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Sample records for position-dependent noncovalent potential

  1. Isospectral Trigonometric Pöschl-Teller Potentials with Position Dependent Mass Generated by Supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago-Cruz, C

    2016-01-01

    In this work a position dependent mass Hamiltonian with the same spectrum of the trigonometric Pöschl-Teller one was constructed by means of the underlying potential algebra. The corresponding wave functions are determined by using the factorization method. A new family of isospectral potentials are constructed by applying a Darboux transformation. An example is presented in order to illustrate the formalism. (paper)

  2. A study of the bound states for square potential wells with position-dependent mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, A.; Kuru, S.; Negro, J.; Nieto, L.M.

    2006-01-01

    A potential well with position-dependent mass is studied for bound states. Applying appropriate matching conditions, a transcendental equation is derived for the energy eigenvalues. Numerical results are presented graphically and the variation of the energy of the bound states are calculated as a function of the well-width and mass

  3. A singular position-dependent mass particle in an infinite potential well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, Omar; Mazharimousavi, S. Habib

    2009-01-01

    An unusual singular position-dependent-mass particle in an infinite potential well is considered. The corresponding Hamiltonian is mapped through a point-canonical-transformation and an explicit correspondence between the target Hamiltonian and a Poeschl-Teller type reference Hamiltonian is obtained. New ordering ambiguity parametric setting are suggested

  4. Dirac Particle for the Position Dependent Mass in the Generalized Asymmetric Woods-Saxon Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner Alpdoğan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The one-dimensional Dirac equation with position dependent mass in the generalized asymmetric Woods-Saxon potential is solved in terms of the hypergeometric functions. The transmission and reflection coefficients are obtained by considering the one-dimensional electric current density for the Dirac particle and the equation describing the bound states is found by utilizing the continuity conditions of the obtained wave function. Also, by using the generalized asymmetric Woods-Saxon potential solutions, the scattering states are found out without making calculation for the Woods-Saxon, Hulthen, cusp potentials, and so forth, which are derived from the generalized asymmetric Woods-Saxon potential and the conditions describing transmission resonances and supercriticality are achieved. At the same time, the data obtained in this work are compared with the results achieved in earlier studies and are observed to be consistent.

  5. Position-Dependent Mass Schrödinger Equation for the Morse Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovando, G; Peña, J J; Morales, J; López-Bonilla, J

    2017-01-01

    The position dependent mass Schrödinger equation (PDMSE) has a wide range of quantum applications such as the study of semiconductors, quantum wells, quantum dots and impurities in crystals, among many others. On the other hand, the Morse potential is one of the most important potential models used to study the electronic properties of diatomic molecules. In this work, the solution of the effective mass one-dimensional Schrödinger equation for the Morse potential is presented. This is done by means of the canonical transformation method in algebraic form. The PDMSE is solved for any model of the proposed kinetic energy operators as for example the BenDaniel-Duke, Gora-Williams, Zhu-Kroemer or Li-Kuhn. Also, in order to solve the PDMSE with Morse potential, we consider a superpotential leading to a special form of the exactly solvable Schrödinger equation of constant mass for a class of multiparameter exponential-type potential along with a proper mass distribution. The proposed approach is general and can be applied in the search of new potentials suitable on science of materials by looking into the viable choices of the mass function. (paper)

  6. On the construction of coherent states of position dependent mass Schroedinger equation endowed with effective potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chithiika Ruby, V.; Senthilvelan, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm to construct coherent states for an exactly solvable position dependent mass Schroedinger equation. We use point canonical transformation method and obtain ground state eigenfunction of the position dependent mass Schroedinger equation. We fix the ladder operators in the deformed form and obtain explicit expression of the deformed superpotential in terms of mass distribution and its derivative. We also prove that these deformed operators lead to minimum uncertainty relations. Further, we illustrate our algorithm with two examples, in which the coherent states given for the second example are new.

  7. Exact solutions of the Schrodinger equation with the position-dependent mass for a hard-core potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Shihai; Lozada-Cassou, M.

    2005-01-01

    The exact solutions of two-dimensional Schrodinger equation with the position-dependent mass for a hard-core potential are obtained. The eigenvalues related to the position-dependent masses μ 1 and μ 2 , the potential well depth V 0 and the effective range r 0 can be calculated by the boundary condition. We generalize this quantum system to three-dimensional case. The special cases for l=0,1 are studied in detail. For l=0 and c=0, we find that the energy levels will increase with the parameters μ 2 , V 0 and r 0 if μ 1 >μ 2

  8. Position-dependent patterning of spontaneous action potentials in immature cochlear inner hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stuart L.; Eckrich, Tobias; Kuhn, Stephanie; Zampini, Valeria; Franz, Christoph; Ranatunga, Kishani M.; Roberts, Terri P.; Masetto, Sergio; Knipper, Marlies; Kros, Corné J.; Marcotti, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous action potential activity is crucial for mammalian sensory system development. In the auditory system, patterned firing activity has been observed in immature spiral ganglion cells and brain-stem neurons and is likely to depend on cochlear inner hair cell (IHC) action potentials. It remains uncertain whether spiking activity is intrinsic to developing IHCs and whether it shows patterning. We found that action potentials are intrinsically generated by immature IHCs of altricial rodents and that apical IHCs exhibit bursting activity as opposed to more sustained firing in basal cells. We show that the efferent neurotransmitter ACh, by fine-tuning the IHC’s resting membrane potential (Vm), is crucial for the bursting pattern in apical cells. Endogenous extracellular ATP also contributes to the Vm of apical and basal IHCs by activating SK2 channels. We hypothesize that the difference in firing pattern along the cochlea instructs the tonotopic differentiation of IHCs and auditory pathway. PMID:21572434

  9. Position-dependent patterning of spontaneous action potentials in immature cochlear inner hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stuart L; Eckrich, Tobias; Kuhn, Stephanie; Zampini, Valeria; Franz, Christoph; Ranatunga, Kishani M; Roberts, Terri P; Masetto, Sergio; Knipper, Marlies; Kros, Corné J; Marcotti, Walter

    2011-06-01

    Spontaneous action potential activity is crucial for mammalian sensory system development. In the auditory system, patterned firing activity has been observed in immature spiral ganglion and brain-stem neurons and is likely to depend on cochlear inner hair cell (IHC) action potentials. It remains uncertain whether spiking activity is intrinsic to developing IHCs and whether it shows patterning. We found that action potentials were intrinsically generated by immature IHCs of altricial rodents and that apical IHCs showed bursting activity as opposed to more sustained firing in basal cells. We show that the efferent neurotransmitter acetylcholine fine-tunes the IHC's resting membrane potential (V(m)), and as such is crucial for the bursting pattern in apical cells. Endogenous extracellular ATP also contributes to the V(m) of apical and basal IHCs by triggering small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK2) channels. We propose that the difference in firing pattern along the cochlea instructs the tonotopic differentiation of IHCs and auditory pathway.

  10. Localization of s-Wave and Quantum Effective Potential of a Quasi-free Particle with Position-Dependent Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Guoxing; Xiang Yang; Ren Zhongzhou

    2006-01-01

    The properties of the s-wave for a quasi-free particle with position-dependent mass (PDM) have been discussed in details. Differed from the system with constant mass in which the localization of the s-wave for the free quantum particle around the origin only occurs in two dimensions, the quasi-free particle with PDM can experience attractive forces in D dimensions except D = 1 when its mass function satisfies some conditions. The effective mass of a particle varying with its position can induce effective interaction, which may be attractive in some cases. The analytical expressions of the eigenfunctions and the corresponding probability densities for the s-waves of the two- and three-dimensional systems with a special PDM are given, and the existences of localization around the origin for these systems are shown.

  11. A position-dependent mass model for the Thomas–Fermi potential: Exact solvability and relation to δ-doped semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze-Halberg, Axel, E-mail: xbataxel@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics and Actuarial Science, Indiana University Northwest, 3400 Broadway, Gary IN 46408 (United States); García-Ravelo, Jesús; Pacheco-García, Christian [Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos, Zacatenco, 07738 México D.F. (Mexico); Juan Peña Gil, José [Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco, CBI - Area de Física Atómica Molecular Aplicada, Av. San Pablo 180, Reynosa Azcapotzalco, 02200 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-06-15

    We consider the Schrödinger equation in the Thomas–Fermi field, a model that has been used for describing electron systems in δ-doped semiconductors. It is shown that the problem becomes exactly-solvable if a particular effective (position-dependent) mass distribution is incorporated. Orthogonal sets of normalizable bound state solutions are constructed in explicit form, and the associated energies are determined. We compare our results with the corresponding findings on the constant-mass problem discussed by Ioriatti (1990) [13]. -- Highlights: ► We introduce an exactly solvable, position-dependent mass model for the Thomas–Fermi potential. ► Orthogonal sets of solutions to our model are constructed in closed form. ► Relation to delta-doped semiconductors is discussed. ► Explicit subband bottom energies are calculated and compared to results obtained in a previous study.

  12. A position-dependent mass model for the Thomas–Fermi potential: Exact solvability and relation to δ-doped semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze-Halberg, Axel; García-Ravelo, Jesús; Pacheco-García, Christian; Juan Peña Gil, José

    2013-01-01

    We consider the Schrödinger equation in the Thomas–Fermi field, a model that has been used for describing electron systems in δ-doped semiconductors. It is shown that the problem becomes exactly-solvable if a particular effective (position-dependent) mass distribution is incorporated. Orthogonal sets of normalizable bound state solutions are constructed in explicit form, and the associated energies are determined. We compare our results with the corresponding findings on the constant-mass problem discussed by Ioriatti (1990) [13]. -- Highlights: ► We introduce an exactly solvable, position-dependent mass model for the Thomas–Fermi potential. ► Orthogonal sets of solutions to our model are constructed in closed form. ► Relation to delta-doped semiconductors is discussed. ► Explicit subband bottom energies are calculated and compared to results obtained in a previous study

  13. Non-covalent interactions across organic and biological subsets of chemical space: Physics-based potentials parametrized from machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereau, Tristan; DiStasio, Robert A.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2018-06-01

    Classical intermolecular potentials typically require an extensive parametrization procedure for any new compound considered. To do away with prior parametrization, we propose a combination of physics-based potentials with machine learning (ML), coined IPML, which is transferable across small neutral organic and biologically relevant molecules. ML models provide on-the-fly predictions for environment-dependent local atomic properties: electrostatic multipole coefficients (significant error reduction compared to previously reported), the population and decay rate of valence atomic densities, and polarizabilities across conformations and chemical compositions of H, C, N, and O atoms. These parameters enable accurate calculations of intermolecular contributions—electrostatics, charge penetration, repulsion, induction/polarization, and many-body dispersion. Unlike other potentials, this model is transferable in its ability to handle new molecules and conformations without explicit prior parametrization: All local atomic properties are predicted from ML, leaving only eight global parameters—optimized once and for all across compounds. We validate IPML on various gas-phase dimers at and away from equilibrium separation, where we obtain mean absolute errors between 0.4 and 0.7 kcal/mol for several chemically and conformationally diverse datasets representative of non-covalent interactions in biologically relevant molecules. We further focus on hydrogen-bonded complexes—essential but challenging due to their directional nature—where datasets of DNA base pairs and amino acids yield an extremely encouraging 1.4 kcal/mol error. Finally, and as a first look, we consider IPML for denser systems: water clusters, supramolecular host-guest complexes, and the benzene crystal.

  14. Noncovalent Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryn'ova, G; Corminboeuf, C

    2018-05-03

    Molecular electronics covers several distinctly different conducting architectures, including organic semiconductors and single-molecule junctions. The noncovalent interactions, abundant in the former, are also often found in the latter, i.e., the dimer junctions. In the present work, we draw the parallel between the two types of noncovalent molecular electronics for a range of π-conjugated heteroaromatic molecules. In silico modeling allows us to distill the factors that arise from the chemical nature of their building blocks and from their mutual arrangement. We find that the same compounds are consistently the worst and the best performers in the two types of electronic assemblies, emphasizing the universal imprint of the underlying chemistry of the molecular cores on their diverse charge transport characteristics. The interplay between molecular and intermolecular factors creates a spectrum of noncovalent conductive architectures, which can be manipulated using the design strategies based upon the established relationships between chemistry and transport.

  15. Noncovalent synthesis of protein dendrimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lempens, E.H.M.; Baal, van I.; Dongen, van J.L.J.; Hackeng, T.M.; Merkx, M.; Meijer, E.W.

    2009-01-01

    The covalent synthesis of complex biomolecular systems such as multivalent protein dendrimers often proceeds with low efficiency, thereby making alternative strategies based on noncovalent chemistry of high interest. Here, the synthesis of protein dendrimers using a strong but noncovalent

  16. Exactly solvable position dependent mass schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koc, R.; Tuetuencueler, H.; Koercuek, E.

    2002-01-01

    Exact solution of the Schrodinger equation with a variable mass is presented. We have derived general expressions for the eigenstates and eigenvalues of the position dependent mass systems. We provide supersymmetric and Lie algebraic methods to discuss the position dependent mass systems

  17. Noncovalent Hydrogen Isotope Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Breslavskaya, N. N.

    2018-02-01

    Zero-point energies (ZPE) and isotope effects, induced by intermolecular, noncovalent vibrations, are computed and tested by experimental data. The ZPE differences of H- and D-complexes of water with hydrogen, methane, and water molecules are about 100-300 cal/mol; they result to isotope effects IE of 1.20-1.70. Semi-ionic bonds between metal ions and water ligands in M(H2O) 6 2+ complexes are much stronger; their ZPEs are about 12-14 kcal/mol per molecule and result to IE of 1.9-2.1 at 300 K. Protonated (deuterated) water and biwater exhibit the largest ZPE differences and isotope effects; the latter are 25-28 and 12-13 for water and biwater, respectively. Noncovalent IEs contribute markedly into the experimentally measured effects and explain many anomalous and even magic properties of the effects, such as the dependence of IE on the solvents and on the presence of the third substances, enormously large isotope effects at the mild conditions, the difference between IEs measured in the reactions of individual protiated and deuterated compounds and those measured in their mixture. Noncovalent IEs are not negligible and should be taken into account to make correct and substantiated conclusions on the reaction mechanisms. The kinetic equations are derived for the total isotope effects, which include noncovalent IEs as additive factors.

  18. Noncovalent interactions in biochemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riley, Kevin Eugene; Hobza, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2011), s. 3-17 ISSN 1759-0876 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Grant - others:NSF EPSCORE(US) EPS-0701525; Korea Science and Engineering Foundation(KR) R32-2008-000-10180-0 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : noncovalent interactions * WFT calculations * DFT calculations * applications Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  19. Position-dependent friction in quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srokowski, T.

    1985-01-01

    The quantum description of motion of a particle subjected to position-dependent frictional forces is presented. The two cases are taken into account: a motion without external forces and in the harmonic oscillator field. As an example, a frictional barrier penetration is considered. 16 refs. (author)

  20. Strings from position-dependent noncommutativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fring, Andreas; Gouba, Laure; Scholtz, Frederik G

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new set of noncommutative spacetime commutation relations in two space dimensions. The space-space commutation relations are deformations of the standard flat noncommutative spacetime relations taken here to have position-dependent structure constants. Some of the new variables are non-Hermitian in the most natural choice. We construct their Hermitian counterparts by means of a Dyson map, which also serves to introduce a new metric operator. We propose PT-like symmetries, i.e. antilinear involutory maps, respected by these deformations. We compute minimal lengths and momenta arising in this space from generalized versions of Heisenberg's uncertainty relations and find that any object in this two-dimensional space is string like, i.e. having a fundamental length in one direction beyond which a resolution is impossible. Subsequently, we formulate and partly solve some simple models in these new variables, the free particle, its PT-symmetric deformations and the harmonic oscillator.

  1. A position-dependent mass harmonic oscillator and deformed space

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Bruno G.; Borges, Ernesto P.

    2018-04-01

    We consider canonically conjugated generalized space and linear momentum operators x^ q and p^ q in quantum mechanics, associated with a generalized translation operator which produces infinitesimal deformed displacements controlled by a deformation parameter q. A canonical transformation (x ^ ,p ^ ) →(x^ q,p^ q ) leads the Hamiltonian of a position-dependent mass particle in usual space to another Hamiltonian of a particle with constant mass in a conservative force field of the deformed space. The equation of motion for the classical phase space (x, p) may be expressed in terms of the deformed (dual) q-derivative. We revisit the problem of a q-deformed oscillator in both classical and quantum formalisms. Particularly, this canonical transformation leads a particle with position-dependent mass in a harmonic potential to a particle with constant mass in a Morse potential. The trajectories in phase spaces (x, p) and (xq, pq) are analyzed for different values of the deformation parameter. Finally, we compare the results of the problem in classical and quantum formalisms through the principle of correspondence and the WKB approximation.

  2. Position-dependent mass, finite-gap systems, and supersymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Rafael; Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    2016-05-01

    The ordering problem in quantum systems with position-dependent mass (PDM) is treated by inclusion of the classically fictitious similarity transformation into the kinetic term. This provides a generation of supersymmetry with the first-order supercharges from the kinetic term alone, while inclusion of the potential term allows us also to generate nonlinear supersymmetry with higher-order supercharges. A broad class of finite-gap systems with PDM is obtained by different reduction procedures, and general results on supersymmetry generation are applied to them. We show that elliptic finite-gap systems of Lamé and Darboux-Treibich-Verdier types can be obtained by reduction to Seiffert's spherical spiral and Bernoulli lemniscate in the presence of Calogero-like or harmonic oscillator potentials, or by angular momentum reduction of a free motion on some AdS2 -related surfaces in the presence of Aharonov-Bohm flux. The limiting cases include the Higgs and Mathews-Lakshmanan oscillator models as well as a reflectionless model with PDM exploited recently in the discussion of cosmological inflationary scenarios.

  3. Default risk modeling with position-dependent killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Yuri A.

    2013-04-01

    Diffusion in a linear potential in the presence of position-dependent killing is used to mimic a default process. Different assumptions regarding transport coefficients, initial conditions, and elasticity of the killing measure lead to diverse models of bankruptcy. One “stylized fact” is fundamental for our consideration: empirically default is a rather rare event, especially in the investment grade categories of credit ratings. Hence, the action of killing may be considered as a small parameter. In a number of special cases we derive closed-form expressions for the entire term structure of the cumulative probability of default, its hazard rate, and intensity. Comparison with historical data on aggregate global corporate defaults confirms the validity of the perturbation method for estimations of long-term probability of default for companies with high credit quality. On a single company level, we implement the derived formulas to estimate the one-year likelihood of default of Enron on a daily basis from August 2000 to August 2001, three months before its default, and compare the obtained results with forecasts of traditional structural models.

  4. Transfer matrix in 1D Schroedinger problems with constant and position-dependent mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Alvarez, R.; Rodriguez-Coppola, H.

    1987-10-01

    We consider the transfer matrix method for obtaining properties of standard wells and barriers in one-dimensional Schroedinger problems with constant and position-dependent mass. We report the formulae for the energy levels of a well and the transmission coefficient of a barrier. We demonstrate the continuity between virtual bound states and bound states in a well of position-dependent mass and the relation between the zero energy gap states of a periodic potential problem with the corresponding energies of the non-periodic ones with transmission coefficient equal to one. The calculations were carried out for a wide class of potential profiles. (author). 30 refs, 2 figs

  5. Noncovalent Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Ravva, Mahesh Kumar; Risko, Chad; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we provide an overview of how noncovalent interactions, determined by the chemical structure of π-conjugated molecules and polymers, govern essential aspects of the electronic, optical, and mechanical characteristics of organic

  6. Helical Polyacetylenes Induced via Noncovalent Chiral Interactions and Their Applications as Chiral Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Katsuhiro; Yashima, Eiji

    2017-08-01

    Construction of predominantly one-handed helical polyacetylenes with a desired helix sense utilizing noncovalent chiral interactions with nonracemic chiral guest compounds based on a supramolecular approach is described. As with the conventional dynamic helical polymers possessing optically active pendant groups covalently bonded to the polymer chains, this noncovalent helicity induction system can show significant chiral amplification phenomena, in which the chiral information of the nonracemic guests can transfer with high cooperativity through noncovalent bonding interactions to induce an almost single-handed helical conformation in the polymer backbone. An intriguing "memory effect" of the induced macromolecular helicity is observed for some polyacetylenes, which means that the helical conformations induced in dynamic helical polyacetylene can be transformed into metastable static ones by tuning their helix-inversion barriers. Potential applications of helical polyacetylenes with controlled helix sense constructed by the "noncovalent helicity induction and/or memory effect" as chiral materials are also described.

  7. Classical and quantum position-dependent mass harmonic oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz y Cruz, S.; Negro, J.; Nieto, L.M.

    2007-01-01

    The position-dependent mass oscillator is studied from both, classical and quantum mechanical points of view, in order to discuss the ambiguity on the operator ordering of the kinetic term in the quantum framework. The results are illustrated by some examples of specific mass functions

  8. Fermionic particles with position-dependent mass in the presence of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Approximate solutions of the Dirac equation with position-dependent mass are presented for the inversely quadratic Yukawa potential and Coulomb-like tensor interaction by using the asymptotic iteration method. The energy eigenvalues and the corresponding normalized eigenfunctions are obtained in the case of ...

  9. Position dependent spin wave spectrum in nanostrip magnonic waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qi; Zhang, Huaiwu; Ma, Guokun; Liao, Yulong; Zhong, Zhiyong; Zheng, Yun

    2014-01-01

    The dispersion curves of propagating spin wave along different positions in nanostrip magnonic waveguides were studied by micromagnetic simulation. The results show that the modes of spin wave in the nanostrip magnonic waveguide are dependent on the position and the weak even modes of spin wave are excited even by symmetric excitation fields in a nanostrip magnonic waveguide. The reasons of the position dependent dispersion curve are explained by associating with geometrical confinement in the nanostrip magnonic waveguide

  10. Asymptotic iteration method solutions to the d-dimensional Schroedinger equation with position-dependent mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuk, F.; Tekin, S.; Boztosun, I.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the exact solutions of the d-dimensional Schroedinger equation with a position-dependent mass m(r)=1/(1+ζ 2 r 2 ) is presented for a free particle, V(r)=0, by using the method of point canonical transformations. The energy eigenvalues and corresponding wavefunctions for the effective potential which is to be a generalized Poeschl-Teller potential are obtained within the framework of the asymptotic iteration method.

  11. Noncovalent Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Ravva, Mahesh Kumar

    2017-06-29

    In this chapter, we provide an overview of how noncovalent interactions, determined by the chemical structure of π-conjugated molecules and polymers, govern essential aspects of the electronic, optical, and mechanical characteristics of organic semiconductors. We begin by describing general aspects of materials design, including the wide variety of chemistries exploited to control the electronic and optical properties of these materials. We then discuss explicit examples of how the study of noncovalent interactions can provide deeper chemical insights that can improve the design of new generations of organic electronic materials.

  12. Beam position dependence of a wall-current monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiya, K.; Asami, A.; Suwada, T.; Urano, T.; Kobayashi, H.

    1995-01-01

    It was pointed out recently that there exists an appreciable beam position dependence in the wall-current monitor widely used in electron accelerators. Detailed study of this dependence is performed on a test bench varying the pulse width and the frequency of the input signal simulating the beam. The results of experiments show that when the pulse width becomes shorter more appreciable becomes the dependence, and it approaches to that of calculated from the method of images. A unified analysis is under way. (author)

  13. The harmonic oscillator and the position dependent mass Schroedinger equation: isospectral partners and factorization operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, J.; Ovando, G.; Pena, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important scientific contributions of Professor Marcos Moshinsky has been his study on the harmonic oscillator in quantum theory vis a vis the standard Schroedinger equation with constant mass [1]. However, a simple description of the motion of a particle interacting with an external environment such as happen in compositionally graded alloys consist of replacing the mass by the so-called effective mass that is in general variable and dependent on position. Therefore, honoring in memoriam Marcos Moshinsky, in this work we consider the position-dependent mass Schrodinger equations (PDMSE) for the harmonic oscillator potential model as former potential as well as with equi-spaced spectrum solutions, i.e. harmonic oscillator isospectral partners. To that purpose, the point canonical transformation method to convert a general second order differential equation (DE), of Sturm-Liouville type, into a Schroedinger-like standard equation is applied to the PDMSE. In that case, the former potential associated to the PDMSE and the potential involved in the Schroedinger-like standard equation are related through a Riccati-type relationship that includes the equivalent of the Witten superpotential to determine the exactly solvable positions-dependent mass distribution (PDMD)m(x). Even though the proposed approach is exemplified with the harmonic oscillator potential, the procedure is general and can be straightforwardly applied to other DEs.

  14. Nature and consequences of non-covalent interactions between flavonoids and macronutrients in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordenave, Nicolas; Hamaker, Bruce R; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2014-01-01

    Many of the potential health benefits of flavonoids have been associated with their specific chemical and biological properties including their ability to interact and bind non-covalently to macronutrients in foods. While flavonoid-protein interactions and binding have been the subject of intensive study, significantly less is understood about non-covalent interactions with carbohydrates and lipids. These interactions with macronutrients are likely to impact both the flavonoid properties in foods, such as their radical scavenging activity, and the food or beverage matrix itself, including their taste, texture and other sensorial properties. Overall, non-covalent binding of flavonoids with macronutrients is primarily driven by van der Waals interactions. From the flavonoid perspective, these interactions are modulated by characteristics such as degree of polymerization, molecular flexibility, number of external hydroxyl groups, or number of terminal galloyl groups. From the macronutrient standpoint, electrostatic and ionic interactions are generally predominant with carbohydrates, while hydrophobic interactions are generally predominant with lipids and mainly limited to interactions with flavonols. All of these interactions are involved in flavonoid-protein interactions. While primarily associated with undesirable characteristics in foods and beverages, such as astringency, negative impact on macronutrient digestibility and hazing, more recent efforts have attempted to leverage these interactions to develop controlled delivery systems or strategies to enhance flavonoids bioavailability. This paper aims at reviewing the fundamental bases for non-covalent interactions, their occurrence in food and beverage systems and their impact on the physico-chemical, organoleptic and some nutritional properties of food.

  15. Non-covalent associative structure of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, H. [Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan (China). School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    2004-06-01

    The recent progress of non-covalent associative structure of coal and the mechanisms of the carbon disulphide-N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (CS{sub 2}/NMP) are mixed solvent and the additive addition enhancing the extraction yield of coals are reviewed, and the aggregation behaviour of coal in solid and solution states are presented, and the aggregation behavior of coal in solid and solution states are introduced in this paper. Coal extraction and swelling in organic solvents at room temperature were the most useful methods to understand the associative structure of coal. CS{sub 2}/NMP is a unique solvent to give high extraction yields for some bituminous coals. Some additives such as tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) can dissociate the stronger interactions among coal molecules and enhance the extraction yields of coal in the mixed solvent. 37 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Classical oscillator with position-dependent mass in a complex domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Subir; Modak, Sujoy Kumar

    2009-01-01

    We study complexified Harmonic Oscillator with a position-dependent mass, termed as Complex Exotic Oscillator (CEO). The complexification induces a gauge invariance [A.V. Smilga, J. Phys. A 41 (2008) 244026, (arXiv:0706.4064); A. Mostafazadeh, J. Math. Phys. 43 (2002) 205; A. Mostafazadeh, J. Math. Phys. 43 (2002) 2814; A. Mostafazadeh, J. Math. Phys. 43 (2002) 3944]. The role of PT-symmetry is discussed from the perspective of classical trajectories of CEO for real energy. Some trajectories of CEO are similar to those for the particle in a quartic potential in the complex domain [C.M. Bender, S. Boettcher, P.N. Meisinger, J. Math. Phys. 40 (1999) 2201; C.M. Bender, D.D. Holm, D. Hook, J. Phys. A 40 (2007) F793, (arXiv:0705.3893)

  17. Predominantly ligand guided non-covalently linked assemblies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JUBARAJ B BARUAH

    2018-05-12

    May 12, 2018 ... Abstract. Various non-covalently linked inorganic self-assemblies formed by the supramolecular interacting .... metal-organic frameworks.59 Inorganic chemists rou- ...... two-dimensional organic–inorganic layered perovskite.

  18. Contribution of inner shell electrons to position-dependent stopping powers of a crystal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narumi, Kazumasa; Fujii, Yoshikazu; Kishine, Keiji; Kurakake, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kenji; Mannami, Michi-hiko

    1994-01-01

    Position-dependent stopping powers of the (001) surface of SnTe single crystal for specularly reflected 15 - 200 keV H + ions are studied. The position dependence of the experimental stopping powers varies with the energy of ions. From the comparison with the theoretical stopping powers based on both the single ion-electron collision and the collective excitation of the valence electrons, it is concluded that the observed change in the position-dependent stopping powers with energy of H + is due to the variation of contribution of inner shell electrons to stopping. (author)

  19. Geometric Shape Regulation and Noncovalent Synthesis of One-Dimensional Organic Luminescent Nano-/Micro-Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Zuolun; Zhang, Shoufeng; Wei, Jinbei; Ye, Kaiqi; Liu, Yu; Marder, Todd B; Wang, Yue

    2017-08-03

    Noncovalent synthesis of one-dimensional (1D) organic nano-/micro-materials with controllable geometric shapes or morphologies and special luminescent and electronic properties is one of the greatest challenges in modern chemistry and material science. Control of noncovalent interactions is fundamental for realizing desired 1D structures and crucial for understanding the functions of these interactions. Here, a series of thiophene-fused phenazines composed of a halogen-substituted π-conjugated plate and a pair of flexible side chains is presented, which displays halogen-dependent 1D self-assemblies. Luminescent 1D twisted wires, straight rods, and zigzag wires, respectively, can be generated in sequence when the halogen atoms are varied from the lightest F to the heaviest I. It was demonstrated that halogen-dependent anisotropic noncovalent interactions and mirror-symmetrical crystallization dominated the 1D-assembly behaviors of this class of molecules. The methodology developed in this study provides a potential strategy for constructing 1D organic materials with unique optoelectronic functions.

  20. Fermionic particles with position-dependent mass in the presence of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-02-01

    Feb 1, 2013 ... Quantum mechanical systems with position-dependent mass are proved ... The relativistic energy eigenvalues of the Dirac equation with ... the exact eigenfunctions can be derived from the following wave function generator:.

  1. Wave-packet revival for the Schroedinger equation with position-dependent mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G.M.

    2006-01-01

    We study the temporal evolution of solutions of 1D Schroedinger equation with position-dependent mass inside an infinite well. Revival of wave-packet is shown to exist and partial revivals are different from the usual ones

  2. Quantum information entropies for position-dependent mass Schrödinger problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yañez-Navarro, G. [Departamento de Física, Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Edificio 9, UPALM, Mexico D. F. 07738 (Mexico); Sun, Guo-Hua, E-mail: sunghdb@yahoo.com [Centro Universitario Valle de Chalco, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Valle de Chalco Solidaridad, Estado de México, 56615 (Mexico); Dytrych, T., E-mail: tdytrych@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Launey, K.D., E-mail: kristina@baton.phys.lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Dong, Shi-Hai, E-mail: dongsh2@yahoo.com [Departamento de Física, Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Edificio 9, UPALM, Mexico D. F. 07738 (Mexico); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Draayer, J.P., E-mail: draayer@sura.org [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The Shannon entropy for the position-dependent Schrödinger equation for a particle with a nonuniform solitonic mass density is evaluated in the case of a trivial null potential. The position S{sub x} and momentum S{sub p} information entropies for the three lowest-lying states are calculated. In particular, for these states, we are able to derive analytical solutions for the S{sub x} entropy as well as for the Fourier transformed wave functions, while the S{sub p} quantity is calculated numerically. We notice the behavior of the S{sub x} entropy, namely, it decreases as the mass barrier width narrows and becomes negative beyond a particular width. The negative Shannon entropy exists for the probability densities that are highly localized. The mass barrier determines the stability of the system. The dependence of S{sub p} on the width is contrary to the one for S{sub x}. Some interesting features of the information entropy densities ρ{sub s}(x) and ρ{sub s}(p) are demonstrated. In addition, the Bialynicki-Birula–Mycielski (BBM) inequality is tested for a number of states and found to hold for all the cases.

  3. Quantum information entropies for position-dependent mass Schrödinger problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yañez-Navarro, G.; Sun, Guo-Hua; Dytrych, T.; Launey, K.D.; Dong, Shi-Hai; Draayer, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    The Shannon entropy for the position-dependent Schrödinger equation for a particle with a nonuniform solitonic mass density is evaluated in the case of a trivial null potential. The position S x and momentum S p information entropies for the three lowest-lying states are calculated. In particular, for these states, we are able to derive analytical solutions for the S x entropy as well as for the Fourier transformed wave functions, while the S p quantity is calculated numerically. We notice the behavior of the S x entropy, namely, it decreases as the mass barrier width narrows and becomes negative beyond a particular width. The negative Shannon entropy exists for the probability densities that are highly localized. The mass barrier determines the stability of the system. The dependence of S p on the width is contrary to the one for S x . Some interesting features of the information entropy densities ρ s (x) and ρ s (p) are demonstrated. In addition, the Bialynicki-Birula–Mycielski (BBM) inequality is tested for a number of states and found to hold for all the cases

  4. Pseudo-Hermitian coherent states under the generalized quantum condition with position-dependent mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahiaoui, S A; Bentaiba, M

    2012-01-01

    In the context of the factorization method, we investigate the pseudo-Hermitian coherent states and their Hermitian counterpart coherent states under the generalized quantum condition in the framework of a position-dependent mass. By considering a specific modification in the superpotential, suitable annihilation and creation operators are constructed in order to reproduce the Hermitian counterpart Hamiltonian in the factorized form. We show that by means of these ladder operators, we can construct a wide range of exactly solvable potentials as well as their accompanying coherent states. Alternatively, we explore the relationship between the pseudo-Hermitian Hamiltonian and its Hermitian counterparts, obtained from a similarity transformation, to construct the associated pseudo-Hermitian coherent states. These latter preserve the structure of Perelomov’s states and minimize the generalized position–momentum uncertainty principle. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Quantum physics with non-Hermitian operators’. (paper)

  5. Noncovalent Labeling of Biomolecules with Red and Near- Infrared Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucjan Strekowski

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers such as proteins and nucleic acids can be labeled with a fluorescent marker to allow for their detection. Covalent labeling is achieved by the reaction of an appropriately functionalized dye marker with a reactive group on a biomolecule. The recent trend, however, is the use of noncovalent labeling that results from strong hydrophobic and/or ionic interactions between the marker and biomolecule of interest. The main advantage of noncovalent labeling is that it affects the functional activity of the biomolecule to a lesser extent. The applications of luminescent cyanine and squarylium dyes are reviewed.

  6. Molecular electrostatic potential analysis of non-covalent complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical Sciences and Technology Division and Academy of Scientific & Innovative Research (AcSIR), ... workers proposed the electrostatic-covalent model of hydrogen bonding. ..... tain degree of electron donation and acceptance occurs.

  7. Noise-driven diamagnetic susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots: Role of anisotropy, position-dependent effective mass and position-dependent dielectric screening function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bera, Aindrila; Saha, Surajit; Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Diamagnetic susceptibility (DMS) of doped quantum dot is studied. • The dot is subjected to Gaussian white noise. • Role of anisotropy, PDEM and PDDSF have been analyzed. • Noise amplifies and suppresses DMS depending on particular condition. • Findings bear significant technological importance. - Abstract: We explore Diamagnetic susceptibility (DMS) of impurity doped quantum dot (QD) in presence of Gaussian white noise introduced to the system additively and multiplicatively. In view of this profiles of DMS have been pursued with variations of geometrical anisotropy and dopant location. We have invoked position-dependent effective mass (PDEM) and position-dependent dielectric screening function (PDDSF) of the system. Presence of noise sometimes suppresses and sometimes amplifies DMS from that of noise-free condition and the extent of suppression/amplification depends on mode of application of noise. It is important to mention that the said suppression/amplification exhibits subtle dependence on use of PDEM, PDDSF and geometrical anisotropy. The study reveals that DMS, or more fundamentally, the effective confinement of LDSS, can be tuned by appropriate mingling of geometrical anisotropy/effective mass/dielectric constant of the system with noise and also on the pathway of application of latter.

  8. Benchmark Calculations of Noncovalent Interactions of Halogenated Molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáč, Jan; Riley, Kevin Eugene; Hobza, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 11 (2012), s. 4285-4292 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : halogenated molecules * noncovalent interactions * benchmark calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.389, year: 2012

  9. Multi-step non-covalent pathways to supramolecular systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, T.M.

    2010-01-01

    The spontaneous organization of building blocks into ordered structures governed by non-covalent interactions, or self-assembly, is a commonly encountered pathway in nature to obtain functional materials. These materials often consist of many different components ordered into intricate structures.

  10. The origins of the directionality of noncovalent intermolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changwei; Guan, Liangyu; Danovich, David; Shaik, Sason; Mo, Yirong

    2016-01-05

    The recent σ-hole concept emphasizes the contribution of electrostatic attraction to noncovalent bonds, and implies that the electrostatic force has an angular dependency. Here a set of clusters, which includes hydrogen bonding, halogen bonding, chalcogen bonding, and pnicogen bonding systems, is investigated to probe the magnitude of covalency and its contribution to the directionality in noncovalent bonding. The study is based on the block-localized wavefunction (BLW) method that decomposes the binding energy into the steric and the charge transfer (CT) (hyperconjugation) contributions. One unique feature of the BLW method is its capability to derive optimal geometries with only steric effect taken into account, while excluding the CT interaction. The results reveal that the overall steric energy exhibits angular dependency notably in halogen bonding, chalcogen bonding, and pnicogen bonding systems. Turning on the CT interactions further shortens the intermolecular distances. This bond shortening enhances the Pauli repulsion, which in turn offsets the electrostatic attraction, such that in the final sum, the contribution of the steric effect to bonding is diminished, leaving the CT to dominate the binding energy. In several other systems particularly hydrogen bonding systems, the steric effect nevertheless still plays the major role whereas the CT interaction is minor. However, in all cases, the CT exhibits strong directionality, suggesting that the linearity or near linearity of noncovalent bonds is largely governed by the charge-transfer interaction whose magnitude determines the covalency in noncovalent bonds. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Two-Agent Scheduling to Minimize the Maximum Cost with Position-Dependent Jobs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Wan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a single-machine two-agent scheduling problem to minimize the maximum costs with position-dependent jobs. There are two agents, each with a set of independent jobs, competing to perform their jobs on a common machine. In our scheduling setting, the actual position-dependent processing time of one job is characterized by variable function dependent on the position of the job in the sequence. Each agent wants to fulfil the objective of minimizing the maximum cost of its own jobs. We develop a feasible method to achieve all the Pareto optimal points in polynomial time.

  12. Position-Dependent Dynamics Explain Pore-Averaged Diffusion in Strongly Attractive Adsorptive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krekelberg, William P; Siderius, Daniel W; Shen, Vincent K; Truskett, Thomas M; Errington, Jeffrey R

    2017-12-12

    Using molecular simulations, we investigate the relationship between the pore-averaged and position-dependent self-diffusivity of a fluid adsorbed in a strongly attractive pore as a function of loading. Previous work (Krekelberg, W. P.; Siderius, D. W.; Shen, V. K.; Truskett, T. M.; Errington, J. R. Connection between thermodynamics and dynamics of simple fluids in highly attractive pores. Langmuir 2013, 29, 14527-14535, doi: 10.1021/la4037327) established that pore-averaged self-diffusivity in the multilayer adsorption regime, where the fluid exhibits a dense film at the pore surface and a lower density interior pore region, is nearly constant as a function of loading. Here we show that this puzzling behavior can be understood in terms of how loading affects the fraction of particles that reside in the film and interior pore regions as well as their distinct dynamics. Specifically, the insensitivity of pore-averaged diffusivity to loading arises from the approximate cancellation of two factors: an increase in the fraction of particles in the higher diffusivity interior pore region with loading and a corresponding decrease in the particle diffusivity in that region. We also find that the position-dependent self-diffusivities scale with the position-dependent density. We present a model for predicting the pore-average self-diffusivity based on the position-dependent self-diffusivity, which captures the unusual characteristics of pore-averaged self-diffusivity in strongly attractive pores over several orders of magnitude.

  13. Flatland Position-Dependent-Mass: Polar Coordinates, Separability and Exact Solvability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Mustafa

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic energy operator with position-dependent-mass in plane polar coordinates is obtained. The separability of the corresponding Schrödinger equation is discussed. A hypothetical toy model is reported and two exactly solvable examples are studied.

  14. Positive and negative ion mode comparison for the determination of DNA/peptide noncovalent binding sites through the formation of "three-body" noncovalent fragment ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahim, Bessem; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Alves, Sandra

    2018-02-01

    Gas-phase fragmentation of single strand DNA-peptide noncovalent complexes is investigated in positive and negative electrospray ionization modes.Collision-induced dissociation experiments, performed on the positively charged noncovalent complex precursor ions, have confirmed the trend previously observed in negative ion mode, i.e. a high stability of noncovalent complexes containing very basic peptidic residues (i.e. R > K) and acidic nucleotide units (i.e. Thy units), certainly incoming from the existence of salt bridge interactions. Independent of the ion polarity, stable noncovalent complex precursor ions were found to dissociate preferentially through covalent bond cleavages of the partners without disrupting noncovalent interactions. The resulting DNA fragment ions were found to be still noncovalently linked to the peptides. Additionally, the losses of an internal nucleic fragment producing "three-body" noncovalent fragment ions were also observed in both ion polarities, demonstrating the spectacular salt bridge interaction stability. The identical fragmentation patterns (regardless of the relative fragment ion abundances) observed in both polarities have shown a common location of salt bridge interaction certainly preserved from solution. Nonetheless, most abundant noncovalent fragment ions (and particularly three-body ones) are observed from positively charged noncovalent complexes. Therefore, we assume that, independent of the preexisting salt bridge interaction and zwitterion structures, multiple covalent bond cleavages from single-stranded DNA/peptide complexes rely on an excess of positive charges in both electrospray ionization ion polarities.

  15. Noncovalently-functionalized reduced graphene oxide sheets by water-soluble methyl green for supercapacitor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Xiaoying; Hu, Zhongai, E-mail: zhongai@nwnu.edu.cn; Hu, Haixiong; Qiang, Ruibin; Li, Li; Li, Zhimin; Yang, Yuying; Zhang, Ziyu; Wu, Hongying

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Electroactive methyl green (MG) is selected to functionalize reduced graphene oxide (RGO) through non-covalent modification and the composite achieves high specific capacitance, good rate capability and excellent long life cycle. - Highlights: • MG–RGO composites were firstly prepared through non-covalent modification. • The mass ratio in composites is a key for achieving high specific capacitance. • MG–RGO 5:4 exhibits the highest specific capacitance of 341 F g{sup −1}. • MG–RGO 5:4 shows excellent rate capability and long life cycle. - Abstract: In the present work, water-soluble electroactive methyl green (MG) has been used to non-covalently functionalize reduced graphene oxide (RGO) for enhancing supercapacitive performance. The microstructure, composition and morphology of MG–RGO composites are systematically characterized by UV–vis absorption, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The electrochemical performances are investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The fast redox reactions from MG could generate additional pseudocapacitance, which endows RGO higher capacitances. As a result, the MG–RGO composite (with the 5:4 mass ratio of MG:RGO) achieve a maximum value of 341 F g{sup −1} at 1 A g{sup −1} within the potential range from −0.25 to 0.75 V and provide a 180% enhancement in specific capacitance in comparison with pure RGO. Furthermore, excellent rate capability (72% capacitance retention from 1 A g{sup −1} to 20 A g{sup −1}) and long life cycle (12% capacitance decay after 5000 cycles) are achieved for the MG–RGO composite electrode.

  16. Klein-Gordon oscillator with position-dependent mass in the rotating cosmic string spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing-Qian; Long, Zheng-Wen; Long, Chao-Yun; Wu, Shu-Rui

    2018-02-01

    A spinless particle coupled covariantly to a uniform magnetic field parallel to the string in the background of the rotating cosmic string is studied. The energy levels of the electrically charged particle subject to the Klein-Gordon oscillator are analyzed. Afterwards, we consider the case of the position-dependent mass and show how these energy levels depend on the parameters in the problem. Remarkably, it shows that for the special case, the Klein-Gordon oscillator coupled covariantly to a homogeneous magnetic field with the position-dependent mass in the rotating cosmic string background has the similar behaviors to the Klein-Gordon equation with a Coulomb-type configuration in a rotating cosmic string background in the presence of an external magnetic field.

  17. Quantum wave packet revival in two-dimensional circular quantum wells with position-dependent mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G.M. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Polo Universitario de Volta Redonda-Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. dos Trabalhadores 420, Volta Redonda RJ, CEP 27255-125 (Brazil)], E-mail: agmschmidt@gmail.com; Azeredo, Abel D. [Departamento de Fisica-Universidade Federal de Roraima, Av. Cap. Ene Garcez 2413, Boa Vista RR, CEP 69304-000 (Brazil)], E-mail: aazeredo@gmail.com; Gusso, A. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas-Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, km 16 Rodovia Ilheus-Itabuna, Ilheus BA, CEP 45662-000 (Brazil)], E-mail: agusso@uesc.br

    2008-04-14

    We study quantum wave packet revivals on two-dimensional infinite circular quantum wells (CQWs) and circular quantum dots with position-dependent mass (PDM) envisaging a possible experimental realization. We consider CQWs with radially varying mass, addressing particularly the cases where M(r){proportional_to}r{sup w} with w=1,2, or -2. The two PDM Hamiltonians currently allowed by theory were analyzed and we were able to construct a strong theoretical argument favoring one of them.

  18. Quantum wave packet revival in two-dimensional circular quantum wells with position-dependent mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G.M.; Azeredo, Abel D.; Gusso, A.

    2008-01-01

    We study quantum wave packet revivals on two-dimensional infinite circular quantum wells (CQWs) and circular quantum dots with position-dependent mass (PDM) envisaging a possible experimental realization. We consider CQWs with radially varying mass, addressing particularly the cases where M(r)∝r w with w=1,2, or -2. The two PDM Hamiltonians currently allowed by theory were analyzed and we were able to construct a strong theoretical argument favoring one of them

  19. Calculations on Noncovalent Interactions and Databases of Benchmark Interaction Energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hobza, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 4 (2012), s. 663-672 ISSN 0001-4842 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:European Social Fund(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : non-covalent interactions * covalent interactions * quantum chemical approach Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 20.833, year: 2012

  20. Algebraic solutions of shape-invariant position-dependent effective mass systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amir, Naila, E-mail: naila.amir@live.com, E-mail: naila.amir@seecs.edu.pk [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Iqbal, Shahid, E-mail: sic80@hotmail.com, E-mail: siqbal@sns.nust.edu.pk [School of Natural Sciences, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-06-15

    Keeping in view the ordering ambiguity that arises due to the presence of position-dependent effective mass in the kinetic energy term of the Hamiltonian, a general scheme for obtaining algebraic solutions of quantum mechanical systems with position-dependent effective mass is discussed. We quantize the Hamiltonian of the pertaining system by using symmetric ordering of the operators concerning momentum and the spatially varying mass, initially proposed by von Roos and Lévy-Leblond. The algebraic method, used to obtain the solutions, is based on the concepts of supersymmetric quantum mechanics and shape invariance. In order to exemplify the general formalism a class of non-linear oscillators has been considered. This class includes the particular example of a one-dimensional oscillator with different position-dependent effective mass profiles. Explicit expressions for the eigenenergies and eigenfunctions in terms of generalized Hermite polynomials are presented. Moreover, properties of these modified Hermite polynomials, like existence of generating function and recurrence relations among the polynomials have also been studied. Furthermore, it has been shown that in the harmonic limit, all the results for the linear harmonic oscillator are recovered.

  1. Body position-dependent shift in odor percept present only for perithreshold odors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundström, Johan N; Boyle, Julie A; Jones-Gotman, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that a supine position causes a decrease in olfactory sensitivity compared with an upright position. We pursued that initial finding in 3 separate experiments in which we explored the extent of, and mechanism underlying, this phenomenon. In Experiment 1, we replicated the decrease in olfactory sensitivity when in a supine compared with an upright position. In Experiment 2, we measured body position-dependent shifts in physiological variables and sniff measures while smelling suprathreshold odorants and performing a perithreshold odor intensity discrimination task. Olfactory performances were reduced while supine. However, no relationships between the shift in olfactory performances and either the physiological variables or sniff measures were found. In Experiment 3, we determined that there were no position-dependent shifts in ability to discriminate or identify suprathreshold odors or rate them for pleasantness, intensity, or familiarity. However, a drop in scores was observed, and performance was slowed, on a cognitive skill while supine. These results demonstrate a body position-dependent shift in olfactory sensitivity only for perithreshold odors that appears to be mediated by cognitive rather than physiological factors. Implications for olfactory imaging studies are discussed.

  2. On Hamiltonians with position-dependent mass from Kaluza–Klein compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballesteros, Ángel, E-mail: angelb@ubu.es; Gutiérrez-Sagredo, Iván, E-mail: igsagredo@ubu.es; Naranjo, Pedro, E-mail: pnaranjo@ubu.es

    2017-02-19

    In a recent paper (Morris (2015) ), an inhomogeneous compactification of the extra dimension of a five-dimensional Kaluza–Klein metric has been shown to generate a position-dependent mass (PDM) in the corresponding four-dimensional system. As an application of this dimensional reduction mechanism, a specific static dilatonic scalar field has been connected with a PDM Lagrangian describing a well-known nonlinear PDM oscillator. Here we present more instances of this construction that lead to PDM systems with radial symmetry, and the properties of their corresponding inhomogeneous extra dimensions are compared with the ones in the nonlinear oscillator model. Moreover, it is also shown how the compactification introduced in this type of models can alternatively be interpreted as a novel mechanism for the dynamical generation of curvature. - Highlights: • New position-dependent mass systems arising from inhomogeneous Kaluza–Klein compactifications are presented. • Connections with known integrable position-dependent mass systems are established. • A novel mechanism for the dynamical generation of curvature is proposed.

  3. Noncovalent functionalization of graphene by CdS nanohybrids for electrochemical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li [Chemical Engineering Research Center, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Qi, Wei, E-mail: qiwei@tju.edu.cn [Chemical Engineering Research Center, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Membrane Science and Desalination Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin 300072 (China); Su, Rongxin [Chemical Engineering Research Center, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Membrane Science and Desalination Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin 300072 (China); He, Zhimin [Chemical Engineering Research Center, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2014-10-01

    Graphene–CdS (GR–CdS) nanocomposites were synthesized via a noncovalent functionalization process. To retain the intrinsic electronic and mechanical properties of graphene, the pristine graphene was firstly modified with 1-aminopyrene based on a strong π–π bond between the pyrenyl groups and the carbon rings of the graphene. Then the CdS nanocrystals were uniformly grown on the amino-graphene. The GR–CdS nanocomposites were characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A glucose biosensor was then fabricated based on the as-prepared GR–CdS nanocomposite by immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOD) in a chitosan thin film on a glassy carbon electrode. Direct electron transfer between GOD and the electrode was achieved and the biosensor showed good electrocatalytic activity with glucose ranging from 0.5 to 7.5 mM and a sensitivity of 45.4 μA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. This work provided a simple and nondestructive functionalization strategy to fabricate graphene-based hybrid nanomaterials and it is expected that this composite film may find more potential applications in biosensors and biocatalysis. - Highlights: • A simple noncovalent approach to synthesize graphene–CdS (GR–CdS) nanocomposites • Direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase based on synergistic effect of GR–CdS • A sensitive glucose biosensor was fabricated based on the GR–CdS hybrids.

  4. Noncovalent functionalization of graphene by CdS nanohybrids for electrochemical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2014-01-01

    Graphene–CdS (GR–CdS) nanocomposites were synthesized via a noncovalent functionalization process. To retain the intrinsic electronic and mechanical properties of graphene, the pristine graphene was firstly modified with 1-aminopyrene based on a strong π–π bond between the pyrenyl groups and the carbon rings of the graphene. Then the CdS nanocrystals were uniformly grown on the amino-graphene. The GR–CdS nanocomposites were characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A glucose biosensor was then fabricated based on the as-prepared GR–CdS nanocomposite by immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOD) in a chitosan thin film on a glassy carbon electrode. Direct electron transfer between GOD and the electrode was achieved and the biosensor showed good electrocatalytic activity with glucose ranging from 0.5 to 7.5 mM and a sensitivity of 45.4 μA mM −1 cm −2 . This work provided a simple and nondestructive functionalization strategy to fabricate graphene-based hybrid nanomaterials and it is expected that this composite film may find more potential applications in biosensors and biocatalysis. - Highlights: • A simple noncovalent approach to synthesize graphene–CdS (GR–CdS) nanocomposites • Direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase based on synergistic effect of GR–CdS • A sensitive glucose biosensor was fabricated based on the GR–CdS hybrids

  5. Approximate energies and thermal properties of a position-dependent mass charged particle under external magnetic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Eshghi; H Mehraban; S M Ikhdair

    2017-01-01

    We solve the Schr(o)dinger equation with a position-dependent mass (PDM) charged particle interacted via the superposition of the Morse-plus-Coulomb potentials and is under the influence of external magnetic and Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux fields.The nonrelativistic bound state energies together with their wave functions are calculated for two spatially-dependent mass distribution functions.We also study the thermal quantifies of such a system.Further,the canonical formalism is used to compute various thermodynamic variables for second choosing mass by using the Gibbs formalism.We give plots for energy states as a function of various physical parameters.The behavior of the internal energy,specific heat,and entropy as functions of temperature and mass density parameter in the inverse-square mass case for different values of magnetic field are shown.

  6. Approximate energies and thermal properties of a position-dependent mass charged particle under external magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshghi, M; Mehraban, H; Ikhdair, S M

    2017-01-01

    We solve the Schrödinger equation with a position-dependent mass (PDM) charged particle interacted via the superposition of the Morse-plus-Coulomb potentials and is under the influence of external magnetic and Aharonov–Bohm (AB) flux fields. The nonrelativistic bound state energies together with their wave functions are calculated for two spatially-dependent mass distribution functions. We also study the thermal quantities of such a system. Further, the canonical formalism is used to compute various thermodynamic variables for second choosing mass by using the Gibbs formalism. We give plots for energy states as a function of various physical parameters. The behavior of the internal energy, specific heat, and entropy as functions of temperature and mass density parameter in the inverse-square mass case for different values of magnetic field are shown. (paper)

  7. New superintegrable models with position-dependent mass from Bertrand's Theorem on curved spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballesteros, A; Herranz, F J [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Burgos, E-09001 Burgos (Spain); Enciso, A [Departamento de Fisica Teorica II, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ragnisco, O; Riglioni, D, E-mail: angelb@ubu.es, E-mail: aenciso@fis.ucm.es, E-mail: fjherranz@ubu.es, E-mail: ragnisco@fis.uniroma3.it, E-mail: riglioni@fis.uniroma3.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma Tre and Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare sezione di Roma Tre, Via Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy)

    2011-03-01

    A generalized version of Bertrand's theorem on spherically symmetric curved spaces is presented. This result is based on the classification of (3+1)-dimensional (Lorentzian) Bertrand spacetimes, that gives rise to two families of Hamiltonian systems defined on certain 3-dimensional (Riemannian) spaces. These two systems are shown to be either the Kepler or the oscillator potentials on the corresponding Bertrand spaces, and both of them are maximally superintegrable. Afterwards, the relationship between such Bertrand Hamiltonians and position-dependent mass systems is explicitly established. These results are illustrated through the example of a superintegrable (nonlinear) oscillator on a Bertrand-Darboux space, whose quantization and physical features are also briefly addressed.

  8. Flowshop Scheduling Problems with a Position-Dependent Exponential Learning Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingbao Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a permutation flowshop scheduling problem with a position-dependent exponential learning effect. The objective is to minimize the performance criteria of makespan and the total flow time. For the two-machine flow shop scheduling case, we show that Johnson’s rule is not an optimal algorithm for minimizing the makespan given the exponential learning effect. Furthermore, by using the shortest total processing times first (STPT rule, we construct the worst-case performance ratios for both criteria. Finally, a polynomial-time algorithm is proposed for special cases of the studied problem.

  9. Position dependence of charge collection in prototype sensors for the CMS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rohe, Tilman; Chiochia, Vincenzo; Cremaldi, Lucien M; Cucciarelli, Susanna; Dorokhov, Andrei; Konecki, Marcin; Prokofiev, Kirill; Regenfus, Christian; Sanders, David A; Son Seung Hee; Speer, Thomas; Swartz, Morris

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on the sensor R&D activity for the CMS pixel detector. Devices featuring several design and technology options have been irradiated up to a proton fluence1 of 1 multiplied by 10**1**5 n //e//q/cm**2 at the CERN PS. Afterward, they were bump bonded to unirradiated readout chips and tested using high energy pions in the H2 beam line of the CERN SPS. The readout chip allows a nonzero suppressed full analogue readout and therefore a good characterization of the sensors in terms of noise and charge collection properties. The position dependence of signal is presented and the differences between the two sensor options are discussed. 20 Refs.

  10. Simulation of Probe Position-Dependent Electron Energy-Loss Fine Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxley, M. P.; Kapetanakis, M. D.; Prange, Micah P.; Varela, M.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2014-03-31

    We present a theoretical framework for calculating probe-position-dependent electron energy-loss near-edge structure for the scanning transmission electron microscope by combining density functional theory with dynamical scattering theory. We show how simpler approaches to calculating near-edge structure fail to include the fundamental physics needed to understand the evolution of near-edge structure as a function of probe position and investigate the dependence of near-edge structure on probe size. It is within this framework that density functional theory should be presented, in order to ensure that variations of near-edge structure are truly due to local electronic structure and how much from the diffraction and focusing of the electron beam.

  11. Periodic position dependence of the energy measured in the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Descamps, Julien

    2006-01-01

    A uniform energy measurement response of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter ECAL is essential for precision physics at the LHC. The ECAL barrel calorimeter consists of 61200 lead tungstate crystals arranged in a quasi-projective geometry. The energy of photons reaching the ECAL will be reconstructed by summing the channels corresponding to matrices of 3x3 or 5x5 crystals centred on the crystal with the largest energy deposit. The energy measured using such matrices of fixed size has been studied using electron test beam data taken in 2004. The variation of the energy containment with the incident electron impact position on the central crystal leads to a degradation of the energy resolution. A method using only the calorimeter information is presented to correct for the position dependent response. After correction, the energy resolution performance for uniform impact distributions of the electrons on the front face of a crystal approaches that obtained for maximal containment with a central impact. The univ...

  12. Non-covalent and reversible functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Di Crescenzo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been proposed and actively explored as multipurpose innovative nanoscaffolds for applications in fields such as material science, drug delivery and diagnostic applications. Their versatile physicochemical features are nonetheless limited by their scarce solubilization in both aqueous and organic solvents. In order to overcome this drawback CNTs can be easily non-covalently functionalized with different dispersants. In the present review we focus on the peculiar hydrophobic character of pristine CNTs that prevent them to easily disperse in organic solvents. We report some interesting examples of CNTs dispersants with the aim to highlight the essential features a molecule should possess in order to act as a good carbon nanotube dispersant both in water and in organic solvents. The review pinpoints also a few examples of dispersant design. The last section is devoted to the exploitation of the major quality of non-covalent functionalization that is its reversibility and the possibility to obtain stimuli-responsive precipitation or dispersion of CNTs.

