those that used a comparative design. We searched PubMed and 4 other data sets from 2003-2015, and assessed learning outcomes, outcome measures, and the quality of studies using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI) and Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) methods. Fourteen studies met inclusion criteria. Most curricula were intended for IM residents in the inpatient setting; only 1 was solely dedicated to FM residents. Median duration was 1 month, and minimum geriatrics competencies covered were 4. Learning outcomes ranged from Kirkpatrick levels 1 to 3. Studies that reported effect size showed a considerable impact on attitudes and knowledge, mainly via pretests and posttests. The mean MERSQI score was 10.5 (range, 8.5-13) on a scale of 5 (lowest quality) to 18 (highest quality). Few geriatrics curricula for IM and FM residents that included learning outcome assessments were published recently. Overall, changes in attitudes and knowledge were sizeable, but reporting was limited to low to moderate Kirkpatrick levels. Study quality was moderate.

  11. Guided Inquiry Facilitated Blended Learning to Improve Metacognitive and Learning Outcome of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwono, H.; Susanti, S.; Lestari, U.

    2017-04-01

    The learning activities that involve the students to learn actively is one of the characteristics of a qualified education. The learning strategy that involves students’ active learning is guided inquiry. Learning problems today are growing metacognitive skills and cognitive learning outcomes. It is the research and development of learning module by using 4D models of Thiagarajan. The first phase is Define, which analyses the problems and needs required by the prior preparation of the module. The second phase is Design, which formulates learning design and devices to obtain the initial draft of learning modules. The third stage is Develop, which is developing and writing module, module validation, product testing, revision, and the resulting an end-product results module development. The fourth stage is Disseminate, which is disseminating of the valid products. Modules were validated by education experts, practitioners, subject matter experts, and expert of online media. The results of the validation module indicated that the module was valid and could be used in teaching and learning. In the validation phase of testing methods, we used experiments to know the difference of metacognitive skills and learning outcomes between the control group and experimental group. The experimental design was a one group pretest-posttest design. The results of the data analysis showed that the modules could enhance metacognitive skills and learning outcomes. The advantages of this module is as follows, 1) module is accompanied by a video link on a website that contains practical activities that are appropriate to Curriculum 2013, 2) module is accompanied by a video link on a website that contains about manual laboratory activities that will be used in the classroom face-to-face, so that students are ready when doing laboratory activities, 3) this module can be online through chat to increase students’ understanding. The disadvantages of this module are the material presented in

  12. Association between classroom ventilation mode and learning outcome in Danish schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Kjeldsen, Birthe Uldahl; Wargocki, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    Associations between learning, ventilation mode, and other classroom characteristics were investigated with data from a Danish test scheme and two widespread cross-sectional studies examining air quality in Danish schools. An academic achievement indicator as a measure of the learning outcome...... concentrations and temperatures in 820 classrooms in 389 schools were available. In 56% and 66% of the classrooms included in the two studies, the measured CO2 concentration was higher than 1000ppm. The findings of this study add to the growing evidence that insufficient classroom ventilation have impacts...... on learning outcomes....

  13. The Interaction Effects of Program Training, Dosage, and Implementation Quality on Targeted Student Outcomes for The RULER Approach to Social and Emotional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Maria Regina; Brackett, Marc A.; Rivers, Susan E.; Elbertson, Nicole A.; Salovey, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study examined how training, dosage, and implementation quality of a social and emotional learning program, The RULER Approach, were related to students' social and emotional competencies. There were no main effects for any of the variables on student outcomes, but students had more positive outcomes when their teachers (a) attended more…

  14. Taylorism and the Logic of Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    This essay examines the shared philosophical foundations of Fredrick W. Taylor's scientific management principles and the contemporary learning outcomes movement (LOM). It analyses the shared philosophical ground between the focal point of Taylor's system--"the task"--and the conceptualization and deployment of "learning…

  15. Training with Differential Outcomes Enhances Discriminative Learning and Visuospatial Recognition Memory in Children Born Prematurely

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Lourdes; Mari-Beffa, Paloma; Roldan-Tapia, Dolores; Ramos-Lizana, Julio; Fuentes, Luis J.; Estevez, Angeles F.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that discriminative learning is facilitated when a particular outcome is associated with each relation to be learned. When this training procedure is applied (the differential outcome procedure; DOP), learning is faster and more accurate than when the more common non-differential outcome procedure is used. This…

  16. Using Cross-Cultural Dimensions Exercises to Improve and Measure Learning Outcomes in International Business Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainuba, Mohamed; Rahal, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes an approach for using cross-cultural dimensions exercises to improve and measure learning outcomes in international business courses. The following key issues are highlighted: (a) what are the targeted learning outcomes to be assessed, (b) how to measure the accomplishment of these learning outcomes, (c) the input measures…

  17. Learned predictiveness and outcome predictability effects are not simply two sides of the same coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorwart, Anna; Livesey, Evan J; Wilhelm, Francisco; Liu, Wei; Lachnit, Harald

    2017-10-01

    The Learned Predictiveness effect refers to the observation that learning about the relationship between a cue and an outcome is influenced by the predictive relevance of the cue for other outcomes. Similarly, the Outcome Predictability effect refers to a recent observation that the previous predictability of an outcome affects learning about this outcome in new situations, too. We hypothesize that both effects may be two manifestations of the same phenomenon and stimuli that have been involved in highly predictive relationships may be learned about faster when they are involved in new relationships regardless of their functional role in predictive learning as cues and outcomes. Four experiments manipulated both the relationships and the function of the stimuli. While we were able to replicate the standard effects, they did not survive a transfer to situations where the functional role of the stimuli changed, that is the outcome of the first phase becomes a cue in the second learning phase or the cue of the first phase becomes the outcome of the second phase. Furthermore, unlike learned predictiveness, there was little indication that the distribution of overt attention in the second phase was influenced by previous predictability. The results suggest that these 2 very similar effects are not manifestations of a more general phenomenon but rather independent from each other. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Acid-Base Learning Outcomes for Students in an Introductory Organic Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanovich, Carlee; Gandhi, Aneri; Flynn, Alison B.

    2015-01-01

    An outcome-based approach to teaching and learning focuses on what the student demonstrably knows and can do after instruction, rather than on what the instructor teaches. This outcome-focused approach can then guide the alignment of teaching strategies, learning activities, and assessment. In organic chemistry, mastery of organic acid-base…

  19. The significance of clinical experience on learning outcome from resuscitation training-a randomised controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Lind; Lippert, Freddy; Hesselfeldt, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: The impact of clinical experience on learning outcome from a resuscitation course has not been systematically investigated. AIM: To determine whether half a year of clinical experience before participation in an Advanced Life Support (ALS) course increases the immediate learning outcome...... and retention of learning. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective single blinded randomised controlled study of the learning outcome from a standard ALS course on a volunteer sample of the entire cohort of newly graduated doctors from Copenhagen University. The outcome measurement was ALS...... immediately following graduation. RESULTS: Invitation to participate was accepted by 154/240 (64%) graduates and 117/154 (76%) completed the study. There was no difference between the intervention and control groups with regard to the immediate learning outcome. The intervention group had significantly higher...

  20. Improving the Students' Activity and Learning Outcomes on Social Sciences Subject Using Round Table and Rally Coach of Cooperative Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningsih; Soetjipto, Budi Eko; Sumarmi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was: (1) to analyze increasing students' learning activity and learning outcomes. Student activities which were observed include the visual, verbal, listening, writing and mental visual activity; (2) to analyze the improvement of student learning outcomes using "Round Table" and "Rally Coach" Model of…

  1. The Influence of Learning Management Technology to Student’s Learning Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufiq Lilo Adi Sucipto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The study examines the influence of learning management systems to the implementation of flipped classroom model in a vocational school in Indonesia. The flipped classroom is a relatively new educational model that inverts students’ time to study on lectures and time spent on homework. Despite studies have been conducted on the model, few addressed the impact of the use of a learning management system to the performance of students involved in such learning model particularly within Indonesian educational systems context. A quasi-experiment approach was applied to an experiment class and another control class. Upon the analysis, the results emphasized previously held research outcomes. The use of Edmodo learning management systems enhances students’ performance in the experiment class, relative to those of the control class.     Except where otherwise noted, content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

  2. Improved sleep patterns positively affect learning outcome among Danish nursing students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per

    physiology is taught at the nursing education programme; this does not mean that nursing students develop good sleep habits. Methods: To support learning an innovative method was chosen where nursing students were motivated to develop good sleep habits through peer learning. Nursing students were taught...... in groups by other students, so-called sleep ambassadors. On the basis of a training programme they developed a creative concept with exercises, tests (memory and power of concentration) and social activities in connection with theoretical teaching in the subject of sleep. This concept was followed......-up by social media activities motivated the nursing students to change their sleep habits. Results: This project has been completed by one of two classes of first semester students at the nursing education programme at UCN. This class demonstrated better examination results and a lower drop-oup rate compared...

  3. Edutourism Taka Bonerate National Park through Scientific Approach to Improve Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, R. S.

    2017-02-01

    This research aim is develop the potential of Taka Bonerate National Park as learning resources through edutourism with scientific approach to improve student learning outcomes. Focus of student learning outcomes are students psychomotor abilities and comprehension on Biodiversity of Marine Biota, Corals Ecosystem, and Conservation topics. The edutourism development products are teacher manual, edutourism worksheet, material booklet, guide’s manual, and Taka Bonerate National Park governor manual. The method to develop edutourism products is ADDIE research and development model that consist of analysis, design, development and production, implementation, and evaluation step. The subjects in the implementation step were given a pretest and posttest and observation sheet to see the effect of edutourism Taka Bonerate National Park through scientific approach to student learning outcomes on Biodiversity of Marine Biota, Corals Ecosystem, and Conservation topics. The data were analyzed qualitative descriptively. The research result is edutourism Taka Bonerate National Park through scientific approach can improve students learning outcomes on Biodiversity of Marine Biota, Corals Ecosystem, and Conservation topics. Edutourism Taka Bonerate National Park can be an alternative of learning method on Biodiversity of Marine Biota, Corals Ecosystem, and Conservation topics.

  4. Learning Outcomes as a Key Concept in Policy Documents throughout Policy Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prøitz, Tine Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Learning outcomes can be considered to be a key concept in a changing education policy landscape, enhancing aspects such as benchmarking and competition. Issues relating to concepts of performance have a long history of debate within the field of education. Today, the concept of learning outcomes has become central in education policy development,…

  5. THE INTENTIONAL USE OF LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES TO IMPROVE LEARNING OUTCOMES IN STUDIO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew MacKenzie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At the University of Canberra, Australia, the design and architecture faculty are trialling a range of approaches to incorporating learning technologies in the first year foundation studio to improve student learning outcomes. For this study researchers collected information on students’ access to their assignment information and feedback from the learning management system (LMS to discover how the students engaged in the design process. The studio curriculum was designed to encourage students to engage in a convergence, divergence dynamic (Brown, 2009; Thomas, Billsberry, Ambrosini, & Barton, 2014 in developing their own understanding of the design process. The staff tailored around points of convergence, online instruction, assessment tools and feedback in studio. We argue that using learning technologies in this way can improve intentionality at the beginning of semester, enhance students understanding of feedback and facilitate a more iterative approach to problem based learning in studio practice.

  6. Promoting Positive Learning in Australian Students Aged 10- to 12-Years-Old Using Attribution Retraining and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodkiewicz, Alicia R; Boyle, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    This study piloted an intervention using attribution retraining and cognitive behavioral therapy techniques to promote positive learning experiences and outcomes for students. This research is an important step to revitalise the dwindling field of attribution retraining research by assessing whether these techniques effectively improve student…

  7. Theoretical Perspectives Underlying the Application of Cooperative Learning in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Van Dat

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative learning has been the centre of worldwide attention because it has been shown to have strong effects on student learning, as well as other positive outcomes. Although the academic, social, affective and psychological outcomes of students taught by cooperative learning are more positive compared with students taught by the traditional…

  8. Dissociation between active and observational learning from positive and negative feedback in Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobza, Stefan; Ferrea, Stefano; Schnitzler, Alfons; Pollok, Bettina; Südmeyer, Martin; Bellebaum, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Feedback to both actively performed and observed behaviour allows adaptation of future actions. Positive feedback leads to increased activity of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, whereas dopamine neuron activity is decreased following negative feedback. Dopamine level reduction in unmedicated Parkinson's Disease patients has been shown to lead to a negative learning bias, i.e. enhanced learning from negative feedback. Recent findings suggest that the neural mechanisms of active and observational learning from feedback might differ, with the striatum playing a less prominent role in observational learning. Therefore, it was hypothesized that unmedicated Parkinson's Disease patients would show a negative learning bias only in active but not in observational learning. In a between-group design, 19 Parkinson's Disease patients and 40 healthy controls engaged in either an active or an observational probabilistic feedback-learning task. For both tasks, transfer phases aimed to assess the bias to learn better from positive or negative feedback. As expected, actively learning patients showed a negative learning bias, whereas controls learned better from positive feedback. In contrast, no difference between patients and controls emerged for observational learning, with both groups showing better learning from positive feedback. These findings add to neural models of reinforcement-learning by suggesting that dopamine-modulated input to the striatum plays a minor role in observational learning from feedback. Future research will have to elucidate the specific neural underpinnings of observational learning.

  9. Pressure to cooperate: is positive reward interdependence really needed in cooperative learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchs, Céline; Gilles, Ingrid; Dutrévis, Marion; Butera, Fabrizio

    2011-03-01

    BACKGROUND. Despite extensive research on cooperative learning, the debate regarding whether or not its effectiveness depends on positive reward interdependence has not yet found clear evidence. AIMS. We tested the hypothesis that positive reward interdependence, as compared to reward independence, enhances cooperative learning only if learners work on a 'routine task'; if the learners work on a 'true group task', positive reward interdependence induces the same level of learning as reward independence. SAMPLE. The study involved 62 psychology students during regular workshops. METHOD. Students worked on two psychology texts in cooperative dyads for three sessions. The type of task was manipulated through resource interdependence: students worked on either identical (routine task) or complementary (true group task) information. Students expected to be assessed with a Multiple Choice Test (MCT) on the two texts. The MCT assessment type was introduced according to two reward interdependence conditions, either individual (reward independence) or common (positive reward interdependence). A follow-up individual test took place 4 weeks after the third session of dyadic work to examine individual learning. RESULTS. The predicted interaction between the two types of interdependence was significant, indicating that students learned more with positive reward interdependence than with reward independence when they worked on identical information (routine task), whereas students who worked on complementary information (group task) learned the same with or without reward interdependence. CONCLUSIONS. This experiment sheds light on the conditions under which positive reward interdependence enhances cooperative learning, and suggests that creating a real group task allows to avoid the need for positive reward interdependence. © 2010 The British Psychological Society.

  10. Presence relates to distinct outcomes in two virtual environments employing different learning modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persky, Susan; Kaphingst, Kimberly A; McCall, Cade; Lachance, Christina; Beall, Andrew C; Blascovich, Jim

    2009-06-01

    Presence in virtual learning environments (VLEs) has been associated with a number of outcome factors related to a user's ability and motivation to learn. The extant but relatively small body of research suggests that a high level of presence is related to better performance on learning outcomes in VLEs. Different configurations of form and content variables such as those associated with active (self-driven, interactive activities) versus didactic (reading or lecture) learning may, however, influence how presence operates and on what content it operates. We compared the influence of presence between two types of immersive VLEs (i.e., active versus didactic techniques) on comprehension and engagement-related outcomes. The findings revealed that the active VLE promoted greater presence. Although we found no relationship between presence and learning comprehension outcomes for either virtual environment, presence was related to information engagement variables in the didactic immersive VLE but not the active environment. Results demonstrate that presence is not uniformly elicited or effective across immersive VLEs. Educational delivery mode and environment complexity may influence the impact of presence on engagement.

  11. Learning outcomes in two different teaching approach in nursing education in Iran: e-learning versus lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrdad, Neda; Zolfaghari, Mitra; Bahrani, Naser; Eybpoosh, Sana

    2011-01-01

    Traditional teaching methods used in medical education couldn't meet the need for keeping pace with up to date information. Present study has conducted in order to compare the effect of lecture and e-learning methods on nursing students' learning outcomes in the context of Iran. A cross-over design was applied. Study sample was consisted of 32 students which were in third semester of nursing bachelor program and were passing Maternal Child nursing course. The first part of the course was taught using lecture method during first four weeks; an e-learning method was the technique used to educate the remained part of the course during the second four weeks. Students' learning outcomes in each method, opinion toward and participation with both educational methods was assessed. No significant difference was found between students exam scores in both methods. Considering students' opinion toward educational methods, no significant difference was found between two methods in general but students reported better "capability" and "independency" in e-learning method while lecture was obtained higher scores in "effectiveness on learning" and "motivation" characteristics. E-learning can be used in teaching some nursing courses. It is recommended to use e-learning method with appropriate interactive strategies and attractive virtual environments to motivate students.

  12. Learning Outcomes in Two Different Teaching Approach in Nursing Education in Iran: E-Learning versus Lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Mehrdad

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditional teaching methods used in medical education couldn't meet the need for keeping pace with up to date information. Present study has conducted in order to compare the effect of lecture and e-learning methods on nursing students' learning outcomes in the context of Iran. A cross-over design was applied. Study sample was consisted of 32 students which were in third semester of nursing bachelor program and were passing Maternal Child nursing course. The first part of the course was taught using lecture method during first four weeks; an e-learning method was the technique used to educate the remained part of the course during the second four weeks. Students' learning outcomes in each method, opinion toward and participation with both educational methods was assessed. No significant difference was found between students exam scores in both methods. Considering students' opinion toward educational methods, no significant difference was found between two methods in general but students reported better "capability" and "independency" in e-learning method while lecture was obtained higher scores in "effectiveness on learning" and "motivation" characteristics. E-learning can be used in teaching some nursing courses. It is recommended to use e-learning method with appropriate interactive strategies and attractive virtual environments to motivate students

  13. #13ReasonsWhy Health Professionals and Educators are Tweeting: A Systematic Analysis of Uses and Perceptions of Show Content and Learning Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kimberly K; Burns, Kelli

    2018-04-27

    This study is a content analysis of health professionals' and educators' tweets about a popular Netflix show that depicts teen suicide: 13 Reasons Why. A content analysis of 740 tweets was conducted to determine the main themes associated with professionals' and educators' tweets about the show, as well as the valence of the tweets. Additionally, a thematic analysis of linked content in tweets (n = 178) was conducted to explore additional content shared about the show and modeling outcomes. Results indicated the largest percentage of tweets was related to social learning, particularly about outcomes that could occur from viewing the show. The valence of the tweets about outcomes was more positive than negative. However, linked materials commonly circulated in tweets signified greater concern with unintended learning outcomes. Some of the linked content included media guidelines for reporting on suicide with recommendations that entertainment producers follow the guidelines. This study emphasizes the importance of including social learning objectives in future typologies of Twitter uses and demonstrates the importance of examining linked content in Twitter studies.

  14. Last-position elimination-based learning automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junqi; Wang, Cheng; Zhou, MengChu

    2014-12-01

    An update scheme of the state probability vector of actions is critical for learning automata (LA). The most popular is the pursuit scheme that pursues the estimated optimal action and penalizes others. This paper proposes a reverse philosophy that leads to last-position elimination-based learning automata (LELA). The action graded last in terms of the estimated performance is penalized by decreasing its state probability and is eliminated when its state probability becomes zero. All active actions, that is, actions with nonzero state probability, equally share the penalized state probability from the last-position action at each iteration. The proposed LELA is characterized by the relaxed convergence condition for the optimal action, the accelerated step size of the state probability update scheme for the estimated optimal action, and the enriched sampling for the estimated nonoptimal actions. The proof of the ϵ-optimal property for the proposed algorithm is presented. Last-position elimination is a widespread philosophy in the real world and has proved to be also helpful for the update scheme of the learning automaton via the simulations of well-known benchmark environments. In the simulations, two versions of the LELA, using different selection strategies of the last action, are compared with the classical pursuit algorithms Discretized Pursuit Reward-Inaction (DP(RI)) and Discretized Generalized Pursuit Algorithm (DGPA). Simulation results show that the proposed schemes achieve significantly faster convergence and higher accuracy than the classical ones. Specifically, the proposed schemes reduce the interval to find the best parameter for a specific environment in the classical pursuit algorithms. Thus, they can have their parameter tuning easier to perform and can save much more time when applied to a practical case. Furthermore, the convergence curves and the corresponding variance coefficient curves of the contenders are illustrated to characterize their

  15. Online dissection audio-visual resources for human anatomy: Undergraduate medical students' usage and learning outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi-Lundberg, Derek L; Cuellar, William A; Williams, Anne-Marie M

    2016-11-01

    In an attempt to improve undergraduate medical student preparation for and learning from dissection sessions, dissection audio-visual resources (DAVR) were developed. Data from e-learning management systems indicated DAVR were accessed by 28% ± 10 (mean ± SD for nine DAVR across three years) of students prior to the corresponding dissection sessions, representing at most 58% ± 20 of assigned dissectors. Approximately 50% of students accessed all available DAVR by the end of semester, while 10% accessed none. Ninety percent of survey respondents (response rate 58%) generally agreed that DAVR improved their preparation for and learning from dissection when used. Of several learning resources, only DAVR usage had a significant positive correlation (P = 0.002) with feeling prepared for dissection. Results on cadaveric anatomy practical examination questions in year 2 (Y2) and year 3 (Y3) cohorts were 3.9% (P learning outcomes of more students. Anat Sci Educ 9: 545-554. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  16. The Effect of Cooperative Learning Model of Teams Games Tournament (TGT) and Students' Motivation toward Physics Learning Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadrah; Tolla, Ismail; Ali, Muhammad Sidin; Muris

    2017-01-01

    This research aims at describing the effect of cooperative learning model of Teams Games Tournament (TGT) and motivation toward physics learning outcome. This research was a quasi-experimental research with a factorial design conducted at SMAN 2 Makassar. Independent variables were learning models. They were cooperative learning model of TGT and…

  17. Learning outcomes afforded by self-assessed, segmented video–print combinations

    OpenAIRE

    Jack Koumi

    2015-01-01

    Learning affordances of video and print are examined in order to assess the learning outcomes afforded by hybrid video–print learning packages. The affordances discussed for print are: navigability, surveyability and legibility. Those discussed for video are: design for constructive reflection, provision of realistic experiences, presentational attributes, motivational influences and teacher personalisation. The video affordances are examined through a framework of pedagogic design principles...

  18. Assessing Higher Education Learning Outcomes in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa, Renato H. L.; Amaral, Eliana; Knobel, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Brazil has developed an encompassing system for quality assessment of higher education, the National System of Higher Education Evaluation (SINAES), which includes a test for assessing learning outcomes at the undergraduate level, the National Exam of Student Performance (ENADE). The present system has been running since 2004, and also serves as…

  19. The Effect of Gender and Race Intersectionality on Student Learning Outcomes in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Hyun Kyoung; Loya, Karla I.

    2015-01-01

    Women and underrepresented minorities in traditionally White and male-dominated disciplines tend to report lower learning outcomes than their White peers. Adopting a feminist intersectionality framework, this study looks at the intersections of gender and race to investigate differences in self-assessed learning outcomes in engineering…

  20. Linking Essential Learning Outcomes and Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Competency in Health Science Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Carole-Rae; Garcia, Luis Ivan; Slusser, Margaret M.; Konowitz, Sharon; Yep, Jewelry

    2017-01-01

    Assessing student learning outcomes and determining achievement of the Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (IPCEP) Core Competency of Values/Ethics in a generic pre-professional Bachelor of Science in Health Science (BSHS) program is challenging. A course level Student Learning Outcome (SLO) is: "….articulate the impact of personal…

  1. Student Self-Reported Learning Outcomes of Field Trips: The pedagogical impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie Alon, Nirit; Tal, Tali

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we used the classification and regression trees (CART) method to draw relationships between student self-reported learning outcomes in 26 field trips to natural environments and various characteristics of the field trip that include variables associated with preparation and pedagogy. We wished to examine the extent to which the preparation for the field trip, its connection to the school curriculum, and the pedagogies used, affect students' self-reported outcomes in three domains: cognitive, affective, and behavioral; and the extent the students' socioeconomic group and the guide's affiliation affect students' reported learning outcomes. Given that most of the field trips were guide-centered, the most important variable that affected the three domains of outcomes was the guide's storytelling. Other variables that showed relationships with self-reported outcomes were physical activity and making connections to everyday life-all of which we defined as pedagogical variables. We found no significant differences in student self-reported outcomes with respect to their socioeconomic group and the guide's organizational affiliation.

  2. Scrum-Based Learning Environment: Fostering Self-Regulated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Tanya

    2018-01-01

    Academics teaching software development courses are experimenting with teaching methods aiming to improve students' learning experience and learning outcomes. Since Agile software development is gaining popularity in industry due to positive effects on managing projects, academics implement similar Agile approaches in student-centered learning…

  3. Effects of mobile gaming patterns on learning outcomes: a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Birgit; Klemke, Roland; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Schmitz, B., Klemke, R., & Specht, M. (2012). Effects of mobile gaming patterns on learning outcomes: A literature review. International Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 4(5-6), 345-358. doi:10.1504/IJTEL.2012.051817

  4. Team-based learning to improve learning outcomes in a therapeutics course sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleske, Barry E; Remington, Tami L; Wells, Trisha D; Dorsch, Michael P; Guthrie, Sally K; Stumpf, Janice L; Alaniz, Marissa C; Ellingrod, Vicki L; Tingen, Jeffrey M

    2014-02-12

    To compare the effectiveness of team-based learning (TBL) to that of traditional lectures on learning outcomes in a therapeutics course sequence. A revised TBL curriculum was implemented in a therapeutic course sequence. Multiple choice and essay questions identical to those used to test third-year students (P3) taught using a traditional lecture format were administered to the second-year pharmacy students (P2) taught using the new TBL format. One hundred thirty-one multiple-choice questions were evaluated; 79 tested recall of knowledge and 52 tested higher level, application of knowledge. For the recall questions, students taught through traditional lectures scored significantly higher compared to the TBL students (88%±12% vs. 82%±16%, p=0.01). For the questions assessing application of knowledge, no differences were seen between teaching pedagogies (81%±16% vs. 77%±20%, p=0.24). Scores on essay questions and the number of students who achieved 100% were also similar between groups. Transition to a TBL format from a traditional lecture-based pedagogy allowed P2 students to perform at a similar level as students with an additional year of pharmacy education on application of knowledge type questions. However, P3 students outperformed P2 students regarding recall type questions and overall. Further assessment of long-term learning outcomes is needed to determine if TBL produces more persistent learning and improved application in clinical settings.

  5. Exploring Learning Outcomes in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy and Existential Therapy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anders Dræby

    This is a presentation of a research project, which explores lived experience of psychotherapy in terms of learning outcomes. This includes both Existential therapy (ET) and Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and their possible differences and similarities. I can describe learning as any...... experiential change that occurs in the participants understanding as result of the therapy in which they participate. Learning outcomes are concerned with the achievements of the learner rather than the intentions of the educator, as expressed in the objectives of an educational effort. This research points...

  6. Analysing Learning Outcomes in an Electrical Engineering Curriculum Using Illustrative Verbs Derived from Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meda, Lawrence; Swart, Arthur James

    2018-01-01

    Learning outcomes are essential to any curriculum in education, where they need to be clear, observable and measurable. However, some academics structure learning outcomes in a way that does not promote student learning. The purpose of this article is to present the analyses of learning outcomes of an Electrical Engineering curriculum offered at a…

  7. Feedback-related negativity codes outcome valence, but not outcome expectancy, during reversal learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borries, A.K.L. von; Verkes, R.J.; Bulten, B.H.; Cools, R.; Bruijn, E.R.A. de

    2013-01-01

    Optimal behavior depends on the ability to assess the predictive value of events and to adjust behavior accordingly. Outcome processing can be studied by using its electrophysiological signatures-that is, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P300. A prominent reinforcement-learning model

  8. Feedback-related negativity codes outcome valence, but not outcome expectancy, during reversal learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borries, A.K.L. von; Verkes, R.J.; Bulten, B.H.; Cools, R.

    2013-01-01

    Optimal behavior depends on the ability to assess the predictive value of events and to adjust behavior accordingly. Outcome processing can be studied by using its electrophysiological signatures--that is, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P300. A prominent reinforcement-learning model

  9. Learning Process and Learning Outcomes of Video Podcasts Including the Instructor and PPT Slides: A Chinese Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Zhongling; Hong, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Video podcasts have become one of the fastest developing trends in learning and teaching. The study explored the effect of the presenting mode of educational video podcasts on the learning process and learning outcomes. Prior to viewing a video podcast, the 94 Chinese undergraduates participating in the study completed a demographic questionnaire…

  10. Capstone Portfolios and Geography Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossa, Joann

    2014-01-01

    Due to increasing demands regarding student learning outcomes and accreditation, a capstone portfolio was added to assess critical thinking and communication skills of geography majors at a large public university in the USA. The portfolio guidelines were designed to be adaptable to a flexible curriculum where about half of the requirements within…

  11. A critical review of simulation-based mastery learning with translational outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaghie, William C; Issenberg, Saul B; Barsuk, Jeffrey H; Wayne, Diane B

    2014-04-01

    This article has two objectives. Firstly, we critically review simulation-based mastery learning (SBML) research in medical education, evaluate its implementation and immediate results, and document measured downstream translational outcomes in terms of improved patient care practices, better patient outcomes and collateral effects. Secondly, we briefly address implementation science and its importance in the dissemination of innovations in medical education and health care. This is a qualitative synthesis of SBML with translational (T) science research reports spanning a period of 7 years (2006-2013). We use the 'critical review' approach proposed by Norman and Eva to synthesise findings from 23 medical education studies that employ the mastery learning model and measure downstream translational outcomes. Research in SBML in medical education has addressed a range of interpersonal and technical skills. Measured outcomes have been achieved in educational laboratories (T1), and as improved patient care practices (T2), patient outcomes (T3) and collateral effects (T4). Simulation-based mastery learning in medical education can produce downstream results. Such results derive from integrated education and health services research programmes that are thematic, sustained and cumulative. The new discipline of implementation science holds promise to explain why medical education innovations are adopted slowly and how to accelerate innovation dissemination. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. High risk pregnancy in the workplace. Influencing positive outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, R B; Schmidt, J V; Cambardella, B; Browne, S E

    2000-09-01

    Childbearing employees are well served by the occupational health nurse who promotes optimal preconceptual and pregnancy health practices, uses community resources, and maintains current knowledge about high risk pregnancy prevention and care. These broad goals of care can lead to decreased absenteeism, healthier and happier employees, and more positive outcomes of pregnancy. For employees with high risk pregnancies, the role of the occupational health nurse includes, but is not limited to, facilitating awareness with the employer, making suggestions for adjusting working conditions, making frequent assessments of the employee's needs, and communicating with prenatal health care providers. Occupational health nurses should never underestimate their role and potential influence on the mother, and on her significant other, for a positive outcome of her pregnancy.

  13. Effects of Negative and Positive Evidence on Adult Word Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strapp, Chehalis M.; Helmick, Augusta L.; Tonkovich, Hayley M.; Bleakney, Dana M.

    2011-01-01

    This study compared negative and positive evidence in adult word learning, predicting that adults would learn more forms following negative evidence. Ninety-two native English speakers (32 men and 60 women [M[subscript age] = 20.38 years, SD = 2.80]), learned nonsense nouns and verbs provided within English frames. Later, participants produced…

  14. Longitudinal investigation on learned helplessness tested under negative and positive reinforcement involving stimulus control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Emileane C; Hunziker, Maria Helena

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we investigated whether (a) animals demonstrating the learned helplessness effect during an escape contingency also show learning deficits under positive reinforcement contingencies involving stimulus control and (b) the exposure to positive reinforcement contingencies eliminates the learned helplessness effect under an escape contingency. Rats were initially exposed to controllable (C), uncontrollable (U) or no (N) shocks. After 24h, they were exposed to 60 escapable shocks delivered in a shuttlebox. In the following phase, we selected from each group the four subjects that presented the most typical group pattern: no escape learning (learned helplessness effect) in Group U and escape learning in Groups C and N. All subjects were then exposed to two phases, the (1) positive reinforcement for lever pressing under a multiple FR/Extinction schedule and (2) a re-test under negative reinforcement (escape). A fourth group (n=4) was exposed only to the positive reinforcement sessions. All subjects showed discrimination learning under multiple schedule. In the escape re-test, the learned helplessness effect was maintained for three of the animals in Group U. These results suggest that the learned helplessness effect did not extend to discriminative behavior that is positively reinforced and that the learned helplessness effect did not revert for most subjects after exposure to positive reinforcement. We discuss some theoretical implications as related to learned helplessness as an effect restricted to aversive contingencies and to the absence of reversion after positive reinforcement. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: insert SI title. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Children's Voices and Positive Affective Outcomes Regarding Play-Based Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheep-Aranai, Rin; Wasanasomsithi, Punchalee

    2016-01-01

    Learner-centeredness is a consistent theme in the field of education. Yet, the perspectives of young learners are still barely considered. Lightbown and Spada (2013) have pointed out that even though young children have not developed cognitive maturity and the metalinguistic awareness of adolescents or adults, they learn a language without any…

  16. Aligning Learning and Talent Development Performance Outcomes with Organizational Objectives: A Proposed Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Iris

    2017-01-01

    The value proposition for learning and talent development (LTD) is often challenged due to human resources' inability to demonstrate meaningful outcomes in relation to organizational needs and return-on-investment. The primary role of human resources (HR) and the learning and talent development (LTD) function is to produce meaningful outcomes to…

  17. Stakeholder Perceptions, Learning Opportunities, and Student Outcomes in Three Clinical Learning Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Susan; DeMeester, Deborah; Stephenson, Evelyn; Welch, Janet

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the strengths and challenges of various clinical models is important for nursing education. Three long-standing clinical models (preceptored, hybrid, and traditional) were compared on several outcome measures related to satisfaction, learning opportunities, and student outcomes. Students, faculty, and preceptors participated in this study. Although no differences were noted in satisfaction or standardized examination scores, students in the preceptored clinical model were able to practice more psychomotor skills. Although participants in the preceptored model reported spending more time communicating with staff nurses than did those in the other models, students in the traditional model spent more time with faculty. No differences were noted among groups in student clinical observation time. All clinical learning models were focused on how clinical time was structured, without an emphasis on how faculty and preceptors work with students to develop nursing clinical reasoning skills. Identifying methodology to impact thinking in the clinical environment is a key next step. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(5):271-277.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Detecting false positive sequence homology: a machine learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, M Stanley; Suvorov, Anton; Jensen, Nicholas O; Clement, Mark J; Bybee, Seth M

    2016-02-24

    Accurate detection of homologous relationships of biological sequences (DNA or amino acid) amongst organisms is an important and often difficult task that is essential to various evolutionary studies, ranging from building phylogenies to predicting functional gene annotations. There are many existing heuristic tools, most commonly based on bidirectional BLAST searches that are used to identify homologous genes and combine them into two fundamentally distinct classes: orthologs and paralogs. Due to only using heuristic filtering based on significance score cutoffs and having no cluster post-processing tools available, these methods can often produce multiple clusters constituting unrelated (non-homologous) sequences. Therefore sequencing data extracted from incomplete genome/transcriptome assemblies originated from low coverage sequencing or produced by de novo processes without a reference genome are susceptible to high false positive rates of homology detection. In this paper we develop biologically informative features that can be extracted from multiple sequence alignments of putative homologous genes (orthologs and paralogs) and further utilized in context of guided experimentation to verify false positive outcomes. We demonstrate that our machine learning method trained on both known homology clusters obtained from OrthoDB and randomly generated sequence alignments (non-homologs), successfully determines apparent false positives inferred by heuristic algorithms especially among proteomes recovered from low-coverage RNA-seq data. Almost ~42 % and ~25 % of predicted putative homologies by InParanoid and HaMStR respectively were classified as false positives on experimental data set. Our process increases the quality of output from other clustering algorithms by providing a novel post-processing method that is both fast and efficient at removing low quality clusters of putative homologous genes recovered by heuristic-based approaches.

  19. Serial Learning Process: Test of Chaining, Position, and Dual-Process Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurintano, S. L.

    1973-01-01

    The chaining, position, and dual-process hypotheses of serial learning (SL) as well as serial recall, reordering, and relearning of paired-associate learning were examined to establish learning patterns. Results provide evidence for dual-process hypothesis. (DS)

  20. Some Factors Effected Student's Calculus Learning Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagukguk, Wamington

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the factors effected calculus learning outcome of the student. This study was conducted with 176 respondents, which were selected randomly. The data were obtained by questionnaire, and then analyzed by using multiple regressions, and correlation, at level of a = 0.05. The findings showed there is the…

  1. Multigenerational Challenges: Team-Building for Positive Clinical Workforce Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jill M; Everly, Marcee; Bauer, Renee

    2016-05-31

    Patient acuity in hospital settings continues to increase, and there is greater emphasis on patient outcomes. The current nursing workforce is comprised of four distinct generational cohorts that include veterans, baby boomers, millennials, and generation Xers. Each group has unique characteristics that add complexity to the workforce and this can add challenges to providing optimal patient care. Team building is one strategy to increase mutual understanding, communication, and respect, and thus potentially improve patient outcomes. In this article, we first briefly define generational cohorts by characteristics, and discuss differing expectations for work/life balance and potential negative outcomes. Our discussion offers team building strategies for positive outcomes, a case scenario, and concludes with resources for team building and organizational opportunities.

  2. Investigating students' perceptions of graduate learning outcomes in mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Deborah; Varsavsky, Cristina; Belward, Shaun; Matthews, Kelly

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the perceptions mathematics students have of the knowledge and skills they develop throughout their programme of study. It addresses current concerns about the employability of mathematics graduates by contributing much needed insight into how degree programmes are developing broader learning outcomes for students majoring in mathematics. Specifically, the study asked students who were close to completing a mathematics major (n = 144) to indicate the extent to which opportunities to develop mathematical knowledge along with more transferable skills (communication to experts and non-experts, writing, working in teams and thinking ethically) were included and assessed in their major. Their perceptions were compared to the importance they assign to each of these outcomes, their own assessment of improvement during the programme and their confidence in applying these outcomes. Overall, the findings reveal a pattern of high levels of students' agreement that these outcomes are important, but evidence a startling gap when compared to students' perceptions of the extent to which many of these - communication, writing, teamwork and ethical thinking - are actually included and assessed in the curriculum, and their confidence in using such learning.

  3. Applying Social Cognitive Theory to Academic Advising to Assess Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlich, Richard J.; Russ-Eft, Darlene

    2011-01-01

    Review of social cognitive theory constructs of self-efficacy and self-regulated learning is applied to academic advising for the purposes of assessing student learning. A brief overview of the history of student learning outcomes in higher education is followed by an explanation of self-efficacy and self-regulated learning constructs and how they…

  4. Assessing learning outcomes and cost effectiveness of an online sleep curriculum for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandla, Hari; Franco, Rose A; Simpson, Deborah; Brennan, Kimberly; McKanry, Jennifer; Bragg, Dawn

    2012-08-15

    Sleep disorders are highly prevalent across all age groups but often remain undiagnosed and untreated, resulting in significant health consequences. To overcome an inadequacy of available curricula and learner and instructor time constraints, this study sought to determine if an online sleep medicine curriculum would achieve equivalent learner outcomes when compared with traditional, classroom-based, face-to-face instruction at equivalent costs. Medical students rotating on a required clinical clerkship received instruction in 4 core clinical sleep-medicine competency domains in 1 of 2 delivery formats: a single 2.5-hour face-to-face workshop or 4 asynchronous e-learning modules. Immediate learning outcomes were assessed in a subsequent clerkship using a multiple-choice examination and standardized patient station, with long-term outcomes assessed through analysis of students' patient write-ups for inclusion of sleep complaints and diagnoses before and after the intervention. Instructional costs by delivery format were tracked. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses compared learning outcomes and costs by instructional delivery method (face-to-face versus e-learning). Face-to-face learners, compared with online learners, were more satisfied with instruction. Learning outcomes (i.e., multiple-choice examination, standardized patient encounter, patient write-up), as measured by short-term and long-term assessments, were roughly equivalent. Design, delivery, and learner-assessment costs by format were equivalent at the end of 1 year, due to higher ongoing teaching costs associated with face-to-face learning offsetting online development and delivery costs. Because short-term and long-term learner performance outcomes were roughly equivalent, based on delivery method, the cost effectiveness of online learning is an economically and educationally viable instruction platform for clinical clerkships.

  5. Improving the power of an efficacy study of a social and emotional learning program: application of generalizability theory to the measurement of classroom-level outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, Andrew J; Downer, Jason T; Rivers, Susan E; Brackett, Marc A; Martinez, Andres

    2014-04-01

    Social and emotional learning programs are designed to improve the quality of social interactions in schools and classrooms in order to positively affect students' social, emotional, and academic development. The statistical power of group randomized trials to detect effects of social and emotional learning programs and other preventive interventions on setting-level outcomes is influenced by the reliability of the outcome measure. In this paper, we apply generalizability theory to an observational measure of the quality of classroom interactions that is an outcome in a study of the efficacy of a social and emotional learning program called The Recognizing, Understanding, Labeling, Expressing, and Regulating emotions Approach. We estimate multiple sources of error variance in the setting-level outcome and identify observation procedures to use in the efficacy study that most efficiently reduce these sources of error. We then discuss the implications of using different observation procedures on both the statistical power and the monetary costs of conducting the efficacy study.

  6. The Impact of Taiwanese College Students' Learning Motivation from Self-Determination Perspective on Learning Outcomes: Moderating Roles of Multi-Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sophia Shi-Huei

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the associations among learning motivation, engagement and outcomes, and the moderating role of various traits in the relationship between deep approaches to learning and outcomes. Based on data from 2,340 students in multiple universities in Taiwan, this study proposes two alternative models, tested by…

  7. Measuring Learning Outcomes in Library Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Connor, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The author uses clicker technology to incorporate polling and multiple choice question techniques into library instruction classes. Clickers can be used to give a keener understanding of how many students grasp the concepts presented in a specific class session. Typically, a student that aces a definition-type question will fail to answer an application-type question correctly. Immediate, electronic feedback helps to calibrate teaching approaches and gather data about learning outcomes. Th...

  8. Effects of problem-based learning vs. traditional lecture on Korean nursing students' critical thinking, problem-solving, and self-directed learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunyoung; Lindquist, Ruth; Song, Yeoungsuk

    2014-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a method widely used in nursing education to develop students' critical thinking skills to solve practice problems independently. Although PBL has been used in nursing education in Korea for nearly a decade, few studies have examined its effects on Korean nursing students' learning outcomes, and few Korean studies have examined relationships among these outcomes. The objectives of this study are to examine outcome abilities including critical thinking, problem-solving, and self-directed learning of nursing students receiving PBL vs. traditional lecture, and to examine correlations among these outcome abilities. A quasi-experimental non-equivalent group pretest-posttest design was used. First-year nursing students (N=90) were recruited from two different junior colleges in two cities (GY and GJ) in South Korea. In two selected educational programs, one used traditional lecture methods, while the other used PBL methods. Standardized self-administered questionnaires of critical thinking, problem-solving, and self-directed learning abilities were administered before and at 16weeks (after instruction). Learning outcomes were significantly positively correlated, however outcomes were not statistically different between groups. Students in the PBL group improved across all abilities measured, while student scores in the traditional lecture group decreased in problem-solving and self-directed learning. Critical thinking was positively associated with problem-solving and self-directed learning (r=.71, and r=.50, respectively, plearning (r=.75, pLearning outcomes of PBL were not significantly different from traditional lecture in this small underpowered study, despite positive trends. Larger studies are recommended to study effects of PBL on critical student abilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Collaborative teacher learning across foci of collaboration : perceived activities and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doppenberg, J.J.; Brok, den P.J.; Bakx, A.W.E.A.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared teacher collaboration with differing foci, in terms of various learning activities and learning outcomes. A total of 411 teachers from 49 primary schools participated by completing a questionnaire. Foci of collaboration explained significant differences in the frequency with

  10. Motivating Students through Positive Learning Experiences: A Comparison of Three Learning Designs for Computer Programming Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykke, Marianne; Coto, Mayela; Jantzen, Christian; Mora, Sonia; Vandel, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Based on the assumption that wellbeing, positive emotions and engagement influence motivation for learning, the aim of this paper is to provide insight into students' emotional responses to and engagement in different learning designs. By comparing students' reports on the experiential qualities of three different learning designs, their…

  11. Does Augmented Reality Affect High School Students' Learning Outcomes in Chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Jonathan Christopher

    Some teens may prefer using a self-directed, constructivist, and technologic approach to learning rather than traditional classroom instruction. If it can be demonstrated, educators may adjust their teaching methodology. The guiding research question for this study focused on how augmented reality affects high school students' learning outcomes in chemistry, as measured by a pretest and posttest methodology when ensuring that the individual outcomes were not the result of group collaboration. This study employed a quantitative, quasi-experimental study design that used a comparison and experimental group. Inferential statistical analysis was employed. The study was conducted at a high school in southwest Colorado. Eighty-nine respondents returned completed and signed consent forms, and 78 participants completed the study. Results demonstrated that augmented reality instruction caused posttest scores to significantly increase, as compared to pretest scores, but it was not as effective as traditional classroom instruction. Scores did improve under both types of instruction; therefore, more research is needed in this area. The present study was the first quantitative experiment controlling for individual learning to validate augmented reality using mobile handheld digital devices that affected individual students' learning outcomes without group collaboration. This topic was important to the field of education as it may help educators understand how students learn and it may also change the way students are taught.

  12. A review of assertions about the processes and outcomes of social learning in natural resource management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundill, G; Rodela, R

    2012-12-30

    Social learning has become a central theme in natural resource management. This growing interest is underpinned by a number of assertions about the outcomes of social learning, and about the processes that support these outcomes. Yet researchers and practitioners who seek to engage with social learning through the natural resource management literature often become disorientated by the myriad processes and outcomes that are identified. We trace the roots of current assertions about the processes and outcomes of social learning in natural resource management, and assess the extent to which there is an emerging consensus on these assertions. Results suggest that, on the one hand, social learning is described as taking place through deliberative interactions amongst multiple stakeholders. During these interactions, it is argued that participants learn to work together and build relationships that allow for collective action. On the other hand, social learning is described as occurring through deliberate experimentation and reflective practice. During these iterative cycles of action, monitoring and reflection, participants learn how to cope with uncertainty when managing complex systems. Both of these processes, and their associated outcomes, are referred to as social learning. Where, therefore, should researchers and practitioners focus their attention? Results suggest that there is an emerging consensus that processes that support social learning involve sustained interaction between stakeholders, on-going deliberation and the sharing of knowledge in a trusting environment. There is also an emerging consensus that the key outcome of such learning is improved decision making underpinned by a growing awareness of human-environment interactions, better relationships and improved problem-solving capacities for participants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Social Outcomes of Older Adult Learning in Taiwan: Evaluation Framework and Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the social outcomes of older adult learning in Taiwan. In light of our society's aging population structure, the task of establishing evaluation framework and indicators for the social outcomes of learning (SOL) as applied to older adults is urgent. In order to construct evaluation indicators for older adult…

  14. Pedagogies to Achieve Sustainability Learning Outcomes in Civil and Environmental Engineering Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela R. Bielefeldt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The civil and environmental engineering disciplines have identified the levels of knowledge about sustainability that are desirable for students to achieve as they graduate with a bachelor’s degree, as well as sustainability-related competencies to be obtained during a master’s degree, and on-the-job, prior to professional licensure. Different pedagogies are better suited to help students attain these levels of cognitive ability, while also developing affective outcomes. This paper provides examples of different methods that have been used at one institution to educate engineering students about sustainability, supported with data that indicates whether the method successfully achieved the targeted learning outcomes. Lectures, in-class active learning, readings, and appropriately targeted homework assignments can achieve basic sustainability knowledge and comprehension by requiring students to define, identify, and explain aspects of sustainability. Case studies and the application of software tools are good methods to achieve application and analysis competencies. Project-based learning (PBL and project-based service-learning (PBSL design projects can reach the synthesis level and may also develop affective outcomes related to sustainability. The results provide examples that may apply to a wider range of disciplines and suggest sustainability outcomes that are particularly difficult to teach and/or assess.

  15. The Relation between Virtual Presence and Learning Outcomes in Serious Games – The Mediating Effect of Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Schrader

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Does the immersive design of a serious game affect learners’ virtual presence? Does virtual presence improve learning? By identifying virtual presence as a variable that may determine learning outcomes, it is argued that computer gaming environments present a new challenge for researchers to investigate. Particularly, the effect of games on virtual presence might help designers to predict which instructional configurations will maximize learning performance. Results indicate that the serious game used as an example in this study leads to a strong form of virtual presence. Virtual presence enhanced retention and comprehension but not transfer. It also significantly increased learners’ motivation. Mediation analyses report that the positive relation between virtual presence, retention and comprehension is mediated through increased motivation. These findings suggest that the relation between all variables should be considered an important factor in the design of virtual worlds for learning.

  16. Enhancing learning: A comparison of lecture and gaming outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Mary; Bear, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Contrary to what we anticipated, our outcomes indicated that learning and satisfaction with learning were no different between the traditional lecture group and the educational gaming group. Learners in the gaming group scored on the examination just as well as, but no higher than, did those in the lecture group. Similarly, students in the gaming group were just as, but no more, satisfied with their learning than were students in the lecture group. Of note, both teaching/learning strategies were shown to be effective for learning with students earning a B average on the examination. Likewise, students in both groups were very satisfied with their respective teaching/learning strategies. Given that our assessment did not support gaming as a superior teaching/learning strategy over lecture, what remains now is the need for a longitudinal study to determine if there are differences in long-term learning. As we implement creative methods of instruction, it is also important to test their effectiveness to ensure that the teaching-learning process is evidence based.

  17. Confirmation bias in human reinforcement learning: Evidence from counterfactual feedback processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Germain; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that factual learning, that is, learning from obtained outcomes, is biased, such that participants preferentially take into account positive, as compared to negative, prediction errors. However, whether or not the prediction error valence also affects counterfactual learning, that is, learning from forgone outcomes, is unknown. To address this question, we analysed the performance of two groups of participants on reinforcement learning tasks using a computational model that was adapted to test if prediction error valence influences learning. We carried out two experiments: in the factual learning experiment, participants learned from partial feedback (i.e., the outcome of the chosen option only); in the counterfactual learning experiment, participants learned from complete feedback information (i.e., the outcomes of both the chosen and unchosen option were displayed). In the factual learning experiment, we replicated previous findings of a valence-induced bias, whereby participants learned preferentially from positive, relative to negative, prediction errors. In contrast, for counterfactual learning, we found the opposite valence-induced bias: negative prediction errors were preferentially taken into account, relative to positive ones. When considering valence-induced bias in the context of both factual and counterfactual learning, it appears that people tend to preferentially take into account information that confirms their current choice. PMID:28800597

  18. Confirmation bias in human reinforcement learning: Evidence from counterfactual feedback processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palminteri, Stefano; Lefebvre, Germain; Kilford, Emma J; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies suggest that factual learning, that is, learning from obtained outcomes, is biased, such that participants preferentially take into account positive, as compared to negative, prediction errors. However, whether or not the prediction error valence also affects counterfactual learning, that is, learning from forgone outcomes, is unknown. To address this question, we analysed the performance of two groups of participants on reinforcement learning tasks using a computational model that was adapted to test if prediction error valence influences learning. We carried out two experiments: in the factual learning experiment, participants learned from partial feedback (i.e., the outcome of the chosen option only); in the counterfactual learning experiment, participants learned from complete feedback information (i.e., the outcomes of both the chosen and unchosen option were displayed). In the factual learning experiment, we replicated previous findings of a valence-induced bias, whereby participants learned preferentially from positive, relative to negative, prediction errors. In contrast, for counterfactual learning, we found the opposite valence-induced bias: negative prediction errors were preferentially taken into account, relative to positive ones. When considering valence-induced bias in the context of both factual and counterfactual learning, it appears that people tend to preferentially take into account information that confirms their current choice.

  19. Learning Resources Centers and Their Effectiveness on Students’ Learning Outcomes: A Case-Study of an Omani Higher Education Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Nouraey

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at investigating the use and effectiveness of a learning resources center, which is generally known as a library. In doing so, eight elements were investigated through an author-designed questionnaire. Each of these elements tended to delve into certain aspects of the afore-mentioned center. These elements included a students’ visits frequency, b availability of books related to modules, c center facilities, d use of discussion rooms, e use of online resources, f staff cooperation, g impact on knowledge enhancement, and, h recommendation to peers. Eighty undergraduate students participated in the study. Participants were then asked to read the statements carefully and choose one of the five responses provided, ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Data were analyzed based on 5-point Likert Scale. Findings of the study revealed that participants were mostly in agreement with all eight statements provided in the questionnaire, which were interpreted as positive feedbacks from the students. Then, the frequencies of responses by the participants were reported. Finally, the results were compared and contrasted and related discussions on the effectiveness of libraries and learning resources centers on students’ learning performances and outcomes were made.

  20. THE EFFECT OF LEARNING INQUIRY TRAINING MODEL ON STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES ON MEASUREMENT MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felisa Irawani Hutabarat

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to know the effect of learning model of inquiry learning results students training material measurement. This type of research is quasi experiment. Sampling done by cluster random sampling by taking 2 classes from grade 9 i.e. class X SCIENCE experiments as a class-B that add up to 35 people and class X SCIENCE-C as control classes that add up to 35 people. The instruments used to find out the results of student learning is the learning outcomes tests have been validated in multiple choice form numbered 15 reserved and activity sheets students. The results of the value obtained 37.71 pretes and postest 70.11. The t-test analysis retrieved thitung greater than ttabel so that it can be concluded no difference due to the influence of the learning model of inquiry learning results students training material measurement.

  1. Learning Outcomes in Professional Contexts in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prøitz, Tine S.; Havnes, Anton; Briggs, Mary; Scott, Ian

    2017-01-01

    With the policy of developing a transparent and competitive European higher education sector, learning outcomes (LOs) are attributed a foundation stone role in policy and curriculum development. A premise for their implementation is that they bear fundamental similarities across national, institutional or professional/disciplinary contexts. In…

  2. The relationship between learning preferences (styles and approaches) and learning outcomes among pre-clinical undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Siaw-Cheok; Sidhu, Jagmohni; Barua, Ankur

    2015-03-11

    Learning styles and approaches of individual undergraduate medical students vary considerably and as a consequence, their learning needs also differ from one student to another. This study was conducted to identify different learning styles and approaches of pre-clinical, undergraduate medical students and also to determine the relationships of learning preferences with performances in the summative examinations. A cross-sectional study was conducted among randomly selected 419 pre-clinical, undergraduate medical students of the International Medical University (IMU) in Kuala Lumpur. The number of students from Year 2 was 217 while that from Year 3 was 202. The Visual, Auditory, Read/Write, Kinesthetic (VARK) and the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST) questionnaires were used for data collection. This study revealed that 343 students (81.9%) had unimodal learning style, while the remaining 76 (18.1%) used a multimodal learning style. Among the unimodal learners, a majority (30.1%) were of Kinesthetic (K) type. Among the middle and high achievers in summative examinations, a majority had unimodal (Kinaesthetic) learning style (30.5%) and were also strategic/deep learners (79.4%). However, the learning styles and approaches did not contribute significantly towards the learning outcomes in summative examinations. A majority of the students in this study had Unimodal (Kinesthetic) learning style. The learning preferences (styles and approaches) did not contribute significantly to the learning outcomes. Future work to re-assess the viability of these learning preferences (styles and approaches) after the incorporation of teaching-learning instructions tailored specifically to the students will be beneficial to help medical teachers in facilitating students to become more capable learners.

  3. E-Learning in Urology: Implementation of the Learning and Teaching Platform CASUS® - Do Virtual Patients Lead to Improved Learning Outcomes? A Randomized Study among Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Anna-Teresa; Albers, Peter; Müller-Mattheis, Volker

    2015-01-01

    E-learning is playing an increasing role in medical education, supporting a problem-based and practical oriented education without putting patients at risk and compensating for the decrease in instructor-centered teaching. Not much research has been done concerning learning effects and reaction on behalf of the students. We created computer-based cases for four important diagnoses in urology using the authoring system CASUS®. Fourth-year medical school students were randomized into two groups: (1) the CASUS® group, using the online cases for preparation, and (2) the book group, using a textbook. A multiple-choice test referring to the prepared topic had to be completed at the beginning of each lecture and the results were analyzed. Evaluation of the students concerning the acceptance of the program was done at the end of the semester. Members of the CASUS® group scored significantly higher with an average of 20% better test results than students using textbooks for preparation. Evaluation regarding the program showed a highly positive rating. Limitations include the small study population and the possibly biased test performance of the students. Computerized patient cases facilitate practice-oriented teaching and result in an interesting and engaging learning model with improved learning outcomes. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Musical preferences and learning outcome of medical students in cadaver dissection laboratory: A Nigerian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanwu, G E; Nto, J N; Agu, A U; Ekezie, J; Esom, E A

    2016-11-01

    Background music has been reported to enhance learning in the cadaver dissection laboratory. This study was designed to determine the impact of various forms of musical genre and some of their characteristics on students' learning outcome in the dissection laboratory. Some selected musical genre in vocal and non-vocal forms and at different tempi and volume were played as background music (BM) to 253 Medical and Dental students during various sessions of cadaver dissection. Psychological Stress assessment was done using Psychological stress measure-9. Participants love for music, preferred musical genre and other musical characteristics were assessed. The impact of the various musical genre and their characteristics on learning was done via written examination on the region dissected during each musical session. A positive relationship was noted between students' preference for musical genre during leisure with their preference for BM during private study time (Pmusical genre on some selected learning factors. Country and Classical music gave the highest positive impact on the various learning factors in CDL followed by R&B. No significant difference was noted between the cognitive values of vocal and non-vocal music. Classical music most effectively reduced the stress induced by dissection in the CDL while Reggae and High life musical genre created a more stressful environment than regular background noise (Pmusical genre and their various characteristics. The inability to isolate the particular musical genre with these desired properties could account for the controversies in the reports of the role of music in academic environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Six-Word Memoirs: A Content Analysis of First-Year Course Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    First-year courses prepare students for the transition to, and success in, college. Institutions are interested in assessing student learning outcomes to achieve institutional goals and maintain accreditation. Though it may be difficult to measure student learning and success, colleges aim to assess student learning in the classroom by setting…

  6. Positive Outcome Expectancy Mediates the Relationship Between Peer Influence and Internet Gaming Addiction Among Adolescents in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jo Yung Wei; Ko, Huei-Chen; Wong, Tsui-Yin; Wu, Li-An; Oei, Tian Po

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the role of positive outcome expectancy in the relationship between peer/parental influence and Internet gaming addiction (IGA) among adolescents in Taiwan. Two thousand, one hundred and four junior high students completed the Chen Internet Addiction Scale for IGA, Parental Influence for IGA, peer influence for IGA, and Positive Outcome Expectancy of Internet Gaming Questionnaire. Results showed that the three types of peer influences (positive attitudes toward Internet gaming, frequency of Internet game use, and invitation to play) and positive outcome expectancy were significantly and positively correlated with IGA. Moreover, peer influence was also positively correlated with positive outcome expectancy. On the other hand, positive outcome expectancy and parental influences had a low correlation. Structural equation modeling analysis revealed that positive outcome expectancy did not mediate the relationship between either type of parental influences and IGA, and only the parent's invitation to play Internet games directly predicted IGA severity. However, peers' positive attitude or the frequency of peers' Internet game use positively predicted IGA and was fully mediated through positive outcome expectancy of Internet gaming. In addition, the frequency of peers' invitation to play Internet games directly and indirectly predicted IGA severity through a partial mediation of positive outcome expectancy of Internet gaming. The overall fit of the model was adequate and was able to explain 25.0 percent of the variance. The findings provide evidence in illuminating the role of peer influences and positive outcome expectancy of Internet gaming in the process of why adolescents may develop IGA.

  7. Learning outcomes for communication skills across the health professions: a systematic literature review and qualitative synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denniston, Charlotte; Molloy, Elizabeth; Nestel, Debra; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Keating, Jennifer L

    2017-04-07

    The aim of this study was to identify and analyse communication skills learning outcomes via a systematic review and present results in a synthesised list. Summarised results inform educators and researchers in communication skills teaching and learning across health professions. Systematic review and qualitative synthesis. A systematic search of five databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, ERIC, CINAHL plus and Scopus), from first records until August 2016, identified published learning outcomes for communication skills in health professions education. Extracted data were analysed through an iterative process of qualitative synthesis. This process was guided by principles of person centredness and an a priori decision guide. 168 papers met the eligibility criteria; 1669 individual learning outcomes were extracted and refined using qualitative synthesis. A final refined set of 205 learning outcomes were constructed and are presented in 4 domains that include: (1) knowledge (eg, describe the importance of communication in healthcare), (2) content skills (eg, explore a healthcare seeker's motivation for seeking healthcare),( 3) process skills (eg, respond promptly to a communication partner's questions) and (4) perceptual skills (eg, reflect on own ways of expressing emotion). This study provides a list of 205 communication skills learning outcomes that provide a foundation for further research and educational design in communication education across the health professions. Areas for future investigation include greater patient involvement in communication skills education design and further identification of learning outcomes that target knowledge and perceptual skills. This work may also prompt educators to be cognisant of the quality and scope of the learning outcomes they design and their application as goals for learning. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Outcome based education enacted: teachers' tensions in balancing between student learning and bureaucracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Linda; Silén, Charlotte; Bolander Laksov, Klara

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports on how teachers within health sciences education translate outcome-based education (OBE) into practice when they design courses. The study is an empirical contribution to the debate about outcome- and competency-based approaches in health sciences education. A qualitative method was used to study how teachers from 14 different study programmes designed courses before and after OBE was implemented. Using an interpretative approach, analysis of documents and interviews was carried out. The findings show that teachers enacted OBE either to design for more competency-oriented teaching-learning, or to further detail knowledge and thus move towards reductionism. Teachers mainly understood the outcome-based framework as useful to support students' learning, although the demand for accountability created tension and became a bureaucratic hindrance to design for development of professional competence. The paper shows variations of how teachers enacted the same outcome-based framework for instructional design. These differences can add a richer understanding of how outcome- or competency-based approaches relate to teaching-learning at a course level.

  9. Promoting positive outcomes through strengths interventions : A literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghielen, S.T.S.; van Woerkom, M.; Meyers, M.C.

    2018-01-01

    This paper reviews studies of strengths interventions published between 2011 and 2016. Strengths interventions aim to promote well-being or other positive outcomes by facilitating strengths identification, and sometimes also strengths use and/or development. The present review provides an overview

  10. Social outcomes of learning - Response to paper by David Campwell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John

    Expert kommentar til rapportudkast fra David Cambell (tidligere forskningsassistent for Robert Putman) i OECD projektet SOL (Social Outcomes of Learning). Publiceres senere som Discussionpaper af OECD...

  11. Using Surgeon-Specific Outcome Reports and Positive Deviance for Continuous Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Jelena; Anstee, Caitlin; Ramsay, Tim; Gilbert, Sebastien; Maziak, Donna E; Shamji, Farid M; Sundaresan, R Sudhir; Villeneuve, P James; Seely, Andrew J E

    2015-10-01

    Using the thoracic morbidity and mortality classification to document all postoperative adverse events between October 2012 and February 2014, we created surgeon-specific outcome reports (SSORs) to promote self-assessment and to implement a divisional continuous quality improvement (CQI) program, on the construct of positive deviance, to improve individual surgeon's clinical performance. Mixed-methods study within a division of six thoracic surgeons, involving (1) development of real-time, Web-based, risk-adjusted SSORs; (2) implementation of CQI seminars (n = 6; September 2013 to June 2014) for evaluation of results, collegial discussion on quality improvement based on identification of positive outliers, and selection of quality indicators for future discussion; and (3) in-person interviews to identify facilitators and barriers to using SSORs and CQI. Interview transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. Interviews revealed enthusiastic support for SSORs as a means to improve patient care through awareness of personal outcomes with blinded divisional comparison for similar operations and diseases, and apply the learning objectives to continuous professional development and maintenance of certification. Perceived limitations of SSORs included difficulty measuring surgeon expertise, limited understanding of risk adjustment, resistance to change, and belief that knowledge of sensitive data could lead to punitive actions. All surgeons believed CQI seminars led to collegial discussions, whereas perceived limitations included quorum participation and failing to circle back on actionable items. Real-time performance feedback using SSORs can motivate surgeons to improve their practice, and CQI seminars offer the opportunity to review and interpret results and address issues in a supportive environment. Whether SSORs and CQI can lead to improvements in rates of postoperative adverse events is a matter of ongoing research. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic

  12. Positive Education for Young Children: Effects of a Positive Psychology Intervention for Preschool Children on Subjective Well Being and Learning Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Shoshani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the flourishing in recent years in applications of positive psychology in the field of education, there is a paucity of research investigating positive psychology interventions for preschool children. The present study examined the effects of a positive psychology-based intervention conducted in Israel on children’s subjective well-being, mental health and learning behaviors. Twelve preschool classrooms of 3–6.5 year-olds were randomly assigned to a positive psychology intervention condition or a wait-list control condition. In the intervention condition, during one school year, 160 children experienced eight modules of basic concepts in positive psychology that were adapted to the developmental characteristics of young children and were compared to 155 children in demographically similar control classrooms. Children were administered a pre-test and post-test of subjective well-being measures. In addition, children’s mental health and emotional well-being were measured by parental questionnaires. Preschool teachers completed questionnaires concerning children’s learning behaviors. The findings showed significant increases in subjective well-being and positive learning behaviors among the intervention participants, with no significant changes in the control group. The results highlight the potential of positive psychology interventions for increasing subjective well-being and a positive approach to learning at young ages.

  13. The effects of formalized and trained non-reciprocal peer teaching on psychosocial, behavioral, pedagogical, and motor learning outcomes in physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R Whipp

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Peer teaching is recognized as a powerful instructional method; however, there is a paucity of studies that have evaluated the outcomes experienced by peer-teachers and their student recipients in the context of trained, non-reciprocal, high school physical education. Accordingly, the effectiveness of a formalized and trained non-reciprocal peer teaching (T-PT program upon psychosocial, behavioral, pedagogical and student learning outcomes within high school physical education classes was investigated. Students from eight intact classes (106 males, 94 females, Mage = 12.46, SD = 0.59 were randomly assigned to either a T-PT intervention group (taught by a volunteer peer-teacher who was trained in line with a tactical games approach or untrained group (U-PT; where volunteer peer-teachers received no formal training, but did receive guidance on the game concepts to teach. Data were collected over 10 lessons in a 5-week soccer unit. Mixed-model ANOVAs/MANOVAs revealed that, in comparison to U-PT, the T-PT program significantly enhanced in-game performance actions and academic learning time among student recipients. Those in the T-PT also provided greater levels of feedback and structured learning time, as well as reporting more positive feelings about peer teaching and fewer perceived barriers to accessing learning outcomes. These findings show that non-reciprocal peer-teachers who receive formalized support through training and tactical games approach-based teaching resources can enhance behavioral, pedagogical, and motor performance outcomes in physical education.

  14. The effects of formalized and trained non-reciprocal peer teaching on psychosocial, behavioral, pedagogical, and motor learning outcomes in physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipp, Peter R; Jackson, Ben; Dimmock, James A; Soh, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Peer teaching is recognized as a powerful instructional method; however, there is a paucity of studies that have evaluated the outcomes experienced by peer-teachers and their student recipients in the context of trained, non-reciprocal, high school physical education (PE). Accordingly, the effectiveness of a formalized and trained non-reciprocal peer teaching (T-PT) program upon psychosocial, behavioral, pedagogical, and student learning outcomes within high school PE classes was investigated. Students from eight intact classes (106 males, 94 females, Mage = 12.46, SD = 0.59) were randomly assigned to either a T-PT intervention group (taught by a volunteer peer-teacher who was trained in line with a tactical games approach) or untrained group (U-PT; where volunteer peer-teachers received no formal training, but did receive guidance on the game concepts to teach). Data were collected over 10 lessons in a 5-week soccer unit. Mixed-model ANOVAs/MANOVAs revealed that, in comparison to U-PT, the T-PT program significantly enhanced in-game performance actions and academic learning time among student recipients. Those in the T-PT also provided greater levels of feedback and structured learning time, as well as reporting more positive feelings about peer teaching and fewer perceived barriers to accessing learning outcomes. These findings show that non-reciprocal peer-teachers who receive formalized support through training and tactical games approach-based teaching resources can enhance behavioral, pedagogical, and motor performance outcomes in PE.

  15. Blended versus Traditional Course Delivery: Comparing Students' Motivation, Learning Outcomes, and Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hungwei; Walsh, Eamonn Joseph, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to compare and assess students' experiences and perceptions in a blended and a traditional course, as well as their level of learning motivation, level of learning outcomes and skills, and learning achievement. Two instructors who were teaching 1 section of an undergraduate English literacy course using the face-to-face format…

  16. Positive parenting in ethnic minority families : challenges and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmen, Rosalia Antonia Grada (Rosanneke)

    2014-01-01

    The overall goal of the current dissertation is to uncover predictors and outcomes of positive parenting in ethnic minority families. Chapter 2 provides an overview of commonly used observational instruments to measure sensitivity, showing the versatility and scientific importance of the construct.

  17. Positive psychology outcome measures for family caregivers of people living with dementia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfeld, Jacki; Stoner, Charlotte R; Wenborn, Jennifer; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Moniz-Cook, Esme; Orrell, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Family caregivers of people living with dementia can have both positive and negative experiences of caregiving. Despite this, existing outcome measures predominately focus on negative aspects of caregiving such as burden and depression. This review aimed to evaluate the development and psychometric properties of existing positive psychology measures for family caregivers of people living with dementia to determine their potential utility in research and practice. A systematic review of positive psychology outcome measures for family caregivers of people with dementia was conducted. The databases searched were as follows: PsychINFO, CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PubMed. Scale development papers were subject to a quality assessment to appraise psychometric properties. Twelve positive outcome measures and six validation papers of these scales were identified. The emerging constructs of self-efficacy, spirituality, resilience, rewards, gain, and meaning are in line with positive psychology theory. There are some robust positive measures in existence for family caregivers of people living with dementia. However, lack of reporting of the psychometric properties hindered the quality assessment of some outcome measures identified in this review. Future research should aim to include positive outcome measures in interventional research to facilitate a greater understanding of the positive aspects of caregiving and how these contribute to well-being.

  18. Selected engagement factors and academic learning outcomes of undergraduate engineering students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Patricia J.