  13. [Noncovalent cation-π interactions--their role in nature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Krzysztof; Boratyński, Janusz

    2014-11-07

    Non-covalent interactions play an extremely important role in organisms. The main non-covalent interactions in nature are: ion-ion interactions, dipole-dipole interactions, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals interactions. A new kind of intermolecular interactions--cation-π interactions--is gaining increasing attention. These interactions occur between a cation and a π system. The main contributors to cation-π interactions are electrostatic, polarization and, to a lesser extent, dispersion interactions. At first, cation-π interactions were studied in a gas phase, with metal cation-aromatic system complexes. The characteristics of these complexes are as follows: an increase of cation atomic number leads to a decrease of interaction energy, and an increase of cation charge leads to an increase of interaction energy. Aromatic amino acids bind with metal cations mainly through interactions with their main chain. Nevertheless, cation-π interaction with a hydrophobic side chain significantly enhances binding energy. In water solutions most cations preferentially interact with water molecules rather than aromatic systems. Cation-π interactions occur in environments with lower accessibility to a polar solvent. Cation-π interactions can have a stabilizing role on the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of proteins. These interactions play an important role in substrate or ligand binding sites in many proteins, which should be taken into consideration when the screening of effective inhibitors for these proteins is carried out. Cation-π interactions are abundant and play an important role in many biological processes.

  14. Novel strategies in feedforward adaptation to a position-dependent perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinder, Mark R; Milner, Theodore E

    2005-08-01

    To investigate the control mechanisms used in adapting to position-dependent forces, subjects performed 150 horizontal reaching movements over 25 cm in the presence of a position-dependent parabolic force field (PF). The PF acted only over the first 10 cm of the movement. On every fifth trial, a virtual mechanical guide (double wall) constrained subjects to move along a straight-line path between the start and target positions. Its purpose was to register lateral force to track formation of an internal model of the force field, and to look for evidence of possible alternative adaptive strategies. The force field produced a force to the right, which initially caused subjects to deviate in that direction. They reacted by producing deviations to the left, "into" the force field, as early as the second trial. Further adaptation resulted in rapid exponential reduction of kinematic error in the latter portion of the movement, where the greatest perturbation to the handpath was initially observed, whereas there was little modification of the handpath in the region where the PF was active. Significant force directed to counteract the PF was measured on the first guided trial, and was modified during the first half of the learning set. The total force impulse in the region of the PF increased throughout the learning trials, but it always remained less than that produced by the PF. The force profile did not resemble a mirror image of the PF in that it tended to be more trapezoidal than parabolic in shape. As in previous studies of force-field adaptation, we found that changes in muscle activation involved a general increase in the activity of all muscles, which increased arm stiffness, and selectively-greater increases in the activation of muscles which counteracted the PF. With training, activation was exponentially reduced, albeit more slowly than kinematic error. Progressive changes in kinematics and EMG occurred predominantly in the region of the workspace beyond the

  15. Using PyMOL to Explore the Effects of pH on Noncovalent Interactions between Immunoglobulin G and Protein A: A Guided-Inquiry Biochemistry Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche Allred, Zahilyn D; Tai, Heeyoung; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Page, Richard C

    2017-11-01

    Students' understandings of foundational concepts such as noncovalent interactions, pH and pK a are crucial for success in undergraduate biochemistry courses. We developed a guided-inquiry activity to aid students in making connections between noncovalent interactions and pH/pK a . Students explore these concepts by examining the primary and tertiary structures of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and Protein A. Students use PyMOL, an open source molecular visualization application, to (1) identify hydrogen bonds and salt bridges between and within the proteins at physiological pH and (2) apply their knowledge of pH/pK a to association rate constant data for these proteins at pH 4 and pH 11. The laboratory activity was implemented within a one semester biochemistry laboratory for students majoring in allied health disciplines, engineering, and biological sciences. Several extensions for more advanced students are discussed. Students' overall performance highlighted their ability to successfully complete tasks such as labeling and identifying noncovalent interactions and revealed difficulties with analyzing noncovalent interactions under varying pH/pK a conditions. Students' evaluations after completing the activity indicated they felt challenged but also recognized the potential of the activity to help them gain meaningful understanding of the connections between noncovalent interactions, pH, pK a , and protein structure. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(6):528-536, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  16. Rapid Evaluation for Position-Dependent Dynamics of a 3-DOF PKM Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-wei Luo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on the substructure synthesis and modal reduction technique, a computationally efficient elastodynamic model for a fully flexible 3-RPS parallel kinematic machine (PKM tool is proposed, in which the frequency response function (FRF at the end of the tool can be obtained at any given position throughout its workspace. In the proposed elastodynamic model, the whole system is divided into a moving platform subsystem and three identical RPS limb subsystems, in which all joint compliances are included. The spherical joint and the revolute joint are treated as lumped virtual springs with equal stiffness; the platform is treated as a rigid body and the RPS limbs are modelled with modal reduction techniques. With the compatibility conditions at interfaces between the limbs and the platform, an analytical system governing differential equation is derived. Based on the derived model, the position-dependent dynamic characteristics such as natural frequencies, mode shapes, and FRFs of the 3-RPS PKM are simulated. The simulation results indicate that the distributions of natural frequencies throughout the workspace are strongly dependant on mechanism's configurations and demonstrate an axial-symmetric tendency. The following finite element analysis and modal tests both validate the analytical results of natural frequencies, mode shapes, and the FRFs.

  17. Position dependent mismatch discrimination on DNA microarrays – experiments and model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Wolfgang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The propensity of oligonucleotide strands to form stable duplexes with complementary sequences is fundamental to a variety of biological and biotechnological processes as various as microRNA signalling, microarray hybridization and PCR. Yet our understanding of oligonucleotide hybridization, in particular in presence of surfaces, is rather limited. Here we use oligonucleotide microarrays made in-house by optically controlled DNA synthesis to produce probe sets comprising all possible single base mismatches and base bulges for each of 20 sequence motifs under study. Results We observe that mismatch discrimination is mostly determined by the defect position (relative to the duplex ends as well as by the sequence context. We investigate the thermodynamics of the oligonucleotide duplexes on the basis of double-ended molecular zipper. Theoretical predictions of defect positional influence as well as long range sequence influence agree well with the experimental results. Conclusion Molecular zipping at thermodynamic equilibrium explains the binding affinity of mismatched DNA duplexes on microarrays well. The position dependent nearest neighbor model (PDNN can be inferred from it. Quantitative understanding of microarray experiments from first principles is in reach.

  18. Igf2/H19 Imprinting Control Region (ICR: An Insulator or a Position-Dependent Silencer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhasis Banerjee

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The imprinting control region (ICR located far upstream of the H19 gene, in conjunction with enhancers, modulates the transcription of Igf2 and H19 genes in an allele-specific manner. On paternal inheritance, the methylated ICR silences the H19 gene and indirectly facilitates transcription from the distant Igf2 promoter, whereas on the maternal chromosome the unmethylated ICR, together with enhancers, activates transcription of the H19 gene and thereby contributes to the repression of Igf2. This repression of maternal Igf2 has recently been postulated to be due to a chromatin boundary or insulator function of the unmethylated ICR. Central to the insulator model is the site-specific binding of a ubiquitous nuclear factor CTCF which exhibits remarkable flexibility in functioning as transcriptional activator or silencer. We suggest that the ICR positioned close to the enhancers in an episomal context might function as a transcriptional silencer by virtue of interaction of CTCF with its modifiers such as SIN3A and histone deacetylases. Furthermore, a localised folded chromatin structure resulting from juxtaposition of two disparate regulatory sequences (enhancer ICR could be the mechanistic basis of ICR-mediated position-dependent (ICR-promoter transcriptional repression in transgenic Drosophila.

  19. Non-Covalent Organocatalyzed Domino Reactions Involving Oxindoles: Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tecla Gasperi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous presence of spirooxindole architectures with several functionalities and stereogenic centers in bioactive molecules has been appealing for the development of novel methodologies seeking their preparation in high yields and selectivities. Expansion and refinement in the field of asymmetric organocatalysis have made possible the development of straightforward strategies that address these two requisites. In this review, we illustrate the current state-of-the-art in the field of spirooxindole synthesis through the use of non-covalent organocatalysis. We aim to provide a concise overview of very recent methods that allow to the isolation of unique, densely and diversified spirocyclic oxindole derivatives with high structural diversity via the use of cascade, tandem and domino processes.

  20. Noncovalent binding of 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide to proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Osamu

    1979-01-01

    Binding of 4NQO to various kinds of enzymes or proteins was studied. Each one of proteins was mixed with 4NQO in 0.4 mM NaHCO 3 solution and eluted through Ultrogel AcA 22 column. Radioactivity of 14 C-labeled 4NQO found in protein fraction was measured. 4NQO bound hardly to polyglutamic acid and polyaspertic acid, somewhat to serum albumin, insulin, trypsin, RNA polymerase and DNA polymerase, and markedly to ureas which is an SH enzyme. Lactate dehydrogenase, one of SH enzymes, aggregated with 4NQO. The binding of SH enzyme with the N-oxide would be attributable to a noncovalent binding such as >N-O---H-S-, because 4NQO-urease binding yield markedly decreased in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate or cysteine, and also 4NQO-bound urease released 4NQO by the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate. (author)

  1. Noncovalent binding of 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide to proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, O [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1979-12-01

    Binding of 4NQO to various kinds of enzymes or proteins was studied. Each one of proteins was mixed with 4NQO in 0.4 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ solution and eluted through Ultrogel AcA 22 column. Radioactivity of /sup 14/C-labeled 4NQO found in protein fraction was measured. 4NQO bound hardly to polyglutamic acid and polyaspertic acid, somewhat to serum albumin, insulin, trypsin, RNA polymerase and DNA polymerase, and markedly to ureas which is an SH enzyme. Lactate dehydrogenase, one of SH enzymes, aggregated with 4NQO. The binding of SH enzyme with the N-oxide would be attributable to a noncovalent binding such as >N-O---H-S-, because 4NQO-urease binding yield markedly decreased in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate or cysteine, and also 4NQO-bound urease released 4NQO by the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate.

  2. Non-covalent conjugates of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid for interaction with cells overexpressing folate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Novoa, Leidy V.

    2013-01-01

    We here present amethod to form a noncovalent conjugate of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid aimed to interact with cells over-expressing folate receptors. The bonding was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple, rapid “one pot” synthesis method. The zeta...... a low toxicity of the conjugates in the THP-1 cells. The low toxicity and the cellular uptake of single-walled carbon nanotube–folic acid by cancer cells suggest their potential use in carbon nanotube-based drug delivery systems and in the diagnosis of cancer or tropical diseases such as leishmaniasis....

  3. Position-dependency of Fuel Pin Homogenization in a Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Woong; Kim, Yonghee [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technolgy, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    By considering the multi-physics effects more comprehensively, it is possible to acquire precise local parameters which can result in a more accurate core design and safety assessment. A conventional approach of the multi-physics neutronics calculation for the pressurized water reactor (PWR) is to apply nodal methods. Since the nodal methods are basically based on the use of assembly-wise homogenized parameters, additional pin power reconstruction processes are necessary to obtain local power information. In the past, pin-by-pin core calculation was impractical due to the limited computational hardware capability. With the rapid advancement of computer technology, it is now perhaps quite practical to perform the direct pin-by-pin core calculation. As such, fully heterogeneous transport solvers based on both stochastic and deterministic methods have been developed for the acquisition of exact local parameters. However, the 3-D transport reactor analysis is still challenging because of the very high computational requirement. Position-dependency of the fuel pin homogenized cross sections in a small PWR core has been quantified via comparison of infinite FA and 2-D whole core calculations with the use of high-fidelity MC simulations. It is found that the pin environmental affect is especially obvious in FAs bordering the baffle reflector regions. It is also noted that the downscattering cross section is rather sensitive to the spectrum changes of the pins. It is expected that the pinwise homogenized cross sections need to be corrected somehow for accurate pin-by-pin core calculations in the peripheral region of the reactor core.

  4. Accuracy of the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for non-covalent bond dissociation enthalpies from coinage metal cation complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Minenkov, Yury; Chermak, Edrisse; Cavallo, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The performance of the domain based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) method has been tested to reproduce the experimental gas phase ligand dissociation enthalpy in a series of Cu+, Ag+ and Au+ complexes. For 33 Cu+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies all-electron calculations with the same method result in MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol, although a MSE of 1.4 kcal/mol indicates systematic underestimation of the experimental values. Inclusion of scalar relativistic effects for Cu either via effective core potential (ECP) or Douglass-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian, reduces the MUE below 1.7 kcal/mol and the MSE to -1.0 kcal/mol. For 24 Ag+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method results in a mean unsigned error (MUE) below 2.1 kcal/mol and vanishing mean signed error (MSE). For 15 Au+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) methods provides larger MUE and MSE, equal to 3.2 and 1.7 kcal/mol, which might be related to poor precision of the experimental measurements. Overall, for the combined dataset of 72 coinage metal ion complexes DLPNO-CCSD(T) results in a MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol and an almost vanishing MSE. As for a comparison with computationally cheaper density functional theory (DFT) methods, the routinely used M06 functional results in MUE and MSE equal to 3.6 and -1.7 kca/mol. Results converge already at CC-PVTZ quality basis set, making highly accurate DLPNO-CCSD(T) estimates to be affordable for routine calculations (single-point) on large transition metal complexes of > 100 atoms.

  5. Accuracy of the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for non-covalent bond dissociation enthalpies from coinage metal cation complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Minenkov, Yury

    2015-08-27

    The performance of the domain based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) method has been tested to reproduce the experimental gas phase ligand dissociation enthalpy in a series of Cu+, Ag+ and Au+ complexes. For 33 Cu+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies all-electron calculations with the same method result in MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol, although a MSE of 1.4 kcal/mol indicates systematic underestimation of the experimental values. Inclusion of scalar relativistic effects for Cu either via effective core potential (ECP) or Douglass-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian, reduces the MUE below 1.7 kcal/mol and the MSE to -1.0 kcal/mol. For 24 Ag+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method results in a mean unsigned error (MUE) below 2.1 kcal/mol and vanishing mean signed error (MSE). For 15 Au+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) methods provides larger MUE and MSE, equal to 3.2 and 1.7 kcal/mol, which might be related to poor precision of the experimental measurements. Overall, for the combined dataset of 72 coinage metal ion complexes DLPNO-CCSD(T) results in a MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol and an almost vanishing MSE. As for a comparison with computationally cheaper density functional theory (DFT) methods, the routinely used M06 functional results in MUE and MSE equal to 3.6 and -1.7 kca/mol. Results converge already at CC-PVTZ quality basis set, making highly accurate DLPNO-CCSD(T) estimates to be affordable for routine calculations (single-point) on large transition metal complexes of > 100 atoms.

  6. The position dependent influence that sensitivity correction processing gives the signal-to-noise ratio measurement in parallel imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Koichi; Yoshida, Koji; Yanagimoto, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    We studied the position dependent influence that sensitivity correction processing gave the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurement of parallel imaging (PI). Sensitivity correction processing that referred to the sensitivity distribution of the body coil improved regional uniformity more than the sensitivity uniformity correction filter with a fixed correction factor. In addition, the position dependent influence to give the SNR measurement in PI was different from the sensitivity correction processing. Therefore, if we divide SNR of the sensitivity correction processing image by SNR of the original image in each pixel and calculate SNR ratio, we can show the position dependent influence that sensitivity correction processing gives the SNR measurement in PI. It is with an index of the sensitivity correction processing precision. (author)

  7. Position-dependent radiative transfer as a tool for studying Anderson localization: Delay time, time-reversal and coherent backscattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tiggelen, B. A.; Skipetrov, S. E.; Page, J. H.

    2017-05-01

    Previous work has established that the localized regime of wave transport in open media is characterized by a position-dependent diffusion coefficient. In this work we study how the concept of position-dependent diffusion affects the delay time, the transverse confinement, the coherent backscattering, and the time reversal of waves. Definitions of energy transport velocity of localized waves are proposed. We start with a phenomenological model of radiative transfer and then present a novel perturbational approach based on the self-consistent theory of localization. The latter allows us to obtain results relevant for realistic experiments in disordered quasi-1D wave guides and 3D slabs.

  8. Characterising non-covalent interactions with the Cambridge Structural Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommerse, J P; Taylor, R

    1997-02-01

    This review describes how the CSD can be used to study non-covalent interactions. Several different types of information may be obtained. First, the relative frequencies of various interactions can be studied; for example, we have shown that the terminal oxygen atoms of phosphate groups accept hydrogen bonds far more often than the linkage oxygens. Secondly, information can be obtained about the geometries of nonbonded contacts; for example, hydrogen bonds to P-O groups rarely form along the extension of the P-O bond, whereas short contacts between oxygen and carbon-bound iodine show a strong preference for linear C-I ... O angles. Thirdly, the CSD can be searched for novel interactions which may be exploited in inhibitor design; for example, the I ... O contacts just mentioned, and N-H ... pi hydrogen bonds. Finally, the CSD can suggest synthetic targets for medicinal chemistry; for example, molecules containing delocalised electron deficient groups such as trimethylammonium, pyridinium, thaizolium and dinitrophenyl have a good chance of binding to an active-site tryptophan. Although the CSD contains small-molecule crystal structures, not protein-ligand complexes, there is considerable evidence that the contacts seen in the two types of structures are similar. We have illustrated this a number of times in the present review and additional evidence has been given previously by Klebe. The major advantages of the CSD are its size, diversity and experimental accuracy. For these reasons, it is a useful tool for modellers engaged in rational inhibitor design.

  9. Noncovalent Interactions between Dopamine and Regular and Defective Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ana C Rossi; Castellani, Norberto J

    2017-08-05

    The role of noncovalent interactions in the adsorption of biological molecules on graphene is a subject of fundamental interest regarding the use of graphene as a material for sensing and drug delivery. The adsorption of dopamine on regular graphene and graphene with monovacancies (GV) is theoretically studied within the framework of density functional theory. Several adsorption modes are considered, and notably those in which the dopamine molecule is oriented parallel or quasi-parallel to the surface are the more stable. The adsorption of dopamine on graphene implies an attractive interaction of a dispersive nature that competes with Pauli repulsion between the occupied π orbitals of the dopamine ring and the π orbitals of graphene. If dopamine adsorbs at the monovacancy in the A-B stacking mode, a hydrogen bond is produced between one of the dopamine hydroxy groups and one carbon atom around the vacancy. The electronic charge redistribution due to adsorption is consistent with an electronic drift from the graphene or GV surface to the dopamine molecule. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Non-covalent interactions between thio-caffeine derivatives and water-soluble porphyrin in ethanol-water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipke, Agnieszka; Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena; Sierakowska, Arleta; Jasiewicz, Beata

    2018-03-01

    To determine the binding interactions and ability to form the non-covalent systems, the association process between 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TTMePP) and a series of five structurally diverse thio-caffeine analogues has been studied in ethanol and ethanol-water solutions, analyzing its absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra. The porphyrin fluorescence lifetimes in the systems studied were established as well. During the titration with thio-caffeine compounds the slight bathochromic effect and considerable hypochromicity of the porphyrin Soret band maximum can be noted. The fluorescence quenching effect observed for interactions in H2TTMePP - thio-caffeine derivative systems, as well as the order of binding and fluorescence quenching constants (of 105-103 mol- 1) suggest the existence of the mechanism of static quenching due to the formation of non-covalent and non-fluorescent stacking complexes. In all the systems studied the phenomenon of the fractional accessibility of the fluorophore for the quencher was observed as well. Additionally, the specific binding interactions, due to the changes in reaction environment polarity, can be observed. It was found that thio-caffeine compounds can quench the porphyrin fluorescence according to the structure of thio-substituent in caffeine molecule. The obtained results can be potentially useful from scientific, therapeutic or environmental points of view.

  11. Non-covalent attachment of silver nanoclusters onto single-walled carbon nanotubes with human serum albumin as linking molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Galván, Andrés, E-mail: andres.rodriguez@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Instituto de Física, Dpto. Física Experimental, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán, México, DF 04510 (Mexico); Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer INCan-UNAM, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México, DF 14080 (Mexico); Heredia, Alejandro [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Amelines-Sarria, Oscar; Rivera, Margarita [Instituto de Física, Dpto. Materia Condensada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); and others

    2015-03-15

    The attachment of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for the formation of integrated fluorescence sites has attracted much attention due their potential applications as biological probes and nanovectors in theragnosis. Here, we report the preparation through assembly of fluorescent quasi 1-D nanomaterial based on SWNTs and silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) non-covalently attached to human serum albumin as biological linker. The fluorescent SWNT–AgNCs–HSA conjugates were characterized by atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), high angle annular dark field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), fluorescent and UV–vis spectroscopy. The above techniques confirmed that AgNCs were non-covalently attached onto the external surface of SWNTs. In addition, it was observed that the modification did not affect the optical properties of the synthesized AgNCs since the absorption spectra and fluorescence under UV irradiation (λ = 365 nm) remain the same. The effect of the functionalized systems was tested on mammal red blood cells (RBCs) and it was found that their structural integrity was compromised by the conjugates, limiting their biological and medical applications.

  12. Non-covalent attachment of silver nanoclusters onto single-walled carbon nanotubes with human serum albumin as linking molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez-Galván, Andrés; Heredia, Alejandro; Amelines-Sarria, Oscar; Rivera, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    The attachment of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for the formation of integrated fluorescence sites has attracted much attention due their potential applications as biological probes and nanovectors in theragnosis. Here, we report the preparation through assembly of fluorescent quasi 1-D nanomaterial based on SWNTs and silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) non-covalently attached to human serum albumin as biological linker. The fluorescent SWNT–AgNCs–HSA conjugates were characterized by atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), high angle annular dark field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), fluorescent and UV–vis spectroscopy. The above techniques confirmed that AgNCs were non-covalently attached onto the external surface of SWNTs. In addition, it was observed that the modification did not affect the optical properties of the synthesized AgNCs since the absorption spectra and fluorescence under UV irradiation (λ = 365 nm) remain the same. The effect of the functionalized systems was tested on mammal red blood cells (RBCs) and it was found that their structural integrity was compromised by the conjugates, limiting their biological and medical applications

  13. Gas-phase noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes with a Ni(II) tetraaza[14]annulene complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Henao-Holguín, Laura Verónica; Álvarez-Zauco, Edgar; Bassiouk, María; Basiuk, Elena V.

    2013-04-01

    The noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with aromatic polyazamacrocyclic compounds, based on π-π-interactions, keeps the intrinsic electronic structure of CNTs totally intact and allows for combining unique properties of the two interacting components. In addition to porphyrins and phthalocyanines, there are other, simpler compounds exhibiting similar properties, potentially useful for photovoltaic, catalytic and electrochemical applications: for example, tetraaza[14]annulenes. Many of them are highly thermally stable, which makes it possible to employ physical vapor deposition for the preparation of macrocycle-nanotube hybrids. One of such compounds is Ni(II) complex of 5,7,12,14-tetramethyldibenzo-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-3,5,7,10,12,14-hexaene (also called Ni(II)-tetramethyldibenzotetraaza[14]annulene, or NiTMTAA for simplicity). In the present work, we attempted the noncovalent functionalization of both single-walled and multi-walled CNTs with NiTMTAA in the gas phase at two selected temperatures of 220 and 270 °C, which does not require the use of organic solvents and therefore can be considered as ecologically friendly. The nanohybrids obtained were characterized by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, Fourier-transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy, as well as thermogravimetric analysis. An additional insight into the structure of adsorption complexes of NiTMTAA on CNTs was provided from density functional theory and molecular mechanics calculations.

  14. Gas-phase noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes with a Ni(II) tetraaza[14]annulene complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A., E-mail: basiuk@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510, México D.F. (Mexico); Henao-Holguín, Laura Verónica [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510, México D.F. (Mexico); Álvarez-Zauco, Edgar [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510, México D.F. (Mexico); Bassiouk, María [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510, México D.F. (Mexico); Basiuk, Elena V. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510, México D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-04-01

    The noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with aromatic polyazamacrocyclic compounds, based on π–π-interactions, keeps the intrinsic electronic structure of CNTs totally intact and allows for combining unique properties of the two interacting components. In addition to porphyrins and phthalocyanines, there are other, simpler compounds exhibiting similar properties, potentially useful for photovoltaic, catalytic and electrochemical applications: for example, tetraaza[14]annulenes. Many of them are highly thermally stable, which makes it possible to employ physical vapor deposition for the preparation of macrocycle–nanotube hybrids. One of such compounds is Ni(II) complex of 5,7,12,14-tetramethyldibenzo-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-3,5,7,10,12, 14-hexaene (also called Ni(II)-tetramethyldibenzotetraaza[14]annulene, or NiTMTAA for simplicity). In the present work, we attempted the noncovalent functionalization of both single-walled and multi-walled CNTs with NiTMTAA in the gas phase at two selected temperatures of 220 and 270 °C, which does not require the use of organic solvents and therefore can be considered as ecologically friendly. The nanohybrids obtained were characterized by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, Fourier-transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy, as well as thermogravimetric analysis. An additional insight into the structure of adsorption complexes of NiTMTAA on CNTs was provided from density functional theory and molecular mechanics calculations.

  15. Gas-phase noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes with a Ni(II) tetraaza[14]annulene complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Henao-Holguín, Laura Verónica; Álvarez-Zauco, Edgar; Bassiouk, María; Basiuk, Elena V.

    2013-01-01

    The noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with aromatic polyazamacrocyclic compounds, based on π–π-interactions, keeps the intrinsic electronic structure of CNTs totally intact and allows for combining unique properties of the two interacting components. In addition to porphyrins and phthalocyanines, there are other, simpler compounds exhibiting similar properties, potentially useful for photovoltaic, catalytic and electrochemical applications: for example, tetraaza[14]annulenes. Many of them are highly thermally stable, which makes it possible to employ physical vapor deposition for the preparation of macrocycle–nanotube hybrids. One of such compounds is Ni(II) complex of 5,7,12,14-tetramethyldibenzo-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-3,5,7,10,12, 14-hexaene (also called Ni(II)-tetramethyldibenzotetraaza[14]annulene, or NiTMTAA for simplicity). In the present work, we attempted the noncovalent functionalization of both single-walled and multi-walled CNTs with NiTMTAA in the gas phase at two selected temperatures of 220 and 270 °C, which does not require the use of organic solvents and therefore can be considered as ecologically friendly. The nanohybrids obtained were characterized by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, Fourier-transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy, as well as thermogravimetric analysis. An additional insight into the structure of adsorption complexes of NiTMTAA on CNTs was provided from density functional theory and molecular mechanics calculations.

  16. Aryloxyalkanoic Acids as Non-Covalent Modifiers of the Allosteric Properties of Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelsattar M. Omar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin (Hb modifiers that stereospecifically inhibit sickle hemoglobin polymer formation and/or allosterically increase Hb affinity for oxygen have been shown to prevent the primary pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD, specifically, Hb polymerization and red blood cell sickling. Several such compounds are currently being clinically studied for the treatment of SCD. Based on the previously reported non-covalent Hb binding characteristics of substituted aryloxyalkanoic acids that exhibited antisickling properties, we designed, synthesized and evaluated 18 new compounds (KAUS II series for enhanced antisickling activities. Surprisingly, select test compounds showed no antisickling effects or promoted erythrocyte sickling. Additionally, the compounds showed no significant effect on Hb oxygen affinity (or in some cases, even decreased the affinity for oxygen. The X-ray structure of deoxygenated Hb in complex with a prototype compound, KAUS-23, revealed that the effector bound in the central water cavity of the protein, providing atomic level explanations for the observed functional and biological activities. Although the structural modification did not lead to the anticipated biological effects, the findings provide important direction for designing candidate antisickling agents, as well as a framework for novel Hb allosteric effectors that conversely, decrease the protein affinity for oxygen for potential therapeutic use for hypoxic- and/or ischemic-related diseases.

  17. Covalent and non-covalent chemical engineering of actin for biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Saroj; Mansson, Alf

    2017-11-15

    The cytoskeletal filaments are self-assembled protein polymers with 8-25nm diameters and up to several tens of micrometres length. They have a range of pivotal roles in eukaryotic cells, including transportation of intracellular cargoes (primarily microtubules with dynein and kinesin motors) and cell motility (primarily actin and myosin) where muscle contraction is one example. For two decades, the cytoskeletal filaments and their associated motor systems have been explored for nanotechnological applications including miniaturized sensor systems and lab-on-a-chip devices. Several developments have also revolved around possible exploitation of the filaments alone without their motor partners. Efforts to use the cytoskeletal filaments for applications often require chemical or genetic engineering of the filaments such as specific conjugation with fluorophores, antibodies, oligonucleotides or various macromolecular complexes e.g. nanoparticles. Similar conjugation methods are also instrumental for a range of fundamental biophysical studies. Here we review methods for non-covalent and covalent chemical modifications of actin filaments with focus on critical advantages and challenges of different methods as well as critical steps in the conjugation procedures. We also review potential uses of the engineered actin filaments in nanotechnological applications and in some key fundamental studies of actin and myosin function. Finally, we consider possible future lines of investigation that may be addressed by applying chemical conjugation of actin in new ways. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Improving Dispersion and Barrier Properties of Polyketone/Graphene Nanoplatelet Composites via Noncovalent Functionalization Using Aminopyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jaehyun; Jeon, Ikseong; Kim, Seong Yun; Lim, Soonho; Jho, Jae Young

    2017-08-23

    A series of polyketone (PK) nanocomposite films with varying content of noncovalently functionalized graphene nanoplatelet with 1-aminopyrene (GNP/APy) is prepared by solution blending with a solvent of hexafluoro-2-propanol. GNP/APy, prepared by a facile method, can effectively induce specific interaction such as hydrogen bonding between the amine functional group of GNP/APy and the carbonyl functional group of the PK matrix. With comparison of GNP and GNP/Py as reference materials, intensive investigation on filler-matrix interaction is achieved. In addition, the dispersion state of the functionalized GNP (f-GNPs; GNP/Py and GNP/APy) in the PK matrix is analyzed by three-dimensional nondestructive X-ray microcomputed tomography, and the increased dispersion state of those fillers results in significant improvement in the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR). The enhancement in WVTR of the PK/GNP/APy nanocomposite film at 1 wt % loading of filler leads to a barrier performance approximately 2 times larger compared to that of PK/GNP nanocomposite film and an approximately 92% reduction in WVTR compared to the case of pristine PK film. We expect that this facile method of graphene functionalization to enhance graphene dispersibility as well as interfacial interaction with the polymer matrix will be widely utilized to expand the potential of graphene materials to barrier film applications.

  19. Stable non-covalent labeling of layered silicate nanoparticles for biological imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Gysell M; Jack, Kevin S; Musumeci, Anthony W; Martin, Darren J; Minchin, Rodney F

    2016-04-01

    Layered silicate nanoparticles (LSN) are widely used in industrial applications and consumer products. They also have potential benefits in biomedical applications such as implantable devices and for drug delivery. To study how nanomaterials interact with cells and tissues, techniques to track and quantify their movement through different biological compartments are essential. While radiolabels can be very sensitive, particularly for in vivo studies, fluorescent labeling has been preferred in recent years because of the array of methods available to image and quantify fluorescent nanoparticles. However, labeling can be problematic, especially if it alters the physical properties of the nanomaterial. Herein is described a novel non-covalent labeling technique for LSN using readily available fluorescent dimeric cyanine dyes without the need to use excess amounts of dye to achieve labeling, or the need for removal of unbound dye. The approach utilizes the cationic binding properties of layered silicate clays and the multiple quaternary nitrogens associated with the dyes. Preparation of YOYO-1 labeled LSN with optimal dispersion in aqueous media is presented. The utilization of the labeled particles is then demonstrated in cell binding and uptake studies using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The labeled LSN are highly fluorescent, stable and exhibit identical physical properties with respect to the unlabeled nanoparticles. The general approach described here is applicable to other cyanine dyes and may be utilized more widely for labeling nanoparticles that comprise a crystalline plate structure with a high binding capacity. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Selective removal of 2,4-dichlorophenol from contaminated water using non-covalent imprinted microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ying; Li Xin; Li Yuqi; Qi Jingyao; Bian Jiang; Yuan Yixing

    2009-01-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for selective removal of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) in water was prepared as microspheres by the reverse microemulsion polymerization method based on the non-covalent interactions between 2,4-DCP, oleic acid, and divinylbenzene in acetonitrile. Microspheres have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) studies with evidence of 2,4-DCP linkage in polymer particles and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study their morphological properties. The proper adsorption and selective recognition ability of the MIP were studied by an equilibrium-adsorption method. The MIP showed outstanding affinity towards 2,4-DCP in aqueous solution and the optimum pH value for binding has been found around the neutral range. The molecular recognition of 2,4-DCP was analyzed in detail by using molecular modeling software. In addition, by investigating the variation in the adsorption ability of the MIP, it clearly showed excellent reproducibility. - Molecular imprinting has potential as a remediation technology in water treatment.

  1. Noncovalently functionalized graphitic mesoporous carbon as a stable support of Pt nanoparticles for oxygen reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Sheng; Kou, Rong; Wang, Chongmin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Lin, Yuehe [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Wang, Xiqing; Dai, Sheng [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2010-04-02

    We report a durable electrocatalyst support, highly graphitized mesoporous carbon (GMPC), for oxygen reduction in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. GMPC is prepared through graphitizing the self-assembled soft-template mesoporous carbon (MPC) under high temperature. Heat-treatment at 2800 C greatly improves the degree of graphitization while most of the mesoporous structures and the specific surface area of MPC are retained. GMPC is then noncovalently functionalized with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and loaded with Pt nanoparticles by reducing Pt precursor (H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}) in ethylene glycol. Pt nanoparticles of {proportional_to}3.0 nm in diameter are uniformly dispersed on GMPC. Compared to Pt supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black (Pt/XC-72), Pt/GMPC exhibits a higher mass activity towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the mass activity retention (in percentage) is improved by a factor of {proportional_to}2 after 44 h accelerated degradation test under the potential step (1.4-0.85 V) electrochemical stressing condition which focuses on support corrosion. The enhanced activity and durability of Pt/GMPC are attributed to the graphitic structure of GMPC which is more resistant to corrosion. These findings demonstrate that GMPC is a promising oxygen reduction electrocatalyst support for PEM fuel cells. The approach reported in this work provides a facile, eco-friendly promising strategy for synthesizing stable metal nanoparticles on hydrophobic support materials. (author)

  2. The non-covalent decoration of self-assembling protein fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Zahra N; Grundy, Daniel J; Channon, Kevin J; Woolfson, Derek N

    2010-10-01

    The design of self-assembling fibers presents challenges in basic science, and has potential for developing materials for applications in areas such as tissue engineering. A contemporary issue in the field is the construction of multi-component, functionalized systems. Previously, we have developed peptide-based fibers, the SAF system, that comprises two complementary peptides, which affords considerable control over assembly and morphology. Here we present a straightforward route to functionalizing the SAFs with small molecules and, subsequently, other moieties. This is achieved via non-covalent recruitment of charged peptide tags, which offers advantages such as further control, reversibility, and future prospects for developing recombinant tags. We demonstrate the concept by appending fluorescent labels and biotin (and thence gold nanoparticles) to the peptides, and visualising the resulting decorated SAFs by light and electron microscopy. The peptide tags bind in the nm-mum range, and show specificity compared with control peptides, and for the SAFs over similar alpha-helix-based peptide fibers. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of noncovalent basal plane functionalization on the quantum capacitance in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrish, Mona A; Olson, Eric J; Koester, Steven J

    2014-07-09

    The concentration-dependent density of states in graphene allows the capacitance in metal-oxide-graphene structures to be tunable with the carrier concentration. This feature allows graphene to act as a variable capacitor (varactor) that can be utilized for wireless sensing applications. Surface functionalization can be used to make graphene sensitive to a particular species. In this manuscript, the effect on the quantum capacitance of noncovalent basal plane functionalization using 1-pyrenebutanoic acid succimidyl ester and glucose oxidase is reported. It is found that functionalized samples tested in air have (1) a Dirac point similar to vacuum conditions, (2) increased maximum capacitance compared to vacuum but similar to air, (3) and quantum capacitance "tuning" that is greater than that in vacuum and ambient atmosphere. These trends are attributed to reduced surface doping and random potential fluctuations as a result of the surface functionalization due to the displacement of H2O on the graphene surface and intercalation of a stable H2O layer beneath graphene that increases the overall device capacitance. The results are important for future application of graphene as a platform for wireless chemical and biological sensors.

  4. Position dependence of the rous sarcoma virus negative regulator of splicing element reflects proximity to a 5' splice site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuedi; McNally, Mark T.

    2003-01-01

    Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) requires incomplete splicing of its viral transcripts to maintain efficient replication. A splicing inhibitor element, the negative regulator of splicing (NRS), is located near the 5' end of the RNA but the significance of this positioning is not known. In a heterologous intron the NRS functions optimally when positioned close to the authentic 5' splice site. This observation led us to investigate the basis of the position dependence. Four explanations were put forth and stressed the role of three major elements involved in splicing, the 3' splice site, the 5' splice site, and the 5' end cap structure. NRS function was unrelated to its position relative to the 3' splice site or the cap structure and appeared to depend on its position relative to the authentic 5' splice site. We conclude that position dependence may reflect distance constraints necessary for competition of the NRS with the authentic 5' splice site for pairing with the 3' splice sites

  5. Transfer matrix in the quasiclassical approximation with constant and position-dependent mass, resonant tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Alvarez, R.; Rodriguez-Coppola, H.; Lopez-Gondar, J.; Izquierdo, M.L.

    1987-11-01

    We develop the quasiclassical approximation for the effective Hamiltonians describing nonhomogeneous systems and we deduce the wave function, the applicability conditions and the connection rules around the turning points. Based on the transfer matrix (TM) formalism we obtain expressions for the transmission coefficient of multiple barriers, the energy levels of multiple wells and the quasistationary levels of a well open by one, and by the two sides. The dispersion relation of a periodic potential profile with variable mass problem is also given. We discuss resonant tunneling for a system of multiple barriers. The transmission coefficient of such a barrier is maximum at energies close to the levels of the inner well when the end barriers are high enough and symmetric. (author). 20 refs, 1 fig

  6. Noncovalent Attachment of PbS Quantum Dots to Single- and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Attachment of PbS quantum dots (QD to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT is described; wherein commercially obtained PbS-QD of size 2.7 nm, stabilized by oleic acid, are added to a suspension of single- or multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNT prefunctionalized noncovalently with 1,2-benzenedimethanethiol (1,2-BDMT in ethanol. The aromatic part of 1,2-BDMT attaches to the CNT by π-π stacking interactions, noncovalently functionalizing the CNT. The thiol part of the 1,2-BDMT on the functionalized CNT replaces oleic acid on the surface of the QD facilitating the noncovalent attachment of the QD to the CNT. The composites were characterized by TEM and FTIR spectroscopy. Quenching of NIR fluorescence of the PbS-QD on attachment to the carbon nanotubes (CNT was observed, indicating FRET from the QD to the CNT.

  7. Atomic Ensemble Effects and Non-Covalent Interactions at the Electrode–Electrolyte Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Cuesta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyanide-modified Pt(111 electrodes have been recently employed to study atomic ensemble effects in electrocatalysis. This work, which will be briefly reviewed, reveals that the smallest site required for methanol dehydrogenation and formic acid dehydration is composed of three contiguous Pt atoms. By blocking these trigonal sites, the specific adsorption of anions, such as sulfate and phosphate, can be inhibited, thus increasing the rate of oxygen reduction reaction by one order of magnitude or more. Moreover, alkali metal cations affect hydrogen adsorption on cyanide-modified Pt(111. This effect is attributed to the non-covalent interactions at the electrical double layer between specifically adsorbed anions or dipoles and the alkali metal cations. A systematic investigation is conducted on the effect of the concentration of alkali metal cations. Accordingly, a simple model that reproduces the experimental observations accurately and enables the understanding of the trends in the strength of the interaction between M+ and CNad when moving from Li+ to Cs+, as well as the deviations from the expected trends, is developed. This simple model can also explain the occurrence of super-Nernstian shifts of the equilibrium potential of interfacial proton-coupled electron transfers. Therefore, the model can be generally applied to explain quantitatively the effect of cations on the properties of the electrical double layer. The recently reported effects of alkali metal cations on several electrocatalytic reactions must be mediated by the interaction between these cations and chemisorbed species. As these interactions seem to be adequately and quantitatively described by our model, we expect the model to also be useful to describe, explain, and potentially exploit these effects.

  8. Vertical eye position-dependence of the human vestibuloocular reflex during passive and active yaw head rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurtell, M J; Black, R A; Halmagyi, G M; Curthoys, I S; Aw, S T

    1999-05-01

    Vertical eye position-dependence of the human vestibuloocular reflex during passive and active yaw head rotations. The effect of vertical eye-in-head position on the compensatory eye rotation response to passive and active high acceleration yaw head rotations was examined in eight normal human subjects. The stimuli consisted of brief, low amplitude (15-25 degrees ), high acceleration (4,000-6,000 degrees /s2) yaw head rotations with respect to the trunk (peak velocity was 150-350 degrees /s). Eye and head rotations were recorded in three-dimensional space using the magnetic search coil technique. The input-output kinematics of the three-dimensional vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) were assessed by finding the difference between the inverted eye velocity vector and the head velocity vector (both referenced to a head-fixed coordinate system) as a time series. During passive head impulses, the head and eye velocity axes aligned well with each other for the first 47 ms after the onset of the stimulus, regardless of vertical eye-in-head position. After the initial 47-ms period, the degree of alignment of the eye and head velocity axes was modulated by vertical eye-in-head position. When fixation was on a target 20 degrees up, the eye and head velocity axes remained well aligned with each other. However, when fixation was on targets at 0 and 20 degrees down, the eye velocity axis tilted forward relative to the head velocity axis. During active head impulses, the axis tilt became apparent within 5 ms of the onset of the stimulus. When fixation was on a target at 0 degrees, the velocity axes remained well aligned with each other. When fixation was on a target 20 degrees up, the eye velocity axis tilted backward, when fixation was on a target 20 degrees down, the eye velocity axis tilted forward. The findings show that the VOR compensates very well for head motion in the early part of the response to unpredictable high acceleration stimuli-the eye position- dependence of the

  9. Phantom position dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorson, M.R.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1981-01-01

    Sensitivity of the Hanford dosimeter response to its position relative to the phantom and the neutron source has always been recognized. A thorough investigation was performed to quantify dosimeter response according to: (a) dosimeter position on phantom, (b) dosimeter distance from phantom, and (c) angular relationship of dosimeter relative to neutron source and phantom. Results were obtained for neutron irradiation at several different energies

  10. Control of structural isomerism in noncovalent hydrogen-bonded assemblies using peripheral chiral information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.J.; Jolliffe, K.A.; Hulst, A.J.R.L.; Timmerman, P.; Reinhoudt, David

    2000-01-01

    The results of a systematic study of the structural isomerism in more than 30 noncovalent hydrogen-bonded assemblies are described. These dynamic assemblies, composed of three calix[4]arene dimelamines and six barbiturates/cyanurates, can be present in three isomeric forms with either D3, C3h, or Cs

  11. Stabilization of Proteins and Noncovalent Protein Complexes during Electrospray Ionization by Amino Acid Additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Lu, Haiyan; Chingin, Konstantin; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-07-21

    Ionization of proteins and noncovalent protein complexes with minimal disturbance to their native structure presents a great challenge for biological mass spectrometry (MS). In living organisms, the native structure of intracellular proteins is commonly stabilized by solute amino acids (AAs) accumulated in cells at very high concentrations. Inspired by nature, we hypothesized that AAs could also pose a stabilizing effect on the native structure of proteins and noncovalent protein complexes during ionization. To test this hypothesis, here we explored MS response for various protein complexes upon the addition of free AAs at mM concentrations into the electrospray ionization (ESI) solution. Thermal activation of ESI droplets in the MS inlet capillary was employed as a model destabilizing factor during ionization. Our results indicate that certain AAs, in particular proline (Pro), pose considerable positive effect on the stability of noncovalent protein complexes in ESI-MS without affecting the signal intensity of protein ions and original protein-ligand equilibrium, even when added at the 20 mM concentration. The data suggest that the degree of protein stabilization is primarily determined by the osmolytic and ampholytic characteristics of AA solutes. The highest stability and visibility of noncovalent protein complexes in ESI-MS are achieved using AA additives with neutral isoelectric point, moderate proton affinity, and unfavorable interaction with the native protein state. Overall, our results indicate that the simple addition of free amino acids into the working solution can notably improve the stability and accuracy of protein analysis by native ESI-MS.

  12. Are Noncovalent Interactions an Achilles Heel in Chemistry Education? A Comparison of Instructional Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Leah C.; Underwood, Sonia M.; Klymkowsky, Michael W.; Cooper, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Intermolecular forces (IMFs), or more broadly, noncovalent interactions either within or between molecules, are central to an understanding of a wide range of chemical and biological phenomena. In this study, we present a multiyear, multi-institutional, longitudinal comparison of how students enrolled in traditional general chemistry courses and…

  13. Catalyst recycling via specific non-covalent adsorption on modified silicas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluwer, A.M.; Simons, C.; Knijnenburg, Q.; van der Vlugt, J.I.; de Bruin, B.; Reek, J.N.H.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a new strategy for the recycling of a homogeneous hydroformylation catalyst, by selective adsorption of the catalyst to tailor-made supports after a batchwise reaction. The separation of the catalyst from the product mixture is based on selective non-covalent supramolecular

  14. Non-covalently functionalized carbon nanostructures for synthesizing carbon-based hybrid nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiqing; Song, Sing I; Song, Ga Young; Kim, Il

    2014-02-01

    Carbon nanostructures (CNSs) such as carbon nanotubes, graphene sheets, and nanodiamonds provide an important type of substrate for constructing a variety of hybrid nanomaterials. However, their intrinsic chemistry-inert surfaces make it indispensable to pre-functionalize them prior to immobilizing additional components onto their surfaces. Currently developed strategies for functionalizing CNSs include covalent and non-covalent approaches. Conventional covalent treatments often damage the structure integrity of carbon surfaces and adversely affect their physical properties. In contrast, the non-covalent approach offers a non-destructive way to modify CNSs with desired functional surfaces, while reserving their intrinsic properties. Thus far, a number of surface modifiers including aromatic compounds, small-molecular surfactants, amphiphilic polymers, and biomacromolecules have been developed to non-covalently functionalize CNS surfaces. Mediated by these surface modifiers, various functional components such as organic species and inorganic nanoparticles were further decorated onto their surfaces, resulting in versatile carbon-based hybrid nanomaterials with broad applications in chemical engineering and biomedical areas. In this review, the recent advances in the generation of such hybrid nanostructures based on non-covalently functionalized CNSs will be reviewed.

  15. Enhanced mechanical properties of epoxy nanocomposites by mixing noncovalently functionalized boron nitride nanoflakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongju; Song, Sung Ho; Hwang, Jaewon; Jin, Sung Hwan; Park, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Bo Hyun; Hong, Soon Hyung; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2013-08-12

    The influence of surface modifications on the mechanical properties of epoxy-hexagonal boron nitride nanoflake (BNNF) nanocomposites is investigated. Homogeneous distributions of boron nitride nanoflakes in a polymer matrix, preserving intrinsic material properties of boron nitride nanoflakes, is the key to successful composite applications. Here, a method is suggested to obtain noncovalently functionalized BNNFs with 1-pyrenebutyric acid (PBA) molecules and to synthesize epoxy-BNNF nanocomposites with enhanced mechanical properties. The incorporation of noncovalently functionalized BNNFs into epoxy resin yields an elastic modulus of 3.34 GPa, and 71.9 MPa ultimate tensile strength at 0.3 wt%. The toughening enhancement is as high as 107% compared to the value of neat epoxy. The creep strain and the creep compliance of the noncovalently functionalized BNNF nanocomposite is significantly less than the neat epoxy and the nonfunctionalized BNNF nanocomposite. Noncovalent functionalization of BNNFs is effective to increase mechanical properties by strong affinity between the fillers and the matrix. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Combining covalent and noncovalent cross-linking: a novel terpolymer for two-step curing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Ghayoury, A.; Hofmeier, H.; Ruiter, de B.; Schubert, U.S.

    2003-01-01

    A terpolymer of poly(butyl acrylate) bearing terpyridine as well as oxetane units was synthesized by free radical polymerization and characterized using NMR, UV-vis, and GPC. Subsequently, UV-vis experiments indicated clearly a noncovalent cross-linking of the terpyridine moieties by addition of

  17. Quantum systems with position-dependent mass and spin-orbit interaction via Rashba and Dresselhaus terms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G. M., E-mail: agmschmidt@gmail.com; Portugal, L., E-mail: liciniolportugal@gmail.com; Jesus, Anderson L. de [Departamento de Física do polo universitário de Volta Redonda, Instituto de Ciências Exatas—Universidade Federal Fluminense, R. Des. Ellis Hermydio Figueira, 783, Volta Redonda, RJ CEP 27215-350 (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    We consider a particle with spin 1/2 with position-dependent mass moving in a plane. Considering separately Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions, we write down the Hamiltonian for this problem and solve it for Dirichlet boundary conditions. Our radial wavefunctions have two contributions: homogeneous ones which are written as Bessel functions of non-integer orders—that depend on angular momentum m—and particular solutions which are obtained after decoupling the non-homogeneous system. In this process, we find non-homogeneous Bessel equation, Laguerre, as well as biconfluent Heun equation. We also present the probability densities for m = 0, 1, 2 in an annular quantum well. Our results indicate that the background as well as the spin-orbit interaction naturally splits the spinor components.

  18. Comment on ‘Nonlinear dynamics of a position-dependent mass-driven Duffing-type oscillator’

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Using a generalized coordinate along with a proper invertible coordinate transformation, we show that the Euler–Lagrange equation used by Bagchi et al (2013 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 46 032001) is in clear violation of Hamilton’s principle. We also show that the Newton equation of motion they have used is not in a form that satisfies the dynamics of position-dependent mass (PDM) settings. The equivalence between the Euler–Lagrange equation and Newton’s equation is now proved and documented through the proper invertible coordinate transformation and the introduction of a new PDM byproducted reaction-type force. The total mechanical energy for the PDM is shown to be conservative (i.e., dE/dt = 0, unlike Bagchi et al's (2013) observation). (comment)

  19. Quantum systems with position-dependent mass and spin-orbit interaction via Rashba and Dresselhaus terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G. M.; Portugal, L.; Jesus, Anderson L. de

    2015-01-01

    We consider a particle with spin 1/2 with position-dependent mass moving in a plane. Considering separately Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions, we write down the Hamiltonian for this problem and solve it for Dirichlet boundary conditions. Our radial wavefunctions have two contributions: homogeneous ones which are written as Bessel functions of non-integer orders—that depend on angular momentum m—and particular solutions which are obtained after decoupling the non-homogeneous system. In this process, we find non-homogeneous Bessel equation, Laguerre, as well as biconfluent Heun equation. We also present the probability densities for m = 0, 1, 2 in an annular quantum well. Our results indicate that the background as well as the spin-orbit interaction naturally splits the spinor components

  20. New SU(1,1) position-dependent effective mass coherent states for a generalized shifted harmonic oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahiaoui, Sid-Ahmed; Bentaiba, Mustapha

    2014-01-01

    A new SU(1,1) position-dependent effective mass coherent states (PDEM CS) related to the shifted harmonic oscillator (SHO) are deduced. This is accomplished by applying a similarity transformation to the generally deformed oscillator algebra (GDOA) generators for PDEM systems and a new set of operators that close the su(1,1) Lie algebra are constructed, being the PDEM CS of the basis for its unitary irreducible representation. From the Lie algebra generators, we evaluate the uncertainty relationship for a position and momentum-like operators in the PDEM CS and show that it is minimized in the sense of Barut–Girardello CS. We prove that the deduced PDEM CS preserve the same analytical form than those of Glauber states. As an illustration of our procedure, we depicted the 2D-probability density in the PDEM CS for SHO with the explicit form of the mass distribution with no singularities. (paper)

  1. Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials: Implications for the Molecular Packing vs Electronic Properties of Acenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher; Risko, Chad; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Noncovalent intermolecular interactions, which can be tuned through the toolbox of synthetic chemistry, determine not only the molecular packing but also the resulting electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of materials derived from π

  2. The noncovalent bonding of antibiotics to a polytetrafluoroethylene-benzalkonium graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, R.A.; Greco, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    This study evaluates the noncovalent bonding of anionic antibiotics to polytetrafluoroethylene grafts using benzalkonium chloride as a cationic anchor. The binding of radiolabeled surfactants and antibiotics was evaluated by liquid scintillation and in an in vitro microbiologic assay against Staphylococcus aureus. Significant quantities of antibiotic were bound when the grafts were pretreated with benzalkonium in ethanol or aqueous solution at elevated temperature. Bound antibiotic is stable in aqueous salt solutions, but slowly dissociates in the presence of blood or serum. The ionic nature of the bonding process is clarified by the use of a variety of antibiotics and surfactants with complementary charges. The ability of the benzalkonium treated grafts to adsorb antibiotic from blood is, likewise, demonstrated and the possibility of concomitantly binding heparin and antibiotic simultaneously is evaluated. These studies support the ability to noncovalently bond antibiotics to polytetrafluoroethylene surfaces and form the basis of eventually utilizing these surfaces in the prevention of vascular prosthetic infections

  3. Second-Generation Non-Covalent NAAA Inhibitors are Protective in a Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Marco; Pontis, Silvia; Fuentes de Arriba, Angel Luis; Realini, Natalia; Torrente, Esther; Armirotti, Andrea; Romeo, Elisa; Di Martino, Simona; Russo, Debora; Pizzirani, Daniela; Summa, Maria; Lanfranco, Massimiliano; Ottonello, Giuliana; Busquet, Perrine; Jung, Kwang-Mook; Garcia-Guzman, Miguel; Heim, Roger; Scarpelli, Rita; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-09-05

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA) are endogenous lipid mediators that suppress inflammation. Their actions are terminated by the intracellular cysteine amidase, N-acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA). Even though NAAA may offer a new target for anti-inflammatory therapy, the lipid-like structures and reactive warheads of current NAAA inhibitors limit the use of these agents as oral drugs. A series of novel benzothiazole-piperazine derivatives that inhibit NAAA in a potent and selective manner by a non-covalent mechanism are described. A prototype member of this class (8) displays high oral bioavailability, access to the central nervous system (CNS), and strong activity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). This compound exemplifies a second generation of non-covalent NAAA inhibitors that may be useful in the treatment of MS and other chronic CNS disorders. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Native Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Mass Spectrometry: Analysis of Noncovalent Protein Complexes Directly from Dried Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicholas J.; Griffiths, Rian L.; Edwards, Rebecca L.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2015-08-01

    Liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) mass spectrometry is a promising tool for the analysis of intact proteins from biological substrates. Here, we demonstrate native LESA mass spectrometry of noncovalent protein complexes of myoglobin and hemoglobin from a range of surfaces. Holomyoglobin, in which apomyoglobin is noncovalently bound to the prosthetic heme group, was observed following LESA mass spectrometry of myoglobin dried onto glass and polyvinylidene fluoride surfaces. Tetrameric hemoglobin [(αβ)2 4H] was observed following LESA mass spectrometry of hemoglobin dried onto glass and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) surfaces, and from dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper. Heme-bound dimers and monomers were also observed. The `contact' LESA approach was particularly suitable for the analysis of hemoglobin tetramers from DBS.

  5. Surface functionalization of PLGA nanoparticles by non-covalent insertion of a homo-bifunctional spacer for active targeting in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamake, S. I.; Raut, S. L.; Ranjan, A. P.; Gryczynski, Z.; Vishwanatha, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    This work reports the surface functionalization of polymeric PLGA nanoparticles by non-covalent insertion of a homo-bifunctional chemical crosslinker, bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS3) for targeted cancer therapy. We dissolved BS3 in aqueous solution of PVA during formulation of nanoparticles by a modified solid/oil/water emulsion solvent evaporation method. The non-covalent insertion of BS3 was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Curcumin and annexin A2 were used as a model drug and a cell specific target, respectively. Nanoparticles were characterized for particle size, zeta potential and surface morphology. The qualitative assessment of antibody attachment was performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as confocal microscopy. The optimized formulation showed antibody attachment of 86%. However, antibody attachment was abolished upon blocking the functional groups of BS3. The availability of functional antibodies was evaluated by the presence of a light chain fraction after gel electrophoresis. We further evaluated the in vitro release kinetics of curcumin from antibody coated and uncoated nanoparticles. The release of curcumin is enhanced upon antibody attachment and followed an anomalous release pattern. We also observed that the cellular uptake of nanoparticles was significantly higher in annexin A2 positive cells than in negative cells. Therefore, these results demonstrate the potential use of this method for functionalization as well as to deliver chemotherapeutic agents for treating cancer.

  6. Surface functionalization of PLGA nanoparticles by non-covalent insertion of a homo-bifunctional spacer for active targeting in cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thamake, S I; Raut, S L [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Ranjan, A P; Vishwanatha, J K [Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Gryczynski, Z, E-mail: jamboor.vishwanatha@unthsc.edu [Center for Commercialization of Fluorescence Technology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2011-01-21

    This work reports the surface functionalization of polymeric PLGA nanoparticles by non-covalent insertion of a homo-bifunctional chemical crosslinker, bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS3) for targeted cancer therapy. We dissolved BS3 in aqueous solution of PVA during formulation of nanoparticles by a modified solid/oil/water emulsion solvent evaporation method. The non-covalent insertion of BS3 was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Curcumin and annexin A2 were used as a model drug and a cell specific target, respectively. Nanoparticles were characterized for particle size, zeta potential and surface morphology. The qualitative assessment of antibody attachment was performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as confocal microscopy. The optimized formulation showed antibody attachment of 86%. However, antibody attachment was abolished upon blocking the functional groups of BS3. The availability of functional antibodies was evaluated by the presence of a light chain fraction after gel electrophoresis. We further evaluated the in vitro release kinetics of curcumin from antibody coated and uncoated nanoparticles. The release of curcumin is enhanced upon antibody attachment and followed an anomalous release pattern. We also observed that the cellular uptake of nanoparticles was significantly higher in annexin A2 positive cells than in negative cells. Therefore, these results demonstrate the potential use of this method for functionalization as well as to deliver chemotherapeutic agents for treating cancer.

  7. PyContact: Rapid, Customizable, and Visual Analysis of Noncovalent Interactions in MD Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheurer, Maximilian; Rodenkirch, Peter; Siggel, Marc; Bernardi, Rafael C; Schulten, Klaus; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Rudack, Till

    2018-02-06

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have become ubiquitous in all areas of life sciences. The size and model complexity of MD simulations are rapidly growing along with increasing computing power and improved algorithms. This growth has led to the production of a large amount of simulation data that need to be filtered for relevant information to address specific biomedical and biochemical questions. One of the most relevant molecular properties that can be investigated by all-atom MD simulations is the time-dependent evolution of the complex noncovalent interaction networks governing such fundamental aspects as molecular recognition, binding strength, and mechanical and structural stability. Extracting, evaluating, and visualizing noncovalent interactions is a key task in the daily work of structural biologists. We have developed PyContact, an easy-to-use, highly flexible, and intuitive graphical user interface-based application, designed to provide a toolkit to investigate biomolecular interactions in MD trajectories. PyContact is designed to facilitate this task by enabling identification of relevant noncovalent interactions in a comprehensible manner. The implementation of PyContact as a standalone application enables rapid analysis and data visualization without any additional programming requirements, and also preserves full in-program customization and extension capabilities for advanced users. The statistical analysis representation is interactively combined with full mapping of the results on the molecular system through the synergistic connection between PyContact and VMD. We showcase the capabilities and scientific significance of PyContact by analyzing and visualizing in great detail the noncovalent interactions underlying the ion permeation pathway of the human P2X 3 receptor. As a second application, we examine the protein-protein interaction network of the mechanically ultrastable cohesin-dockering complex. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society

  8. Alignment of non-covalent interactions at protein-protein interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study and comparison of protein-protein interfaces is essential for the understanding of the mechanisms of interaction between proteins. While there are many methods for comparing protein structures and protein binding sites, so far no methods have been reported for comparing the geometry of non-covalent interactions occurring at protein-protein interfaces. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present a method for aligning non-covalent interactions between different protein-protein interfaces. The method aligns the vector representations of van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds based on their geometry. The method has been applied to a dataset which comprises a variety of protein-protein interfaces. The alignments are consistent to a large extent with the results obtained using two other complementary approaches. In addition, we apply the method to three examples of protein mimicry. The method successfully aligns respective interfaces and allows for recognizing conserved interface regions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The Galinter method has been validated in the comparison of interfaces in which homologous subunits are involved, including cases of mimicry. The method is also applicable to comparing interfaces involving non-peptidic compounds. Galinter assists users in identifying local interface regions with similar patterns of non-covalent interactions. This is particularly relevant to the investigation of the molecular basis of interaction mimicry.

  9. Non-covalent interaction between polyubiquitin and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 dictates its degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhao

    Full Text Available GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTPCH1 is the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4. GTPCH1 protein degradation has been reported in animal models of several diseases, including diabetes mellitus and hypertension. However, the molecular mechanisms by which GTPCH1 is degraded remain uncharacterized. Here we report a novel non-covalent interaction between polyubiquitin and GTPCH1 in vitro and in vivo. The non-covalent binding of GTPCH1 to polyubiquitin via an ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD results in ubiquitination and degradation. Ectopic expression of ubiquitin in cultured cells accelerated GTPCH1 degradation. In cultured cells and in vitro assays, Lys48-linked ubiquitin chains, but not Lys63-linked chains, interacted with GTPCH1 and targeted it for degradation. Consistently, proteasome inhibition attenuated GTPCH1 degradation. Finally, direct mutagenesis of an isoleucine (Ile131 in the hydrophobic patch of the GTPCH1 UBD affected its ubiquitin binding and the enzyme stability. Taken together, we conclude that GTPCH1 non-covalently interacts with polyubiquitin via an ubiquitin-binding domain. The polyubiquitin binding directs GTPCH1 ubiquitination and proteasome degradation.

  10. Systematic spatial bias in DNA microarray hybridization is caused by probe spot position-dependent variability in lateral diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Doris; Berry, David; Haider, Susanne; Horn, Matthias; Wagner, Michael; Stocker, Roman; Loy, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The hybridization of nucleic acid targets with surface-immobilized probes is a widely used assay for the parallel detection of multiple targets in medical and biological research. Despite its widespread application, DNA microarray technology still suffers from several biases and lack of reproducibility, stemming in part from an incomplete understanding of the processes governing surface hybridization. In particular, non-random spatial variations within individual microarray hybridizations are often observed, but the mechanisms underpinning this positional bias remain incompletely explained. This study identifies and rationalizes a systematic spatial bias in the intensity of surface hybridization, characterized by markedly increased signal intensity of spots located at the boundaries of the spotted areas of the microarray slide. Combining observations from a simplified single-probe block array format with predictions from a mathematical model, the mechanism responsible for this bias is found to be a position-dependent variation in lateral diffusion of target molecules. Numerical simulations reveal a strong influence of microarray well geometry on the spatial bias. Reciprocal adjustment of the size of the microarray hybridization chamber to the area of surface-bound probes is a simple and effective measure to minimize or eliminate the diffusion-based bias, resulting in increased uniformity and accuracy of quantitative DNA microarray hybridization.

  11. Determination of lateral diffusivity in single pixel X-ray absorbers with implications for position dependent excess broadening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saab, T.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Iyomoto, N.; Herbert, B.D.; Bandler, S.R.; Chervenak, J.; Finkbeiner, F.; Kelley, R.L.; Kilbourne, C.A.; Porter, F.S.; Sadleir, J.

    2006-01-01

    An ideal microcalorimeter is characterized by a constant energy resolution across the sensor's dynamic range. Any dependence of pulse shape on the position within the absorber where an event occurs leads to a degradation in resolution that is linear with event's energy (excess broadening). In this paper we present a numerical simulation that was developed to model the variation in pulse shape with position based on the thermal conductivity within the absorber and between the absorber, sensor, and heat bath, for arbitrarily shaped absorbers and sensors. All the parameters required for the simulation can be measured from actual devices. We describe how the thermal conductivity of the absorber material is determined by comparing the results of this model with data taken from a position sensitive detector in which any position dependent effect is purposely emphasized by constructing a long, narrow absorber that is readout by sensors on both ends. Finally, we present the implications for excess broadening given the measured parameters of our X-ray microcalorimeters

  12. Asymmetric simple exclusion process with position-dependent hopping rates: Phase diagram from boundary-layer analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherji, Sutapa

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we study a one-dimensional totally asymmetric simple exclusion process with position-dependent hopping rates. Under open boundary conditions, this system exhibits boundary-induced phase transitions in the steady state. Similarly to totally asymmetric simple exclusion processes with uniform hopping, the phase diagram consists of low-density, high-density, and maximal-current phases. In various phases, the shape of the average particle density profile across the lattice including its boundary-layer parts changes significantly. Using the tools of boundary-layer analysis, we obtain explicit solutions for the density profile in different phases. A detailed analysis of these solutions under different boundary conditions helps us obtain the equations for various phase boundaries. Next, we show how the shape of the entire density profile including the location of the boundary layers can be predicted from the fixed points of the differential equation describing the boundary layers. We discuss this in detail through several examples of density profiles in various phases. The maximal-current phase appears to be an especially interesting phase where the boundary layer flows to a bifurcation point on the fixed-point diagram.

  13. Covalent and non-covalent curcumin loading in acid-responsive polymeric micellar nanocarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min; Chen, Chao; Fan, Aiping; Zhang, Ju; Kong, Deling; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Yanjun

    2015-07-01

    Poor aqueous solubility, potential degradation, rapid metabolism and elimination lead to low bioavailability of pleiotropic impotent curcumin. Herein, we report two types of acid-responsive polymeric micelles where curcumin was encapsulated via both covalent and non-covalent modes for enhanced loading capacity and on-demand release. Biodegradable methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) copolymer (mPEG-PLA) was conjugated with curcumin via a hydrazone linker, generating two conjugates differing in architecture (single-tail versus double-tail) and free curcumin was encapsulated therein. The two micelles exhibited similar hydrodynamic size at 95 ± 3 nm (single-tail) and 96 ± 3 nm (double-tail), but their loading capacities differed significantly at 15.0 ± 0.5% (w/w) (single-tail) and 4.8 ± 0.5% (w/w) (double-tail). Under acidic sink conditions (pH 5.0 and 6.0), curcumin displayed a faster release from the single-tail nanocarrier, which was correlated to a low IC50 of 14.7 ± 1.6 (μg mL-1) compared to the value of double-tail micelle (24.9 ± 1.3 μg mL-1) in HeLa cells. The confocal imaging and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated a superior capability of single-tail micelle for intracellular curcumin delivery, which was a consequence of the higher loading capacity and lower degree of mPEG surface coverage. In conclusion, the dual loading mode is an effective means to increase the drug content in the micellar nanocarriers whose delivery efficiency is highly dependent on its polymer-drug conjugate architecture. This strategy offers an alternative nanoplatform for intracellularly delivering impotent hydrophobic agents (i.e. curcumin) in an efficient stimuli-triggered way, which is valuable for the enhancement of curcumin’s efficacy in managing a diverse range of disorders.

  14. Covalent and non-covalent curcumin loading in acid-responsive polymeric micellar nanocarriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Min; Chen, Chao; Fan, Aiping; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Yanjun; Zhang, Ju; Kong, Deling

    2015-01-01

    Poor aqueous solubility, potential degradation, rapid metabolism and elimination lead to low bioavailability of pleiotropic impotent curcumin. Herein, we report two types of acid-responsive polymeric micelles where curcumin was encapsulated via both covalent and non-covalent modes for enhanced loading capacity and on-demand release. Biodegradable methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) copolymer (mPEG-PLA) was conjugated with curcumin via a hydrazone linker, generating two conjugates differing in architecture (single-tail versus double-tail) and free curcumin was encapsulated therein. The two micelles exhibited similar hydrodynamic size at 95 ± 3 nm (single-tail) and 96 ± 3 nm (double-tail), but their loading capacities differed significantly at 15.0 ± 0.5% (w/w) (single-tail) and 4.8 ± 0.5% (w/w) (double-tail). Under acidic sink conditions (pH 5.0 and 6.0), curcumin displayed a faster release from the single-tail nanocarrier, which was correlated to a low IC_5_0 of 14.7 ± 1.6 (μg mL"−"1) compared to the value of double-tail micelle (24.9 ± 1.3 μg mL"−"1) in HeLa cells. The confocal imaging and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated a superior capability of single-tail micelle for intracellular curcumin delivery, which was a consequence of the higher loading capacity and lower degree of mPEG surface coverage. In conclusion, the dual loading mode is an effective means to increase the drug content in the micellar nanocarriers whose delivery efficiency is highly dependent on its polymer–drug conjugate architecture. This strategy offers an alternative nanoplatform for intracellularly delivering impotent hydrophobic agents (i.e. curcumin) in an efficient stimuli-triggered way, which is valuable for the enhancement of curcumin’s efficacy in managing a diverse range of disorders. (paper)

  15. The BioFragment Database (BFDb): An open-data platform for computational chemistry analysis of noncovalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Lori A.; Faver, John C.; Zheng, Zheng; Marshall, Michael S.; Smith, Daniel G. A.; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Merz, Kenneth M.; Sherrill, C. David

    2017-10-01

    Accurate potential energy models are necessary for reliable atomistic simulations of chemical phenomena. In the realm of biomolecular modeling, large systems like proteins comprise very many noncovalent interactions (NCIs) that can contribute to the protein's stability and structure. This work presents two high-quality chemical databases of common fragment interactions in biomolecular systems as extracted from high-resolution Protein DataBank crystal structures: 3380 sidechain-sidechain interactions and 100 backbone-backbone interactions that inaugurate the BioFragment Database (BFDb). Absolute interaction energies are generated with a computationally tractable explicitly correlated coupled cluster with perturbative triples [CCSD(T)-F12] "silver standard" (0.05 kcal/mol average error) for NCI that demands only a fraction of the cost of the conventional "gold standard," CCSD(T) at the complete basis set limit. By sampling extensively from biological environments, BFDb spans the natural diversity of protein NCI motifs and orientations. In addition to supplying a thorough assessment for lower scaling force-field (2), semi-empirical (3), density functional (244), and wavefunction (45) methods (comprising >1M interaction energies), BFDb provides interactive tools for running and manipulating the resulting large datasets and offers a valuable resource for potential energy model development and validation.

  16. Non-covalent conjugation of cutinase from Fusarium sp. ICT SAC1 with pectin for enhanced stability: Process minutiae, kinetics, thermodynamics and structural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muley, Abhijeet B; Chaudhari, Sandeep A; Singhal, Rekha S

    2017-09-01

    Cutinase, a member of α/β-fold hydrolase family possess potentially diverse applications in several industrial processes and products. The present work aims towards thermo-stabilization of cutinase from novel source Fusarium sp. ICT SAC1 via non-covalent interaction with polysaccharides. Although all six polysaccharides chosen for study enhanced the thermal stability, pectin was found to be most promising. The interaction protocol for cutinase with pectin was optimized sequentially with respect to the ratio of enzyme to pectin, solution pH, and buffer strength. Cutinase-pectin conjugate under optimized conditions (1:12, pH-6.5, 50mM) showed enhanced thermal stability as evident from lower inactivation rate constant, higher half-life and D-value within the 40-55°C. A slender rise in K m and V max values and enhanced thermodynamic parameters of cutinase-pectin conjugate were observed after non-covalent interaction. Entropy values were 1.5-fold higher for cutinase-pectin conjugate at each temperature suggesting an upsurge in number of protein molecules in a transition activated state. Positive values of entropy for both forms of cutinase suggested a rise in disordered conformation. Noticeable conformational changes in cutinase after conjugation with pectin were confirmed by FTIR as well as fluorescence emission spectra. An increment in helix to turn conversion was observed in complexed cutinase vis-à-vis free cutinase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Position-dependent correlation function from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 10 CMASS sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Chi-Ting; Wagner, Christian; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schmidt, Fabian; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    We report on the first measurement of the three-point function with the position-dependent correlation function from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 10 CMASS sample. This new observable measures the correlation between two-point functions of galaxy pairs within different subvolumes, ξ-circumflex (ř,ř L ), where ř L is the location of a subvolume, and the corresponding mean overdensities, δ-bar (ř L ). This correlation, which we call the 'integrated three-point function', iζ(r)≡(ξ-circumflex (ř,ř L )δ-bar (ř L )), measures a three-point function of two short- and one long-wavelength modes, and is generated by nonlinear gravitational evolution and possibly also by the physics of inflation. The iζ(r) measured from the BOSS data lies within the scatter of those from the mock galaxy catalogs in redshift space, yielding a ten-percent-level determination of the amplitude of iζ(r). The tree-level perturbation theory in redshift space predicts how this amplitude depends on the linear and quadratic nonlinear galaxy bias parameters (b 1 and b 2 ), as well as on the amplitude and linear growth rate of matter fluctuations (σ 8 and f). Combining iζ(r) with the constraints on b 1σ 8 and fσ 8 from the global two-point correlation function and that on σ 8 from the weak lensing signal of BOSS galaxies, we measure b 2 =0.41±0.41 (68% C.L.) assuming standard perturbation theory at the tree level and the local bias model

  18. Position Dependent Spontaneous Emission Spectra of a Λ-Type Atomic System Embedded in a Defective Photonic Crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entezar, S. Roshan

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the position dependent spontaneous emission spectra of a Λ-type three-level atom with one transition coupled to the free vacuum reservoir and the other one coupled to a double-band photonic band gap reservoir with a defect mode in the band gap. It is shown that, for the atom at the defect location, we have a two-peak spectrum with a wide dark line due to the strong coupling between the atom and the defect mode. While, when the atom is far from the defect location (or in the absence of the defect mode), the spectrum has three peaks with two dark lines due to the coupling between the atom and the photonic band gap reservoir with the largest density of states near the band edges. On the other hand, we have a four-peak spectrum for the atom at the space in between. Moreover, the average spontaneous emission spectra of the atoms uniformly embedded in high dielectric or low dielectric regions are described. It is shown that the atoms embedded in high (low) dielectric regions far from the defect location, effectively couple to the modes of the lower (upper) photonic band. However, the atoms embedded in high dielectric or low dielectric regions at the defect location, are coupled mainly to the defect modes. While, the atoms uniformly embedded in high (low) dielectric regions with a normal distance from the defect location, are coupled to both of defect and lower (upper) photonic band modes. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  19. Role of muscle pulleys in producing eye position-dependence in the angular vestibuloocular reflex: a model-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurtell, M. J.; Kunin, M.; Raphan, T.; Wall, C. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    the roll gain of the angular vestibuloocular reflex was modified during the initial period of the response, while pulley coefficient was maintained at 0.5. Hence a roll gain modification allows stabilization of the retinal image without requiring a change in the pulley effect. Our results therefore indicate that the eye position-dependent velocity axis tilts could arise due to the effects of the pulleys and that a roll gain modification in the central vestibular structures may be responsible for countering the pulley effect.

  20. Recognition of anions using urea and thiourea substituted calixarenes: A density functional theory study of non-covalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athar, Mohd; Lone, Mohsin Y.; Jha, Prakash C.

    2018-02-01

    Designing of new calixarene receptors for the selective binding of anions is an age-old concept; even though expected outcomes from this field are at premature stage. Herein, we have performed quantum chemical calculations to provide structural basis of anion binding with urea and thiourea substituted calixarenes (1, 2, and 3). In particular, spherical halides (F-, Cl-, Br-) and linear anions (CN-, N3-, SCN-) were modelled for calculating binding energies with receptor 1, 2 and 3 followed by their marked IR vibrations; taking the available experimental information into account. We found that the thiourea substitutions have better capability to stabilize the anions. Results have suggested that the structural behaviour of macrocyclic motifs were responsible for displaying the anion binding potentials. Moreover, second order "charge transfer" interactions of n-σ∗NH and n-σ∗OH type along the H-bond axis played critical role in developing hydrogen bonds. The present work also examines the role of non-covalent interactions (NCI) and their effects on thermodynamic and chemical-reactivity descriptors.

  1. Non-Covalent Interactions and Impact of Charge Penetration Effects in Linear Oligoacene Dimers and Single Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-05-18

    Non-covalent interactions determine in large part the thermodynamic aspects of molecular packing in organic crystals. Using a combination of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) and classical multipole electrostatics, we describe the interaction potential energy surfaces for dimers of the oligoacene family, from benzene to hexacene. An analysis of these surfaces and a thorough assessment of dimers extracted from the reported crystal structures underline that high-order interactions (i.e., three-body non-additive interactions) must be considered in order to rationalize the details of the crystal structures. A comparison of the SAPT electrostatic energy with the multipole interaction energy demonstrates the importance of the contribution of charge penetration, which is shown to account for up to 50% of the total interaction energy in dimers extracted from the experimental single crystals; in the case of the most stable co-facial model dimers, this contribution is even larger than the total interaction energy. Our results highlight the importance of taking account of charge penetration in studies of the larger oligoacenes.

  2. Preventing disulfide bond formation weakens non-covalent forces among lysozyme aggregates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Ravi

    Full Text Available Nonnative disulfide bonds have been observed among protein aggregates in several diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cataract and so on. The molecular mechanism by which formation of such bonds promotes protein aggregation is poorly understood. Here in this work we employ previously well characterized aggregation of hen eggwhite lysozyme (HEWL at alkaline pH to dissect the molecular role of nonnative disulfide bonds on growth of HEWL aggregates. We employed time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy, atomic force microscopy and single-molecule force spectroscopy to quantify the size, morphology and non-covalent interaction forces among the aggregates, respectively. These measurements were performed under conditions when disulfide bond formation was allowed (control and alternatively when it was prevented by alkylation of free thiols using iodoacetamide. Blocking disulfide bond formation affected growth but not growth kinetics of aggregates which were ∼50% reduced in volume, flatter in vertical dimension and non-fibrillar in comparison to control. Interestingly, single-molecule force spectroscopy data revealed that preventing disulfide bond formation weakened the non-covalent interaction forces among monomers in the aggregate by at least ten fold, thereby stalling their growth and yielding smaller aggregates in comparison to control. We conclude that while constrained protein chain dynamics in correctly disulfide bonded amyloidogenic proteins may protect them from venturing into partial folded conformations that can trigger entry into aggregation pathways, aberrant disulfide bonds in non-amyloidogenic proteins (like HEWL on the other hand, may strengthen non-covalent intermolecular forces among monomers and promote their aggregation.

  3. Correlating Nitrile IR Frequencies to Local Electrostatics Quantifies Noncovalent Interactions of Peptides and Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Pranab; Haldar, Tapas; Kashid, Somnath M; Banerjee, Subhrashis; Chakrabarty, Suman; Bagchi, Sayan

    2016-05-05

    Noncovalent interactions, in particular the hydrogen bonds and nonspecific long-range electrostatic interactions are fundamental to biomolecular functions. A molecular understanding of the local electrostatic environment, consistently for both specific (hydrogen-bonding) and nonspecific electrostatic (local polarity) interactions, is essential for a detailed understanding of these processes. Vibrational Stark Effect (VSE) has proven to be an extremely useful method to measure the local electric field using infrared spectroscopy of carbonyl and nitrile based probes. The nitrile chemical group would be an ideal choice because of its absorption in an infrared spectral window transparent to biomolecules, ease of site-specific incorporation into proteins, and common occurrence as a substituent in various drug molecules. However, the inability of VSE to describe the dependence of IR frequency on electric field for hydrogen-bonded nitriles to date has severely limited nitrile's utility to probe the noncovalent interactions. In this work, using infrared spectroscopy and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we have reported for the first time a linear correlation between nitrile frequencies and electric fields in a wide range of hydrogen-bonding environments that may bridge the existing gap between VSE and H-bonding interactions. We have demonstrated the robustness of this field-frequency correlation for both aromatic nitriles and sulfur-based nitriles in a wide range of molecules of varying size and compactness, including small molecules in complex solvation environments, an amino acid, disordered peptides, and structured proteins. This correlation, when coupled to VSE, can be used to quantify noncovalent interactions, specific or nonspecific, in a consistent manner.

  4. Noncovalent Complexation of Monoamine Neurotransmitters and Related Ammonium Ions by Tetramethoxy Tetraglucosylcalix[4]arene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torvinen, Mika; Kalenius, Elina; Sansone, Francesco; Casnati, Alessandro; Jänis, Janne

    2012-02-01

    The noncovalent complexation of monoamine neurotransmitters and related ammonium and quaternary ammonium ions by a conformationally flexible tetramethoxy glucosylcalix[4]arene was studied by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry. The glucosylcalixarene exhibited highest binding affinity towards serotonin, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine. Structural properties of the guests, such as the number, location, and type of hydrogen bonding groups, length of the alkyl spacer between the ammonium head-group and the aromatic ring structure, and the degree of nitrogen substitution affected the complexation. Competition experiments and guest-exchange reactions indicated that the hydroxyl groups of guests participate in intermolecular hydrogen bonding with the glucocalixarene.

  5. Synthesis and non-covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes rings: new nanomaterials with lectin affinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assali, Mohyeddin; Leal, Manuel Pernía; Khiar, Noureddine; Fernández, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    We present a mild and practical carbon nanotubes rings (CNRs) synthesis from non-covalent functionalized and water-soluble linear single-wall carbon nanotubes. The hemi-micellar–supramolecular self-organization of lactose-based glycolipid 1 on the ring surface, followed by photo-polymerization of the diacetylenic function triggered by UV light afforded the first water-soluble and biocompatible CNRs. The obtained donut-like nanoconstructs expose a high density of lactose moieties on their surface, and are able to engage specific interactions with Arachis hypogea lectin similar to glycoconjugates on the cell membrane. (paper)

  6. Arginine-rich intracellular delivery peptides noncovalently transport protein into living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.-H.; Chen, C.-P.; Chan, M.-H.; Chang, M.; Hou, Y.-W.; Chen, H.-H.; Hsu, H.-R.; Liu, Kevin; Lee, H.-J.

    2006-01-01

    Plasma membranes of plant or animal cells are generally impermeable to peptides or proteins. Many basic peptides have previously been investigated and covalently cross-linked with cargoes for cellular internalization. In the current study, we demonstrate that arginine-rich intracellular delivery (AID) peptides are able to deliver fluorescent proteins or β-galactosidase enzyme into animal and plant cells, as well as animal tissue. Cellular internalization and transdermal delivery of protein could be mediated by effective and nontoxic AID peptides in a neither fusion protein nor conjugation fashion. Therefore, noncovalent AID peptides may provide a useful strategy to have active proteins function in living cells and tissues in vivo

  7. Enzyme catalysis: a new definition accounting for noncovalent substrate- and product-like states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purich, D L

    2001-07-01

    Biological catalysis frequently causes changes in noncovalent bonding. By building on Pauling's assertion that any long-lived, chemically distinct interaction is a chemical bond, this article redefines enzyme catalysis as the facilitated making and/or breaking of chemical bonds, not just of covalent bonds. It is also argued that nearly every ATPase or GTPase is misnamed as a hydrolase and actually belongs to a distinct class of enzymes, termed here 'energases'. By transducing covalent bond energy into mechanical work, energases mediate such fundamental processes as protein folding, self-assembly, G-protein interactions, DNA replication, chromatin remodeling and even active transport.

  8. ESI-MS study on non-covalent bond complex of rhFKBP12 and new neurogrowth promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Hongxia; (王红霞); ZHANG; Xuemin; (张学敏); YANG; Songcheng; (杨松成); XIAO; Junhai; (肖军海); NIE; Aihua; (聂爱华); ZHAO; Liqin; (赵丽琴); LI; Song; (李松)

    2003-01-01

    An ESI-MS method for studying the non-covalent bond complex of rhFKBP12 with its nonimmunosuppressive ligands was developed. The method was used to screen out three compounds capable of binding to rhFKBP12 non-covalently from 52 compounds. By competing binding experiment, the binding site and the relative binding strength of these three compounds 000107, 000308 and A2B12 with rhFKBP12 were measured. All of them have the same binding site as FK506 does. X-ray crystalline diffraction experiment of non-covalent bond complex of 000107, 000308 with rhFKBP12 by Tsinghua University showed the same results. Among them 000308 has good effect on stimulating neurite to grow in chicken sensory neuronal cultures.

  9. Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials: Implications for the Molecular Packing vs Electronic Properties of Acenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2015-10-30

    Noncovalent intermolecular interactions, which can be tuned through the toolbox of synthetic chemistry, determine not only the molecular packing but also the resulting electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of materials derived from π-conjugated molecules, oligomers, and polymers. Here, we provide an overview of the theoretical underpinnings of noncovalent intermolecular interactions and briefly discuss the computational chemistry approaches used to understand the magnitude of these interactions. These methodologies are then exploited to illustrate how noncovalent intermolecular interactions impact important electronic properties-such as the electronic coupling between adjacent molecules, a key parameter for charge-carrier transport-through a comparison between the prototype organic semiconductor pentacene with a series of N-substituted heteropentacenes. Incorporating an understanding of these interactions into the design of organic semiconductors can assist in developing novel materials systems from this fascinating molecular class. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  10. Modulation of the genotoxicity of bleomycin by amines through noncovalent DNA interactions and alteration of physiological conditions in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, George R.; Gessner, Gabrielle S.; Hughes, Jennifer F.; Ronan, Matthew V.; Sylvia, Katelyn E.; Willett, Christine J.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of amines on the induction of mitotic gene conversion by bleomycin (BLM) were studied at the trp5 locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain D7. BLM induces double-strand breaks in DNA and is a potent recombinagen in this assay. The polyamine spermidine causes concentration-dependent protection against the genotoxicity of BLM, reducing the convertant frequency by over 90% under the most protective conditions. Spermine, diethylenetriamine, ethylenediamine, putrescine, and ethylamine were also antigenotoxic in combined treatments with BLM. There was a general correspondence between the protective effect and the number of amino groups, suggesting that more strongly cationic amines tend to be stronger antirecombinagens. Electrostatic association of the amines with DNA probably hinders BLM access to the 4' position of deoxyribose where it generates a free radical. Other amines interact with BLM differently from these unbranched aliphatic amines. The aminothiol cysteamine inhibits the genotoxicity of BLM under hypoxic conditions but increases it under euoxic conditions. In contrast, pargyline potentiates the genotoxicity of BLM under hypoxic conditions but not under euoxic conditions. The antirecombinagenic effect of cysteamine apparently involves DNA binding and depletion of oxygen needed for BLM activity, whereas its potentiation of BLM entails its serving as an electron source for the activation of BLM. Pargyline may enhance BLM indirectly by preventing the depletion of oxygen by monoamine and polyamine oxidase. The planar 9-aminoacridine weakly induces gene conversion in strain D7, but it is strongly synergistic with BLM. Enhancement of BLM activity by this compound and by the related nitroacridine Entozon is apparently mediated by intercalation of the acridine ring system into DNA. Thus, the influence of amines on the genotoxicity of BLM in yeast encompasses antigenotoxic, potentiating, and synergistic interactions. The underlying mechanisms involve

  11. Modulation of the genotoxicity of bleomycin by amines through noncovalent DNA interactions and alteration of physiological conditions in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, George R. [Department of Biology, College of the Holy Cross, One College Street, Worcester, MA 01610-2395 (United States)], E-mail: ghoffmann@holycross.edu; Gessner, Gabrielle S.; Hughes, Jennifer F.; Ronan, Matthew V.; Sylvia, Katelyn E.; Willett, Christine J. [Department of Biology, College of the Holy Cross, One College Street, Worcester, MA 01610-2395 (United States)

    2007-10-01

    The effects of amines on the induction of mitotic gene conversion by bleomycin (BLM) were studied at the trp5 locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain D7. BLM induces double-strand breaks in DNA and is a potent recombinagen in this assay. The polyamine spermidine causes concentration-dependent protection against the genotoxicity of BLM, reducing the convertant frequency by over 90% under the most protective conditions. Spermine, diethylenetriamine, ethylenediamine, putrescine, and ethylamine were also antigenotoxic in combined treatments with BLM. There was a general correspondence between the protective effect and the number of amino groups, suggesting that more strongly cationic amines tend to be stronger antirecombinagens. Electrostatic association of the amines with DNA probably hinders BLM access to the 4' position of deoxyribose where it generates a free radical. Other amines interact with BLM differently from these unbranched aliphatic amines. The aminothiol cysteamine inhibits the genotoxicity of BLM under hypoxic conditions but increases it under euoxic conditions. In contrast, pargyline potentiates the genotoxicity of BLM under hypoxic conditions but not under euoxic conditions. The antirecombinagenic effect of cysteamine apparently involves DNA binding and depletion of oxygen needed for BLM activity, whereas its potentiation of BLM entails its serving as an electron source for the activation of BLM. Pargyline may enhance BLM indirectly by preventing the depletion of oxygen by monoamine and polyamine oxidase. The planar 9-aminoacridine weakly induces gene conversion in strain D7, but it is strongly synergistic with BLM. Enhancement of BLM activity by this compound and by the related nitroacridine Entozon is apparently mediated by intercalation of the acridine ring system into DNA. Thus, the influence of amines on the genotoxicity of BLM in yeast encompasses antigenotoxic, potentiating, and synergistic interactions. The underlying mechanisms involve

  12. Stereodynamic tetrahydrobiisoindole “NU-BIPHEP(O”s: functionalization, rotational barriers and non-covalent interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golo Storch

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Stereodynamic ligands offer intriguing possibilities in enantioselective catalysis. “NU-BIPHEPs” are a class of stereodynamic diphosphine ligands which are easily accessible via rhodium-catalyzed double [2 + 2 + 2] cycloadditions. This study explores the preparation of differently functionalized “NU-BIPHEP(O” compounds, the characterization of non-covalent adduct formation and the quantification of enantiomerization barriers. In order to explore the possibilities of functionalization, we studied modifications of the ligand backbone, e.g., with 3,5-dichlorobenzoyl chloride. Diastereomeric adducts with Okamoto-type cellulose derivatives and on-column deracemization were realized on the basis of non-covalent interactions. Enantioselective dynamic HPLC (DHPLC allowed for the determination of rotational barriers of ΔG‡298K = 92.2 ± 0.3 kJ mol−1 and 99.5 ± 0.1 kJ mol−1 underlining the stereodynamic properties of “NU-BIPHEPs” and “NU-BIPHEP(Os”, respectively. These results make the preparation of tailor-made functionalized stereodynamic ligands possible and give an outline for possible applications in enantioselective catalysis.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Barnase: Contribution of Noncovalent Intramolecular Interaction to Thermostability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguo Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ribonuclease Barnase (RNase Ba is a 12 kD (kilodalton small extracellular ribonuclease. It has broad application prospects in agriculture, clinical medicine, pharmaceutical, and so forth. In this work, the thermal stability of Barnase has been studied using molecular dynamics simulation at different temperatures. The present study focuses on the contribution of noncovalent intramolecular interaction to protein stability and how they affect the thermal stability of the enzyme. Profiles of root mean square deviation and root mean square fluctuation identify thermostable and thermosensitive regions of Barnase. Analyses of trajectories in terms of secondary structure content, intramolecular hydrogen bonds and salt bridge interactions indicate distinct differences in different temperature simulations. In the simulations, Four three-member salt bridge networks (Asp8-Arg110-Asp12, Arg83-Asp75-Arg87, Lys66-Asp93-Arg69, and Asp54-Lys27-Glu73 have been identified as critical salt bridges for thermostability which are maintained stably at higher temperature enhancing stability of three hydrophobic cores. The study may help enlighten our knowledge of protein structural properties, noncovalent interactions which can stabilize secondary peptide structures or promote folding, and also help understand their actions better. Such an understanding is required for designing efficient enzymes with characteristics for particular applications at desired working temperatures.

  14. Direct effects of ionizing radiation on integral membrane proteins. Noncovalent energy transfer requires specific interpeptide interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhun, E.; Jhun, B.H.; Jones, L.R.; Jung, C.Y.

    1991-01-01

    The 12 transmembrane alpha helices (TMHs) of human erythrocyte glucose transporter were individually cut by pepsin digestion as membrane-bound 2.5-3.5-kDa peptide fragments. Radiation-induced chemical degradation of these fragments showed an average target size of 34 kDa. This is 10-12 x larger than the average size of an individual TMH, demonstrating that a significant energy transfer occurs among these TMHs in the absence of covalent linkage. Heating this TMH preparation at 100 degree C for 15 min reduced the target size to 5 kDa or less, suggesting that the noncovalent energy transfer requires specific helix-helix interactions. Purified phospholamban, a small (6-kDa) integral membrane protein containing a single TMH, formed a pentameric assembly in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The chemical degradation target size of this phospholamban pentamer was 5-6 kDa, illustrating that not all integral membrane protein assemblies permit intersubunit energy transfer. These findings together with other published observations suggest strongly that significant noncovalent energy transfer can occur within the tertiary and quaternary structure of membrane proteins and that as yet undefined proper molecular interactions are required for such covalent energy transfer. Our results with pepsin-digested glucose transporter also illustrate the importance of the interhelical interaction as a predominating force in maintaining the tertiary structure of a transmembrane protein

  15. Effects of multiple substitution upon the P...N noncovalent interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheiner, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The presence of one halogen opposite the N results in strong attraction between P and N. This force is little affected by identity of Y atoms, whether H or halogen. Highlights: → Strong attractive force directly between trivalent P and N atoms. → P...N force is unlike H-bonds or halogen bonds, but stronger than both. → Multiple halogenation beyond a single atom on P slightly weakens the interaction. - Abstract: The attractive noncovalent interaction of a P atom with N is derived primarily from two sources. Charge transfer from the N lone pair into the σ * antibonding orbital of a P-X bond that is turned away from the N atom combines with attractive Coulombic forces. As in the case of H-bonding, which is parallel in some ways to P...N attraction, placement of an electron-withdrawing substituent on the P atom enhances both of these components, and strengthens the overall interaction. However, in stark contrast with H-bonding, halogenation beyond monosubstitution does not lead to any further strengthening of the P...N noncovalent bond. Indeed, di and tri-substitution lead to small reductions in the interaction energy. In all cases, the geometry which contains a P...N bond is more stable than other candidate structures, some of which contain hydrogen or halogen bonds.

  16. Four levels of hierarchical organization, including noncovalent chainmail, brace the mature tumor herpesvirus capsid against pressurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z Hong; Hui, Wong Hoi; Shah, Sanket; Jih, Jonathan; O'Connor, Christine M; Sherman, Michael B; Kedes, Dean H; Schein, Stan

    2014-10-07

    Like many double-stranded DNA viruses, tumor gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus withstand high internal pressure. Bacteriophage HK97 uses covalent chainmail for this purpose, but how this is achieved noncovalently in the much larger gammaherpesvirus capsid is unknown. Our cryoelectron microscopy structure of a gammaherpesvirus capsid reveals a hierarchy of four levels of organization: (1) Within a hexon capsomer, each monomer of the major capsid protein (MCP), 1,378 amino acids and six domains, interacts with its neighboring MCPs at four sites. (2) Neighboring capsomers are linked in pairs by MCP dimerization domains and in groups of three by heterotrimeric triplex proteins. (3) Small (∼280 amino acids) HK97-like domains in MCP monomers alternate with triplex heterotrimers to form a belt that encircles each capsomer. (4) One hundred sixty-two belts concatenate to form noncovalent chainmail. The triplex heterotrimer orchestrates all four levels and likely drives maturation to an angular capsid that can withstand pressurization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A noncovalent class of papain-like protease/deubiquitinase inhibitors blocks SARS virus replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratia, Kiira; Pegan, Scott; Takayama, Jun; Sleeman, Katrina; Coughlin, Melissa; Baliji, Surendranath; Chaudhuri, Rima; Fu, Wentao; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Johnson, Michael E.; Baker, Susan C.; Ghosh, Arun K.; Mesecar, Andrew D. (Loyola); (Purdue); (UIC)

    2008-10-27

    We report the discovery and optimization of a potent inhibitor against the papain-like protease (PLpro) from the coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV). This unique protease is not only responsible for processing the viral polyprotein into its functional units but is also capable of cleaving ubiquitin and ISG15 conjugates and plays a significant role in helping SARS-CoV evade the human immune system. We screened a structurally diverse library of 50,080 compounds for inhibitors of PLpro and discovered a noncovalent lead inhibitor with an IC{sub 50} value of 20 {mu}M, which was improved to 600 nM via synthetic optimization. The resulting compound, GRL0617, inhibited SARS-CoV viral replication in Vero E6 cells with an EC{sub 50} of 15 {mu}M and had no associated cytotoxicity. The X-ray structure of PLpro in complex with GRL0617 indicates that the compound has a unique mode of inhibition whereby it binds within the S4-S3 subsites of the enzyme and induces a loop closure that shuts down catalysis at the active site. These findings provide proof-of-principle that PLpro is a viable target for development of antivirals directed against SARS-CoV, and that potent noncovalent cysteine protease inhibitors can be developed with specificity directed toward pathogenic deubiquitinating enzymes without inhibiting host DUBs.

  18. The effect of non-covalent functionalization on the thermal conductance of graphene/organic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Shangchao; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-01-01

    The intrinsic interfacial thermal resistance at graphene/organic interfaces, as a result of mismatches in the phonon vibrational spectra of the two materials, diminishes the overall heat transfer performance of graphene/organic nanocomposites. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to design alkyl-pyrene molecules that can non-covalently functionalize graphene surfaces in contact with a model organic phase composed of octane. The alkyl-pyrene molecules possess phonon-spectra features of both graphene and octane and, therefore, can serve as phonon-spectra linkers to bridge the vibrational mismatch at the graphene/octane interface. In support of this hypothesis, we find that the best linker candidate can enhance the out-of-plane graphene/organic interfacial thermal conductance by ∼22%, attributed to its capability to compensate the low-frequency phonon mode of graphene. We also find that the length of the alkyl chain indirectly affects the interfacial thermal conductance through different orientations of these chains because they dictate the contribution of the out-of-plane high-frequency carbon–hydrogen bond vibrations to the overall phonon transport. This study advances our understanding of the less destructive non-covalent functionalization method and design principles of suitable linker molecules to enhance the thermal performance of graphene/organic nanocomposites while retaining the intrinsic chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties of pristine graphene. (paper)

  19. On the performance of the semiempirical quantum mechanical PM6 and PM7 methods for noncovalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostaš, Jiří; Řezáč, Jan; Hobza, Pavel

    2013-05-01

    In this Letter, we compare the recently released semiempirical method PM7 with its predecessor, PM6 with post-SCF corrections. These corrections were introduced in order to improve the description of noncovalent interactions (dispersion, hydrogen bonds and halogen bonds) and have become an integral part of PM7. A large collection of data on noncovalent interactions, covering not only interaction energies but also conformational changes and geometries, is used as a benchmark. Among the methods tested, PM6 with the latest corrections (PM6-D3H4X) yields the best results. PM7 yields only slightly worse results but brings additional improvements in the description of other molecular properties.

  20. A versatile strategy towards non-covalent functionalization of graphene by surface-confined supramolecular self-assembly of Janus tectons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Du

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D, supramolecular self-assembly at surfaces is now well-mastered with several existing examples. However, one remaining challenge to enable future applications in nanoscience is to provide potential functionalities to the physisorbed adlayer. This work reviews a recently developed strategy that addresses this key issue by taking advantage of a new concept, Janus tecton materials. This is a versatile, molecular platform based on the design of three-dimensional (3D building blocks consisting of two faces linked by a cyclophane-type pillar. One face is designed to steer 2D self-assembly onto C(sp2-carbon-based flat surfaces, the other allowing for the desired functionality above the substrate with a well-controlled lateral order. In this way, it is possible to simultaneously obtain a regular, non-covalent paving as well as supramolecular functionalization of graphene, thus opening interesting perspectives for nanoscience applications.

  1. Using PyMOL to Explore the Effects of ph on Noncovalent Interactions between Immunoglobulin G and Protein A: A Guided-Inquiry Biochemistry Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche Allred, Zahilyn D.; Tai, Heeyoung; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Page, Richard C.

    2017-01-01

    Students' understandings of foundational concepts such as noncovalent interactions, pH and pK[subscript a] are crucial for success in undergraduate biochemistry courses. We developed a guided-inquiry activity to aid students in making connections between noncovalent interactions and pH/pK[subscript a]. Students explore these concepts by examining…

  2. Asymmetric noncovalent synthesis of self-assembled one-dimensional stacks by a chiral supramolecular auxiliary approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, S.J.; Tomovic, Z.; Averbeke, Van B.; Beljonne, D.; Lazzaroni, R.; Schenning, A.P.H.J.; Meijer, E.W.

    2012-01-01

    Stereoselective noncovalent synthesis of one-dimensional helical self-assembled stacks of achiral oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) ureidotriazine (AOPV3) monomers is obtained by a chiral supramolecular auxiliary approach. The racemic mixture of helical stacks of achiral AOPV3 molecules is converted into

  3. Crystal Structure of the Dithiol Oxidase DsbA Enzyme from Proteus Mirabilis Bound Non-covalently to an Active Site Peptide Ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Fabian; Duprez, Wilko; Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Schembri, Mark A.; Fairlie, David P.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    The disulfide bond forming DsbA enzymes and their DsbB interaction partners are attractive targets for development of antivirulence drugs because both are essential for virulence factor assembly in Gram-negative pathogens. Here we characterize PmDsbA from Proteus mirabilis, a bacterial pathogen increasingly associated with multidrug resistance. PmDsbA exhibits the characteristic properties of a DsbA, including an oxidizing potential, destabilizing disulfide, acidic active site cysteine, and dithiol oxidase catalytic activity. We evaluated a peptide, PWATCDS, derived from the partner protein DsbB and showed by thermal shift and isothermal titration calorimetry that it binds to PmDsbA. The crystal structures of PmDsbA, and the active site variant PmDsbAC30S were determined to high resolution. Analysis of these structures allows categorization of PmDsbA into the DsbA class exemplified by the archetypal Escherichia coli DsbA enzyme. We also present a crystal structure of PmDsbAC30S in complex with the peptide PWATCDS. The structure shows that the peptide binds non-covalently to the active site CXXC motif, the cis-Pro loop, and the hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site of the enzyme. This high-resolution structural data provides a critical advance for future structure-based design of non-covalent peptidomimetic inhibitors. Such inhibitors would represent an entirely new antibacterial class that work by switching off the DSB virulence assembly machinery. PMID:24831013

  4. Properties of ammonium ion-water clusters: analyses of structure evolution, noncovalent interactions, and temperature and humidity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shi-Tu; Jiang, Shuai; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Xu, Kang-Ming; Wen, Hui; Zhu, Yu-Peng; Huang, Wei

    2015-03-26

    Although ammonium ion-water clusters are abundant in the biosphere, some information regarding these clusters, such as their growth route, the influence of temperature and humidity, and the concentrations of various hydrated clusters, is lacking. In this study, theoretical calculations are performed on ammonium ion-water clusters. These theoretical calculations are focused on determining the following characteristics: (1) the pattern of cluster growth; (2) the percentages of clusters of the same size at different temperatures and humidities; (3) the distributions of different isomers for the same size clusters at different temperatures; (4) the relative strengths of the noncovalent interactions for clusters of different sizes. The results suggest that the dipole moment may be very significant for the ammonium ion-water system, and some new stable isomers were found. The nucleation of ammonium ions and water molecules is favorable at low temperatures; thus, the clusters observed at high altitudes might not be present at low altitudes. High humidity can contribute to the formation of large ammonium ion-water clusters, whereas the formation of small clusters may be favorable under low-humidity conditions. The potential energy surfaces (PES) of these different sized clusters are complicated and differ according to the distribution of isomers at different temperatures. Some similar structures are observed between NH4(+)(H2O)n and M(H2O)n (where M represents an alkali metal ion or water molecule); when n = 8, the clusters begin to form the closed-cage geometry. As the cluster size increases, these interactions become progressively weaker. The successive binding energy at the DF-MP2-F12/VDZ-F12 level is better than that at the PW91PW91/6-311++G(3df, 3pd) level and is consistent with the experimentally determined values.

  5. Photodissociative Cross-Linking of Non-covalent Peptide-Peptide Ion Complexes in the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huong T. H.; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C.; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Shaffer, Christopher J.; Tureček, František

    2018-05-01

    We report a gas-phase UV photodissociation study investigating non-covalent interactions between neutral hydrophobic pentapeptides and peptide ions incorporating a diazirine-tagged photoleucine residue. Phenylalanine (Phe) and proline (Pro) were chosen as the conformation-affecting residues that were incorporated into a small library of neutral pentapeptides. Gas-phase ion-molecule complexes of these peptides with photo-labeled pentapeptides were subjected to photodissociation. Selective photocleavage of the diazirine ring at 355 nm formed short-lived carbene intermediates that underwent cross-linking by insertion into H-X bonds of the target peptide. The cross-link positions were established from collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectra (CID-MS3) providing sequence information on the covalent adducts. Effects of the amino acid residue (Pro or Phe) and its position in the target peptide sequence were evaluated. For proline-containing peptides, interactions resulting in covalent cross-links in these complexes became more prominent as proline was moved towards the C-terminus of the target peptide sequence. The photocross-linking yields of phenylalanine-containing peptides depended on the position of both phenylalanine and photoleucine. Density functional theory calculations were used to assign structures of low-energy conformers of the (GLPMG + GLL*LK + H)+ complex. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectory calculations were used to capture the thermal motion in the complexes within 100 ps and determine close contacts between the incipient carbene and the H-X bonds in the target peptide. This provided atomic-level resolution of potential cross-links that aided spectra interpretation and was in agreement with experimental data. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Ultrasensitive Nanoimmunosensor by coupling non-covalent functionalized graphene oxide platform and numerous ferritin labels on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Rashida; Jeong, Bongjin; Choi, Jong-Soon; Rahman, Md Aminur

    2016-06-15

    An ultrasensitive electrochemical nanostructured immunosensor for a breast cancer biomarker carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3) was fabricated using non-covalent functionalized graphene oxides (GO/Py-COOH) as sensor probe and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs)-supported numerous ferritin as labels. The immunosensor was constructed by immobilizing a monoclonal anti-CA 15-3 antibody on the GO modified cysteamine (Cys) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on an Au electrode (Au/Cys) through the amide bond formation between the carboxylic acid groups of GO/Py-COOH and amine groups of anti-CA 15-3. Secondary antibody conjugated MWCNT-supported ferritin labels (Ab2-MWCNT-Ferritin) were prepared through the amide bond formation between amine groups of Ab2 and ferritin and carboxylic acid groups of MWCNTs. The detection of CA 15-3 was based on the enhanced bioelectrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide mediated by hydroquinone (HQ) at the GO/Py-COOH-based sensor probe. The GO/Py-COOH-based sensor probe and Ab2-MWCNT-Ferritin labels were characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) technique, CA 15-3 can be selectively detected as low as 0.01 ± 0.07 U/mL in human serum samples. Additionally, the proposed CA 15-3 immunosensor showed excellent selectivity and better stability in human serum samples, which demonstrated that the proposed immunosensor has potentials in proteomic researches and diagnostics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Network Formation via Anion Coordination: Crystal Structures Based on the Interplay of Non-Covalent Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Savastano

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe the synthesis and the structural characterization of new H2L(CF3CO22 (1 and H2L(Ph2PO42 (2 compounds containing the diprotonated form (H2L2+ of the tetrazine-based molecule 3,6-di(pyridin-4-yl-1,2,4,5-tetrazine. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis of single crystals of these compounds showed that H2L2+ displays similar binding properties toward both anions when salt bridge interactions are taken into account. Nevertheless, the different shapes, sizes and functionalities of trifluoroacetate and diphenyl phosphate anions define quite different organization patterns leading to the peculiar crystal lattices of 1 and 2. These three-dimensional (3D architectures are self-assembled by a variety of non-covalent forces, among which prominent roles are played by fluorine–π (in 1 and anion–π (in 2 interactions.

  8. Enzymatic Activity Enhancement of Non-Covalent Modified Superoxide Dismutase and Molecular Docking Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-Jun Song

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase was improved in the pyrogallol autoxidation system by about 27%, after interaction between hydroxypropyl-β-cyclo- dextrin and superoxide dismutase. Fluorescence spectrometry was used to study the interaction between hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and superoxide dismutase at different temperatures. By doing this, it can be found that these interactions increase fluorescence sensitivity. In the meantime, the synchronous fluorescence intensity revealed the interaction sites to be close to the tryptophan (Trp and tyrosine (Tyr residues of superoxide dismutase. Furthermore, molecular docking was applied to explore the binding mode between the ligands and the receptor. This suggested that HP-β-CD interacted with the B ring, G ring and the O ring and revealed that the lysine (Lys residues enter the nanocavity. It was concluded that the HP-β-CD caused specific conformational changes in SOD by non-covalent modification.

  9. Core/Shell Conjugated Polymer/Quantum Dot Composite Nanofibers through Orthogonal Non-Covalent Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad W. Watson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructuring organic polymers and organic/inorganic hybrid materials and controlling blend morphologies at the molecular level are the prerequisites for modern electronic devices including biological sensors, light emitting diodes, memory devices and solar cells. To achieve all-around high performance, multiple organic and inorganic entities, each designed for specific functions, are commonly incorporated into a single device. Accurate arrangement of these components is a crucial goal in order to achieve the overall synergistic effects. We describe here a facile methodology of nanostructuring conjugated polymers and inorganic quantum dots into well-ordered core/shell composite nanofibers through cooperation of several orthogonal non-covalent interactions including conjugated polymer crystallization, block copolymer self-assembly and coordination interactions. Our methods provide precise control on the spatial arrangements among the various building blocks that are otherwise incompatible with one another, and should find applications in modern organic electronic devices such as solar cells.

  10. Non-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene by a conjugated polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Jiwuer, Jilili

    2014-07-07

    We report first-principles calculations on the binding of poly[(9,9-bis-(6-bromohexylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(benzene-1,4-diyl)] to a (8,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and to graphene. Considering different relative orientations of the subsystems, we find for the generalized gradient approximation a non-binding state, whereas the local density approximation predicts reasonable binding energies. The results coincide after inclusion of van der Waals corrections, which demonstrates a weak interaction between the polymer and SWCNT/graphene, mostly of van der Waals type. Accordingly, the density of states shows essentially no hybridization. The physisorption mechanism explains recent experimental observations and suggests that the conjugated polymer can be used for non-covalent functionalization.

  11. Non-Covalent Microgel Particles Containing Functional Payloads: Coacervation of PEG-Based Triblocks via Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cynthia X; Utech, Stefanie; Gopez, Jeffrey D; Mabesoone, Mathijs F J; Hawker, Craig J; Klinger, Daniel

    2016-07-06

    Well-defined microgel particles were prepared by combining coacervate-driven cross-linking of ionic triblock copolymers with the ability to control particle size and encapsulate functional cargos inherent in microfluidic devices. In this approach, the efficient assembly of PEO-based triblock copolymers with oppositely charged end-blocks allows for bioinspired cross-linking under mild conditions in dispersed aqueous droplets. This strategy enables the integration of charged cargos into the coacervate domains (e.g., the loading of anionic model compounds through electrostatic association with cationic end-blocks). Distinct release profiles can be realized by systematically varying the chemical nature of the payload and the microgel dimensions. This mild and noncovalent assembly method represents a promising new approach to tunable microgels as scaffolds for colloidal biomaterials in therapeutics and regenerative medicine.

  12. Photoclickable dendritic molecular glue: noncovalent-to-covalent photochemical transformation of protein hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Noriyuki; Okuro, Kou; Niitani, Yamato; Ling, Xiao; Ariga, Takayuki; Tomishige, Michio; Aida, Takuzo

    2013-03-27

    A water-soluble dendron with a fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) fluorescent label and bearing nine pendant guanidinium ion (Gu(+))/benzophenone (BP) pairs at its periphery (Glue(BP)-FITC) serves as a "photoclickable molecular glue". By multivalent salt-bridge formation between Gu(+) ions and oxyanions, Glue(BP)-FITC temporarily adheres to a kinesin/microtubule hybrid. Upon subsequent exposure to UV light, this noncovalent binding is made permanent via a cross-linking reaction mediated by carbon radicals derived from the photoexcited BP units. This temporal-to-permanent transformation by light occurs quickly and efficiently in this preorganized state, allowing the movements of microtubules on a kinesin-coated glass plate to be photochemically controlled. A fundamental difference between such temporal and permanent bindings was visualized by the use of "optical tweezers".

  13. Non-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene by a conjugated polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Jiwuer, Jilili; Abdurahman, Ayjamal; Gü lseren, Oğuz; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    We report first-principles calculations on the binding of poly[(9,9-bis-(6-bromohexylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(benzene-1,4-diyl)] to a (8,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and to graphene. Considering different relative orientations of the subsystems, we find for the generalized gradient approximation a non-binding state, whereas the local density approximation predicts reasonable binding energies. The results coincide after inclusion of van der Waals corrections, which demonstrates a weak interaction between the polymer and SWCNT/graphene, mostly of van der Waals type. Accordingly, the density of states shows essentially no hybridization. The physisorption mechanism explains recent experimental observations and suggests that the conjugated polymer can be used for non-covalent functionalization.

  14. Optimization of single-walled carbon nanotube solubility by noncovalent PEGylation using experimental design methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadidi N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Naghmeh Hadidi1, Farzad Kobarfard2, Nastaran Nafissi-Varcheh3, Reza Aboofazeli11Department of Pharmaceutics, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranAbstract: In this study, noncovalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs with phospholipid-polyethylene glycols (Pl-PEGs was performed to improve the solubility of SWCNTs in aqueous solution. Two kinds of PEG derivatives, ie, Pl-PEG 2000 and Pl-PEG 5000, were used for the PEGylation process. An experimental design technique (D-optimal design and second-order polynomial equations was applied to investigate the effect of variables on PEGylation and the solubility of SWCNTs. The type of PEG derivative was selected as a qualitative parameter, and the PEG/SWCNT weight ratio and sonication time were applied as quantitative variables for the experimental design. Optimization was performed for two responses, aqueous solubility and loading efficiency. The grafting of PEG to the carbon nanostructure was determined by thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Aqueous solubility and loading efficiency were determined by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry and measurement of free amine groups, respectively. Results showed that Pl-PEGs were grafted onto SWCNTs. Aqueous solubility of 0.84 mg/mL and loading efficiency of nearly 98% were achieved for the prepared Pl-PEG 5000-SWCNT conjugates. Evaluation of functionalized SWCNTs showed that our noncovalent functionalization protocol could considerably increase aqueous solubility, which is an essential criterion in the design of a carbon nanotube-based drug delivery system and its biodistribution.Keywords: phospholipid-PEG, D-optimal design, loading efficiency, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, theromogravimetric analysis, carbon nanotubes

  15. Exchange-Correlation Effects for Noncovalent Interactions in Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-de-la-Roza, A; DiLabio, Gino A; Johnson, Erin R

    2016-07-12

    In this article, we develop an understanding of how errors from exchange-correlation functionals affect the modeling of noncovalent interactions in dispersion-corrected density-functional theory. Computed CCSD(T) reference binding energies for a collection of small-molecule clusters are decomposed via a molecular many-body expansion and are used to benchmark density-functional approximations, including the effect of semilocal approximation, exact-exchange admixture, and range separation. Three sources of error are identified. Repulsion error arises from the choice of semilocal functional approximation. This error affects intermolecular repulsions and is present in all n-body exchange-repulsion energies with a sign that alternates with the order n of the interaction. Delocalization error is independent of the choice of semilocal functional but does depend on the exact exchange fraction. Delocalization error misrepresents the induction energies, leading to overbinding in all induction n-body terms, and underestimates the electrostatic contribution to the 2-body energies. Deformation error affects only monomer relaxation (deformation) energies and behaves similarly to bond-dissociation energy errors. Delocalization and deformation errors affect systems with significant intermolecular orbital interactions (e.g., hydrogen- and halogen-bonded systems), whereas repulsion error is ubiquitous. Many-body errors from the underlying exchange-correlation functional greatly exceed in general the magnitude of the many-body dispersion energy term. A functional built to accurately model noncovalent interactions must contain a dispersion correction, semilocal exchange, and correlation components that minimize the repulsion error independently and must also incorporate exact exchange in such a way that delocalization error is absent.

  16. Decision making for position-dependent obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on the basis of patient information and physical examinations of the upper airway, acquired on an outpatient basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Minoru; Kondo, Takahito; Shimada, Rie; Tsukahara, Kiyoaki

    2018-06-01

    Patients with body mass index (BMI) position-dependent OSAS. Diagnosis of position-dependent/position-independent OSAS can be difficult in patients satisfying both 'BMI >25 kg/m 2 ' and 'any of tongue enlargement (TE), palatine tonsil hypertrophy (PTH) and obstruction by Muller's maneuver (OMM)'. Polysomnography is warranted in such patients. The objective was to retrospectively elucidate criteria for differentiating position-dependent OSAS on the basis of patient information and physical examinations of the upper airway obtainable in clinics. The 643 patients were categorized as positional patients (PPs) or non-positional patients (NPPs). The patient background factors examined were sex, age, BMI, and hypertension. TE, PTH, pharyngeal tonsil hypertrophy, and OMM were evaluated. Cross-validation was performed using even-numbered registrations as the training set group (Group A) and odd-numbered registrations as the test case group (Group B). In Group A, patients with BMI <25 kg/m 2 were clearly more frequent among PP than among NPP. In Group A with BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 , significant differences were found for TE, PTH and OMM. Significant differences were found between 0 and 1/2/3 for number of factors. Results generated from Group A were validated in Group B.