    The concept of student engagement and its relationship to successful student performance and learning outcomes has a long history in higher education (Kuh, 2007). Attention to faculty and student engagement has only recently become of interest to the engineering education community. This interest can be attributed to long-standing research by George Kuh's, National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) at the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research. In addition, research projects sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the Academic Pathway Study (APS) at the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education (CAEE) and the Center for the Advancement of Scholarship on Engineering Education (CASEE), Measuring Student and Faculty Engagement in Engineering Education, at the National Academy of Engineering. These research studies utilized the framework and data from the Engineering Change study by the Center for the Study of Higher Education, Pennsylvania State, that evaluated the impact of the new Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET) EC2000 "3a through k" criteria identify 11 learning outcomes expected of engineering graduates. The purpose of this study was to explore the extent selected engagement factors of 1. institution, 2. social, 3. cognitive, 4. finance, and 5. technology influence undergraduate engineering students and quality student learning outcomes. Through the descriptive statistical analysis indicates that there maybe problems in the engineering program. This researcher would have expected at least 50% of the students to fall in the Strongly Agree and Agree categories. The data indicated that the there maybe problems in the engineering program problems in the data. The problems found ranked in this order: 1). Dissatisfaction with faculty instruction methods and quality of instruction and not a clear understanding of engineering majors , 2). inadequate Engineering faculty and advisors availability especially applicable

  19. A Meta-Analysis of Educational Data Mining on Improvements in Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShammari, Iqbal A.; Aldhafiri, Mohammed D.; Al-Shammari, Zaid

    2013-01-01

    A meta-synthesis study was conducted of 60 research studies on educational data mining (EDM) and their impacts on and outcomes for improving learning outcomes. After an overview, an examination of these outcomes is provided (Romero, Ventura, Espejo, & Hervas, 2008; Romero, "et al.", 2011). Then, a review of other EDM-related research…

  20. Do the Critical Success Factors from Learning Analytics Predict Student Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Kenneth David

    2016-01-01

    This article starts with a detailed literature review of recent studies that focused on using learning analytics software or learning management system data to determine the nature of any relationships between online student activity and their academic outcomes within university-level business courses. The article then describes how data was…

  1. Incorporating Meaningful Gamification in a Blended Learning Research Methods Class: Examining Student Learning, Engagement, and Affective Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Meng; Hew, Khe Foon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how the use of meaningful gamification affects student learning, engagement, and affective outcomes in a short, 3-day blended learning research methods class using a combination of experimental and qualitative research methods. Twenty-two postgraduates were randomly split into two groups taught by the same…

  2. The Effects of Game Design on Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael W.; Shen, Yuzhong

    2014-01-01

    This article details the administration and results of an experiment conducted to assess the impact of three video game design concepts upon learning outcomes. The principles tested include game aesthetics, player choice, and player competition. The experiment participants were asked to play a serious game over the course of a week, and the…

  3. Pairing attachment theory and social learning theory in video-feedback intervention to promote positive parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juffer, Femmie; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H

    2017-06-01

    Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting and Sensitive Discipline (VIPP-SD) is a social-learning and attachment-based intervention using video feedback to support sensitive parenting and at the same time setting firm limits. Empirical studies and meta-analyses have shown that sensitive parenting is the key determinant to promote secure child-parent attachment relationships and that adequate parental discipline contributes to fewer behavior problems in children. Building on this evidence, VIPP-SD has been tested in various populations of at-risk parents and vulnerable children (in the age range of zero to six years), as well as in the context of child care. In twelve randomized controlled trials including 1116 parents and caregivers, VIPP-SD proved to be effective in promoting sensitive caregiving, while positive social-emotional child outcomes were also found. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Children who screen positive for autism at 2.5 years and receive early intervention: a prospective naturalistic 2-year outcome study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spjut Jansson, Birgitta; Miniscalco, Carmela; Westerlund, Joakim; Kantzer, Anne-Katrin; Fernell, Elisabeth; Gillberg, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous research has stressed the importance of early identification and intervention for children with autism spectrum disorders. Methods Children who had screened positive for autism at the age of 2.5 years in a general population screening and then received a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder were enrolled in an intervention program provided by Swedish habilitation services. The following interventions were available: a comprehensive intervention based on Applied Behavior Analysis – Intensive Learning (IL) – in two settings, which included home- and preschool-based (IL Regular) and only home-based (IL Modified) and eclectic interventions. Results There was considerable variability in terms of outcome, but intervention group status was not associated with any of the chosen outcome variables. Conclusion The main finding was that the type of intervention was not critical for outcome of adaptive or global functioning. The variability in outcome demonstrates the need for continuous assessments and evaluation of the child’s function and behavior throughout the intervention period. PMID:27621636

  5. Comparing the effects of positive and negative feedback in information-integration category learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedberg, Michael; Glass, Brian; Filoteo, J Vincent; Hazeltine, Eliot; Maddox, W Todd

    2017-01-01

    Categorical learning is dependent on feedback. Here, we compare how positive and negative feedback affect information-integration (II) category learning. Ashby and O'Brien (2007) demonstrated that both positive and negative feedback are required to solve II category problems when feedback was not guaranteed on each trial, and reported no differences between positive-only and negative-only feedback in terms of their effectiveness. We followed up on these findings and conducted 3 experiments in which participants completed 2,400 II categorization trials across three days under 1 of 3 conditions: positive feedback only (PFB), negative feedback only (NFB), or both types of feedback (CP; control partial). An adaptive algorithm controlled the amount of feedback given to each group so that feedback was nearly equated. Using different feedback control procedures, Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that participants in the NFB and CP group were able to engage II learning strategies, whereas the PFB group was not. Additionally, the NFB group was able to achieve significantly higher accuracy than the PFB group by Day 3. Experiment 3 revealed that these differences remained even when we equated the information received on feedback trials. Thus, negative feedback appears significantly more effective for learning II category structures. This suggests that the human implicit learning system may be capable of learning in the absence of positive feedback.

  6. Positive Emotion in Nature as a Precursor to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Tamara Chase

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the perception of learning in adults generated by the effect of a positive emotion-in this case, awe. For the study, a working definition of awe is an "impact-provoking reverence due to a powerful, positive emotional response to the natural world." This qualitative study used primarily face-to-face…

  7. Crumpled Molecules and Edible Plastic: Science Learning Activation in Out-of-School Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorph, Rena; Schunn, Christian D.; Crowley, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    The Coalition for Science After School highlights the dual nature of outcomes for science learning during out-of- school time (OST): Learning experiences should not only be positive in the moment, but also position youth for future success. Several frameworks speak to the first set of immediate outcomes--what youth learn, think, and feel as the…

  8. The Effectiveness of the Gesture-Based Learning System (GBLS and Its Impact on Learning Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moamer Ali Shakroum

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Several studies and experiments have been conducted in recent years to examine the value and the advantage of using the Gesture-Based Learning System (GBLS.The investigation of the influence of the GBLS mode on the learning outcomes is still scarce. Most previous studies did not address more than one category of learning outcomes (cognitive, affective outcomes, etc. at the same time when used to understand the impact of GBLS. Moreover, none of these studies considered the difference in students’ characteristics such as learning styles and spatial abilities. Therefore, a comprehensive empirical research on the impact of the GBLS mode on learning outcomes is needed. The purpose of this paper is to fill in the gap and to investigate the effectiveness of the GBLS mode on learning using Technology Mediated Learning (TML models. This study revealed that the GBLS mode has greater positive impact on students’ learning outcomes (cognitive and affective outcomes when compared with other two learning modes that are classified as Computer Simulation Software Learning (CSSL mode and conventional learning mode. In addition, this study also found that the GBLS mode is capable of serving all students with different learning styles and spatial ability levels. The results of this study revealed that the GBLS mode outperformed the existing learning methods by providing a unique learning experience that considers the differences between students. The results have also shown that the Kinect user interface can create an interactive and an enjoyable learning experience.

  9. Issues in Institutional Benchmarking of Student Learning Outcomes Using Case Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Thomas P.; Pondish, Christopher; Secolsky, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Benchmarking is a process that can take place at both the inter-institutional and intra-institutional level. This paper focuses on benchmarking intra-institutional student learning outcomes using case examples. The findings of the study illustrate the point that when the outcomes statements associated with the mission of the institution are…

  10. The role of character positional frequency on Chinese word learning during natural reading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Liang

    Full Text Available Readers' eye movements were recorded to examine the role of character positional frequency on Chinese lexical acquisition during reading and its possible modulation by word spacing. In Experiment 1, three types of pseudowords were constructed based on each character's positional frequency, providing congruent, incongruent, and no positional word segmentation information. Each pseudoword was embedded into two sets of sentences, for the learning and the test phases. In the learning phase, half the participants read sentences in word-spaced format, and half in unspaced format. In the test phase, all participants read sentences in unspaced format. The results showed an inhibitory effect of character positional frequency upon the efficiency of word learning when processing incongruent pseudowords both in the learning and test phase, and also showed facilitatory effect of word spacing in the learning phase, but not at test. Most importantly, these two characteristics exerted independent influences on word segmentation. In Experiment 2, three analogous types of pseudowords were created whilst controlling for orthographic neighborhood size. The results of the two experiments were consistent, except that the effect of character positional frequency was absent in the test phase in Experiment 2. We argue that the positional frequency of a word's constituent characters may influence the character-to-word assignment in a process that likely incorporates both lexical segmentation and identification.

  11. THE POSITIVE EFFECTS OF COGNITIVE LEARNING STYLES IN ELT CLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    Ozlem Yagcioglu

    2016-01-01

    In the EFL, ESL, ESP and in the ELT classes, students are taught their courses with different kinds of methods and approaches. Cognitive learning styles are the most essential styles in foreign language education. In this paper, the positive effects of cognitive learning styles will be handled. The benefits of these styles will be highlighted. Games on cognitive learning styles will be explained. Sample classroom activities will be shared. Useful books, videos and websites on cognitive learni...

  12. A Study of Fifth Graders' Environmental Learning Outcomes in Taipei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-San

    2018-01-01

    Environmental education has recently received much more attention than before among elementary school students' science learning in Taiwan. The major purpose of this study is to explore the learning outcomes on environmental education for 5th graders in Taipei. A quasi-experimental design with a single group was used in this study. Students in the…

  13. The processing of unexpected positive response outcomes in the mediofrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdinand, Nicola K; Mecklinger, Axel; Kray, Jutta; Gehring, William J

    2012-08-29

    The human mediofrontal cortex, especially the anterior cingulate cortex, is commonly assumed to contribute to higher cognitive functions like performance monitoring. How exactly this is achieved is currently the subject of lively debate but there is evidence that an event's valence and its expectancy play important roles. One prominent theory, the reinforcement learning theory by Holroyd and colleagues (2002, 2008), assigns a special role to feedback valence, while the prediction of response-outcome (PRO) model by Alexander and Brown (2010, 2011) claims that the mediofrontal cortex is sensitive to unexpected events regardless of their valence. However, paradigms examining this issue have included confounds that fail to separate valence and expectancy. In the present study, we tested the two competing theories of performance monitoring by using an experimental task that separates valence and unexpectedness of performance feedback. The feedback-related negativity of the event-related potential, which is commonly assumed to be a reflection of mediofrontal cortex activity, was elicited not only by unexpected negative feedback, but also by unexpected positive feedback. This implies that the mediofrontal cortex is sensitive to the unexpectedness of events in general rather than their valence and by this supports the PRO model.

  14. Exploring the Relationships between Tutor Background, Tutor Training, and Student Learning: A Problem-Based Learning Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Heather; Walker, Andrew; Shelton, Brett E.; Fitt, M. Harrison

    2013-01-01

    Despite years of primary research on problem-based learning and literature reviews, no systematic effort has been made to analyze the relationship between tutor characteristics and student learning outcomes. In an effort to fill that gap the following meta-analysis coded 223 outcomes from 94 studies with small but positive gains for PBL students…

  15. Application of active learning modalities to achieve medical genetics competencies and their learning outcome assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagiwara N

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nobuko Hagiwara Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA Abstract: The steadily falling costs of genome sequencing, coupled with the growing number of genetic tests with proven clinical validity, have made the use of genetic testing more common in clinical practice. This development has necessitated nongeneticist physicians, especially primary care physicians, to become more responsible for assessing genetic risks for their patients. Providing undergraduate medical students a solid foundation in genomic medicine, therefore, has become all the more important to ensure the readiness of future physicians in applying genomic medicine to their patient care. In order to further enhance the effectiveness of instructing practical skills in medical genetics, the emphasis of active learning modules in genetics curriculum at medical schools has increased in recent years. This is because of the general acceptance of a better efficacy of active learner-centered pedagogy over passive lecturer-centered pedagogy. However, an objective standard to evaluate students’ skill levels in genomic medicine achieved by active learning is currently missing. Recently, entrustable professional activities (EPAs in genomic medicine have been proposed as a framework for developing physician competencies in genomic medicine. EPAs in genomic medicine provide a convenient guideline for not only developing genomic medicine curriculum but also assessing students’ competency levels in practicing genomic medicine. In this review, the efficacy of different types of active learning modules reported for medical genetics curricula is discussed using EPAs in genomic medicine as a common evaluation standard for modules’ learning outcomes. The utility of the EPAs in genomic medicine for designing active learning modules in undergraduate medical genetics curricula is also discussed. Keywords

  16. Position-aware deep multi-task learning for drug-drug interaction extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Deyu; Miao, Lei; He, Yulan

    2018-05-01

    A drug-drug interaction (DDI) is a situation in which a drug affects the activity of another drug synergistically or antagonistically when being administered together. The information of DDIs is crucial for healthcare professionals to prevent adverse drug events. Although some known DDIs can be found in purposely-built databases such as DrugBank, most information is still buried in scientific publications. Therefore, automatically extracting DDIs from biomedical texts is sorely needed. In this paper, we propose a novel position-aware deep multi-task learning approach for extracting DDIs from biomedical texts. In particular, sentences are represented as a sequence of word embeddings and position embeddings. An attention-based bidirectional long short-term memory (BiLSTM) network is used to encode each sentence. The relative position information of words with the target drugs in text is combined with the hidden states of BiLSTM to generate the position-aware attention weights. Moreover, the tasks of predicting whether or not two drugs interact with each other and further distinguishing the types of interactions are learned jointly in multi-task learning framework. The proposed approach has been evaluated on the DDIExtraction challenge 2013 corpus and the results show that with the position-aware attention only, our proposed approach outperforms the state-of-the-art method by 0.99% for binary DDI classification, and with both position-aware attention and multi-task learning, our approach achieves a micro F-score of 72.99% on interaction type identification, outperforming the state-of-the-art approach by 1.51%, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Measuring Learning Outcomes and Attitudes in a Flipped Introductory Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilli-Turner, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the positive effects on learning and retention rates that active learning brings to the classroom. A flipped classroom is a type of active learning where transmission of content occurs outside of the classroom environment and problem solving and learning activities become the focus of classroom time. This article…

  18. Assuring Student Learning Outcomes Achievement through Faculty Development: An Online University Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Shelia; Ewing, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Asynchronous discussions in the online teaching and learning environment significantly contributes to the achievement of student learning outcomes, which is dependent upon qualified and engaged faculty members. The discourse within this article addresses how an online university conducted faculty development through its unique Robust Learning…

  19. Modifying Softball for Maximizing Learning Outcomes in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian, Ali; Ward, Phillip; Goodway, Jacqueline D.; Sutherland, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Softball is taught in many physical education programs throughout the United States. This article describes modifications that maximize learning outcomes and that address the National Standards and safety recommendations. The modifications focus on tasks and equipment, developmentally appropriate motor-skill acquisition, increasing number of…

  20. A randomised controlled trial in comparing maternal and neonatal outcomes between hands-and-knees delivery position and supine position in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyu; Huang, Shurong; Guo, Xiaolan; Zhao, Ningning; Lu, Yujing; Chen, Min; Li, Yingxia; Wu, Junqin; Huang, Lihua; Ma, Fenglan; Yang, Yuhong; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Guo, Renfei; Cai, Wenzhi

    2017-07-01

    the supine position is the most frequently offered for birth delivery in China and many other countries, but the hands-and-knees position is now gaining prominence with doctors in China. This study aims to examine the differences in maternal and neonatal outcomes among low-risk women who gave birth either in the hands-and-knees position or the supine position. a randomised controlled trial was conducted in 11 hospitals in China from May to December in 2012. In total, 1400 women were recruited and randomly allocated to either the experimental group (n=700, 446 completed the protocol) who delivered in hands-and-knees position and the control group (n=700, 440 completed the protocol) who delivered in supine position. Women who could not maintain the randomised position during the second stage of labour were allowed to withdraw from the study. The primary maternal outcome measured was rate of episiotomy. Secondary outcomes included degree of perineum laceration, rate of emergency caesarean section, rate of shoulder dystocia, and duration of labour, postpartum bleeding, neonatal Apgar score, and the rate of neonatal asphyxia. Because outcome data were only collected for women who gave birth in the randomised position, per-protocol analyses were used to compare groups. The primary outcome, episiotomy, was also compared between groups using logistic regression adjusting for maternal age,gestational age at birth, whether the woman was primiparous, the process of second stage of labour and birthweight. as compared with the control group, the experimental group had lower rates of episiotomy and second-degree perineum laceration (including episiotomy), and higher rates of intact perineum and first-degree perineum laceration, with a longer duration of second stage of labour. No significant differences were found in the amount of postpartum bleeding, shoulder dystocia, neonatal asphyxia and neonatal Apgar scores at 1minute and 5minutes. Adjusted for maternal age, gestational

  1. Machine learning approach for the outcome prediction of temporal lobe epilepsy surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Armañanzas

    Full Text Available Epilepsy surgery is effective in reducing both the number and frequency of seizures, particularly in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of these patients continue suffering seizures after surgery. Here we used a machine learning approach to predict the outcome of epilepsy surgery based on supervised classification data mining taking into account not only the common clinical variables, but also pathological and neuropsychological evaluations. We have generated models capable of predicting whether a patient with TLE secondary to hippocampal sclerosis will fully recover from epilepsy or not. The machine learning analysis revealed that outcome could be predicted with an estimated accuracy of almost 90% using some clinical and neuropsychological features. Importantly, not all the features were needed to perform the prediction; some of them proved to be irrelevant to the prognosis. Personality style was found to be one of the key features to predict the outcome. Although we examined relatively few cases, findings were verified across all data, showing that the machine learning approach described in the present study may be a powerful method. Since neuropsychological assessment of epileptic patients is a standard protocol in the pre-surgical evaluation, we propose to include these specific psychological tests and machine learning tools to improve the selection of candidates for epilepsy surgery.

  2. The Positive Effects of Cognitive Learning Styles in ELT Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagcioglu, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    In the EFL, ESL, ESP and in the ELT classes, students are taught their courses with different kinds of methods and approaches. Cognitive learning styles are the most essential styles in foreign language education. In this paper, the positive effects of cognitive learning styles will be handled. The benefits of these styles will be highlighted.…

  3. Learning outcomes using video in supervision and peer feedback during clinical skills training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Toftgård, Rie Castella; Nørgaard, Cita

    supervision of clinical skills (formative assessment). Demonstrations of these principles will be presented as video podcasts during the session. The learning outcomes of video supervision and peer-feedback were assessed in an online questionnaire survey. Results Results of the supervision showed large self......Objective New technology and learning principles were introduced in a clinical skills training laboratory (iLab). The intension was to move from apprenticeship to active learning principles including peer feedback and supervision using video. The objective of this study was to evaluate student...... learning outcomes in a manual skills training subject using video during feedback and supervision. Methods The iLab classroom was designed to fit four principles of teaching using video. Two of these principles were (a) group work using peer-feedback on videos produced by the students and, (b) video...

  4. Unpacking the Learning-Work Nexus: "Priming" as Lever for High-Quality Learning Outcomes in Work-Integrated Learning Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Calvin; Worsfold, Kate

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the impacts of work-integrated learning (WIL) curriculum components on general employability skills--professional work-readiness, self-efficacy and team skills. Regression analyses emphasise the importance of the "authenticity" of WIL placements for the development of these generic outcomes. Other curricula factors…

  5. Autonomy, Affiliation, and Ability: Relative Salience of Factors that Influence Online Learner Motivation and Learning Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Chung Chen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Autonomy, affiliation, and ability appear as main factors that influence online learners‟ motivation and learning outcomes, however, the relative salience of these three factors remains unclear in the online learning literature. Drawing on Deci and Ryan‟s self-determination theory, this study sought to bridge this gap by investigating the relative salience of perceived autonomy, affiliation, and ability on learner motivation and learning outcomes in two special education online programs (N = 262. This study found that the most salient predictor varied from categories of motivation and learning outcomes, and the number of significant predictors increased by participants‟ level of motivation/self-determination. Results of this study provide implications for online learner support.

  6. The effectiveness of Internet-based e-learning on clinician behaviour and patient outcomes: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Peter M; Kable, Ashley; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Booth, Debbie

    2016-05-01

    The contemporary health workforce has a professional responsibility to maintain competency in practice. However, some difficulties exist with access to ongoing professional development opportunities, particularly for staff in rural and remote areas and those not enrolled in a formal programme of study. E-learning is at the nexus of overcoming these challenges. The benefits of e-learning have been reported in terms of increased accessibility to education, improved self-efficacy, knowledge generation, cost effectiveness, learner flexibility and interactivity. What is less clear, is whether improved self-efficacy or knowledge gained through e-learning influences healthcare professional behaviour or skill development, whether these changes are sustained, and whether these changes improve patient outcomes. To identify, appraise and synthesise the best available evidence for the effectiveness of e-learning programmes on health care professional behaviour and patient outcomes. A systematic review of randomised controlled trials was conducted to assess the effectiveness of e-learning programmes on clinician behaviour and patient outcomes. Electronic databases including CINAHL, Embase, ERIC, MEDLINE, Mosby's Index, Scopus and Cochrane - CENTRAL were searched in July 2014 and again in July 2015. Studies were reviewed and data extracted by two independent reviewers using the Joanna Briggs Institute standardised critical appraisal and data extraction instruments. Seven trials met the inclusion criteria for the analysis. Due to substantial instructional design, subject matter, study population, and methodological variation between the identified studies, statistical pooling was not possible and a meta-analysis could not be performed. Consequently, the findings of this systematic review are presented as a narrative review. The results suggest that e-learning was at least as effective as traditional learning approaches, and superior to no instruction at all in improving health

  7. Evaluating the Impact of Wikis on Student Learning Outcomes: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trocky, Nina M; Buckley, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    Although wikis appear to have been reported as effective tools for educators, uncertainty exists as to their effectiveness in achieving student learning outcomes. The aim of this integrative review was to examine the current evidence on the impact of wikis on student learning in courses requiring collaborative or co-developed assignments or activities. The authors searched several electronic databases for relevant articles and used R. Whittemore and K. Knafl's (2005) integrative review method to analyze and synthesize the evidence. Twenty-five articles met the selection criteria for this review, and four major themes for wiki use were identified: (a) writing skills, (b) collaboration, (c) knowledge acquisition, and (d) centralized repository. Although wikis have been found useful in improving student learning outcomes and hold great potential as an instructional strategy to aid students in learning various skills and gaining new knowledge, more research is needed on their effectiveness, especially in the area of nursing education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Perceived Learning Outcomes from Participation in One Type of Registered Student Organization: Equestrian Sport Clubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulec, Erin; McKinney, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Learning takes place both inside and outside of the classroom. While there are a few studies that focus on the professional, developmental, and learning outcomes of participation in student organizations, there has been insufficient research on these outcomes in sport clubs. The paper reports on the results of an online, primarily qualitative…

  9. Goals, Motivation for, and Outcomes of Personal Learning through Networks: Results of a Tweetstorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sie, Rory L. L.; Pataraia, Nino; Boursinou, Eleni; Rajagopal, Kamakshi; Margaryan, Anoush; Falconer, Isobel; Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Littlejohn, Allison; Sloep, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in the use of social media for learning have posed serious challenges for learners. The information overload that these online social tools create has changed the way learners learn and from whom they learn. An investigation of learners' goals, motivations and expected outcomes when using a personal learning network is…

  10. Motivation, students' needs and learning outcomes: a hybrid game-based app for enhanced language learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Anke; Isla-Montes, José-Luis; Palomo-Duarte, Manuel; Dodero, Juan-Manuel

    2016-01-01

    In the context of European Higher Education students face an increasing focus on independent, individual learning-at the expense of face-to-face interaction. Hence learners are, all too often, not provided with enough opportunities to negotiate in the target language. The current case study aims to address this reality by going beyond conventional approaches to provide students with a hybrid game-based app, combining individual and collaborative learning opportunities. The 4-week study was carried out with 104 German language students (A1.2 CEFR) who had previously been enrolled in a first-semester A1.1 level course at a Spanish university. The VocabTrainerA1 app-designed specifically for this study-harnesses the synergy of combining individual learning tasks and a collaborative murder mystery game in a hybrid level-based architecture. By doing so, the app provides learners with opportunities to apply their language skills to real-life-like communication. The purpose of the study was twofold: on one hand we aimed to measure learner motivation, perceived usefulness and added value of hybrid game-based apps; on the other, we sought to determine their impact on language learning. To this end, we conducted focus group interviews and an anonymous Technology Acceptance Model survey (TAM). In addition, students took a pre-test and a post-test. Scores from both tests were compared with the results obtained in first-semester conventional writing tasks, with a view to measure learning outcomes. The study provides qualitative and quantitative data supporting our initial hypotheses. Our findings suggest that hybrid game-based apps like VocabTrainerA1-which seamlessly combine individual and collaborative learning tasks-motivate learners, stimulate perceived usefulness and added value, and better meet the language learning needs of today's digital natives. In terms of acceptance, outcomes and sustainability, the data indicate that hybrid game-based apps significantly improve

  11. How Can Service-Learning Prepare Students for the Workforce? Exploring the Potential of Positive Psychological Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElravy, L. J.; Matkin, Gina; Hastings, Lindsay J.

    2018-01-01

    Although service-learning increases several important development and learning outcomes in college students (Yorio & Ye, 2012), it is not clear whether service-learning is better preparing these students for their future careers (Gray, Ondaatje, Fricker, & Geschwind, 2000). To better understand the influence of service-learning on student…

  12. Comparing Learning Outcomes of Video-Based E-Learning with Face-to-Face Lectures of Agricultural Engineering Courses in Korean Agricultural High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Youl; Kim, Soo-Wook; Cha, Seung-Bong; Nam, Min-Woo

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of e-learning by comparing the learning outcomes in conventional face-to-face lectures and e-learning methods. Two video-based e-learning contents were developed based on the rapid prototyping model and loaded onto the learning management system (LMS), which was available at http://www.greenehrd.com.…

  13. Exploring Service Learning Outcomes in Students: A Mixed Methods Study for Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John F.

    2017-01-01

    This mixed methods study exploring student outcomes of service learning experiences is inter-disciplinary, near the intersection of higher education research, moral development, and nursing. The specific problem examined in this study is that service learning among university students is utilized by educators, but largely without a full…

  14. Peranan Strategic Leadership terhadap Competitive Positioning melalui Organization Learning pada Perusahaan Non Manufaktur di Surabaya

    OpenAIRE

    Saputra, Lydia Kartika

    2015-01-01

    This study was accomplished to reveal the role of strategic leadership to competitive positioning through organization learning. Strategic leadership and organization learning owned and implemented within an organization can create even strengthen the competitive positioning of the organization. Through the dimensions each variable can indicate how far the role of strategic leadership and organization learning to competitive positioning.The analysis technique used was outer and inner model by...

  15. Student Outcomes of Eco-Restoration Service-Learning Experiences in Urban Woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knackmuhs, Eric; Farmer, James; Reynolds, Heather L.

    2017-01-01

    Service learning with ecological restoration projects can positively affect participants' attitudes, behaviors, and learning, but little is known about the longevity of these effects. Furthermore, urban green spaces are an understudied, yet increasingly important, context for eco-restoration service learning. This study examined the persistence of…

  16. Personalized Resource Recommendations using Learning from Positive and Unlabeled Examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyank Thakkar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel approach for recommending social resources using learning from positive and unlabeled examples. Bookmarks submitted on social bookmarking system delicious1 and artists on online music system last.fm2 are considered as social resources. The foremost feature of this problem is that there are no labeled negative resources/examples available for learning a recommender/classifier. The memory based collaborative filtering has served as the most widely used algorithm for social resource recommendation. However, its predictions are based on some ad hoc heuristic rules and its success depends on the availability of a critical mass of users. This paper proposes model based two-step techniques to learn a classifier using positive and unlabeled examples to address personalized resource recommendations. In the first step of these techniques, naïve Bayes classifier is employed to identify reliable negative resources. In the second step, to generate effective resource recommender, classification and regression tree and least square support vector machine (LS-SVM are exercised. A direct method based on LS-SVM is also put forward to realize the recommendation task. LS-SVM is customized for learning from positive and unlabeled data. Furthermore, the impact of feature selection on our proposed techniques is also studied. Memory based collaborative filtering as well as our proposed techniques exploit usage data to generate personalized recommendations. Experimental results show that the proposed techniques outperform existing method appreciably.

  17. Conflict Elaboration and Cognitive Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Buchs, Céline; Butera, Fabrizio; Mugny, Gabriel; Darnon, Céline

    2004-01-01

    This article presents advice for teachers about using sociocognitive conflicts to promote academic learning. In doing so, the conditions under which sociocognitive conflicts are constructive or disruptive are examined and the relevant research is reviewed on social development, cooperative learning, and social influence. Two types of conflict elaboration—epistemic and relational—are identified. Epistemic elaborations focus students on task resolution leading to positive cognitive outcomes, an...

  18. Goals, Motivation for, and Outcomes of Personal Learning through Networks: Results of a Tweetstorm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, Rory; Pataraia, Nino; Boursinou, Eleni; Rajagopal, Kamakshi; Margaryan, Anoush; Falconer, Isobel; Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Littlejohn, Allison; Sloep, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Recent developments in the use of social media for learning have posed serious challenges for learners. The information overload that these online social tools create has changed the way learners learn and from whom they learn. An investigation of learners' goals, motivations and expected outcomes

  19. Dissociable brain systems mediate vicarious learning of stimulus-response and action-outcome contingencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljeholm, Mimi; Molloy, Ciara J; O'Doherty, John P

    2012-07-18

    Two distinct strategies have been suggested to support action selection in humans and other animals on the basis of experiential learning: a goal-directed strategy that generates decisions based on the value and causal antecedents of action outcomes, and a habitual strategy that relies on the automatic elicitation of actions by environmental stimuli. In the present study, we investigated whether a similar dichotomy exists for actions that are acquired vicariously, through observation of other individuals rather than through direct experience, and assessed whether these strategies are mediated by distinct brain regions. We scanned participants with functional magnetic resonance imaging while they performed an observational learning task designed to encourage either goal-directed encoding of the consequences of observed actions, or a mapping of observed actions to conditional discriminative cues. Activity in different parts of the action observation network discriminated between the two conditions during observational learning and correlated with the degree of insensitivity to outcome devaluation in subsequent performance. Our findings suggest that, in striking parallel to experiential learning, neural systems mediating the observational acquisition of actions may be dissociated into distinct components: a goal-directed, outcome-sensitive component and a less flexible stimulus-response component.

  20. Strategies for Assessing Learning Outcomes in an Online Oceanography Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, D. L.

    2003-12-01

    All general education courses at the San Jose State University, including those in the sciences, must present a detailed assessment plan of student learning, prior to certification for offering. The assessment plan must state a clear methodology for acquiring data on student achievement of the learning outcomes for the specific course category, as well as demonstrate how students fulfill a strong writing requirement. For example, an online course in oceanography falls into the Area R category, the Earth and Environment, through which a student should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the methods and limits of scientific investigation; distinguish science from pseudo-science; and apply a scientific approach to answer questions about the Earth and environment. The desired learning outcomes are shared with students at the beginning of the course and subsequent assessments on achieving each outcome are embedded in the graded assignments, which include a critical thinking essay, mid-term exam, poster presentation in a symposium-style format, portfolio of web-based work, weekly discussions on an electronic bulletin board, and a take-home final exam, consisting of an original research grant proposal. The diverse nature of the graded assignments assures a comprehensive assessment of student learning from a variety of perspectives, such as quantitative, qualitative, and analytical. Formative assessment is also leveraged into learning opportunities, which students use to identify the acquisition of knowledge. For example, pre-tests are used to highlight preconceptions at the beginning of specific field studies and post-testing encourages students to present the results of small research projects. On a broader scale, the assessment results contradict common misperceptions of online and hybrid courses. Student demand for online courses is very high due to the self-paced nature of learning. Rates of enrollment attrition match those of classroom sections, if students

  1. Problem- and case-based learning in science: an introduction to distinctions, values, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allchin, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Case-based learning and problem-based learning have demonstrated great promise in reforming science education. Yet an instructor, in newly considering this suite of interrelated pedagogical strategies, faces a number of important instructional choices. Different features and their related values and learning outcomes are profiled here, including: the level of student autonomy; instructional focus on content, skills development, or nature-of-science understanding; the role of history, or known outcomes; scope, clarity, and authenticity of problems provided to students; extent of collaboration; complexity, in terms of number of interpretive perspectives; and, perhaps most importantly, the role of applying versus generating knowledge.

  2. 數位學習之學習成果的再思考 Rethinking the Learning Outcome of E-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jing Chiou

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available 本文分析國內外近年來在數位學習(E-Learning)的評量學習成果的方式,並進一步比較國內外研究在理論及實證上差異處,希望透過相關的文獻分析重新思考數位學習的學習成果及其評量方式,以瞭解數位學習對學習者的助益。本研究的分結果發現,在國內針對數位學習的學習成果多以成就測驗的成績及課程滿意度做為評量依據,但國外近來相關研究則認為學習成為應從多元壆度來評量,且師生應用數位學習的方式直接影響到學習成果的高低。This paper analysises the recently approach of assessment E-learning outcome in internal and abroad, and further compare the difference of practical and theory between internal and abroad. The destination of this paper is through rethinking related study about assessment approach of E-learning outcome to realize the advantages to learners. This study discovery in internal, the learning outcome of E-learning almost use the grade of achievement test and satisfaction as indicators, but abroad indicators are use multidimensional indicators, and the approach which instructor and learners implement E-learning direct affect learning outcome.

  3. Perceptions of the use of reflective learning journals in online graduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Malinda E; Brown, Sylvia T

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of graduate nursing students and a small sample of faculty regarding learning outcomes associated with reflective learning journals (RLJ) in online education. Reflective journaling is used extensively in nursing curricula, yet few studies have explored perceptions of learning outcomes with online students, specifically those preparing to become nurse educators.An electronic survey was developed utilizing items associated with four learning outcomes of reflective journaling: professional development, personal growth, empowerment, and facilitation of the learning process. Positive outcomes such as the connection between theory and practice, recognition of strengths and weaknesses, and integration of new ideas and concepts were identified. Obstacles included the amount of time needed for reflection and grading, and the development of trust between students and faculty. The results of this study indicate that graduate students and faculty perceive positive learning outcomes with the use of reflective journals in online education.