  17. Nicked apomyoglobin: a noncovalent complex of two polypeptide fragments comprising the entire protein chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musi, Valeria; Spolaore, Barbara; Picotti, Paola; Zambonin, Marcello; De Filippis, Vincenzo; Fontana, Angelo

    2004-05-25

    Limited proteolysis of the 153-residue chain of horse apomyoglobin (apoMb) by thermolysin results in the selective cleavage of the peptide bond Pro88-Leu89. The N-terminal (residues 1-88) and C-terminal (residues 89-153) fragments of apoMb were isolated to homogeneity and their conformational and association properties investigated in detail. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) measurements revealed that both fragments in isolation acquire a high content of helical secondary structure, while near-UV CD indicated the absence of tertiary structure. A 1:1 mixture of the fragments leads to a tight noncovalent protein complex (1-88/89-153, nicked apoMb), characterized by secondary and tertiary structures similar to those of intact apoMb. The apoMb complex binds heme in a nativelike manner, as given by CD measurements in the Soret region. Second-derivative absorption spectra in the 250-300 nm region provided evidence that the degree of exposure of Tyr residues in the nicked species is similar to that of the intact protein at neutral pH. Also, the microenvironment of Trp residues, located in positions 7 and 14 of the 153-residue chain of the protein, is similar in both protein species, as given by fluorescence emission data. Moreover, in analogy to intact apoMb, the nicked protein binds the hydrophobic dye 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS). Taken together, our results indicate that the two proteolytic fragments 1-88 and 89-153 of apoMb adopt partly folded states characterized by sufficiently nativelike conformational features that promote their specific association and mutual stabilization into a nicked protein species much resembling in its structural features intact apoMb. It is suggested that the formation of a noncovalent complex upon fragment complementation can mimic the protein folding process of the entire protein chain, with the difference that the folding of the complementary fragments is an intermolecular process. In particular, this study emphasizes the

  18. Noncovalent interaction of polyethylene glycol with copper complex of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and its application in constructing inorganic nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shu Zhen; Song, Le Xin; Chen, Jie; Du, Fang Yun; Yang, Jing; Xia, Juan

    2011-10-21

    In this study, we try to answer a fundamental question: what is the consequence of the noncovalent interaction between a polymer and a coordination compound? Here, polyethylene glycol (PEG-4000, PEG-b) and copper complex of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (H(2)CuY) were employed to solve this problem. A novel adduct (CEP) between H(2)CuY and PEG-b was prepared. Our results indicated several interesting findings. First, the introduction of H(2)CuY had no effect on the stacking structure of PEG-b but led to a large change in surface structure of the polymer. Second, there was a significant difference (117 K) in the maximum degradation temperature between the PEG and the CEP, suggesting that the noncovalent interaction can drastically improve the thermal stability of the PEG. Third, sintering experiments showed that H(2)CuY and CEP produced completely different decomposition products. The former formed Cu crystals in nitrogen and CuO in air, but the latter generated Cu and CuCl crystals with good crystallinity, respectively. Finally, three independent measurements: viscosity, conductivity and nuclear magnetic resonance in solution, provided useful information and insights from both sides of the noncovalent interaction. Probable interaction mechanisms and interaction sites were proposed. We consider that the current research could create the foundation for a new understanding of how the noncovalent adduct interaction between a metallic complex and a polymer relates to the change in physical and chemical properties of the adducted components. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  19. Structural dynamics of a noncovalent charge transfer complex from femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Tomotsumi; Creelman, Mark; Mathies, Richard A

    2012-09-06

    Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy is used to examine the structural dynamics of photoinduced charge transfer within a noncovalent electron acceptor/donor complex of pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA, electron acceptor) and hexamethylbenzene (HMB, electron donor) in ethylacetate and acetonitrile. The evolution of the vibrational spectrum reveals the ultrafast structural changes that occur during the charge separation (Franck-Condon excited state complex → contact ion pair) and the subsequent charge recombination (contact ion pair → ground state complex). The Franck-Condon excited state is shown to have significant charge-separated character because its vibrational spectrum is similar to that of the ion pair. The charge separation rate (2.5 ps in ethylacetate and ∼0.5 ps in acetonitrile) is comparable to solvation dynamics and is unaffected by the perdeuteration of HMB, supporting the dominant role of solvent rearrangement in charge separation. On the other hand, the charge recombination slows by a factor of ∼1.4 when using perdeuterated HMB, indicating that methyl hydrogen motions of HMB mediate the charge recombination process. Resonance Raman enhancement of the HMB vibrations in the complex reveals that the ring stretches of HMB, and especially the C-CH(3) deformations are the primary acceptor modes promoting charge recombination.

  20. Preparation and Performance of Amphiphilic Random Copolymer Noncovalently Modified MWCNTs/Epoxy Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An amphiphilic random copolymer of polyglycidyl methacrylate-co-N-vinyl carbazole P(GMA-co-NVC was synthesized by free radical polymerization and was used to noncovalently modify multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. The obtained P(GMA-co-NVC/MWCNTs was mixed with epoxy resin and used to reinforce epoxy resin. Polymer modified carbon nanotubes/epoxy resin composites were prepared by a casting molding method. Tensile test, electrical resistivity test and differential scanning calorimeter(DSC analysis were used to study the effect of polymer modified carbon nanotubes on the mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of epoxy resin. The results show that the epoxy composite reinforced with P(GMA-co-NVC/MWCNTs shows a remarkable enhancement in both tensile strength and elongation at break compared to either the pure epoxy or the pristine MWCNTs/epoxy composites. In addition, the electrical conductivity of epoxy is significantly improved and the volume resistivity decreases from 1014Ω·m to 106Ω·m with 0.25% mass fraction loading of P(GMA-co-NVC/MWCNTs. Moreover, glass transition temperature of the epoxy composite also increases from 144℃ to 149℃.

  1. π-Donors microstructuring on surface of polymer film by their noncovalent interactions with iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traven, Valerii F., E-mail: valerii.traven@gmail.com [Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, Moscow 125047, Miusskaya sq., 9 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Ivan V.; Dolotov, Sergei M. [Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, Moscow 125047, Miusskaya sq., 9 (Russian Federation); Veciana, Jaume Miro; Lebedev, Victor S. [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona–CSIC, Campus de la UAB, 08193, Bellaterra (Spain); Shulga, Yurii M.; Khasanov, Salavat S. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Acad. N.N. Semenov Prosp., 1, Chernogolovka, 142432 (Russian Federation); Medvedev, Michael G. [A. N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991, Vavilova str., 28 (Russian Federation); Laukhina, Elena E. [The Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine, ICMAB-CSIC, Bellaterra, 08193 (Spain)

    2015-06-15

    Noncovalent (charge transfer) interaction between perylene and iodine in polycarbonate film provides formation of microstructured perylene layer on the polymer surface upon exposure of polymer film which contains dissolved perylene to solvent + iodine vapors. The prepared bilayer film possesses a sensing effect to iodine vapors which can be observed by both fluorescence and electrical conductivity changes. Similar bilayer films have been prepared also with anthracene and phenothiazine as π-donors with use of different polymer matrixes. Interaction of iodine with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) has also been studied by the M06-2x DFT calculations for better understanding of phenomenon of π-donors microstructuring on surface of polymer film. - Highlights: • Preparation of bilayer polymer films with π-donors on surface for the first time. • π-Donor phase purity is confirmed by XRD, IR spectroscopy, SEM. • Perylene bilayer polymer films possess fluorescence. • Perylene bilayer polymer films loss fluorescence under iodine vapors. • Perylene bilayer polymer films possess electrical conductivity when treated by iodine vapors.

  2. An NMR study of the covalent and noncovalent interactions of CC-1065 and DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scahill, T.A.; Jensen, R.M.; Swenson, D.H.; Hatzenbuhler, N.T.; Petzold, G.; Wierenga, W.; Brahme, N.D.

    1990-01-01

    The binding of the antitumor drug CC-1065 has been studied with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This study involves two parts, the elucidation of the covalent binding site of the drug to DNA and a detailed investigation of the noncovalent interactions of CC-1065 with a DNA fragment through analysis of 2D NOE (NOESY) experiments. A CC-1065-DNA adduct was prepared, and an adenine adduct was released upon heating. NMR ( 1 H and 13 C) analysis of the adduct shows that the drug binds to N3 of adenine by reaction of its cyclopropyl group. The reaction pathway and product formed were determined by analysis of the 13 C DEPT spectra. An octamer duplex, d(CGATTAGC·GCTAATCG), was synthesized and used in the interaction study of CC-1065 and the oligomer. The duplex and the drug-octamer complex were both analyzed by 2D spectroscopy (COSY, NOESY). The relative intensity of the NOEs observed between the drug (CC-1065) and the octamer duplex shows conclusively that the drug is located in the minor groove, covalently attached to N3 of adenine 6 and positioned from the 3' → 5' end in relation to strand A [d(CGATTA 6 GC)]. A mechanism for drug binding and stabilization can be inferred from the NOE data and model-building studies

  3. Origin of supercharging in electrospray ionization of noncovalent complexes from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Harry J; Williams, Evan R

    2009-10-01

    The use of m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) to enhance charging of noncovalent complexes formed by electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions was investigated. Addition of up to 1% m-NBA can result in a significant increase in the average charging of complexes, ranging from approximately 13% for the homo-heptamer of NtrC4-RC (317 kDa; maximum charge state increases from 42+ to 44+) to approximately 49% for myoglobin (17.6 kDa; maximum charge state increases from 9+ to 16+). Charge state distributions of larger complexes obtained from heated solutions to which no m-NBA was added are remarkably similar to those containing small amounts of m-NBA. Dissociation of the complexes through identical channels both upon addition of higher concentrations of m-NBA and heating is observed. These results indicate that the enhanced charging upon addition of m-NBA to aqueous electrospray solutions is a result of droplet heating owing to the high boiling point of m-NBA, which results in a change in the higher-order structure and/or dissociation of the complexes. For monomeric proteins and small complexes, the enhancement of charging is lower for heated aqueous solutions than from solutions with m-NBA because rapid folding of proteins from heated solutions that do not contain m-NBA can occur after the electrospray droplet is formed and is evaporatively cooled.

  4. Enhancing catalytic performance of Au catalysts by noncovalent functionalized graphene using functional ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shuwen; Guo, Shujing; Yang, Honglei; Gou, Galian; Ren, Ren; Li, Jing; Dong, Zhengping; Jin, Jun; Ma, Jiantai

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The new catalyst was fabricated by a facile and environment-friendly approach. • The catalyst has excellent activity and reusability due to the synergistic effect. • The approach provides a green way to synthesize low cost Au-based catalysts. - Abstract: New catalyst, prepared through Au nanoparticles anchored on the Ionic Liquid of 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic acid-noncovalent functionalized graphene (Au/PDIL-GS), was fabricated using a facile and environment-friendly approach. The information of the morphologies, sizes, dispersion of Au nanoparticles (NPs) and chemical composition for the as-prepared catalysts was verified by systematic characterizations, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). As a new catalyst, the resulting Au/PDIL-GS exhibited excellent catalytic activity in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol because of the synergistic effect between the PDIL-GS and Au NPs. The facile and environment-friendly approach provides a green way to effectively synthesize low cost Au-based catalysts for 4-NP reduction and is promising for the development of other useful materials

  5. Isoelectric focusing of small non-covalent metal species from plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Jessica; Hayen, Heiko; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Weber, Günther

    2011-03-01

    IEF is known as a powerful electrophoretic separation technique for amphoteric molecules, in particular for proteins. The objective of the present work is to prove the suitability of IEF also for the separation of small, non-covalent metal species. Investigations are performed with copper-glutathione complexes, with the synthetic ligand ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(o-hydroxyphenyl)acetic acid (EDDHA) and respective metal complexes (Fe, Ga, Al, Ni, Zn), and with the phytosiderophore 2'-deoxymugineic acid (DMA) and its ferric complex. It is shown that ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(o-hydroxyphenyl)acetic acid and DMA species are stable during preparative scale IEF, whereas copper-glutathione dissociates considerably. It is also shown that preparative scale IEF can be applied successfully to isolate ferric DMA from real plant samples, and that multidimensional separations are possible by combining preparative scale IEF with subsequent HPLC-MS analysis. Focusing of free ligands and respective metal complexes with di- and trivalent metals results in different pIs, but CIEF is usually needed for a reliable estimation of pI values. Limitations of the proposed methods (preparative IEF and CIEF) and consequences of the results with respect to metal speciation in plants are discussed. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Inverting Steric Effects: Using "Attractive" Noncovalent Interactions To Direct Silver-Catalyzed Nitrene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minxue; Yang, Tzuhsiung; Paretsky, Jonathan D; Berry, John F; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2017-12-06

    Nitrene transfer (NT) reactions represent powerful and direct methods to convert C-H bonds into amine groups that are prevalent in many commodity chemicals and pharmaceuticals. The importance of the C-N bond has stimulated the development of numerous transition-metal complexes to effect chemo-, regio-, and diastereoselective NT. An ongoing challenge is to understand how subtle interactions between catalyst and substrate influence the site-selectivity of the C-H amination event. In this work, we explore the underlying reasons why Ag(tpa)OTf (tpa = tris(pyridylmethyl)amine) prefers to activate α-conjugated C-H bonds over 3° alkyl C(sp 3 )-H bonds and apply these insights to reaction optimization and catalyst design. Experimental results suggest possible roles of noncovalent interactions (NCIs) in directing the NT; computational studies support the involvement of π···π and Ag···π interactions between catalyst and substrate, primarily by lowering the energy of the directed transition state and reaction conformers. A simple Hess's law relationship can be employed to predict selectivities for new substrates containing competing NCIs. The insights presented herein are poised to inspire the design of other catalyst-controlled C-H functionalization reactions.

  7. Thermometric sensing of nitrofurantoin by noncovalently imprinted polymers containing two complementary functional monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athikomrattanakul, Umporn; Gajovic-Eichelmann, Nenad; Scheller, Frieder W

    2011-10-15

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for nitrofurantoin (NFT) recognition addressing in parallel of two complementary functional groups were created using a noncovalent imprinting approach. Specific tailor-made functional monomers were synthesized: a diaminopyridine derivative as the receptor for the imide residue and three (thio)urea derivatives for the interaction with the nitro group of NFT. A significantly improved binding of NFT to the new MIPs was revealed from the imprinting factor, efficiency of binding, affinity constants and maximum binding number as compared to previously reported MIPs, which addressed either the imide or the nitro residue. Substances possessing only one functionality (either the imide group or nitro group) showed significantly weaker binding to the new imprinted polymers than NFT. However, the compounds lacking both functionalities binds extremely weak to all imprinted polymers. The new imprinted polymers were applied in a flow-through thermistor in organic solvent for the first time. The MIP-thermistor allows the detection of NFT down to a concentration of 5 μM in acetonitrile + 0.2% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The imprinting factor of 3.91 at 0.1 mM of NFT as obtained by thermistor measurements is well comparable to the value obtained by batch binding experiments. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. Bioelectrochemistry of non-covalent immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase on oxidized diamond nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau, Eduardo; Méndez, Jessica; Fonseca, José J; Griebenow, Kai; Cabrera, Carlos R

    2012-06-01

    Diamond nanoparticles are considered a biocompatible material mainly due to their non-cytotoxicity and remarkable cellular uptake. Model proteins such as cytochrome c and lysozyme have been physically adsorbed onto diamond nanoparticles, proving it to be a suitable surface for high protein loading. Herein, we explore the non-covalent immobilization of the redox enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (E.C.1.1.1.1) onto oxidized diamond nanoparticles for bioelectrochemical applications. Diamond nanoparticles were first oxidized and physically characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR and TEM. Langmuir isotherms were constructed to investigate the ADH adsorption onto the diamond nanoparticles as a function of pH. It was found that a higher packing density is achieved at the isoelectric point of the enzyme. Moreover, the relative activity of the immobilized enzyme on diamond nanoparticles was addressed under optimum pH conditions able to retain up to 70% of its initial activity. Thereafter, an ethanol bioelectrochemical cell was constructed by employing the immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase onto diamond nanoparticles, this being able to provide a current increment of 72% when compared to the blank solution. The results of this investigation suggest that this technology may be useful for the construction of alcohol biosensors or biofuel cells in the near future. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Structure of eight molecular salts assembled from noncovalent bonding between carboxylic acids, imidazole, and benzimidazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shouwen; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Hui; Wen, Xianhong; Li, Minghui; Wang, Daqi

    2015-09-01

    Eight organic salts of imidazole/benzimidazole have been prepared with carboxylic acids as 2-methyl-2-phenoxypropanoic acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, 5-nitrosalicylic acid, isophthalic acid, 4-nitro-phthalic acid, and 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. The eight crystalline forms reported are proton-transfer compounds of which the crystals and compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. These structures adopted hetero supramolecular synthons, with the most common R22(7) motif observed at salts 2, 3, 5, 6 and 8. Analysis of the crystal packing of 1-8 suggests that there are extensive strong Nsbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) between acid and imidazolyl components in all of the salts. Except the classical hydrogen bonding interactions, the secondary propagating interactions also play important roles in structure extension. This variety, coupled with the varying geometries and number of acidic groups of the acids utilized, has led to the creation of eight supramolecular arrays with 1D-3D structure. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is analyzed. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the Nsbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds between acids and imidazole/benzimidazole are sufficient to bring about the formation of organic salts.

  10. A non-covalent peptide-based strategy for ex vivo and in vivo oligonucleotide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombez, Laurence; Morris, May C; Heitz, Frederic; Divita, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    The dramatic acceleration in identification of new nucleic acid-based therapeutic molecules such as short interfering RNA (siRNA) and peptide-nucleic acid (PNA) analogues has provided new perspectives for therapeutic targeting of specific genes responsible for pathological disorders. However, the poor cellular uptake of nucleic acids together with the low permeability of the cell membrane to negatively charged molecules remain major obstacles to their clinical development. Several non-viral strategies have been proposed to improve the delivery of synthetic short oligonucleotides both in cultured cells and in vivo. Cell-penetrating peptides constitute very promising tools for non-invasive cellular import of oligonucleotides and analogs. We recently described a non-covalent strategy based on short amphiphatic peptides (MPG8/PEP3) that have been successfully applied ex vivo and in vivo for the delivery of therapeutic siRNA and PNA molecules. PEP3 and MPG8 form stable nanoparticles with PNA analogues and siRNA, respectively, and promote their efficient cellular uptake, independently of the endosomal pathway, into a wide variety of cell lines, including primary and suspension lines, without any associated cytotoxicity. This chapter describes easy-to-handle protocols for the use of MPG-8 or PEP-3-nanoparticle technologies for PNA and siRNA delivery into adherent and suspension cell lines as well as in vivo into cancer mouse models.

  11. Non-covalent interactions of cadmium sulphide and gold nanoparticles with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atay, Z.; Biver, T.; Corti, A.; Eltugral, N.; Lorenzini, E.; Masini, M.; Paolicchi, A.; Pucci, A.; Ruggeri, G.; Secco, F.; Venturini, M.

    2010-08-01

    Mercaptoethanol-capped CdS nanoparticles (CdSnp) and monohydroxy-(1-mercaptoundec-11-yl)tetraethylene-glycol-capped Au nanoparticles (Aunp) were synthesised, characterised and their interactions with DNA were investigated. Aunp are stable in different aqueous solvents, whereas CdSnp do precipitate in 0.1 M NaCl and form two different cluster types in 0.1 M NaNO3. As regards the CdSnp/DNA interaction, absorbance and fluorescence titrations, ethidium bromide displacement assays and gel electrophoresis experiments indicate that a non-covalent interaction between DNA and the CdSnp external surface does take place. The binding constant was evaluated to be equal to (2.2 ± 0.5) × 105 M-1. On the contrary, concerning Aunp, no direct interaction with DNA could be observed. Possible interaction with serum albumin was also checked, but no effects could be observed for either CdSnp or Aunp. Finally, short-time exposure of cultured cells to nanoparticles revealed the ability of CdSnp to enter the cells and allocate both in cytosol and nucleus, thus promoting cell proliferation at low concentration ( p resulted in a significant inhibition of cell growth, accompanied by apoptotic cell death. Aunp neither enter the cells, nor do affect cell proliferation. In conclusion, our data indicate that CdSnp can strongly interact with living cells and nucleic acid while no effects or interactions were observed for Aunp.

  12. Non-covalent interactions of cadmium sulphide and gold nanoparticles with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atay, Z. [Bogazici University, Department of Chemistry (Turkey); Biver, T., E-mail: tarita@dcci.unipi.i [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale (Italy); Corti, A. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Patologia Sperimentale BMIE (Italy); Eltugral, N. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale (Italy); Lorenzini, E.; Masini, M.; Paolicchi, A. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Patologia Sperimentale BMIE (Italy); Pucci, A.; Ruggeri, G.; Secco, F.; Venturini, M. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    Mercaptoethanol-capped CdS nanoparticles (CdS{sub np}) and monohydroxy-(1-mercaptoundec-11-yl)tetraethylene-glycol-capped Au nanoparticles (Au{sub np}) were synthesised, characterised and their interactions with DNA were investigated. Au{sub np} are stable in different aqueous solvents, whereas CdS{sub np} do precipitate in 0.1 M NaCl and form two different cluster types in 0.1 M NaNO{sub 3}. As regards the CdS{sub np}/DNA interaction, absorbance and fluorescence titrations, ethidium bromide displacement assays and gel electrophoresis experiments indicate that a non-covalent interaction between DNA and the CdS{sub np} external surface does take place. The binding constant was evaluated to be equal to (2.2 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1}. On the contrary, concerning Au{sub np}, no direct interaction with DNA could be observed. Possible interaction with serum albumin was also checked, but no effects could be observed for either CdS{sub np} or Au{sub np}. Finally, short-time exposure of cultured cells to nanoparticles revealed the ability of CdS{sub np} to enter the cells and allocate both in cytosol and nucleus, thus promoting cell proliferation at low concentration (p < 0.005), while longer-time exposure resulted in a significant inhibition of cell growth, accompanied by apoptotic cell death. Au{sub np} neither enter the cells, nor do affect cell proliferation. In conclusion, our data indicate that CdS{sub np} can strongly interact with living cells and nucleic acid while no effects or interactions were observed for Au{sub np}.

  13. Functional materials based on carbon nanotubes: Carbon nanotube actuators and noncovalent carbon nanotube modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifield, Leonard S.

    Carbon nanotubes have attractive inherent properties that encourage the development of new functional materials and devices based on them. The use of single wall carbon nanotubes as electromechanical actuators takes advantage of the high mechanical strength, surface area and electrical conductivity intrinsic to these molecules. The work presented here investigates the mechanisms that have been discovered for actuation of carbon nanotube paper: electrostatic, quantum chemical charge injection, pneumatic and viscoelastic. A home-built apparatus for the measurement of actuation strain is developed and utilized in the investigation. An optical fiber switch, the first demonstrated macro-scale device based on the actuation of carbon nanotubes, is described and its performance evaluated. Also presented here is a new general process designed to modify the surface of carbon nanotubes in a non-covalent, non-destructive way. This method can be used to impart new functionalities to carbon nanotube samples for a variety of applications including sensing, solar energy conversion and chemical separation. The process described involves the achievement of large degrees of graphitic surface coverage with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons through the use of supercritical fluids. These molecules are bifunctional agents that anchor a desired chemical group to the aromatic surface of the carbon nanotubes without adversely disrupting the conjugated backbone that gives rise the attractive electronic and physical properties of the nanotubes. Both the nanotube functionalization work and the actuator work presented here emphasize how an understanding and control of nanoscale structure and phenomena can be of vital importance in achieving desired performance for active materials. Opportunities for new devices with improved function over current state-of-the-art can be envisioned and anticipated based on this understanding and control.

  14. Crystal structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis GlgE and complexes with non-covalent inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindenberger, Jared J.; Veleti, Sri Kumar; Wilson, Brittney N.; Sucheck, Steven J.; Ronning, Donald R. (Toledo)

    2015-08-06

    GlgE is a bacterial maltosyltransferase that catalyzes the elongation of a cytosolic, branched α-glucan. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb), inactivation of GlgE (Mtb GlgE) results in the rapid death of the organism due to a toxic accumulation of the maltosyl donor, maltose-1-phosphate (M1P), suggesting that GlgE is an intriguing target for inhibitor design. In this study, the crystal structures of the Mtb GlgE in a binary complex with maltose and a ternary complex with maltose and a maltosyl-acceptor molecule, maltohexaose, were solved to 3.3 Å and 4.0 Å, respectively. The maltohexaose structure reveals a dominant site for α-glucan binding. To obtain more detailed interactions between first generation, non-covalent inhibitors and GlgE, a variant Streptomyces coelicolor GlgEI (Sco GlgEI-V279S) was made to better emulate the Mtb GlgE M1P binding site. The structure of Sco GlgEI-V279S complexed with α-maltose-C-phosphonate (MCP), a non-hydrolyzable substrate analogue, was solved to 1.9 Å resolution, and the structure of Sco GlgEI-V279S complexed with 2,5-dideoxy-3-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-2,5-imino-D-mannitol (DDGIM), an oxocarbenium mimic, was solved to 2.5 Å resolution. These structures detail important interactions that contribute to the inhibitory activity of these compounds, and provide information on future designs that may be exploited to improve upon these first generation GlgE inhibitors.

  15. Strategies to balance covalent and non-covalent biomolecule attachment within collagen-GAG biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Jacquelyn C; Gonnerman, Emily A; Bailey, Ryan C; Harley, Brendan A C

    2014-09-01

    Strategies to integrate instructive biomolecular signals into a biomaterial are becoming increasingly complex and bioinspired. While a large majority of reports still use repeated treatments with soluble factors, this approach can be prohibitively costly and difficult to translate in vivo for applications where spatial control over signal presentation is necessary. Recent efforts have explored the use of covalent immobilization of biomolecules to the biomaterial, via both bulk (ubiquitous) as well as spatially-selective light-based crosslinking, as a means to both enhance stability and bioactivity. However, little is known about how processing conditions during immobilization impact the degree of unintended non-covalent interactions, or fouling, that takes place between the biomaterial and the biomolecule of interest. Here we demonstrate the impact of processing conditions for bulk carbodiimide (EDC) and photolithography-based benzophenone (BP) crosslinking on specific attachment vs. fouling of a model protein (Concanavalin A, ConA) within collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds. Collagen source significantly impacts the selectivity of biomolecule immobilization. EDC crosslinking intensity and ligand concentration significantly impacted selective immobilization. For benzophenone photoimmobilization we observed that increased UV exposure time leads to increased ConA immobilization. Immobilization efficiency for both EDC and BP strategies was maximal at physiological pH. Increasing ligand concentration during immobilization process led to enhanced immobilization for EDC chemistry, no impact on BP immobilization, but significant increases in non-specific fouling. Given recent efforts to covalently immobilize biomolecules to a biomaterial surface to enhance bioactivity, improved understanding of the impact of crosslinking conditions on selective attachment versus non-specific fouling will inform the design of instructive biomaterials for applications across tissue

  16. Noncovalently Functionalized Tungsten Disulfide Nanosheets for Enhanced Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Epoxy Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Megha; Narashimhan, Lakshmi; Prakash, Om; Raichur, Ashok M

    2017-04-26

    In the present study, noncovalently functionalized tungsten disulfide (WS 2 ) nanosheets were used as a toughening agent for epoxy nanocomposites. WS 2 was modified with branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) to increase the degree of interaction of nanosheets with the epoxy matrix and prevent restacking and agglomeration of the sheets in the epoxy matrix. The functionalization of WS 2 sheets was confirmed through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The exfoliation of the bulk WS 2 was confirmed through X-ray diffraction and various microscopic techniques. Epoxy nanocomposites containing up to 1 wt % of WS 2 -PEI nanosheets were fabricated. They showed a remarkable improvement in fracture toughness (K IC ). K IC increased from 0.94 to 1.72 MPa m -1/2 for WS 2 -PEI nanosheet loadings as low as 0.25 wt %. Compressive and flexural properties also showed a significant improvement as incorporation of 0.25 wt % of WS 2 -PEI nanosheets resulted in 43 and 65% increase in the compressive and flexural strengths of epoxy nanocomposites, respectively, compared with neat epoxy. Thermal stability and thermomechanical properties of the WS 2 -PEI-modified epoxy also showed a significant improvement. The simultaneous improvement in the mechanical and thermal properties could be attributed to the good dispersion of WS 2 -PEI nanosheets in the matrix, intrinsic high strength and thermal properties of the nanosheets, and improved interaction of the WS 2 nanosheets with the epoxy matrix owing to the presence of PEI molecules on the surface of the WS 2 nanosheets.

  17. An Effective Approach towards the Immobilization of PtSn Nanoparticles on Noncovalent Modified Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Ethanol Electrooxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Geng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe an effective method to tether Pt and PtSn nanoparticles (NPs on polyelectrolyte modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs for ethanol electrooxidation. By using a polymer wrapping technique, positively charged polyethyleneimine (PEI was attached onto carbon nanotubes (CNTs to provide preferential linking sites for metal precursors. Well-dispersed Pt and PtSn nanocrystals (2–5 nm were subsequently decorated on PEI-functionalized MWCNTs through the polyol reduction method. The successful non-covalent modification of MWCNTs was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and Zeta potential measurements. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectrum indicates approximately 20 wt % Pt loading and a desirable Pt:Sn atomic ratio of 1:1. Electrochemical analysis demonstrated that the as-synthesized PtSn/PEI-MWCNTs nanocomposite exhibited improved catalytic activity and higher poison tolerance for ethanol oxidation as compared to Pt/PEI-MWCNTs and commercial Pt/XC-72 catalysts. The enhanced electrochemical performance may be attributed to the uniform dispersion of NPs as well as the mitigating of CO self-poisoning effect by the alloying of Sn element. This modification and synthetic strategy will be studied further to develop a diversity of carbon supported Pt-based hybrid nanomaterials for electrocatalysis.

  18. Inter- and intramolecular non-covalent interactions in 1-methylimidazole-2-carbaldehyde complexes of copper, silver, and gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Laura; Jääskeläinen, Sirpa; Hirva, Pipsa; Haukka, Matti

    2014-09-01

    Three new imidazole compounds, [CuBr2(mimc)2] (1), [Ag(mimc)2][CF3SO3] (2), and [AuCl3(mimc)] (3) (mimc = 1-methylimidazole-2-carbaldehyde), have been synthesized, structurally characterized, and further analyzed using the QTAIM analysis. The compounds exhibit self-assembled 3D networks arising from intermolecular non-covalent interactions such as metallophilic interactions, metal-π contacts, halogens-halogen interactions, and hydrogen bonds. These weak interactions have a strong impact on the coordination sphere of the metal atoms and on the packing of compounds 1, 2, and 3.

  19. Materials Design via Optimized Intramolecular Noncovalent Interactions for High-Performance Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xiaojie; Liao, Qiaogan; Manley, Eric F.; Wu, Zishan; Wang, Yulun; Wang, Weida; Yang, Tingbin; Shin, Young-Eun; Cheng, Xing; Liang, Yongye; Chen, Lin X.; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Marks, Tobin J.; Guo, Xugang

    2016-03-15

    We report the design, synthesis, and implemention in semiconducting polymers of a novel head-to-head linkage containing the TRTOR (3-alkyl-3'-alkoxy-2,2'-bithiophene) donor subunit having a single strategically optimized, planarizing noncovalent S···O interaction. Diverse complementary thermal, optical, electrochemical, X-ray scattering, electrical, photovoltaic, and electron microscopic characterization techniques are applied to establish structure-property correlations in a TRTOR-based polymer series. In comparison to monomers having double S···O interactions, replacing one alkoxy substituent with a less electron-donating alkyl one yields TRTOR-based polymers with significantly depressed (0.2-0.3 eV) HOMOs. Furthermore, the weaker single S···O interaction and greater TRTOR steric encumberance enhances materials processability without sacrificing backbone planarity. From another perspective, TRTOR has comparable electronic properties to ring-fused 5Hdithieno[ 3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyran (DTP) subunits, but a centrosymmetric geometry which promotes a more compact and ordered structure than bulkier, axisymmetric DTP. Compared to monosubstituted TTOR (3-alkoxy-2,2'-bithiophene), alkylation at the TRTOR bithiophene 3-position enhances conjugation and polymer crystallinity with contracted π-π stacking. Grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) data reveal that the greater steric hindrance and the weaker single S···O interaction are not detrimental to close packing and high crystallinity. As a proof of materials design, copolymerizing TRTOR with phthalimides yields copolymers with promising thin-film transistor mobility as high as 0.42 cm2/(V·s) and 6.3% power conversion efficiency in polymer solar cells, the highest of any phthalimide copolymers reported to date. The depressed TRTOR HOMOs imbue these polymers with substantially increased Ion/Ioff ratios and Voc’s versus analogous subunits with multiple electron donating

  20. Materials Design via Optimized Intramolecular Noncovalent Interactions for High-Performance Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xiaojie [Shenzhen Key Laboratory; Liao, Qiaogan [Shenzhen Key Laboratory; Manley, Eric F. [Department; Chemical; Wu, Zishan [Shenzhen Key Laboratory; Wang, Yulun [Shenzhen Key Laboratory; Wang, Weida [Shenzhen Key Laboratory; Yang, Tingbin [Shenzhen Key Laboratory; Shin, Young-Eun [Department; Cheng, Xing [Shenzhen Key Laboratory; Liang, Yongye [Shenzhen Key Laboratory; Chen, Lin X. [Department; Chemical; Baeg, Kang-Jun [Department; Marks, Tobin J. [Department; Guo, Xugang [Shenzhen Key Laboratory

    2016-03-15

    We report the design, synthesis, and implemention in semiconducting polymers of a novel head-to-head linkage containing the TRTOR (3-alkyl-3'-alkoxy-2,2'-bithiophene) donor subunit having a single strategically optimized, planarizing noncovalent S···O interaction. Diverse complementary thermal, optical, electrochemical, X-ray scattering, electrical, photovoltaic, and electron microscopic characterization techniques are applied to establish structure–property correlations in a TRTOR-based polymer series. In comparison to monomers having double S···O interactions, replacing one alkoxy substituent with a less electron-donating alkyl one yields TRTOR-based polymers with significantly depressed (0.2–0.3 eV) HOMOs. Furthermore, the weaker single S···O interaction and greater TRTOR steric encumberance enhances materials processability without sacrificing backbone planarity. From another perspective, TRTOR has comparable electronic properties to ring-fused 5H-dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyran (DTP) subunits, but a centrosymmetric geometry which promotes a more compact and ordered structure than bulkier, axisymmetric DTP. Compared to monosubstituted TTOR (3-alkoxy-2,2'-bithiophene), alkylation at the TRTOR bithiophene 3-position enhances conjugation and polymer crystallinity with contracted π–π stacking. Grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) data reveal that the greater steric hindrance and the weaker single S···O interaction are not detrimental to close packing and high crystallinity. As a proof of materials design, copolymerizing TRTOR with phthalimides yields copolymers with promising thin-film transistor mobility as high as 0.42 cm2/(V·s) and 6.3% power conversion efficiency in polymer solar cells, the highest of any phthalimide copolymers reported to date. The depressed TRTOR HOMOs imbue these polymers with substantially increased Ion/Ioff ratios and Voc’s versus analogous subunits with multiple electron

  1. Preparation and characterization of malonic acid cross-linked chitosan and collagen 3D scaffolds: an approach on non-covalent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Tapas; Sailakshmi, G; Gnanamani, A; Mandal, A B

    2012-05-01

    The present study emphasizes the influence of non-covalent interactions on the mechanical and thermal properties of the scaffolds of chitosan/collagen origin. Malonic acid (MA), a bifuncitonal diacid was chosen to offer non-covalent cross-linking. Three dimensional scaffolds was prepared using chitosan at 1.0% (w/v) and MA at 0.2% (w/v), similarly collagen 0.5% (w/v) and MA 0.2% (w/v) and characterized. Results on FT-IR, TGA, DSC, SEM and mechanical properties (tensile strength, stiffness, Young's modulus, etc.) assessment demonstrated the existence of non-covalent interaction between MA and chitosan/collagen, which offered flexibility and high strength to the scaffolds suitable for tissue engineering research. Studies using NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells suggested biocompatibility nature of the scaffolds. Docking simulation study further supports the intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions between MA and chitosan/collagen.

  2. Relationships between Cargo, Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cell Type for Uptake of Non-Covalent Complexes into Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea-Anneliese Keller

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Modulating signaling pathways for research and therapy requires either suppression or expression of selected genes or internalization of proteins such as enzymes, antibodies, nucleotide binding proteins or substrates including nucleoside phosphates and enzyme inhibitors. Peptides, proteins and nucleotides are transported by fusing or conjugating them to cell penetrating peptides or by formation of non-covalent complexes. The latter is often preferred because of easy handling, uptake efficiency and auto-release of cargo into the live cell. In our studies complexes are formed with labeled or readily detectable cargoes for qualitative and quantitative estimation of their internalization. Properties and behavior of adhesion and suspension vertebrate cells as well as the protozoa Leishmania tarentolae are investigated with respect to proteolytic activity, uptake efficiency, intracellular localization and cytotoxicity. Our results show that peptide stability to membrane-bound, secreted or intracellular proteases varies between different CPPs and that the suitability of individual CPPs for a particular cargo in complex formation by non-covalent interactions requires detailed studies. Cells vary in their sensitivity to increasing concentrations of CPPs. Thus, most cells can be efficiently transduced with peptides, proteins and nucleotides with intracellular concentrations in the low micromole range. For each cargo, cell type and CPP the optimal conditions must be determined separately.

  3. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Scaled MP3 non-covalent interaction energies agree closely with accurate CCSD(T) benchmark data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitonák, Michal; Neogrády, Pavel; Cerný, Jirí; Grimme, Stefan; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-01-12

    Scaled MP3 interaction energies calculated as a sum of MP2/CBS (complete basis set limit) interaction energies and scaled third-order energy contributions obtained in small or medium size basis sets agree very closely with the estimated CCSD(T)/CBS interaction energies for the 22 H-bonded, dispersion-controlled and mixed non-covalent complexes from the S22 data set. Performance of this so-called MP2.5 (third-order scaling factor of 0.5) method has also been tested for 33 nucleic acid base pairs and two stacked conformers of porphine dimer. In all the test cases, performance of the MP2.5 method was shown to be superior to the scaled spin-component MP2 based methods, e.g. SCS-MP2, SCSN-MP2 and SCS(MI)-MP2. In particular, a very balanced treatment of hydrogen-bonded compared to stacked complexes is achieved with MP2.5. The main advantage of the approach is that it employs only a single empirical parameter and is thus biased by two rigorously defined, asymptotically correct ab-initio methods, MP2 and MP3. The method is proposed as an accurate but computationally feasible alternative to CCSD(T) for the computation of the properties of various kinds of non-covalently bound systems.

  5. Tuning the electronic structure and transport properties of graphene by noncovalent functionalization: effects of organic donor, acceptor and metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yonghui; Zhou Kaige; Xie Kefeng; Zeng Jing; Zhang Haoli; Peng Yong

    2010-01-01

    Using density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism, we have theoretically investigated the binding of organic donor, acceptor and metal atoms on graphene sheets, and revealed the effects of the different noncovalent functionalizations on the electronic structure and transport properties of graphene. The adsorptions of 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) induce hybridization between the molecular levels and the graphene valence bands, and transform the zero-gap semiconducting graphene into a metallic graphene. However, the current versus voltage (I-V) simulation indicates that the noncovalent modifications by organic molecules are not sufficient to significantly alter the transport property of the graphene for sensing applications. We found that the molecule/graphene interaction could be dramatically enhanced by introducing metal atoms to construct molecule/metal/graphene sandwich structures. A chemical sensor based on iron modified graphene shows a sensitivity two orders of magnitude higher than that of pristine graphene. The results of this work could help to design novel graphene-based sensing or switching devices.

  6. Eight supramolecular assemblies constructed from bis(benzimidazole) and organic acids through strong classical hydrogen bonding and weak noncovalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shouwen; Wang, Daqi

    2014-05-01

    Eight crystalline organic acid-base adducts derived from alkane bridged bis(N-benzimidazole) and organic acids (2,4,6-trinitrophenol, p-nitrobenzoic acid, m-nitrobenzoic acid, 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 5-sulfosalicylic acid and oxalic acid) were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. Of the eight compounds five are organic salts (1, 4, 6, 7 and 8) and the other three (2, 3, and 5) are cocrystals. In all of the adducts except 1 and 8, the ratio of the acid and the base is 2:1. All eight supramolecular assemblies involve extensive intermolecular classical hydrogen bonds as well as other noncovalent interactions. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. These weak interactions combined, all the complexes displayed 3D framework structure. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the classical N+-H⋯O-, O-H⋯O, and O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds (ionic or neutral) and other nonbonding associations between acids and ditopic benzimidazoles are sufficient to bring about the formation of cocrystals or organic salts.

  7. Electromagnetic interference shielding and thermal properties of non-covalently functionalized reduced graphene oxide/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Chhetri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO was non-covalently functionalized using sulfanilic acid azocromotrop (SAC followed by hydrazine reduction to achieve SAC functionalized reduced GO (SAC-rGO. Fourier transform infrared spectra analysis and electrical conductivity measurements confirmed the successful functionlization and reduction of GO. The electrical conductivity of ~515 S•m−1 for SAC-rGO was recorded. The non-covalently functionalized reduced GO was subsequently dispersed in epoxy matrix at the loading level of 0.3 to 0.5 wt% to investigate its electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding properties. The morphological and structural characterization of the SAC-rGO/epoxy composites was carried out using X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy analysis, which revealed the good dispersion of SAC-rGO in the epoxy. The SAC-rGO/epoxy composites showed the EMI shielding of −22.6 dB at the loading of 0.5 wt% SAC-rGO. Dynamical mechanical properties of the composites were studied to establish the reinforcing competency of the SAC-rGO. The storage modulus of the composites was found to increase within the studied temperature. Thermal stability of pure epoxy and its composites were compared by selecting the temperatures at 10 and 50% weight loss, respectively.

  8. Two supramolecular complexes based on polyoxometalates and Co-EDTA units via covalent connection or non-covalent interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Chunlin; Xiao, Hanxi [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Organic Chemistry and Functional Molecule for Ministry of Education, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Cai, Qing [Chemistry Department, City University of New York, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Tang, Jianting; Cai, Tiejun [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Organic Chemistry and Functional Molecule for Ministry of Education, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Deng, Qian, E-mail: dengqian10502@163.com [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Organic Chemistry and Functional Molecule for Ministry of Education, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Two new 3D network organic-inorganic hybrid supramolecular complexes ([Na{sub 6}(CoEDTA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 13}]·(H{sub 2}SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40})·xH{sub 2}O)n (1) and [CoH{sub 4}EDTA(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}(SiW{sub 12}O{sub 40})·15H{sub 2}O (2) (H{sub 4}EDTA=Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid) have been successfully synthesized by solution method, and characterized by infrared spectrum (IR), thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and single{sup −}crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). Both of the complexes are the supramolecules, but with different liking mode, they are two representative models of supramolecule. complex (1) is a 3D infinite network supramolecular coordination polymer with a rare multi-metal sturcture of sodium-cobalt-containing, which is mainly linked through coordinate-covalent bonds. While complex (2) is normal supramolecule, which linked by non-covalent interactions, such as H-bonding interaction, electrostatic interaction and van der waals force. Both of complex (1) and (2) exhibit good catalytic activities for catalytic oxidation of methanol, when the initial concentration of methanol is 3.0 g m{sup −3}, flow rate is 10 mL min{sup −1}, and the quality of catalyst is 0.2 g, for complex (1) and complex (2) the maximum elimination rates of methanol are 85% (150 °C) and 92% (120 °C), respectively. - Graphical abstract: Two new organic-inorganic hybrid supramolecular complexes based on Co-EDTA, and Keggin polyanions have been successfully synthesized with different pH value by solution method. They are attributed to two representative models of supramolecule. Complex(1) is an infinite coordination polymer with a rare multi-metal sturcture of sodium-cobalt-containing, which is mainly linked through covalent bonds. Complex (2) is a normal supramolecule, which linked by non-covalent interactions of H-bonding interaction, electrostatic interaction and van der waals force. - Highlights: • Two supramolecules

  9. Effects of non-covalent interactions with 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (chlorogenic acid) on the heat denaturation and solubility of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prigent, S.V.E.; Gruppen, H.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Koningsveld, G.A. van; Jong, G.A.H. de; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    The non-covalent interactions between the monomeric phenolic compound chlorogenic acid (5-CQA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme, and α-lactalbumin were characterized, and their effect on protein properties was examined. 5-CQA had a low affinity for all three proteins, and these interactions

  10. Temperature Scanning Stress Relaxation of an Autonomous Self-Healing Elastomer Containing Non-Covalent Reversible Network Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Das

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report about the mechanical relaxation characteristics of an intrinsically self-healable imidazole modified commercial rubber. This kind of self-healing rubber was prepared by melt mixing of 1-butyl imidazole with bromo-butyl rubber (bromine modified isoprene-isobutylene copolymer, BIIR. By this melt mixing process, the reactive allylic bromine of bromo-butyl rubber was converted into imidazole bromide salt. The resulting development of an ionic character to the polymer backbone leads to an ionic association of the groups which ultimately results to the formation of a network structure of the rubber chains. The modified BIIR thus behaves like a robust crosslinked rubber and shows unusual self-healing properties. The non-covalent reversible network has been studied in detail with respect to stress relaxation experiments, scanning electron microscopic and X-ray scattering.

  11. Thermal solid-state Z/E isomerization of 2-alkylidene-4-oxothiazolidines: effects of non-covalent interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZDRAVKO DŽAMBASKI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Configurational isomerization of stereo-defined 5-substituted and unsubstituted 2-alkylidene-4-oxothiazolidines (1 in the solid state, giving the Z/E mixtures in various ratios, was investigated by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, X-ray powder crystallography and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The Z/E composition can be rationalized in terms of non-covalent interactions, involving intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonding and directional non-bonded 1,5-type S×××O interactions. X-Ray powder crystallography, using selected crystalline (Z-4-oxothiazolidine substrates, revealed transformation to the amorphous state during the irreversible Z®E process. A correlation between previous results on the Z/E isomerization in solution and now in the solid state was established.

  12. Effect of density variation and non-covalent functionalization on the compressive behavior of carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, A [Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, 560012 (India); Raney, J R; Craig, A E; Daraio, C, E-mail: daraio@caltech.edu [Engineering and Applied Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-10-21

    Arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been proposed for different applications, including electrochemical energy storage and shock-absorbing materials. Understanding their mechanical response, in relation to their structural characteristics, is important for tailoring the synthesis method to the different operational conditions of the material. In this paper, we grow vertically aligned CNT arrays using a thermal chemical vapor deposition system, and we study the effects of precursor flow on the structural and mechanical properties of the CNT arrays. We show that the CNT growth process is inhomogeneous along the direction of the precursor flow, resulting in varying bulk density at different points on the growth substrate. We also study the effects of non-covalent functionalization of the CNTs after growth, using surfactant and nanoparticles, to vary the effective bulk density and structural arrangement of the arrays. We find that the stiffness and peak stress of the materials increase approximately linearly with increasing bulk density.

  13. Specific Noncovalent Association of Chiral Large-Ring Hexaimines: Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry and PM7 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troć, Anna; Gajewy, Jadwiga; Danikiewicz, Witold; Kwit, Marcin

    2016-09-05

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry and PM7 semiempirical calculations are effective complementary methods to study gas phase formation of noncovalent complexes from vaselike macrocycles. The specific association of large-ring chiral hexaimines, derived from enantiomerically pure trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane and various isophthaldehydes, is driven mostly by CH-π and π-π stacking interactions. The isotrianglimine macrocycles are prone to form two types of aggregates: tail-to-tail and head-to-head (capsule) dimers. The stability of the tail-to-tail dimers is affected by the size and electronic properties of the substituents at the C-5 position of the aromatic ring. Electron-withdrawing groups stabilize the aggregate, whereas bulky or electron-donating groups destabilize the complexes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Lithium Enolates in the Enantioselective Construction of Tetrasubstituted Carbon Centers with Chiral Lithium Amides as Noncovalent Stereodirecting Auxiliaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Lu, Ping; Jackson, Jeffrey J; Nguyen, Thuy-Ai D; Alvarado, Joseph; Stivala, Craig E; Ma, Yun; Mack, Kyle A; Hayton, Trevor W; Collum, David B; Zakarian, Armen

    2017-01-11

    Lithium enolates derived from carboxylic acids are ubiquitous intermediates in organic synthesis. Asymmetric transformations with these intermediates, a central goal of organic synthesis, are typically carried out with covalently attached chiral auxiliaries. An alternative approach is to utilize chiral reagents that form discrete, well-defined aggregates with lithium enolates, providing a chiral environment conducive of asymmetric bond formation. These reagents effectively act as noncovalent, or traceless, chiral auxiliaries. Lithium amides are an obvious choice for such reagents as they are known to form mixed aggregates with lithium enolates. We demonstrate here that mixed aggregates can effect highly enantioselective transformations of lithium enolates in several classes of reactions, most notably in transformations forming tetrasubstituted and quaternary carbon centers. Easy recovery of the chiral reagent by aqueous extraction is another practical advantage of this one-step protocol. Crystallographic, spectroscopic, and computational studies of the central reactive aggregate, which provide insight into the origins of selectivity, are also reported.

  15. MP2.5 and MP2.X: Approaching CCSD(T) Quality Description of Noncovalent Interaction at the Cost of a Single CCSD Iteration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlák, Robert; Riley, K. E.; Řezáč, Jan; Pitoňák, M.; Hobza, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2013), s. 698-707 ISSN 1439-4235 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:European Social Fund(XE) CZ1.05/2.1.00/03/0058 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : benchmark dataset * complete basis set limit * correlation energy * MOllerPlesset perturbation theory * noncovalent interactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.360, year: 2013

  16. The aug-cc-pVnZ-F12 basis set family: Correlation consistent basis sets for explicitly correlated benchmark calculations on anions and noncovalent complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvetsky, Nitai; Kesharwani, Manoj K; Martin, Jan M L

    2017-10-07

    We have developed a new basis set family, denoted as aug-cc-pVnZ-F12 (or aVnZ-F12 for short), for explicitly correlated calculations. The sets included in this family were constructed by supplementing the corresponding cc-pVnZ-F12 sets with additional diffuse functions on the higher angular momenta (i.e., additional d-h functions on non-hydrogen atoms and p-g on hydrogen atoms), optimized for the MP2-F12 energy of the relevant atomic anions. The new basis sets have been benchmarked against electron affinities of the first- and second-row atoms, the W4-17 dataset of total atomization energies, the S66 dataset of noncovalent interactions, the Benchmark Energy and Geometry Data Base water cluster subset, and the WATER23 subset of the GMTKN24 and GMTKN30 benchmark suites. The aVnZ-F12 basis sets displayed excellent performance, not just for electron affinities but also for noncovalent interaction energies of neutral and anionic species. Appropriate CABSs (complementary auxiliary basis sets) were explored for the S66 noncovalent interaction benchmark: between similar-sized basis sets, CABSs were found to be more transferable than generally assumed.

  17. Non-covalent interactions of the carcinogen (+)-anti-BPDE with exon 1 of the human K-ras proto-oncogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jorge H.; Deligkaris, Christos

    2013-03-01

    Investigating the complementary, but different, effects of physical (non-covalent) and chemical (covalent) mutagen-DNA and carcinogen-DNA interactions is important for understanding possible mechanisms of development and prevention of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. A highly mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[ α]pyrene, namely (+)-anti-BPDE, is known to undergo both physical and chemical complexation with DNA. The major covalent adduct, a promutagenic, is known to be an external (+)-trans-anti-BPDE-N2-dGuanosine configuration whose origins are not fully understood. Thus, it is desirable to study the mechanisms of external non-covalent BPDE-DNA binding and their possible relationships to external covalent trans adduct formation. We present a detailed codon-by-codon computational study of the non-covalent interactions of (+)-anti-BPDE with DNA which explains and correctly predicts preferential (+)-anti-BPDE binding at minor groove guanosines. Due to its relevance to carcinogenesis, the interaction of (+)-anti-BPDE with exon 1 of the human K-ras gene has been studied in detail. Present address: Department of Physics, Drury University

  18. Capillaries modified by noncovalent anionic polymer adsorption for capillary zone electrophoresis, micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography and capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendahl, L; Hansen, S H; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2001-01-01

    A simple coating procedure for generation of a high and pH-independent electroosmotic flow in capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MEKC) is described. The bilayer coating was formed by noncovalent adsorption of the ionic polymers Polybrene...... capillaries was (4.9+/-0.1) x 10(-4) cm2V(-1)s(-1) in a pH-range of 2-10 (ionic strength = 30 mM). When alkaline compounds were used as test substances intracapillary and intercapillary migration time variations (n = 6) were less than 1% relative standard deviation (RSD) and 2% RSD, respectively in the entire...... pH range. The coating was fairly stable in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate, and this made it possible to perform fast MEKC separations at low pH. When neutral compounds were used as test substances, the intracapillary migration time variations (n = 6) were less than 2% RSD in a pH range of 2...

  19. Noncovalent Pi-Pi Stacking at the Carbon-Electrolyte Interface: Controlling the Voltage Window of Electrochemical Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengya; Westover, Andrew S; Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Muralidharan, Nitin; Boire, Timothy C; Sung, Hak-Joon; Pint, Cary L

    2016-08-03

    A key parameter in the operation of an electrochemical double-layer capacitor is the voltage window, which dictates the device energy density and power density. Here we demonstrate experimental evidence that π-π stacking at a carbon-ionic liquid interface can modify the operation voltage of a supercapacitor device by up to 30%, and this can be recovered by steric hindrance at the electrode-electrolyte interface introduced by poly(ethylene oxide) polymer electrolyte additives. This observation is supported by Raman spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry that each independently elucidates the signature of π-π stacking between imidazole groups in the ionic liquid and the carbon surface and the role this plays to lower the energy barrier for charge transfer at the electrode-electrolyte interface. This effect is further observed universally across two separate ionic liquid electrolyte systems and is validated by control experiments showing an invariant electrochemical window in the absence of a carbon-ionic liquid electrode-electrolyte interface. As interfacial or noncovalent interactions are usually neglected in the mechanistic picture of double-layer capacitors, this work highlights the importance of understanding chemical properties at supercapacitor interfaces to engineer voltage and energy capability.

  20. Sacrificial spacer and non-covalent routes toward the molecular imprinting of 'poorly-functionalized' N-heterocycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, N.; Alexander, C.; Davies, S.; Whitcombe, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    A comparison of three different methods for the imprinting of small aromatic heterocycles containing only a single nitrogen atom, for the preparation of specific analytical phases, was carried out. A conventional non-covalent approach to the imprinting of pyridine using methacrylic acid as the functional monomer was compared with two sacrificial spacer methods, in which heterocycles were imprinted as covalent template analogues. The results of binding experiments showed that discrimination based on ligand size was possible when polymers were prepared using a silyl ester-based template. The most selective polymer was able to bind pyridine in preference to quinoline or acridine which is opposite to the trend predicted by the pK HB values for the three ligands. Curve fitting of the isotherm for pyridine binding to this polymer to the Langmuir model gave an approximate K d of 1.1±0.1 mM and a binding site concentration of 57±2 mmol g -1 . Acridine binding did not show saturation behaviour and was non-specific and cooperative in nature

  1. Artificial nacre-like papers based on noncovalent functionalized boron nitride nanosheets with excellent mechanical and thermally conductive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaoliang; Ye, Lei; Yu, Shuhui; Li, Hao; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2015-04-21

    Inspired by the nano/microscale hierarchical structure and the precise inorganic/organic interface of natural nacre, we fabricated artificial nacre-like papers based on noncovalent functionalized boron nitride nanosheets (NF-BNNSs) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) via a vacuum-assisted self-assembly technique. The artificial nacre-like papers exhibit excellent tensile strength (125.2 MPa), on a par with that of the natural nacre, and moreover display a 30% higher toughness (2.37 MJ m(-3)) than that of the natural nacre. These excellent mechanical properties result from an ordered 'brick-and-mortar' arrangement of NF-BNNSs and PVA, in which the long-chain PVA molecules act as the bridge to link NF-BNNSs via hydrogen bonds. The resulting papers also render high thermal conductivity (6.9 W m(-1) K(-1)), and reveal their superiority as flexible substrates to support light-emitting-diode chips. The combined mechanical and thermal properties make the materials highly desirable as flexible substrates for next-generation commercial portable electronics.

  2. Non-covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes: Controlling Chirality Selectivity via Alkyl Groups of Conjugated Co-Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight, Braden; Gifford, Brendan; Kilina, Svetlana

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) play an important role in nanotechnology, including electronics, chemical sensors, and solar cells. Their electronic and optical properties depend on the size and geometry (chirality) of the nanotube. However, one main concern regarding nanotube application in optoelectronic devices is the difficulty of separating them based upon chirality after synthesis, as all known synthesis methods produce more than one chirality simultaneously. To get around this, one method is the functionalization of the CNTs via non-covalent bonding of co-polymers by wrapping them around the tube. We use force field simulations to explore the effects of various structural manipulations to the co-polymer 9,9-dialkylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl bipyridine (PFO-BPY) to find the preferential mechanisms of selective interactions between the PFO-BPY and CNTs of various chiralities. In particular, we focus on the effect of the branching in alkyl side-groups of PFO-BPY on their binding to the CNT surface. We have observed correlations between the side-group structures and their wrapping morphology on the CNT-Polymer interactions. Our calculations demonstrate that the branching in the position closest to the conjugated backboned results in the strongest interaction with all CNT. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation (CHE 1413614) and the Center for Computationally-Assisted Science and Technology at NDSU.

  3. Sacrificial spacer and non-covalent routes toward the molecular imprinting of 'poorly-functionalized' N-heterocycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirsch, N.; Alexander, C.; Davies, S.; Whitcombe, M.J

    2004-02-16

    A comparison of three different methods for the imprinting of small aromatic heterocycles containing only a single nitrogen atom, for the preparation of specific analytical phases, was carried out. A conventional non-covalent approach to the imprinting of pyridine using methacrylic acid as the functional monomer was compared with two sacrificial spacer methods, in which heterocycles were imprinted as covalent template analogues. The results of binding experiments showed that discrimination based on ligand size was possible when polymers were prepared using a silyl ester-based template. The most selective polymer was able to bind pyridine in preference to quinoline or acridine which is opposite to the trend predicted by the pK{sub HB} values for the three ligands. Curve fitting of the isotherm for pyridine binding to this polymer to the Langmuir model gave an approximate K{sub d} of 1.1{+-}0.1 mM and a binding site concentration of 57{+-}2 mmol g{sup -1}. Acridine binding did not show saturation behaviour and was non-specific and cooperative in nature.

  4. A smart pH responsive graphene/polyacrylamide complex via noncovalent interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Lulu; Liu Tianxi; Guo Juan; Guo Shuzhong; Wang Xiaoyan; Wang Weizhi

    2010-01-01

    We report that the graphene sheets can be stably dispersed in water by hydrophobic interaction with polyacrylamide. Most interestingly, the resultant graphene-polyacrylamide complexes show a reversible pH responsive property although polyacrylamide itself does not possess such characteristics. This method opens up novel opportunities for the potential applications of graphene in intelligent sensors, biology, medicine, nanoelectronics and other relevant areas.

  5. Complete Basis Set Extrapolation and Hybrid Schemes for Geometry Gradients of Noncovalent Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Jiří; Pitoňák, M.; Riley, Kevin Eugene; Hobza, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 12 (2011), s. 3924-3934 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : potential-energy surface * benzene dimer * stacking * convergence Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.215, year: 2011

  6. Electrostatics Explains the Position-Dependent Effect of G⋅U Wobble Base Pairs on the Affinity of RNA Kissing Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Ghanem, Josephine; Rabin, Clémence; Porrini, Massimiliano; Dausse, Eric; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques; Gabelica, Valérie

    2017-10-06

    In the RNA realm, non-Watson-Crick base pairs are abundant and can affect both the RNA 3D structure and its function. Here, we investigated the formation of RNA kissing complexes in which the loop-loop interaction is modulated by non-Watson-Crick pairs. Mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and UV-melting experiments show that the G⋅U wobble base pair favors kissing complex formation only when placed at specific positions. We tried to rationalize this effect by molecular modeling, including molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MMPBSA) thermodynamics calculations and PBSA calculations of the electrostatic potential surfaces. Modeling reveals that the G⋅U stabilization is due to a specific electrostatic environment defined by the base pairs of the entire loop-loop region. The loop is not symmetric, and therefore the identity and position of each base pair matters. Predicting and visualizing the electrostatic environment created by a given sequence can help to design specific kissing complexes with high affinity, for potential therapeutic, nanotechnology or analytical applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Position-Dependent Cardiovascular Response and Time-Motion Analysis During Training Drills and Friendly Matches in Elite Male Basketball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Ronda, Lorena; Ric, Angel; Llabres-Torres, Ivan; de Las Heras, Bernat; Schelling I Del Alcazar, Xavi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure differences in the cardiovascular workload (heart rate [HR]) and time-motion demands between positional groups, during numerous basketball training drills, and compare the results with in-game competition demands. A convenience sample of 14 top-level professional basketball players from the same club (Spanish First Division, ACB) participated in the study. A total of 146 basketball exercises per player (performed over an 8-week period in 32 team training sessions throughout the competitive season) and 7 friendly matches (FM) played during the preparatory phase were analyzed. The results reveal that HRavg and HRpeak were the highest in FM (158 ± 10; 198 ± 9 b · min(-1), respectively). Time-motion analysis showed 1v1 to be the most demanding drill (53 ± 8 and 46 ± 12 movements per minute for full and half court, respectively). During FM, players performed 33 ± 7 movements per minute. Positional differences exist for both HR and time-motion demands, ranging from moderate to very large for all basketball drills compared with FM. Constraints such as number of players, court size, work-to-rest ratios, and coach intervention are key factors influencing cardiovascular responses and time-motion demands during basketball training sessions. These results demonstrate that systematic monitoring of the physical demands and physiological responses during training and competition can inform and potentially improve coaching strategy, basketball-specific training drills, and ultimately, match performance.

  8. Artificial nacre-like papers based on noncovalent functionalized boron nitride nanosheets with excellent mechanical and thermally conductive properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaoliang; Ye, Lei; Yu, Shuhui; Li, Hao; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by the nano/microscale hierarchical structure and the precise inorganic/organic interface of natural nacre, we fabricated artificial nacre-like papers based on noncovalent functionalized boron nitride nanosheets (NF-BNNSs) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) via a vacuum-assisted self-assembly technique. The artificial nacre-like papers exhibit excellent tensile strength (125.2 MPa), on a par with that of the natural nacre, and moreover display a 30% higher toughness (2.37 MJ m-3) than that of the natural nacre. These excellent mechanical properties result from an ordered `brick-and-mortar' arrangement of NF-BNNSs and PVA, in which the long-chain PVA molecules act as the bridge to link NF-BNNSs via hydrogen bonds. The resulting papers also render high thermal conductivity (6.9 W m-1 K-1), and reveal their superiority as flexible substrates to support light-emitting-diode chips. The combined mechanical and thermal properties make the materials highly desirable as flexible substrates for next-generation commercial portable electronics.Inspired by the nano/microscale hierarchical structure and the precise inorganic/organic interface of natural nacre, we fabricated artificial nacre-like papers based on noncovalent functionalized boron nitride nanosheets (NF-BNNSs) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) via a vacuum-assisted self-assembly technique. The artificial nacre-like papers exhibit excellent tensile strength (125.2 MPa), on a par with that of the natural nacre, and moreover display a 30% higher toughness (2.37 MJ m-3) than that of the natural nacre. These excellent mechanical properties result from an ordered `brick-and-mortar' arrangement of NF-BNNSs and PVA, in which the long-chain PVA molecules act as the bridge to link NF-BNNSs via hydrogen bonds. The resulting papers also render high thermal conductivity (6.9 W m-1 K-1), and reveal their superiority as flexible substrates to support light-emitting-diode chips. The combined mechanical and thermal properties make

  9. A role for non-covalent SUMO interaction motifs in Pc2/CBX4 E3 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline C Merrill

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Modification of proteins by the small ubiquitin like modifier (SUMO is an essential process in mammalian cells. SUMO is covalently attached to lysines in target proteins via an enzymatic cascade which consists of E1 and E2, SUMO activating and conjugating enzymes. There is also a variable requirement for non-enzymatic E3 adapter like proteins, which can increase the efficiency and specificity of the sumoylation process. In addition to covalent attachment of SUMO to target proteins, specific non-covalent SUMO interaction motifs (SIMs that are generally short hydrophobic peptide motifs have been identified.Intriguingly, consensus SIMs are present in most SUMO E3s, including the polycomb protein, Pc2/Cbx4. However, a role for SIMs in SUMO E3 activity remains to be shown. We show that Pc2 contains two functional SIMs, both of which contribute to full E3 activity in mammalian cells, and are also required for sumoylation of Pc2 itself. Pc2 forms distinct sub-nuclear foci, termed polycomb bodies, and can recruit partner proteins, such as the corepressor CtBP. We demonstrate that mutation of the SIMs in Pc2 prevents Pc2-dependent CtBP sumoylation, and decreases enrichment of SUMO1 and SUMO2 at polycomb foci. Furthermore, mutational analysis of both SUMO1 and SUMO2 reveals that the SIM-interacting residues of both SUMO isoforms are required for Pc2-mediated sumoylation and localization to polycomb foci.This work provides the first clear evidence for a role for SIMs in SUMO E3 activity.

  10. Quantum Mechanical Calculation of Noncovalent Interactions: A Large-Scale Evaluation of PMx, DFT, and SAPT Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Amanda; Muddana, Hari S; Gilson, Michael K

    2014-04-08

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations of noncovalent interactions are uniquely useful as tools to test and improve molecular mechanics force fields and to model the forces involved in biomolecular binding and folding. Because the more computationally tractable QM methods necessarily include approximations, which risk degrading accuracy, it is essential to evaluate such methods by comparison with high-level reference calculations. Here, we use the extensive Benchmark Energy and Geometry Database (BEGDB) of CCSD(T)/CBS reference results to evaluate the accuracy and speed of widely used QM methods for over 1200 chemically varied gas-phase dimers. In particular, we study the semiempirical PM6 and PM7 methods; density functional theory (DFT) approaches B3LYP, B97-D, M062X, and ωB97X-D; and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) approach. For the PM6 and DFT methods, we also examine the effects of post hoc corrections for hydrogen bonding (PM6-DH+, PM6-DH2), halogen atoms (PM6-DH2X), and dispersion (DFT-D3 with zero and Becke-Johnson damping). Several orders of the SAPT expansion are also compared, ranging from SAPT0 up to SAPT2+3, where computationally feasible. We find that all DFT methods with dispersion corrections, as well as SAPT at orders above SAPT2, consistently provide dimer interaction energies within 1.0 kcal/mol RMSE across all systems. We also show that a linear scaling of the perturbative energy terms provided by the fast SAPT0 method yields similar high accuracy, at particularly low computational cost. The energies of all the dimer systems from the various QM approaches are included in the Supporting Information, as are the full SAPT2+(3) energy decomposition for a subset of over 1000 systems. The latter can be used to guide the parametrization of molecular mechanics force fields on a term-by-term basis.

  11. A pH-responsive wormlike micellar system of a noncovalent interaction-based surfactant with a tunable molecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wanli; Wang, Pengxiang; Fan, Haiming; Yang, Hongbin; Dai, Caili; Yin, Xia; Zhao, Yilu; Guo, Shujun

    2017-02-08

    Responsive wormlike micelles are very useful in a number of applications, whereas it is still challenging to create dramatic viscosity changes in wormlike micellar systems. Here we developed a pH-responsive wormlike micellar system based on a noncovalent constructed surfactant, which is formed by the complexation of N-erucamidopropyl-N,N-dimethylamine (UC 22 AMPM) and citric acid at the molar ratio of 3 : 1 (EACA). The phase behavior, aggregate microstructure and viscoelasticity of EACA solutions were investigated by macroscopic appearance observation, rheological and cryo-TEM measurements. It was found that the phase behavior of EACA solutions undergoes transition from transparent viscoelastic fluids to opalescent solutions and then phase separation with white floaters upon increasing the pH. Upon increasing the pH from 2.03 to 6.17, the viscosity of wormlike micelles in the transparent solutions continuously increased and reached ∼683 000 mPa s at pH 6.17. As the pH was adjusted to 7.31, the opalescent solution shows a water-like flowing behaviour and the η 0 rapidly declines to ∼1 mPa s. Thus, dramatic viscosity changes of about 6 magnitudes can be triggered by varying the pH values without any deterioration of the EACA system. This drastic variation in rheological behavior is attributed to the pH dependent interaction between UC 22 AMPM and citric acid. Furthermore, the dependence on concentration and temperature of the rheological behavior of EACA solutions was also studied to assist in obtaining the desired pH-responsive viscosity changes.

  12. Identification and Characterization of Noncovalent Interactions That Drive Binding and Specificity in DD-Peptidases and β-Lactamases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargis, Jacqueline C; Vankayala, Sai Lakshmana; White, Justin K; Woodcock, H Lee

    2014-02-11

    Bacterial resistance to standard (i.e., β-lactam-based) antibiotics has become a global pandemic. Simultaneously, research into the underlying causes of resistance has slowed substantially, although its importance is universally recognized. Key to unraveling critical details is characterization of the noncovalent interactions that govern binding and specificity (DD-peptidases, antibiotic targets, versus β-lactamases, the evolutionarily derived enzymes that play a major role in resistance) and ultimately resistance as a whole. Herein, we describe a detailed investigation that elicits new chemical insights into these underlying intermolecular interactions. Benzylpenicillin and a novel β-lactam peptidomimetic complexed to the Stremptomyces R61 peptidase are examined using an arsenal of computational techniques: MD simulations, QM/MM calculations, charge perturbation analysis, QM/MM orbital analysis, bioinformatics, flexible receptor/flexible ligand docking, and computational ADME predictions. Several key molecular level interactions are identified that not only shed light onto fundamental resistance mechanisms, but also offer explanations for observed specificity. Specifically, an extended π-π network is elucidated that suggests antibacterial resistance has evolved, in part, due to stabilizing aromatic interactions. Additionally, interactions between the protein and peptidomimetic substrate are identified and characterized. Of particular interest is a water-mediated salt bridge between Asp217 and the positively charged N-terminus of the peptidomimetic, revealing an interaction that may significantly contribute to β-lactam specificity. Finally, interaction information is used to suggest modifications to current β-lactam compounds that should both improve binding and specificity in DD-peptidases and their physiochemical properties.

  13. Stability and thermophysical properties of non-covalently functionalized graphene nanoplatelets nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarsam, Wail Sami; Amiri, Ahmad; Kazi, S.N.; Badarudin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The prepared water-based pristine GNPs nanofluids in this research were not stable. • All the surfactants investigated, SDBS, GA, CTAB, and SDS, increased the viscosity. • Thermal conductivity of nanofluids enhanced in the presence of GA, SDBS, and CTAB. • Highest nanofluid stability was obtained using an ultrasonication time of 60 min. • (1–1) SDBS–GNPs nanofluid with 60 min ultrasonication showed the highest stability. - Abstract: A pioneering idea for increasing the thermal performance of heat transfer fluids was to use ultrafine solid particles suspended in the base fluid. Nanofluids, synthesized by mixing solid nanometer sized particles at low concentrations with the base fluid, were used as a new heat transfer fluid and developed a remarkable effect on the thermophysical properties and heat transfer coefficient. For any nanofluid to be usable in heat transfer applications, the main concern is its long-term stability. The aim of this research is to investigate the effect of using four different surfactants (sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and gum Arabic (GA)), each with three different concentrations, and five ultrasonication times (15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min) on the stability of water-based graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) nanofluids. In addition, the viscosity and thermal conductivity of the highest stability samples were measured at different temperatures. For this aim, nineteen different nanofluids with 0.1 wt% concentration of GNPs were prepared via the two-step method. An ultrasonication probe was utilized to disperse the GNPs in distilled water. UV–vis spectrometry, zeta potential, average particle size, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were helpful in evaluating the stability and characterizing the prepared nanofluids. TEM and zeta potential results were in agreement with the UV–vis measurements. The highest nanofluid stability was

  14. Conformers and non-covalent interactions studied by laser spectroscopies and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, Susanne

    2001-07-01

    The model peptides, formanilide and acetanilide, and their weakly bound complexes were studied in the gas-phase using resonance enhanced multi-photon ionisation (REMPI) and zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy. Both, cis- and trans-isomers of formanilide, were observed under molecular beam conditions. Trans-formanilide displayed predominantly in-plane vibrational excitation indicative of a planar geometry with modest geometry changes upon excitation and ionisation. In cis-formanilide the side-chain is twisted compared to the phenyl plane in the S{sub 0} state, but planar in the S{sub 1} and D{sub 0} states, revealed in characteristic side-chain torsional and out-of-plane bending excitations. Additionally, the ZEKE spectra provide evidence that excess cationic charge is delocalised from the aromatic ring to the side chain. The work on trans-formanilide was extended to its van der Waals complex with Argon with the purpose of investigating the torsional potential of the side-chain and probing charge delocalisation. Complexation of amides with water is of considerable interest since water is not only present as a bulk solvent surrounding a peptide but also attached to specific binding sites in its interior. Evidence was found for the existence of a NH- and CO-bound isomer of trans-formanilide in the neutral, S{sub 0} and S{sub 1}, states, with the ZEKE spectrum of the cationic 'CO-bound' complex indicating a strong preference for the NH binding site. (author)

  15. Halloysite Nanotubes Noncovalently Functionalised with SDS Anionic Surfactant and PS-b-P4VP Block Copolymer for Their Effective Dispersion in Polystyrene as UV-Blocking Nanocomposite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazaros Tzounis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and versatile method is reported for the noncovalent functionalisation of natural and “green” halloysite nanotubes (HNTs allowing their effective dispersion in a polystyrene (PS thermoplastic matrix via solvent mixing. Initially, HNTs (pristine HNTs were modified with physically adsorbed surfactant molecules of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS and PS-b-P4VP [P4VP: poly(4-vinylpyridine] block copolymer (BCP. Hereafter, SDS and BCP modified HNTs will be indicated as SDS-m-HNT and BCP-m-HNT. Nanocomposite films with 1, 2, and 5 wt.% HNT loadings were prepared, abbreviated as PS-SDS-m-HNT1, PS-SDS-m-HNT2, and PS-SDS-m-HNT5 and PS-BCP-m-HNT1, PS-BCP-m-HNT2, and PS-BCP-m-HNT5 (where 1, 2, and 5 correspond to the wt.% of HNTs. All nanocomposites depicted improved thermal degradation compared to the neat PS as revealed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM confirmed the good dispersion state of HNTs and the importance of modification by SDS and BCP. X-ray diffraction (XRD studies showed the characteristic interlayer spacing between the two silicate layers of pristine and modified HNTs. The PS/HNT nanocomposite films exhibited excellent ultraviolent-visible (UV-vis absorbance properties and their potential application as UV-filters could be envisaged.

  16. Collision-induced dissociation of noncovalent complexes between vancomycin antibiotics and peptide ligand stereoisomers: evidence for molecular recognition in the gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Delforge, D; Remacle, J

    1999-01-01

    In solution, the antibiotics of the vancomycin group bind stereospecifically to peptides with the C-terminal sequence: -L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala, Substitution by a L-Ala at either of the two C-terminal residues causes a dramatic decrease in the binding affinity to the antibiotics. This solution behavior...... is clearly reflected in electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectra obtained from equimolar mixtures of an antibiotic, an isotopically labelled peptide ligand and an unlabelled peptide stereoisomer. Using collision-induced dissociation (CID) we have probed the gas phase stability of isomeric (1:1) noncovalent...

  17. Preparation of non-aggregated fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) by non-covalent coating with a block copolymer and proteins for enhancement of intracellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Woo; Lee, Seonju; Jang, Sangmok; Han, Kyu Young; Kim, Younggyu; Hyun, Jaekyung; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Yan

    2013-05-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are very promising fluorophores for use in biosystems due to their high biocompatibility and photostability. To overcome their tendency to aggregate in physiological solutions, which severely limits the biological applications of FNDs, we developed a new non-covalent coating method using a block copolymer, PEG-b-P(DMAEMA-co-BMA), or proteins such as BSA and HSA. By simple mixing of the block copolymer with FNDs, the cationic DMAEMA and hydrophobic BMA moieties can strongly interact with the anionic and hydrophobic moieties on the FND surface, while the PEG block can form a shell to prevent the direct contact between FNDs. The polymer-coated FNDs, along with BSA- and HSA-coated FNDs, showed non-aggregation characteristics and maintained their size at the physiological salt concentration. The well-dispersed, polymer- or protein-coated FNDs in physiological solutions showed enhanced intracellular uptake, which was confirmed by CLSM. In addition, the biocompatibility of the coated FNDs was expressly supported by a cytotoxicity assay. Our simple non-covalent coating with the block copolymer, which can be easily modified by various chemical methods, projects a very promising outlook for future biomedical applications, especially in comparison with covalent coating or protein-based coating.

  18. Determination of Noncovalent Binding Using a Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor as a Flow Injection Device Coupled to Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Inês C.; Waybright, Veronica B.; Fan, Hui; Ramirez, Sabra; Mesquita, Raquel B. R.; Rangel, António O. S. S.; Fryčák, Petr; Schug, Kevin A.

    2015-07-01

    Described is a new method based on the concept of controlled band dispersion, achieved by hyphenating flow injection analysis with ESI-MS for noncovalent binding determinations. A continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was used as a FIA device for exponential dilution of an equimolar host-guest solution over time. The data obtained was treated for the noncovalent binding determination using an equimolar binding model. Dissociation constants between vancomycin and Ac-Lys(Ac)-Ala-Ala-OH peptide stereoisomers were determined using both the positive and negative ionization modes. The results obtained for Ac- L-Lys(Ac)- D-Ala- D-Ala (a model for a Gram-positive bacterial cell wall) binding were in reasonable agreement with literature values made by other mass spectrometry binding determination techniques. Also, the developed method allowed the determination of dissociation constants for vancomycin with Ac- L-Lys(Ac)- D-Ala- L-Ala, Ac- L-Lys(Ac)- L-Ala- D-Ala, and Ac- L-Lys(Ac)- L-Ala- L-Ala. Although some differences in measured binding affinities were noted using different ionization modes, the results of each determination were generally consistent. Differences are likely attributable to the influence of a pseudo-physiological ammonium acetate buffer solution on the formation of positively- and negatively-charged ionic complexes.

  19. The preparation of highly water-soluble multi-walled carbon nanotubes by irreversible noncovalent functionalization with a pyrene-carrying polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Chaohua; Zhou Renjia; Shi Minmin; Gao Yan; Wu Gang; Chen Hongzheng; Wang Mang; Zhang Xiaobin

    2008-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been solubilized in water via a noncovalent method of exfoliation and centrifugation cycles with the assistance of hydrolyzed poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) carrying pyrene (HPSMAP). After the obtained solution was micro-filtered and dried, a water-soluble complex of HPSMAP-MWNTs was obtained. The solubility of HPSMAP-MWNTs was measured to be 46.2 mg ml -1 with a net MWNT concentration of 7.4 mg ml -1 in water. Thermal gravimetric analyses showed that there was a large amount of polymer remaining on the surface of MWNTs irreversibly after thoroughly removing the free polymer. Other characterizations using transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence decay were conducted

  20. Fabrication and non-covalent modification of highly oriented thin films of a zeolite-like metal-organic framework (ZMOF) with rho topology

    KAUST Repository

    Shekhah, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the fabrication of the first thin film of a zeolite-like metal-organic framework (ZMOF) with rho topology (rho-ZMOF-1, ([In48(HImDC)96]48-)n) in a highly oriented fashion on a gold-functionalized substrate. The oriented rho-ZMOF-1 film was functionalized by non-covalent modification via post-synthetic exchange of different probe molecules, such as acridine yellow, methylene blue, and Nile red. In addition, encapsulation of a porphyrin moiety was achieved via in situ synthesis and construction of the rho-ZMOF. Adsorption kinetics of volatile organic compounds on rho-ZMOF-1 thin films was also investigated. This study suggests that rho-ZMOF-1 thin films can be regarded as a promising platform for various applications such as sensing and catalysis. This journal is

  1. Peptide carrier-mediated non-covalent delivery of unmodified cisplatin, methotrexate and other agents via intravenous route to the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobinda Sarkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapid pre-clinical evaluation of chemotherapeutic agents against brain cancers and other neurological disorders remains largely unattained due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, which limits transport of most therapeutic compounds to the brain. A synthetic peptide carrier, K16ApoE, was previously developed that enabled transport of target proteins to the brain by mimicking a ligand-receptor system. The peptide carrier was found to generate transient BBB permeability, which was utilized for non-covalent delivery of cisplatin, methotrexate and other compounds to the brain. APPROACH: Brain delivery of the chemotherapeutics and other agents was achieved either by injecting the carrier peptide and the drugs separately or as a mixture, to the femoral vein. A modification of the method comprised injection of K16ApoE pre-mixed with cetuximab, followed by injection of a 'small-molecule' drug. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Seven-of-seven different small molecules were successfully delivered to the brain via K16ApoE. Depending on the method, brain uptake with K16ApoE was 0.72-1.1% for cisplatin and 0.58-0.92% for methotrexate (34-50-fold and 54-92 fold greater for cisplatin and methotrexate, respectively, with K16ApoE than without. Visually intense brain-uptake of Evans Blue, Light Green SF and Crocein scarlet was also achieved. Direct intracranial injection of EB show locally restricted distribution of the dye in the brain, whereas K16ApoE-mediated intravenous injection of EB resulted in the distribution of the dye throughout the brain. Experiments with insulin suggest that ligand-receptor signaling intrinsic to the BBB provides a natural means for passive transport of some molecules across the BBB. SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that the carrier peptide can non-covalently transport various chemotherapeutic agents to the brain. Thus, the method offers an avenue for pre-clinical evaluation of various small and large therapeutic molecules

  2. Noncovalent functionalization of pristine CVD single-walled carbon nanotubes with 3d metal(II) phthalocyanines by adsorption from the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Flores-Sánchez, Laura J.; Meza-Laguna, Victor; Flores-Flores, José Ocotlán; Bucio-Galindo, Lauro; Puente-Lee, Iván; Basiuk, Elena V.

    2018-04-01

    Noncovalent hybrids of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with phthalocyanines (Pcs) is a subject of growing research effort focused on the development of new efficient organic photovoltaic cells, heterogeneous catalysts, lithium batteries, gas sensors, field effect transistors, among other possible applications. The main advantage of using unsubstituted Pcs is their very moderate cost and easy commercial availability. Unfortunately, the deposition of unsubstituted Pcs onto CNT sidewalls via the traditional liquid-phase strategy proves to be very problematic due to an extremely poor solubility of Pcs. At the same time, unsubstituted free-base H2Pc ligand and many of its transition metal complexes exhibit high thermal stability and volatility under reduced pressure, which allows for their physical vapor deposition onto solid surfaces. In the present work, we demonstrated the possibility of simple, fast, efficient and environmentally friendly noncovalent functionalization of single-walled CNTs (SWNTs) with a series of 3d metal(II) phthalocyanines Me(II)Pc, where Me = Co, Ni, Cu and Zn. The functionalization can be performed at 400-500 °C under moderate vacuum, and takes about 2-3 h only. The nanohybrids obtained were characterized by means of Fourier-transform infrared, Raman, UV-vis and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning and transmission electron microscopy. TGA suggested that Pc weight content is 30%, 17% and 35% for NiPc, CuPc and ZnPc, respectively (CoPc exhibited anomalous behavior), which is close to the estimates from EDS spectra of 24-39%, 27-36% and 27-44% for CoPc, CuPc and ZnPc, respectively. A strong increase in intensity of D band in the Raman spectra of SWNT‒Pc hybrids, as compared to that of pristine nanotubes, was interpreted as very strong interactions between Pc molecules and SWNT sidewalls. Very high absolute values of binding energies of 32.46-37.12 kcal/mol and the patterns of HOMO and LUMO distribution

  3. A look at the density functional theory zoo with the advanced GMTKN55 database for general main group thermochemistry, kinetics and noncovalent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerigk, Lars; Hansen, Andreas; Bauer, Christoph; Ehrlich, Stephan; Najibi, Asim; Grimme, Stefan

    2017-12-13

    We present the GMTKN55 benchmark database for general main group thermochemistry, kinetics and noncovalent interactions. Compared to its popular predecessor GMTKN30 [Goerigk and Grimme J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2011, 7, 291], it allows assessment across a larger variety of chemical problems-with 13 new benchmark sets being presented for the first time-and it also provides reference values of significantly higher quality for most sets. GMTKN55 comprises 1505 relative energies based on 2462 single-point calculations and it is accessible to the user community via a dedicated website. Herein, we demonstrate the importance of better reference values, and we re-emphasise the need for London-dispersion corrections in density functional theory (DFT) treatments of thermochemical problems, including Minnesota methods. We assessed 217 variations of dispersion-corrected and -uncorrected density functional approximations, and carried out a detailed analysis of 83 of them to identify robust and reliable approaches. Double-hybrid functionals are the most reliable approaches for thermochemistry and noncovalent interactions, and they should be used whenever technically feasible. These are, in particular, DSD-BLYP-D3(BJ), DSD-PBEP86-D3(BJ), and B2GPPLYP-D3(BJ). The best hybrids are ωB97X-V, M052X-D3(0), and ωB97X-D3, but we also recommend PW6B95-D3(BJ) as the best conventional global hybrid. At the meta-generalised-gradient (meta-GGA) level, the SCAN-D3(BJ) method can be recommended. Other meta-GGAs are outperformed by the GGA functionals revPBE-D3(BJ), B97-D3(BJ), and OLYP-D3(BJ). We note that many popular methods, such as B3LYP, are not part of our recommendations. In fact, with our results we hope to inspire a change in the user community's perception of common DFT methods. We also encourage method developers to use GMTKN55 for cross-validation studies of new methodologies.

  4. Accurate Open-Shell Noncovalent Interaction Energies from the Orbital-Optimized Møller-Plesset Perturbation Theory: Achieving CCSD Quality at the MP2 Level by Orbital Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soydaş, Emine; Bozkaya, Uğur

    2013-11-12

    The accurate description of noncovalent interactions is one of the most challenging problems in modern computational chemistry, especially those for open-shell systems. In this study, an investigation of open-shell noncovalent interactions with the orbital-optimized MP2 and MP3 (OMP2 and OMP3) is presented. For the considered test set of 23 complexes, mean absolute errors in noncovalent interaction energies (with respect to CCSD(T) at complete basis set limits) are 0.68 (MP2), 0.37 (OMP2), 0.59 (MP3), 0.23 (OMP3), and 0.38 (CCSD) kcal mol(-1) . Hence, with a greatly reduced computational cost, one may achieve CCSD quality at the MP2 level by orbital optimization [scaling formally as O(N(6)) for CCSD compared to O(N(5)) for OMP2, where N is the number of basis functions]. Further, one may obtain a considerably better performance than CCSD using the OMP3 method, which has also a lower cost than CCSD.

  5. Non-covalent doping of graphitic carbon nitride with ultrathin graphene oxide and molybdenum disulfide nanosheets: an effective binary heterojunction photocatalyst under visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S W; Yang, L W; Tian, Y; Wei, X L; Ding, J W; Zhong, J X; Chu, Paul K

    2014-10-01

    A proof of concept integrating binary p-n heterojunctions into a semiconductor hybrid photocatalyst is demonstrated by non-covalent doping of graphite-like carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with ultrathin GO and MoS2 nanosheets using a facile sonochemical method. In this unique ternary hybrid, the layered MoS2 and GO nanosheets with a large surface area enhance light absorption to generate more photoelectrons. On account of the coupling between MoS2 and GO with g-C3N4, the ternary hybrid possesses binary p-n heterojunctions at the g-C3N4/MoS2 and g-C3N4/GO interfaces. The space charge layers created by the p-n heterojunctions not only enhance photogeneration, but also promote charge separation and transfer of electron-hole pairs. In addition, the ultrathin MoS2 and GO with high mobility act as electron mediators to facilitate separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs at each p-n heterojunction. As a result, the ternary hybrid photocatalyst exhibits improved photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation compared to other reference materials. The results provide new insights into the large-scale production of semiconductor photocatalysts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigation of Non-Covalent Interactions of Aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1, G2, and M1 with Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós Poór

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins are widely spread mycotoxins produced mainly by Aspergillus species. Consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated foods and drinks causes serious health risks for people worldwide. It is well-known that the reactive epoxide metabolite of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 forms covalent adducts with serum albumin. However, non-covalent interactions of aflatoxins with human serum albumin (HSA are poorly characterized. Thus, in this study the complex formation of aflatoxins was examined with HSA applying spectroscopic and molecular modelling studies. Our results demonstrate that aflatoxins form stable complexes with HSA as reflected by binding constants between 2.1 × 104 and 4.5 × 104 dm3/mol. A binding free energy value of −26.90 kJ mol−1 suggests a spontaneous binding process between AFB1 and HSA at room-temperature, while the positive entropy change of 55.1 JK−1 mol−1 indicates a partial decomposition of the solvation shells of the interacting molecules. Modeling studies and investigations with site markers suggest that Sudlow’s Site I of subdomain IIA is the high affinity binding site of aflatoxins on HSA. Interaction of AFB1 with bovine, porcine, and rat serum albumins was also investigated. Similar stabilities of the examined AFB1-albumin complexes were observed suggesting the low species differences of the albumin-binding of aflatoxins.

  7. A FRET-based probe for epidermal growth factor receptor bound non-covalently to a pair of synthetic amphipathic helixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Reina E.; Kurokawa, Kazuo; Fujioka, Aki; Sharma, Alok; Mayer, Bruce J.; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2005-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor plays a pivotal role in a variety of cellular functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and migration. To monitor the EGF receptor (EGFR) activity in living cells, we developed a probe for EGFR activity based on the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Previously, we developed a probe designated as Picchu (Phosphorylation indicator of the CrkII chimeric unit), which detects the tyrosine phosphorylation of the CrkII adaptor protein. We used a pair of synthetic amphipathic helixes, WinZipA2 and WinZipB1, to bind Picchu non-covalently to the carboxyl-terminus of the EGFR. Using this modified probe named Picchu-Z, the activity of EGFR was followed in EGF-stimulated Cos7 cells. We found that a high level of tyrosine phosphorylation of Picchu-Z probe remained after endocytosis until the point when the EGFR was translocated to the perinuclear region. These findings are in agreement with the previously reported 'signaling endosome' model. Furthermore, by pulse stimulation with EGF and by acute ablation of EGFR activity with AG1478, it was suggested that the phosphorylation of Picchu-Z probe, and probably the phosphorylation of EGFR also, underwent a rapid equilibrium (τ 1/2 < 2 min) between the phosphorylated and dephosphorylated states in the presence of EGF

  8. Noncovalent PEGylation: different effects of dansyl-, L-tryptophan-, phenylbutylamino-, benzyl- and cholesteryl-PEGs on the aggregation of salmon calcitonin and lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Claudia; Capelle, Martinus A H; Seyrek, Emek; Martel, Sophie; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Arvinte, Tudor; Borchard, Gerrit

    2012-06-01

    Protein aggregation is a major instability that can occur during all stages of protein drug production and development. Protein aggregates may compromise the safety and efficacy of the final protein formulation. In this paper, various new excipients [phenylbutylamino-, benzyl-, and cholesteryl-polyethylene glycols (PEGs)] and their use for the reduction of aggregation of salmon calcitonin (sCT) and hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) by noncovalent PEGylation are presented. The ability to suppress aggregation of sCT in various buffer systems at a 1:1 molar ratio was assessed by following changes in protein conformation and aggregation state over time. The results are compared with that of dansyl- and L-tryptophan (Trp)-PEGs described in earlier publications. Furthermore, the influence of the different PEG-based excipients on the aggregation of HEWL was measured. HEWL aggregation was completely suppressed in the presence of cholesteryl-PEGs (2 and 5 kDa), whereas deterioration was observed using benzyl-methoxy polyethylene glycols (mPEGs; 2 and 5 kDa). Phenylbutylamino- and Trp-mPEG (2 kDa), as well as dansyl-PEGs of different molecular weight prolonged the lag phase of aggregation and reduced the aggregation velocity of HEWL. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Non-Covalent Functionalisation of C30 Fullerene by Pyrrole-n-Carboxylic Acid (n=2, 3): Density Functional Theory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harismah, Kun; Mirzaei, Mahmoud; Ghasemi, Nahid; Nejati, Mohammad

    2017-12-01

    For functionalisation of a representative C30 fullerene nanostructure by pyrrole-n-carboxylic acid (PnCA; n=2, 3) their stabilities and properties were investigated based on density functional theory calculations. Parallel calculations were also done for C60 fullerene as evidence for comparing the results. Non-covalent interactions are considered to make the functionalised structures. In contrast with the spherical shape of C60, the shape of C30 fullerene is elliptical; therefore, the functionalisation processes were done for both axial and equatorial elliptical positions (AC30 and EC30). The results indicated that both the positions of C30 have almost equivalent chances to be functionalised by PnCA; but functionalisation by P2CA is slightly more favourable than P3CA, either for C60. The illustrated molecular orbitals' distributions indicated that the direction of charge transfer could be considered from PnCA counterparts to fullerene counterparts. The molecular properties indicated more reactivity for C30 than for C60 fullerene. Finally, the atomic scale quadrupole coupling constants indicated different roles for N and O atoms of PnCA in the functionalised models.

  10. A novel noncovalent complex of chorismate mutase and DAHP synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: protein purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ökvist, Mats; Sasso, Severin; Roderer, Kathrin; Kast, Peter; Krengel, Ute

    2009-01-01

    Two shikimate-pathway enzymes from M. tuberculosis, the intracellular chorismate mutase (MtCM) and DAHP synthase (MtDS), were produced recombinantly and purified. MtCM was crystallized alone and in complex with MtDS and analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Chorismate mutase catalyzes a key step in the shikimate-biosynthetic pathway and hence is an essential enzyme in bacteria, plants and fungi. Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains two chorismate mutases, a secreted and an intracellular one, the latter of which (MtCM; Rv0948c; 90 amino-acid residues; 10 kDa) is the subject of this work. Here are reported the gene expression, purification and crystallization of MtCM alone and of its complex with another shikimate-pathway enzyme, DAHP synthase (MtDS; Rv2178c; 472 amino-acid residues; 52 kDa), which has been shown to enhance the catalytic efficiency of MtCM. The MtCM–MtDS complex represents the first noncovalent enzyme complex from the common shikimate pathway to be structurally characterized. Soaking experiments with a transition-state analogue are also reported. The crystals of MtCM and the MtCM–MtDS complex diffracted to 1.6 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively

  11. A novel noncovalent complex of chorismate mutase and DAHP synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: protein purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ökvist, Mats; Sasso, Severin; Roderer, Kathrin; Kast, Peter; Krengel, Ute

    2009-01-01

    Chorismate mutase catalyzes a key step in the shikimate-biosynthetic pathway and hence is an essential enzyme in bacteria, plants and fungi. Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains two chorismate mutases, a secreted and an intracellular one, the latter of which (MtCM; Rv0948c; 90 amino-acid residues; 10 kDa) is the subject of this work. Here are reported the gene expression, purification and crystallization of MtCM alone and of its complex with another shikimate-pathway enzyme, DAHP synthase (MtDS; Rv2178c; 472 amino-acid residues; 52 kDa), which has been shown to enhance the catalytic efficiency of MtCM. The MtCM–MtDS complex represents the first noncovalent enzyme complex from the common shikimate pathway to be structurally characterized. Soaking experiments with a transition-state analogue are also reported. The crystals of MtCM and the MtCM–MtDS complex diffracted to 1.6 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively. PMID:19851019

  12. Non-covalent functionalisation of C{sub 30} fullerene by pyrrole-n-carboxylic acid (n=2, 3). Density functional theory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harismah, Kun [Univ. Muhammadiyah Surakarta (Indonesia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Mirzaei, Mahmoud [Isfahan Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Bioinformatics Research Center; Ghasemi, Nahid [Islamic Azad Univ., Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry; Nejati, Mohammad [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry

    2018-04-01

    For functionalisation of a representative C{sub 30} fullerene nanostructure by pyrrole-n-carboxylic acid (PnCA; n=2, 3) their stabilities and properties were investigated based on density functional theory calculations. Parallel calculations were also done for C{sub 60} fullerene as evidence for comparing the results. Non-covalent interactions are considered to make the functionalised structures. In contrast with the spherical shape of C{sub 60}, the shape of C{sub 30} fullerene is elliptical; therefore, the functionalisation processes were done for both axial and equatorial elliptical positions (AC{sub 30} and EC{sub 30}). The results indicated that both the positions of C{sub 30} have almost equivalent chances to be functionalised by PnCA; but functionalisation by P2CA is slightly more favourable than P3CA, either for C{sub 60}. The illustrated molecular orbitals' distributions indicated that the direction of charge transfer could be considered from PnCA counterparts to fullerene counterparts. The molecular properties indicated more reactivity for C{sub 30} than for C{sub 60} fullerene. Finally, the atomic scale quadrupole coupling constants indicated different roles for N and O atoms of PnCA in the functionalised models.

  13. Host-Guest Complexes of Cyclodextrins and Nanodiamonds as a Strong Non-Covalent Binding Motif for Self-Assembled Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibilla, Frauke; Voskuhl, Jens; Fokina, Natalie A; Dahl, Jeremy E P; Schreiner, Peter R; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2017-11-13

    We report the inclusion of carboxy- and amine-substituted molecular nanodiamonds (NDs) adamantane, diamantane, and triamantane by β-cyclodextrin and γ-cyclodextrin (β-CD and γ-CD), which have particularly well-suited hydrophobicity and symmetry for an optimal fit of the host and guest molecules. We studied the host-guest interactions in detail and generally observed 1:1 association of the NDs with the larger γ-CD cavity, but observed 1:2 association for the largest ND in the series (triamantane) with β-CD. We found higher binding affinities for carboxy-substituted NDs than for amine-substituted NDs. Additionally, cyclodextrin vesicles (CDVs) were decorated with d-mannose by using adamantane, diamantane, and triamantane as non-covalent anchors, and the resulting vesicles were compared with the lectin concanavalin A in agglutination experiments. Agglutination was directly correlated to the host-guest association: adamantane showed lower agglutination than di- or triamantane with β-CDV and almost no agglutination with γ-CDV, whereas high agglutination was observed for di- and triamantane with γ-CDV. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Non-covalently anchored multi-walled carbon nanotubes with hexa-decafluorinated zinc phthalocyanine as ppb level chemiresistive chlorine sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshul Kumar; Mahajan, Aman; Bedi, R. K.; Kumar, Subodh; Debnath, A. K.; Aswal, D. K.

    2018-01-01

    A cost effective solution assembly method has been explored for preparing zinc(II)1,2,3,4,8,9,10,11,15,16,17,18,22,23,24,25-hexa-decafluoro-29H,31H-phthalocyanine/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (F16ZnPc/MWCNTs-COOH) hybrid. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) investigations confirm the non-covalent anchoring of F16ZnPc onto MWCNTs-COOH through п-п stacking interactions. Further, a highly sensitive and selective chemiresistive Cl2 sensor has been fabricated using F16ZnPc/MWCNTs-COOH hybrid. The response of sensor is found to be 21.28% for 2 ppm of Cl2 with a response time of 14 s and theoretical detection limit of the sensor is found down to 0.06 ppb. The improved Cl2 sensing characteristics of hybrid are found to be originated from the synergetic interaction between F16ZnPc and MWCNTs-COOH. The underlying mechanism for improved gas sensing performance of F16ZnPc/MWCNTs-COOH sensor towards Cl2 has been explained using Raman, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies.

  15. CCSD[T] Describes Noncovalent Interactions Better than the CCSD(T), CCSD(TQ), and CCSDT Methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáč, Jan; Šimová, Lucia; Hobza, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2013), s. 364-369 ISSN 1549-9618 Grant - others:European Social Foundation(XE) CZ1.05/2.1.00/03/0058 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : potential-energy curve * coupled-cluster theory * electron-correlation * thermophysical properties Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.310, year: 2013

  16. Structure of a SUMO-binding-motif mimic bound to Smt3p–Ubc9p: conservation of a noncovalent Ubiquitin-like protein–E2 complex as a platform for selective interactions within a SUMO pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, David M.; van Waardenburg, Robert C. A. M.; Borg, Laura A.; McGarity, Sierra; Nourse, Amanda; Waddell, M. Brett; Bjornsti, Mary-Ann; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The SUMO ubiquitin-like proteins play regulatory roles in cell division, transcription, DNA repair, and protein subcellular localization. Paralleling other ubiquitin-like proteins, SUMO proteins are proteolytically processed to maturity, conjugated to targets by E1-E2-E3 cascades, and subsequently recognized by specific downstream effectors containing a SUMO-binding motif (SBM). SUMO and its E2 from the budding yeast S. cerevisiae, Smt3p and Ubc9p, are encoded by essential genes. Here we describe the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of a noncovalent Smt3p–Ubc9p complex. Unexpectedly, a heterologous portion of the crystallized complex derived from the expression construct mimics an SBM, and binds Smt3p in a manner resembling SBM binding to human SUMO family members. In the complex, Smt3p binds a surface distal from Ubc9's catalytic cysteine. The structure implies that a single molecule of Smt3p cannot bind concurrently to both the noncovalent binding site and the catalytic cysteine of a single Ubc9p molecule. However, formation of higher-order complexes can occur, where a single Smt3p covalently linked to one Ubc9p's catalytic cysteine also binds noncovalently to another molecule of Ubc9p. Comparison with other structures from the SUMO pathway suggests that formation of the noncovalent Smt3p–Ubc9p complex occurs mutually exclusively with many other Smt3p and Ubc9p interactions in the conjugation cascade. By contrast, high-resolution insights into how Smt3p–Ubc9p can also interact with downstream recognition machineries come from contacts with the SBM mimic. Interestingly, the overall architecture of the Smt3p–Ubc9p complex is strikingly similar to recent structures from the ubiquitin pathway. The results imply that noncovalent ubiquitin-like protein–E2 complexes are conserved platforms, which function as parts of larger assemblies involved many protein post-translational regulatory pathways. PMID:17475278

  17. Electrophilic-Nucleophilic Dualism of Nickel(II) toward Ni···I Noncovalent Interactions: Semicoordination of Iodine Centers via Electron Belt and Halogen Bonding via σ-Hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikbaeva, Zarina M; Ivanov, Daniil M; Novikov, Alexander S; Ananyev, Ivan V; Bokach, Nadezhda A; Kukushkin, Vadim Yu

    2017-11-06

    The nitrosoguanidinate complex [Ni{NH═C(NMe 2 )NN(O)} 2 ] (1) was cocrystallized with I 2 and sym-trifluorotriiodobenzene (FIB) to give associates 1·2I 2 and 1·2FIB. Structures of these solid species were studied by XRD followed by topological analysis of the electron density distribution within the framework of Bader's approach (QTAIM) at the M06/DZP-DKH level of theory and Hirshfeld surface analysis. Our results along with inspection of XRD (CCDC) data, accompanied by the theoretical calculations, allowed the identification of three types of Ni···I contacts. The Ni···I semicoordination of the electrophilic nickel(II) center with electron belt of I 2 was observed in 1·2I 2 , the metal-involving halogen bonding between the nucleophilic nickel(II)-d z 2 center and σ-hole of iodine center was recognized and confirmed theoretically in the structure of [FeNi(CN) 4 (IPz)(H 2 O)] n (IPz = 4-N-coordinated 2-I-pyrazine), whereas the arrangement of FIB in 1·2FIB provides a boundary case between the semicoordination and the halogen Ni···I bondings. In 1·2I 2 and 1·2FIB, noncovalent interactions were studied by variable temperature XRD detecting the expansion of noncovalent contacts with preservation of covalent bond lengths upon the temperature increase from 100 to 300 K. The nature and energies of all identified types of the Ni···I noncovalent interactions in the obtained (1·2I 2 and 1·2FIB) and in the previously reported ([FeNi(CN) 4 (IPz)(H 2 O)] n , [NiL 2 ](I 3 ) 2 ·2I 2 (L = o-phenylene-bis(dimethylphosphine), [NiL]I 2 (L = 1,4,8,11-tetra-azacyclotetradecane), Ni(en) 2 ] n [AgI 2 ] 2n (en = ethylenediamine), and [NiL](ClO 4 ) (L = 4-iodo-2-((2-(2-(2-pyridyl)ethylsulfanyl)ethylimino)methyl)-phenolate)) structures were studied theoretically. The estimated strengths of these Ni···I noncovalent contacts vary from 1.6 to 4.1 kcal/mol and, as expected, become weaker on heating. This work is the first emphasizing electrophilic-nucleophilic dualism

  18. Non-Covalent Interactions in Hydrogen Storage Materials LiN(CH32BH3 and KN(CH32BH3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Sagan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an in-depth, qualitative and quantitative description of non-covalent interactions in the hydrogen storage materials LiN(CH32BH3 and KN(CH32BH3 was performed by means of the charge and energy decomposition method (ETS-NOCV as well as the Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA approach. It was determined that both crystals are stabilized by electrostatically dominated intra- and intermolecular M∙∙∙H–B interactions (M = Li, K. For LiN(CH32BH3 the intramolecular charge transfer appeared (B–H→Li to be more pronounced compared with the corresponding intermolecular contribution. We clarified for the first time, based on the ETS-NOCV and IQA methods, that homopolar BH∙∙∙HB interactions in LiN(CH32BH3 can be considered as destabilizing (due to the dominance of repulsion caused by negatively charged borane units, despite the fact that some charge delocalization within BH∙∙∙HB contacts is enforced (which explains H∙∙∙H bond critical points found from the QTAIM method. Interestingly, quite similar (to BH∙∙∙HB intermolecular homopolar dihydrogen bonds CH∙∙∙HC appared to significantly stabilize both crystals—the ETS-NOCV scheme allowed us to conclude that CH∙∙∙HC interactions are dispersion dominated, however, the electrostatic and σ/σ*(C–H charge transfer contributions are also important. These interactions appeared to be more pronounced in KN(CH32BH3 compared with LiN(CH32BH3.

  19. Influence of non-covalent modification of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the crystallization behaviour of binary blends of polypropylene and polyamide 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Nabaneeta; Panwar, Ajay S; Kumar, Gulshan; Samajdar, I; Bhattacharyya, Arup R

    2015-02-14

    Blends of polypropylene (PP) and polyamide 6 (PA6) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were prepared using different processing strategies in a twin-screw micro-compounder. The effect of MWNTs on the crystallization behaviour of the PP phase and the PA6 phase of the blend has been investigated through non-isothermal crystallization studies by differential scanning calorimetric analysis. Furthermore, the effect of the addition of the compatibilizer (PP-g-MA) and the modification of MWNTs (m-MWNTs) with a non-covalent organic modifier (Li-salt of 6 amino hexanoic acid, Li-AHA) has also been studied in context to the crystallization behaviour of the PP and PA6 phase in the blend. The crystallization studies have indicated a significant increase in bulk crystallization temperature of the PP phase in the blend in the presence of MWNTs. Moreover, the formation of 'trans-lamellar crystalline' structure consisting of PA6 'trans-crystalline lamellae' on MWNTs surface was facilitated in the case of blends prepared via 'protocol 2' as compared to the corresponding blends prepared via 'protocol 1'. Wide angle X-ray diffraction analysis has showed the existence of a β-polymorph of the PP phase due to incorporation of the PA6 phase in the blend. Addition of MWNTs in the blends has facilitated further β-crystalline structure formation of the PP phase. In the presence of m-MWNTs, a higher β-fraction was observed in the PP phase as compared to the blend with pristine MWNTs. Addition of PP-g-MA has suppressed the β-phase formation in the PP phase in the blend. X-ray bulk texture analysis revealed that incorporation of PA6 as well as pristine/modified MWNTs has influenced the extent of orientation of the PP chains towards specific crystalline planes in various blend compositions of PP and PA6.

  20. Appointing silver and bronze standards for noncovalent interactions: A comparison of spin-component-scaled (SCS), explicitly correlated (F12), and specialized wavefunction approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, Lori A.; Marshall, Michael S.; Sherrill, C. David

    2014-01-01

    A systematic examination of noncovalent interactions as modeled by wavefunction theory is presented in comparison to gold-standard quality benchmarks available for 345 interaction energies of 49 bimolecular complexes. Quantum chemical techniques examined include spin-component-scaling (SCS) variations on second-order perturbation theory (MP2) [SCS, SCS(N), SCS(MI)] and coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) [SCS, SCS(MI)]; also, method combinations designed to improve dispersion contacts [DW-MP2, MP2C, MP2.5, DW-CCSD(T)-F12]; where available, explicitly correlated (F12) counterparts are also considered. Dunning basis sets augmented by diffuse functions are employed for all accessible ζ-levels; truncations of the diffuse space are also considered. After examination of both accuracy and performance for 394 model chemistries, SCS(MI)-MP2/cc-pVQZ can be recommended for general use, having good accuracy at low cost and no ill-effects such as imbalance between hydrogen-bonding and dispersion-dominated systems or non-parallelity across dissociation curves. Moreover, when benchmarking accuracy is desirable but gold-standard computations are unaffordable, this work recommends silver-standard [DW-CCSD(T**)-F12/aug-cc-pVDZ] and bronze-standard [MP2C-F12/aug-cc-pVDZ] model chemistries, which support accuracies of 0.05 and 0.16 kcal/mol and efficiencies of 97.3 and 5.5 h for adenine·thymine, respectively. Choice comparisons of wavefunction results with the best symmetry-adapted perturbation theory [T. M. Parker, L. A. Burns, R. M. Parrish, A. G. Ryno, and C. D. Sherrill, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 094106 (2014)] and density functional theory [L. A. Burns, Á. Vázquez-Mayagoitia, B. G. Sumpter, and C. D. Sherrill, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 084107 (2011)] methods previously studied for these databases are provided for readers' guidance

  1. Synthesis and structure of 1,3-dimethyl-5-(p-sulfonamide-phenylazo)-6-aminouracil and its Ni(II) complex: Topological insights and investigation for noncovalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Diptanu; Roy, Subhadip; Purkayastha, Atanu; Bauzá, Antonio; Choudhury, Rupasree; Ganguly, Rakesh; Frontera, Antonio; Misra, Tarun Kumar

    2017-08-01

    The azo-derivative, 1,3-dimethyl-5-(p-sulfonamide-phenylazo)-6-aminouracil (HL) containing 6-aminouracil (a biomolecule) and sulfonamide functionality (commonly found in sulfa-drugs), and its Ni(II) complex, NiIIL2 were synthesized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies show that the ligand (HL) consists of an E conformation about the azo-linkage with a nearly planar geometry and the complex possesses distorted square planar geometry. The H-bonded underlying networks of HL and NiIIL2 were topologically classified revealing distinct topological types, namely tts and hxl, respectively. Moreover, topology of molecular packings in HL and NiIIL2 has also been discussed. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations, at the M06-2X/def2TZVP level of theory, are employed to characterize a great variety of non-covalent interactions that explicitly show the importance of antiparallel stacking interactions established by π--π+ interactions and H-bonds in the self-assembled dimmers in HL and lp-π/C-H⋯π interactions in NiIIL2. The results of NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies evidence that the ligand exists in hydrazone-imine-keto (B) tautomeric form in solution. The ligand absorption bands consist of the overlapping bands of π→π* and n→π* transitions. The complex experiences electronic transitions that consist of basically ILCT in character with some sort of participation of the atomic d-orbitals of the nickel. The pKa value of the ligand is found to be 4.09.

  2. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions between cell penetrating peptides and plasmid DNA are important for stable non-covalent complexation and intracellular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhya, Archana; Sangave, Preeti C

    2016-10-01

    Cell penetrating peptides are useful tools for intracellular delivery of nucleic acids. Delivery of plasmid DNA, a large nucleic acid, poses a challenge for peptide mediated transport. The paper investigates and compares efficacy of five novel peptide designs for complexation of plasmid DNA and subsequent delivery into cells. The peptides were designed to contain reported DNA condensing agents and basic cell penetrating sequences, octa-arginine (R 8 ) and CHK 6 HC coupled to cell penetration accelerating peptides such as Bax inhibitory mutant peptide (KLPVM) and a peptide derived from the Kaposi fibroblast growth factor (kFGF) membrane translocating sequence. A tryptophan rich peptide, an analogue of Pep-3, flanked with CH 3 on either ends was also a part of the study. The peptides were analysed for plasmid DNA complexation, protection of peptide-plasmid DNA complexes against DNase I, serum components and competitive ligands by simple agarose gel electrophoresis techniques. Hemolysis of rat red blood corpuscles (RBCs) in the presence of the peptides was used as a measure of peptide cytotoxicity. Plasmid DNA delivery through the designed peptides was evaluated in two cell lines, human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and (NIH/3 T3) mouse embryonic fibroblasts via expression of the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene. The importance of hydrophobic sequences in addition to cationic sequences in peptides for non-covalent plasmid DNA complexation and delivery has been illustrated. An alternative to the employment of fatty acid moieties for enhanced gene transfer has been proposed. Comparison of peptides for plasmid DNA complexation and delivery of peptide-plasmid DNA complexes to cells estimated by expression of a reporter gene, SEAP. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Noncovalent pegylation by dansyl-poly(ethylene glycol)s as a new means against aggregation of salmon calcitonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Claudia; Capelle, Martinus A H; Arvinte, Tudor; Seyrek, Emek; Borchard, Gerrit

    2011-05-01

    During all stages of protein drug development, aggregation is one of the most often encountered problems. Covalent conjugation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), also called PEGylation, to proteins has been shown to reduce aggregation of proteins. In this paper, new excipients based on PEG are presented that are able to reduce aggregation of salmon calcitonin (sCT). Several PEG polymers consisting of a hydrophobic dansyl-headgroup attached to PEGs of different molecular weights have been synthesized and characterized physicochemically. After addition of dansyl-methoxypoly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) 2 kDa to a 40 times molar excess of sCT resulted in an increase in dansyl-fluorescence and a decrease in 90° light scatter suggesting possible interactions. The aggregation of sCT in different buffer systems in presence or absence of the different dansyl-PEGs was measured by changes in Nile red fluorescence and turbidity. Dansyl-mPEG 2 kDa in a 1:1 molar ratio to sCT strongly reduced aggregation. Reduction of sCT aggregation was also measured for the bivalent dansyl-PEG 3 kDa in a 1:1 molar ratio. Dansyl-mPEG 5 kDa deteriorated sCT aggregation. Potential cytotoxicity and hemolysis were investigated. This paper shows that dansyl-PEGs are efficacious in reducing aggregation of sCT. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Theoretical study of X⁻ · 1 · YF (1 = triazine, X = Cl, Br and I, Y = H, Cl, Br, I, PH₂ and AsH₂): noncovalently electron-withdrawing effects on anion-arene interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yishan; Yao, Lifeng

    2014-01-01

    The ternary complexes X(-) · 1 · YF (1 = triazine, X = Cl, Br and I, Y = H, Cl, Br, I, PH2 and AsH2) have been investigated by MP2 calculations to understand the noncovalently electron-withdrawing effects on anion-arene interactions. The results indicate that in binary complexes (1 · X(-)), both weak σ-type and anion-π complexes can be formed for Cl(-) and Br(-), but only anion-π complex can be formed for I(-). Moreover, the hydrogen-bonding complex is the global minimum for all three halides in binary complexes. However, in ternary complexes, anion-π complex become unstable and only σ complex can retain in many cases for Cl(-) and Br(-). Anion-π complex keeps stable only when YF = HF. In contrast with binary complexes, σ complex become the global minimum for Cl(-) and Br(-) in ternary complexes. These changes in binding mode and strength are consistent with the results of covalently electron-withdrawing effects. However, in contrast with the covalently electron-withdrawing substituents, Cl(-) and Br(-) can attack the aromatic carbon atom to form a strong σ complex when the noncovalently electron-withdrawing effect is induced by halogen bonding. The binding behavior for I(-) is different from that for Cl(-) and Br(-) in two aspects. First, the anion-π complex for I(-) can also keep stable when the noncovalent interaction is halogen bonding. Second, the anion-π complex for I(-) is the global minimum when it can retain as a stable structure.

  5. Noncovalent DNA Binding Drives DNA Alkylation by Leinamycin. Evidence That the Z,E-5-(Thiazol-4-yl)-penta-2,4-dienone Moiety of the Natural Product Serves As An Atypical DNA Intercalator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekry, Mostafa I.; Szekely, Jozsef; Dutta, Sanjay; Breydo, Leonid; Zang, Hong; Gates, Kent S.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular recognition and chemical modification of DNA are important in medicinal chemistry, toxicology, and biotechnology. Historically, natural products have revealed many interesting and unexpected mechanisms for noncovalent DNA binding and covalent DNA modification. The studies reported here characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying the efficient alkylation of duplex DNA by the Streptomyces-derived natural product leinamycin. Previous studies suggested that alkylation of duplex DNA by activated leinamycin (2) is driven by noncovalent association of the natural product with the double helix. This is striking because leinamycin does not contain a classical noncovalent DNA-binding motif such as an intercalating unit, a groove binder, or a polycation. The experiments described here provide evidence that leinamycin is an atypical DNA-intercalating agent. A competition binding assay involving daunomycin-mediated inhibition of DNA alkylation by leinamycin provided evidence that activated leinamycin binds to duplex DNA with an apparent binding constant of approximately 4.3 ± 0.4 × 103 M−1. Activated leinamycin caused duplex unwinding and hydrodynamic changes in DNA-containing solutions that are indicative of DNA intercalation. Characterization of the reaction of activated leinamycin with palindromic duplexes containing 5'-CG and 5'-GC target sites, bulge-containing duplexes, and 5-methylcytosine-containing duplexes provided evidence regarding the orientation of leinamycin with respect to target guanine residues. The data allows construction of a model for the leinamycin-DNA complex suggesting how a modest DNA-binding constant combines with proper positioning of the natural product to drive efficient alkylation of guanine residues in the major groove of duplex DNA. PMID:21954957

  6. Non-Covalent Supported of l-Proline on Graphene Oxide/Fe3O4 Nanocomposite: A Novel, Highly Efficient and Superparamagnetically Separable Catalyst for the Synthesis of Bis-Pyrazole Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosadegh Keshavarz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A superparamagnetic graphene oxide/Fe3O4/l-proline nano hybrid that was obtained from the non-covalent immobilization of l-proline on graphene oxide/Fe3O4 nanocomposite was used as a new magnetically separable catalyst for the efficient synthesis of 4,4′-(arylmethylenebis(1H-pyrazol-5-ol derivatives. The prepared heterogeneous catalyst was characterized using FTIR, TGA, DTG, XRD, TEM, SEM, and elemental analysis techniques. Short reaction times (5–15 min, excellent yields (87–98%, and simple experimental procedure with an easy work-up are some of the advantages of the introduced catalyst.