  4. Forum: Learning Outcomes in Communication. Upside Down/Side Up: Problematizing Teacher Communication Behaviors and Learning Outcomes in Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannels, Deanna P.; Toale, Mary C.; Backlund, Philip M.; Frederick, John G. M.; Love, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Could teacher communication behaviors generally assumed to be positive ever be detrimental to student realization of particular outcomes? This essay argues for increased scholarly attention to this question. The authors advocate a research agenda that explores the potential "downside" of teacher communication behaviors (TCBs);…

  5. The Association Between Learning Climate and Adverse Obstetrical Outcomes in 16 Nontertiary Obstetrics-Gynecology Departments in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Alina; Ravelli, Anita C J; Stalmeijer, Renée E; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Heineman, Maas Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; van der Post, Joris A M; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the association between learning climate and adverse perinatal and maternal outcomes in obstetrics-gynecology departments. The authors analyzed 23,629 births and 103 learning climate evaluations from 16 nontertiary obstetrics-gynecology departments in the Netherlands in 2013. Multilevel logistic regressions were used to calculate the odds of adverse perinatal and maternal outcomes, by learning climate score tertile, adjusting for maternal and department characteristics. Adverse perinatal outcomes included fetal or early neonatal mortality, five-minute Apgar score Learning climate scores were significantly associated with increased odds of adverse perinatal outcomes (aOR 2.06, 95% CI 1.14-3.72). Compared with the lowest tertile, departments in the middle tertile had 46% greater odds of adverse perinatal outcomes (aOR 1.46, 95% CI 1.09-1.94); departments in the highest tertile had 69% greater odds (aOR 1.69, 95% CI 1.24-2.30). Learning climate was not associated with adverse maternal outcomes (middle vs. lowest tertile: OR 1.04, 95% CI 0.93-1.16; highest vs. lowest tertile: OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.88-1.10). Learning climate was associated with significantly increased odds of adverse perinatal, but not maternal, outcomes. Research in similar clinical contexts is needed to replicate these findings and explore potential mechanisms behind these associations.

  6. Learning Outcomes--A Useful Tool in Quality Assurance? Views from Academic Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamodt, Per Olaf; Frølich, Nicoline; Stensaker, Bjørn

    2018-01-01

    While the establishment of quality assurance has been seen for decades as the most significant instrument to secure and enhance the quality of teaching and learning in higher education, the concept of developing more specific learning outcomes has in recent years attracted much interest, not least due to the creation of national qualification…

  7. The Co-mentoring Project: Overview and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée A. Zucchero, PhD

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The Co-mentoring Project matched developmental psychology students with older adult volunteers for an intergenerational learning experience. Students conducted a biopsychosocial life review to increase understanding of older adult development and the continuity in lifespan development. Each student developed a summary paper containing the older adult’s life history, a developmental analysis, and personal reflection. A project description, including the scholarship of teaching and learning, and an overview of its outcomes are presented. The project goal was accomplished; students positively evaluated learning outcomes and displayed a significant increase in knowledge about older adults and aging. Implications for college instructors are discussed.

  8. The Effects of Positive and Negative Mood on Cognition and Motivation in Multimedia Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Tze Wei; Tan, Su-Mae

    2016-01-01

    The Cognitive-Affective Theory of Learning with Media framework posits that the multimedia learning process is mediated by the learner's mood. Recent studies have shown that positive mood has a facilitating effect on multimedia learning. Though literature has shown that negative mood encourages an individual to engage in a more systematic,…

  9. Hunting and Gathering: New Imperatives in Mapping and Collecting Student Learning Data to Assure Quality Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Romy; Taylor, Tracy; French, Erica; Fallshaw, Eveline; Hall, Cathy; Kinash, Shelley; Summers, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Assurance of learning (AOL) is a quality enhancement and quality assurance process used in higher education. It involves a process of determining programme learning outcomes and standards, and systematically gathering evidence to measure students' performance on these. The systematic assessment of whole-of-programme outcomes provides a basis for…

  10. Comparison and Evaluation of Learning Outcomes from an International Perspective: Development of a Best-Practice Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmgren, Maja; Ho, Felix; Åkesson, Eva; Schmid, Siegbert; Towns, Marcy

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry education focused on learning outcomes is increasingly practiced, providing new opportunities for international comparisons. The interest in intended learning outcomes and constructive alignment has grown in many parts of the world due to both research in higher education and political decisions. In an International Union of Pure and…

  11. Perceptions versus Realities: Exploring Needs and Science Learning Outcomes In the Mississippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, Lacey S.

    The Mississippi Delta (MS Delta) is a high-poverty region in northwestern Mississippi located between the Mississippi and Yazoo rivers. The Delta is home to sixteen rural counties with over seventy failing or underperforming schools. Many of these schools lack the resources necessary to ensure adequate opportunities for all students. Learning outcomes for the state are among the lowest in the nation, and scores in the rural Delta are far below the state average. Graduating seniors take the ACT college entrance exam, with about 10% of Mississippi seniors scoring as "college-ready" in science. The region has a critical shortage of science teachers, and many schools do not offer advanced science courses. This study assessed teachers' needs, identified key characteristics of the secondary science programs in which they teach, and sought to understand conditions affecting science learning outcomes. An inventory of science teachers' needs was administered to teachers in the region. The greatest needs were material resources, high quality training, and strategies for improving poor reading and problem-solving skills of students. Of the factors examined, the percentage of students receiving free lunch had the strongest correlation with science learning outcomes in the school, higher than access to resources, number of science courses offered, and level of self-reported teacher need. A three-tiered approach to improving science learning outcomes has been developed, emphasizing community relationships, targeted professional development, and relevant science curriculum.

  12. Probability estimation with machine learning methods for dichotomous and multicategory outcome: theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruppa, Jochen; Liu, Yufeng; Biau, Gérard; Kohler, Michael; König, Inke R; Malley, James D; Ziegler, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Probability estimation for binary and multicategory outcome using logistic and multinomial logistic regression has a long-standing tradition in biostatistics. However, biases may occur if the model is misspecified. In contrast, outcome probabilities for individuals can be estimated consistently with machine learning approaches, including k-nearest neighbors (k-NN), bagged nearest neighbors (b-NN), random forests (RF), and support vector machines (SVM). Because machine learning methods are rarely used by applied biostatisticians, the primary goal of this paper is to explain the concept of probability estimation with these methods and to summarize recent theoretical findings. Probability estimation in k-NN, b-NN, and RF can be embedded into the class of nonparametric regression learning machines; therefore, we start with the construction of nonparametric regression estimates and review results on consistency and rates of convergence. In SVMs, outcome probabilities for individuals are estimated consistently by repeatedly solving classification problems. For SVMs we review classification problem and then dichotomous probability estimation. Next we extend the algorithms for estimating probabilities using k-NN, b-NN, and RF to multicategory outcomes and discuss approaches for the multicategory probability estimation problem using SVM. In simulation studies for dichotomous and multicategory dependent variables we demonstrate the general validity of the machine learning methods and compare it with logistic regression. However, each method fails in at least one simulation scenario. We conclude with a discussion of the failures and give recommendations for selecting and tuning the methods. Applications to real data and example code are provided in a companion article (doi:10.1002/bimj.201300077). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Developing a blended learning program for nursing and midwifery students in Iran: Process and preliminary outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfaghari, Mitra; Negarandeh, Reza; Eybpoosh, Sana

    2013-01-01

    Background: We aimed to develop and evaluate outcomes of a blended learning (BL) program for educating nursing and midwifery students of Tehran university of medical sciences (Tehran, Iran). Materials and Methods: This was a participatory action research project. After designing BL website, providing technological infrastructures, and holding preparatory workshops, 22 blended courses were designed. BL method was implemented for one semester. Students’ grade point average, participation with courses, and opinion about educational methods, and instructors’ attitude and opinion about educational methods were assessed. Results: Most students (n = 181; 72.1%) and 17 instructors (28.3%) consented to participate in the study. Students’ grade point average and participation was significantly higher in BL rather than in face-to-face method (P students preferred BL method and felt more independent in this method. However, they complained about lack of easy access to Internet and weakness in computer skills. Instructors admired the flexibility and incentives that had been provided in the program. However, some of them complained about the time-consuming nature of BL course design. Conclusion: The program showed positive effect on students’ learning outcomes and participation. The strengths and weaknesses of the program should be considered for development of next phase of the project. Lessons learned in this phase might be helpful for decision makers who tend to develop similar programs in Iran. Motivational and communicational issues and users’ IT skills should be addressed in every BL program. PMID:23983723

  14. Examining Self-Determination in a Service Learning Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque-Bristol, Chantal; Stanek, Layla R.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines students' perceptions of the learning environment in a service learning research course and increases in student motivation and skill development. According to self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985), positive learning environments increase levels of student motivation and learning outcomes. Survey responses…

  15. Machine Learning and Neurosurgical Outcome Prediction: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senders, Joeky T; Staples, Patrick C; Karhade, Aditya V; Zaki, Mark M; Gormley, William B; Broekman, Marike L D; Smith, Timothy R; Arnaout, Omar

    2018-01-01

    Accurate measurement of surgical outcomes is highly desirable to optimize surgical decision-making. An important element of surgical decision making is identification of the patient cohort that will benefit from surgery before the intervention. Machine learning (ML) enables computers to learn from previous data to make accurate predictions on new data. In this systematic review, we evaluate the potential of ML for neurosurgical outcome prediction. A systematic search in the PubMed and Embase databases was performed to identify all potential relevant studies up to January 1, 2017. Thirty studies were identified that evaluated ML algorithms used as prediction models for survival, recurrence, symptom improvement, and adverse events in patients undergoing surgery for epilepsy, brain tumor, spinal lesions, neurovascular disease, movement disorders, traumatic brain injury, and hydrocephalus. Depending on the specific prediction task evaluated and the type of input features included, ML models predicted outcomes after neurosurgery with a median accuracy and area under the receiver operating curve of 94.5% and 0.83, respectively. Compared with logistic regression, ML models performed significantly better and showed a median absolute improvement in accuracy and area under the receiver operating curve of 15% and 0.06, respectively. Some studies also demonstrated a better performance in ML models compared with established prognostic indices and clinical experts. In the research setting, ML has been studied extensively, demonstrating an excellent performance in outcome prediction for a wide range of neurosurgical conditions. However, future studies should investigate how ML can be implemented as a practical tool supporting neurosurgical care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Internship-Related Learning Outcomes and Their Influential Factors: The Case of Vietnamese Tourism and Hospitality Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghia, Tran Le Huu; Duyen, Nguyen Thi My

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of Tourism and Hospitality interns in Vietnam to identify dimensions of internship-related learning outcomes and factors influencing these learning outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 12 in-depth interviews were conducted with 12 interns to identify the dimensions of…

  17. Outcome-Based Education and Student Learning in Managerial Accounting in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Gladie; Shum, Connie

    2012-01-01

    Although Outcome-based Education has not been successful in public education in several countries, it has been successful in the medical fields in higher education in the U.S. The author implemented OBE in her Managerial Accounting course in H.K. Intended learning outcomes were mapped again Bloom's Cognitive Domain. Teaching and learning…

  18. Playing Games: Do Game Consoles Have a Positive Impact on Girls' Learning Outcomes and Motivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitching, Lucy; Wheeler, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Games based learning is currently a hotly debated topic in education and is a fertile field of study (Holmes, 2011; Abrams, 2009). Many schools are exploring ways in which games can be embedded into the curriculum, to enhance learning through deeper engagement and higher levels of motivation (Miller & Robertson, 2010). This paper explores the…

  19. Health Information Technology Continues to Show Positive Effect on Medical Outcomes: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Clemens Scott; Beane, Amanda

    2018-02-05

    Health information technology (HIT) has been introduced into the health care industry since the 1960s when mainframes assisted with financial transactions, but questions remained about HIT's contribution to medical outcomes. Several systematic reviews since the 1990s have focused on this relationship. This review updates the literature. The purpose of this review was to analyze the current literature for the impact of HIT on medical outcomes. We hypothesized that there is a positive association between the adoption of HIT and medical outcomes. We queried the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) by PubMed databases for peer-reviewed publications in the last 5 years that defined an HIT intervention and an effect on medical outcomes in terms of efficiency or effectiveness. We structured the review from the Primary Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA), and we conducted the review in accordance with the Assessment for Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR). We narrowed our search from 3636 papers to 37 for final analysis. At least one improved medical outcome as a result of HIT adoption was identified in 81% (25/37) of research studies that met inclusion criteria, thus strongly supporting our hypothesis. No statistical difference in outcomes was identified as a result of HIT in 19% of included studies. Twelve categories of HIT and three categories of outcomes occurred 38 and 65 times, respectively. A strong majority of the literature shows positive effects of HIT on the effectiveness of medical outcomes, which positively supports efforts that prepare for stage 3 of meaningful use. This aligns with previous reviews in other time frames. ©Clemens Scott Kruse, Amanda Beane. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 05.02.2018.

  20. The Effects of Reciprocal Imitation on Teacher-Student Relationships and Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiangyuan

    2012-01-01

    Neuroscientific and developmental psychological research in imitation has yielded important insights into building teacher-student relationships and enhancing students' learning. This study investigated the effects of reciprocal imitation on teacher-student relationships and students' learning outcomes in one-on-one teacher-student interactions.…

  1. The outcome of infected total knee arthroplasty: culture-positive versus culture-negative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoo; Park, Jang-Won; Kim, Jun-Shik; Kim, Dong-Jin

    2015-10-01

    We studied the outcome in culture-positive and culture-negative infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We retrospectively reviewed 140 patients with culture-positive and 102 patients with culture-negative infected TKAs. We determined the infection control rate and clinical outcome after repeated debridement, and repeated 2-stage TKA in the culture-positive and culture-negative groups. The mean follow-up was 9.3 years (range 5-14 years) in the culture-positive group and 10.6 years (5-22) in the culture-negative group. The overall infection control rate was 56 % in both groups after the first treatment. The overall infection control rate was 90 % in the culture-positive group and 95 % in the culture-negative group. A functional knee was obtained in 90 % in the culture-positive group and 95 % in the culture-negative group. The data suggest that treatment according to the types of infection in both culture-positive and culture-negative groups after TKA controlled infection and maintained functional TKA with a firm level of fixation for most patients. Repeated debridement and repeated two-stage exchange TKA further improved infection control rates after the initial treatment and increased the likelihood of maintaining a functional TKA.

  2. Online Quiz Time Limits and Learning Outcomes in Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Brent; Culp, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the impact of timing limits, the authors compare the learning outcomes of students who completed timed quizzes with students who took untimed quizzes in economics principles courses. Students were assigned two online quizzes--one timed and one untimed--and re-tested on the material the following class day. Our…

  3. Predictors of Positive Outcomes in Offspring of Depressed Parents and Non-depressed Parents Across 20 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdeli, Helen; Wickramaratne, Priya; Warner, Virginia; Mancini, Anthony; Weissman, Myrna

    2014-01-01

    Understanding differences in factors leading to positive outcomes in high-risk and low-risk offspring has important implications for preventive interventions. We identified variables predicting positive outcomes in a cohort of 235 offspring from 76 families in which one, both, or neither parent had major depressive disorder. Positive outcomes were termed resilient in offspring of depressed parents, and competent in offspring of non-depressed parents, and defined by two separate criteria: absence of psychiatric diagnosis and consistently high functioning at 2, 10, and 20 years follow-up. In offspring of depressed parents, easier temperament and higher self-esteem were associated with greater odds of resilient outcome defined by absence of diagnosis. Lower maternal overprotection, greater offspring self-esteem, and higher IQ were associated with greater odds of resilient outcome defined by consistently high functioning. Multivariate analysis indicated that resilient outcome defined by absence of diagnosis was best predicted by offspring self-esteem; resilient outcome defined by functioning was best predicted by maternal overprotection and self-esteem. Among offspring of non-depressed parents, greater family cohesion, easier temperament and higher self-esteem were associated with greater odds of offspring competent outcome defined by absence of diagnosis. Higher maternal affection and greater offspring self-esteem were associated with greater odds of competent outcome, defined by consistently high functioning. Multivariate analysis for each criterion indicated that competent outcome was best predicted by offspring self-esteem. As the most robust predictor of positive outcomes in offspring of depressed and non-depressed parents, self-esteem is an important target for youth preventive interventions. PMID:25374449

  4. Grasping the TLRP Nettle: Preliminary Analysis and Some Enduring Issues Surrounding the Improvement of Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Mary; Brown, Sally

    2005-01-01

    The ESRC Teaching and Learning Research Programme is the largest ever programme of educational research in the UK. This article reports the purposes, processes, outcomes and issues arising from cross-programme thematic work on the conceptualization of, and research into, 'enhancing learning outcomes' which is a key aim of the programme. Early…

  5. The Effect of Family and School Cultural Environment Through Self Efficacy on Student Learning Result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ely Rizky Amaliyah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to explain the relationship between environmental variables out g a, school culture, self-efficacy and student learning outcomes Administrative Program Program at SMK. This research includes quantitative research type with the explanatory descriptive method. The sampling technique was proportionate stratified random sampling, the study sample consisted of 114 students. Data analysis in this research using path analysis. Results research shows that there is a positive and significant influence of family environment on self-efficacy, there is the positive and significant influence of school culture on self-efficacy, there is a direct positive and significant influence between the environment to the family on the results of learning. While the school culture The air does not directly influence the learning outcomes, but the air of self-efficacy ng driving direct effect on learning outcomes, and the family environment is not aired directly influence the outcome through self-efficacy jar arts students, and school culture has an indirect effect on learning outcomes through students' self-efficacy.

  6. Communicating Learning Outcomes and Student Performance through the Student Transcript

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, George; Barnes, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    The university accreditation process now puts more emphasis on self assessment. This change requires universities to identify program objectives, performance indicators, and areas for improvement. Many accrediting institutions are requiring that institutions communicate clearly to constituents: 1) what learning outcomes were achieved by students,…

  7. Teaching pathology via online digital microscopy: positive learning outcomes for rurally based medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivamalai, Sundram; Murthy, Shashidhar Venkatesh; Gupta, Tarun Sen; Woolley, Torres

    2011-02-01

    Technology has revolutionised teaching. Teaching pathology via digital microscopy (DM) is needed to overcome increasing student numbers, a shortage of pathology academics in regional medical schools, and difficulties with teaching students on rural clinical placement. To identify whether an online DM approach, combining digital pathology software, Web-based slides and classroom management software, delivers effective, practical pathology teaching sessions to medical students located both on campus and on rural placement. An online survey collected feedback from fourth and fifth year undergraduate James Cook University medical students on the importance of 16 listed benefits and challenges of using online DM to teach pathology, via a structured five-point Likert survey. Fifty-three students returned the survey (response rate = 33%). Benefits of online DM to teach pathology rated as 'very important' or 'extremely important' by over 50% of students included: higher quality images; faster learning; more convenient; better technology; everyone sees the same image; greater accessibility; helpful annotations on slides; cost savings; and more opportunity for self-paced learning out-of-hours and for collaborative learning in class. Challenges of online DM rated as 'very important' or 'extremely important' by over 50% of students included: Internet availability in more remote locations and potential problems using online technology during class. Nearly all medical students welcomed learning pathology via online digital technology. DM should improve the quantity, quality, cost and accessibility of pathology teaching by regional medical schools, and has significant implications for the growing emphasis in Australia for decentralised medical education and rural clinical placements. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  8. Social Positioning, Participation, and Second Language Learning: Talkative Students in an Academic ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayi-Aydar, Hayriye

    2014-01-01

    Guided by positioning theory and poststructural views of second language learning, the two descriptive case studies presented in this article explored the links between social positioning and the language learning experiences of two talkative students in an academic ESL classroom. Focusing on the macro- and micro-level contexts of communication,…

  9. 76 FR 1440 - Notice of Revised Child Outcomes Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... Outcomes Framework, renamed The Head Start Child Development and Learning Framework: Promoting Positive Outcomes in Early Childhood Programs Serving Children 3-5 Years Old. The Framework was revised to give more... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Notice of Revised...

  10. Active Learning Classrooms and Educational Alliances: Changing Relationships to Improve Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baepler, Paul; Walker, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the "educational alliance" among students and between students and instructors. We contend that this is a framework that can help us understand how active learning classrooms facilitate positive educational outcomes.

  11. The development of interactive multimedia based on auditory, intellectually, repetition in repetition algorithm learning to increase learning outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir; Sutarno, H.; Aisyah, N. S.

    2018-05-01

    This research aims to find out how the development of interactive multimedia based on auditory, intellectually, and repetition can improve student learning outcomes. This interactive multimedia is developed through 5 stages. Analysis stages include the study of literature, questionnaire, interviews and observations. The design phase is done by the database design, flowchart, storyboards and repetition algorithm material while the development phase is done by the creation of web-based framework. Presentation material is adapted to the model of learning such as auditory, intellectually, repetition. Auditory points are obtained by recording the narrative material that presented by a variety of intellectual points. Multimedia as a product is validated by material and media experts. Implementation phase conducted on grade XI-TKJ2 SMKN 1 Garut. Based on index’s gain, an increasing of student learning outcomes in this study is 0.46 which is fair due to interest of student in using interactive multimedia. While the multimedia assessment earned 84.36% which is categorized as very well.

  12. Learning outcomes evaluation of a simulation-based introductory course to anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rábago, J L; López-Doueil, M; Sancho, R; Hernández-Pinto, P; Neira, N; Capa, E; Larraz, E; Redondo-Figuero, C G; Maestre, J M

    2017-10-01

    An increased number of errors and reduced patient safety have been reported during the incorporation of residents, as this period involves learning new skills. The objectives were to evaluate the learning outcomes of an immersive simulation boot-camp for incoming residents before starting the clinical rotations. Airway assessment, airway control with direct laryngoscopy, and epidural catheterization competencies were evaluated. Twelve first-year anaesthesiology residents participated. A prospective study to evaluate transfer of endotracheal intubation skills learned at the simulation centre to clinical practice (primary outcome) was conducted. A checklist of 28 skills and behaviours was used to assess the first supervised intubation performed during anaesthesia induction in ASA I/II patients. Secondary outcome was self-efficacy to perform epidural catheterization. A satisfaction survey was also performed. Seventy-five percent of residents completed more than 21 out of 28 skills and behaviours to assess and control the airway during their first intubation in patients. Twelve items were performed by all residents and 5 by half of them. More than 83% of participants reported a high level of self-efficacy in placing an epidural catheter. All participants would recommend the course to their colleagues. A focused intensive simulation-based boot-camp addressing key competencies required to begin anaesthesia residency was well received, and led to transfer of airway management skills learned to clinical settings when performing for first time on patients, and to increased self-reported efficacy in performing epidural catheterization. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Positioning Learning Design: Learner Experience and the challenges of transforming teaching practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Mark; Griffiths, Dai; Hanslot, Zubair

    2010-01-01

    Johnson, M., Griffiths, D., & Hanslot, Z. (2010). Positioning Learning Design: Learner Experience and the challenges of transforming teaching practice. In D. Griffiths, & R. Koper (Eds.), Rethinking Learning and Employment at a Time of Economic Uncertainty. Proceedings of the 6th TENCompetence Open

  14. Compositions of fuzzy relations applied to veryfication learning outcomes on the example of the major “Geodesy and Cartography”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mreła

    2015-05-01

        Abstract The paper presents discussion about using mathematical functions in order to help academic teachers to verify acquirement of learning outcomes by students on the example of the major “geodesy and cartography”. It is relatively easy to build fuzzy relation describing levels of realization and validation learning outcomes during subject examinations and the fuzzy relation with students’ grades is already built by teachers, the problem is to combine these two relations to get one which describes the level of acquiring learning outcomes by students. There are two main requirements facing this combinations and the paper shows that the best combination according to these requirements is algebraic composition.   Keywords: learning outcome, fuzzy relation, algebraic composition.

  15. Mobile Learning and Indigenous Education in Canada: A Synthesis of New Ways of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulla, Siomonn

    2017-01-01

    M-Learning holds great potential for supporting the positive educational outcomes of underserved Indigenous communities in the Canadian North, and even in urban centers, that are at risk of exclusion from affordable, high-quality learning experiences. The technical advantages of having mobile technology to deliver educational curricula and assess…

  16. Learning from authoritarian teachers: Controlling the situation or controlling yourself can sustain motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Everhart Chaffee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive psychology encompasses the study of positive outcomes, optimal functioning, and resilience in difficult circumstances. In the context of language learning, positive outcomes include academic engagement, self-determined motivation, persistence in language learning, and eventually becoming a proficient user of the language. These questionnaire studies extend previous research by addressing how these positive outcomes can be achieved even in adverse circumstances. In Study 1, the primary and secondary control scales of interest were validated using 2468 students at a Canadian university. Study 2 examined the capacity of 100 Canadian language learners to adjust themselves to fit in with their environment, termed secondary control, and how it was related to their motivation for and engagement in language learning and their feelings of anxiety speaking in the classroom. Secondary control in the form of adjusting one’s attitude towards language learning challenges through positive reappraisals was positively associated with self-determined motivation, need satisfaction, and engagement. analyses, positive reappraisals were also found to buffer the negative effects of having a controlling instructor on students’ engagement and anxiety. These findings suggest that personal characteristics interact with the learning environment to allow students to function optimally in their language courses even when the teacher is controlling.

  17. Positive interaction of social comparison and personal responsibility for outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygolec, Jaroslaw; Coricelli, Giorgio; Rustichini, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    We formulate and test a model that allows sharp separation between two different ways in which environment affects evaluation of outcomes, by comparing social vs. private and personal responsibility vs. chance. In the experiment, subjects chose between two lotteries, one low-risk and one high-risk. They could then observe the outcomes. By varying the environment between private (they could observe the outcome of the chosen lottery and the outcome of the lottery they had not chosen) and social (they could observe the outcome of the lottery chosen by another subject) we can differentiate the response and brain activity following the feedback in social and private settings. The evidence suggests that envy and pride are significant motives driving decisions and outcomes evaluation, stronger than private emotions like regret and rejoice, with ventral striatum playing a key role. When we focus on the outcome evaluation stage we demonstrate that BOLD signal in ventral striatum is increasing in the difference between obtained and counterfactual payoffs. For a given difference in payoffs, striatal responses are more pronounced in social than in private environment. Moreover, a positive interaction (complementarity) between social comparison and personal responsibility is reflected in the pattern of activity in the ventral striatum. At decision stage we observe getting ahead of the Joneses effect in ventral striatum with subjective value of risk larger in social than in private environment.

  18. Analysis of Traditional versus Three-Dimensional Augmented Curriculum on Anatomical Learning Outcome Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Diana Coomes; Mlynarczyk, Gregory S.A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether student learning outcome measures are influenced by the addition of three-dimensional and digital teaching tools to a traditional dissection and lecture learning format curricula. The study was performed in a semester long graduate level course that incorporated both gross anatomy and neuroanatomy curricula. Methods…

  19. Vicarious reinforcement learning signals when instructing others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, Matthew A J; Lesage, Elise; Ramnani, Narender

    2015-02-18

    Reinforcement learning (RL) theory posits that learning is driven by discrepancies between the predicted and actual outcomes of actions (prediction errors [PEs]). In social environments, learning is often guided by similar RL mechanisms. For example, teachers monitor the actions of students and provide feedback to them. This feedback evokes PEs in students that guide their learning. We report the first study that investigates the neural mechanisms that underpin RL signals in the brain of a teacher. Neurons in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) signal PEs when learning from the outcomes of one's own actions but also signal information when outcomes are received by others. Does a teacher's ACC signal PEs when monitoring a student's learning? Using fMRI, we studied brain activity in human subjects (teachers) as they taught a confederate (student) action-outcome associations by providing positive or negative feedback. We examined activity time-locked to the students' responses, when teachers infer student predictions and know actual outcomes. We fitted a RL-based computational model to the behavior of the student to characterize their learning, and examined whether a teacher's ACC signals when a student's predictions are wrong. In line with our hypothesis, activity in the teacher's ACC covaried with the PE values in the model. Additionally, activity in the teacher's insula and ventromedial prefrontal cortex covaried with the predicted value according to the student. Our findings highlight that the ACC signals PEs vicariously for others' erroneous predictions, when monitoring and instructing their learning. These results suggest that RL mechanisms, processed vicariously, may underpin and facilitate teaching behaviors. Copyright © 2015 Apps et al.

  20. Student Buy-In to Active Learning in a College Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Andrew J.; Aragón, Oriana R.; Chen, Xinnian; Couch, Brian; Durham, Mary; Bobrownicki, Aiyana; Hanauer, David I.; Graham, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of introducing active learning in college science courses are well established, yet more needs to be understood about student buy-in to active learning and how that process of buy-in might relate to student outcomes. We test the exposure–persuasion–identification–commitment (EPIC) process model of buy-in, here applied to student (n = 245) engagement in an undergraduate science course featuring active learning. Student buy-in to active learning was positively associated with engagement in self-regulated learning and students’ course performance. The positive associations among buy-in, self-regulated learning, and course performance suggest buy-in as a potentially important factor leading to student engagement and other student outcomes. These findings are particularly salient in course contexts featuring active learning, which encourage active student participation in the learning process. PMID:27909026

  1. A personal connection: Promoting positive attitudes towards teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Heidi L; DiCarlo, Stephen E

    2017-09-01

    Students' attitudes towards teaching and learning must be addressed with the same seriousness and effort as we address content. Establishing a personal connection and addressing our students' basic psychological needs will produce positive attitudes towards teaching and learning and develop life-long learners. It will also promote constructive student-teacher relationships that have a profound influence on our students' approach towards school. To begin this process, consider the major tenets of the Self-Determination Theory. The Self-Determination Theory of human motivation focuses on our students' innate psychological needs and the degree to which an individual's behavior is self-motivated and self-determined. Faculty can satisfy the innate psychological needs by addressing our students' desire for relatedness, competence and autonomy. Relatedness refers to our students' need to feel connected to others, to be a member of a group, to have a sense of communion and to develop close relationships with others. Competence is believing our students can succeed , challenging them to do so and imparting that belief in them. Autonomy involves considering the perspectives of the student and providing relevant information and opportunities for student choice and initiating and regulating their own behaviors. Establishing a personal connection and addressing our students' basic psychological needs will improve our teaching, inspire and engage our students and promote positive attitudes towards teaching and learning while reducing competition and increasing compassion. These are important goals because unless students are inspired and motivated and have positive attitudes towards teaching and learning our efforts will fail to meet their full potential. Anat Sci Educ 10: 503-507. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  2. Writing Learning Outcomes for English Language Lessons in Multilingual Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sally Ann

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a pedagogic innovation in teacher education by articulating a method for writing learning outcomes for English language lessons in multilingual school contexts. The argument for this approach is founded on curriculum studies; however, the practice also draws specifically on applied psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic…

  3. The Effectiveness of CASAs in Achieving Positive Outcomes for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzelfelner, Pat

    2000-01-01

    Evaluated effectiveness of court-appointed special advocates (CASAs) in achieving positive outcomes for children in the child welfare system, using data from court and CASA program files on 200 children. Found that CASAs may have reduced the number of placements and court continuances children experienced. More services were provided to children…

  4. IMPROVING LEARNING PROCESS AND STUDENT RESULTS LEARNING TO TUNE-UPMOTORCYCLE USING DEMONSTRATION METHODOF CLASS XI SMA N 1 PLAYEN YEAR STUDY2013/2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haryono Haryono

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This research is to improve the learning process and results in learning a tune-up motorcycle  using the demonstrationmethod of class XI SMA 1 Playen.              This research is a classroom action research (PTK, using the demonstration method.Subyek this study were students of class XI SMA Negeri 1 Playen.Theimplementationofthisstudyusing3cycles,there is a (planning, implementation (actuating, observation (observing, and reflection (reflecting. Collecting data in this study are observations of student learning process and student learning outcomes test data pre-test, postesI, II, III and documentation as a support to the two data. Further observation data based on the observation of student learning just learning the positive process of learning student and test data were analyzed for comparison. Indicators of success in this classroom action research that student learning increases towards positive along with the use of methods of demonstration, is to see an increase from the pre-cycle to end the first cycle, the first cycle to the second cycle and the secondcyclebycycle III.             From the results of this study concluded that the method could improve the demonstration of positive student learning, from the first cycle of 30%, 50% second cycle and third cycle of 80%. Learning is also more effective with students indicated more quickly adapt as a positive activity, especially in terms of increased student asked, noting the test and work on the problems. Demonstration method can improve the learning outcomes  students of class XI SMA 1 Playen as evidenced by an increase in the average yield final test first cycle of 64.09; second cycle of 77.82 and 78.86 for the third cycle. So it proved with the increasing positive student learning canalso improve student learning outcomes.

  5. International Exchanges as a Learning Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austring, Bennye Düranc; Schlüntz, Ditte Annette

    The project focused on the learning outcome of three one-week camps in Latvia, Denmark and Poland, where about 40 8th grade students each place were working with art based activities like dance, song writing, DJ'ing and circus. Especially these six objectives were measured on: Foreign language sp...... speaking, Knowledge about other countries, Understanding od democracy and human rights, Personal development, Art-based learning benefits and Inclusion and motivation of young people. The positive development of 'knowledge of other countries' was the most eye-catching learning outcome....

  6. Improve Outcomes Study subjects Chemistry Teaching and Learning Strategies through independent study with the help of computer-based media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiharti, Gulmah

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to see the improvement of student learning outcomes by independent learning using computer-based learning media in the course of STBM (Teaching and Learning Strategy) Chemistry. Population in this research all student of class of 2014 which take subject STBM Chemistry as many as 4 class. While the sample is taken by purposive as many as 2 classes, each 32 students, as control class and expriment class. The instrument used is the test of learning outcomes in the form of multiple choice with the number of questions as many as 20 questions that have been declared valid, and reliable. Data analysis techniques used one-sided t test and improved learning outcomes using a normalized gain test. Based on the learning result data, the average of normalized gain values for the experimental class is 0,530 and for the control class is 0,224. The result of the experimental student learning result is 53% and the control class is 22,4%. Hypothesis testing results obtained t count> ttable is 9.02> 1.6723 at the level of significance α = 0.05 and db = 58. This means that the acceptance of Ha is the use of computer-based learning media (CAI Computer) can improve student learning outcomes in the course Learning Teaching Strategy (STBM) Chemistry academic year 2017/2018.

  7. Interpreting Students’ Perceptions in Fluid Mechanics Learning Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena SOARES

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to analyse the impact of introducing a practical work in the learning process of the Fluid Transport Systems course in Chemical Engineering degree. The students, in groups of two or three elements, were free to choose the application case in order to develop the practical work proposed by the responsible teachers. The students selected a centrifugal pump to supply water to houses or buildings and designed the piping system. The practical work was evaluated through the written report. The students’ perceptions were analysed through a questionnaire. The learning outcomes were also considered in order to understand how the fluid mechanics concepts were acquired. In the teachers’ point of view the teamwork should enable the development of students’ soft skills and competencies, promoting the ability to integrate and work in teams. The students changed their learning processing and perception becoming more reflective and less accommodative, forcing them to think critically and share opinions. Regarding the Fluid Mechanics assessment, the practical work increased, in average, the final grade at least one value.