  7. Controlling noncovalent interactions between a lysine-rich α-helical peptide and self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols on Au through functional group diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raigoza, Annette F.; Onyirioha, Kristeen; Webb, Lauren J., E-mail: lwebb@cm.utexas.edu

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Functional variety in SAMs control covalent binding of proteins to surfaces. • Peptide density on Au(111) surfaces controlled by SAM functional groups. • Affinity between biomolecule and SAM surface follows a Langmuir isotherm. • Surface chemistry can mimic functional group diversity in proteins and peptides. - Abstract: Reliably attaching a structured biomolecule to an inorganic substrate would enable the preparation of surfaces that incorporate both biological and inorganic functions and structures. To this end, we have previously developed a procedure using the copper(I)-catalyzed click reaction to tether synthetic α-helical peptides carrying two alkyne groups to well-ordered alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on a Au(111) surface, in which the SAM is composed of a mixture of methyl and azide termination. Proteins, however, are composed of many diverse functional groups, and this composition directly effects protein structure, interactions, and reactivity. Here, we explore the utility of mixed SAMs with alternative terminating functional groups to tune and direct the reactivity of the surface through noncovalent peptide-surface interactions. We study both polar surfaces (OH-terminated) and charged surfaces (COOH- and NH{sub 3}-terminated, which are negatively and positively charged, respectively, under our reaction conditions). Surfaces were functionalized with a bipolar peptide composed of Lys and Leu residues that could express different interactions through either hydrophilic and/or charge (Lys) or hydrophobic (Leu) influences. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize surfaces at all stages of the peptide functionalization procedure. This strategy resulted in a high density of surface-bound α-helices without aggregation. Mixed SAMs that included a positively charged alkanethiol along with the azide-terminated thiol resulted in a more efficient reaction and better

  8. Controlling noncovalent interactions between a lysine-rich α-helical peptide and self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols on Au through functional group diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raigoza, Annette F.; Onyirioha, Kristeen; Webb, Lauren J.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Functional variety in SAMs control covalent binding of proteins to surfaces. • Peptide density on Au(111) surfaces controlled by SAM functional groups. • Affinity between biomolecule and SAM surface follows a Langmuir isotherm. • Surface chemistry can mimic functional group diversity in proteins and peptides. - Abstract: Reliably attaching a structured biomolecule to an inorganic substrate would enable the preparation of surfaces that incorporate both biological and inorganic functions and structures. To this end, we have previously developed a procedure using the copper(I)-catalyzed click reaction to tether synthetic α-helical peptides carrying two alkyne groups to well-ordered alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on a Au(111) surface, in which the SAM is composed of a mixture of methyl and azide termination. Proteins, however, are composed of many diverse functional groups, and this composition directly effects protein structure, interactions, and reactivity. Here, we explore the utility of mixed SAMs with alternative terminating functional groups to tune and direct the reactivity of the surface through noncovalent peptide-surface interactions. We study both polar surfaces (OH-terminated) and charged surfaces (COOH- and NH_3-terminated, which are negatively and positively charged, respectively, under our reaction conditions). Surfaces were functionalized with a bipolar peptide composed of Lys and Leu residues that could express different interactions through either hydrophilic and/or charge (Lys) or hydrophobic (Leu) influences. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize surfaces at all stages of the peptide functionalization procedure. This strategy resulted in a high density of surface-bound α-helices without aggregation. Mixed SAMs that included a positively charged alkanethiol along with the azide-terminated thiol resulted in a more efficient reaction and better alignment

  9. Density-functional approaches to noncovalent interactions: a comparison of dispersion corrections (DFT-D), exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) theory, and specialized functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Lori A; Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Sumpter, Bobby G; Sherrill, C David

    2011-02-28

    A systematic study of techniques for treating noncovalent interactions within the computationally efficient density functional theory (DFT) framework is presented through comparison to benchmark-quality evaluations of binding strength compiled for molecular complexes of diverse size and nature. In particular, the efficacy of functionals deliberately crafted to encompass long-range forces, a posteriori DFT+dispersion corrections (DFT-D2 and DFT-D3), and exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) theory is assessed against a large collection (469 energy points) of reference interaction energies at the CCSD(T) level of theory extrapolated to the estimated complete basis set limit. The established S22 [revised in J. Chem. Phys. 132, 144104 (2010)] and JSCH test sets of minimum-energy structures, as well as collections of dispersion-bound (NBC10) and hydrogen-bonded (HBC6) dissociation curves and a pairwise decomposition of a protein-ligand reaction site (HSG), comprise the chemical systems for this work. From evaluations of accuracy, consistency, and efficiency for PBE-D, BP86-D, B97-D, PBE0-D, B3LYP-D, B970-D, M05-2X, M06-2X, ωB97X-D, B2PLYP-D, XYG3, and B3LYP-XDM methodologies, it is concluded that distinct, often contrasting, groups of these elicit the best performance within the accessible double-ζ or robust triple-ζ basis set regimes and among hydrogen-bonded or dispersion-dominated complexes. For overall results, M05-2X, B97-D3, and B970-D2 yield superior values in conjunction with aug-cc-pVDZ, for a mean absolute deviation of 0.41 - 0.49 kcal/mol, and B3LYP-D3, B97-D3, ωB97X-D, and B2PLYP-D3 dominate with aug-cc-pVTZ, affording, together with XYG3/6-311+G(3df,2p), a mean absolute deviation of 0.33 - 0.38 kcal/mol.

  10. Non-covalent interactions between {N,N′-bis[(2-pyridinyl)methylene]-1, 2-benzenediamine]-bis(nitrato)}Cu(II) with pyridoxine hydrochloride in methanol at T = (298.15, 308.15 and 318.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahman, Dhiraj; Sinha, Biswajit

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Methanolic solution of pyridoxine hydrochloride used as solvent. • {N,N′-bis[(2-pyridinyl)methylene]-1, 2-benzenediamine]-bis(nitrato)}Cu(II) used as solute. • Partial molar volumes and viscosity B-coefficients of the solute were determined. • Weak 1:1 association between the complex and pyridoxine hydrochloride found. • Non-covalent interactions and Cu(II) complex acts as a net structure maker in the ternary solutions. - Abstract: Non-covalent interactions between of {N,N′-bis[(2-pyridinyl)methylene]-1, 2-benzenediamine]-bis(nitrato)}Cu(II) with pyridoxine hydrochloride in methanol were investigated by a combination of physico-chemical and spectrophotometric methods at T = (298.15, 308.15 and 318.15) K under ambient pressure. From measured density and viscosity data the apparent molar volume (ϕ V ), the slope (S V ∗ ), standard partial molar volume (ϕ V 0 ), standard transfer volume (Δ t ϕ V 0 ), isobaric apparent molar expansibility (ϕ E ), standard isobaric partial molar expansibility (ϕ E 0 ), the viscosity B-coefficient, its temperature derivative (∂B/∂T), solvation number (S n ) were calculated and discussed on the basis of specific or non-specific (solute + cosolute) and (solute + solvent) interactions. Thermodynamics of viscous flow were discussed on the basis of the transition state theory. Spectrophotometric results indicated 1:1 (solute + cosolute) interaction between the complex and pyridoxine hydrochloride

  11. Water-soluble light-emitting nanoparticles prepared by non-covalent bond self-assembly of a hydroxyl group functionalized oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene) with different water-soluble polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Water-soluble light-emitting nanoparticles were prepared from hydroxyl group functionalized oligos(p-phenyleneethynylene) (OHOPEL) and water-soluble polymers(PEG,PAA,and PG) by non-covalent bond self-assembly.Their structure and optoelectronic properties were investigated through dynamic light scattering(DLS) ,UV and PL spectroscopy.The optical properties of OHOPEL-based water-soluble nanoparticles exhibited the same properties as that found in OHOPEL films,indicating the existence of interchain-aggregation of OHOPELs in the nanoparticles.OHOPEL-based nanoparticles prepared from conjugated oligomers show smaller size and lower dispersity than nanoparticles from conjugated polymers,which means that the structures of water-soluble nanoparticles are linked to the conjugated length.Furthermore,the OHOPEL/PG and OHOPEL/PAA systems produced smaller particles and lower polydispersity than the OHOPEL/PEG system,indicating that there may exist influence of the strength of non-covalent bonds on the size and degree of dispersity of the nanoparticles.

  12. A statistical nanomechanism of biomolecular patterning actuated by surface potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Ting; Lin, Chih-Hao

    2011-02-01

    Biomolecular patterning on a nanoscale/microscale on chip surfaces is one of the most important techniques used in vitro biochip technologies. Here, we report upon a stochastic mechanics model we have developed for biomolecular patterning controlled by surface potential. The probabilistic biomolecular surface adsorption behavior can be modeled by considering the potential difference between the binding and nonbinding states. To verify our model, we experimentally implemented a method of electroactivated biomolecular patterning technology and the resulting fluorescence intensity matched the prediction of the developed model quite well. Based on this result, we also experimentally demonstrated the creation of a bovine serum albumin pattern with a width of 200 nm in 5 min operations. This submicron noncovalent-binding biomolecular pattern can be maintained for hours after removing the applied electrical voltage. These stochastic understandings and experimental results not only prove the feasibility of submicron biomolecular patterns on chips but also pave the way for nanoscale interfacial-bioelectrical engineering.

  13. Continuous compliance compensation of position-dependent flexible structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kontaras, Nikolaos; Heertjes, Marcel; Zwart, Heiko J.

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of lightweight high-performance motion systems in lithography and other applications imposes lower requirements on actuators, amplifiers, and cooling. However, the decreased stiffness of lightweight designs increases the effect of structural flexibilities especially when the point

  14. Position-dependent Effects of Polylysine on Sec Protein Transport*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fu-Cheng; Bageshwar, Umesh K.; Musser, Siegfried M.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial Sec protein translocation system catalyzes the transport of unfolded precursor proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane. Using a recently developed real time fluorescence-based transport assay, the effects of the number and distribution of positive charges on the transport time and transport efficiency of proOmpA were examined. As expected, an increase in the number of lysine residues generally increased transport time and decreased transport efficiency. However, the observed effects were highly dependent on the polylysine position in the mature domain. In addition, a string of consecutive positive charges generally had a more significant effect on transport time and efficiency than separating the charges into two or more charged segments. Thirty positive charges distributed throughout the mature domain resulted in effects similar to 10 consecutive charges near the N terminus of the mature domain. These data support a model in which the local effects of positive charge on the translocation kinetics dominate over total thermodynamic constraints. The rapid translocation kinetics of some highly charged proOmpA mutants suggest that the charge is partially shielded from the electric field gradient during transport, possibly by the co-migration of counter ions. The transport times of precursors with multiple positively charged sequences, or “pause sites,” were fairly well predicted by a local effect model. However, the kinetic profile predicted by this local effect model was not observed. Instead, the transport kinetics observed for precursors with multiple polylysine segments support a model in which translocation through the SecYEG pore is not the rate-limiting step of transport. PMID:22367204

  15. Position-dependent effects of polylysine on Sec protein transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fu-Cheng; Bageshwar, Umesh K; Musser, Siegfried M

    2012-04-13

    The bacterial Sec protein translocation system catalyzes the transport of unfolded precursor proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane. Using a recently developed real time fluorescence-based transport assay, the effects of the number and distribution of positive charges on the transport time and transport efficiency of proOmpA were examined. As expected, an increase in the number of lysine residues generally increased transport time and decreased transport efficiency. However, the observed effects were highly dependent on the polylysine position in the mature domain. In addition, a string of consecutive positive charges generally had a more significant effect on transport time and efficiency than separating the charges into two or more charged segments. Thirty positive charges distributed throughout the mature domain resulted in effects similar to 10 consecutive charges near the N terminus of the mature domain. These data support a model in which the local effects of positive charge on the translocation kinetics dominate over total thermodynamic constraints. The rapid translocation kinetics of some highly charged proOmpA mutants suggest that the charge is partially shielded from the electric field gradient during transport, possibly by the co-migration of counter ions. The transport times of precursors with multiple positively charged sequences, or "pause sites," were fairly well predicted by a local effect model. However, the kinetic profile predicted by this local effect model was not observed. Instead, the transport kinetics observed for precursors with multiple polylysine segments support a model in which translocation through the SecYEG pore is not the rate-limiting step of transport.

  16. Positional dependence of the SNPP VIIRS SD BRDF degradation factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ning; Chen, Xuexia; Chang, Tiejun; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2017-09-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite is a passive scanning radiometer and an imager. The VIIRS regularly performs on-orbit radiometric calibration of its reflective solar bands (RSBs) through observing an onboard sunlit solar diffuser (SD). The reflectance of the SD changes over time and the change is denoted as the SD bidirectional reflectance distribution function degradation factor. The degradation factor, measured by an onboard solar diffuser stability monitor, has been shown to be both incident sunlight and outgoing direction dependent. In this Proceeding, we investigate the factor's dependence on SD position. We develop a model to relate the SD degradation factor with the amount of solar exposure. We use Earth measurements to evaluate the effectiveness of the model.

  17. Peptide-based soft materials as potential drug delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sandeep; Joshi, K B; Ghosh, Surajit

    2007-11-01

    Emerging concepts in the construction of nanostructures hold immense potential in the areas of drug delivery and targeting. Such nanoscopic assemblies/structures, similar to natural proteins and self-associating systems, may lead to the formation of programmable soft structures with expanded drug delivery options and the capability to circumvent first-pass metabolism. This article aims to illustrate key recent developments and innovative bioinspired design paradigms pertaining to peptide-containing self-assembled tubular and vesicular soft structures. Soft structures are composed of components that self-assemble to reveal diverse morphologies stabilized by weak, noncovalent interactions. Morphological properties of such structures and their ability to encapsulate drugs, biologicals and bioactive small molecules, with the promise of targeted delivery, are discussed.

  18. Non-covalent association of protein and capsular polysaccharide on bacteria-sized latex beads as a model for polysaccharide-specific humoral immunity to intact Gram-positive extracellular bacteria1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colino, Jesus; Duke, Leah; Snapper, Clifford M.

    2013-01-01

    Intact Streptococcus pneumoniae, expressing type 14 capsular polysaccharide (PPS14) and type III Streptococcus agalactiae containing a PPS14 core capsule identical to PPS14, exhibit non-covalent associations of PPS14 and bacterial protein, in contrast to soluble covalent conjugates of these respective antigens. Both bacteria and conjugates induce murine PPS14-specific IgG responses dependent on CD4+ T cells. Further, secondary immunization with conjugate and S. agalactiae, although not S. pneumoniae, results in a boosted response. However, in contrast to conjugate, PPS14-specific IgG responses to bacteria lack affinity maturation, utilize the 44.1-idiotype and are dependent on marginal zone B cells. To better understand the mechanism underlying this dichotomy we developed a minimal model of intact bacteria in which PPS14 and pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) were stably attached to 1 μm (bacteria-sized) latex beads, but not directly linked to each other, in contrast to PPS14-PspA conjugate. PPS14+[PspA] beads, similar to conjugate, induced in mice boosted PPS14-specific IgG secondary responses, dependent on T cells and ICOS-dependent costimulation, and in which priming could be achieved with PspA alone. In contrast to conjugate, but similar to intact bacteria, the primary PPS14-specific IgG response to PPS14+[PspA] beads peaked rapidly, with the secondary response highly enriched for the 44.1-idiotype and lacking affinity maturation. These results demonstrate that non-covalent association in a particle, of polysaccharide and protein, recapitulates essential immunologic characteristics of intact bacteria that are distinct from soluble covalent conjugates of these respective antigens. PMID:23926322

  19. Magnon spin transport driven by the magnon chemical potential in a magnetic insulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, L J; Peters, K J H; Bauer, G. E. W.; Duine, R A; van Wees, B J

    2016-01-01

    We develop a linear-response transport theory of diffusive spin and heat transport by magnons in magnetic insulators with metallic contacts. The magnons are described by a position-dependent temperature and chemical potential that are governed by diffusion equations with characteristic relaxation

  20. Magnon spin transport driven by the magnon chemical potential in a magnetic insulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, L.J.; Peters, K. J H; Bauer, G.E.; Duine, R. A.; Van Wees, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    We develop a linear-response transport theory of diffusive spin and heat transport by magnons in magnetic insulators with metallic contacts. The magnons are described by a position-dependent temperature and chemical potential that are governed by diffusion equations with characteristic relaxation

  1. Magnon spin transport driven by the magnon chemical potential in a magnetic insulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, Ludo J.; Peters, Kevin J. H.; Duine, Rembert A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830127; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Wees, Bart J. van

    2016-01-01

    We develop a linear-response transport theory of diffusive spin and heat transport by magnons in magnetic insulators with metallic contacts. The magnons are described by a position dependent temperature and chemical potential that are governed by diffusion equations with characteristic relaxation

  2. Potential enzyme toxicity of oxytetracycline to catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi Zhenxing; Liu Rutao; Zhang Hao

    2010-01-01

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a kind of widely used veterinary drugs. The residue of OTC in the environment is potentially harmful. In the present work, the non-covalent toxic interaction of OTC with catalase was investigated by the fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy at physiological pH 7.4. OTC can interact with catalase to form a complex mainly by van der Waals' interactions and hydrogen bonds with one binding site. The association constants K were determined to be K 293K = 7.09 x 10 4 L mol -1 and K 311K = 3.31 x 10 4 L mol -1 . The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH o , ΔG o and ΔS o ) of the interaction were calculated. Based on the Foerster theory of non-radiative energy transfer, the distance between bound OTC and the tryptophan residues of catalase was determined to be 6.48 nm. The binding of OTC can result in change of the micro-environment of the tryptophan residues and the secondary structure of catalase. The activity of catalase was also inhibited for the bound OTC. This work establishes a new strategy to probe the enzyme toxicity of veterinary drug residues and is helpful for clarifying the molecular toxic mechanism of OTC in vivo. The established strategy can be used to investigate the potential enzyme toxicity of other small organic pollutants and drugs.

  3. Potential enzyme toxicity of oxytetracycline to catalase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhenxing, Chi; Rutao, Liu; Zhang Hao, E-mail: Trutaoliu@sdu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, China-America CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2010-10-15

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a kind of widely used veterinary drugs. The residue of OTC in the environment is potentially harmful. In the present work, the non-covalent toxic interaction of OTC with catalase was investigated by the fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy at physiological pH 7.4. OTC can interact with catalase to form a complex mainly by van der Waals' interactions and hydrogen bonds with one binding site. The association constants K were determined to be K{sub 293K} = 7.09 x 10{sup 4} L mol{sup -1} and K{sub 311K} = 3.31 x 10{sup 4} L mol{sup -1}. The thermodynamic parameters ({Delta}H{sup o}, {Delta}G{sup o} and {Delta}S{sup o}) of the interaction were calculated. Based on the Foerster theory of non-radiative energy transfer, the distance between bound OTC and the tryptophan residues of catalase was determined to be 6.48 nm. The binding of OTC can result in change of the micro-environment of the tryptophan residues and the secondary structure of catalase. The activity of catalase was also inhibited for the bound OTC. This work establishes a new strategy to probe the enzyme toxicity of veterinary drug residues and is helpful for clarifying the molecular toxic mechanism of OTC in vivo. The established strategy can be used to investigate the potential enzyme toxicity of other small organic pollutants and drugs.

  4. Synthesis of 1D-glyconanomaterials by a hybrid noncovalent-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes: a study of their selective interactions with lectins and with live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernía Leal, M.; Assali, M.; Cid, J. J.; Valdivia, V.; Franco, J. M.; Fernández, I.; Pozo, D.; Khiar, N.

    2015-11-01

    To take full advantage of the remarkable applications of carbon nanotubes in different fields, there is a need to develop effective methods to improve their water dispersion and biocompatibility while maintaining their physical properties. In this sense, current approaches suffer from serious drawbacks such as loss of electronic structure together with low surface coverage in the case of covalent functionalizations, or instability of the dynamic hybrids obtained by non-covalent functionalizations. In the present work, we examined the molecular basis of an original strategy that combines the advantages of both functionalizations without their main drawbacks. The hierarchical self-assembly of diacetylenic-based neoglycolipids into highly organized and compacted rings around the nanotubes, followed by photopolymerization leads to the formation of nanotubes covered with glyconanorings with a shish kebab-type topology exposing the carbohydrate ligands to the water phase in a multivalent fashion. The glyconanotubes obtained are fully functional, and able to establish specific interactions with their cognate receptors. In fact, by taking advantage of this selective binding, an easy method to sense lectins as a working model of toxin detection was developed based on a simple analysis of TEM images. Remarkably, different experimental settings to assess cell membrane integrity, cell growth kinetics and cell cycle demonstrated the cellular biocompatibility of the sugar-coated carbon nanotubes compared to pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes.To take full advantage of the remarkable applications of carbon nanotubes in different fields, there is a need to develop effective methods to improve their water dispersion and biocompatibility while maintaining their physical properties. In this sense, current approaches suffer from serious drawbacks such as loss of electronic structure together with low surface coverage in the case of covalent functionalizations, or instability of

  5. Potential Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lukeš, Jaroslav; Netuka, Ivan; Veselý, Jiří

    1988-01-01

    Within the tradition of meetings devoted to potential theory, a conference on potential theory took place in Prague on 19-24, July 1987. The Conference was organized by the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, with the collaboration of the Institute of Mathematics, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, the Department of Mathematics, Czech University of Technology, the Union of Czechoslovak Mathematicians and Physicists, the Czechoslovak Scientific and Technical Society, and supported by IMU. During the Conference, 69 scientific communications from different branches of potential theory were presented; the majority of them are in­ cluded in the present volume. (Papers based on survey lectures delivered at the Conference, its program as well as a collection of problems from potential theory will appear in a special volume of the Lecture Notes Series published by Springer-Verlag). Topics of these communications truly reflect the vast scope of contemporary potential theory. Some contributions deal...

  6. Potential bags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, P.L.; Tomio, L.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, relativistic confining potential models, endowed with bag constants associated to volume energy terms, are investigated. In contrast to the usual bag model, these potential bags are distinguished by having smeared bag surfaces. Based on the dynamical assumptions underlying the fuzzy bag model, these bag constants are derived from the corresponding energy-momentum tensor. Explicit expressions for the single-quark energies and for the nucleon bag constant are obtained by means of an improved analytical version of the saddle-point variational method for the Dirac equation with confining power-law potentials of the scalar plus vector (S + V) or pure scalar (S) type

  7. Groundwater Potential

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    big timmy

    4Department of Geology, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria. Corresponding ... integrated for the classification of the study area into different groundwater potential zones. .... table is mainly controlled by subsurface movement of water into ...

  8. Non-covalent synthesis of organic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.J.; Timmerman, P.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    This review describes the synthesis, characterization and functionalization of hydrogen bonded, box-like assemblies. These assemblies are formed upon mixing bismelamine calix[4]arenes with a complementary barbiturate in apolar solvents. Various techniques for the characterization have been used,

  9. Discovery, Synthesis, And Structure-Based Optimization of a Series of N-(tert-Butyl)-2-(N-arylamido)-2-(pyridin-3-yl) Acetamides (ML188) as Potent Noncovalent Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) 3CL Protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Jon [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Specialized Chemistry Center for Probe Development (MLPCN), Nashville, TN (United States); Grum-Tokars, Valerie [Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Zhou, Ya [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Specialized Chemistry Center for Probe Development (MLPCN), Nashville, TN (United States); Turlington, Mark [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Specialized Chemistry Center for Probe Development (MLPCN), Nashville, TN (United States); Saldanha, S. Adrian [Sripps Research Inst. Molecular Screening Center, Jupiter, FL (United States); Chase, Peter [Sripps Research Inst. Molecular Screening Center, Jupiter, FL (United States); Eggler, Aimee [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Dawson, Eric S. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Specialized Chemistry Center for Probe Development (MLPCN), Nashville, TN (United States); Baez-Santos, Yahira M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Tomar, Sakshi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Mielech, Anna M. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Baker, Susan C. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Lindsley, Craig W. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Specialized Chemistry Center for Probe Development (MLPCN), Nashville, TN (United States); Hodder, Peter [Sripps Research Inst. Molecular Screening Center, Jupiter, FL (United States); Mesecar, Andrew [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Stauffer, Shaun R. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt Specialized Chemistry Center for Probe Development (MLPCN), Nashville, TN (United States)

    2012-12-11

    A high-throughput screen of the NIH molecular libraries sample collection and subsequent optimization of a lead dipeptide-like series of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) main protease (3CLpro) inhibitors led to the identification of probe compound ML188 (16-(R), (R)-N-(4-(tert-butyl)phenyl)-N-(2-(tert-butylamino)-2-oxo-1-(pyridin-3-yl)ethyl)furan-2-carboxamide, Pubchem CID: 46897844). But, unlike the majority of reported coronavirus 3CLpro inhibitors that act via covalent modification of the enzyme, 16-(R) is a noncovalent SARS-CoV 3CLpro inhibitor with moderate MW and good enzyme and antiviral inhibitory activity. A multicomponent Ugi reaction was utilized to rapidly explore structure–activity relationships within S1', S1, and S2enzyme binding pockets. Moreover, the X-ray structure of SARS-CoV 3CLpro bound with 16-(R) was instrumental in guiding subsequent rounds of chemistry optimization. 16-(R) provides an excellent starting point for the further design and refinement of 3CLpro inhibitors that act by a noncovalent mechanism of action.

  10. Violent Potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Henrik Hvenegaard; Søgaard, Thomas Friis

    2015-01-01

    ” plays a critical role in relation to Bugkalot men’s construction of hegemonic masculinity and the sustaining of complex egalitarian relations. The Bugkalot have a notoriously violent history; until the late 1970s more than half of the adult men engaged in ritual killings. While most Bugkalot men has...... that can also be used in other contexts to understand how men construct hegemonic masculinity by strategically adopting the interspace of civility and violence.......This article explores the social significance of violence as potentiality and performance among former headhunters. Taking its outset in an ethnographic study of violence and masculinity among the Philippine people known as the Bugkalot, we explore how violence as “performed violent potentiality...

  11. Potential theory

    CERN Document Server

    Helms, Lester L

    2014-01-01

    Potential Theory presents a clear path from calculus to classical potential theory and beyond, with the aim of moving the reader into the area of mathematical research as quickly as possible. The subject matter is developed from first principles using only calculus. Commencing with the inverse square law for gravitational and electromagnetic forces and the divergence theorem, the author develops methods for constructing solutions of Laplace's equation on a region with prescribed values on the boundary of the region. The latter half of the book addresses more advanced material aimed at those with the background of a senior undergraduate or beginning graduate course in real analysis. Starting with solutions of the Dirichlet problem subject to mixed boundary conditions on the simplest of regions, methods of morphing such solutions onto solutions of Poisson's equation on more general regions are developed using diffeomorphisms and the Perron-Wiener-Brelot method, culminating in application to Brownian motion. In ...

  12. Biological assessment of neonicotinoids imidacloprid and its major metabolites for potentially human health using globular proteins as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fei; Peng, Wei

    2015-06-01

    The assessment of biological activities of imidacloprid and its two major metabolites, namely 6-chloronicotinic acid and 2-imidazolidone for nontarget organism, by employing essentially functional biomacromolecules, albumin and hemoglobin as a potentially model with the use of circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence, extrinsic 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence as well as molecular modeling is the theme of this work. By dint of CD spectra and synchronous fluorescence, it was clear that the orderly weak interactions between amino acid residues within globular proteins were disturbed by imidacloprid, and this event led to marginally alterations or self-regulations of protein conformation so as to lodge imidacloprid more tightly. Both steady state and time-resolved fluorescence suggested that the fluorescence of Trp residues in proteins was quenched after the presence of imidacloprid, corresponding to noncovalent protein-imidacloprid complexes formation and, the reaction belongs to moderate association (K=1.888/1.614×10(4)M(-1) for albumin/hemoglobin-imidacloprid, respectively), hydrogen bonds and π stacking performed a vital role in stabilizing the complexes, as derived from thermodynamic analysis and molecular modeling. With the aid of hydrophobic ANS experiments, subdomain IIA and α1β2 interface of albumin and hemoglobin, respectively, were found to be preserved high-affinity for imidacloprid. These results ties in with the subsequently molecular modeling laying imidacloprid in the Sudlow's site I and close to Trp-213 residue on albumin, while settling down B/Trp-37 residue nearby in hemoglobin, and these conclusions further confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation. But, at the same time, several crucial noncovalent bonds came from other amino acid residues, e.g. Arg-194 and Arg-198 (albumin) and B/Arg-40, B/Asp-99 and B/Asn-102 (hemoglobin) cannot be ignored completely. Based on the comparative studies of

  13. Violent potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Henrik Hvenegaard; Friis Søgaard, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    as ‘performed violent potentiality’ plays a critical role in relation to Bugkalot men’s construction of hegemonic masculinity and the sustaining of complex egalitarian relations. The Bugkalot have a notoriously violent history; until the late 1970s more than half of the adult men engaged in ritual killings...... provide general insights that can also be used in other contexts to understand how men construct hegemonic masculinity by strategically adopting the interspace of civility and violence.......This article explores the social significance of violence as potentiality and performance among former headhunters engaged in ritual killings. Taking its outset in an ethnographic study of violence and masculinity among the Philippine people known as the Bugkalot, we explore how violence...

  14. Potential of acylated peptides to target the influenza A virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lauster

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For antiviral drug design, especially in the field of influenza virus research, potent multivalent inhibitors raise high expectations for combating epidemics and pandemics. Among a large variety of covalent and non-covalent scaffold systems for a multivalent display of inhibitors, we created a simple supramolecular platform to enhance the antiviral effect of our recently developed antiviral Peptide B (PeBGF, preventing binding of influenza virus to the host cell. By conjugating the peptide with stearic acid to create a higher-order structure with a multivalent display, we could significantly enhance the inhibitory effect against the serotypes of both human pathogenic influenza virus A/Aichi/2/1968 H3N2, and avian pathogenic A/FPV/Rostock/34 H7N1 in the hemagglutination inhibition assay. Further, the inhibitory potential of stearylated PeBGF (C18-PeBGF was investigated by infection inhibition assays, in which we achieved low micromolar inhibition constants against both viral strains. In addition, we compared C18-PeBGF to other published amphiphilic peptide inhibitors, such as the stearylated sugar receptor mimicking peptide (Matsubara et al. 2010, and the “Entry Blocker” (EB (Jones et al. 2006, with respect to their antiviral activity against infection by Influenza A Virus (IAV H3N2. However, while this strategy seems at a first glance promising, the native situation is quite different from our experimental model settings. First, we found a strong potential of those peptides to form large amyloid-like supramolecular assemblies. Second, in vivo, the large excess of cell surface membranes provides an unspecific target for the stearylated peptides. We show that acylated peptides insert into the lipid phase of such membranes. Eventually, our study reveals serious limitations of this type of self-assembling IAV inhibitors.

  15. Open Circuit Potential Changes upon Protonation/Deprotonation of ω-Functionalized Alkanethiols on Au: Determination of Surface pK {sub 1/2} in Aqueous and Non-Aqueous System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Ryul; Park, Kyung Soon; Jang, Jae Won; Hwang, Seong Pil [Korea Univ., Sejong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The controlled assembly of functional nanomaterials has been drawing significant interest for making devices by integration of nanomaterials. The building blocks of functional nanomaterials might be confined spatially on the chemically patterned surface through both covalent and non-covalent bonds. Potentiometric measurement is affordable technique for various researchers because it requires only voltmeter and reference electrode. Moreover, it can be applied to various polar solvent such as methanol and ethanol. The open circuit potential (OCP) is measured indicating the potential difference between reference electrode and working electrode. The potential of working electrode might be affected by redox chemical reaction and charge state/separation. Our results provide the simple and affordable method to investigate pK {sub 1/2} of thin film both in aqueous phase and in non-aqueous phase, which has significant role in colloidal chemistry, nanochemistry, surface chemistry, electrochemistry, and others.

  16. Scattering of sine-Gordon kinks on potential wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piette, Bernard; Zakrzewski, W J

    2007-01-01

    We study the scattering properties of sine-Gordon kinks on obstructions in the form of finite size potential 'wells'. We model this by making the coefficient of the cos(ψ) - 1 term in the Lagrangian position dependent. We show that when the kinks find themselves in the well they radiate and then interact with this radiation. As a result of this energy loss, the kinks become trapped for small velocities while at higher velocities they are transmitted with a loss of energy. However, the interaction with the radiation can produce 'unexpected' reflections by the well. We present two simple models which capture the gross features of this behaviour. Both involve standing waves either at the edges of the well or in the well itself

  17. Localized second-order optical potential for electron scattering in terms of imaginary-frequency susceptibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valone, S.M.; Truhlar, D.G.; Thirumialai, D.

    1982-01-01

    A local approximation to the second-order optical potential for elastic scattering of low-energy electrons from ground-state atoms is expressed in terms of the imaginary-frequency susceptibilities of the atom due to a point charge and to modified perturbing potentials. This provides a basis for the physically appealing concept of regarding the perturbation due to the projectile as having a position-dependent effective frequency associated with it. The result is extended to higher energies with the use of the concept of a local kinetic energy. With a semiclassical approximation the result reduces to a simple general form that should be useful for model potential studies of electron-atom and electron-molecule scattering. Alternatively, variational functionals for the susceptibilities can be used to calculate the approximate optical potential most rigorously without making effective-frequency, average-kinetic-energy, or semiclassical approximations. Intermediate levels of rigor are also possible

  18. Non-bonding interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects play a critical role in the relative stability of group 12 complexes arising from interaction of diethanoldithiocarbamate with the cations of transition metals Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II): a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Homayoon; Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-07-01

    The chelating properties of diethanoldithiocarbamate (DEDC) and π-electron flow from the nitrogen atom to the sulfur atom via a plane-delocalized π-orbital system (quasi ring) was studied using a density functional theory method. The molecular structure of DEDC and its complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) were also considered. First, the geometries of this ligand and DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) were optimized, and the formation energies of these complexes were then calculated based on the electronic energy, or sum of electronic energies, with the zero point energy of each species. Formation energies indicated the DEDC-Zn(II) complex as the most stable complex, and DEDC-Cd(II) as the least stable. Structural data showed that the N1-C2 π-bond was localized in the complexes rather than the ligand, and a delocalized π-bond over S7-C2-S8 was also present. The stability of DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) complexes increased in the presence of the non-specific effects of the solvent (PCM model), and their relative stability did not change. There was π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 and along S7-C2-S8 in the ligand. The π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 was abolished when the metal interacted with sulfur atoms. Energy belonging to van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand was calculated for each complex. The results of nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) indicated a decreasing trend as Zn(II) Hg(II) for the aromaticity of the quasi-rings. Finally, by ignoring van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand, the relative stability of the complexes was changed as follows:[Formula: see text] Graphical Abstract Huge electronic cloud localized on Hg(II) in the Hg(II)-DEDC complex.

  19. Unexpected Position-Dependent Effects of Ribose G-Quartets in G-Quadruplexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhou, J.; Amrane, S.; Rosu, F.; Salgado, G.; Bian, Y.; Tateishi-Karimata, H.; Largy, E.; Korkut, D. N.; Bourdoncle, A.; Miyoshi, D.; Zhang, J.; Ju, H.; Wang, W.; Sugimoto, N.; Gabelica, V.; Mergny, Jean-Louis

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 23 (2017), s. 7768-7779 ISSN 0002-7863 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : human telomeric rna * electrospray mass-spectrometry * molecular crowding conditions * dna g-quadruplexes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cells, batteries, fuel cells, corrosion metals, electrolysis) Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016

  20. Connective Tissue Fibroblast Properties Are Position-Dependent during Mouse Digit Tip Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Karen; Karapetyan, Adrine; Fernando, Warnakulusuriya Akash; Simkin, Jennifer; Han, Manjong; Rugg, Elizabeth L.; Muneoka, Ken

    2013-01-01

    A key factor that contributes to the regenerative ability of regeneration-competent animals such as the salamander is their use of innate positional cues that guide the regeneration process. The limbs of mammals has severe regenerative limitations, however the distal most portion of the terminal phalange is regeneration competent. This regenerative ability of the adult mouse digit is level dependent: amputation through the distal half of the terminal phalanx (P3) leads to successful regeneration, whereas amputation through a more proximal location, e.g. the subterminal phalangeal element (P2), fails to regenerate. Do the connective tissue cells of the mammalian digit play a role similar to that of the salamander limb in controlling the regenerative response? To begin to address this question, we isolated and cultured cells of the connective tissue surrounding the phalangeal bones of regeneration competent (P3) and incompetent (P2) levels. Despite their close proximity and localization, these cells show very distinctive profiles when characterized in vitro and in vivo. In vitro studies comparing their proliferation and position-specific interactions reveal that cells isolated from the P3 and P2 are both capable of organizing and differentiating epithelial progenitors, but with different outcomes. The difference in interactions are further characterized with three-dimension cultures, in which P3 regenerative cells are shown to lack a contractile response that is seen in other fibroblast cultures, including the P2 cultures. In in vivo engraftment studies, the difference between these two cell lines is made more apparent. While both P2 and P3 cells participated in the regeneration of the terminal phalanx, their survival and proliferative indices were distinct, thus suggesting a key difference in their ability to interact within a regeneration permissive environment. These studies are the first to demonstrate distinct positional characteristics of connective tissue cells that are associated with their regenerative capabilities. PMID:23349966

  1. Control of ribosome traffic by position-dependent choice of synonymous codons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Pedersen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) encodes a sequence of amino acids by using codons. For most amino acids, there are multiple synonymous codons that can encode the amino acid. The translation speed can vary from one codon to another, thus there is room for changing the ribosome speed while keeping the amino acid sequence and hence the resulting protein. Recently, it has been noticed that the choice of the synonymous codon, via the resulting distribution of slow- and fast-translated codons, affects not only on the average speed of one ribosome translating the mRNA but also might have an effect on nearby ribosomes by affecting the appearance of ‘traffic jams’ where multiple ribosomes collide and form queues. To test this ‘context effect’ further, we here investigate the effect of the sequence of synonymous codons on the ribosome traffic by using a ribosome traffic model with codon-dependent rates, estimated from experiments. We compare the ribosome traffic on wild-type (WT) sequences and sequences where the synonymous codons were swapped randomly. By simulating translation of 87 genes, we demonstrate that the WT sequences, especially those with a high bias in codon usage, tend to have the ability to reduce ribosome collisions, hence optimizing the cellular investment in the translation apparatus. The magnitude of such reduction of the translation time might have a significant impact on the cellular growth rate and thereby have importance for the survival of the species. (paper)

  2. Temporal dynamics of ocular position dependence of the initial human vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Benjamin T; Tian, Junru; Demer, Joseph L

    2006-04-01

    While an ideal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) generates ocular rotations compensatory for head motion, during visually guided movements, Listing's Law (LL) constrains the eye to rotational axes lying in Listing's Plane (LP). The present study was conducted to explore the recent proposal that the VOR's rotational axis is not collinear with the head's, but rather follows a time-dependent strategy intermediate between LL and an ideal VOR. Binocular LPs were defined during visual fixation in eight normal humans. The VOR was evoked by a highly repeatable transient whole-body yaw rotation in darkness at a peak acceleration of 2800 deg/s2. Immediately before rotation, subjects regarded targets 15 or 500 cm distant located at eye level, 20 degrees up, or 20 degrees down. Eye and head responses were compared with LL predictions in the position and velocity domains. LP orientation varied both among subjects and between individual subject's eyes, and rotated temporally with convergence by 5 +/- 5 degrees (+/-SEM). In the position domain, the eye compensated for head displacement even when the head rotated out of LP. Even within the first 20 ms from onset of head rotation, the ocular velocity axis tilted relative to the head axis by 30% +/- 8% of vertical gaze position. Saccades increased this tilt. Regardless of vertical gaze position, the ocular rotation axis tilted backward 4 degrees farther in abduction than in adduction. There was also a binocular vertical eye velocity transient and lateral tilt of the ocular axis. These disconjugate, short-latency axis perturbations appear intrinsic to the VOR and may have neural or mechanical origins.

  3. Connective tissue fibroblast properties are position-dependent during mouse digit tip regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Wu

    Full Text Available A key factor that contributes to the regenerative ability of regeneration-competent animals such as the salamander is their use of innate positional cues that guide the regeneration process. The limbs of mammals has severe regenerative limitations, however the distal most portion of the terminal phalange is regeneration competent. This regenerative ability of the adult mouse digit is level dependent: amputation through the distal half of the terminal phalanx (P3 leads to successful regeneration, whereas amputation through a more proximal location, e.g. the subterminal phalangeal element (P2, fails to regenerate. Do the connective tissue cells of the mammalian digit play a role similar to that of the salamander limb in controlling the regenerative response? To begin to address this question, we isolated and cultured cells of the connective tissue surrounding the phalangeal bones of regeneration competent (P3 and incompetent (P2 levels. Despite their close proximity and localization, these cells show very distinctive profiles when characterized in vitro and in vivo. In vitro studies comparing their proliferation and position-specific interactions reveal that cells isolated from the P3 and P2 are both capable of organizing and differentiating epithelial progenitors, but with different outcomes. The difference in interactions are further characterized with three-dimension cultures, in which P3 regenerative cells are shown to lack a contractile response that is seen in other fibroblast cultures, including the P2 cultures. In in vivo engraftment studies, the difference between these two cell lines is made more apparent. While both P2 and P3 cells participated in the regeneration of the terminal phalanx, their survival and proliferative indices were distinct, thus suggesting a key difference in their ability to interact within a regeneration permissive environment. These studies are the first to demonstrate distinct positional characteristics of connective tissue cells that are associated with their regenerative capabilities.

  4. Control of ribosome traffic by position-dependent choice of synonymous codons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Pedersen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) encodes a sequence of amino acids by using codons. For most amino acids, there are multiple synonymous codons that can encode the amino acid. The translation speed can vary from one codon to another, thus there is room for changing the ribosome speed while keeping the amino...... acid sequence and hence the resulting protein. Recently, it has been noticed that the choice of the synonymous codon, via the resulting distribution of slow- and fast-translated codons, affects not only on the average speed of one ribosome translating the mRNA but also might have an effect on nearby...... ribosomes by affecting the appearance of 'traffic jams' where multiple ribosomes collide and form queues. To test this 'context effect' further, we here investigate the effect of the sequence of synonymous codons on the ribosome traffic by using a ribosome traffic model with codon-dependent rates, estimated...

  5. Lead-position dependent regular oscillations and random fluctuations of conductance in graphene quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Liang; Yang Rui; Lai Yingcheng; Ferry, David K

    2013-01-01

    Quantum interference causes a wavefunction to have sensitive spatial dependence, and this has a significant effect on quantum transport. For example, in a quantum-dot system, the conductance can depend on the lead positions. We investigate, for graphene quantum dots, the conductance variations with the lead positions. Since for graphene the types of boundaries, e.g., zigzag and armchair, can fundamentally affect the quantum transport characteristics, we focus on rectangular graphene quantum dots, for which the effects of boundaries can be systematically studied. For both zigzag and armchair horizontal boundaries, we find that changing the positions of the leads can induce significant conductance variations. Depending on the Fermi energy, the variations can be either regular oscillations or random conductance fluctuations. We develop a physical theory to elucidate the origin of the conductance oscillation/fluctuation patterns. In particular, quantum interference leads to standing-wave-like-patterns in the quantum dot which, in the absence of leads, are regulated by the energy-band structure of the corresponding vertical graphene ribbon. The observed ‘coexistence’ of regular oscillations and random fluctuations in the conductance can be exploited for the development of graphene-based nanodevices. (paper)

  6. Position-dependent termination and widespread obligatory frameshifting in Euplotes translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobanov, Alexei V.; Heaphy, Stephen M.; Turanov, Anton A.; Gerashchenko, Maxim V.; Pucciarelli, Sandra; Devaraj, Raghul R.; Xie, Fang; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.; Klobutcher, Lawrence A.; Atkins, John F.; Miceli, Cristina; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Baranov, Pavel V.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2016-11-21

    The ribosome can change its reading frame during translation in a process known as programmed ribosomal frameshifting. These rare events are supported by complex mRNA signals. However, we found that the ciliates Euplotes crassus and Euplotes focardii exhibit widespread frameshifting at stop codons. 47 different codons preceding stop signals resulted in either +1 or +2 frameshifts, and +1 frameshifting at AAA was the most frequent. The frameshifts showed unusual plasticity and rapid evolution, and had little influence on translation rates. The proximity of a stop codon to the 3' mRNA end, rather than its occurrence or sequence context, appeared to designate termination. Thus, a ‘stop codon’ is not a sufficient signal for translation termination, and the default function of stop codons in Euplotes is frameshifting, whereas termination is specific to certain mRNA positions and probably requires additional factors.

  7. Hand position-dependent modulation of errors in vibrotactile temporal order judgments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina; Hermosillo, Robert; Kroliczak, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    this confounded information is processed in the brain is poorly understood. In the present set of experiments, we addressed this knowledge gap by using singlepulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to disrupt processing in the right or left posterior parietal cortex (PPC) during a vibrotactile TOJ task...... with stimuli applied to the right and left index fingers. In the first experiment, participants held their hands in an uncrossed configuration, and we found that when the index finger contralateral to the site of TMS was stimulated first, there was a significant increase in TOJ errors. This increase did...... that these TMS-induced changes in TOJ errors were not due to a reduced ability to detect the timing of the vibrotactile stimuli. Taken together, these results demonstrate that both the right and left PPC contribute to the processing underlying vibrotactile TOJs by integrating vibrotactile information...

  8. The galactic position dependence of fast radio bursts and the discovery of FRB011025

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke-Spolaor, Sarah [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA (United States); Bannister, Keith W., E-mail: sarahbspolaor@gmail.com [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Sciences, P.O. Box 76, Epping NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2014-09-01

    We report the detection of a dispersed fast radio burst (FRB) in archival intermediate-latitude Parkes Radio Telescope data. The burst appears to be of the same physical origin as the four purported extragalactic FRBs reported by Thornton et al. This burst's arrival time precedes the Thornton et al. bursts by 10 years. We consider that this survey, and many other archival low-latitude (|gb| < 30°) pulsar surveys, have been searched for FRBs but produced fewer detections than the comparatively brief Thornton et al. search. Such a rate dependence on Galactic position could provide critical supporting evidence for an extragalactic origin for FRBs. To test this, we form an analytic expression to account for Galactic position and survey setup in FRB rate predictions. Employing a sky temperature, scattering, and dispersion model of the Milky Way, we compute the expected number of FRBs if they are isotropically distributed on the sky with respect to the Galactic position (i.e., local), and if they are of extragalactic origin. We demonstrate that the relative detection rates reject a local origin with a confidence of 99.96% (∼3.6σ). The extragalactic predictions provide a better agreement; however, there are still strong discrepancies with the low-latitude detection rate at a confidence of 99.69% (∼2.9σ). However, for the extragalactic population, the differences in predicted versus detected population may be accounted for by a number of factors, which we discuss.

  9. The galactic position dependence of fast radio bursts and the discovery of FRB011025

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Bannister, Keith W.

    2014-01-01

    We report the detection of a dispersed fast radio burst (FRB) in archival intermediate-latitude Parkes Radio Telescope data. The burst appears to be of the same physical origin as the four purported extragalactic FRBs reported by Thornton et al. This burst's arrival time precedes the Thornton et al. bursts by 10 years. We consider that this survey, and many other archival low-latitude (|gb| < 30°) pulsar surveys, have been searched for FRBs but produced fewer detections than the comparatively brief Thornton et al. search. Such a rate dependence on Galactic position could provide critical supporting evidence for an extragalactic origin for FRBs. To test this, we form an analytic expression to account for Galactic position and survey setup in FRB rate predictions. Employing a sky temperature, scattering, and dispersion model of the Milky Way, we compute the expected number of FRBs if they are isotropically distributed on the sky with respect to the Galactic position (i.e., local), and if they are of extragalactic origin. We demonstrate that the relative detection rates reject a local origin with a confidence of 99.96% (∼3.6σ). The extragalactic predictions provide a better agreement; however, there are still strong discrepancies with the low-latitude detection rate at a confidence of 99.69% (∼2.9σ). However, for the extragalactic population, the differences in predicted versus detected population may be accounted for by a number of factors, which we discuss.

  10. Effective Fragment Potential Method for H-Bonding: How To Obtain Parameters for Nonrigid Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinets, Nikita; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V

    2017-07-20

    Accuracy of the effective fragment potential (EFP) method was explored for describing intermolecular interaction energies in three dimers with strong H-bonded interactions, formic acid, formamide, and formamidine dimers, which are a part of HBC6 database of noncovalent interactions. Monomer geometries in these dimers change significantly as a function of intermonomer separation. Several EFP schemes were considered, in which fragment parameters were prepared for a fragment in its gas-phase geometry or recomputed for each unique fragment geometry. Additionally, a scheme in which gas-phase fragment parameters are shifted according to relaxed fragment geometries is introduced and tested. EFP data are compared against the coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations (CCSD(T)) method in a complete basis set (CBS) and the symmetry adapted perturbation theory (SAPT). All considered EFP schemes provide a good agreement with CCSD(T)/CBS for binding energies at equilibrium separations, with discrepancies not exceeding 2 kcal/mol. However, only the schemes that utilize relaxed fragment geometries remain qualitatively correct at shorter than equilibrium intermolecular distances. The EFP scheme with shifted parameters behaves quantitatively similar to the scheme in which parameters are recomputed for each monomer geometry and thus is recommended as a computationally efficient approach for large-scale EFP simulations of flexible systems.

  11. D-amino acid-containing supramolecular nanofibers for potential cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaimin; Feng, Zhaoqianqi; Xu, Bing

    2017-02-01

    Nanostructures formed by peptides that self-assemble in water through non-covalent interactions have attracted considerable attention because peptides possess several unique advantages, such as modular design and easiness of synthesis, convenient modification with known functional motifs, good biocompatibility, low immunogenicity and toxicity, inherent biodegradability, and fast responses to a wide range of external stimuli. After about two decades of development, peptide-based supramolecular nanostructures have already shown great potentials in the fields of biomedicine. Among a range of biomedical applications, using such nanostructures for cancer therapy has attracted increased interests since cancer remains the major threat for human health. Comparing with L-peptides, nanostructures containing peptides made of D-amino acid (i.e., D-peptides) bear a unique advantage, biostability (i.e., resistance towards most of endogenous enzymes). The exploration of nanostructures containing D-amino acids, especially their biomedical applications, is still in its infancy. Herein we review the recent progress of D-amino acid-containing supramolecular nanofibers as an emerging class of biomaterials that exhibit unique features for the development of cancer therapeutics. In addition, we give a brief perspective about the challenges and promises in this research direction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The triel bond: a potential force for tuning anion-π interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mousavian, Parisasadat

    2018-02-01

    Using ab-initio calculations, the mutual influence between anion-π and B···N or B···C triel bond interactions is investigated in some model complexes. The properties of these complexes are studied by molecular electrostatic potential, noncovalent interaction index, quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) and natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses. According to the results, the formation of B···N or B···C triel bond interactions in the multi-component systems makes a significant shortening of anion-π distance. Such remarkable variation in the anion-π distances has not been reported previously. The strengthening of the anion-π bonding in the multi-component systems depend significantly on the nature of the anion, and it becomes larger in the order Br- > Cl- > F-. The parameters derived from the QTAIM and NBO methodologies are used to study the mechanism of the cooperativity between the anion-π and triel bond interactions in the multi-component complexes.

  13. Nested Potential Games

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshi Uno

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a new class of potential games, the nested potential games, which generalize the potential games defined in Monderer and Shapley (1996), as well as the pseudo-potential games defined in Dubey et al. (2006). We show that each maximizer of a nested potential is a Nash equilibrium.

  14. Chirality of weakly bound complexes: The potential energy surfaces for the hydrogen-peroxide−noble-gas interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roncaratti, L. F., E-mail: lz@fis.unb.br; Leal, L. A.; Silva, G. M. de [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910 Brasília (Brazil); Pirani, F. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Aquilanti, V. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210 Salvador (Brazil); Gargano, R. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910 Brasília (Brazil); Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Florida, Quantum Theory Project, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    We consider the analytical representation of the potential energy surfaces of relevance for the intermolecular dynamics of weakly bound complexes of chiral molecules. In this paper we study the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}−Ng (Ng=He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) systems providing the radial and the angular dependence of the potential energy surface on the relative position of the Ng atom. We accomplish this by introducing an analytical representation which is able to fit the ab initio energies of these complexes in a wide range of geometries. Our analysis sheds light on the role that the enantiomeric forms and the symmetry of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecule play on the resulting barriers and equilibrium geometries. The proposed theoretical framework is useful to study the dynamics of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecule, or other systems involving O–O and S–S bonds, interacting by non-covalent forces with atoms or molecules and to understand how the relative orientation of the O–H bonds changes along collisional events that may lead to a hydrogen bond formation or even to selectivity in chemical reactions.

  15. Synthetic, XRD, non-covalent interactions and solvent dependent nonlinear optical studies of Sulfadiazine-Ortho-Vanillin Schiff base: (E)-4-((2-hydroxy-3-methoxy- benzylidene) amino)-N-(pyrimidin-2-yl)benzene-sulfonamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Salim, Muhammad; Khalid, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Khan, Muhammad Usman; Braga, Ataualpa Albert Carmo

    2018-06-01

    In this study, Sulfadiazine-Ortho-Vanillin Schiff base namely (E)-4-((2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)amino)sbnd N-(pyrimidin-2-yl)benzene-sulfonamide (BS) was synthesized. Chemical characterization and computational studies using different techniques like XRD, FT-IR, UV-Vis, NBO, FMO, and MEP have been employed. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed at M06-2X/6-311 + G(d,p) level of theory to obtain optimized geometry and vibrational wave numbers for (E)-4-((2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)amino)sbnd N-(pyrimidin-2-yl)benzene-sulfonamide (BS). The DFT optimized geometry supports the experimental XRD parameters. Frontier molecular orbital (FMO) energies and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surfaces have been executed at M06-2X/6-311 + G(d,p) level of theory. NBO analysis has been carried out at M06-2X/6-311 + G(d,p) level which not only discovered the hyper conjugative interactions and stability in title molecule but also reconfirmed the existence of Nsbnd H⋯N hydrogen bonds between the dimer. The findings of small EHOMO-ELUMO gap shows less hardness and larger softness values which suggested the bioactiveness of the title molecule. Finally, the effect of solvent on nonlinear optical (NLO) properties has been executed using M06-2X level of theory and 6-311 + G (d,p) basis set. The solvent polarity enhanced the NLO response from 3.62 × 10-30 esu to 4.66 × 10-30 esu indicating the considerable NLO character hence in general may have potential applications in the development of non-linear optical materials.

  16. Early visual evoked potentials are modulated by eye position in humans induced by whole body rotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petit Laurent

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To reach and grasp an object in space on the basis of its image cast on the retina requires different coordinate transformations that take into account gaze and limb positioning. Eye position in the orbit influences the image's conversion from retinotopic (eye-centered coordinates to an egocentric frame necessary for guiding action. Neuroimaging studies have revealed eye position-dependent activity in extrastriate visual, parietal and frontal areas that is along the visuo-motor pathway. At the earliest vision stage, the role of the primary visual area (V1 in this process remains unclear. We used an experimental design based on pattern-onset visual evoked potentials (VEP recordings to study the effect of eye position on V1 activity in humans. Results We showed that the amplitude of the initial C1 component of VEP, acknowledged to originate in V1, was modulated by the eye position. We also established that putative spontaneous small saccades related to eccentric fixation, as well as retinal disparity cannot explain the effects of changing C1 amplitude of VEP in the present study. Conclusions The present modulation of the early component of VEP suggests an eye position-dependent activity of the human primary visual area. Our findings also evidence that cortical processes combine information about the position of the stimulus on the retinae with information about the location of the eyes in their orbit as early as the stage of primary visual area.

  17. Effective potential for non-convex potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Y.; O'Raifeartaigh, L.; Parravicini, G.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the well-known relationship between the effective potential GAMMA and the vacuum graphs μ of scalar QFT follows directly from the translational invariance of the measure, and that it holds for all values of the fields phi if, and only if, the classical potential is convex. In the non-convex case μ appears to become complex for some values of phi, but it is shown that the complexity is only apparent and is due to the failure of the loop expansion. The effective potential actually remains real and well-defined for all phi, and reduces to μ in the neighbourhood of the classical minima. A number of examples are considered, notably potentials which are spontaneously broken. In particular the mechanism by which a spontaneous breakdown may be generated by radiative corrections is re-investigated and some new insights obtained. Finally, it is shown that the renormalization group equations for the parameters may be obtained by inspection from the effective potential, and among the examples considered are SU(n) fields and supermultiplets. In particular, it is shown that for supermultiplets the effective potential is not only real but positive. (orig.)

  18. Structure factor of polymers interacting via a short range repulsive potential: Application to hairy wormlike micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massiera, Gladys; Ramos, Laurence; Ligoure, Christian; Pitard, Estelle

    2003-01-01

    We use the random phase approximation to compute the structure factor S(q) of a solution of chains interacting through a soft and short range repulsive potential V. Above a threshold polymer concentration, whose magnitude is essentially controlled by the range of the potential, S(q) exhibits a peak whose position depends on the concentration. We take advantage of the close analogy between polymers and wormlike micelles and apply our model, using a Gaussian function for V, to quantitatively analyze experimental small angle neutron scattering profiles of solutions of hairy wormlike micelles. These samples, which consist in surfactant self-assembled flexible cylinders decorated by amphiphilic copolymer, provide indeed an appropriate experimental model system to study the structure of sterically interacting polymer solutions

  19. Non-covalent interaction between dietary stilbenoids and human serum albumin: Structure-affinity relationship, and its influence on the stability, free radical scavenging activity and cell uptake of stilbenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Jia, Xueping; Shi, Jian; Xiao, Jianbo; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2016-07-01

    Dietary stilbenoids are associated with many benefits for human health, which depend on their bioavailability and bioaccessibility. The stilbenoid-human serum albumin (HSA) interactions are investigated to explore the structure-affinity relationship and influence on the stability, free radical scavenging activity and cell uptake of stilbenoids. The structure-affinity relationship of the stilbenoids-HSA interaction was found as: (1) the methoxylation enhanced the affinity, (2) an additional hydroxyl group increases the affinity and (3) the glycosylation significantly weakened the affinity. HSA obviously masked the free radical scavenging potential of stilbenoids. The stabilities of stilbenoids in different medium were determined as: HSA solution>human plasma>Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. It appears that the milk enhanced the cell uptake of stilbenoids with multi-hydroxyl groups and weakened the cell uptake of stilbenoids with methoxyl group on EA.hy 926 endothelial cells. The stilbenoids are hardly absorbed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells in the presence of milk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Soils - Potential Runoff

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This digital spatial data set provides information on the spatial distribution of potential runoff-contributing areas in Kansas. Potential runoff-contributing areas...

  1. Crown Fire Potential

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Crown fire potential was modeled using FlamMap, an interagency fire behavior mapping and analysis program that computes potential fire behavior characteristics. The...

  2. Retail Spending Potential

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — This map shows the average household spending potential for retail goods in the United States in 2012. Spending potential data measures household consumer spending...

  3. Generalized Rosenbluth potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.H.A.

    1977-05-01

    It is shown that the coefficients of friction and diffusion of the Balescu-Lenard equation can be derived from two ''generalized Rosenbluth potentials'', which reduce to the standard Rosenbluth potentials if wave effects are neglected. The potentials are evaluated explicitly in the case of Maxwellian field particles. The dominant contribution of wave effects to the potentials is due to the interaction of electron field particles with ion sound waves

  4. Application of potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petris, L.

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained with the nucleon-nucleon potential presented previously for: 1) the deuteron properties and wave function, 2) a Hartree-Fock calculation on O 16 , and 3) the perturbation V-matrix and G-matrix results for the potential in relation to the results of other potentials and to saturation

  5. Super periodic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammd; Mandal, Bhabani Prasad

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of super periodic potential (SPP) of arbitrary order n, n ∈I+, in one dimension. General theory of wave propagation through SPP of order n is presented and the reflection and transmission coefficients are derived in their closed analytical form by transfer matrix formulation. We present scattering features of super periodic rectangular potential and super periodic delta potential as special cases of SPP. It is found that the symmetric self-similarity is the special case of super periodicity. Thus by identifying a symmetric fractal potential as special cases of SPP, one can obtain the tunnelling amplitude for a particle from such fractal potential. By using the formalism of SPP we obtain the close form expression of tunnelling amplitude of a particle for general Cantor and Smith-Volterra-Cantor potentials.

  6. Generalized magnetic Rosenbluth potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.H.A.

    1977-12-01

    It is shown that the coefficients of friction and diffusion of the magnetized Balescu-Lenard equation describing the interaction of ion test particles with electron field particles can be derived from two scalar potentials, which reduce to the potentials derived previously when wave effects are neglected. The parts of the potentials describing ''wave effects'' are evaluated explicitly in the case of Maxwellian electrons and the results are compared with the unmagnetized Rosenbluth potentials. The correction is dominant when eta=Ωsub(e)/ωsub(e)(>)1

  7. Quantum potential theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schürmann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This volume contains the revised and completed notes of lectures given at the school "Quantum Potential Theory: Structure and Applications to Physics," held at the Alfried-Krupp-Wissenschaftskolleg in Greifswald from February 26 to March 10, 2007. Quantum potential theory studies noncommutative (or quantum) analogs of classical potential theory. These lectures provide an introduction to this theory, concentrating on probabilistic potential theory and it quantum analogs, i.e. quantum Markov processes and semigroups, quantum random walks, Dirichlet forms on C* and von Neumann algebras, and boundary theory. Applications to quantum physics, in particular the filtering problem in quantum optics, are also presented.