  8. Inhibition of vicariously learned fear in children using positive modeling and prior exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askew, Chris; Reynolds, Gemma; Fielding-Smith, Sarah; Field, Andy P

    2016-02-01

    One of the challenges to conditioning models of fear acquisition is to explain how different individuals can experience similar learning events and only some of them subsequently develop fear. Understanding factors moderating the impact of learning events on fear acquisition is key to understanding the etiology and prevention of fear in childhood. This study investigates these moderators in the context of vicarious (observational) learning. Two experiments tested predictions that the acquisition or inhibition of fear via vicarious learning is driven by associative learning mechanisms similar to direct conditioning. In Experiment 1, 3 groups of children aged 7 to 9 years received 1 of 3 inhibitive information interventions-psychoeducation, factual information, or no information (control)-prior to taking part in a vicarious fear learning procedure. In Experiment 2, 3 groups of children aged 7 to 10 years received 1 of 3 observational learning interventions-positive modeling (immunization), observational familiarity (latent inhibition), or no prevention (control)-before vicarious fear learning. Results indicated that observationally delivered manipulations inhibited vicarious fear learning, while preventions presented via written information did not. These findings confirm that vicarious learning shares some of the characteristics of direct conditioning and can explain why not all individuals will develop fear following a vicarious learning event. They also suggest that the modality of inhibitive learning is important and should match the fear learning pathway for increased chances of inhibition. Finally, the results demonstrate that positive modeling is likely to be a particularly effective method for preventing fear-related observational learning in children. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Linking Individual Learning Styles to Approach-Avoidance Motivational Traits and Computational Aspects of Reinforcement Learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Carl Aberg

    Full Text Available Learning how to gain rewards (approach learning and avoid punishments (avoidance learning is fundamental for everyday life. While individual differences in approach and avoidance learning styles have been related to genetics and aging, the contribution of personality factors, such as traits, remains undetermined. Moreover, little is known about the computational mechanisms mediating differences in learning styles. Here, we used a probabilistic selection task with positive and negative feedbacks, in combination with computational modelling, to show that individuals displaying better approach (vs. avoidance learning scored higher on measures of approach (vs. avoidance trait motivation, but, paradoxically, also displayed reduced learning speed following positive (vs. negative outcomes. These data suggest that learning different types of information depend on associated reward values and internal motivational drives, possibly determined by personality traits.

  10. Linking Individual Learning Styles to Approach-Avoidance Motivational Traits and Computational Aspects of Reinforcement Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl Aberg, Kristoffer; Doell, Kimberly C.; Schwartz, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Learning how to gain rewards (approach learning) and avoid punishments (avoidance learning) is fundamental for everyday life. While individual differences in approach and avoidance learning styles have been related to genetics and aging, the contribution of personality factors, such as traits, remains undetermined. Moreover, little is known about the computational mechanisms mediating differences in learning styles. Here, we used a probabilistic selection task with positive and negative feedbacks, in combination with computational modelling, to show that individuals displaying better approach (vs. avoidance) learning scored higher on measures of approach (vs. avoidance) trait motivation, but, paradoxically, also displayed reduced learning speed following positive (vs. negative) outcomes. These data suggest that learning different types of information depend on associated reward values and internal motivational drives, possibly determined by personality traits. PMID:27851807

  11. Outcome in clients with positive pregnancy test following IVF/ICSI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A retrospective analysis of the outcome of all patients who have recorded a positive pregnancy test following IVF/ICSI treatment from June 1999 to December 2002 was done. Materials and Methods: A total of 1256 treatment cycles were carried out using the long day 1 (early follicular phase) or day 21 ...

  12. Perinatal Outcomes in HIV Positive Pregnant Women with Concomitant Sexually Transmitted Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Burnett

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate whether HIV infected pregnant women with concomitant sexually transmitted infection (STIs are at increased risk of adverse perinatal and neonatal outcomes. Methods. We conducted a cohort study of HIV positive women who delivered at an inner-city hospital in Atlanta, Georgia, from 2003 to 2013. Demographics, presence of concomitant STIs, prenatal care information, and maternal and neonatal outcomes were collected. The outcomes examined were the association of the presence of concomitant STIs on the risk of preterm birth (PTB, postpartum hemorrhage, chorioamnionitis, preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, small for gestational age, low Apgar scores, and neonatal intensive care admission. Multiple logistic regression was performed to adjust for potential confounders. Results. HIV positive pregnant women with concomitant STIs had an increased risk of spontaneous PTB (odds ratio (OR 2.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12–3.97. After adjusting for a history of preterm birth, maternal age, and low CD4+ count at prenatal care entry the association between concomitant STIs and spontaneous PTB persisted (adjusted OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.01–3.78. Conclusions. HIV infected pregnant women with concomitant STIs relative to HIV positive pregnant women without a concomitant STI are at increased risk of spontaneous PTB.

  13. Improving Learner Outcomes in Lifelong Education: Formal Pedagogies in Non-Formal Learning Contexts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepke, Nick; Leach, Linda

    2006-01-01

    This article explores how far research findings about successful pedagogies in formal post-school education might be used in non-formal learning contexts--settings where learning may not lead to formal qualifications. It does this by examining a learner outcomes model adapted from a synthesis of research into retention. The article first…

  14. Playful Learning Culture in the Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchetti, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    not undergone much investigation. This study was conducted in cooperation with two historical museums, these being the Transport Museum in Coventry, England and The Viking Museum in Ribe, Denmark. A new learning platform called MicroCulture has been created, aimed at eliciting a sociocultural understanding......Museum learning culture is going through a paradigmatic change. Two main positions are dominant: the modernist, emphasizing the need for assessment and uniform learning outcomes, and the postmodern, encouraging dialogue and multiple learning outcomes. A critical factor is the potential contribution...... of history in young visitors. This study indicates that museum learning culture could be enriched by the introduction of mediated play as a resource for conceptual thinking and social interaction....

  15. Effectively identifying compound-protein interactions by learning from positive and unlabeled examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhanzhan; Zhou, Shuigeng; Wang, Yang; Liu, Hui; Guan, Jihong; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2016-05-18

    Prediction of compound-protein interactions (CPIs) is to find new compound-protein pairs where a protein is targeted by at least a compound, which is a crucial step in new drug design. Currently, a number of machine learning based methods have been developed to predict new CPIs in the literature. However, as there is not yet any publicly available set of validated negative CPIs, most existing machine learning based approaches use the unknown interactions (not validated CPIs) selected randomly as the negative examples to train classifiers for predicting new CPIs. Obviously, this is not quite reasonable and unavoidably impacts the CPI prediction performance. In this paper, we simply take the unknown CPIs as unlabeled examples, and propose a new method called PUCPI (the abbreviation of PU learning for Compound-Protein Interaction identification) that employs biased-SVM (Support Vector Machine) to predict CPIs using only positive and unlabeled examples. PU learning is a class of learning methods that leans from positive and unlabeled (PU) samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that identifies CPIs using only positive and unlabeled examples. We first collect known CPIs as positive examples and then randomly select compound-protein pairs not in the positive set as unlabeled examples. For each CPI/compound-protein pair, we extract protein domains as protein features and compound substructures as chemical features, then take the tensor product of the corresponding compound features and protein features as the feature vector of the CPI/compound-protein pair. After that, biased-SVM is employed to train classifiers on different datasets of CPIs and compound-protein pairs. Experiments over various datasets show that our method outperforms six typical classifiers, including random forest, L1- and L2-regularized logistic regression, naive Bayes, SVM and k-nearest neighbor (kNN), and three types of existing CPI prediction models. Source code, datasets and

  16. Developing a Learning Outcome-Based Question Examination Paper Tool for Universiti Putra Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sa'adah; Admodisastro, Novia Indriaty; Kamaruddin, Azrina; Baharom, Salmi; Pa, Noraini Che

    2016-01-01

    Much attention is now given on producing quality graduates. Therefore, outcome-based education (OBE) in teaching and learning is now being implemented in Malaysia at all levels of education especially at higher education institutions. For implementing OBE, the design of curriculum and courses should be based on specified outcomes. Thus, the…

  17. Exploring the relation between online case-based discussions and learning outcomes in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, Sebastiaan; Vervaeke, Stijn; Cosyn, Jan; De Bruyn, Hugo

    2014-11-01

    Online case-based discussions, parallel to theoretical dental education, have been highly valued by students and supervisors. This study investigated the relation between variables of online group discussions and learning outcomes. At Ghent University in Belgium, undergraduate dental students (years two and three) are required to participate in online case-based discussion groups (five students/group) in conjunction with two theoretical courses on basic periodontics and related therapy. Each week, a patient case is discussed under supervision of a periodontist, who authored the case and performed the treatment. Each case includes treatment history and demand, intra- and extraoral images, and full diagnostic information with periodontal and radiographic status. For this retrospective study, data were obtained for all 252 students in forty-three discussion groups between 2009 and 2012. Spearman's rank correlations were calculated to investigate the relation among group dynamics (number of group posts and views), individual student contributions (number of individual posts, newly introduced elements, questions, and reactions to other posts), supervisors' interventions (number of posts and posed questions), and learning outcomes (examination result). The results showed that learning outcomes were significantly related to the number of student posts (Spearman's rho (ρ)=0.19), newly introduced elements (ρ=0.21), reactions to other posts (ρ=0.14), number of supervisors' interventions (ρ=0.12), and supervisors' questions (ρ=0.20). These results suggest that individual student contributions during online case-based discussions and the provided supervision were related to learning outcomes.

  18. Support Vector Hazards Machine: A Counting Process Framework for Learning Risk Scores for Censored Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanjia; Chen, Tianle; Zeng, Donglin

    2016-01-01

    Learning risk scores to predict dichotomous or continuous outcomes using machine learning approaches has been studied extensively. However, how to learn risk scores for time-to-event outcomes subject to right censoring has received little attention until recently. Existing approaches rely on inverse probability weighting or rank-based regression, which may be inefficient. In this paper, we develop a new support vector hazards machine (SVHM) approach to predict censored outcomes. Our method is based on predicting the counting process associated with the time-to-event outcomes among subjects at risk via a series of support vector machines. Introducing counting processes to represent time-to-event data leads to a connection between support vector machines in supervised learning and hazards regression in standard survival analysis. To account for different at risk populations at observed event times, a time-varying offset is used in estimating risk scores. The resulting optimization is a convex quadratic programming problem that can easily incorporate non-linearity using kernel trick. We demonstrate an interesting link from the profiled empirical risk function of SVHM to the Cox partial likelihood. We then formally show that SVHM is optimal in discriminating covariate-specific hazard function from population average hazard function, and establish the consistency and learning rate of the predicted risk using the estimated risk scores. Simulation studies show improved prediction accuracy of the event times using SVHM compared to existing machine learning methods and standard conventional approaches. Finally, we analyze two real world biomedical study data where we use clinical markers and neuroimaging biomarkers to predict age-at-onset of a disease, and demonstrate superiority of SVHM in distinguishing high risk versus low risk subjects.

  19. Development of a Mechanical Engineering Test Item Bank to promote learning outcomes-based education in Japanese and Indonesian higher education institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S. Cross

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Following on the 2008-2012 OECD Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes (AHELO feasibility study of civil engineering, in Japan a mechanical engineering learning outcomes assessment working group was established within the National Institute of Education Research (NIER, which became the Tuning National Center for Japan. The purpose of the project is to develop among engineering faculty members, common understandings of engineering learning outcomes, through the collaborative process of test item development, scoring, and sharing of results. By substantiating abstract level learning outcomes into concrete level learning outcomes that are attainable and assessable, and through measuring and comparing the students’ achievement of learning outcomes, it is anticipated that faculty members will be able to draw practical implications for educational improvement at the program and course levels. The development of a mechanical engineering test item bank began with test item development workshops, which led to a series of trial tests, and then to a large scale test implementation in 2016 of 348 first semester master’s students in 9 institutions in Japan, using both multiple choice questions designed to measure the mastery of basic and engineering sciences, and a constructive response task designed to measure “how well students can think like an engineer.” The same set of test items were translated from Japanese into to English and Indonesian, and used to measure achievement of learning outcomes at Indonesia’s Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB on 37 rising fourth year undergraduate students. This paper highlights how learning outcomes assessment can effectively facilitate learning outcomes-based education, by documenting the experience of Japanese and Indonesian mechanical engineering faculty members engaged in the NIER Test Item Bank project.First published online: 30 November 2017

  20. Learning to Learn: towards a Relational and Transformational Model of Learning for Improved Integrated Care Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Diamond

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Health and social care systems are implementing fundamental changes to organizational structures and work practices in an effort to achieve integrated care. While some integration initiatives have produced positive outcomes, many have not. We reframe the concept of integration as a learning process fueled by knowledge exchange across diverse professional and organizational communities. We thus focus on the cognitive and social dynamics of learning in complex adaptive systems, and on learning behaviours and conditions that foster collective learning and improved collaboration. We suggest that the capacity to learn how to learn shapes the extent to which diverse professional groups effectively exchange knowledge and self-organize for integrated care delivery.

  1. Differences between the IPA Learning Outcomes Learning Module Part with Conventional Learning Class IV in SDN Jodipan Malang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helda Kusuma Wardani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Perbedaan Hasil Pembelajaran IPA antara Pembelajaran Modul Bagian dengan Pembelajaran Konvensional Kelas IV SD Abstract: The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of learning science a significant difference between the learning modules with conventional learning class section IV in SDN Jodipan Malang and describe the realization of the effectiveness and appeal of learning on learning module and conventional learning section. This quasi-experimental research design was used pre- and post-test design or nonequivalent control group. Testing the hypothesis used t test using SPSS. Conclusions from the results of hypothesis testing is no significant difference between the effectiveness of learning modules with conventional learning section on the topic of the relationship between structure and function of plant roots after the implementation of learning. Minimal realization completeness criteria (KKM classroom learning module parts is very high. Scores posttes conventional learning classes showed no achievement of KKM. Realization appeal the high part of the learning modules according to the whole class learning module sample parts, and the appeal of high-graded conventional learning. KKM realization is directly proportional to the realization of part of the appeal of the learning module. Key Words: learning outcomes, the learning module parts, conventional learning Abstrak: Tujuan penelitian ini adalah menguji perbedaan signifikan keefektifan pembelajaran IPA antara pembelajaran modul bagian dengan pembelajaran konvensional kelas IV di SDN Jodipan Kota Malang dan mendeskripsikan realisasi keefektifan serta daya tarik pembelajaran pada pembelajaran modul bagian maupun pembelajaran konvensional. Penelitian eksperimen kuasi ini menggunakan rancangan pre- and post-test design atau nonequivalent control group design. Pengujian hipotesis digunakan uji t menggunakan SPSS. Simpulan dari hasil uji hipotesis adalah ada perbedaan signifikan antara

  2. Inculcating Positive Thinking in the Self-Concept of Children with Learning Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Mohaned Ghazi

    2017-01-01

    Inculcating positive thinking can act as a valuable tool in enhancing the overall self-concept of children with learning disabilities. The value of positive psychology is recognized as the basis for recent research conducted in the field of strength development. Positive psychology is centered on the view that individual lives can be improved by…

  3. Investigating Students' Perceptions of Graduate Learning Outcomes in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Deborah; Varsavsky, Cristina; Belward, Shaun; Matthews, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the perceptions mathematics students have of the knowledge and skills they develop throughout their programme of study. It addresses current concerns about the employability of mathematics graduates by contributing much needed insight into how degree programmes are developing broader learning outcomes for…

  4. Systemic assessment framework of a learning organization's competitive positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissam EL Hachem

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to devise an innovative feasible, replicable and comprehensive assessment framework of a learning organization's competitive positioning. Design/methodology/approach: The three characteristics listed above are approached as follows. Feasible refers to being easy and not in need of much resources (time, personnel,.... This is done through early elimination of non-important variables. Replicable is having a well structured methodology based on scientific proven methods. Following this methodology would result in good results that can be explained if needed and replicated if deemed necessary. Comprehensive translates into a holistic set of indices that measure performance as well as organizational learning. Findings and Originality/value: The three attributes (feasible, replicable and comprehensive have become crucial for ensuring any kind of added value for such a methodology that hopes to tackle the modern dynamic business environment and gaining a sustainable competitive advantage. Research limitations/implications: Such a methodology would require several full contextual applications to be able to set its final design. It entails thorough internal revision of a company's structure. Therefore a great deal of transparency and self-transcendence from the individual involved is a pre-requisite for any chance of success. Originality/value: It offers a systematic way to assess a company's performance/competitive positioning while accounting for the crucial attribute of organizational learning in its makeup.

  5. Transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus: Evaluating the effect of the learning curve on the outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhar Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : Initial experience with transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA using detachable coils and Amplatzer duct occluder devices is reported. We evaluated the outcome, complications, and influence of the learning curve, and also assessed the need of surgical backup for such interventional procedures. Methods: From January 2000 to December 2004, 121 patients underwent transcatheter closure of PDA. Aortic angiogram was performed to evaluate the size, position, and shape of the duct for appropriately choosing the occluder device type and size. A second aortic angiogram was performed 10 minutes after device deployment. Echocardiography was repeated at intervals of 24 hours, then at 1, 3, and 6 months after the procedure to assess complications. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to assess the role of experience in improving the outcome of the procedure. Results: Of 121 cases, four patients had pulmonary artery embolization of the occluder device which was successfully retrieved in the catheterization laboratory, while two others had embolization that required surgical intervention. Four patients had temporary residual leak, nine had protrusion of the device into the aorta without significant Doppler pressure gradient or hemolysis on follow-up, and five had partial hemodynamically insignificant obstruction to the left pulmonary artery. Statistical analysis showed that the effect of the learning curve and experience was responsible for 93% improvement in the procedural outcome over the five-year study period. Conclusion: Transcatheter occlusion of PDA is safe and effective alternative to surgery. Complications occurred in those with unfavorable duct anatomy and with the use of multiple coils. Surgical backup was important for such interventional procedures. Experience played a major role in the proper choice of device type and size which greatly influenced the outcome of the procedure.

  6. Does a positive pretransplant crossmatch affect long-term outcome in liver transplantation?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Al-Sibae, Mohamad R

    2012-02-01

    Despite the historical success of liver transplantation in the face of a positive lymphocytic crossmatch, increased incidence of acute cellular rejection and graft loss have been reported in this setting. Given the potential adverse effects of antirejection treatment, especially in hepatitis C virus-positive recipients, identification of predisposing factors could allow for better surveillance, avoidance of rejection, and potentially better graft outcomes.

  7. Pregnancy outcomes in HIV-positive women: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab, Kholoud; Spence, Andrea R; Czuzoj-Shulman, Nicholas; Abenhaim, Haim A

    2017-03-01

    In the United States, an estimated 8500 HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) positive women gave birth in 2014. This rate appears to be increasing annually. Our objective is to examine obstetrical outcomes of pregnancy among HIV-positive women. A population-based cohort study was conducted using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database (2003-2011) from the United States. Pregnant HIV-positive women were identified and compared to pregnant women without HIV. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the adjusted effect of HIV status on obstetrical and neonatal outcomes. Among 7,772,999 births over the study period, 1997 were in HIV-positive women (an incidence of 25.7/100,000 births). HIV-infected patients had greater frequency of pre-existing diabetes and chronic hypertension, and use of cigarettes, drugs, and alcohol during pregnancy (p HIV-infected women had greater likelihood of antenatal complications: preterm premature rupture of membranes (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.14-1.60) and urinary tract infections (OR 3.02, 95% CI 2.40-3.81). Delivery and postpartum complications were also increased among HIV-infected women: cesarean delivery (OR 3.06, 95% CI 2.79-3.36), postpartum sepsis (OR 8.05, 95% CI 5.44-11.90), venous thromboembolism (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.46-3.33), blood transfusions (OR 3.67, 95% CI 3.01-4.49), postpartum infection (OR 3.00, 95% CI 2.37-3.80), and maternal mortality (OR 21.52, 95% CI 12.96-35.72). Neonates born to these mothers were at higher risk of prematurity and intrauterine growth restriction. Pregnancy in HIV-infected women is associated with adverse maternal and newborn complications. Pregnant HIV-positive women should be followed in high-risk healthcare centers.

  8. Predicting Positive Education Outcomes for Emerging Adults in Mental Health Systems of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Eileen M; Nygren, Peggy; Stephens, Robert L; Croskey, Adrienne

    2016-10-01

    Emerging adults who receive services based on positive youth development models have shown an ability to shape their own life course to achieve positive goals. This paper reports secondary data analysis from the Longitudinal Child and Family Outcome Study including 248 culturally diverse youth ages 17 through 22 receiving mental health services in systems of care. After 12 months of services, school performance was positively related to youth ratings of school functioning and service participation and satisfaction. Regression analysis revealed ratings of young peoples' perceptions of school functioning, and their experience in services added to the significant prediction of satisfactory school performance, even controlling for sex and attendance. Finally, in addition to expected predictors, participation in planning their own services significantly predicted enrollment in higher education for those who finished high school. Findings suggest that programs and practices based on positive youth development approaches can improve educational outcomes for emerging adults.

  9. Assessing students' learning outcomes, self-efficacy and attitudes toward the integration of virtual science laboratory in general physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatty, Sundara L.

    Over the past decade, there has been a dramatic rise in online delivery of higher education in the United States. Recent developments in web technology and access to the internet have led to a vast increase in online courses. For people who work during the day and whose complicated lives prevent them from taking courses on campus, online courses are the only alternatives by which they may achieve their goals in education. The laboratory courses are the major requirements for college and university students who want to pursue degree and certification programs in science. It is noted that there is a lack of laboratory courses in online physics courses. The present study addressed the effectiveness of a virtual science laboratory in physics instruction in terms of learning outcomes, attitudes, and self-efficacy of students in a Historically Black University College. The study included fifty-eight students (36 male and 22 female) of different science majors who were enrolled in a general physics laboratory course. They were divided into virtual and traditional groups. Three experiments were selected from the syllabus. The traditional group performed one experiment in a traditional laboratory, while the virtual group performed the same experiment in a virtual laboratory. For the second experiment, the use of laboratories by both groups was exchanged. Learner's Assessment Test (LAT), Attitudes Toward Physics Laboratories (ATPL), and Self-Efficacy Survey (SES) instruments were used. Additionally, quantitative methods such as an independent t-test, a paired t-test, and correlation statistics were used to analyze the data. The results of the first experiment indicated the learning outcomes were higher in the Virtual Laboratory than in the traditional laboratory, whereas there was no significant difference in learning outcomes with either type of lab instruction. However, significant self-efficacy gains were observed. Students expressed positive attitudes in terms of liking

  10. Effect of audience response system technology on learning outcomes in health students and professionals: an updated systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlantis, Evan; Cheema, Birinder S

    2015-03-01

    : Audience response system (ARS) technology is a recent innovation that is increasingly being used by health educators to improve learning outcomes. Equivocal results from previous systematic review research provide weak support for the use of ARS for improving learning outcomes at both short and long terms. This review sought to update and critically review the body of controlled experimental evidence on the use of ARS technology on learning outcomes in health students and professionals. This review searched using all identified keywords both electronic databases (CINAHL, Embase, ERIC, Medline, Science Direct, Scopus, and Web of Science) and reference lists of retrieved articles to find relevant published studies for review, from 2010 to April 2014. A descriptive synthesis of important study characteristics and effect estimates for learning outcomes was done. Three controlled trials in 321 participants from the United States were included for review. ARS knowledge retention scores were lower than the control group in one study, higher than control group provided that immediate feedback was given about each question in one study, and equivalent between intervention and control groups in another study. There is an absence of good quality evidence on effectiveness of ARS technologies for improving learning outcomes in health students and professionals.

  11. Exploring Sex and Status Differences in Perceptions, Acceptance, and Outcomes in E- Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The integration of electronic technologies in teaching and learning has been a top priority in higher education. However, there is a great deal of controversy in the literature regarding its effectiveness. This bears the question, to what extent are the outcomes (e.g., the student success) in an e-learning environment comparable with that of a…

  12. Discovery learning with SAVI approach in geometry learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahara, R.; Mardiyana; Saputro, D. R. S.

    2018-05-01

    Geometry is one branch of mathematics that an important role in learning mathematics in the schools. This research aims to find out about Discovery Learning with SAVI approach to achievement of learning geometry. This research was conducted at Junior High School in Surakarta city. Research data were obtained through test and questionnaire. Furthermore, the data was analyzed by using two-way Anova. The results showed that Discovery Learning with SAVI approach gives a positive influence on mathematics learning achievement. Discovery Learning with SAVI approach provides better mathematics learning outcomes than direct learning. In addition, students with high self-efficacy categories have better mathematics learning achievement than those with moderate and low self-efficacy categories, while student with moderate self-efficacy categories are better mathematics learning achievers than students with low self-efficacy categories. There is an interaction between Discovery Learning with SAVI approach and self-efficacy toward student's mathematics learning achievement. Therefore, Discovery Learning with SAVI approach can improve mathematics learning achievement.

  13. Utterance-final position and pitch marking aid word learning in school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Piera; Laaha, Sabine; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the effects of word order and prosody on word learning in school-age children. Third graders viewed photographs belonging to one of three semantic categories while hearing four-word nonsense utterances containing a target word. In the control condition, all words had the same pitch and, across trials, the position of the target word was varied systematically within each utterance. The only cue to word-meaning mapping was the co-occurrence of target words and referents. This cue was present in all conditions. In the Utterance-final condition, the target word always occurred in utterance-final position, and at the same fundamental frequency as all the other words of the utterance. In the Pitch peak condition, the position of the target word was varied systematically within each utterance across trials, and produced with pitch contrasts typical of infant-directed speech (IDS). In the Pitch peak + Utterance-final condition, the target word always occurred in utterance-final position, and was marked with a pitch contrast typical of IDS. Word learning occurred in all conditions except the control condition. Moreover, learning performance was significantly higher than that observed with simple co-occurrence ( control condition) only for the Pitch peak + Utterance-final condition. We conclude that, for school-age children, the combination of words' utterance-final alignment and pitch enhancement boosts word learning.

  14. Image annotation based on positive-negative instances learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Hu, Jiwei; Liu, Quan; Lou, Ping

    2017-07-01

    Automatic image annotation is now a tough task in computer vision, the main sense of this tech is to deal with managing the massive image on the Internet and assisting intelligent retrieval. This paper designs a new image annotation model based on visual bag of words, using the low level features like color and texture information as well as mid-level feature as SIFT, and mixture the pic2pic, label2pic and label2label correlation to measure the correlation degree of labels and images. We aim to prune the specific features for each single label and formalize the annotation task as a learning process base on Positive-Negative Instances Learning. Experiments are performed using the Corel5K Dataset, and provide a quite promising result when comparing with other existing methods.

  15. Playing styles based on experiential learning theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bontchev, Boyan; Vassileva, Dessislava; Aleksieva-Petrova, Adelina; Petrov, Milen

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, many researchers have reported positive outcomes and effects from applying computer games to the educational process. The main preconditions for an effective game-based learning process include the presence of high learning interest and the desire to study hard. Therefore,

  16. An evaluation of CPD learning and impact upon positive practice change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy-Jane

    2011-05-01

    This paper explores positive practice change in nursing and health care practice following continuing professional development (CPD). It is derived from a commissioned evaluation study within the United Kingdom (UK). Evaluation data was gathered using semi structured discussions with CPD participants, a convenience sample of line managers and University module leaders. Findings suggest that professional peer attitudes and support, when harnessed effectively in the practice setting, strongly enhance positive change. Conversely a lack of engagement with practice peers, a lack of strategic support and not knowing how to access support hinder change. The study found that learning need was often explored through personal development planning and appraisal, however there was little systematic follow up, review and support following learning. Interestingly the individual personal drive and enthusiasm of practitioners was perceived as the strongest factor helping practice change, while policy drivers and national health targets were secondary. Possible strategies to enhance positive practice change are explored. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Machine learning for outcome prediction of acute ischemic stroke post intra-arterial therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Asadi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Stroke is a major cause of death and disability. Accurately predicting stroke outcome from a set of predictive variables may identify high-risk patients and guide treatment approaches, leading to decreased morbidity. Logistic regression models allow for the identification and validation of predictive variables. However, advanced machine learning algorithms offer an alternative, in particular, for large-scale multi-institutional data, with the advantage of easily incorporating newly available data to improve prediction performance. Our aim was to design and compare different machine learning methods, capable of predicting the outcome of endovascular intervention in acute anterior circulation ischaemic stroke. METHOD: We conducted a retrospective study of a prospectively collected database of acute ischaemic stroke treated by endovascular intervention. Using SPSS®, MATLAB®, and Rapidminer®, classical statistics as well as artificial neural network and support vector algorithms were applied to design a supervised machine capable of classifying these predictors into potential good and poor outcomes. These algorithms were trained, validated and tested using randomly divided data. RESULTS: We included 107 consecutive acute anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients treated by endovascular technique. Sixty-six were male and the mean age of 65.3. All the available demographic, procedural and clinical factors were included into the models. The final confusion matrix of the neural network, demonstrated an overall congruency of ∼ 80% between the target and output classes, with favourable receiving operative characteristics. However, after optimisation, the support vector machine had a relatively better performance, with a root mean squared error of 2.064 (SD: ± 0.408. DISCUSSION: We showed promising accuracy of outcome prediction, using supervised machine learning algorithms, with potential for incorporation of larger multicenter

  18. Measuring Learning Outcomes. Evolution of Cognitive Skills among Graduate Students in Auditing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Steenholdt, Niels

    with the knowledge provided in a graduate course the student learns from his prior experiences and stores the important aspects of each experience in memory in accordance with such schemas. The schemas available for students taking a graduate auditing course reflects prior accounting work experience for some...... students and undergraduate accounting coursework experience for all students. This paper extends prior research on the role of declarative and procedural knowledge in performing auditing tasks. Measuring learning outcomes is a complex matter requiring sensible measures for both declarative knowledge...... outcomes in the context of an auditing course by posing a broad set of questions testing declarative knowledge and the full range of intellectual skills from discrimination to the use of higher-order-rules . The paper presents data collected in September 1999 including 34 graduate students representing...

  19. Flowshop Scheduling Problems with a Position-Dependent Exponential Learning Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingbao Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a permutation flowshop scheduling problem with a position-dependent exponential learning effect. The objective is to minimize the performance criteria of makespan and the total flow time. For the two-machine flow shop scheduling case, we show that Johnson’s rule is not an optimal algorithm for minimizing the makespan given the exponential learning effect. Furthermore, by using the shortest total processing times first (STPT rule, we construct the worst-case performance ratios for both criteria. Finally, a polynomial-time algorithm is proposed for special cases of the studied problem.

  20. Distinct fronto-striatal couplings reveal the double-faced nature of response-outcome relations in instruction-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruge, Hannes; Wolfensteller, Uta

    2015-06-01

    Higher species commonly learn novel behaviors by evaluating retrospectively whether actions have yielded desirable outcomes. By relying on explicit behavioral instructions, only humans can use an acquisition shortcut that prospectively specifies how to yield intended outcomes under the appropriate stimulus conditions. A recent and largely unexplored hypothesis suggests that striatal areas interact with lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) when novel behaviors are learned via explicit instruction, and that regional subspecialization exists for the integration of differential response-outcome contingencies into the current task model. Behaviorally, outcome integration during instruction-based learning has been linked to functionally distinct performance indices. This includes (1) compatibility effects, measured in a postlearning test procedure probing the encoding strength of outcome-response (O-R) associations, and (2) increasing response slowing across learning, putatively indicating active usage of O-R associations for the online control of goal-directed action. In the present fMRI study, we examined correlations between these behavioral indices and the dynamics of fronto-striatal couplings in order to mutually constrain and refine the interpretation of neural and behavioral measures in terms of separable subprocesses during outcome integration. We found that O-R encoding strength correlated with LPFC-putamen coupling, suggesting that the putamen is relevant for the formation of both S-R habits and habit-like O-R associations. By contrast, response slowing as a putative index of active usage of O-R associations correlated with LPFC-caudate coupling. This finding highlights the relevance of the caudate for the online control of goal-directed action also under instruction-based learning conditions, and in turn clarifies the functional relevance of the behavioral slowing effect.

  1. Effects of feedback in a computer-based learning environment on students’ learning outcomes: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kleij, Fabienne; Feskens, Remco C.W.; Eggen, Theodorus Johannes Hendrikus Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this meta-analysis, we investigated the effects of methods for providing item-based feedback in a computer-based environment on students’ learning outcomes. From 40 studies, 70 effect sizes were computed, which ranged from −0.78 to 2.29. A mixed model was used for the data analysis. The results

  2. Learning gene regulatory networks from only positive and unlabeled data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkan Charles

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, supervised learning methods have been exploited to reconstruct gene regulatory networks from gene expression data. The reconstruction of a network is modeled as a binary classification problem for each pair of genes. A statistical classifier is trained to recognize the relationships between the activation profiles of gene pairs. This approach has been proven to outperform previous unsupervised methods. However, the supervised approach raises open questions. In particular, although known regulatory connections can safely be assumed to be positive training examples, obtaining negative examples is not straightforward, because definite knowledge is typically not available that a given pair of genes do not interact. Results A recent advance in research on data mining is a method capable of learning a classifier from only positive and unlabeled examples, that does not need labeled negative examples. Applied to the reconstruction of gene regulatory networks, we show that this method significantly outperforms the current state of the art of machine learning methods. We assess the new method using both simulated and experimental data, and obtain major performance improvement. Conclusions Compared to unsupervised methods for gene network inference, supervised methods are potentially more accurate, but for training they need a complete set of known regulatory connections. A supervised method that can be trained using only positive and unlabeled data, as presented in this paper, is especially beneficial for the task of inferring gene regulatory networks, because only an incomplete set of known regulatory connections is available in public databases such as RegulonDB, TRRD, KEGG, Transfac, and IPA.

  3. Evaluating the Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Process in Undergraduate Parks and Recreation Academic Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Craig M.; Young, Sarah J.; Sturts, Jill R.

    2012-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are increasingly being held more accountable for assessing student learning both in and out of their classrooms along with reporting results to their stakeholders. The purpose of this study, which examined assessment of student learning outcomes in undergraduate park and recreation academic programs, was two-fold:…

  4. Navigation towards a goal position: from reactive to generalised learned control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire da Silva, Valdinei [Laboratorio de Tecnicas Inteligentes - LTI, Escola Politecnica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, trav.3, n.158, Cidade Universitaria Sao Paulo (Brazil); Selvatici, Antonio Henrique [Universidade Nove de Julho, Rua Vergueiro, 235, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Reali Costa, Anna Helena, E-mail: valdinei.freire@gmail.com, E-mail: antoniohps@uninove.br, E-mail: anna.reali@poli.usp.br [Laboratorio de Tecnicas Inteligentes - LTI, Escola Politecnica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, trav.3, n.158, Cidade Universitaria Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-03-01

    The task of navigating to a target position in space is a fairly common task for a mobile robot. It is desirable that this task is performed even in previously unknown environments. One reactive architecture explored before addresses this challenge by denning a hand-coded coordination of primitive behaviours, encoded by the Potential Fields method. Our first approach to improve the performance of this architecture adds a learning step to autonomously find the best way to coordinate primitive behaviours with respect to an arbitrary performance criterion. Because of the limitations presented by the Potential Fields method, especially in relation to non-convex obstacles, we are investigating the use of Relational Reinforcement Learning as a method to not only learn to act in the current environment, but also to generalise prior knowledge to the current environment in order to achieve the goal more quickly in a non-convex structured environment. We show the results of our previous efforts in reaching goal positions along with our current research on generalised approaches.

  5. Navigation towards a goal position: from reactive to generalised learned control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire da Silva, Valdinei; Selvatici, Antonio Henrique; Reali Costa, Anna Helena

    2011-01-01

    The task of navigating to a target position in space is a fairly common task for a mobile robot. It is desirable that this task is performed even in previously unknown environments. One reactive architecture explored before addresses this challenge by denning a hand-coded coordination of primitive behaviours, encoded by the Potential Fields method. Our first approach to improve the performance of this architecture adds a learning step to autonomously find the best way to coordinate primitive behaviours with respect to an arbitrary performance criterion. Because of the limitations presented by the Potential Fields method, especially in relation to non-convex obstacles, we are investigating the use of Relational Reinforcement Learning as a method to not only learn to act in the current environment, but also to generalise prior knowledge to the current environment in order to achieve the goal more quickly in a non-convex structured environment. We show the results of our previous efforts in reaching goal positions along with our current research on generalised approaches.