  8. Handbook of interatomic potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoneham, A.M.; Taylor, R.

    1981-08-01

    This Handbook collects together interatomic potentials for a large number of metals. Most of the potentials describe the interactions of host metal atoms with each other, and these, in some cases, may be applied to solid and liquid metals. In addition, there are potentials (a) for a metallic impurity alloyed with the host, (b) for a small number of chemical impurities in the metal (eg H, O), and (c) for rare-gas impurities, notably He. The Handbook is intended to be a convenient source of potentials for bulk, surface and defect calculations, both static and dynamic. (author)

  9. Examining Management Success Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quatrano, Louis A.

    The derivation of a model of management success potential in hospitals or health services administration is described. A questionnaire developed to assess management success potential in health administration students was voluntarily completed by approximately 700 incoming graduate students in 35 university health services administration programs…

  10. Pumping potential wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkowitz, N.; Forest, C.; Wang, E. Y.; Intrator, T.

    1987-01-01

    Nonmonotonic plasma potential structures are a common feature of many double layers and sheaths. Steady state plasma potential wells separating regions having different plasma potentials are often found in laboratory experiments. In order to exist, such structures all must find a solution to a common problem. Ions created by charge exchange or ionization in the region of the potential well are electrostatically confined and tend to accumulate and fill up the potential well. The increase in positive charge should eliminate the well. Nevertheless, steady state structures are found in which the wells do not fill up. This means that it is important to take into account processes which 'pump' ions from the well. As examples of ion pumping of plasma wells, potential dips in front of a positively biased electro collecting anode in a relatively cold, low density multidipole plasma is considered. Pumping is provided by ion leaks from the edges of the potential dip or by oscillating the applied potential. In the former case the two dimensional character of the problem is shown to be important.

  11. Pumping potential wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershkowitz, N.; Forest, C.; Wang, E.Y.; Intrator, T.

    1987-01-01

    Nonmonotonic plasma potential structures are a common feature of many double layers and sheaths. Steady state plasma potential wells separating regions having different plasma potentials are often found in laboratory experiments. In order to exist, all such structures must find a solution to a common problem. Ions created by charge exchange or ionization in the region of the potential well are electrostatically confined and tend to accumulate and fill up the potential well. The increase in positive charge should eliminate the well. Nevertheless, steady state structures are found in which the wells do not fill up. This means that it is important to take into account processes which pump ions from the well. As examples of ion pumping of plasma wells, potential dips in front of a positively biased electron collecting anode in a relatively cold, low density, multidipole plasma are considered. Pumping is provided by ion leaks from the edges of the potential dip or by oscillating the applied potential. In the former case the two-dimensional character of the problem is shown to be important

  12. Pumping potential wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershkowitz, N.; Forest, C.; Wang, E.Y.; Intrator, T.

    1987-01-01

    Nonmonotonic plasma potential structures are a common feature of many double layers and sheaths. Steady state plasma potential wells separating regions having different plasma potentials are often found in laboratory experiments. In order to exist, such structures all must find a solution to a common problem. Ions created by charge exchange or ionization in the region of the potential well are electrostatically confined and tend to accumulate and fill up the potential well. The increase in positive charge should eliminate the well, but steady state structures are found in which the wells do not fill up. This means that it is important to take into account processes which 'pump' ions from the well. As examples of ion pumping of plasma wells, potential dips in front of a positively biased electron collecting anode in a relatively cold, low density multidipole plasma are considered. Pumping is provided by ion leaks from the edges of the potential dip or by oscillating the applied potential. In the former case the two dimensional character of the problem is shown to be important. (author)

  13. Covalent and non-covalent functionalization and solubilization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    photographs of the dispersions of amide-functio- nalized DWNTs in dichloromethane and tetrahydro- furan. In figure 3b, we show a TEM image of DWNTs after covalent functionalization. The images are not as sharp after functionalization as in the case of pris- tine nanotubes (figure 3a), and the bundles seem to be intact.

  14. Quantum Monte Carlo Methods Describe Noncovalent Interactions with Subchemical Accuracy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dubecký, M.; Jurečka, P.; Derian, R.; Hobza, Pavel; Otyepka, M.; Mitas, L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 10 (2013), s. 4287-4292 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:Operational Program Research and Development for Innovations(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0058; Operational Program Education for Competitiveness(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0004; Operational Program Education for Competitiveness(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0058 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Gaussian-basis sets * wave-functions * electronic-structure Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.310, year: 2013

  15. Non-covalent Interactions of Graphene with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zygouri, Panagiota; Potsi, Georgia; Mouzourakis, Eleftherios; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    In this mini review we discuss the interactions of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with graphene and the experimental approaches developed so far to create novel graphene/PAH hybrids and composite systems. The utilization of these systems in electrical, biomedical and polymer-reinforcement

  16. Accuracy of Quantum Chemical Methods for Large Noncovalent Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlák, Robert; Janowski, T.; Pitoňák, M.; Řezáč, Jan; Pulay, P.; Hobza, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 8 (2013), s. 3364-3374 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:Operational Program Research and Development for Innovations(XE) CZ1.05/2.1.00/03/0058 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : density functional theory * intermolecular interaction energies * correlated molecular calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.310, year: 2013

  17. Effect of citric acid on noncovalent interactions in biopolymer jellies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuanyzhbek Musabekov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of citric acid on the formation of gels based on gelatine, melon pulp and sugar has been studied. It is found that the structuring of gelatin the presence of melon pulp is due to hydrogen bonds between the amino acids of gelatin and pectin melon by hydrogen bonds. It is shown that the structuring of gelatin and gelatin – melon pulp depends on the concentration of sugar. The addition of acid in the pectin-gelatin composition reduces the pH, the solubility of pectin and accelerates the formation of jelly. This is due to the fact that in the presence of citric acid reduced the degree of dissociation of galacturonic acid. The intensity of the effect of citric acid on the structure in the presence of melon pulp could be explained by the formation of hydrogen bonds between pectin and citric acid.

  18. Assembly of nanoparticles on patterned surfaces by noncovalent interachtions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maury, P.A.; Reinhoudt, David; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the recent developments in the assembly of nanoparticles into patterned arrays. An introduction is given on nanoparticles assembly and its applications. This is followed by a discussion on recent papers, seen from the perspective of the interaction between particle and

  19. Noncovalent Interactions: a Challenge for Experiment and Theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müller-Dethlefs, K.; Hobza, Pavel

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 1 (2000), s. 143-167 ISSN 0009-2665 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/98/1166; GA AV ČR IAA4040903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901; CEZ:A54/98:Z4-040-9-ii Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 21.244, year: 1999

  20. Polysaccharide-based Noncovalent Assembly for Targeted Delivery of Taxol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Chen, Yong; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The construction of synthetic straightforward, biocompatible and biodegradable targeted drug delivery system with fluorescent tracking abilities, high anticancer activities and low side effects is still a challenge in the field of biochemistry and material chemistry. In this work, we constructed targeted paclitaxel (Taxol) delivery nanoparticles composed of permethyl-β-cyclodextrin modified hyaluronic acid (HApCD) and porphyrin modified paclitaxel prodrug (PorTaxol), through host-guest and amphiphilic interactions. The obtained nanoparticles (HATXP) were biocompatible and enzymatic biodegradable due to their hydrophilic hyaluronic acid (HA) shell and hydrophobic Taxol core, and exhibited specific targeting internalization into cancer cells via HA receptor mediated endocytosis effects. The cytotoxicity experiments showed that the HATXP exhibited similar anticancer activities to, but much lower side effects than commercial anticancer drug Taxol. The present work would provide a platform for targeted paclitaxel drug delivery and a general protocol for the design of advanced multifunctional nanoscale biomaterials for targeted drug/gene delivery.

  1. The potential of renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piot, M.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents and comments on definitions of the potential of renewable forms of energy and, in a second part, takes a look at the potentials mentioned in the energy perspectives published by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). The following potentials are looked at: technical potential, ecological potential, economic potential, exploitable and expected potentials, technical, economic and ecological expansion potentials, potential of particular technologies in Switzerland, exploitable and expected expansion potential. Four scenarios for expansion potential are briefly described

  2. Organotin(IV) Carboxylates as Promising Potential Drug Candidates in the Field of Cancer Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirajuddin, Muhammad; Ali, Saqib

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal inorganic chemistry plays an important role in exploring the properties of metal ions for the designing of new drugs. The field has been stimulated by the success of cis-platin, the world best selling anticancer drug and platinum complexes with reduced toxicity, oral activity and activity against resistant tumors are currently on clinical trial. The use of cis-platin is, however, severely limited by its toxic side-effects. This has stimulated chemists to employ different strategies in the development of new metal-based anticancer agents with different mechanisms of action. The discovery of new non-covalent interactions with the classical target, DNA, was the first developing step in the treatment of cancer. The use of organometallic compounds as a medicine is very common now a days because it offers potential advantages over the more common organic-based drugs. In this article we have highlighted the anticancer activity of the organotin(IV) carboxylates published in the last few years (from 2008 to 2016). In most cases they present lower IC50 values than those of cisplatin, which indicates their high activity against the cancer cell lines. The summarized data reveal that every year new organotin(IV) carboxylate complexes are synthesized with the aim of new anticancer agent with much better results than the than the corresponding activity of cis-platin or other clinically approved drugs. In addition to the advantages of high activity, compared to the platinum compound, tin complexes are much cheaper. Thus by using organotin carboxylate for clinical medicine, cost reduction, dosage reduction and effect enhancement will be reached. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Improving intermolecular interactions in DFTB3 using extended polarization from chemical-potential equalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Anders S., E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu; Cui, Qiang, E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Elstner, Marcus [Theoretische Chemische Biologie, Universität Karlsruhe, Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-08-28

    Semi-empirical quantum mechanical methods traditionally expand the electron density in a minimal, valence-only electron basis set. The minimal-basis approximation causes molecular polarization to be underestimated, and hence intermolecular interaction energies are also underestimated, especially for intermolecular interactions involving charged species. In this work, the third-order self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding method (DFTB3) is augmented with an auxiliary response density using the chemical-potential equalization (CPE) method and an empirical dispersion correction (D3). The parameters in the CPE and D3 models are fitted to high-level CCSD(T) reference interaction energies for a broad range of chemical species, as well as dipole moments calculated at the DFT level; the impact of including polarizabilities of molecules in the parameterization is also considered. Parameters for the elements H, C, N, O, and S are presented. The Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) interaction energy is improved from 6.07 kcal/mol to 1.49 kcal/mol for interactions with one charged species, whereas the RMSD is improved from 5.60 kcal/mol to 1.73 for a set of 9 salt bridges, compared to uncorrected DFTB3. For large water clusters and complexes that are dominated by dispersion interactions, the already satisfactory performance of the DFTB3-D3 model is retained; polarizabilities of neutral molecules are also notably improved. Overall, the CPE extension of DFTB3-D3 provides a more balanced description of different types of non-covalent interactions than Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap type of semi-empirical methods (e.g., PM6-D3H4) and PBE-D3 with modest basis sets.

  4. ICRF enhanced potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    Ion-confining potentials in the Phaedrus tandem mirror are shown to be enhanced over Boltzmann-relations predicted values by radio-frequency (rf) waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). The ICRF enhanced potential is larger in the end cell with a lower passing density. Peak potential values decrease with increasing ion endloss current (or central cell density) for a constant rf capacitor bank voltage, and increase with increasing rf-capacitor bank voltage, for a constant ion endloss value (or central cell density). In fully axisymmetric operation, a potential peak is produced in an end cell by the central-cell rf, (with-out end-cell rf) and is found only in the end cell nearer the central-cell antenna. ICRF enhanced potentials are explained as an equilibrium between the electron-collisional filling-in rate and the electron pumping out rate provided by axial time-varying electric fields. Thermal barrier-like potential structures were found in the transition regions between the central cell and end cells, in the fully axisymmetric Phaedrus. Central-cell ICRF trapping effects combined with end-cell μΔ B forces create and pump the barrier potential wells

  5. Potential theory of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Hueihuang.

    1989-01-01

    A theoretical method is being developed by which the structure of a radiation field can be predicted by a radiation potential theory, similar to a classical potential theory. The introduction of a scalar potential is justified on the grounds that the spectral intensity vector is irrotational. The vector is also solenoidal in the limits of a radiation field in complete radiative equilibrium or in a vacuum. This method provides an exact, elliptic type equation that will upgrade the accuracy and the efficiency of the current CFD programs required for the prediction of radiation and flow fields. A number of interesting results emerge from the present study. First, a steady state radiation field exhibits an optically modulated inverse square law distribution character. Secondly, the unsteady radiation field is structured with two conjugate scalar potentials. Each is governed by a Klein-Gordon equation with a frictional force and a restoring force. This steady potential field structure and the propagation of radiation potentials are consistent with the well known results of classical electromagnetic theory. The extension of the radiation potential theory for spray combustion and hypersonic flow is also recommended

  6. China's Military Potential

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wortzel, Larry

    1998-01-01

    The People's Republic of China (PRC) is seen by many as an economic powerhouse with the world's largest standing military that has the potential to translate economic power into the military sphere...

  7. Some torsion potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundberg, J; Lindstrom, U

    1986-10-01

    Using the notion of torsion potentials, the duality between antisymmetric tensor fields and scalar fields is discussed. First-order actions with these fields, the connection and the metric as independent variables are presented.

  8. Abuse Potential of Pregabalin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjerning, Ole; Rosenzweig, Mary; Pottegård, Anton

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several case reports and epidemiological studies have raised concern about the abuse potential of pregabalin, the use of which has increased substantially over the last decade. Pregabalin is, in some cases, used for recreational purposes and it has incurred attention among drug abusers...... for causing euphoric and dissociative effects when taken in doses exceeding normal therapeutic dosages or used by alternative routes of administration, such as nasal insufflation or venous injection. The magnitude of the abuse potential and the mechanism behind it are not fully known. OBJECTIVE: The aim...... of this study was to present a systematic review of the data concerning the abuse potential of pregabalin. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search and reviewed the preclinical, clinical and epidemiological data on the abuse potential of pregabalin. RESULTS: We included preclinical (n = 17...

  9. Elderberry: Botany, Horticulture, Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horticultural Review allows extensive reviews of the state of the knowledge on certain topics or crops. Elderberry: Botany, Horticulture, Potential, is outlined with an Introduction, Botany, Horticulture, Propagation, Uses and Conclusion sections. This review compiles literature from around the w...

  10. Supersymmetrically transformed periodic potentials

    OpenAIRE

    C, David J. Fernandez

    2003-01-01

    The higher order supersymmetric partners of a stationary periodic potential are studied. The transformation functions associated to the band edges do not change the spectral structure. However, when the transformation is implemented for factorization energies inside of the forbidden bands, the final potential will have again the initial band structure but it can have bound states encrusted into the gaps, giving place to localized periodicity defects.

  11. Nucleus--nucleus potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaqaman, H.R.

    1977-01-01

    The nucleus--nucleus interaction is studied within the framework of the generator coordinate method that permits an easy incorporation of the full effects of antisymmetrization. It is found that the interaction, as far as the elastic scattering problem is concerned, can be described by a simple effective potential that is equivalent to the original many-body (and hence non-local) problem. The potential is obtained by dividing the wavefunction into a long-range part and a short-range part and requiring the former to satisfy a Schroedinger equation. This enables avoiding dealing with the troublesome short-range part of the wavefunction and provides a direct link with the optical model so that the potential obtained here is equivalent to the real part of the optical potential (the imaginary part is not investigated). The effective potential is found to consist of three parts: an interaction term between the nucleons belonging to different nuclei, a kinetic energy term due to the change in the intrinsic kinetic energy of the system as a result of the antisymmetrization, and finally an l-dependent part. The kinetic energy term is found to be very repulsive and effectively gives a hard core, and is calculated for the α--α and 16 O-- 16 O cases. The full potential is calculated for the α--α case for the S, D, and G partial waves and then used to calculate the corresponding phase shifts that are then compared with experimental results and other microscopic calculations. Finally, some recent results and analyses of fusion and deep inelastic reactions are reviewed that seem to indicate the presence of a hard core in the nucleus--nucleus potential. Such a hard core is present in the potential obtained in the sudden approximation

  12. Overview of interatomic potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonny, G.; Malerba, L.

    2005-12-01

    In this report an overview on interatomic potentials is given. This overview is by no means complete and it has merely the intention to give the reader an idea of where interatomic potentials come from, as well as to provide the basic ideas behind some commonly used methods for deriving interatomic potentials for molecular dynamics applications. We start by giving a short introduction about the concept of interatomic potential in the framework of quantum mechanics, followed by a short description of commonly used methods for deriving semi-empirical interatomic potentials. After some short theoretical notions on each method, some practical parameterizations of commonly used potentials are given, including very recent ones. An effort has been made to classify existing approaches within a rational and consequent scheme, which is believed to be of use for a thorough comprehension of the topic. Although these approaches can be used in a variety of different materials, we will only discuss the practical cases of metals. Following this, some widespread ad hoc modification of the general methods are discussed. The report is concluded by a generalization of the methods to multi-component materials, in particular metallic alloys. (author)

  13. Assessing offshore wind potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelaja, Adesoji; McKeown, Charles; Calnin, Benjamin; Hailu, Yohannes

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying wind potential is a pivotal initial step in developing and articulating a state’s policies and strategies for offshore wind industry development. This is particularly important in the Great Lakes States where lessons from other offshore environments are not directly applicable. This paper presents the framework developed for conducting a preliminary assessment of offshore wind potential. Information on lake bathymetry and wind resources were combined in simulating alternative scenarios of technically feasible turbine construction depths and distance concerns by stakeholders. These yielded estimates of developable offshore wind areas and potential power generation. While concerns about the visibility of turbines from shore reduce the power that can be generated, engineering solutions that increase the depths at which turbines can be sited increase such potential power output. This paper discusses the costs associated with technical limitations on depth and the social costs related to public sentiments about distance from the shoreline, as well as the possible tradeoffs. The results point to a very large untapped energy resource in the Michigan’s Great Lakes, large enough to prompt policy action from the state government. - Highlights: ▶ We build a theoretical framework for modeling offshore wind power production. ▶ Illustration of the impact of technology and social limitations on offshore wind energy development. ▶ Geospatial modeling of the offshore wind potential of the Great Lakes.

  14. Forecasting potential crises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufeld, W.P.

    1984-01-01

    Recently, the Trend Analysis Program (TAP) of the American Council of Life Insurance commissioned the Futures Group of Glastonbury, Connecticut, to examine the potential for large-scale catastrophic events in the near future. TAP was specifically concerned with five potential crises: the warming of the earth's atmosphere, the water shortage, the collapse of the physical infrastructure, the global financial crisis, and the threat of nuclear war. We are often unprepared to take action; in these cases, we lose an advantage we might have otherwise had. This is the whole idea behind forecasting: to foresee possibilities and to project how we can respond. If we are able to create forecasts against which we can test policy options and choices, we may have the luxury of adopting policies ahead of events. Rather than simply fighting fires, we have the option of creating a future more to our choosing. Short descriptions of these five potential crises and, in some cases, possible solutions are presented

  15. Potential for waste reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The author focuses on wastes considered hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This chapter discusses wastes that are of interest as well as the factors affecting the quantity of waste considered available for waste reduction. Estimates are provided of the quantities of wastes generated. Estimates of the potential for waste reduction are meaningful only to the extent that one can understand the amount of waste actually being generated. Estimates of waste reduction potential are summarized from a variety of government and nongovernment sources

  16. Robotics Potential Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Lucero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This problem was to calculate the path a robot would take to navigate an obstacle field and get to its goal. Three obstacles were given as negative potential fields which the robot avoided, and a goal was given a positive potential field that attracted the robot. The robot decided each step based on its distance, angle, and influence from every object. After each step, the robot recalculated and determined its next step until it reached its goal. The robot's calculations and steps were simulated with Microsoft Excel.

  17. Neutron optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmore, D.; Hodgson, P.E.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a guide to the use of optical model computer programs to analyse and calculate neutron data. After a brief discussion of the physical basis of the optical model a survey is given of the most widely used optical model and Hauser-Feshbach computer programs. The range of applicability and reliability of the major optical potentials proposed is assessed by comparison with available experimental data and some observations and suggestions are made for the optimum choice of optical potentials for given purposes of neutron data calculations. (author)

  18. The logarithmic potential

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Griffith Conrad

    1927-01-01

    This book studies fundamental properties of the logarithmic potential and their connections to the theory of Fourier series, to potential theory, and to function theory. The material centers around a study of Poisson's integral in two dimensions and of the corresponding Stieltjes integral. The results are then extended to the integrals in terms of Green's functions for general regions. There are some thirty exercises scattered throughout the text. These are designed in part to familiarize the reader with the concepts introduced, and in part to complement the theory. The reader should know some

  19. Potential support ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Søren; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    The ‘prospective potential support ratio’ has been proposed by researchers as a measure that accurately quantifies the burden of ageing, by identifying the fraction of a population that has passed a certain measure of longevity, for example, 17 years of life expectancy. Nevertheless......, the prospective potential support ratio usually focuses on the current mortality schedule, or period life expectancy. Instead, in this paper we look at the actual mortality experienced by cohorts in a population, using cohort life tables. We analyse differences between the two perspectives using mortality models...

  20. Deposition potential of polonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heal, H. G.

    1948-11-23

    The cathodic deposition potential for polonium in concentrations of 10{sup -13} normal and 8 x 10{sup -13} normal, the former being 100-fold smaller than the smallest concentrations previously studied, has been determined. The value is 0.64 volt on the hydrogen scale. Considering the various ways in which the graphs can reasonably be drawn, we consider the maximum possible error to be of the order of +- 0.03 volt. There is apparently no shift of deposition potential between concentrations of 10{sup -8} and 10{sup -13} normal, indicating that the Nernst equation is not applicable in these circumstances.

  1. Potentials of biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munack, A.; Schroder, O. [Johann Heinrich von Thunen Inst., Braunschweig (Germany); Krahl, J. [Coburg Univ. of Applied Sciences, Coburg (Germany); Bunger, J. [Inst. for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident Insurance, Ruhr-Univ. Inst., Bochum (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed the potential of biofuels with particular reference to the situation in Germany and Europe. Emphasis was on technical potential, such as biofuel production, utilization and environmental aspects. The Institute of Agricultural Technology and Biosystems Engineering ran vTI emission tests on diesel engines to evaluate the environmental impacts of biofuels. This testing facility is able to drive heavy-duty diesel engines in both stationary and dynamic test cycles, such as the European ESC and ETC. Additional analyses were conducted to determine the fine and ultra-fine particles, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), aldehydes, ketones, and the usual regulated exhaust gas compounds. Ames tests were conducted to assess the mutagenic potential of tailpipe emissions. Previous study results showed that neat vegetable oils can render the exhaust high in mutagenic potency. Some of the non-regulated exhaust gas compounds were found to vary nonlinearly with the blend composition. B20 was found to have high mutagenic potential and was subject to sedimentation.

  2. Language as Pure Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joseph Sung-Yul

    2016-01-01

    Language occupies a crucial position in neoliberalism, due to the reimagination of language as commodified skill. This paper studies the role of language ideology in this transformation by identifying a particular ideology that facilitates this process, namely the ideology which views language as pure potential. Neoliberalism treats language as a…

  3. Iraq's Tourism Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Hooman Dabidian; Mohammed Wafaa Al-Ani; Christopher Hassaan Francke; Ahmed Redwan

    2013-01-01

    While it will require further political stability and security, tourism in Iraq stands to be a major growth sector. The Iraqi tourism sector is currently underdeveloped and in a state of neglect, due to decades of war, closed regimes and recurrent instability and insecurity. However, as Iraq continues to develop and stabilizes, it can begin to meet its tremendous potential as a global tour...

  4. Characterization of particle morphology of biochanin A molecularly imprinted polymers and their properties as a potential sorbent for solid-phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowska, Anna M.; Poliwoda, Anna, E-mail: Anna.Poliwoda@uni.opole.pl; Wieczorek, Piotr P.

    2015-04-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with biochanin A as a template were obtained using a bulk polymerization with non-covalent imprinting approach. The polymers were prepared in acetonitrile as porogen, using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) as cross-linking agent. The synthesis, with an application of 1′,1′-azobis(cyclohexanecarbonitrile) (ACHN) as an initiator, has been performed thermally. During the synthesis process the effect of different functional monomers such as methacrylic acid (MAA), acrylamide (AA) and 4-vinylpyridine (4-VP) was investigated. The application of nitrogen sorption porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) permitted the characterization and evaluation of synthesized polymers. The adsorption capacity of obtained MIPs was checked by using the binding testing. All synthesized polymers were evaluated as solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbents for isolation and preconcentration of biochanin A and its analogues, daidzein and genistein. The MIPs exhibited higher affinity for biochanin A over competitive compounds. - Highlights: • The molecularly imprinted polymers with biochanin A as a template were synthesized. • The surface of synthesized monoliths was formed mainly from mesopores (73–77%). • Biochanin A was effectively concentrated in each of the synthesized polymers (recovery > 89.8%). • The results show potential ability of synthesized MIPs in analysis of phytoestrogens in real samples.

  5. Development potential for hydropower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laufer, F.; Groetzinger, S.; Peter, M.; Schmutz, A.

    2004-11-01

    This comprehensive report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at the potential for the development of hydropower in Switzerland. The report updates the energy perspectives made ten years earlier. An overview of Swiss electricity production and consumption is presented and the proportion provided by hydropower is noted. Figures on installed capacity and import/export quantities are presented and discussed. Technological developments and the economical frameworks involved are discussed, as are regulatory measures that can be taken. Theoretical and technically realisable potentials for increased use of hydropower are discussed. The methods used to do this are examined. Strategies and measures to be taken are listed and discussed. An appendix includes data sheets on power plant modelling, including examples

  6. Scalar Potential Model progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, John

    2007-04-01

    Because observations of galaxies and clusters have been found inconsistent with General Relativity (GR), the focus of effort in developing a Scalar Potential Model (SPM) has been on the examination of galaxies and clusters. The SPM has been found to be consistent with cluster cellular structure, the flow of IGM from spiral galaxies to elliptical galaxies, intergalactic redshift without an expanding universe, discrete redshift, rotation curve (RC) data without dark matter, asymmetric RCs, galaxy central mass, galaxy central velocity dispersion, and the Pioneer Anomaly. In addition, the SPM suggests a model of past expansion, past contraction, and current expansion of the universe. GR corresponds to the SPM in the limit in which a flat and static scalar potential field replaces the Sources and Sinks such as between clusters and on the solar system scale which is small relative to the distance to a Source. The papers may be viewed at http://web.infoave.net/˜scjh/ .

  7. Potentials Unbounded Below

    CERN Document Server

    Curtright, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Continuous interpolates are described for classical dynamical systems defined by discrete time-steps. Functional conjugation methods play a central role in obtaining the interpolations. The interpolates corrrespond to particle motion in an underlying potential, V. Typically, V has no lower bound and can exhibit switchbacks wherein V changes form when turning points are encountered by the particle. The logistic map is used to illustrate these features.

  8. Exploring Vietnam's oil potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    A brief review is given of the oil production potential in Vietnam. Since Since 1987, the country has been open to foreign investment in offshore exploration but has suffered from a US embargo on trade and economic ties. Nevertheless some exploration has occurred and twenty production sharing contracts with international oil companies has been signed. To date most of the finds have been non-commercial but optimism remains high. (U.K.)

  9. Nonadiabatic Ponderomotive Potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodin IY, Fisch NJ

    2005-01-01

    An approximate integral of the Manley-Rowe type is found for a particle moving in a high-frequency field, which may interact resonantly with natural particle oscillations. An effective ponderomotive potential is introduced accordingly and can capture nonadiabatic particle dynamics. We show that nonadiabatic ponderomotive barriers can trap classical particles, produce cooling effect, and generate one-way walls for resonant species. Possible atomic applications are also envisioned

  10. POTENTIAL OF BUSINESS

    OpenAIRE

    Julija Avakumovic, Jelena Avakumovic

    2014-01-01

    Potential of businesses is available and relevant developed business opportunities which under certain conditions can affect the results of the business. Those are certain conditions possible exposure of the company. The success of a business depends of the knowledge of these resources and the way how to find the optimum combination of scale, structure and dynamics of available resources by the management of the business.

  11. Sicilian potential biogas production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Comparetti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at predicting the Sicilian potential biogas production, using the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW, animal manure and food industry by-products, in a region where only one biogas plant using MSW and one co-digestion plant are nowadays available. The statistical data about OFMSW, the number of animals bred in medium and large farms and the amounts of by-products of food processing industries were evaluated, in order to compute the Sicilian potential biogas and energy production. The OFMSW produced in Sicily, that is 0.8 million tons ca. per year (37% of MSW, could be used in a bio-reactor, together with other raw materials, for Anaerobic Digestion (AD process, producing biogas and “digestate”. Moreover, 3.03 million tons ca. of manure, collected in medium and large animal husbandry farms (where cows, pigs and poultry are bred, and 350 thousand tons ca. of by-products, collected in food processing industries (pomace from olive oil mills and grape marc from wineries, might be used for AD process. The Sicilian potential biogas production from the AD of the above raw materials is 170.2 millions of m3, that is equal to 1023.4 GWh of energy per year, of which 484 GWh from animal manure, 303 GWh from OFMSW and 236.4 GWh from food industry by-products. The highest biogas production is in the province of Palermo (35.6 millions of m3, Ragusa (30.8 millions of m3 and Catania (22.8 millions of m3, having a potential energy production of 213.8, 185 and 137 GWh, respectively.

  12. Compact Polarimetry Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, My-Linh; Dubois-Fernandez, Pascale; Pottier, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to show the potential of a compact-pol SAR system for vegetation applications. Compact-pol concept has been suggested to minimize the system design while maximize the information and is declined as the ?/4, ?/2 and hybrid modes. In this paper, the applications such as biomass and vegetation height estimates are first presented, then, the equivalence between compact-pol data simulated from full-pol data and compact-pol data processed from raw data as such is shown. Finally, a calibration procedure using external targets is proposed.

  13. Thermodynamics extends economics potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandura, Alexander V. [Kiev Technical Univ., Dept. of Marketing and Management, Kiev (Ukraine); Brodiansky, Victor M. [Moscow Energy Inst., Dept. of Cryogen Machines, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-08-01

    In this paper we consider the use of exergy in economic valuation and its correlation with money. Exergy-based determination of production expenses provides a new base for 'natural' price determination. A new macroeconomic dynamics approach based on this correlation is proposed. This method is relatively general because it is not restricted by certain assumptions used in traditional economic analysis. The exergy model of macroeconomic dynamics was tested by utilizing data from the US economy. This test, covering a period of about 25 years, confirms this approach and opens new potentials in economic analysis. (Author)

  14. ICT Enhanced Buildings Potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansson, Per

    2007-01-01

    component systems that are accessed and integrated in the real world of building use in different contexts. The ICT systems may be physically or virtually embedded in the building. Already in 1982 AT&T established the 'intelligent buildings', IB, concept due to marketing reasons and the Informart building...... with focus on virtual building models support, new services and user environment definitions and development, virtual spaces and augmented reality, intelligent building components, application ontologies, and ICT systems integration to illustrate ICT enhanced buildings potentials and R&D needs.  ...

  15. Pion nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, J. de.

    1981-01-01

    The main goal of the investigations, presented is to establish the contributions to the optical potential, coming from scattering processes which involve 1p-1h nuclear states in the intermediate scattering system. The effects of the Pauli principle corrections and the binding corrections are studied in detail. A phenomenological study of pion absorption effects is also presented. The calculations all concern π- 4 He scattering. The simplicity of the 4 He structure makes the π- 4 He system quite an ideal tool for studying the reaction mechanism. (Auth.)

  16. A crafting of potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilbourn, Kyle

    In the movement from understanding the past towards creating the future design anthropology, as a discipline, will turn from one with archival qualities to one endowed with potentials for change. One challenge facing design anthropology is how to show relevance for theory generation while also in......-as is complemented by designing for as design anthropologists stage design workshops, span knowledge traditions, and make design moves. Reflecting on my own research process, I trace a few research tools that underline the craft of design anthropology....

  17. On chemical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, H.

    1981-01-01

    In the framework of the C*-algebra formalism of quantum statistical mechanics, the concept of chemical potential or its vector generalization in the case of an arbitrary (not necessarily abelian) separable compact gauge group (of the first kind) is described as an algebraic label of equilibrium states at a given inverse temperature β. It is mathematically attained by extending a (clustering) KMS state of the gauge-invariant part of a C*-algebra F to a state of F and by examining the KMS property of the extension. (Auth.)

  18. On quantum potential dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, Sheldon; Struyve, Ward

    2015-01-01

    Non-relativistic de Broglie–Bohm theory describes particles moving under the guidance of the wave function. In de Broglie's original formulation, the particle dynamics is given by a first-order differential equation. In Bohm's reformulation, it is given by Newton's law of motion with an extra potential that depends on the wave function—the quantum potential—together with a constraint on the possible velocities. It was recently argued, mainly by numerical simulations, that relaxing this velocity constraint leads to a physically untenable theory. We provide further evidence for this by showing that for various wave functions the particles tend to escape the wave packet. In particular, we show that for a central classical potential and bound energy eigenstates the particle motion is often unbounded. This work seems particularly relevant for ways of simulating wave function evolution based on Bohm's formulation of the de Broglie–Bohm theory. Namely, the simulations may become unstable due to deviations from the velocity constraint. (paper)

  19. The potentialities of terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.L.

    1976-01-01

    The potential hazard of terrorists obtaining plutonium and building a nuclear device is examined within the perspective of other terrorist activities. Various sources are quoted on the possibility of a terrorist group having the resources, including skilled personnel, to build a bomb. The potential damage engendered by such a device is hypothesized to be less than that of many other terrorist actions which could be easily accomplished. Other activities, poison or nerve gas, gasoline dropped on a football stadium, destruction of a large dam, poisoning food or water supply and armed action against a tanker carrying liquefied natural gas, are cited as examples of terrorist incidents more devastating than building a crude plutonium bomb. Resistance to blackmail strategies is seen as the only reliable way to thwart their activities in the long run. Although plutonium must be guarded carefully, it is demonstrated as being far from the only or most devastating means of blackmail. It is concluded that the threat of terrorist activities is being used by anti-nuclear groups to support emotionally based dislike of nuclear power. (J.T.A.)

  20. Cosmology with exponential potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehagias, Alex; Kofinas, Georgios

    2004-01-01

    We examine in the context of general relativity the dynamics of a spatially flat Robertson-Walker universe filled with a classical minimally coupled scalar field φ of exponential potential V(φ) ∼ exp(-μφ) plus pressureless baryonic matter. This system is reduced to a first-order ordinary differential equation for Ω φ (w φ ) or q(w φ ), providing direct evidence on the acceleration/deceleration properties of the system. As a consequence, for positive potentials, passage into acceleration not at late times is generically a feature of the system for any value of μ, even when the late-times attractors are decelerating. Furthermore, the structure formation bound, together with the constraints Ω m0 ∼ 0.25 - 0.3, -1 ≤ w φ0 ≤ -0.6, provides, independently of initial conditions and other parameters, the necessary condition 0 N , while the less conservative constraint -1 ≤ w φ ≤ -0.93 gives 0 N . Special solutions are found to possess intervals of acceleration. For the almost cosmological constant case w φ ∼ -1, the general relation Ω φ (w φ ) is obtained. The generic (nonlinearized) late-times solution of the system in the plane (w φ , Ω φ ) or (w φ , q) is also derived

  1. Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Task 8 is responsible for assessing the hydrocarbon potential of the Yucca Mountain vincinity. Our main focus is source rock stratigraphy in the NTS area in southern Nevada. (In addition, Trexler continues to work on a parallel study of source rock stratigraphy in the oil-producing region of east central Nevada, but this work is not funded by Task 8.) As a supplement to the stratigraphic studies, we are studying the geometry and kinematics of deformation at NTS, particularly as these pertain to reconstructing Paleozoic stratigraphy and to predicting the nature of the Late Paleozoic rocks under Yucca Mountain. Our stratigraphic studies continue to support the interpretation that rocks mapped as the open-quotes Eleana Formationclose quotes are in fact parts of two different Mississippian units. We have made significant progress in determining the basin histories of both units. These place important constraints on regional paleogeographic and tectonic reconstructions. In addition to continued work on the Eleana, we plan to look at the overlying Tippipah Limestone. Preliminary TOC and maturation data indicate that this may be another potential source rock

  2. International Evoked Potentials Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    1980-01-01

    The past decade has seen great progress in the measurement of evoked potentials in man; a steady increase in our understanding of their charac­ teristics, their origins and their usefulness; and a growing application in the field of clinical diagnosis. The topic is a truly multidisciplinary one. Important research contributions have been made by workers of many different backgrounds and clinical applications span the specialities. This book represents a revised and updated version of the work originally presented at the international evoked potential symposium held in Nottingham 4-6 1978. The Nottingham Symposium provided a forum for a state-of-the-art discussion amongst workers from many different disciplines and from many different countries. For each major topic in the field an expert review set the scene for discussion of current research presentations. This format is retained in the book: the chapters in Part A provide the context in which the research presented in Part B is set. The task of selecting m...

  3. Radiosensitizers: rationale and potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews agents that are capable of sensitizing hypoxic cells to radiation and chemotherapeutic agents. The first part is a synopsis of the development of hypoxic radiosensitizers, which concludes that misonidazole can be effective against human tumors. Unfortunately, neurotoxicity limits its effectiveness in humans because the dose that can be given in conjunction with daily fractionated radiation is five to ten times lower than is required for full radiosensitization of the hypoxic cells. The second part covers our recent efforts to develop a drug that does not produce such limiting neurotoxicity. The primary rationale of our program was to synthesize a drug with a short plasma half-life that was too hydrophilic to cross the blood-brain barrier but was able to penetrate tumors and radiosensitize hypoxic cells. From this program, a new drug, SR-2508, has been found that is as efficient as misonidazole in its radiosensitizing ability, but is four to ten times less toxic. Finally, the potential of radiosensitizers not only as agents that can sensitize tumor cells to radiation, but also as agents that can specifically sensitize tumors to chemotherapeutic agents, is discussed. In addition, these drugs may be potential cytotoxic agents that produce toxicity only in solid tumors

  4. Solutions of the Bogoliubov–de Gennes equation with position dependent Fermi-velocity and gap profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presilla, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Panella, O., E-mail: orlando.panella@pg.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Roy, P. [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata-700108 (India)

    2017-02-19

    It is shown that bound state solutions of the one dimensional Bogoliubov–de Gennes (BdG) equation may exist when the Fermi velocity becomes dependent on the space coordinate. The existence of bound states in continuum (BIC) like solutions has also been confirmed both in the normal phase as well as in the super-conducting phase. We also show that a combination of Fermi velocity and gap parameter step-like profiles provides scattering solutions with normal reflection and transmission. - Highlights: • Bound states of BdG equation via Fermi velocity modulation. • Existence of bound states in continuum in both the normal and the superconducting phase. • Scattering solutions and bound states within a combination of step-like Fermi velocity and gap profiles.

  5. Position-dependent shear-induced austenite– martensite transformation in double-notched TRIP and dual-phase steel samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blondé, R.J.P.; Jimenez-Melero, E.; Anusuya Ponnusami, S.; Zhao, L.; Schell, N.; Brück, E.H.; Van der Zwaag, S.; Van Dijk, N.H.

    2014-01-01

    While earlier studies on transformation-induced-plasticity (TRIP) steels focused on the determination of the austenite-to-martensite decomposition in uniform deformation or thermal fields, the current research focuses on the determination of the local retained austenite-to-martensite transformation

  6. Measurements and simulations on position dependencies in the response of single PWO crystals and a prototype for the PANDA EMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremer, Daniel Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The PANDA experiment, which will be located at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, aims at the study of strong interaction within the charm sector via antiproton- proton collisions. An essential component of the PANDA detector to achieve the ambitious physics goals is the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMC). Reason for this is particularly its high detection efficiency for photons and electrons over a large dynamic range, since most of the expected physics channels are accompanied by secondary photons. The EMC is based on second generation lead tungstate scintillator crystals and thus features a very compact design and improved performance. To guarantee a homogeneous and precise energy and momentum response, an exact knowledge on the incident particle position is mandatory. In the scope of this work, non-uniformities in the light yield of single lead tungstate crystals with tapered geometry are investigated. This effect was studied with the SLitrani simulation package in comparison to a series of dedicated experimental setups. The so called precision setup allowed for a comparative measurement of the response to cosmic muons and low energetic photons. Furthermore, an analogous beam measurement was performed with 80 MeV protons. Both, simulation and experiments agree that, in case of the PANDA crystal geometry types, the obtained light yield increases quadratically with the distance of the location of the energy deposition inside the crystal to the photo sensor. A clear correlation of the observed amount of non-uniformity to the mean tapering angle of the individual crystal geometry type could be determined. Furthermore, no significant difference in non-uniformity was observed for the three different particle species. Therefore, the observed non-uniformities can be regarded as independent of the exact mechanism of the energy deposition. Hence, the main effect governing the obtained non-uniformities is the interplay of the focussing caused by the high amount of internally reflected scintillation light and the intrinsic absorption in the crystal. Various techniques to achieve a light yield uniformisation, including wrapping and crystal surface modifications, have been investigated. Among these, emery polishing of one crystal surface succeeded in a partial uniformisation of the response to photons with an acceptable light yield loss compared to an intrinsically uniform untapered crystal type. However, an evaluation of the influence on a matrix of 60 crystals based on GEANT4 simulations showed that, in spite being beneficial for energies above several hundred MeV energy, due to the inherent light yield loss entailing a resolution loss in the low energy regime, a uniformisation is not recommendable for the PANDA Barrel EMC. In case of the end caps, the straight geometry of the implemented crystals does not require uniformisation. The position response of the prototype PROTO60, representing a subsection of the PANDA Barrel EMC comprised of 6 x 10 lead tungstate crystals, was investigated during a 15 (GeV)/(c) positron beam test at CERN SPS. Due to the availability of a high resolution reference position provided by a tracking station based on two double-sided silicon strip detectors, linearity and resolution of the incident particle position reconstructed with PROTO60 could be investigated extensively. Both deployed reconstruction techniques, based on a centre of gravity algorithm with either logarithmic weighting or linear weighting with successive S-curve correction, yield comparable results. An overall position resolution of σ x,y =1.1 mm could be achieved. However, for incident positions located at the crystal junctions, an improved resolution down to 0.5 mm is obtained. These results, which represent the high energy limit of the PANDA EMC, are superior to the stated specifications. In addition, a comparison of the achieved resolution to the upper limit deduced from the convolution of photon beam and detector resolution at energies up to 1.5 GeV leads to the conclusion that also in the low energy regime a resolution superior to the specifications is achievable. The achieved results specific for the PANDA EMC design are compared to recent experiences of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter, showing many similarities.

  7. A comparison of mixed-integer linear programming models for workforce scheduling with position-dependent processing times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Camacho, Carlos A.; Montoya-Torres, Jairo R.; Vélez-Gallego, Mario C.

    2018-06-01

    Only a few studies in the available scientific literature address the problem of having a group of workers that do not share identical levels of productivity during the planning horizon. This study considers a workforce scheduling problem in which the actual processing time is a function of the scheduling sequence to represent the decline in workers' performance, evaluating two classical performance measures separately: makespan and maximum tardiness. Several mathematical models are compared with each other to highlight the advantages of each approach. The mathematical models are tested with randomly generated instances available from a public e-library.

  8. Measurement of position dependence of spectral distribution in primary X-ray beam of CT system using compton spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Masao; Maeda, Koji; Maeda, Koji

    2005-01-01

    Our purpose is to acquire the diagnostic x-ray spectra of the CT system easily under clinical conditions by Compton scatter spectroscopy using a high resolution Schottky CdTe detector recently developed and to estimate the quality and quantity of these spectra compared the relative exposure measured using an ionization chamber with curves measured by the reconstructed spectra. Although the spectral broadening and the fluctuation were slightly shown, the errors of the relative exposure were under 10%. Though the experimental arrangement of this method is so easy and reconstructed algorithm is simple, these results suggested that this method is little influenced by the variation of dose rates or property of the incident x rays. We therefore propose that the Compton scatter spectroscopy with the newly developed Schottky CdTe detector is suitable for measuring the diagnostic x-ray spectra of the CT system under the clinical conditions and useful for quality assurance and quality control of the clinical x-ray CT system. (author)

  9. Single Machine Scheduling and Due Date Assignment with Past-Sequence-Dependent Setup Time and Position-Dependent Processing Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Li Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers single machine scheduling and due date assignment with setup time. The setup time is proportional to the length of the already processed jobs; that is, the setup time is past-sequence-dependent (p-s-d. It is assumed that a job's processing time depends on its position in a sequence. The objective functions include total earliness, the weighted number of tardy jobs, and the cost of due date assignment. We analyze these problems with two different due date assignment methods. We first consider the model with job-dependent position effects. For each case, by converting the problem to a series of assignment problems, we proved that the problems can be solved in On4 time. For the model with job-independent position effects, we proved that the problems can be solved in On3 time by providing a dynamic programming algorithm.

  10. Position-dependent energy-level shifts of an accelerated atom in the presence of a boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhiying; Yu Hongwei

    2010-01-01

    We consider a uniformly accelerated atom interacting with a vacuum electromagnetic field in the presence of an infinite conducting plane boundary and calculate separately the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction to the atomic energy-level shift. We analyze in detail the behavior of the total energy shift in three different regimes of the distance in both the low-acceleration and high-acceleration limits. Our results show that, in general, an accelerated atom does not behave as if immersed in a thermal bath at the Unruh temperature in terms of the atomic energy-level shifts, and the effect of the acceleration on the atomic energy-level shifts may in principle become appreciable in certain circumstances, although it may not be realistic for actual experimental measurements. We also examine the effects of the acceleration on the level shifts when the acceleration is of the order of the transition frequency of the atom and we find some features which differ from what was obtained in the existing literature.

  11. Single-Lung Transplant Results in Position Dependent Changes in Regional Ventilation: An Observational Case Series Using Electrical Impedance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollengode Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lung transplantation is the optimal treatment for end stage lung disease. Donor shortage necessitates single-lung transplants (SLT, yet minimal data exists regarding regional ventilation in diseased versus transplanted lung measured by Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT. Method. We aimed to determine regional ventilation in six SLT outpatients using EIT. We assessed end expiratory volume and tidal volumes. End expiratory lung impedance (EELI and Global Tidal Variation of Impedance were assessed in supine, right lateral, left lateral, sitting, and standing positions in transplanted and diseased lungs. A mixed model with random intercept per subject was used for statistical analysis. Results. EELI was significantly altered between diseased and transplanted lungs whilst lying on right and left side. One patient demonstrated pendelluft between lungs and was therefore excluded for further comparison of tidal variation. Tidal variation was significantly higher in the transplanted lung for the remaining five patients in all positions, except when lying on the right side. Conclusion. Ventilation to transplanted lung is better than diseased lung, especially in lateral positions. Positioning in patients with active unilateral lung pathologies will be implicated. This is the first study demonstrating changes in regional ventilation, associated with changes of position between transplanted and diseased lung.

  12. CLIC Physics Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Pandurovic, Mila

    2017-01-01

    The CLICdp is an international collaboration that investigates the physics potential of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and performs research and development of the CLIC detector. CLIC is a future multi-TeV linear electron-positron collider, designed to cover a physics program of the Standard model physics, with the emphasis on Higgs and top as well as to address the wide range of open questions of the phenomena beyond the Standard model with high precision. The CLIC is designed to be build and operated at three discrete energy stages, sort(s) = 380 GeV, 1.5 and 3.0 TeV, which are optimized for the foreseen physics program. In this talk the CLIC accelerator, detector and experimental environment of CLIC will be presented, as well as, the number of the full-simulation measurements in the Higgs, top and beyond Standard model sector, presenting the capabilities of CLIC for high precision measurements.

  13. The effective nuclear potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skyrme, T.H.R.

    1994-01-01

    An empirical analyses is made of the mean effective internucleon potential required in the shell-model description of nuclei, allowing for the presence of many-body effects as suggested by current theory. A consistent description is found in which the effective two-body interaction acts almost entirely in even states, and the many-body effects are simulated by a repulsive three-body contact interaction. The strength of the two-body interaction is consistent with that expressed by the free scattering matrix of the two-nucleon system, and that of the three-body interaction with the 'rearrangement energy' calculated in the many-body theory. (author). 21 refs, 2 figs, 7 tabs

  14. Potential for nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, B.M.

    1977-05-01

    The question of whether or not terrorists will ''go nuclear'' is discussed. It is possible, although there is no historical evidence that any criminal or terrorist group ever made any attempt to acquire nuclear material for use in an explosive or dispersal device. In terms of intentions, psychotics are potential nuclear terrorists, but in terms of capabilities, they are the farthest away from being able to acquire a nuclear weapon. The history of nuclear incidents in the U.S. and abroad is reviewed. As the nuclear industry expands, the number of low-level incidents (bomb threats, pilferage, etc.) will increase also, but not necessarily escalate to more serious incidents. Terrorists may ''go nuclear'' solely for the publicity value; nuclear hoaxes may be attenpted. Nuclear terrorism seems more attractive as a threat than as an action. But the nature of the threat may change in the future, and the danger of imitation of a successful nuclear terrorist act is pointed out

  15. Corrosion potential analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Karl F.

    1998-03-01

    Many cities in the northeastern U.S. transport electrical power from place to place via underground cables, which utilize voltages from 68 kv to 348 kv. These cables are placed in seamless steel pipe to protect the conductors. These buried pipe-type-cables (PTCs) are carefully designed and constantly pressurized with transformer oil to prevent any possible contamination. A protective coating placed on the outside diameter of the pipe during manufacture protects the steel pipe from the soil environment. Notwithstanding the protection mechanisms available, the pipes remain vulnerable to electrochemical corrosion processes. If undetected, corrosion can cause the pipes to leak transformer oil into the environment. These leaks can assume serious proportions due to the constant pressure on the inside of the pipe. A need exists for a detection system that can dynamically monitor the corrosive potential on the length of the pipe and dynamically adjust cathodic protection to counter local and global changes in the cathodic environment surrounding the pipes. The northeastern United States contains approximately 1000 miles of this pipe. This milage is critical to the transportation and distribution of power. So critical, that each of the pipe runs has a redundant double running parallel to it. Invocon, Inc. proposed and tested a technically unique and cost effective solution to detect critical corrosion potential and to communicate that information to a central data collection and analysis location. Invocon's solution utilizes the steel of the casing pipe as a communication medium. Each data gathering station on the pipe can act as a relay for information gathered elsewhere on the pipe. These stations must have 'smart' network configuration algorithms that constantly test various communication paths and determine the best and most power efficient route through which information should flow. Each network station also performs data acquisition and analysis tasks that ultimately

  16. Pseudo potentials and model potentials in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, O.; Jouin, H.; Fuentealba, P.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, it is discussed the main differences between the use of pseudo-potentials and model potentials in collision problems . It is shown the potential energy curves for distinct systems obtained with both kinds of potentials. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  17. Bioremedication: Potentials and pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    The three main types of marine oil spill bioremediation involve fertilizers, seeding, and open-water applications. Fertilizers contain nutrients that trigger the growth of indigenous oil-degrading microorganisms. Seeding involves adding exogenous microbes to an oiled environment to promote increased biodegradation rates. The effectiveness of using either seeding or fertilizers in the open ocean has not been well established and most of the scientific community and many oil professionals remain skeptical about the utility of bioremediation at sea because rigorously controlled and documented experiments have not yet been done. Several companies have advocated using bioremediation for open ocean oil spills, but they have not yet produced convincing evidence that their products work as claimed. A potentially significant problem at sea is keeping the microorganisms in contact with the oil long enough for degradation to occur. The jury is still out regarding regulatory and public acceptance of bioremediation as a technique to clean up oil spills in general. Commercialization of bioremediation products is hindered by lack of protocols for testing and approval, although efforts are underway to devise such mechanisms

  18. Quantum potentiality revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Gregg

    2017-10-01

    Heisenberg offered an interpretation of the quantum state which made use of a quantitative version of an earlier notion, , of Aristotle by both referring to it using its Latin name, potentia, and identifying its qualitative aspect with . The relationship between this use and Aristotle's notion was not made by Heisenberg in full detail, beyond noting their common character: that of signifying the system's objective capacity to be found later to possess a property in actuality. For such actualization, Heisenberg required measurement to have taken place, an interaction with external systems that disrupts the otherwise independent, natural evolution of the quantum system. The notion of state actualization was later taken up by others, including Shimony, in the search for a law-like measurement process. Yet, the relation of quantum potentiality to Aristotle's original notion has been viewed as mainly terminological, even by those who used it thus. Here, I reconsider the relation of Heisenberg's notion to Aristotle's and show that it can be explicated in greater specificity than Heisenberg did. This is accomplished through the careful consideration of the role of potentia in physical causation and explanation, and done in order to provide a fuller understanding of this aspect of Heisenberg's approach to quantum mechanics. Most importantly, it is pointed out that Heisenberg's requirement of an external intervention during measurement that disrupts the otherwise independent, natural evolution of the quantum system is in accord with Aristotle's characterization of spontaneous causation. Thus, the need for a teleological understanding of the actualization of potentia, an often assumed requirement that has left this fundamental notion neglected, is seen to be spurious. This article is part of the themed issue `Second quantum revolution: foundational questions'.

  19. RANGELAND SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Spangler; George F. Vance; Gerald E. Schuman; Justin D. Derner

    2012-03-31

    Rangelands occupy approximately half of the world's land area and store greater than 10% of the terrestrial biomass carbon and up to 30% of the global soil organic carbon. Although soil carbon sequestration rates are generally low on rangelands in comparison to croplands, increases in terrestrial carbon in rangelands resulting from management can account for significant carbon sequestration given the magnitude of this land resource. Despite the significance rangelands can play in carbon sequestration, our understanding remains limited. Researchers conducted a literature review to identify sustainably management practices that conserve existing rangeland carbon pools, as well as increase or restore carbon sequestration potentials for this type of ecosystem. The research team also reviewed the impact of grazing management on rangeland carbon dynamics, which are not well understood due to heterogeneity in grassland types. The literature review on the impact of grazing showed a wide variation of results, ranging from positive to negative to no response. On further review, the intensity of grazing appears to be a major factor in controlling rangeland soil organic carbon dynamics. In 2003, researchers conducted field sampling to assess the effect of several drought years during the period 1993-2002. Results suggested that drought can significantly impact rangeland soil organic carbon (SOC) levels, and therefore, carbon sequestration. Resampling was conducted in 2006; results again suggested that climatic conditions may have overridden management effects on SOC due to the ecological lag of the severe drought of 2002. Analysis of grazing practices during this research effort suggested that there are beneficial effects of light grazing compared to heavy grazing and non-grazing with respect to increased SOC and nitrogen contents. In general, carbon storage in rangelands also increases with increased precipitation, although researchers identified threshold levels of

  20. Quantum potentiality revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Gregg

    2017-11-13

    Heisenberg offered an interpretation of the quantum state which made use of a quantitative version of an earlier notion, [Formula: see text], of Aristotle by both referring to it using its Latin name, potentia , and identifying its qualitative aspect with [Formula: see text] The relationship between this use and Aristotle's notion was not made by Heisenberg in full detail, beyond noting their common character: that of signifying the system's objective capacity to be found later to possess a property in actuality. For such actualization, Heisenberg required measurement to have taken place, an interaction with external systems that disrupts the otherwise independent, natural evolution of the quantum system. The notion of state actualization was later taken up by others, including Shimony, in the search for a law-like measurement process. Yet, the relation of quantum potentiality to Aristotle's original notion has been viewed as mainly terminological, even by those who used it thus. Here, I reconsider the relation of Heisenberg's notion to Aristotle's and show that it can be explicated in greater specificity than Heisenberg did. This is accomplished through the careful consideration of the role of potentia in physical causation and explanation, and done in order to provide a fuller understanding of this aspect of Heisenberg's approach to quantum mechanics. Most importantly, it is pointed out that Heisenberg's requirement of an external intervention during measurement that disrupts the otherwise independent, natural evolution of the quantum system is in accord with Aristotle's characterization of spontaneous causation. Thus, the need for a teleological understanding of the actualization of potentia, an often assumed requirement that has left this fundamental notion neglected, is seen to be spurious.This article is part of the themed issue 'Second quantum revolution: foundational questions'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Solar potential in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soezen, Adnan; Arcaklioglu, Erol

    2005-01-01

    Most of the locations in Turkey receive abundant solar-energy, because Turkey lies in a sunny belt between 36 deg. and 42 deg. N latitudes. Average annual temperature is 18 to 20 deg. C on the south coast, falls to 14-16 deg. C on the west coat, and fluctuates between 4 and 18 deg. C in the central parts. The yearly average solar-radiation is 3.6 kW h/m 2 day, and the total yearly radiation period is ∼2610 h. In this study, a new formulation based on meteorological and geographical data was developed to determine the solar-energy potential in Turkey using artificial neural-networks (ANNs). Scaled conjugate gradient (SCG), Pola-Ribiere conjugate gradient (CGP), and Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) learning algorithms and logistic sigmoid (logsig) transfer function were used in the networks. Meteorological data for last four years (2000-2003) from 12 cities (Canakkale, Kars, Hakkari, Sakarya, Erzurum, Zonguldak, Balikesir, Artvin, Corum, Konya, Siirt, and Tekirdag) spread over Turkey were used in order to train the neural-network. Meteorological and geographical data (latitude, longitude, altitude, month, mean sunshine-duration, and mean temperature) are used in the input layer of the network. Solar-radiation is in the output layer. The maximum mean absolute percentage error was found to be less than 3.832% and R 2 values to be about 99.9738% for the selected stations. The ANN models show greater accuracy for evaluating solar-resource possibilities in regions where a network of monitoring stations has not been established in Turkey. This study confirms the ability of the ANN to predict solar-radiation values accurately

  2. Potentials of fissioning plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlheinz, Thom.

    1979-01-01

    Successful experiments with the nuclear pumping of lasers have demonstrated that in gaseous medium the kinetic energy of fission fragments can be converted directly into non-equilibrium optical radiation. This confirms the concept that the fissioning medium in a gas-phase nuclear reactor shows an internal structure such as a plasma in nearly thermal equilibrium varying up to a state of extreme-non-equilibrium. The accompanying variations of temperatures, pressure and radiative spectrum suggest wide ranges of applications. For example, in the gas-phase fission reactor concept enriched uranium hexafluoride or an uranium plasma replaces conventional fuel elements and permits operation above the melting point of solid materials. This potential has been motivation for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to conduct relevant research for high specific impulse propulsion in space. The need to separate the high temperature gaseous fuel from the surfaces of a containing vessel and to protect them against thermal radiation has led to the concept of an externally moderated reactor in which the fissioning gaseous material is suspended by fluid dynamic means and the flow of opaque buffer gas removes the power. The gaseous nuclear fuel can slowly be circulated through the reactor for continuous on-site reprocessing including the annihilation of transuranium actinides at fission when being fed back into the reactor. An equilibrium of the generation and destruction of such actinides at fission when being fed back into the reactor. An equilibrium of the generation and destruction of such actinides can thus be achieved. These characteristics and the unique radiative properties led to the expectation that the gas-phase fission reactor could feature improved safety, safeguarding and economy, in addition to new technologies such as processing, photochemistry and the transmission of power over large distances in space

  3. Toxic potential of palytoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patocka, Jiří; Gupta, Ramesh C; Wu, Qing-hua; Kuca, Kamil

    2015-10-01

    This review briefly describes the origin, chemistry, molecular mechanism of action, pharmacology, toxicology, and ecotoxicology of palytoxin and its analogues. Palytoxin and its analogues are produced by marine dinoflagellates. Palytoxin is also produced by Zoanthids (i.e. Palythoa), and Cyanobacteria (Trichodesmium). Palytoxin is a very large, non-proteinaceous molecule with a complex chemical structure having both lipophilic and hydrophilic moieties. Palytoxin is one of the most potent marine toxins with an LD50 of 150 ng/kg body weight in mice exposed intravenously. Pharmacological and electrophysiological studies have demonstrated that palytoxin acts as a hemolysin and alters the function of excitable cells through multiple mechanisms of action. Palytoxin selectively binds to Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase with a Kd of 20 pM and transforms the pump into a channel permeable to monovalent cations with a single-channel conductance of 10 pS. This mechanism of action could have multiple effects on cells. Evaluation of palytoxin toxicity using various animal models revealed that palytoxin is an extremely potent neurotoxin following an intravenous, intraperitoneal, intramuscular, subcutaneous or intratracheal route of exposure. Palytoxin also causes non-lethal, yet serious toxic effects following dermal or ocular exposure. Most incidents of palytoxin poisoning have manifested after oral intake of contaminated seafood. Poisonings in humans have also been noted after inhalation, cutaneous/systemic exposures with direct contact of aerosolized seawater during Ostreopsis blooms and/or through maintaining aquaria containing Cnidarian zoanthids. Palytoxin has a strong potential for toxicity in humans and animals, and currently this toxin is of great concern worldwide.