  6. Predicting radiotherapy outcomes using statistical learning techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naqa, Issam; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Deasy, Joseph O; Lindsay, Patricia E; Hope, Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    Radiotherapy outcomes are determined by complex interactions between treatment, anatomical and patient-related variables. A common obstacle to building maximally predictive outcome models for clinical practice is the failure to capture potential complexity of heterogeneous variable interactions and applicability beyond institutional data. We describe a statistical learning methodology that can automatically screen for nonlinear relations among prognostic variables and generalize to unseen data before. In this work, several types of linear and nonlinear kernels to generate interaction terms and approximate the treatment-response function are evaluated. Examples of institutional datasets of esophagitis, pneumonitis and xerostomia endpoints were used. Furthermore, an independent RTOG dataset was used for 'generalizabilty' validation. We formulated the discrimination between risk groups as a supervised learning problem. The distribution of patient groups was initially analyzed using principle components analysis (PCA) to uncover potential nonlinear behavior. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate correlations and actuarial analysis. Over-fitting was controlled via cross-validation resampling. Our results suggest that a modified support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression and neural networks in cases where the data exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA. For instance, in prediction of esophagitis and pneumonitis endpoints, which exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA, the method provided 21% and 60% improvements, respectively. Furthermore, evaluation on the independent pneumonitis RTOG dataset demonstrated good generalizabilty beyond institutional data in contrast with other models. This indicates that the prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing nonlinear kernel methods for discovering important nonlinear interactions among model

  7. How does classroom composition affect learning outcomes in Ugandan primary schools?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Edward Samuel

    2016-01-01

    There is widespread agreement that schooling quality should be a priority in the post-2015 education agenda, but less agreement on how quality can be enhanced in a cost effective manner. In Uganda, classroom overcrowding is often considered a critical cause of poor learning outcomes. This paper...

  8. Learning outcomes of occupational therapy and physiotherapy students during their communitybased education attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Ndlovu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Community-based education (CBE is a learning approach that enables students to acquire skills by means of applied learning in the community. The goals of CBE include creating adequate knowledge, skills and attitudes that facilitate service delivery in communities. These goals ensure the provision of efficient health services to marginalised communities with significant resource constraints. The Department of Rehabilitation at the University of Zimbabwe, Harare, has adopted CBE as one of the learning approaches that enables students to acquire comprehensive skills for future service provision in the community.Objectives. To determine the learning outcomes of rehabilitation students at the University of Zimbabwe and to identify factors affecting learning during the CBE attachments.Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted at the University of Zimbabwe. Thirty-five final-year occupational therapy and physiotherapy students responded to a self-administered questionnaire. Data were analysed using Microsoft Excel 2013 (USA and SPSS version 21 (IBM Corp., USA.Results. All the students reported that the CBE attachment improved their community-engagement skills, professional skills and personal growth. Barriers to effective learning included inadequate transport (100%, poor internet connectivity (82%, lack of research-related objectives (74% and inadequate resources for CBE activities (60%.Conclusion. The CBE attachment enabled students to gain skills in community engagement, professionalism and personal growth. However, more funding directed towards CBE activities and introducing objectives related to research, are some of the strategies that might improve the students’ learning outcomes during the attachments.

  9. POSITIVE VERSUS NEGATIVE COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES IN TASK-BASED LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Rohani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at describing how the implementation of Task Based Learning (TBL would shape or change students’ use of oral communication strategies. Students’ problems and strategies to solve the problems during the implementation of TBL were also explored. The study was a mixed method, employing both quantitative and qualitative analysis throughmulti-methods of questionnaire, interviews, focus group discussion, learning journals, and classroom observation. Participants were 26 second year students of the State Polytechnic of Malang. Data collection was conducted for one semester. Findingsshow linguistic and non-linguistic problems encountered by students during one-semester implementation of TBL. Students also performedincreased use of positive strategies but reduced use of negative strategies after the implementation of TBL.

  10. Increasing Student Engagement Using Asynchronous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northey, Gavin; Bucic, Tania; Chylinski, Mathew; Govind, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement is an ongoing concern for educators because of its positive association with deep learning and educational outcomes. This article tests the use of a social networking site (Facebook) as a tool to facilitate asynchronous learning opportunities that complement face-to-face interactions and thereby enable a stronger learning…

  11. How Do Social Networks Influence Learning Outcomes? A Case Study in an Industrial Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglajlic, Seid; Helic, Denis

    2012-01-01

    and Purpose: The purpose of this research is to shed light on the impact of implicit social networks to the learning outcome of e-learning participants in an industrial setting. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents a theoretical framework that allows the authors to measure correlation coefficients between the different affiliations that…

  12. A Millennium Learning Goal for Education Post-2015: A Question of Outcomes or Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Angeline M.

    2011-01-01

    As the target year for the current Millennium Development Goal of universal completion of primary education approaches, three World Bank economists have proposed its replacement with a Millennium Learning Goal. This is part of a trend of increased privileging of learning outcomes. The proposal is assessed from the perspective of human rights-based…

  13. Visual Literacy Skills of Students in College-Level Biology: Learning Outcomes Following Digital or Hand-Drawing Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Justine C.

    2014-01-01

    To test the claim that digital learning tools enhance the acquisition of visual literacy in this generation of biology students, a learning intervention was carried out with 33 students enrolled in an introductory college biology course. This study compared learning outcomes following two types of learning tools: a traditional drawing activity, or…

  14. Career and Technical Education, Inclusion, and Postsecondary Outcomes for Students With Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Roddy J; Goldhaber, Dan D; Gratz, Trevor M; Holden, Kristian L

    2018-05-01

    We used longitudinal data from Washington State to investigate the relationships among career and technical education (CTE) enrollment, inclusion in general education, and high school and postsecondary outcomes for students with learning disabilities. We replicated earlier findings that students with learning disabilities who were enrolled in a "concentration" of CTE courses had higher rates of employment after graduation than observably similar students with learning disabilities who were enrolled in fewer CTE courses. We also found that students with learning disabilities who spent more time in general education classrooms in high school had higher rates of on-time graduation, college attendance, and employment than observably similar students with learning disabilities who spent less time in general education classrooms in these grades.

  15. A Review of the Instructional Practices for Promoting Online Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Woei; Flom, Elicia; Manu, Jacob; Mahmoud, Enaz

    2015-01-01

    An effective learning community helps foster positive student learning experiences and outcomes. However, in distance learning environments, the communication barriers inevitably hinder the interaction among the students because of the lower levels of social presence. These barriers present challenges in building learning communities in an online…

  16. The effectiveness of internet-based e-learning on clinician behavior and patient outcomes: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Peter; Kable, Ashley; Levett-Jones, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    participant experience and knowledge acquisition, outcomes that correspond with the first two levels of Kirkpatrick's model.To date, few studies have examined the effectiveness of internet-based e-learning programs on HCP behavior, which aligns with Level 3 of Kirkpatrick's model.Studies exist that use self-reported measures of intention to change behavior, however self-reported intention to change does not necessarily translate into actual behavior change. Studies that have not used self-reported measures of behavior change have used objectively measured evaluation criteria including objective structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS) using various methods including simulation task trainers and clinical simulations using standardized patients scored by a panel of experts using standardized assessment tools. Carney et al. used a national reporting and data system to measure the impact of a single one hour e-learning program undertaken by radiologists (n=31) aimed at reducing unnecessary recall during mammography screening. Carney et al. reported a null effect and attributed this to the complexities of behavior change, suggesting that longer term reinforcement of principles relating to mammography recall was required to effect behavior change. These findings also suggest that a multi-modal intervention may be required in order to reduce excessive recall rates in this area, rather than a single intervention. Contrary to Carney et al., Pape-Koehler et al. and Smeekins et al. reported positive findings using randomized controlled designs to test the efficacy of e-learning interventions on individual's surgical performance and the detection of child abuse, respectively. Pape-Koehler et al. used a 2x2 factorial design to demonstrate that an e-learning intervention significantly improved novice surgeon (n=70) surgical performance of a laparoscopic cholecystectomy (change between pre-post test OSATS p 0.001) when used in isolation or in combination with a practical training

  17. PBL-GIS in Secondary Geography Education: Does It Result in Higher-Order Learning Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Bui, Elisabeth N.; Chang, Chew-Hung; Lossman, Hans G.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents research on evaluating problem-based learning using GIS technology in a Singapore secondary school. A quasi-experimental research design was carried to test the PBL pedagogy (PBL-GIS) with an experimental group of students and compare their learning outcomes with a control group who were exposed to PBL but not GIS. The…

  18. Relations between student perceptions of assessment authenticity, study approaches and learning outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulikers, J.T.M.; Bastiaens, Th.J.; Kirschner, P.A.; Kester, L.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the relationships between perceptions of authenticity and alignment on study approach and learning outcome. Senior students of a vocational training program performed an authentic assessment and filled in a questionnaire about the authenticity of various assessment

  19. Branding MBA Programs: The Use of Target Market Desired Outcomes for Effective Brand Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Louise A.; Nadeau, John

    2010-01-01

    Branding is about delivering on desired outcomes. The importance of positioning program offerings on the basis of outcomes sought in the education market is illustrated in this study of choice of an MBA program by prospective students. MBA fair attendees were surveyed and multiple methods were employed to determine the importance of desired…

  20. The Relationships between Language Learning Strategies and Positive Emotions among Malaysian ESL Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadipour, Mohammad; Rashid, Sabariah Md; Rafik-Galea, Shameem; Thai, Yap Ngee

    2018-01-01

    Emotions are an indispensable part of second language learning. The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between the use of language learning strategies and positive emotions. The present study adopted a sequential mixed methods design. The participants were 300 Malaysian ESL undergraduates selected through stratified random sampling…

  1. U.S. dental hygiene faculty perceptions of learner outcomes in distance education courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corum, Kathrine A; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Johnson, Kerry; Strait, Tia M

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine perceptions of full-time, entry-level dental hygiene educators regarding the ability to achieve interaction in their distance education courses and the impact of interaction on learning outcomes. The specific interactions explored were student-instructor, student-content, and student-student. A survey was developed, pilot tested, revised, and mailed to 287 educators across the United States, generating an overall response rate of 22.3 percent. The majority of respondents perceived interaction to be achievable in their distance courses, to increase through technology, and to positively influence learning outcomes. Nearly 90 percent reported student-instructor interaction as achievable, 95.3 percent reported student-content interaction as achievable, and 79.7 percent reported student-student interaction as achievable. Learning outcomes were defined in this study as the student's achievement of course objectives and competencies at course completion. Approximately 81 percent of the respondents reported a positive influence from student-instructor interaction, 79.7 percent from student-content interaction, and 70.3 percent from student-student interaction. This study also examined which modalities were perceived as being most influential in achieving interaction. The results demonstrated a prevalence of discussion board posting in an environment in which numerous Web 2.0 tools are available and respondents were not as positive about their ability to achieve student-student interaction in the distance learning environment. The authors conclude that faculty development is critical in achieving quality outcomes in dental hygiene distance education courses.

  2. Right ventricular pacemaker lead position is associated with differences in long-term outcomes and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Chance M; Lenz, Charles J; Shih, Henry H; Ebrille, Elisa; Rosenbaum, Andrew N; van Zyl, Martin; Aung, Htin; Manocha, Kevin K; Deshmukh, Abhishek J; Hodge, David O; Mulpuru, Siva K; Cha, Yong-Mei; Espinosa, Raul E; Asirvatham, Samuel J; Mcleod, Christopher J

    2017-08-01

    Cardiac pacing from the right ventricular apex is associated with detrimental long-term effects and nonapical pacing locations may be associated with improved outcomes. There is little data regarding complications with nonapical lead positions. The aim of this study was to assess long-term outcomes and lead-related complications associated with differing ventricular lead tip position. All adult patients who underwent dual-chamber pacemaker implantation from 2004 to 2014 were included if they had postprocedure chest radiographs amenable to lead position determination. Long-term outcomes and lead-related complication rates were recorded. These were compared at 5 years between: (1) apical and septal leads, (2) apical and nonseptal nonapical (NSNA), and (3) apical and septal with >40% ventricular pacing. We retrospectively evaluated 3,450 patients, which included 238 with a septal position and 733 with NSNA lead positions. Septal lead position was associated with a lower mortality compared to apical leads (24% vs. 31%, P = 0.02). In patients with greater than 40% pacing, septal leads were associated with significantly higher rates of incident atrial fibrillation compared to apical leads (49% vs. 34%, P = 0.04). NSNA positions were associated with a significantly higher rate of lead dislodgement (4% vs. 2%, P = 0.005) and need for revision (8% vs. 5%, P = 0.005). Septal pacemaker lead position is associated with a lower mortality compared to apically placed leads, but a higher incidence of atrial fibrillation with higher percentage ventricular pacing. NSNA lead locations are associated with more complications and should be avoided. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The influence of virtual presence: Effects on experienced cognitive load and learning outcomes in educational computer games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrader, Claudia; Bastiaens, Theo

    2018-01-01

    Does the immersive design of an educational gaming environment affect learners’ virtual presence and how much do they learn? Does virtual presence affect learning? This study tries to answer these ques- tions by examining the differences in virtual presence and learning outcomes in two different

  4. Increasing positive attitudes toward individuals with disabilities through community service learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Janelle E; Cruz, Rebecca A; Knollman, Gregory A

    2017-10-01

    Providing equal-status contact between those with and without disabilities can improve attitudes and reduce discrimination toward individuals with disabilities. This study investigated community service learning as a means by which to provide college students with equal-status contact with individuals with disabilities and increase their positive attitudes toward those with disabilities. A total of 166 college students in one university in the United States enrolled in an Introduction to Disability course received content on disability in society and participated in community service involving 20h of direct contact with individuals with disabilities. Findings indicated that college students who had prior contact with individuals with disabilities had more positive attitudes toward individuals with disabilities than college students who did not have prior contact at the start of the course. For the college students who did not have any prior contact, their attitudes toward individuals with disabilities became significantly more positive at the end of the community service learning course. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Climate Change Professional Development: Design, Implementation, and Initial Outcomes on Teacher Learning, Practice, and Student Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Nicole A.; Mouza, Chrystalla; Drewes, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present the design, implementation, and initial outcomes of the Climate Academy, a hybrid professional development program delivered through a combination of face-to-face and online interactions, intended to prepare formal and informal science teachers (grades 5-16) in teaching about climate change. The Climate Academy was designed around core elements of successful environmental professional development programs and aligned with practices advocated in benchmarked science standards. Data were collected from multiple sources including observations of professional development events, participants' reflections on their learning, and collection of instructional units designed during the Academy. Data were also collected from a focal case study teacher in a middle school setting. Case study data included classroom observations, teacher interviews, and student beliefs toward climate change. Results indicated that the Climate Academy fostered increased learning among participants of both climate science content and pedagogical strategies for teaching about climate change. Additionally, results indicated that participants applied their new learning in the design of climate change instructional units. Finally, results from the case study indicated positive impacts on student beliefs and greater awareness about climate change. Results have implications for the design of professional development programs on climate change, a topic included for the first time in national standards.

  6. The impact of arbitrarily applicable relational responding on evaluative learning about hypothetical money and shock outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymond, Simon; Molet, Mikael; Davies, Lynette

    2017-08-01

    Evaluative learning comprises changes in preferences after co-occurrences between conditioned stimuli (CSs) and an unconditioned stimulus (US) of affective value. Co-occurrences may involve relational responding. Two experiments examined the impact of arbitrary relational responding on evaluative preferences for hypothetical money and shock outcomes. In Experiment 1, participants were trained to make arbitrary relational responses by placing CSs of the same size but different colours into boxes and were then instructed that these CSs represented different intensities of hypothetical USs (money or shock). Liking ratings of the CSs were altered in accordance with the underlying bigger/smaller than relations. A reversal of preference was also observed: the CS associated with the smallest hypothetical shock was rated more positively than the CS associated with the smallest amount of hypothetical money. In Experiment 2, procedures from Relational Frame Theory (RFT) established a relational network of more than/less than relations consisting of five CSs (A-B-C-D-E). Overall, evaluative preferences were altered, but not reversed, depending on (a) how stimuli had been related to one another during the learning phase and (b) whether those stimuli referred to money or shocks. The contribution of RFT to evaluative learning research is discussed.

  7. Positive Education for Young Children: Effects of a Positive Psychology Intervention for Preschool Children on Subjective Well Being and Learning Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Anat Shoshani; Michelle Slone

    2017-01-01

    Despite the flourishing in recent years in applications of positive psychology in the field of education, there is a paucity of research investigating positive psychology interventions for preschool children. The present study examined the effects of a positive psychology-based intervention conducted in Israel on children’s subjective well-being, mental health and learning behaviors. Twelve preschool classrooms of 3–6.5 year-olds were randomly assigned to a positive psychology intervention co...

  8. Structure, Content, Delivery, Service, and Outcomes: Quality e-Learning in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colla J. MacDonald

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the need for quality e-Learning experiences. We used the Demand-Driven Learning Model (MacDonald, Stodel, Farres, Breithaupt, and Gabriel, 2001 to evaluate an online Masters in Education course. Multiple data collection methods were used to understand the experiences of stakeholders in this case study: the learners, design team, and facilitators. We found that all five dimensions of the model (structure, content, delivery, service, and outcomes must work in concert to implement a quality e-Learning course. Key themes include evolving learner needs, the search for connection, becoming an able e-participant, valued interactions, social construction of content, integration of delivery partners, and mindful weighing of benefits and trade-offs. By sharing insights into what is needed to design and deliver an e-Learning experience, our findings add to the growing knowledge of online learning. Using this model to evaluate perceptions of quality by key stakeholders has led to insights and recommendations on the Demand Driven Learning Model itself which may be useful for researchers in this area and strengthen the model. Quality has been defined in terms of the design of the e-Learning experience, the contextualized experience of learners, and evidence of learning outcomes (Carr and Carr, 2000; Jung 2000; Salmon, 2000. Quality and design of e-Learning courses, however, are sometimes compromised in an “ . . . effort to simply get something up and running��� in response to pressing consumer demands (Dick, 1996, p. 59. Educators and researchers have voiced concern over the lack of rigorous evaluation studies of e-Learning programs (e.g., Arbaugh, 2000; Howell, Saba, Lindsay, and Williams, 2004; Lockyer, Patterson, and Harper, 1999; Robinson, 2001. McGorry (2003 adds, “although the number of courses being delivered via the Internet is increasing rapidly, our knowledge of what makes these courses effective learning experiences

  9. Evaluating a Gender Diversity Workshop to Promote Positive Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, James; Lucassen, Mathijs F. G.; Hamilton, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on data from an Aotearoa/New Zealand study of more than 230 secondary students, this article evaluates the potential of a 60-min gender diversity workshop to address bullying and promote positive environments for learning. Students completed pre- and postworkshop questionnaires. The authors used descriptive statistics to summarize results…

  10. People newly in love are more responsive to positive feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cassandra L; Beninger, Richard J

    2012-06-01

    Passionate love is associated with increased activity in dopamine-rich regions of the brain. Increased dopamine in these regions is associated with a greater tendency to learn from reward in trial-and-error learning tasks. This study examined the prediction that individuals who were newly in love would be better at responding to reward (positive feedback). In test trials, people who were newly in love selected positive outcomes significantly more often than their single (not in love) counterparts but were no better at the task overall. This suggests that people who are newly in love show a bias toward responding to positive feedback, which may reflect a general bias towards reward-seeking.

  11. Want Positive Behavior? Use Positive Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chip; Freeman-Loftis, Babs

    2012-01-01

    Positive adult language is the professional use of words and tone of voice to enable students to learn in an engaged, active way. This includes learning social skills. To guide children toward choosing and maintaining positive behaviors, adults need to carefully choose the words and tone of voice used when speaking to them. Learning to use…

  12. New York College of Osteopathic Medicine Learning Outcomes Assessment 2009-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John R.; Mead, Pelham; Achziger, Mary Ann; Bruno, Felicia; Bryant, Claire; Goldstein, Leonard; Jeger, Abraham; Zaika, Rodika; Portanova, Ron

    2009-01-01

    This is a document that lays out the Mission of the NY College of Osteopathic Medicine's Mission Statement, It's 13 Goals and subsequent Objectives of Learning Outcomes. Benchmarks were established for each Educational Goal and defined further in Objectives. This document represents an historic attempt by NYCOM to address it's need for complete…

  13. Measuring Longitudinal Student Performance on Student Learning Outcomes in Sustainability Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarchow, Meghann E.; Formisano, Paul; Nordyke, Shane; Sayre, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the student learning outcomes (SLOs) for a sustainability major, evaluate faculty incorporation of the SLOs into the courses in the sustainability major curriculum and measure student performance on the SLOs from entry into the major to the senior capstone course. Design/methodology/approach:…

  14. Cognitive Load Imposed by Ultrasound-Facilitated Teaching Does Not Adversely Affect Gross Anatomy Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamniczky, Heather A.; Cotton, Darrel; Paget, Michael; Ramji, Qahir; Lenz, Ryan; McLaughlin, Kevin; Coderre, Sylvain; Ma, Irene W. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonography is increasingly used in medical education, but its impact on learning outcomes is unclear. Adding ultrasound may facilitate learning, but may also potentially overwhelm novice learners. Based upon the framework of cognitive load theory, this study seeks to evaluate the relationship between cognitive load associated with using…

  15. Deconstructing Constructivism: Modeling Causal Relationships Among Constructivist Learning Environment Factors and Student Outcomes in Introductory Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komperda, Regis

    The purpose of this dissertation is to test a model of relationships among factors characterizing aspects of a student-centered constructivist learning environment and student outcomes of satisfaction and academic achievement in introductory undergraduate chemistry courses. Constructivism was chosen as the theoretical foundation for this research because of its widespread use in chemical education research and practice. In a constructivist learning environment the role of the teacher shifts from delivering content towards facilitating active student engagement in activities that encourage individual knowledge construction through discussion and application of content. Constructivist approaches to teaching introductory chemistry courses have been adopted by some instructors as a way to improve student outcomes, but little research has been done on the causal relationships among particular aspects of the learning environment and student outcomes. This makes it difficult for classroom teachers to know which aspects of a constructivist teaching approach are critical to adopt and which may be modified to better suit a particular learning environment while still improving student outcomes. To investigate a model of these relationships, a survey designed to measure student perceptions of three factors characterizing a constructivist learning environment in online courses was adapted for use in face-to-face chemistry courses. These three factors, teaching presence, social presence, and cognitive presence, were measured using a slightly modified version of the Community of Inquiry (CoI) instrument. The student outcomes investigated in this research were satisfaction and academic achievement, as measured by standardized American Chemical Society (ACS) exam scores and course grades. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to statistically model relationships among the three presence factors and student outcome variables for 391 students enrolled in six sections of a

  16. Learning outcomes associated with patient simulation method in pharmacotherapy education: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aura, Suvi M; Sormunen, Marjorita S T; Jordan, Sue E; Tossavainen, Kerttu A; Turunen, Hannele E

    2015-06-01

    The aims of this systematic integrative review were to identify evidence for the use of patient simulation teaching methods in pharmacotherapy education and to explore related learning outcomes. A systematic literature search was conducted using 6 databases as follows: CINAHL, PubMed, SCOPUS, ERIC, MEDIC, and the Cochrane Library, using the key words relating to patient simulation and pharmacotherapy. The methodological quality of each study was evaluated. Eighteen articles met the inclusion criteria. The earliest article was published in 2005. The selected research articles were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Patient simulation has been used in pharmacotherapy education for preregistration nursing, dental, medical, and pharmacy students and for the continuing education of nurses. Learning outcomes reported were summarized as follows: (1) commitment to pharmacotherapy learning, (2) development of pharmacotherapy evaluation skills, (3) improvement in pharmacotherapy application skills, and (4) knowledge and understanding of pharmacotherapy. To develop effective teaching methods and ensure health care professionals' competence in medication management, further research is needed to determine the educational and clinical effectiveness of simulation teaching methods.

  17. A Comparison of the Learning Outcomes of Traditional Lecturing with that of Computer-Based Learning in two Optometry Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Kangari

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The literature on distance education has provided different reports about the effectiveness of traditional lecture based settings versus computer based study settings. This studyis an attempt to compare the learning outcomes of the traditional lecture based teaching with that of the computer based learning in the optometry curriculum.Methods: Two courses in the optometry curriculum, Optometry I, with 24 students and Optometry II, with 27 students were used in this study. In each course, the students were randomly divided into two groups. In each scheduled class session, one group randomly attended the lecture, while the other studied in the computer stations. The same content was presented to both groups and at end of each session the same quiz was given to both. In the next session, the groups switched place. This processcontinued for four weeks. The quizzes were scored and a paired t-test was used to examine any difference. The data was analyzed by SPSS 15 software.Results: The mean score for Optometry I, lecture settings was 3.36 +0.59, for Optometry I computer based study was 3.27+0.63 , for Optometry II, in lecture setting was 3.22+0.57 and for Optometry II, computer based setting was 2.85+0.69. The paired sample t-test was performed on the scores, revealing no statistical significant difference between the two settings. However, the mean score for lecture sessions was slightly higher in lecture settings.Conclusion: Since this study reveals that the learning outcomes in traditional lecture based settings and computer based study are not significantly different, the lecture sessions can be safely replacedby the computer based study session. Further practice in the computer based setting might reveal better outcomes in computer study settings.Key words: LECTURING, COMPUTER BASED LEARNING, DISTANCE EDUCATION

  18. Improving Primary Education in Pakistan: An Examination of the Association between School Autonomy and Children's Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Bushra

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of the delegation of financial authority to public primary schools through Parent-Teacher Councils (PTCs) on learning outcomes of primary school children in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) province, Pakistan. The learning outcomes were measured in three subject areas (Urdu, English, and Mathematics).…

  19. The Consequences and Implications of Providing Management Learning in a Blended Format

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Annemette

    that this is actually quite well perceived by students and has a positive learning outcome that equals or even increases the learning outcome of on-campus courses (Arbaugh, 2000; Redpath, 2012). Less has been written about blended formats (see Arbaugh, 2014 for a review of what has been written) and my question......Many universities are in the process of experimenting with online teaching and are moving knowledge transmission online in a format where short, concise videos are presented followed by different activities including quizzes, dialogue fora etc. Research into learning outcome shows...

  20. Positive-Unlabeled Learning for Pupylation Sites Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pupylation plays a key role in regulating various protein functions as a crucial posttranslational modification of prokaryotes. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of pupylation, it is important to identify pupylation substrates and sites accurately. Several computational methods have been developed to identify pupylation sites because the traditional experimental methods are time-consuming and labor-sensitive. With the existing computational methods, the experimentally annotated pupylation sites are used as the positive training set and the remaining nonannotated lysine residues as the negative training set to build classifiers to predict new pupylation sites from the unknown proteins. However, the remaining nonannotated lysine residues may contain pupylation sites which have not been experimentally validated yet. Unlike previous methods, in this study, the experimentally annotated pupylation sites were used as the positive training set whereas the remaining nonannotated lysine residues were used as the unlabeled training set. A novel method named PUL-PUP was proposed to predict pupylation sites by using positive-unlabeled learning technique. Our experimental results indicated that PUL-PUP outperforms the other methods significantly for the prediction of pupylation sites. As an application, PUL-PUP was also used to predict the most likely pupylation sites in nonannotated lysine sites.

  1. A "Virtual Fieldtrip": Service Learning in Distance Education Technical Writing Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Krista M.; Weiner, Brad

    2013-01-01

    This mixed-methods experimental study examined the effect of service learning in a distance education technical writing course. Quantitative analysis of data found evidence for a positive relationship between participation in service learning and technical writing learning outcomes. Additionally, qualitative analysis suggests that service learning…

  2. Replacing stressful challenges with positive coping strategies: a resilience program for clinical placement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delany, C; Miller, K J; El-Ansary, D; Remedios, L; Hosseini, A; McLeod, S

    2015-12-01

    Clinical education is foundational to health professional training. However, it is also a time of increased stress for students. A student's perception of stressors and their capacity to effectively manage them is a legitimate concern for educators, because anxiety and decreased coping strategies can interfere with effective learning, clinical performance and capacity to care for patients. Resilience is emerging as a valuable construct to underpin positive coping strategies for learning and professional practice. We report the development and evaluation of a psycho-education resilience program designed to build practical skills-based resilience capacities in health science (physiotherapy) students. Six final year undergraduate physiotherapy students attended four action research sessions led by a clinical health psychologist. Resilience strategies drawn from cognitive behavioural therapy, and positive and performance psychology were introduced. Students identified personal learning stressors and their beliefs and responses. They chose specific resilience-based strategies to address them, and then reported their impact on learning performance and experiences. Thematic analysis of the audio-recorded and transcribed action research sessions, and students' de identified notes was conducted. Students' initial descriptions of stressors as 'problems' outside their control resulting in poor thinking and communication, low confidence and frustration, changed to a focus on how they managed and recognized learning challenges as normal or at least expected elements of the clinical learning environment. The research suggests that replacing stressful challenges with positive coping strategies offers a potentially powerful tool to build self-efficacy and cognitive control as well as greater self-awareness as a learner and future health practitioner.

  3. Neonatal outcomes of deliveries in occiput posterior position when delayed pushing is practiced: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlqvist, Kristina; Jonsson, Maria

    2017-11-14

    To examine the impact of occiput posterior position, compared to occiput anterior position, on neonatal outcomes in a setting where delayed pushing is practiced. The specific aim was to estimate the risk of acidaemia. Cohort study from a university hospital in Sweden between 2004 and 2012. Information was collected from a local database of 35,546 births. Umbilical artery sampling was routine. Outcomes were: umbilical artery pH pushing, birth in occiput posterior compared with anterior position is not associated with acidaemia. The higher risk of neonatal morbidity is of concern and any long-term consequences need to be investigated in future studies.

  4. Modelling self-efficacy, self-regulation, self-directed learning and career processes of adult professionals and relations with learning outcomes and labour market success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijker, Monique; Van der Klink, Marcel; Boshuizen, Els

    2010-01-01

    Bijker, M. M., Van der Klink, M. R., & Boshuizen, H. P. A. (2010, 25-27 August). Modelling self-efficacy, self-regulation, self-directed learning and career processes of adult professionals and relations with learning outcomes and labour market success. Paper presented at the 5th EARLI-SIG14

  5. Growth as Product and as Process: Student Learning Outcomes Attained through College Experiences in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Yuhao

    2012-01-01

    Little empirical research has been done on student learning outcomes and college experiences in China, where the gross enrollment rate in higher education reached 26.5 percent and the undergraduate population exceeded 22 million in 2010. This study seeks to describe, explain, and interpret student learning as perceived from students in Chinese…

  6. A Meta-Analysis of the Relationship between Learning Outcomes and Parental Involvement during Early Childhood Education and Early Elementary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Krenn, Huilan Y.; Hu, Shanshan; Yuan, Jing

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis examined the relationship between learning outcomes of children and educational involvement of parents during a unique period of early childhood education and early elementary education based on 100 independent effect sizes from 46 studies. Learning outcomes are academic achievement, and frameworks of parental involvement…

  7. Information Problem-Solving Skills in Small Virtual Groups and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Consuelo; Badia, Antoni

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the frequency of use of information problem-solving (IPS) skills and its relationship with learning outcomes. During the course of the study, 40 teachers carried out a collaborative IPS task in small virtual groups in a 4-week online training course. The status of IPS skills was collected through self-reports handed in over…

  8. The Contribution of Learning Outcomes for Listening to Creative Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldig, Ebru; Arseven, Ayla

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine teacher's opinions on the contribution of learning outcomes for listening defined in the Ministry of National Education's Turkish course curriculum for the 6th, 7th and 8th grades to the development of creative thinking skills. Mixed methods research design was adopted in the study. As the quantitative part of the study,…

  9. Transitioning HIV-Positive Adolescents to Adult Care: Lessons Learned From Twelve Adolescent Medicine Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Amanda E; Philbin, Morgan M; DuVal, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2016-01-01

    To maximize positive health outcomes for youth with HIV as they transition from youth to adult care, clinical staff need strategies and protocols to help youth maintain clinic engagement and medication adherence. Accordingly, this paper describe transition processes across twelve clinics within the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions (ATN) to provide lessons learned and inform the development of transition protocols to improve health outcomes as youth shift from adolescent to adult HIV care. During a large multi-method Care Initiative program evaluation, three annual visits were completed at each site from 2010-2012 and conducted 174 semi-structured interviews with clinical and program staff (baseline n=64, year 1 n=56, year 2=54). The results underscore the value of adhering to recent American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) transition recommendations, including: developing formal transition protocols, preparing youth for transition, facilitating youth's connection to the adult clinic, and identifying necessary strategies for transition evaluation. Transitioning youth with HIV involves targeting individual-, provider-, and system-level factors. Acknowledging and addressing key barriers is essential for developing streamlined, comprehensive, and context-specific transition protocols. Adolescent and adult clinic involvement in transition is essential to reduce service fragmentation, provide coordinated and continuous care, and support individual and community level health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Student learning outcomes associated with video vs. paper cases in a public health dentistry course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Donald L; Pickrell, Jacqueline E; Riedy, Christine A

    2014-01-01

    Educational technologies such as video cases can improve health professions student learning outcomes, but few studies in dentistry have evaluated video-based technologies. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes associated with video and paper cases used in an introductory public health dentistry course. This was a retrospective cohort study with a historical control group. Based on dual coding theory, the authors tested the hypotheses that dental students who received a video case (n=37) would report better affective, cognitive, and overall learning outcomes than students who received a paper case (n=75). One-way ANOVA was used to test the hypotheses across ten cognitive, two affective, and one general assessment measures (α=0.05). Students in the video group reported a significantly higher overall mean effectiveness score than students in the paper group (4.2 and 3.3, respectively; p<0.001). Video cases were also associated with significantly higher mean scores across the remaining twelve measures and were effective in helping students achieve cognitive (e.g., facilitating good discussions, identifying public health problems, realizing how health disparities might impact their future role as dentists) and affective (e.g., empathizing with vulnerable individuals, appreciating how health disparities impact real people) goals. Compared to paper cases, video cases significantly improved cognitive, affective, and overall learning outcomes for dental students.

  11. Prediction of outcome in internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: A machine learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhard, Fabian; Sauer, Sebastian; Andersson, Erik; Månsson, Kristoffer Nt; Mataix-Cols, David; Rück, Christian; Serlachius, Eva

    2018-03-01

    There are no consistent predictors of treatment outcome in paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). One reason for this might be the use of suboptimal statistical methodology. Machine learning is an approach to efficiently analyse complex data. Machine learning has been widely used within other fields, but has rarely been tested in the prediction of paediatric mental health treatment outcomes. To test four different machine learning methods in the prediction of treatment response in a sample of paediatric OCD patients who had received Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT). Participants were 61 adolescents (12-17 years) who enrolled in a randomized controlled trial and received ICBT. All clinical baseline variables were used to predict strictly defined treatment response status three months after ICBT. Four machine learning algorithms were implemented. For comparison, we also employed a traditional logistic regression approach. Multivariate logistic regression could not detect any significant predictors. In contrast, all four machine learning algorithms performed well in the prediction of treatment response, with 75 to 83% accuracy. The results suggest that machine learning algorithms can successfully be applied to predict paediatric OCD treatment outcome. Validation studies and studies in other disorders are warranted. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Developing a Rubric to Assess Student Learning Outcomes Using a Class Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Nicholas; Kazemi, Ellie; Huscher, Crystal

    2009-01-01

    We developed a rubric to assess several of our department's undergraduate student learning outcomes (SLOs). Target SLOs include applications of principles of research methodology, using appropriate statistics, adherence to the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, and written communication skills. We randomly sampled 20…

  13. Strategies for Effective Dissemination of the Outcomes of Teaching and Learning Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwell, Deborah; Gannaway, Deanne; Orrell, Janice; Chalmers, Denise; Abraham, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an empirical study that addresses the question of how higher education institutions can disseminate effectively the outcomes of projects that seek to achieve large-scale change in teaching and learning. Traditionally, dissemination of innovation and good practice is strongly advocated within universities, but little…

  14. The Determinants of Students' Perceived Learning Outcomes and Satisfaction in University Online Education: An Empirical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Sean B.; Wen, H. Joseph; Ashill, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    In this study, structural equation modeling is applied to examine the determinants of students' satisfaction and their perceived learning outcomes in the context of university online courses. Independent variables included in the study are course structure, instructor feedback, self-motivation, learning style, interaction, and instructor…

  15. The Explained Effects of Computer Mediated Conferencing on Student Learning Outcomes and Engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Cain, Darrell L.

    2005-01-01

    There has been an increasing growth in the use of technology resources in traditional classroom styled higher education courses. This growth has received with both optimism and criticism. One of the issues critics have posed is that the use of technology resources does little, if anything, to improve student learning. As a result, this research examined if the use of technology contributes to student learning outcomes and student engagement activities, above and beyond student demographic var...

  16. Positive smoking outcome expectancies mediate the association between negative affect and smoking urge among women during a quit attempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Miguel Ángel; Lam, Cho Y; Chen, Minxing; Adams, Claire E; Correa-Fernández, Virmarie; Stewart, Diana W; McClure, Jennifer B; Cinciripini, Paul M; Wetter, David W

    2014-08-01

    Ecological momentary assessment was used to examine associations between negative affect, positive smoking outcome expectancies, and smoking urge during the first 7 days of a smoking quit attempt. Participants were 302 female smokers who enrolled in an individually tailored smoking cessation treatment study. Multilevel mediation analysis was used to examine the temporal relationship among the following: (a) the effects of negative affect and positive smoking outcome expectancies at 1 assessment point (e.g., time j) on smoking urge at the subsequent time point (e.g., time j + 1) in Model 1; and, (b) the effects of negative affect and smoking urge at time j on positive smoking outcome expectancies at time j + 1 in Model 2. The results from Model 1 showed a statistically significant effect of negative affect at time j on smoking urge at time j + 1, and this effect was mediated by positive smoking outcome expectancies at time j, both within- and between-participants. In Model 2, the within-participant indirect effect of negative affect at time j on positive smoking outcome expectancies at time j + 1 through smoking urge at time j was nonsignificant. However, a statistically significant indirect between-participants effect was found in Model 2. The findings support the hypothesis that urge and positive smoking outcome expectancies increase as a function of negative affect, and suggest a stronger effect of expectancies on urge as opposed to the effect of urge on expectancies.

  17. Associations of Subjective Immersion, Immersion Subfactors, and Learning Outcomes in the Revised Game Engagement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Paul A.; Bowers, Clint

    2018-01-01

    Serious Educational Video Games (SEGs) play a large role in education for both children and adults. However, the budget for SEGs is typically lower than traditional entertainment video games, bringing with it the need to optimize the learning experience. This article looks at the role game immersion plays in improving learning outcomes, using the…

  18. A Critical Perspective on Learning Outcomes and the Effectiveness of Experiential Approaches in Entrepreneurship Education: Do we Innovate or Implement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jonathan M; Penaluna, Andy; Thompson, John L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to conduct a critical appraisal of how experiential approaches can more effectively enhance the achievement of desired learning outcomes in entrepreneurship education. In particular, the authors critique whether actual learning outcomes can be profitably used to measure effectiveness; and consider how student…

  19. Negative relationship behavior is more important than positive: Correlates of outcomes during stressful life events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Alannah Shelby; Sanford, Keith

    2018-04-01

    When people who are married or cohabiting face stressful life situations, their ability to cope may be associated with two separate dimensions of interpersonal behavior: positive and negative. These behaviors can be assessed with the Couple Resilience Inventory (CRI). It was expected that scales on this instrument would correlate with outcome variables regarding life well-being, stress, and relationship satisfaction. It was also expected that effects for negative behavior would be larger than effects for positive and that the effects might be curvilinear. Study 1 included 325 married or cohabiting people currently experiencing nonmedical major life stressors and Study 2 included 154 married or cohabiting people with current, serious medical conditions. All participants completed an online questionnaire including the CRI along with an alternate measure of couple behavior (to confirm scale validity), a measure of general coping style (to serve as a covariate), and measures of outcome variables regarding well-being, quality of life, perceived stress, and relationship satisfaction. The effects for negative behavior were larger than effects for positive in predicting most outcomes, and many effects were curvilinear. Notably, results remained significant after controlling for general coping style, and scales measuring positive and negative behavior demonstrated comparable levels of validity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Towards a Model and Methodology for Assessing Student Learning Outcomes and Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Lola C.; Weeks, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to introduce a conceptual model for assessing undergraduate student learning outcomes and satisfaction that involves concepts drawn from the services marketing and assessment literatures; second, to illustrate the utility of the model as implemented in an academic department (geography)…

  1. Beyond Student Learning Outcomes: Developing Comprehensive, Strategic Assessment Plans for Advising Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    This article argues that while the importance of assessment in academic advising is clear and the current emphasis on defining and measuring student learning outcomes represents an essential component of any comprehensive advising assessment plan, an even more comprehensive understanding of programme assessment is needed. Drawing upon business…

  2. Questions never asked. Positive family outcomes of extremely premature childbirth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Hanne; Pedersen, Birthe D; Hedegaard, Morten

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore positive aspects of family life after extremely premature childbirth, thereby supplementing current literature on long-term family outcome. DESIGN: Semi-structured, qualitative research interviews were analysed according to the editing strategy described by Miller and Crabtree....... SETTING: Denmark, Europe. PARTICIPANTS: Nine fathers and 11 mothers of 14 children born before 28 completed weeks of gestation at a tertiary centre were interviewed when their children were 7-10 years old. RESULTS: Whereas developmental delay, functional limitations, family burden, and parental distress...

  3. A Comparison of Learning Outcomes in Skills-Based Courses: Online versus Face-to-Face Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Ronda Roberts; Love, Mary Sue

    2016-01-01

    In comparing the learning outcomes of online versus face-to-face courses, skills-based forms of instruction have received little attention. This study asks the question "Can skills-based courses taught online achieve the same outcomes as face-to-face courses in which the instructor and students interacting in real time may have higher levels…

  4. Harnessing members' positive mood for team-directed learning behaviour and team innovation : The moderating role of perceived team feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, Frank; van der Vegt, Gerben S.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the role of individual team members' positive mood and perceived team feedback for their team-directed learning behaviour. Results obtained in a sample of 186 members from 27 work teams showed that positive mood was positively associated with team-directed learning behaviour if

  5. The kids got game: Computer/video games, gender and learning outcomes in science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Janice Lyn

    In recent years educators have begun to explore how to purposively design computer/video games to support student learning. This interest in video games has arisen in part because educational video games appear to have the potential to improve student motivation and interest in technology, and engage students in learning through the use of a familiar medium (Squire, 2005; Shaffer, 2006; Gee, 2005). The purpose of this dissertation research is to specifically address the issue of student learning through the use of educational computer/video games. Using the Quest Atlantis computer game, this study involved a mixed model research strategy that allowed for both broad understandings of classroom practices and specific analysis of outcomes through the themes that emerged from the case studies of the gendered groups using the game. Specifically, this study examined how fifth-grade students learning about science concepts, such as water quality and ecosystems, unfolds over time as they participate in the Quest Atlantis computer game. Data sources included classroom observations and video, pre- and post-written assessments, pre- and post- student content interviews, student field notebooks, field reports and the field notes of the researcher. To make sense of how students learning unfolded, video was analyzed using a framework of interaction analysis and small group interactions (Jordan & Henderson, 1995; Webb, 1995). These coded units were then examined with respect to student artifacts and assessments and patterns of learning trajectories analyzed. The analysis revealed that overall, student learning outcomes improved from pre- to post-assessments for all students. While there were no observable gendered differences with respect to the test scores and content interviews, there were gendered differences with respect to game play. Implications for game design, use of external scaffolds, games as tools for learning and gendered findings are discussed.

  6. Are marketing students in control in problem-based learning?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geitz, Gerry; Joosten-ten Brinke, Desirée; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated to what extent self-efficacy, learning behavior, and performance outcomes relate to each other and how they can be positively influenced by students asking for and seeking feedback within a problem-based learning (PBL) environment in order to meet today’s requirements of

  7. Cohorts and Relatedness: Self-Determination Theory as an Explanation of How Learning Communities Affect Educational Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachboard, Martine Robinson; Beachboard, John C.; Li, Wenling; Adkison, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines whether feelings of relatedness constitute a substantial means by which learning communities (cohorts) improve learning outcomes in higher education. It applies Ryan and Deci's Self-Determination Theory to an analysis of the National Survey of Student Engagement. The SDT hypothesizes that environments that support perceptions…

  8. Differently Structured Advance Organizers Lead to Different Initial Schemata and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurlitt, Johannes; Dummel, Sebastian; Schuster, Silvia; Nuckles, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Does the specific structure of advance organizers influence learning outcomes? In the first experiment, 48 psychology students were randomly assigned to three differently structured advance organizers: a well-structured, a well-structured and key-concept emphasizing, and a less structured advance organizer. These were followed by a sorting task, a…

  9. The changing concept of competence and categorisation of learning outcomes in Europe: Implications for the design of higher education radiography curricula at the European level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, Joseph; Caruana, Carmel J.; Wainwright, David

    2011-01-01

    The Bologna process has made the qualifications framework of the European Higher Educational Area based on three cycles and on learning outcomes central to curriculum development in higher education in Europe. The Tuning Educational Structures in Europe project recommended that learning outcomes be expressed in terms of competences. The expression of educational programme learning outcomes as inventories of competences has since become the norm at the European level. However, the more recent European Qualifications Framework for lifelong learning utilises a tripartite set of categories of learning outcomes, namely, knowledge, skills and competence. In addition, the definition of competence used though overlapping with that used by Tuning, is however not identical. This article reviews and discusses the changing definition of the concept of competence and changes in categorisation of learning outcomes in Europe and their potential impact on curriculum development in radiography at the European level. It is proposed that the shift in the definition of competence and in the categorisation of learning outcomes should be taken into account in the formulation of new European curricula or the updating of present ones so that they may reference in a more direct manner to the levels of the European Qualifications Framework.

  10. Student perceptions and learning outcomes of blended learning in a massive first-year core physiology for allied health subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Janelle; Meehan-Andrews, Terri; Weerakkody, Nivan; Hughes, Diane L; Rathner, Joseph A

    2017-03-01

    Evidence shows that factors contributing to success in physiology education for allied health students at universities include not only their high school achievement and background but also factors such as confidence with their teachers and quality of their learning experience, justifying intensive and continued survey of students' perceptions of their learning experience. Here we report data covering a 3-yr period in a physiology subject that has been redesigned for blended and online presentation. Consistent with previous reports, we show that when we undertook a blended mode of delivery, students demonstrated better grades than traditional modes of teaching; however the absence of didactic teaching in this subject resulted in lower grades overall. Students have very strong positive attitudes to weekly quizzes (80% positive approval) but report ambivalent attitudes to online self-directed learning (61% negative perception), even though they had 2-h weekly facilitated workshops. Overwhelmingly, students who undertook the subject in a self-directed online learning mode requested more face-to-face-teaching (70% of comments). From these data, we suggest that there is a quantifiable benefit to didactic teaching in the blended teaching mode that is not reproduced in online self-directed learning, even when face-to-face guided inquiry-based learning is embedded in the subject. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Measuring Learning Outcomes. A Learner Perspective in Auditing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Steenholdt, Niels

    The ability to provide sensible measures for learning outcomes in accounting education is under increased scrutiny. In this paper we use a learner perspective in auditing education which reflects that some students taking accounting classes also are provided with on-the-job training in accounting...... is part of every day life within most accounting firms. Developing a sound on-the-job training environment is pivotal in the recruitment and design of supervision, and in the end for the expected "successrate" in retaining (valuable) employees. Prior research suggests that scripts or schemas provide...

  12. Teachers' Roles, Students' Personalities, Inquiry Learning Outcomes, and Practices of Science and Engineering: The Development and Validation of the McGill Attainment Value for Inquiry Engagement Survey in STEM Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed; Aulls, Mark W.; Shore, Bruce M.

    2017-01-01

    Inquiry engagement is a newly defined construct that represents the participation in carrying out practices of science and engineering to achieve learning outcomes and is influenced by learners' personalities and teachers' roles. Expectancy value theory posits that attainment values are important components of task values that, in turn, directly…

  13. The development of learning materials based on core model to improve students’ learning outcomes in topic of Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avianti, R.; Suyatno; Sugiarto, B.

    2018-04-01

    This study aims to create an appropriate learning material based on CORE (Connecting, Organizing, Reflecting, Extending) model to improve students’ learning achievement in Chemical Bonding Topic. This study used 4-D models as research design and one group pretest-posttest as design of the material treatment. The subject of the study was teaching materials based on CORE model, conducted on 30 students of Science class grade 10. The collecting data process involved some techniques such as validation, observation, test, and questionnaire. The findings were that: (1) all the contents were valid, (2) the practicality and the effectiveness of all the contents were good. The conclusion of this research was that the CORE model is appropriate to improve students’ learning outcomes for studying Chemical Bonding.

  14. A Paradigm for Student Learning Outcome Assessment in Information Systems Education: Continuous Improvement or Chasing Rainbows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulnier, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    A paradigm is presented for student learning outcome assessment in information systems education. Successful deployment of the paradigm is illustrated using the author's home institution. The paradigm is consistent with both the scholarship of teaching and learning and the scholarship of assessment. It is concluded that the deployment of the…

  15. Cognitive and Socio-Affective Outcomes of Project-Based Learning: Perceptions of Greek Second Chance School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutrouba, Konstantina; Karageorgou, Elissavet

    2013-01-01

    The present questionnaire-based study was conducted in 2010 in order to examine 677 Greek Second Chance School (SCS) students' perceptions about the cognitive and socio-affective outcomes of project-based learning. Data elaboration, statistical and factor analysis showed that the participants found that project-based learning offered a second…

  16. Forum: Learning Outcomes in Communication. Responses. On the Importance of Communication Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangelisti, Anita L.

    2016-01-01

    Anita Vangelisti writes in this response that although the recommendations set forward in this "Forum" are well thought out and important additions to the discussion, teacher-scholars in the field of communication can, and should, do more. She agrees that there is a need to identify and describe learning outcomes in communication, and…

  17. Effects of Mobile Instant Messaging on Collaborative Learning Processes and Outcomes: The Case of South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyewon; Lee, MiYoung; Kim, Minjeong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the effects of mobile instant messaging on collaborative learning processes and outcomes. The collaborative processes were measured in terms of different types of interactions. We measured the outcomes of the collaborations through both the students' taskwork and their teamwork. The collaborative…

  18. e-Learning competency for practice nurses: an evaluation report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heartfield, Marie; Morello, Andrea; Harris, Melanie; Lawn, Sharon; Pols, Vincenza; Stapleton, Carolyn; Battersby, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Practice nurses in Australia are now funded to facilitate chronic condition management, including self-management support. Chronic disease management requires an established rapport, support and proactivity between general practitioners, patients and the practice nurses. To achieve this, training in shared decision making is needed. e-Learning supports delivery and achievement of such policy outcomes, service improvements and skill development. However, e-learning effectiveness for health care professionals' is determined by several organisational, economic, pedagogical and individual factors, with positive e-learning experience linked closely to various supports. This paper reinforces previous studies showing nurses' expanding role across general practice teams and reports on some of the challenges of e-learning. Merely providing practice nurses with necessary information via web-based learning systems does not ensure successful learning or progress toward improving health outcomes for patients.

  19. Green Schoolyards in Low-Income Urban Neighborhoods: Natural Spaces for Positive Youth Development Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn R. Bates

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Children from low-income families are increasingly growing up in urban areas with limited access to nature. In these environments, strategies that promote access to natural outdoor spaces, such as green schoolyards, may enhance positive youth development outcomes by promoting physical activity (PA and prosocial behavior, as well as increasing perceptions of safety. The current study examines children’s PA and social interactions, as well as caregiver and teacher perceptions of safety, injuries, teasing/bullying, and gang activity on three newly renovated green schoolyards in low-income urban neighborhoods. A multi-method strategy, including behavioral mapping and caregiver- and teacher-reported surveys, was utilized at three time points to examine positive youth development outcomes and maintenance of effects over time. Analyses revealed that children evidenced a range of PA on the green schoolyards and demonstrated significant decreases in sedentary activity over time. The majority of children were engaged in social interactions with peers on the green schoolyards when observed. Less than 3% of interactions were negative and follow-up analyses found significant increases in positive interactions on the green schoolyards up to 24 months post-renovation. Caregivers and teachers reported increased perceptions of safety, fewer injuries, less teasing/bullying, and less gang-related activity on the renovated green schoolyards in comparison to the pre-renovation schoolyards, and these effects were maintained up to 32 months post-renovation. Overall, the study suggests that green schoolyards may promote positive development outcomes among youth living in urban, low-income neighborhoods by providing natural and safe spaces for PA and prosocial behavior.

  20. The Impact of Computer Use on Learning of Quadratic Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlap, Sirje

    2017-01-01

    Studies of the impact of various types of computer use on the results of learning and student motivation have indicated that the use of computers can increase learning motivation, and that computers can have a positive effect, a negative effect, or no effect at all on learning outcomes. Some results indicate that it is not computer use itself that…

  1. Application of active learning modalities to achieve medical genetics competencies and their learning outcome assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Nobuko

    2017-01-01

    The steadily falling costs of genome sequencing, coupled with the growing number of genetic tests with proven clinical validity, have made the use of genetic testing more common in clinical practice. This development has necessitated nongeneticist physicians, especially primary care physicians, to become more responsible for assessing genetic risks for their patients. Providing undergraduate medical students a solid foundation in genomic medicine, therefore, has become all the more important to ensure the readiness of future physicians in applying genomic medicine to their patient care. In order to further enhance the effectiveness of instructing practical skills in medical genetics, the emphasis of active learning modules in genetics curriculum at medical schools has increased in recent years. This is because of the general acceptance of a better efficacy of active learner-centered pedagogy over passive lecturer-centered pedagogy. However, an objective standard to evaluate students' skill levels in genomic medicine achieved by active learning is currently missing. Recently, entrustable professional activities (EPAs) in genomic medicine have been proposed as a framework for developing physician competencies in genomic medicine. EPAs in genomic medicine provide a convenient guideline for not only developing genomic medicine curriculum but also assessing students' competency levels in practicing genomic medicine. In this review, the efficacy of different types of active learning modules reported for medical genetics curricula is discussed using EPAs in genomic medicine as a common evaluation standard for modules' learning outcomes. The utility of the EPAs in genomic medicine for designing active learning modules in undergraduate medical genetics curricula is also discussed.

  2. 臺灣國小行動學習計畫的學生自評學習效益影響因素探討 Investigating the Perceived Learning Outcomes of Elementary Students in a Mobile Learning Program in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    陳奕樺 I-Hua Chen

    2016-09-01

    program, with data collected from 44 teachers and 1,877 students. The results show that (1 Higher students’ task-value, self-efficacy and perceived family support were associated with higher perceived learning outcomes; (2 Lower class size was associated with higher perceived learning outcomes; and (3 Lower teacher beliefs regarding students’ ability to use information and communications technology (ICT enhanced higher strength of positive relation between task-value and perceived learning outcomes, while higher teacher beliefs related to students’ learning efficacy and ability to use ICT enhanced higher strength of positive relation between self-efficacy and perceived learning outcomes.

  3. Learning through the Adventure of Youth Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Tarkington J.; Kim, Melissa; Tucker, Anita R.; Alvarez, M. Antonio G.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Participation in youth sport is often associated with a variety of positive development outcomes. In order to effectively utilize sport as a context of learning and development, the sport must be intentionally designed and programed. One often-used approach is known as sport-based positive youth development (PYD). Recently, to further…

  4. Improving Learning Outcomes: The iPad and Preschool Children with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiliar, Linda

    2017-01-01

    The digital age has reached early childhood, and the use of touch screens by young children is common place. Research on the use of touch screen tablets with young children is becoming more prevalent; however, less information is available on the use of touch screen tablets to support young children with disabilities. Touch screen tablets may offer possibilities to preschool children with disabilities to participate in learning in a digital way. The iPad provides easy interaction on the touch screen and access to a multitude of engaging early learning applications. This paper summarizes a pilot study with 8 young children with disabilities included in a preschool classroom, who were given iPads to use in class and at home for a period of 21 weeks. Systematic observations, classroom assessments, and teacher and parent interviews documented the improvements in learning outcomes for each child in many areas including, but not limited to: shape and color recognition, letter recognition, and tracing letters throughout six research cycles.

  5. Flipped Learning in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom: Outcomes and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Given; Wallace, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    Although many educators have recently discussed the positive effects of flipped learning, there is little empirical evidence about whether this approach can actually promote students' English learning. This study was undertaken in four sections of the same College English 1 (E1) course over two consecutive semesters at a South Korean university. A…

  6. Computer-based learning: games as an instructional strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, J; Goodman, J

    1999-01-01

    Games are a creative teaching strategy that enhances learning and problem solving. Gaming strategies are being used by the authors to make learning interesting, stimulating and fun. This article focuses on the development and implementation of computer games as an instructional strategy. Positive outcomes have resulted from the use of games in the classroom.

  7. Cortical ensemble activity increasingly predicts behaviour outcomes during learning of a motor task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubach, Mark; Wessberg, Johan; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2000-06-01

    When an animal learns to make movements in response to different stimuli, changes in activity in the motor cortex seem to accompany and underlie this learning. The precise nature of modifications in cortical motor areas during the initial stages of motor learning, however, is largely unknown. Here we address this issue by chronically recording from neuronal ensembles located in the rat motor cortex, throughout the period required for rats to learn a reaction-time task. Motor learning was demonstrated by a decrease in the variance of the rats' reaction times and an increase in the time the animals were able to wait for a trigger stimulus. These behavioural changes were correlated with a significant increase in our ability to predict the correct or incorrect outcome of single trials based on three measures of neuronal ensemble activity: average firing rate, temporal patterns of firing, and correlated firing. This increase in prediction indicates that an association between sensory cues and movement emerged in the motor cortex as the task was learned. Such modifications in cortical ensemble activity may be critical for the initial learning of motor tasks.

  8. Working memory and reward association learning impairments in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppin, Géraldine; Nolan-Poupart, Sarah; Jones-Gotman, Marilyn; Small, Dana M

    2014-12-01

    Obesity has been associated with impaired executive functions including working memory. Less explored is the influence of obesity on learning and memory. In the current study we assessed stimulus reward association learning, explicit learning and memory and working memory in healthy weight, overweight and obese individuals. Explicit learning and memory did not differ as a function of group. In contrast, working memory was significantly and similarly impaired in both overweight and obese individuals compared to the healthy weight group. In the first reward association learning task the obese, but not healthy weight or overweight participants consistently formed paradoxical preferences for a pattern associated with a negative outcome (fewer food rewards). To determine if the deficit was specific to food reward a second experiment was conducted using money. Consistent with Experiment 1, obese individuals selected the pattern associated with a negative outcome (fewer monetary rewards) more frequently than healthy weight individuals and thus failed to develop a significant preference for the most rewarded patterns as was observed in the healthy weight group. Finally, on a probabilistic learning task, obese compared to healthy weight individuals showed deficits in negative, but not positive outcome learning. Taken together, our results demonstrate deficits in working memory and stimulus reward learning in obesity and suggest that obese individuals are impaired in learning to avoid negative outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Learning Program for Enhancing Visual Literacy for Non-Design Students Using a CMS to Share Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, Taeko; Watanabe, Takashi; Otani, Toshio; Masuzawa, Toshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a basic learning program for enhancing visual literacy using an original Web content management system (Web CMS) to share students' outcomes in class as a blog post. It seeks to reinforce students' understanding and awareness of the design of visual content. The learning program described in this research focuses on to address…

  10. Self-Determined Learning to Motivate Struggling Learners in Reading and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Shogren, Karrie A.; Toste, Jessica R.; Mahal, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Promoting self-determined learning through student-directed learning strategies has been documented to promote more positive school-related outcomes for upper elementary grade learners with disabilities and other students who are struggling. These strategies are typically introduced in multicomponent interventions combining several…

  11. On-Line Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management: Using Learning Outcome Statements To Design Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettijohn, James B.; Ragan, Gay A.; Ragan, Kent P.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an Internet-based project to familiarize students with online investment analysis and stock portfolio management. Outlines a process for writing learning outcomes that address three levels of cognition: knowledge/comprehension, application/analysis, and synthesis/evaluation. (SK)

  12. Student Buy-In to Active Learning in a College Science Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Andrew J; Aragón, Oriana R; Chen, Xinnian; Couch, Brian; Durham, Mary; Bobrownicki, Aiyana; Hanauer, David I; Graham, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of introducing active learning in college science courses are well established, yet more needs to be understood about student buy-in to active learning and how that process of buy-in might relate to student outcomes. We test the exposure-persuasion-identification-commitment (EPIC) process model of buy-in, here applied to student (n = 245) engagement in an undergraduate science course featuring active learning. Student buy-in to active learning was positively associated with engagement in self-regulated learning and students' course performance. The positive associations among buy-in, self-regulated learning, and course performance suggest buy-in as a potentially important factor leading to student engagement and other student outcomes. These findings are particularly salient in course contexts featuring active learning, which encourage active student participation in the learning process. © 2016 A. J. Cavanagh et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. Frequency of head-impact-related outcomes by position in NCAA division I collegiate football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Christine M; Kiernan, Patrick T; Kroshus, Emily; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Montenigro, Philip H; McKee, Ann C; Stern, Robert A

    2015-03-01

    Concussions and subconcussive impacts sustained in American football have been associated with short- and long-term neurological impairment, but differences in head impact outcomes across playing positions are not well understood. The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine has identified playing position as a key risk factor for concussion in football and one for which additional research is needed. This study examined variation in head impact outcomes across primary football playing positions in a group of 730 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Football Championship Series athletes, using a self-report questionnaire. Although there were no significant differences between position groups in the number of diagnosed concussions during the 2012 football season, there were significant differences between groups in undiagnosed concussions (p=0.008) and "dings" (pfootball season, with offensive linemen reporting significantly more symptoms compared to most other groups. There were also positional differences in frequency of returning to play while symptomatic (p<0.001) and frequency of participating in full-contact practice (p<0.001). Offensive linemen reported having returned to play while experiencing symptoms more frequently and participating in more full-contact practices than other groups. These findings suggest that offensive linemen, a position group that experiences frequent, but low-magnitude, head impacts, develop more postimpact symptoms than other playing positions, but do not report these symptoms as a concussion.

  14. Frequency of Head-Impact–Related Outcomes by Position in NCAA Division I Collegiate Football Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Patrick T.; Kroshus, Emily; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Montenigro, Philip H.; McKee, Ann C.; Stern, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Concussions and subconcussive impacts sustained in American football have been associated with short- and long-term neurological impairment, but differences in head impact outcomes across playing positions are not well understood. The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine has identified playing position as a key risk factor for concussion in football and one for which additional research is needed. This study examined variation in head impact outcomes across primary football playing positions in a group of 730 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Football Championship Series athletes, using a self-report questionnaire. Although there were no significant differences between position groups in the number of diagnosed concussions during the 2012 football season, there were significant differences between groups in undiagnosed concussions (p=0.008) and “dings” (pfootball season, with offensive linemen reporting significantly more symptoms compared to most other groups. There were also positional differences in frequency of returning to play while symptomatic (p<0.001) and frequency of participating in full-contact practice (p<0.001). Offensive linemen reported having returned to play while experiencing symptoms more frequently and participating in more full-contact practices than other groups. These findings suggest that offensive linemen, a position group that experiences frequent, but low-magnitude, head impacts, develop more postimpact symptoms than other playing positions, but do not report these symptoms as a concussion. PMID:25155288

  15. IMPACT OF MEDICAL AND SOCIAL FACTORS ON SURGICAL OUTCOMES OF PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS IN HIV POSITIVE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Аlkаz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the study of the impact of social and medical factors and bad habits on the outcomes of planned surgery in 95 patients with concurrent respiratory tuberculosis and HIV infection The correlation analysis was performed which discovered the factors providing a positive impact on treatment outcomes The following factors have the strongest association with treatment outcome: patient's regular job, family, no alcohol or nicotine addiction, a form of tuberculosis, and administration of antiretroviral therapy It was noted that surgery outcome could be predicted and potential complications prevented 

  16. Learning outcomes between Socioscientific Issues-Based Learning and Conventional Learning Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Piyaluk Wongsri; Prasart Nuangchalerm

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Socioscientific issues-based learning activity is essential for scientific reasoning skills and it could be used for analyzing problems be applied to each situation for more successful and suitable. The purposes of this research aimed to compare learning achievement, analytical thinking and moral reasoning of seventh grade students who were organized between socioscientific issues-based learning and conventional learning activities. Approach: The samples used in research we...

  17. Electronic learning and constructivism: a model for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, Sasikarn; Isaramalai, Sang-Arun; Pohthong, Amnart

    2010-01-01

    Nurse educators are challenged to teach nursing students to become competent professionals, who have both in-depth knowledge and decision-making skills. The use of electronic learning methods has been found to facilitate the teaching-learning process in nursing education. Although learning theories are acknowledged as useful guides to design strategies and activities of learning, integration of these theories into technology-based courses appears limited. Constructivism is a theoretical paradigm that could prove to be effective in guiding the design of electronic learning experiences for the purpose of providing positive outcomes, such as the acquisition of knowledge and decision-making skills. Therefore, the purposes of this paper are to: describe electronic learning, present a brief overview of what is known about the outcomes of electronic learning, discuss constructivism theory, present a model for electronic learning using constructivism, and describe educators' roles emphasizing the utilization of the model in developing electronic learning experiences in nursing education.

  18. Problem-based learning in pre-clinical medical education: 22 years of outcome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartling, Lisa; Spooner, Carol; Tjosvold, Lisa; Oswald, Anna

    2010-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review of problem-based learning (PBL) in undergraduate, pre-clinical medical education. A research librarian developed comprehensive search strategies for MEDLINE, PSYCINFO, and ERIC (1985-2007). Two reviewers independently screened search results and applied inclusion criteria. Studies were included if they had a comparison group and reported primary data for evaluative outcomes. One reviewer extracted data and a second reviewer checked data for accuracy. Two reviewers independently assessed methodological quality. Quantitative synthesis was not performed due to heterogeneity. A qualitative review with detailed evidence tables is provided. Thirty unique studies were included. Knowledge acquisition measured by exam scores was the most frequent outcome reported; 12 of 15 studies found no significant differences. Individual studies demonstrated either improved clerkship (N = 3) or residency (N = 1) performance, or benefits on some clinical competencies during internships for PBL (N = 1). Three of four studies found some benefits for PBL when evaluating diagnostic accuracy. Three studies found few differences of clinical (or practical) importance on the impact of PBL on practicing physicians. Twenty-two years of research shows that PBL does not impact knowledge acquisition; evidence for other outcomes does not provide unequivocal support for enhanced learning. Work is needed to determine the most appropriate outcome measures to capture and quantify the effects of PBL. General conclusions are limited by methodological weaknesses and heterogeneity across studies. The critical appraisal of previous studies, conducted as part of this review, provides direction for future research in this area.

  19. Blended learning versus traditional teaching-learning-setting: Evaluation of cognitive and affective learning outcomes for the inter-professional field of occupational medicine and prevention / Blended Learning versus traditionelles Lehr-Lernsetting: Evaluierung von kognitiven und affektiven Lernergebnissen für das interprofessionelle Arbeitsfeld Arbeitsmedizin und Prävention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckler Ursula

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Blended learning is characterised as a combination of face-to-face teaching and e-learning in terms of knowledge transfer, students’ learning activities and reduced presence at the teaching facility. The present cohort study investigated long-term effects of blended learning regarding cognitive outcomes as well as self-indicated estimates of immediate learning effects on the affective domain in the inter-professional field of occupational medicine. Physiotherapy students (bachelor degree at FH Campus Wien – University of Applied Sciences completed the course Occupational Medicine/Prevention either in a traditional teaching-learning setting entirely taught face-to-face (control-group, n=94, or with a blended learning model (intervention-group, n=93. Long-term effects (1.5 year follow-up on the cognitive learning outcomes were assessed according to four levels of Bloom’s learning objectives. In addition, students estimated potential benefits resulting from blended learning based on four Krathwohl’s learning objectives for the affective domain by means of a six-option Likert scale (n=282. Concerning cognitive outcomes, significant results favouring both groups were found with effect sizes from small to medium. The traditional teaching-learning setting resulted in significantly better results in the upmost aspired learning objective (analysis at the long-term (p<0,01; r=-0,33. In contrast, the intervention group resulted in significantly better long-term results on learning objective levels 1 (knowledge and 2 (understanding (p=0,01; r=-0,20 and, p=0,02; r=-0,17, respectively. Hence, no general recommendation favouring either the classical setting or blending learning can be drawn regarding the cognitive domain. However, students’ self-indications on the affective domain give preference to blended learning, particularly if inter-professional teamwork is a course objective.

  20. Investigating Implementation Methods and Perceived Learning Outcomes of Children’s Library Instruction Programs: A Case of Parent-child Doctors’ Mailbox in National Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Chang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the implementation methods, process and perceived learning outcomes of children’s library instruction programs. This study adopted a qualitative approach with the Parent-child Doctors’ Mailbox program in National Library of Public Information. Observation (including thinking aloud, interviews and documents were used for data collection in order to elicit perspectives of 31 children, 26 parents and 3 librarians. Main findings derived from this study can be summarized as follows: (1 Parent-child Doctors’ Mailbox integrated play (e.g., prize quizzes and reading guides into the program design, which was based upon the development of different age groups. Children needed to go to the circulation desk in person in order to get designated books and answer sheets. Children earned points to redeem for prizes by answering questions correctly. (2 Motivations for children’s participation in the program were categorized as external (e.g., prizes, recommendations from friends and serendipity and internal (e.g., cultivating habits of reading and writing, and siblings’ company. (3 Children’s perceived learning outcomes of participation in the program included improving children’s attention span, the positive influence of messages delivered by books on children, and the positive progress of children’s reading, writing, logical thinking and interpersonal skills. (4 Parents’ roles in children’s participation in the program included accompanying children and providing reactive assistance. Roles of librarians involved administrative work, encouragement and befriending children. [Article content in Chinese

  1. Younger but not older adults benefit from salient feedback during learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eHerbert

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Older adults are impaired in reinforcement learning (RL when feedback is partially ambiguous (e.g., Eppinger and Kray, 2011. In this study we examined whether older adults benefit from salient feedback information during learning. We used an electrophysiological approach and investigated 15 younger and 15 older adults with a RL task in which they had to learn stimulus-response associations under two learning conditions. In the positive learning conditions, participants could gain 50 Cents for a correct response but did not gain or lose money (*00 Cent for an incorrect response. In negative learning conditions, they could lose 50 Cents for an incorrect response but did not gain or lose money (*00 Cent for a correct response. As the identical outcome 00 Cent is either better or worse than the alternative outcome depending on the learning condition, this feedback type is ambiguous. To examine the influence of feedback salience we compared this condition with a condition in which positive and negative outcomes were color-coded and thereby clearly separable. The behavioral results indicated that younger adults reached higher accuracy levels under salient feedback conditions. Moreover, the error-related negativity (ERN and the feedback-related negativity (FRN for losses were larger if the good-bad dimension of feedback was salient. Hence, in younger adults salient feedback facilitates the rapid evaluation of outcomes on a good-bad dimension and by this supports learning. In contrast, for older adults we obtained neither behavioral nor electrophysiological effects of feedback salience. The older adults’ performance monitoring system therefore appears less flexible in integrating additional information in this evaluation process.

  2. Evolving Digital Divides in Information Literacy and Learning Outcomes: A BYOD Journey in a Scondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Janak; Scogings, Chris; Mathrani, Anuradha; Sofat, Indu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to seek answers to questions on how equity of information literacy and learning outcomes have evolved with the ongoing advances in technologies in teaching and learning across schools. The authors' report on a five-year long bring your own device (BYOD) journey of one school, which was one of the earliest…

  3. Evaluating the negative or valuing the positive? Neural mechanisms supporting feedback-based learning across development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C K; Zanolie, Kiki; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Raijmakers, Maartje E J; Crone, Eveline A

    2008-09-17

    How children learn from positive and negative performance feedback lies at the foundation of successful learning and is therefore of great importance for educational practice. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural developmental changes related to feedback-based learning when performing a rule search and application task. Behavioral results from three age groups (8-9, 11-13, and 18-25 years of age) demonstrated that, compared with adults, 8- to 9-year-old children performed disproportionally more inaccurately after receiving negative feedback relative to positive feedback. Additionally, imaging data pointed toward a qualitative difference in how children and adults use performance feedback. That is, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and superior parietal cortex were more active after negative feedback for adults, but after positive feedback for children (8-9 years of age). For 11- to 13-year-olds, these regions did not show differential feedback sensitivity, suggesting that the transition occurs around this age. Pre-supplementary motor area/anterior cingulate cortex, in contrast, was more active after negative feedback in both 11- to 13-year-olds and adults, but not 8- to 9-year-olds. Together, the current data show that cognitive control areas are differentially engaged during feedback-based learning across development. Adults engage these regions after signals of response adjustment (i.e., negative feedback). Young children engage these regions after signals of response continuation (i.e., positive feedback). The neural activation patterns found in 11- to 13-year-olds indicate a transition around this age toward an increased influence of negative feedback on performance adjustment. This is the first developmental fMRI study to compare qualitative changes in brain activation during feedback learning across distinct stages of development.

  4. Transitioning a bachelor of science in nursing program to blended learning: Successes, challenges & outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, Laurie; Pintz, Christine

    2017-09-01

    To help address the challenges of providing undergraduate nursing education in an accelerated time frame, the Teaching and Transforming through Technology (T3) project was funded to transition a second-degree ABSN program to a blended learning format. The project has explored the use of blended learning to: enable flexible solutions to support teaching goals and address course challenges; provide students with new types of independent learning activities outside of the traditional classroom; increase opportunities for active learning in the classroom; and improve students' digital literacy and lifelong learning skills. Program evaluation included quality reviews of the redesigned courses, surveys of student perceptions, pre- and post-program assessment of students' digital literacy and interviews with faculty about their experiences with the new teaching methods. Adopting an established quality framework to guide course design and evaluation for quality contributed to the efficient and effective development of a high-quality undergraduate blended nursing program. Program outcomes and lessons learned are presented to inform future teaching innovation and research related to blended learning in undergraduate nursing education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Digital and traditional slides for teaching cellular morphology: a comparative analysis of learning outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, Brooke L

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in technology have brought forth an intriguing new tool for teaching hematopoietic cellular identification skills: the digital slide. Although digitized slides offer a number of appealing options for educators, little research has been done to examine how their utilization would impact learning outcomes. To fill that void, this study was designed to examine student performance, skill retention and transferability, and self-efficacy beliefs amongst undergraduate MLS students learning cellular morphology with digital versus traditional slides. Results showed that students learning with digital slides performed better on assessments containing only traditional slide specimens than students learning with traditional slides, both immediately following the learning activity and after a considerable duration of time. Students learning with digital slides also reported slightly higher levels of self-efficacy related to cellular identification. The findings of this study suggest that students learning cellular identification skills with digital slides are able to transfer that skill directly to traditional slides, and that their ability to identify cells is not negatively affected in present or future settings.

  6. Improving Learning Outcomes in Office Automation Subjects Through Development of Video-Based Media Learning Operating Microsoft Publisher 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Mastumasari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to produce instructional media video-based operate Microsoft Publisher 2010 which is validated by experts for student at class X of Office Administration in SMKN 1 Malang through experimental class and control class. This study uses Research and Development research design (R & D through 8 steps, namely: (1 research and information gathering early, (2 planning, (3 product development, (4 validation expert, (5 product revision, (6 the trial court (small groups, (7 the revision of the product, and (8 field trials (large group. Results of validation by material experts, media experts and 12 students, the media is expressed very valid and can be used. Based on t test, it is known that a significant difference between the average student learning outcomes experimental class and control class, so that learning media can be said to be effective for use in the learning process.

  7. Perceived Benefits of Pre-Clinical Simulation-based Training on Clinical Learning Outcomes among Omani Undergraduate Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girija Madhavanprabhakaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to explore the benefits perceived by Omani undergraduate maternity nursing students regarding the effect of pre-clinical simulation-based training (PSBT on clinical learning outcomes. Methods: This non-experimental quantitative survey was conducted between August and December 2012 among third-year baccalaureate nursing students at Sultan Qaboos University in Muscat, Oman. Voluntary participants were exposed to faculty-guided PSBT sessions using low- and medium-fidelity manikins, standardised scenarios and skill checklists on antenatal, intranatal, postnatal and newborn care and assessment. Participants answered a purposely designed self-administered questionnaire on the benefits of PSBT in enhancing learning outcomes. Items were categorised into six subscales: knowledge, skills, patient safety, academic safety, confidence and satisfaction. Scores were rated on a four-point Likert scale. Results: Of the 57 participants, the majority (95.2% agreed that PSBT enhanced their knowledge. Most students (94.3% felt that their patient safety practices improved and 86.5% rated PSBT as beneficial for enhancing skill competencies. All male students and 97% of the female students agreed that PSBT enhanced their confidence in the safe holding of newborns. Moreover, 93% of participants were satisfied with PSBT. Conclusion: Omani undergraduate nursing students perceived that PSBT enhanced their knowledge, skills, patient safety practices and confidence levels in providing maternity care. These findings support the use of simulation training as a strategy to facilitate clinical learning outcomes in future nursing courses in Oman, although further research is needed to explore the objective impact of PSBT on learning outcomes.

  8. Expressions of positive emotion in women's college yearbook pictures and their relationship to personality and life outcomes across adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, L; Keltner, D

    2001-01-01

    To test hypotheses about positive emotion, the authors examined the relationship of positive emotional expression in women's college pictures to personality, observer ratings, and life outcomes. Consistent with the notion that positive emotions help build personal resources, positive emotional expression correlated with the self-reported personality traits of affiliation, competence, and low negative emotionality across adulthood and predicted changes in competence and negative emotionality. Observers rated women displaying more positive emotion more favorably on several personality dimensions and expected interactions with them to be more rewarding; thus, demonstrating the beneficial social consequences of positive emotions. Finally, positive emotional expression predicted favorable outcomes in marriage and personal well-being up to 30 years later. Controlling for physical attractiveness and social desirability had little impact on these findings.

  9. Campus Community Involvement in an Experimental Food Research Project Increases Students' Motivation and Improves Perceived Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, K.; Bianco-Simeral, S.

    2009-01-01

    Although the effects of pedagogical strategies using collaborative learning on students' perceived learning outcomes have been studied, little has been examined about possible benefits and challenges in collaborating with the campus community in a food science research project conducted by nutrition majors. We examined the effects of involving…

  10. Exploring Student Perceptions, Learning Outcome and Gender Differences in a Flipped Mathematics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, So-Chen; Yang, Stephen J. H.; Hsiao, Chia-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The flipped classroom approach has recently gained prominence in education. However, a review of previous studies shows that the relationship associated with gender difference, student perceptions and learning outcomes has still remained unexplored, and there has been little discussion regarding flipped classroom environment. To fill this gap,…

  11. Assessing the Quality of the Learning Outcome in Vocational Education: The Expero Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervai, Sara; Cian, Luca; Berlanga, Alicia; Borelli, Massimo; Kekale, Tauno

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present an innovative model to evaluate the quality of the learning outcome in vocational education and training (VET) considering a wide approach that includes, in particular, stakeholders' expectations and perceptions. Design/methodology/approach: The Expero model was implemented in various kinds of vocational schools…

  12. Can Cooperative Learning Maximize the Effectiveness of WebQuest Used in Learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitah Spian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate whether cooperative learning can maximize the effectiveness of webQuest used as a medium in teaching and learning in Islamic education. The present study also examined the perception of students towards WebQuest and cooperative learning method. Muslim students were selected from a rural school in Penang, Malaysia. Quantitative and qualitative approaches were used in this study. The results showed that WebQuest used in teaching and learning in Islamic education had positive impact on students’ learning'. However, cooperative learning method did not influence the students’ learning outcome. Nevertheless, students were interested in the medium of instruction used. Integration of ICT in class lesson in Islamic subject enables the creation of interactive and fun learning among students. Therefore, the application of WebQuest in lessons is suitable and should be applied by all teachers in their learning activities to increase students’ interest and performance in Islamic education.

  13. The Effect of Animation in Multimedia Computer-Based Learning and Learning Style to the Learning Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad RUSLI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of a learning depends on four main elements, they are content, desired learning outcome, instructional method and the delivery media. The integration of those four elements can be manifested into a learning modul which is called multimedia learning or learning by using multimedia. In learning context by using computer-based multimedia, there are two main things that need to be noticed so that the learning process can run effectively: how the content is presented, and what the learner’s chosen way in accepting and processing the information into a meaningful knowledge. First it is related with the way to visualize the content and how people learn. The second one is related with the learning style of the learner. This research aims to investigate the effect of the type of visualization—static vs animated—on a multimedia computer-based learning, and learning styles—visual vs verbal, towards the students’ capability in applying the concepts, procedures, principles of Java programming. Visualization type act as independent variables, and learning styles of the students act as a moderator variable. Moreover, the instructional strategies followed the Component Display Theory of Merril, and the format of presentation of multimedia followed the Seven Principles of Multimedia Learning of Mayer and Moreno. Learning with the multimedia computer-based learning has been done in the classroom. The subject of this research was the student of STMIK-STIKOM Bali in odd semester 2016-2017 which followed the course of Java programming. The Design experiments used multivariate analysis of variance, MANOVA 2 x 2, with a large sample of 138 students in 4 classes. Based on the results of the analysis, it can be concluded that the animation in multimedia interactive learning gave a positive effect in improving students’ learning outcomes, particularly in the applying the concepts, procedures, and principles of Java programming. The

  14. INFUSING INDUSTRY PRACTICES INTO AN ENGINEERING CAPTSONE PROJECT: A LEARNING OUTCOME ATTAINMENT CASE STUDY

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    SATESH NAMASIVAYAM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A capstone project in current engineering education is often introduced to enable the holistic attainment of engineering knowledge by an engineering undergraduate. Essentially project-based in nature, there exists a need to ensure that part of the attainment process involves key industry practices – such practices being necessary in attaining the status of a professional engineer. Herein lies the synergy that can be made use of between industry and academia. By exposing engineering undergraduates to a project which addresses an engineering challenge and providing them with the opportunity to learn from professional engineers who are experts in the fields of safety, sustainability, quality management, ethics and project management, this culminates in the implementation of a prototype design which incorporates the amalgamation of knowledge from industry and academia. This paper presents the unique curriculum developed in a capstone project module, incorporating learning sessions from professional engineers in the five (5 key areas of industry practice highlighted above and how these have contributed to significantly enhancing the learning outcome and hence programme outcome attainment of the engineering undergraduates who have experienced the module.

  15. Could Learning Outcomes of the First Course in Accounting Predict Overall Academic Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanzi, Khalid A.; Alfraih, Mishari M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to question whether learning outcomes of the first course in accounting could predict the overall academic performance of accounting students as measured by their graduating grade point average (GPA). Design/methodology/approach The sample of the present study was drawn from accounting students who were graduated during…

  16. Positive Feedback From Male Authority Figures Boosts Women's Math Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Lora E; Kondrak, Cheryl L; Ward, Deborah E; Streamer, Lindsey

    2018-03-01

    People often search for cues in the environment to determine whether or not they will be judged or treated negatively based on their social identities. Accordingly, feedback from gatekeepers-members of majority groups who hold authority and power in a field-may be an especially important cue for those at risk of experiencing social identity threat, such as women in math settings. Across a series of studies, women who received positive ("Good job!") versus objective (score only) feedback from a male (vs. female) authority figure in math reported greater confidence; belonging; self-efficacy; more favorable Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) attitudes/identification/interest; and greater implicit identification with math. Men were affected only by the type of math feedback they received, not by the source of feedback. A meta-analysis across studies confirmed results. Together, these findings suggest that positive feedback from gatekeepers is an important situational cue that can improve the outcomes of negatively stereotyped groups.

  17. Social support and negative and positive outcomes of experienced traumatic events in a group of male emergency service workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogińska-Bulik, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The paper investigates the relationship between perceived social support in the workplace and both negative (post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms) and positive outcomes (post-traumatic growth) of experienced traumatic events in a group of male emergency service workers. Data of 116 workers representing emergency services (37.1% firefighters, 37.1%, police officers and 30% medical rescue workers) who have experienced a traumatic event in their worksite were analyzed. The range of age of the participants was 21-57 years (M=35.27; SD=8.13). Polish versions of the Impact of Event Scale--Revised and the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory were used to assess the negative and positive outcomes of the experienced event. A perceived social support scale was measured by the scale What support you can count on. The data obtained from the study revealed the negative dependence of social support from supervisors with PTSD symptoms and positive--social support from co-workers with post-traumatic growth. Moreover the results of the study indicate the positive relationship between negative and positive outcomes of experienced traumatic events in the workplace. Perceived social support plays a more important role in gaining benefits from trauma than preventing negative outcomes of the experienced traumatic event. Support from co-workers, compared to support from supervisors, has greater importance.

  18. Development of a Blended Learning Environment to Support Achievement of Graduate Outcomes through Optimal Learning in an Undergraduate Pharmacy Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyson Brown

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of graduate attributes through health professional courses requires the opportunity to engage with learning and teaching activities that reflect the work-based role to which the student aspires. Such activities allow the contextualisation of discipline-specific knowledge, forging a critical understanding of the underpinning theory, and providing a firm foundation for the development of lifelong learning skills. A blended learning approach can be particularly valuable in supporting achievement of the learning outcomes in modules where performance is measured in terms of competency in work-based scenarios. An action research approach was taken to develop and evaluate a cardiovascular risk assessment as the basis for clinically and professionally relevant problem-based learning. Support for this was provided by means of blended learning including a number of online activities. Talking wall focus groups were used to evaluate the student experience, and this was combined with quantitative data regarding student examination performance. Student performance in the cardiovascular section of the examination paper was significantly higher than in other sections. Students reported very favorably on the use of this approach to support not only examination preparation, but also in terms of developing professional identity and enhancing employability skills.

  19. Quantum learning of classical stochastic processes: The completely positive realization problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monràs, Alex; Winter, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Among several tasks in Machine Learning, a specially important one is the problem of inferring the latent variables of a system and their causal relations with the observed behavior. A paradigmatic instance of this is the task of inferring the hidden Markov model underlying a given stochastic process. This is known as the positive realization problem (PRP), [L. Benvenuti and L. Farina, IEEE Trans. Autom. Control 49(5), 651–664 (2004)] and constitutes a central problem in machine learning. The PRP and its solutions have far-reaching consequences in many areas of systems and control theory, and is nowadays an important piece in the broad field of positive systems theory. We consider the scenario where the latent variables are quantum (i.e., quantum states of a finite-dimensional system) and the system dynamics is constrained only by physical transformations on the quantum system. The observable dynamics is then described by a quantum instrument, and the task is to determine which quantum instrument — if any — yields the process at hand by iterative application. We take as a starting point the theory of quasi-realizations, whence a description of the dynamics of the process is given in terms of linear maps on state vectors and probabilities are given by linear functionals on the state vectors. This description, despite its remarkable resemblance with the hidden Markov model, or the iterated quantum instrument, is however devoid of any stochastic or quantum mechanical interpretation, as said maps fail to satisfy any positivity conditions. The completely positive realization problem then consists in determining whether an equivalent quantum mechanical description of the same process exists. We generalize some key results of stochastic realization theory, and show that the problem has deep connections with operator systems theory, giving possible insight to the lifting problem in quotient operator systems. Our results have potential applications in quantum machine

  20. Quantum learning of classical stochastic processes: The completely positive realization problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monràs, Alex; Winter, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Among several tasks in Machine Learning, a specially important one is the problem of inferring the latent variables of a system and their causal relations with the observed behavior. A paradigmatic instance of this is the task of inferring the hidden Markov model underlying a given stochastic process. This is known as the positive realization problem (PRP), [L. Benvenuti and L. Farina, IEEE Trans. Autom. Control 49(5), 651-664 (2004)] and constitutes a central problem in machine learning. The PRP and its solutions have far-reaching consequences in many areas of systems and control theory, and is nowadays an important piece in the broad field of positive systems theory. We consider the scenario where the latent variables are quantum (i.e., quantum states of a finite-dimensional system) and the system dynamics is constrained only by physical transformations on the quantum system. The observable dynamics is then described by a quantum instrument, and the task is to determine which quantum instrument — if any — yields the process at hand by iterative application. We take as a starting point the theory of quasi-realizations, whence a description of the dynamics of the process is given in terms of linear maps on state vectors and probabilities are given by linear functionals on the state vectors. This description, despite its remarkable resemblance with the hidden Markov model, or the iterated quantum instrument, is however devoid of any stochastic or quantum mechanical interpretation, as said maps fail to satisfy any positivity conditions. The completely positive realization problem then consists in determining whether an equivalent quantum mechanical description of the same process exists. We generalize some key results of stochastic realization theory, and show that the problem has deep connections with operator systems theory, giving possible insight to the lifting problem in quotient operator systems. Our results have potential applications in quantum machine

  1. Quantum learning of classical stochastic processes: The completely positive realization problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monràs, Alex [Física Teòrica: Informació i Fenòmens Quàntics, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Winter, Andreas [Física Teòrica: Informació i Fenòmens Quàntics, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); ICREA—Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, Pg. Lluis Companys, 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Among several tasks in Machine Learning, a specially important one is the problem of inferring the latent variables of a system and their causal relations with the observed behavior. A paradigmatic instance of this is the task of inferring the hidden Markov model underlying a given stochastic process. This is known as the positive realization problem (PRP), [L. Benvenuti and L. Farina, IEEE Trans. Autom. Control 49(5), 651–664 (2004)] and constitutes a central problem in machine learning. The PRP and its solutions have far-reaching consequences in many areas of systems and control theory, and is nowadays an important piece in the broad field of positive systems theory. We consider the scenario where the latent variables are quantum (i.e., quantum states of a finite-dimensional system) and the system dynamics is constrained only by physical transformations on the quantum system. The observable dynamics is then described by a quantum instrument, and the task is to determine which quantum instrument — if any — yields the process at hand by iterative application. We take as a starting point the theory of quasi-realizations, whence a description of the dynamics of the process is given in terms of linear maps on state vectors and probabilities are given by linear functionals on the state vectors. This description, despite its remarkable resemblance with the hidden Markov model, or the iterated quantum instrument, is however devoid of any stochastic or quantum mechanical interpretation, as said maps fail to satisfy any positivity conditions. The completely positive realization problem then consists in determining whether an equivalent quantum mechanical description of the same process exists. We generalize some key results of stochastic realization theory, and show that the problem has deep connections with operator systems theory, giving possible insight to the lifting problem in quotient operator systems. Our results have potential applications in quantum machine

  2. Improving Learning Outcomes: The iPad and Preschool Children with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Chmiliar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The digital age has reached early childhood, and the use of touch screens by young children is common place. Research on the use of touch screen tablets with young children is becoming more prevalent; however, less information is available on the use of touch screen tablets to support young children with disabilities. Touch screen tablets may offer possibilities to preschool children with disabilities to participate in learning in a digital way. The iPad provides easy interaction on the touch screen and access to a multitude of engaging early learning applications. This paper summarizes a pilot study with 8 young children with disabilities included in a preschool classroom, who were given iPads to use in class and at home for a period of 21 weeks. Systematic observations, classroom assessments, and teacher and parent interviews documented the improvements in learning outcomes for each child in many areas including, but not limited to: shape and color recognition, letter recognition, and tracing letters throughout six research cycles.

  3. Nothing Succeeds Like Success? Equity, Student Outcomes, and Opportunity to Learn in High- and Middle-Income Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santibañez, Lucrecia; Fagioli, Loris

    2016-01-01

    A strong relationship between article background and educational outcomes fuels a negative inequality cycle. This paper explores the interplay between student socioeconomic status and educational outcomes, and the mediating role of Opportunity-to-Learn (OTL) in high- and middle-income countries. Using data from PISA 2012, we find that the…

  4. The effects of cognitive load during intertrial intervals on judgements of control: The role of working memory and contextual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavus, H A; Msetfi, Rachel M

    2016-11-01

    When there is no contingency between actions and outcomes, but outcomes occur frequently, people tend to judge that they have control over those outcomes, a phenomenon known as the outcome density (OD) effect. Recent studies show that the OD effect depends on the duration of the temporal interval between action-outcome conjunctions, with longer intervals inducing stronger effects. However, under some circumstances OD effect is reduced, for example when participants are mildly depressed. We reasoned that working memory (WM) plays an important role in learning of context; with reduced WM capacity to process contextual information during intertrial intervals (ITIs) during contingency learning might lead to reduced OD effects (limited capacity hypothesis). To test this, we used a novel dual-task procedure that increases the WM load during the ITIs of an operant (e.g., action-outcome) contingency learning task to impact contextual learning. We tested our hypotheses in groups of students with zero (Experiments 1, N=34), and positive contingencies (Experiment 2, N=34). The findings indicated that WM load during the ITIs reduced the OD effects compared to no load conditions (Experiment 1 and 2). In Experiment 2, we observed reduced OD effects on action judgements under high load in zero and positive contingencies. However, the participants' judgements were still sensitive to the difference between zero and positive contingencies. We discuss the implications of our findings for the effects of depression and context in contingency learning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparing Delivery Approaches to Teaching Abnormal Psychology: Investigating Student Perceptions and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goette, William F.; Delello, Julie A.; Schmitt, Andrew L.; Sullivan, Jeremy R.; Rangel, Angelica

    2017-01-01

    This study compares the academic performance and perceptions of 114 undergraduate students enrolled in an abnormal psychology course. Specifically, this study focuses on whether face-to-face (F2F) or blended modalities are associated with student learning outcomes. In this study, data analysis was based upon the examination of end-of-course…

  6. Tablet Use in Schools: A Critical Review of the Evidence for Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haßler, B.; Major, L.; Hennessy, S.

    2016-01-01

    The increased popularity of tablets in general has led to uptake in education. We critically review the literature reporting use of tablets by primary and secondary school children across the curriculum, with a particular emphasis on learning outcomes. The systematic review methodology was used, and our literature search resulted in 33 relevant…

  7. Train-the-Trainers: Implementing Outcomes-Based Teaching and Learning in Malaysian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, John; Tang, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The decision by the Minister of Higher Education, that Malaysian post-secondary institutions should move to outcomes-based teaching and learning (OBTL), involves a change in teaching in over 1,000 institutions. This massive changeover would be accomplished using the "Train-the-Trainers" model in a series of workshops. We are proud to…

  8. Two spatiotemporally distinct value systems shape reward-based learning in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouragnan, Elsa; Retzler, Chris; Mullinger, Karen; Philiastides, Marios G

    2015-09-08

    Avoiding repeated mistakes and learning to reinforce rewarding decisions is critical for human survival and adaptive actions. Yet, the neural underpinnings of the value systems that encode different decision-outcomes remain elusive. Here coupling single-trial electroencephalography with simultaneously acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging, we uncover the spatiotemporal dynamics of two separate but interacting value systems encoding decision-outcomes. Consistent with a role in regulating alertness and switching behaviours, an early system is activated only by negative outcomes and engages arousal-related and motor-preparatory brain structures. Consistent with a role in reward-based learning, a later system differentially suppresses or activates regions of the human reward network in response to negative and positive outcomes, respectively. Following negative outcomes, the early system interacts and downregulates the late system, through a thalamic interaction with the ventral striatum. Critically, the strength of this coupling predicts participants' switching behaviour and avoidance learning, directly implicating the thalamostriatal pathway in reward-based learning.

  9. Is Active Learning Like Broccoli? Student Perceptions of Active Learning in Large Lecture Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. Veronica; Cardaciotto, LeeAnn

    2011-01-01

    Although research suggests that active learning is associated with positive outcomes (e.g., memory, test performance), use of such techniques can be difficult to implement in large lecture-based classes. In the current study, 1,091 students completed out-of-class group exercises to complement course material in an Introductory Psychology class.…

  10. Comparing Online with Brick and Mortar Course Learning Outcomes: An Analysis of Quantitative Methods Curriculum in Public Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ronald A.; Nikitenko, Gleb O.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching graduate students in an intensive adult-learning format presents a special challenge for quantitative analytical competencies. Students often lack necessary background, skills and motivation to deal with quantitative-skill-based course work. This study compares learning outcomes for graduate students enrolled in three course sections…

  11. E-learning for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaona, Alberto; Banzi, Rita; Kwag, Koren H; Rigon, Giulio; Cereda, Danilo; Pecoraro, Valentina; Tramacere, Irene; Moja, Lorenzo

    2018-01-21

    The use of e-learning, defined as any educational intervention mediated electronically via the Internet, has steadily increased among health professionals worldwide. Several studies have attempted to measure the effects of e-learning in medical practice, which has often been associated with large positive effects when compared to no intervention and with small positive effects when compared with traditional learning (without access to e-learning). However, results are not conclusive. To assess the effects of e-learning programmes versus traditional learning in licensed health professionals for improving patient outcomes or health professionals' behaviours, skills and knowledge. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, five other databases and three trial registers up to July 2016, without any restrictions based on language or status of publication. We examined the reference lists of the included studies and other relevant reviews. If necessary, we contacted the study authors to collect additional information on studies. Randomised trials assessing the effectiveness of e-learning versus traditional learning for health professionals. We excluded non-randomised trials and trials involving undergraduate health professionals. Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We graded the certainty of evidence for each outcome using the GRADE approach and standardised the outcome effects using relative risks (risk ratio (RR) or odds ratio (OR)) or standardised mean difference (SMD) when possible. We included 16 randomised trials involving 5679 licensed health professionals (4759 mixed health professionals, 587 nurses, 300 doctors and 33 childcare health consultants).When compared with traditional learning at 12-month follow-up, low-certainty evidence suggests that e-learning may make little or no difference for the following patient outcomes: the proportion of patients with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol of less than 100 mg

  12. The Application of Carousel Feedback and Round Table Cooperative Learning Models to Improve Student's Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) and Social Studies Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusmanto, Harry; Soetjipto, Budi Eko; Djatmika, Ery Tri

    2017-01-01

    This Classroom Action Research aims to improve students' HOTS (High Order Thinking Skills) and Social Studies learning outcomes through the application of Carousel Feedback and Round Table cooperative learning methods. This study was based on a model proposed by Elliott and was implemented for three cycles. The subjects were 30 female students of…

  13. Key to Language Learning Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktavian Mantiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the important elements of language learning and teaching i.e. the role of teachers as well as the attitude and motivation of learners. Teachers undoubtedly play crucial roles in students’ language learning outcome which could ignite or diminish students’ motivation. Positive attitudes and motivation – instrumental or integrative and intrinsic or extrinsic – are key to successful learning. Therefore it is paramount for language teachers as well as learners to know these roles and nurture the best possible ways where language teaching and learning will thrive. This paper also suggested that both stake-holders should be open to holistic approach of language learning and that other factors such as the environment could play an important part in language teaching and learning success.

  14. Finding benefits from acculturative stress among Asian Americans: Self-reflection moderating the mediating effects of ethnocultural empathy on positive outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Meifen; Li, Chun-I; Wang, Cixin; Ko, Stacy Y

    2016-11-01

    This study examined a moderated mediation model to see whether self-reflection moderated (a) the association between acculturative stress and ethnocultural empathy and (b) the indirect effects of acculturative stress on 2 positive outcomes (i.e., bicultural competence and making positive sense of adversity) through ethnocultural empathy. A total of 330 Asian American college students from a West coast university participated in an online survey. Results from PROCESS supported hypotheses. First, self-reflection significantly moderated the effects of acculturative stress on ethnocultural empathy. Specifically, the effect of acculturative stress on ethnocultural empathy was significantly positive for those with lower self-reflection. Conversely, this effect was not significant for those with higher self-reflection, but ethnocultural empathy was consistently high across all levels of acculturative stress for those with higher self-reflection. Post hoc exploratory analyses examined the moderated mediation model using each of the 5 domains of acculturative stress as predictors; results supported the moderated mediation hypotheses for 2 domains, discrimination and cultural isolation. Second, self-reflection significantly moderated the indirect effects of acculturative stress on 2 positive outcomes through ethnocultural empathy. Results from conditional indirect effects suggested that the indirect effects of acculturative stress on 2 positive outcomes through ethnocultural empathy were significantly positive for those with lower self-reflection. Conversely, the indirect effects were not significant for those with higher self-reflection, but the 2 positive outcomes stayed high at all levels of acculturative stress. Post hoc analyses found that 5 of 6 components of bicultural competence used as outcome variables supported the moderation mediation hypotheses. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Learning outcomes of "The Oncology Patient" study among nursing students: A comparison of teaching strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Judith; Reguant, Mercedes; Canet, Olga

    2016-11-01

    Teaching strategies are essential in order to facilitate meaningful learning and the development of high-level thinking skills in students. To compare three teaching methodologies (problem-based learning, case-based teaching and traditional methods) in terms of the learning outcomes achieved by nursing students. This quasi-experimental research was carried out in the Nursing Degree programme in a group of 74 students who explored the subject of The Oncology Patient through the aforementioned strategies. A performance test was applied based on Bloom's Revised Taxonomy. A significant correlation was found between the intragroup theoretical and theoretical-practical dimensions. Likewise, intergroup differences were related to each teaching methodology. Hence, significant differences were estimated between the traditional methodology (x-=9.13), case-based teaching (x-=12.96) and problem-based learning (x-=14.84). Problem-based learning was shown to be the most successful learning method, followed by case-based teaching and the traditional methodology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Emotion-based learning systems and the development of morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, R J R

    2017-10-01

    In this paper it is proposed that important components of moral development and moral judgment rely on two forms of emotional learning: stimulus-reinforcement and response-outcome learning. Data in support of this position will be primarily drawn from work with individuals with the developmental condition of psychopathy as well as fMRI studies with healthy individuals. Individuals with psychopathy show impairment on moral judgment tasks and a pronounced increased risk for instrumental antisocial behavior. It will be argued that these impairments are developmental consequences of impaired stimulus-aversive conditioning on the basis of distress cue reinforcers and response-outcome learning in individuals with this disorder. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Position of the American Dietetic Association and American Society for Nutrition: obesity, reproduction, and pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; King, Janet C

    2009-05-01

    Given the detrimental influence of maternal overweight and obesity on reproductive and pregnancy outcomes for the mother and child, it is the position of the American Dietetic Association and the American Society for Nutrition that all overweight and obese women of reproductive age should receive counseling on the roles of diet and physical activity in reproductive health prior to pregnancy,during pregnancy, and in the inter conceptional period, in order to ameliorate these adverse outcomes. The effect of maternal nutritional status prior to pregnancy on reproduction and pregnancy outcomes is of great public health importance. Obesity in the United States and worldwide has grown to epidemic proportions, with an estimated 33% of US women classified as obese. This position paper has two objectives: (a) to help nutrition professionals become aware of the risks and possible complications of overweight and obesity for fertility,the course of pregnancy, birth outcomes, and short- and long-term maternal and child health outcomes;and (b) related to the commitment to research by the American Dietetic Association and the American Society for Nutrition, to identify the gaps in research to improve our knowledge of the risks and complications associated with being overweight and obese before and during pregnancy.Only with an increased knowledge of these risks and complications can health care professionals develop effective strategies that can be implemented before and during pregnancy as well as during the inter conceptional period to ameliorate adverse outcomes.

  18. mGluR5 Positive Allosteric Modulation Enhances Extinction Learning Following Cocaine Self-Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Cleva, Richard M.; Hicks, Megan P.; Gass, Justin T.; Wischerath, Kelly C.; Plasters, Elizabeth T.; Widholm, John J.; Olive, M. Foster

    2011-01-01

    Extinction of classically and instrumentally conditioned behaviors, such as conditioned fear and drug-seeking behavior, is a process of active learning, and recent studies indicate that potentiation of glutamatergic transmission facilitates extinction learning. In this study we investigated the effects of the type 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR5) positive allosteric modulator 3-cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)benzamide (CDPPB) on the extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior in ...

  19. Nursing students evaluation of problem based learning and the impact of culture on the learning process and outcomes: a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kloub, Manal Ibrahim; Salameh, Taghreed Nayel; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluates students' learning experiences in a clinical pediatric nursing course adopting Problem Based Learning (PBL) and investigates how students' cultural background impacts on self directed learning. A mixed-methods approach combining quantitative and qualitative methods was utilized to answer the research objectives. An observational technique for the PBL teaching sessions was employed; and 226 third-year students were asked to complete PBL evaluation questionnaire. Fifty seven percent (n = 130) responses to the questionnaire were analyzed. Overall, students considered PBL to be moderately effective in their learning experience, with a mean of 3.64 (S.D = 1.18). Students qualitative responses fell within four thematic categories including: developing cognitive abilities, independent learning, motivation to learn, and group learning. Difficulties encountered by students were: it is time-consuming, it has unclear objectives, it is a stressful process, and it results in an increased workload. A small number of students indicated that PBL tutorials were boring and complained about lack of contribution from instructors and limited recourses. Learning is intertwined with culture; students' previous educational experiences, uncertainty, English language proficiency, computer resources, gender, and achievement were identified as the most important cultural issues that impact the learning process and outcomes. Successful implementation of PBL does not come easily; teachers should be alert to the issues of culture in designing curriculum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An Investigation of the Effects of a Graphic Organizer in an Online Serious Game on Learning Outcomes and Attitudinal Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Jongpil; Chung, Sungwon; Song, Jaeki; Kim, Yongjin

    2015-01-01

    A serious game, which is designed for learning purposes rather than recreational purposes, has been applied for digital game-based Learning. This study investigated the effects of graphic organizers in a serious game, "The Transistor", on learning outcomes and attitudinal perceptions. A total of 99 participants were randomly assigned to…