  4. Lateralization of event-related potential effects during mental rotation of polygons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellkofer, Julia; Jansen, Petra; Heil, Martin

    2012-07-11

    Numerous studies have shown that there is an amplitude modulation of the late positivity depending on the angular disparity during mental rotation performance. However, almost all of these studies used characters as stimulus material, whereas studies with different stimuli are rare. In the present experiment, 35 participants were instructed to rotate polygons mentally. Most importantly, with this stimulus material, the well-known event-related potential effects were also present at posterior electrode leads. Interestingly, the amplitude modulation were found to be larger and more reliable over left than over right posterior electrode leads, a finding reported previously for characters as stimuli, although not consistently. Thus, the present data suggest that the left lateralization of event-related potential effects during mental rotation of characters might not be because of their 'verbal nature', but might suggest a stronger involvement of the left parietal cortex during mental rotation per se, a suggestion that needs to be addressed with methods providing a higher spatial resolution.

  5. On the scalar potential models from the isospectral potential class

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, V. Gomes [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Santos, V. Silva [Paraiba Univ., Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Civil; Rodrigues, R. de Lima [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: rafaelr@cbpf.br

    2001-10-01

    The static field classical configuration in (1+1)-dimensions for new non-linear potential models is investigated from an isospectral potential class and the concept of bosonic zero mode solution. One of the models considered here has a static nontopological configuration with a single vacuum state, whose potential in the stability equation corresponds to broken a supersymmetry. (author)

  6. PV potential and potential PV rent in European regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Chr.; Thorn, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The paper provides a GIS based model for assessing the potentials of photovoltaic electricity in Europe by NUTS 2 regions. The location specific energy potential per PV-­‐panel area is estimated based on observations of solar irradiation, conversion efficiency, levelised costs and the social value...... of PV-­‐electricity. Combined with the potential density of PV-­‐panel area based on land cover and environental restrictions, the PV energy potential and the potential PV ressource rent is calculated. These calculations enbable the model to estimate the regional patterns at NUTS 2 level...

  7. An improved potential for krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    An improved potential for krypton is presented. It has the simple but realistic form used by Aziz and Chen for argon based on the HFD potential suggested by Ahlrichs et.al. The potential, with known long-range behaviour, was fitted to second virial, viscosity and thermal conductivity data. The potential appears to have the best overall predictive ability for dilute gas, bulk and microscopic data. (author)

  8. Instantons and the interquark potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, N.A.

    1980-01-01

    It is argued that the contributions to the interquark potential from instantons of all scale sizes may be calculated in a consistent, cut-off-independent manner using the dilute-gas approximation; and that an interquark potential dominated at intermediate distances by these contributions is similar to already successful phenomenological potentials. (orig.)

  9. Potentials of surfaces in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whipple, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of a body in space is determined by a balance between various charging currents such as the transfer of charge from plasma particles, photoemission, and secondary electron emission. These processes are evaluated for bodies in the solar system and in interstellar space under the headings; an overview of charging, survey of early work on charging, charging processes, effects of non-isotropic plasmas and magnetic and electric fields, calculation of surface potentials, differential charging, potential barriers and discharge processes, measurements of potential, potential modification and control on spacecraft, and astrophysical applications. (U.K.)

  10. Measurement of proton autoneutralization potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.

    1984-09-01

    A proton space charge having multi-MeV kinetic energy was injected through a thin ground plane to extract electrons and produce a time-dependent autoneutralization space potential. An electon-emitting floating-potential resistive divider was used to measure the space potential during 20 ns of the proton current pulse. During this time, proton kinetic energy fell from 10.6 MeV to 8.5 MeV and thus the space potential (taken as 1.09 x the floating potential) fell from 5.8 kV to 4.6 kV

  11. Molecular electrostatic potential and "atoms-in-molecules" analyses of the interplay between π-hole and lone pair···π/X-H···π/metal···π interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauzá, Antonio; Seth, Saikat Kumar; Frontera, Antonio

    2018-04-05

    Using ab initio calculations, we analyze the interplay between π-hole interactions involving the nitro group of 1,4-dinitrobenzene and lone pair···π (lp···π), C-H···π or metal(M)···π noncovalent interactions. Moreover, we have also used 1,4-phenylenebis(phosphine dioxide) for comparison purposes. Interesting cooperativity effects are found when π-hole (F···N,P) and lp···π/C-H···π/M···π interactions coexist in the same supramolecular assembly. These effects are studied theoretically in terms of energetic and geometric features of the complexes, which are computed by ab initio methods (RI-MP2/def2-TZVP). A charge density analysis using the Bader's theory of "atoms in molecules" is carried out to characterize the interactions and to analyze their strengthening or weakening depending on the variation of charge density at critical points. The importance of electrostatic effects on the mutual influence of the interaction is studied by means of molecular electrostatic potential calculations. By taking advantage of these computational tools, the present study examines interplay of these interactions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Pair potentials in liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faber, T.E.

    1980-01-01

    The argument which justifies the use of a pair potential to describe the structure-dependent term in the energy of liquid metals is briefly reviewed. Because there is an additional term in the energy which depends upon volume rather than structure, and because the pair potential itself is volume-dependent, the relationship between pair potential and observable properties such as pressure, bulk modulus and pair distribution function is more complicated for liquid metals than it is for molecular liquids. Perhaps for this reason, the agreement between pair potentials inferred from observable properties and pair potentials calculated by means of pseudo-potential theory is still far from complete. The pair potential concept is applicable only to simple liquid metals, in which the electron-ion interaction is weak. No attempt is made to discuss liquid transition and rare-earth metals, which are not simple in this sense. (author)

  13. State-dependent classical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, M.

    2001-01-01

    As alternative treatment to the potential operators of standard quantum mechanics is presented. The method is derived from Bohm's mechanics. The operator scalar (V) and vector (A) potential functions are replaced by a quantum potential. It is argued that the classical potential is a special limiting case of a more general quantum potential. The theory is illustrated by deriving an equivalent single-particle equation for the i-th particle of an n-body Bohmian system. The resulting effective state-dependent potential holds the interaction between the single-particle self-wave ψ s and the environment wave ψ e of the n - 1 remaining particles. The effective state-dependent potential is offered as a resolution to the Aharonov-Bohm effect where the phase difference is shown to result from the presence of ψ e . Finally, the interaction between ψ s and ψ e is illustrated graphically

  14. The neutron optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    The present status of optical model calculations of neutron scattering and interactions is reviewed, with special emphasis on more recent developments and the more promising lines of research. The use of dispersion relations to provide an extra constraint on the potential is discussed, together with their application to studies of the Fermi surface anomaly. The application of potential inversion techniques to determine the form of the potential is also considered. (author). 39 refs, figs

  15. Oxygen potentials of transuranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haruyoshi Otobe; Mituso Akabori; Arai Yasuo; Kazuo Minato

    2008-01-01

    The oxygen potentials of pyrochlore-type Pu 2 Zr 2 O 7+y , fluorite-type (Pu 0.5 Zr 0.5 )O 2-x and AmO 2-x have been measured by the electromotive force (EMF) method with a zirconia solid-electrolyte. The oxygen potentials of these oxides were reviewed. The phase relations, microstructure, equilibrium state of these oxides were discussed, referring to the isothermal curve of the oxygen potentials. (authors)

  16. Ambipolar potential formation in TMX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correl, D.L.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    TMX experimental data on ambipolar potential control and on the accompanying electrostatic confinement are reported. New results on the radial dependence of the central-cell confining potential are given. Radial and axial particle losses as well as scaling of the central-cell axial confinement are discussed

  17. The erosive potential of lollipops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Gambon, D.L.; Paap, A.; Bulthuis, M.S.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Nieuw Amerongen, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine the erosive potential of several commercially available lollipops and the protective effect of saliva. Methods: The erosive potential of lollipops was determined in vitro by measuring the pH and neutralisable acidity. Subsequently, 10 healthy volunteers tested different types of

  18. Miscellaneous conditions and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.; Ehman, R.L.; Richardson, M.L.; Helms, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The previous chapters have discussed basic principles and the types of musculoskeletal pathology that have been most extensively studied with magnetic resonance (MR) techniques. MR has also demonstrated significant potential in other areas, but experience is more limited. Despite this limited experience, the potential application of MR imaging in these areas is discussed in this paper

  19. Potential photosynthesis of crop surfaces.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de C.T.

    1959-01-01

    A formula for calculating the potential photosynthesis of a closed crop surface is proposed, assuming that the leaves of the crop are not arranged in any definite direction. In the Netherlands, values for potential photosynthesis vary from 290 kg. CH2O/ha./day in June to 50 kg./ha./day in December.

  20. Supermodular Games and Potential Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brânzei, R.; Mallozzi, L.; Tijs, S.H.

    2001-01-01

    Potential games and supermodular games are attractive games, especially because under certain conditions they possess pure Nash equilibria. Subclasses of games with a potential are considered which are also strategically equivalent to supermodular games. The focus is on two-person zero-sum games and

  1. Finite-Temperature Higgs Potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgopolov, M.V.; Gurskaya, A.V.; Rykova, E.N.

    2016-01-01

    In the present article we consider the short description of the “Finite-Temperature Higgs Potentials” program for calculating loop integrals at vanishing external momenta and applications for extended Higgs potentials reconstructions. Here we collect the analytic forms of the relevant loop integrals for our work in reconstruction of the effective Higgs potential parameters in extended models (MSSM, NMSSM and etc.)

  2. High-temperature axion potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowrick, N.J.; McDougall, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of new terms in the high-temperature axion potential arising from the dynamical nature of the axion field and from higher-order corrections to the θ dependence in the free energy of the quark-gluon plasma. We find that the dynamical nature of the axion field does not affect the potential but that the higher-order effects lead to new terms in the potential which are larger than the term previously considered. However, neither the magnitude nor the sign of the potential can be calculated by a perturbative expansion of the free energy since the coupling is too large. We show that a change in the magnitude of the potential does not significantly affect the bound on the axion decay constant but that the sign of the potential is of crucial importance. By investigating the formal properties of the functional integral within the instanton dilute-gas approximation, we find that the sign of the potential does not change and that the minimum remains at θ=0. We conclude that the standard calculation of the axion energy today is not significantly modified by this investigation

  3. Cold atoms in singular potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denschlag, J. P.

    1998-09-01

    We studied both theoretically and experimentally the interaction between cold Li atoms from a magnetic-optical trap (MOT) and a charged or current-carrying wire. With this system, we were able to realize 1/r 2 and 1/r potentials in two dimensions and to observe the motion of cold atoms in both potentials. For an atom in an attractive 1/r 2 potential, there exist no stable trajectories, instead there is a characteristic class of trajectories for which atoms fall into the singularity. We were able to observe this falling of atoms into the center of the potential. Moreover, by probing the singular 1/r 2 potential with atomic clouds of varying size and temperature we extracted scaling properties of the atom-wire interaction. For very cold atoms, and very thin wires the motion of the atoms must be treated quantum mechanically. Here we predict that the absorption cross section for the 1/r 2 potential should exhibit quantum steps. These quantum steps are a manifestation of the quantum mechanical decomposition of plane waves into partial waves. For the second part of this work, we realized a two dimensional 1/r potential for cold atoms. If the potential is attractive, the atoms can be bound and follow Kepler-like orbits around the wire. The motion in the third dimension along the wire is free. We were able to exploit this property and constructed a novel cold atom guide, the 'Kepler guide'. We also demonstrated another type of atom guide (the 'side guide'), by combining the magnetic field of the wire with a homogeneous offset magnetic field. In this case, the atoms are held in a potential 'tube' on the side of the wire. The versatility, simplicity, and scaling properties of this guide make it an interesting technique. (author)

  4. Exceptional circles of radial potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, M; Perry, P; Siltanen, S

    2013-01-01

    A nonlinear scattering transform is studied for the two-dimensional Schrödinger equation at zero energy with a radial potential. Explicit examples are presented, both theoretically and computationally, of potentials with nontrivial singularities in the scattering transform. The singularities arise from non-uniqueness of the complex geometric optics solutions that define the scattering transform. The values of the complex spectral parameter at which the singularities appear are called exceptional points. The singularity formation is closely related to the fact that potentials of conductivity type are ‘critical’ in the sense of Murata. (paper)

  5. Potential Theory Surveys and Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Lukeš, Jaroslav; Netuka, Ivan; Veselý, Jiří

    1988-01-01

    The volume comprises eleven survey papers based on survey lectures delivered at the Conference in Prague in July 1987, which covered various facets of potential theory, including its applications in other areas. The survey papers deal with both classical and abstract potential theory and its relations to partial differential equations, stochastic processes and other branches such as numerical analysis and topology. A collection of problems from potential theory, compiled on the occasion of the conference, is included, with additional commentaries, in the second part of this volume.

  6. Chemical potentials in gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actor, A.; Pennsylvania State Univ., Fogelsville

    1985-01-01

    One-loop calculations of the thermodynamic potential Ω are presented for temperature gauge and non-gauge theories. Prototypical formulae are derived which give Ω as a function of both (i) boson and/or fermion chemical potential, and in the case of gauge theories (ii) the thermal vacuum parameter Asub(O)=const (Asub(μ) is the euclidean gauge potential). From these basic abelian gauge theory formulae, the one-loop contribution to Ω can readily be constructed for Yang-Mills theories, and also for non-gauge theories. (orig.)

  7. The nucleon-nucleon potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    The first part of this talk is based on the one presented at the Tokyo conference last September and can be found in ref( 1 ). This coveres such topics as the Paris and Stonybrook potentials, the new values of the NN coupling constants and also our understanding of the NNω coupling constant. The second part reviews recent developments concerning the Paris potential, the application of the MIT bag model to the NN interaction, the effect of crossed pion processes and vertex form factors. Comments made about the possible future trends of NN potential calculations. The current status of the D-state probability of the deuteron is discussed. (orig./AH) [de

  8. Potential Theory of Multicomponent Adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1998-01-01

    We developed a theory of multicomponent adsorption on the basis of the potential concept originally suggested by Polanyi. The mixture is considered as a heterogeneous substance segregated in the external field emitted by the adsorbent. The same standard equation of state, with no additional fitting...... and high degree of predictability of the theory developed....... the potential theory and the spreading pressure concept is established, and problems of the theory consistency are studied. Numerical algorithms are suggested for evaluation of the segregated state of the mixture in the potential field of adsorption forces. Comparison with experimental data shows good agreement...

  9. The deuteron microscopic optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Congshan; Zhang Jingshang; Shen Qingbiao

    1991-01-01

    The two particle Green's function is introduced. When the direct interaction between two nucleons is neglected, the first and second order mass operators of two particles are the sum of those for each particle. The nucleon microscopic optical potential is calculated by applying nuclear matter approximation and effective Skyrme interaction. Then the deuteron microscopic optical potential (DMOP) is calculated by using fold formula. For improvement of the theory, the two particle polarization diagram contribution to the imaginary part of the deuteron microscopic optical potential is studied

  10. Quark potential of spontaneous strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    German, G.; Kleinert, H.

    1989-01-01

    The authors present some recent developments in string models with an extrinsic curvature term in action. Particular emphasis is placed upon the static quark potential and on the thermal deconfinement properties of spontaneous strings

  11. Singular potentials in quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera-Navarro, V.C.; Koo, E. Ley

    1995-10-01

    This paper is a review of some mathematical methods as recently developed and applied to deal with singular potentials in Quantum Mechanics. Regular and singular perturbative methods as well as variational treatments are considered. (author). 25 refs

  12. Potential Leaders and Democratic Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsma, Stephen V.

    1971-01-01

    Indicates that potential contenders for public office are likely to be more knowledgeable, interested, and libertarian than the average citizen. Concludes that these differences exist before leaders are elected and that this discrimination is functional in a democracy. (MB)

  13. Molecular potentials and relaxation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karo, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The use of empirical pseudopotentials, in evaluating interatomic potentials, provides an inexpensive and convenient method for obtaining highly accurate potential curves and permits the modeling of core-valence correlation, and the inclusion of relativistic effects when these are significant. As an example, recent calculations of the chi 1 Σ + and a 3 Σ + states of LiH, NaH, KH, RbH, and CsH and the chi 2 Σ + states of their anions are discussed. Pseudopotentials, including core polarization terms, have been used to replace the core electrons, and this has been coupled with the development of compact, highly-optimized basis sets for the corresponding one- and two-electron atoms. Comparisons of the neutral potential curves with experiment and other ab initio calculations show good agreement (within 1000 cm -1 over most of the potential curves) with the difference curves being considerably more accurate

  14. ANTAGONISTIC POTENTIAL OF FLUORESCENT Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    GROWTH OF TOMATO CHALLENGED WITH PHTOPATHOGENS ... This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth .... the 5 days old culture in starch agar with Lugol's.

  15. Potential measurements in tandem mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glowienka, J.C.

    1985-11-01

    The US mirror program has begun conducting experiments with a thermal barrier tandem mirror configuration. This configuration requires a specific axial potential profile and implies measurements of potential for documentation and optimization of the configuration. This report briefly outlines the motivation for the thermal barrier tandem mirror and then outlines the techniques used to document the potential profile in conventional and thermal barrier tandem mirrors. Examples of typical data sets from the world's major tandem mirror experiments, TMX and TMX-U at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Gamma 10 at Tsukuba University in Japan, and the current interpretation of the data are discussed together with plans for the future improvement of measurements of plasma potential

  16. Towards a commercially potential process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panpipat, Worawan; Xu, Xuebing; Guo, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    In order to examine the industrial potential to indirectly isolate phytosterols from deodoriser distillates (DODs), enzymatic transesterification of an industrial rapeseed and soybean oil DOD mixture with bioethanol was investigated using commercial lipases and a few newly immobilised preparations...

  17. Effective potentials for twisted fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banach, R.

    1981-01-01

    Minus the density of the effective action, evaluated at the lowest eigenfunction of the (space-time) derivative part of the second (functional) derivative of the classical action, is proposed as a generalised definition of the effective potential, applicable to twisted as well as untwisted sectors of a field theory. The proposal is corroborated by several specific calculations in the twisted sector, namely phi 4 theory (real and complex) and wrong-sign-Gordon theory, in an Einstein cylinder, where the exact integrability of the static solutions confirms the effective potential predictions. Both models exhibit a phase transition, which the effective potential locates, and the one-loop quantum shift in the critical radius is computed for the real phi 4 model, being a universal result. Topological mass generation at the classical level is pointed out, and the exactness of the classical effective potential approximation for complex phi 4 is discussed. (author)

  18. Perihelium shifts in central potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, A.E.A.; Ferreira, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    Motivated by the rigorous results on level ordering for arbitrary central potentials recently derived in the literature a classical treatment of the perihelium shifts is presented, based on the consideration of those orbits which lie in the vicinity of a circular orbit. The role played by the Laplacian of the potential is emphasized. By the same approach Bertrand's theorem is also discussed, in connection with Arnold's proof. (Author) [pt

  19. Static quark-antiquark potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deo, B.B.; Barik, B.K.

    1983-01-01

    A heavy-quark--antiquark potential is suggested which connects asymptotic freedom and quark confinement in a unified manner by formal methods of field theory using some plausible assumptions. The potential has only one additional adjustable parameter B which is proportional to (M/sub q//m/sub q/), where M/sub q/ and m/sub q/ are the constituent and current quark masses, respectively

  20. Molecular potentials and relaxation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karo, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The use of empirical pseudopotentials, in evaluating interatomic potentials, provides an inexpensive and convenient method for obtaining highly accurate potential curves and permits the modeling of core-valence correlation, and the inclusion of relativistic effects when these are significant. Recent calculations of the X 1 Σ + and a 3 Σ + states of LiH, NaH, KH, RbH, and CsH and the X 2 Σ + states of their anions are discussed. Pseudopotentials, including core polarization terms, have been used to replace the core electrons, and this has been coupled with the development of compact, higly-optimized basis sets for the corresponding one- and two-electron atoms. Comparisons of the neutral potential curves with experiment and other ab initio calculations show good agreement (within 1000 cm -1 over most of the potential curves) with the difference curves being considerably more accurate. In the method of computer molecular dynamics, the force acting on each particle is the resultant of all interactions with other atoms in the neighborhood and is obtained as the derivative of an effective many-body potential. Exploiting the pseudopotential approach, in obtaining the appropriate potentials may be very fruitful in the future. In the molecular dynamics example considered here, the conventional sum-of-pairwise-interatomic-potentials (SPP) approximation is used with the potentials derived either from experimental spectroscopic data or from Hartree-Fock calculations. The problem is the collisional de-excitation of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen at an Fe surface. The calculations have been carried out for an initial vibrotational state v = 8, J = 1 and a translational temperature corresponding to a gas temperature of 500 0 K. Different angles of approach and different initial random impact points on the surface have been selected. For any given collision with the wall, the molecule may pick up or lose vibrotatonal and translational energy

  1. Deuteron microscopic optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hairui; Han Yinlu; Shen Qingbiao; Xu Yongli

    2010-01-01

    A deuteron microscopic optical model potential is obtained by the Green function method through nuclear-matter approximation and local-density approximation based on the effective Skyrme interaction. The microscopic optical model potential is used to calculate the deuteron reaction cross sections and the elastic scattering angular distributions for some target nuclei in the mass range 6≤A≤208 with incident deuteron energies up to 200 MeV. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data.

  2. Potential scattering of Dirac particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaller, B.

    1981-01-01

    A quantum mechanical interpretation of the Dirac equation for particles in external electromagnetic potentials is discussed. It is shown that a consequent development of the Stueckelberg-Feynman theory into a probabilistic interpretation of the Dirac equation corrects some prejudices concerning negative energy states, Zitterbewegung and bound states in repulsive potentials and yields the connection between propagator theory and scattering theory. Limits of the Dirac equation, considered as a wave mechanical equation, are considered. (U.K.)

  3. STUDENTS’ POTENTIAL FOR AUTHENTIC LEADERSHIP

    OpenAIRE

    Djurdja Solesa-Grijak; Dragan Solesa; Nedjo Kojic

    2015-01-01

    To know yourself and to act accordingly has been seen as a moral imperative throughout history. The aim of this research was to determine potential of students for authentic leadership and relation between their authentic personality and potential for authentic leadership. The sample consisted of students (N=133) from Serbia (male – 59% and female – 41%). The average age of students was M=21.9. Instruments used were Authenticity Scale (Wood et al., 2008) and Authentic Leadership Self-Assessme...

  4. Estimation of potential uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curry, D.L.

    1977-09-01

    Potential estimates, like reserves, are limited by the information on hand at the time and are not intended to indicate the ultimate resources. Potential estimates are based on geologic judgement, so their reliability is dependent on the quality and extent of geologic knowledge. Reliability differs for each of the three potential resource classes. It is greatest for probable potential resources because of the greater knowledge base resulting from the advanced stage of exploration and development in established producing districts where most of the resources in this class are located. Reliability is least for speculative potential resources because no significant deposits are known, and favorability is inferred from limited geologic data. Estimates of potential resources are revised as new geologic concepts are postulated, as new types of uranium ore bodies are discovered, and as improved geophysical and geochemical techniques are developed and applied. Advances in technology that permit the exploitation of deep or low-grade deposits, or the processing of ores of previously uneconomic metallurgical types, also will affect the estimates

  5. Vicious walkers in a potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, Alan J; Winkler, Karen

    2004-01-01

    We consider N vicious walkers moving in one dimension in a one-body potential v(x). Using the backward Fokker-Planck equation we derive exact results for the asymptotic form of the survival probability Q(x, t) of vicious walkers initially located at (x 1 , ..., x N ) = x, when v(x) is an arbitrary attractive potential. Explicit results are given for a square-well potential with absorbing or reflecting boundary conditions at the walls, and for a harmonic potential with an absorbing or reflecting boundary at the origin and the walkers starting on the positive half line. By mapping the problem of N vicious walkers in zero potential onto the harmonic potential problem, we rederive the results by Fisher (1984 J. Stat. Phys. 34 667) and Krattenthaler et al (2000 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 33 8835) respectively for vicious walkers on an infinite line and on a semi-infinite line with an absorbing wall at the origin. This mapping also gives a new result for vicious walkers on a semi-infinite line with a reflecting boundary at the origin: Q(x,t) ∼ t N(N-1)/2

  6. Economic potential of inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1984-04-01

    Beyond the achievement of scientific feasibility, the key question for fusion energy is: does it have the economic potential to be significantly cheaper than fission and coal energy. If fusion has this high economic potential then there are compelling commercial and geopolitical incentives to accelerate the pace of the fusion program in the near term, and to install a global fusion energy system in the long term. Without this high economic potential, fusion's success depends on the failure of all alternatives, and there is no real incentive to accelerate the program. If my conjectures on the economic potential of inertial fusion are approximately correct, then inertial fusion energy's ultimate costs may be only half to two-thirds those of advanced fission and coal energy systems. Relative cost escalation is not assumed and could increase this advantage. Both magnetic and inertial approaches to fusion potentially have a two-fold economic advantage which derives from two fundamental properties: negligible fuel costs and high quality energy which makes possible more efficient generation of electricity. The wining approach to fusion may excel in three areas: electrical generating efficiency, minimum material costs, and adaptability to manufacture in automated factories. The winning approach must also rate highly in environmental potential, safety, availability factor, lifetime, small 0 and M costs, and no possibility of utility-disabling accidents

  7. Labor potential: enhancing its development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.P. Melnichuk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This publication presents the views of the author about the need to expand research of labor potential, estimation of quantitative indicators and qualitative characteristics at the individual, regional levels and the state as a whole to develop the mechanisms of its development. The existing methods of labour potential assessment are mainly based on the probable approach taking into account external and internal factors. In the case of assessment of labour potential of a single enterprise for the most suitable for this production method the mechanisms of its development can be worked out. However, for the state under a certain depreciation of the resource, property, financial and other potentials, aggressive manifestations of the crisis phenomena, processes etc. to resolve urgent is the problem of enhancing the development of qualitative characteristics of labor potential at all its levels. In this context it is important to exploit the potential of domestic education and science which now continue to be reformed for the sake of achieving European standards, using the advanced experience of other countries. Every means of legal, financial, managerial, and organizational impact should be used for this.

  8. Streaming potential measurements of biosurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wagenen, R. A.; Andrade, J. D.; Hibbs, J. B., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A technique based on the measurement of streaming potentials has been developed to evaluate the electrokinetic region of the cell periphery. This approach is feasible for cell lines propagated in in-vitro cell cultures in monolayer form. The advantage of this system is that cells may be evaluated in the living state atttached to a substrate; it is not necessary to subject the cells to enzymatic, chemical, or mechanical trauma required to obtain monodisperse suspensions which are then normally evaluated by microelectrophoresis. In this manner, it should be possible to study the influence of substrate and environmental factors on the charge density and potential at the cell periphery. The apparatus and procedure are described as well as some results concerning the electrokinetic potential of borosilicate capillaries as a function of ionic strength, pH, and temperature. The effect that turbulence and entrance flow conditions have on accurate streaming-potential measurements is discussed. The electrokinetic potential of BALB/c 3T12 fibroblasts has been quantified as a function of pH, ionic strength, glutaraldehyde fixation, and Giemsa staining.

  9. A semiclassical study of optical potentials - potential resonances -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Takigawa, N.; Marty, C.

    1977-01-01

    A semiclassical method is used to analyze resonances produced by complex potentials. The absorption plays a central role: when it is not too great, resonances manifest themselves by enhancement of cross sections near π. The reverse is not necessarily true, for instance the anomalous large angle scattering for α-Ca is due to a coherent superposition of many partial waves

  10. Neutron and proton optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.F.

    1985-11-01

    The neutron and proton optical model potentials (OMP) are discussed in terms of microscopic (MOMP) and phenomenological (POMP) models. For the MOMP, two approaches are discussed, the nucleus matter approach [Jeukenne-Lejeune-Mahaux (JLM) and Brieva-Rook-von Geramb (BRVG), potentials] and the finite nuclei approach (Osterfeld and Madsen). For the POMP, the Lane charge-exchange potential and its validity over a wide mass range is reviewed. In addition to the Lane symmetry term, the Coulomb correction to both the real and imaginary parts of the OMP is discussed for the above models. The use of the OMP to calculate collective inelastic scattering and observed differences between the neutron- and proton-deformation parameters is also illustrated. 25 refs., 3 figs

  11. Wind energy potential in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shtrakov, Stanko Vl.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, wind characteristic and wind energy potential in Bulgaria were analyzed using the wind speed data. The wind energy potential at different sites in Bulgaria has been investigated by compiling data from different sources and analyzing it using a software tool. The wind speed distribution curves were obtained by using the Weibull and Rayleigh probability density functions. The results relating to wind energy potential are given in terms of the monthly average wind speed, wind speed probability density function (PDF), wind speed cumulative density function (CDF), and wind speed duration curve. A technical and economic assessment has been made of electricity generation from three wind turbines having capacity of (60, 200, and 500 kW). The yearly energy output capacity factor and the electrical energy cost of kWh produced by the three different turbines were calculated

  12. Accelerating cosmologies from exponential potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neupane, Ishwaree P.

    2003-11-01

    It is learnt that exponential potentials of the form V ∼ exp(-2cφ/M p ) arising from the hyperbolic or flux compactification of higher-dimensional theories are of interest for getting short periods of accelerated cosmological expansions. Using a similar potential but derived for the combined case of hyperbolic-flux compactification, we study a four-dimensional flat (or open) FRW cosmologies and give analytic (and numerical) solutions with exponential behavior of scale factors. We show that, for the M-theory motivated potentials, the cosmic acceleration of the universe can be eternal if the spatial curvature of the 4d spacetime is negative, while the acceleration is only transient for a spatially flat universe. We also briefly discuss about the mass of massive Kaluza-Klein modes and the dynamical stabilization of the compact hyperbolic extra dimensions. (author)

  13. Introduction to heat potential theory

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, Neil A

    2012-01-01

    This book is the first to be devoted entirely to the potential theory of the heat equation, and thus deals with time dependent potential theory. Its purpose is to give a logical, mathematically precise introduction to a subject where previously many proofs were not written in detail, due to their similarity with those of the potential theory of Laplace's equation. The approach to subtemperatures is a recent one, based on the Poisson integral representation of temperatures on a circular cylinder. Characterizations of subtemperatures in terms of heat balls and modified heat balls are proved, and thermal capacity is studied in detail. The generalized Dirichlet problem on arbitrary open sets is given a treatment that reflects its distinctive nature for an equation of parabolic type. Also included is some new material on caloric measure for arbitrary open sets. Each chapter concludes with bibliographical notes and open questions. The reader should have a good background in the calculus of functions of several vari...

  14. Potential Theory of Multicomponent Adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1998-01-01

    We developed a theory of multicomponent adsorption on the basis of the potential concept originally suggested by Polanyi. The mixture is considered as a heterogeneous substance segregated in the external field emitted by the adsorbent. The same standard equation of state, with no additional fitting...... parameters, is used for the segregated and for the bulk phases. With this approach, few parameters are needed to correlate pure component adsorption isotherms. These parameters may be used to predict adsorption equilibria of multicomponent mixtures without additional adjustment. A connection between...... the potential theory and the spreading pressure concept is established, and problems of the theory consistency are studied. Numerical algorithms are suggested for evaluation of the segregated state of the mixture in the potential field of adsorption forces. Comparison with experimental data shows good agreement...

  15. The potential of biogas energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acaroglu, M.; Hepbasli, A.; Kocar, G.

    2005-01-01

    Biogas technology has been known about for a long time, but in recent years the interest in it has significantly increased, especially due to the higher costs and the rapid depletion of fossil fuels as well as their environmental considerations. The main objective of the present study is to investigate the potential of biogas energy in the 15 European Union (EU) countries and in Turkey, which is seeking admission to the EU and is trying to meet EU environmental standards. Biogas energy potential of the 15 EU countries is estimated to be about 800 PJ. Besides this, Turkey's annual animal waste potential is obtained to be about 11.81 million tons with a biogas energy equivalent of 53.6 PJ. It is expected that this study will be helpful in developing highly applicable and productive planning for energy policies towards the optimum utilization of biogas energy. (author)

  16. Handbook methane potential; Handbok metanpotential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, My (AnoxKaldnes AB (Sweden)); Schnurer, Anna (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2011-07-15

    Before using a organic material for biogas production it is essential to evaluate the methane production potential. The methane potential is one important tool possible to use during planning of new plants but also when new materials are considered for already running biogas plants. The chemical composition of different organic material varies extensively and this will have an impact on both the degradability and the methane potential. Information about the methane potential of a specific material can sometimes be found in the literature or can be calculated after a chemical/ physical or biological characterization. Here, the BMP test (Biochemical Methane Potential) is a commonly used method. Today the BMP test is a commonly used method to determine the methane potential. Many national and international research groups, consultants as well as personal at biogas plants are using this method and there is a lot of data available in the literature from such tests. In addition there are several protocols giving guidelines on how to execute a BMP-test. The BMP-test is performed in many different ways, not always under optimized conditions, and there is a lack of information on how to interpret the obtained data. This report summarizes knowledge from the literature and the experience from a Swedish referee group, consisting of persons being active performers of BMP-tests. The report does not include a standardized protocol as the procedure can be performed in different ways depending on available equipment and on the type of material to be tested. Instead the report discusses different factors of great importance for a successful test giving reliable results. The report also summarizes important information concerning the interpretation and how to present results in order to allow comparison of data from different test.

  17. A reversible albumin-binding growth hormone derivative is well tolerated and possesses a potential once-weekly treatment profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Michael Højby; Olsen, Minna W Brændholt; Alifrangis, Lene; Klim, Søren; Suntum, Mette

    2014-10-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) replacement therapy currently requires daily sc injections for years/lifetime, which may be both inconvenient and distressing for patients. NNC0195-0092 is a novel hGH derivative intended for once-weekly treatment of GH deficiency. A noncovalent albumin binding moiety is attached to the hGH backbone. Clearance is reduced as a consequence of a reversible binding to circulating serum albumin, which prolongs the pharmacodynamic (PD) effect. To evaluate safety, local tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a single dose (SD) and multiple doses (MD) of NNC0195-0092. Randomized, single-center, placebo-controlled, double-blind, SD/MD, dose-escalation trial of 105 healthy male subjects. NNC0195-0092 sc administration: Five cohorts of eight subjects received one dose of NNC0195-0092 (0.01-0.32 mg/kg) (n = 6) or placebo (n = 2). Sixteen subjects (equal numbers of Japanese and non-Asian) received once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092 (0.02-0.24 mg/kg; n=12) or placebo (n=4) for 4 weeks. Blood samples were drawn for assessment of safety, PK, IGF-1, and IGF binding protein 3 profiles and anti-drug antibodies. SD and MD of NNC0195-0092 were well tolerated at all dose levels. No safety concerns or local tolerability issues were identified. A dose-dependent IGF-1 response was observed. IGF-1 profiles suggest that NNC0195-0092 may be suitable for once-weekly dosing, with a clinically relevant dose ≤0.08 mg/kg/week. No differences in PK and PD were observed between Japanese and non-Asian subjects. SD and MD of NNC0195-0092 administered to healthy Japanese and non-Asian male subjects were well tolerated at all doses. The present trial suggests that NNC0195-0092 has the potential for an efficacious, well-tolerated, once-weekly GH treatment.

  18. Potential problems with interpolating fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birse, Michael C. [The University of Manchester, Theoretical Physics Division, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2017-11-15

    A potential can have features that do not reflect the dynamics of the system it describes but rather arise from the choice of interpolating fields used to define it. This is illustrated using a toy model of scattering with two coupled channels. A Bethe-Salpeter amplitude is constructed which is a mixture of the waves in the two channels. The potential derived from this has a strong repulsive core, which arises from the admixture of the closed channel in the wave function and not from the dynamics of the model. (orig.)

  19. Tunnel superpenetrability of potential barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakhariev, B N.

    1982-01-01

    The transmission of two particles through the same barrier is considered. The limiting cases are compared when the particles are joined together in a single particle with double mass-energy and potential and when they pass the barrier independently. As an intermediate case a pair of particles bound in a quasideuteron of a finite size is considered. It is shown that long-range collective correlations of particles (of the superfluidity type and others) simplify very much for them passing through high potential barriers. This happens due to the transfer of the additional energy from the particles outside the barriers to those inside it

  20. Potential Applications of Manual Games,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    34 just because some electronic equipment is used to keep track of logistics, combat results, and force status. Even a highly computerized game like...D-A152 541 POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS OF MANUAL GAMES (U) RAND CORP ii SANTA MONICA CA T A BROW~N FEB 84 RAND/P-6957 UNCLASI7FIED F/G 12/2 N El..I 111 1...128 112.5 111 m; * _ 1.8 I1111 ’I’ll MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATI NAl fii~ t1 RI 1A L4k, I POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS OF MANUJAL GAMES Lfl N Lfl

  1. Diatomic interaction potential theory applications

    CERN Document Server

    Goodisman, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Diatomic Interaction Potential Theory, Volume 2: Applications discusses the variety of applicable theoretical material and approaches in the calculations for diatomic systems in their ground states. The volume covers the descriptions and illustrations of modern calculations. Chapter I discusses the calculation of the interaction potential for large and small values of the internuclear distance R (separated and united atom limits). Chapter II covers the methods used for intermediate values of R, which in principle means any values of R. The Hartree-Fock and configuration interaction schemes des

  2. Effective potential models for hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucha, W.

    1995-12-01

    The aim of these lectures is to give a self-contained introduction to nonrelativistic potential models, to their formulation as well as to their possible applications. At the price of some lack of (in a mathematical sense) rigorous derivations, we try to give a feeling and understanding for the simplest conceivable method to extract the explicit form of the forces acting between quarks from the interplay between experimental observations and theoretical considerations. According to this spirit, we demonstrate, in detail, how to obtain the underlying Hamiltonian and how to determine the Lorentz structure of the quark-(anti-)quark interaction potential from well-established experimental facts. (author)

  3. Global warming potential of pavements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santero, Nicholas J [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 407 McLaughlin Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1712 (United States); Horvath, Arpad, E-mail: njsantero@cal.berkeley.ed, E-mail: horvath@ce.berkeley.ed [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 215B McLaughlin Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1712 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Pavements comprise an essential and vast infrastructure system supporting our transportation network, yet their impact on the environment is largely unquantified. Previous life-cycle assessments have only included a limited number of the applicable life-cycle components in their analysis. This research expands the current view to include eight different components: materials extraction and production, transportation, onsite equipment, traffic delay, carbonation, lighting, albedo, and rolling resistance. Using global warming potential as the environmental indicator, ranges of potential impact for each component are calculated and compared based on the information uncovered in the existing research. The relative impacts between components are found to be orders of magnitude different in some cases. Context-related factors, such as traffic level and location, are also important elements affecting the impacts of a given component. A strategic method for lowering the global warming potential of a pavement is developed based on the concept that environmental performance is improved most effectively by focusing on components with high impact potentials. This system takes advantage of the fact that small changes in high-impact components will have more effect than large changes in low-impact components.

  4. Global warming potential of pavements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santero, Nicholas J; Horvath, Arpad

    2009-01-01

    Pavements comprise an essential and vast infrastructure system supporting our transportation network, yet their impact on the environment is largely unquantified. Previous life-cycle assessments have only included a limited number of the applicable life-cycle components in their analysis. This research expands the current view to include eight different components: materials extraction and production, transportation, onsite equipment, traffic delay, carbonation, lighting, albedo, and rolling resistance. Using global warming potential as the environmental indicator, ranges of potential impact for each component are calculated and compared based on the information uncovered in the existing research. The relative impacts between components are found to be orders of magnitude different in some cases. Context-related factors, such as traffic level and location, are also important elements affecting the impacts of a given component. A strategic method for lowering the global warming potential of a pavement is developed based on the concept that environmental performance is improved most effectively by focusing on components with high impact potentials. This system takes advantage of the fact that small changes in high-impact components will have more effect than large changes in low-impact components.

  5. Exponential Potential versus Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-15

    scale of the solar system. Galaxy, Dark matter , Galaxy cluster, Gravitation, Quantum gravity...A two parameter exponential potential explains the anomalous kinematics of galaxies and galaxy clusters without need for the myriad ad hoc dark ... matter models currently in vogue. It also explains much about the scales and structures of galaxies and galaxy clusters while being quite negligible on the

  6. Riesz potential versus fractional Laplacian

    KAUST Repository

    Ortigueira, Manuel Duarte

    2014-09-01

    This paper starts by introducing the Grünwald-Letnikov derivative, the Riesz potential and the problem of generalizing the Laplacian. Based on these ideas, the generalizations of the Laplacian for 1D and 2D cases are studied. It is presented as a fractional version of the Cauchy-Riemann conditions and, finally, it is discussed with the n-dimensional Laplacian.

  7. Assessment of triton potential energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friar, J.L.; Payne, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    An assessment is made of the dominant features contributing to the triton potential energy, with the objective of understanding qualitatively their origins and sensitivities. Relativistic effects, short-range repulsion, and OPEP dominance are discussed. A determination of the importance of various regions of nucleon-nucleon separation is made numerically. (author)

  8. Sports Potentials for Physical Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1978-01-01

    This report, one of a series on research into specific physical activities and their efficacy in improving and maintaining physical fitness, examines sport participation and the potential it has for developing muscular strength, muscular endurance, and circulatory-respiratory endurance. The activities consist primarily of the following twelve…

  9. Evolutionary potential games on lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabó, György; Borsos, István

    2016-01-01

    Game theory provides a general mathematical background to study the effect of pair interactions and evolutionary rules on the macroscopic behavior of multi-player games where players with a finite number of strategies may represent a wide scale of biological objects, human individuals, or even their associations. In these systems the interactions are characterized by matrices that can be decomposed into elementary matrices (games) and classified into four types. The concept of decomposition helps the identification of potential games and also the evaluation of the potential that plays a crucial role in the determination of the preferred Nash equilibrium, and defines the Boltzmann distribution towards which these systems evolve for suitable types of dynamical rules. This survey draws parallel between the potential games and the kinetic Ising type models which are investigated for a wide scale of connectivity structures. We discuss briefly the applicability of the tools and concepts of statistical physics and thermodynamics. Additionally the general features of ordering phenomena, phase transitions and slow relaxations are outlined and applied to evolutionary games. The discussion extends to games with three or more strategies. Finally we discuss what happens when the system is weakly driven out of the “equilibrium state” by adding non-potential components representing games of cyclic dominance.

  10. Being a potentially responsible party

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronan, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on CERCLA II- ability for the unlucky potentially responsible parties (PRPs) which is a Draconian form of strict, joint and several liability with limited statutory defenses that in most cases are impossible to establish. CERCLA vigorously employs these legal concepts, stretching a PRP's financial exposure to the limits necessary to meet the enormous financial costs of remediation

  11. High Potentials: A CEO Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Jeanine

    2007-01-01

    Finding high potentials has been identified as one of the major challenges for society and for higher education. But how does one find the talented individuals who will design the future of society? Can and should universities cooperate or compete with business and industry for these talents? Three CEOs reflect on this worldwide competition for…

  12. Evolutionary potential games on lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabó, György, E-mail: szabo@mfa.kfki.hu; Borsos, István, E-mail: borsos@mfa.kfki.hu

    2016-04-05

    Game theory provides a general mathematical background to study the effect of pair interactions and evolutionary rules on the macroscopic behavior of multi-player games where players with a finite number of strategies may represent a wide scale of biological objects, human individuals, or even their associations. In these systems the interactions are characterized by matrices that can be decomposed into elementary matrices (games) and classified into four types. The concept of decomposition helps the identification of potential games and also the evaluation of the potential that plays a crucial role in the determination of the preferred Nash equilibrium, and defines the Boltzmann distribution towards which these systems evolve for suitable types of dynamical rules. This survey draws parallel between the potential games and the kinetic Ising type models which are investigated for a wide scale of connectivity structures. We discuss briefly the applicability of the tools and concepts of statistical physics and thermodynamics. Additionally the general features of ordering phenomena, phase transitions and slow relaxations are outlined and applied to evolutionary games. The discussion extends to games with three or more strategies. Finally we discuss what happens when the system is weakly driven out of the “equilibrium state” by adding non-potential components representing games of cyclic dominance.

  13. Health Educational Potentials of Technologies.

    OpenAIRE

    Magnussen, Rikke; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The field of health promotion technology has been in an exponential growth in recent years and smart phone applications, exer-games and self-monitoring devices has become part of fitness activities and health education. In this work-in-progress-paper theoretical perspectives for categorising and analysing health educational potentials of technologies are presented.

  14. Event horizon and scalar potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duruisseau, J.P.; Tonnelat, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The introduction of a scalar potential with a more general scheme than General Relativity eliminates the event horizon. Among possible solutions, the Schwarzschild one represents a singular case. A study of the geodesic properties of the matching with an approximated interior solution are given. A new definition of the gravitational mass and chi function is deduced. (author)

  15. Potential theory for directed networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Ming Zhang

    Full Text Available Uncovering factors underlying the network formation is a long-standing challenge for data mining and network analysis. In particular, the microscopic organizing principles of directed networks are less understood than those of undirected networks. This article proposes a hypothesis named potential theory, which assumes that every directed link corresponds to a decrease of a unit potential and subgraphs with definable potential values for all nodes are preferred. Combining the potential theory with the clustering and homophily mechanisms, it is deduced that the Bi-fan structure consisting of 4 nodes and 4 directed links is the most favored local structure in directed networks. Our hypothesis receives strongly positive supports from extensive experiments on 15 directed networks drawn from disparate fields, as indicated by the most accurate and robust performance of Bi-fan predictor within the link prediction framework. In summary, our main contribution is twofold: (i We propose a new mechanism for the local organization of directed networks; (ii We design the corresponding link prediction algorithm, which can not only testify our hypothesis, but also find out direct applications in missing link prediction and friendship recommendation.

  16. Determination of nominal accelerating potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizin, P.; Kase, K.

    1986-01-01

    We present a simple linear relationship between the nominal accelerating potential (NAP) and the ratios of ionization measurements made with constant source--detector distance and at two different phantom thicknesses. This relationship can be used as a standard, unambiguous method for determining NAP for use in dosimetry and quality control

  17. Evolutionary potential games on lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, György; Borsos, István

    2016-04-01

    Game theory provides a general mathematical background to study the effect of pair interactions and evolutionary rules on the macroscopic behavior of multi-player games where players with a finite number of strategies may represent a wide scale of biological objects, human individuals, or even their associations. In these systems the interactions are characterized by matrices that can be decomposed into elementary matrices (games) and classified into four types. The concept of decomposition helps the identification of potential games and also the evaluation of the potential that plays a crucial role in the determination of the preferred Nash equilibrium, and defines the Boltzmann distribution towards which these systems evolve for suitable types of dynamical rules. This survey draws parallel between the potential games and the kinetic Ising type models which are investigated for a wide scale of connectivity structures. We discuss briefly the applicability of the tools and concepts of statistical physics and thermodynamics. Additionally the general features of ordering phenomena, phase transitions and slow relaxations are outlined and applied to evolutionary games. The discussion extends to games with three or more strategies. Finally we discuss what happens when the system is weakly driven out of the "equilibrium state" by adding non-potential components representing games of cyclic dominance.

  18. Riesz potential versus fractional Laplacian

    KAUST Repository

    Ortigueira, Manuel Duarte; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem; Machado, José Antó nio Tenreiro

    2014-01-01

    This paper starts by introducing the Grünwald-Letnikov derivative, the Riesz potential and the problem of generalizing the Laplacian. Based on these ideas, the generalizations of the Laplacian for 1D and 2D cases are studied. It is presented as a fractional version of the Cauchy-Riemann conditions and, finally, it is discussed with the n-dimensional Laplacian.

  19. Tank farm potential ignition sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaief, C.C. III.

    1996-01-01

    This document identifies equipment, instrumentation, and sensors that are located in-tank as well as ex-tank in areas that may have communication paths with the tank vapor space. For each item, and attempt is made to identify the potential for ignition of flammable vapors using a graded approach. The scope includes all 177 underground storage tanks

  20. Wind energy potential in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangarajan, S.

    1995-01-01

    Though located in the tropics, India is endowed with substantial wind resources because of its unique geographical location which gets fully exposed to both the south-west and north-east monsoon winds. The westerly winds of the south-west monsoons provide bulk of the wind potential. Areas with mean annual wind speed exceeding 18 k mph and areas with mean annual power density greater than 140 W/m 2 have been identified using the wind data collected by the wind monitoring project funded by the Ministry of Non-conventional Energy Sources (MNES). Seasonal variations in wind speed at selected locations are discussed as also the frequency distribution of hourly wind speed. Annual capacity factors for 250 kW wind electric generators have been calculated for several typical locations. A good linear correlation has been found between mean annual wind speed and mean annual capacity factor. A method is described for assessing wind potential over an extended region where adequate data is available. It is shown that the combined wind energy potential over five selected areas of limited extent in Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu alone amounts to 22,000 MW under the assumption of 20 per cent land availability for installing wind farms. For a higher percentage of land availability, the potential will be correspondingly higher. (author). 12 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Bitcoin's Potential for Going Mainstream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasiyanto, Safari

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the possibility of bringing Bitcoin into the mainstream. In so doing, it elaborates the potential and obstacles of the Bitcoin system and what it would take for it to go mainstream. A cross-cutting discussion provides a helicopter view and encompasses the technical, economic,

  2. Potential Theory for Directed Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Lü, Linyuan; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Uncovering factors underlying the network formation is a long-standing challenge for data mining and network analysis. In particular, the microscopic organizing principles of directed networks are less understood than those of undirected networks. This article proposes a hypothesis named potential theory, which assumes that every directed link corresponds to a decrease of a unit potential and subgraphs with definable potential values for all nodes are preferred. Combining the potential theory with the clustering and homophily mechanisms, it is deduced that the Bi-fan structure consisting of 4 nodes and 4 directed links is the most favored local structure in directed networks. Our hypothesis receives strongly positive supports from extensive experiments on 15 directed networks drawn from disparate fields, as indicated by the most accurate and robust performance of Bi-fan predictor within the link prediction framework. In summary, our main contribution is twofold: (i) We propose a new mechanism for the local organization of directed networks; (ii) We design the corresponding link prediction algorithm, which can not only testify our hypothesis, but also find out direct applications in missing link prediction and friendship recommendation. PMID:23408979

  3. Electromagnetic potentials without gauge transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubykalo, A; Espinoza, A; Alvarado Flores, R

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we show that the use of the Helmholtz theorem enables the derivation of uniquely determined electromagnetic potentials without the necessity of using gauge transformation. We show that the electromagnetic field comprises two components, one of which is characterized by instantaneous action at a distance, whereas the other propagates in retarded form with the velocity of light. In our attempt to show the superiority of the new proposed method to the standard one, we argue that the action-at-a-distance components cannot be considered as a drawback of our method, because the recommended procedure for eliminating the action at a distance in the Coulomb gauge leads to theoretical subtleties that allow us to say that the needed gauge transformation is not guaranteed. One of the theoretical consequences of this new definition is that, in addition to the electric E and magnetic B fields, the electromagnetic potentials are real physical quantities. We show that this property of the electromagnetic potentials in quantum mechanics is also a property of the electromagnetic potentials in classical electrodynamics.

  4. The hydrogeothermal potential of Southern Hesse; Das hydrogeothermische Potential Suedhessens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzer, C; Fluhrer, S; Sanner, B; Knoblich, K [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften

    1997-12-01

    The paper investigates rock series suited as storage media and the temperature distribution in the subsurface of Southern Hesse. It gives an idea of the possibilities for hydrogeothermal energy use in the area. The densily populated Rhein-Main-region provides a good demand potential for geothermal heat. A substantially elevated geothermal gradient of about 60 K/km as compared to the continental average of 30 K/km could be demonstrated in the northern part of the Upper Rhine Graben. Thermal anomalies could be localised. The Rotliegend-layers (Perm) provide the highest geothermal ressources in the region. In more shallow depth, the Hydrobia layers (Teritary) show reasonable values. To the north, the potential of these series decreases. Hence hydrogeothermal energy use should not be considered in the northern part of Southern Hesse. The highest potential can be expected from the Rotliegend layers in the area of Stockstadt and Biebesheim. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Untersuchung geht auf die moeglichen Speichergesteine und die Temperaturverteilung im Untergrund Suedhessens ein und gibt einen ersten Eindruck von den Moeglichkeiten zur Nutzung der Hydrogeothermie in der Region. Fuer geothermische Waerme besteht im dicht besiedelten Rhein-Main-Gebiet eine gute Abnehmerstruktur. Im noerdlichen Oberrheingraben konnte im Mittel ein deutlich erhoehter Temperaturgradient von etwa 60 K/km gegenueber dem kontinentalen Krustendurchschnittswert von 30 K/km nachgewiesen werden. Waemeanomalien wurden lokalisiert. Die Rotliegendschichten weisen im untersuchten Gebiet eindeutig die hoechsten Ressourcen auf. In geringerer Tiefenlage erzielen die Hydrobienschichten noch beachtliche Werte. Nach Norden nimmt das Potential der Schichten ab. Daher ist von einer Nutzung der Hydrogeothermie im noerdlichen Bereich Suedhessens eher abzuraten. Die hoechsten Ressourcen in Suedhessen sind im Bereich von Stockstadt und Biebesheim in den Rotliegenschichten zu erwarten. (orig.)

  5. Decoupling Action Potential Bias from Cortical Local Field Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen V. David

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurophysiologists have recently become interested in studying neuronal population activity through local field potential (LFP recordings during experiments that also record the activity of single neurons. This experimental approach differs from early LFP studies because it uses high impendence electrodes that can also isolate single neuron activity. A possible complication for such studies is that the synaptic potentials and action potentials of the small subset of isolated neurons may contribute disproportionately to the LFP signal, biasing activity in the larger nearby neuronal population to appear synchronous and cotuned with these neurons. To address this problem, we used linear filtering techniques to remove features correlated with spike events from LFP recordings. This filtering procedure can be applied for well-isolated single units or multiunit activity. We illustrate the effects of this correction in simulation and on spike data recorded from primary auditory cortex. We find that local spiking activity can explain a significant portion of LFP power at most recording sites and demonstrate that removing the spike-correlated component can affect measurements of auditory tuning of the LFP.

  6. On the dynamics of gauge potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Jiafu; Li Yuanjie; Zhang Jinru

    1992-01-01

    The gauge potential is resolved into gauge potential of strength and gauge potential of phase. The phase gauge potential can be described with an equivalent potential of inertial force. A Lagrangian density with phase gauge potential is given and some examples are discussed. The method proposed has been extended to the case of the non-Abelian group

  7. The Biodiversity Informatics Potential Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Biodiversity informatics is a relatively new discipline extending computer science in the context of biodiversity data, and its development to date has not been uniform throughout the world. Digitizing effort and capacity building are costly, and ways should be found to prioritize them rationally. The proposed 'Biodiversity Informatics Potential (BIP) Index' seeks to fulfill such a prioritization role. We propose that the potential for biodiversity informatics be assessed through three concepts: (a) the intrinsic biodiversity potential (the biological richness or ecological diversity) of a country; (b) the capacity of the country to generate biodiversity data records; and (c) the availability of technical infrastructure in a country for managing and publishing such records. Methods Broadly, the techniques used to construct the BIP Index were rank correlation, multiple regression analysis, principal components analysis and optimization by linear programming. We built the BIP Index by finding a parsimonious set of country-level human, economic and environmental variables that best predicted the availability of primary biodiversity data accessible through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) network, and constructing an optimized model with these variables. The model was then applied to all countries for which sufficient data existed, to obtain a score for each country. Countries were ranked according to that score. Results Many of the current GBIF participants ranked highly in the BIP Index, although some of them seemed not to have realized their biodiversity informatics potential. The BIP Index attributed low ranking to most non-participant countries; however, a few of them scored highly, suggesting that these would be high-return new participants if encouraged to contribute towards the GBIF mission of free and open access to biodiversity data. Conclusions The BIP Index could potentially help in (a) identifying countries most likely to

  8. Hemolytic potential of hydrodynamic cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, S D; Bartlett, R H; Ceccio, S L

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the hemolytic potentials of discrete bubble cavitation and attached cavitation. To generate controlled cavitation events, a venturigeometry hydrodynamic device, called a Cavitation Susceptibility Meter (CSM), was constructed. A comparison between the hemolytic potential of discrete bubble cavitation and attached cavitation was investigated with a single-pass flow apparatus and a recirculating flow apparatus, both utilizing the CSM. An analytical model, based on spherical bubble dynamics, was developed for predicting the hemolysis caused by discrete bubble cavitation. Experimentally, discrete bubble cavitation did not correlate with a measurable increase in plasma-free hemoglobin (PFHb), as predicted by the analytical model. However, attached cavitation did result in significant PFHb generation. The rate of PFHb generation scaled inversely with the Cavitation number at a constant flow rate, suggesting that the size of the attached cavity was the dominant hemolytic factor.

  9. Potential therapeutic applications of biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiña, Eduardo J; Rangarajan, Vivek; Sen, Ramkrishna; Rodrigues, Lígia R

    2013-12-01

    Biosurfactants have recently emerged as promising molecules for their structural novelty, versatility, and diverse properties that are potentially useful for many therapeutic applications. Mainly due to their surface activity, these molecules interact with cell membranes of several organisms and/or with the surrounding environments, and thus can be viewed as potential cancer therapeutics or as constituents of drug delivery systems. Some types of microbial surfactants, such as lipopeptides and glycolipids, have been shown to selectively inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells and to disrupt cell membranes causing their lysis through apoptosis pathways. Moreover, biosurfactants as drug delivery vehicles offer commercially attractive and scientifically novel applications. This review covers the current state-of-the-art in biosurfactant research for therapeutic purposes, providing new directions towards the discovery and development of molecules with novel structures and diverse functions for advanced applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. In plant corrosion potential monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, B.; Molander, A.

    1997-01-01

    Examples of in plant redox and corrosion potential monitoring in light water reactors are given. All examples are from reactors in Sweden. The measurements have either been performed in side-stream autoclaves connected to the reactor systems by sampling lines, or in-situ in the system piping itself. Potential monitoring can give quite different results depending upon the experimental method. For environments with small concentrations of oxidants sampling lines can introduce large errors. During such circumstances in-situ measurements are necessary. Electrochemical monitoring is a valuable technique as a complement to conventional water chemistry follow-up in plants. It can be used for water chemistry surveillance and can reveal unintentional and harmful water chemistry transients. (author). 15 figs

  11. Kleptomania and Potential Exacerbating Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Kleptomania is an impulse control disorder that can cause significant impairment and serious consequences. Often, the condition is kept secret by the patient, and usually help is sought only when confronted by the legal consequences of the impulsive behaviors. Historically, kleptomania has been viewed from a psychodynamic perspective, and the mainstay of treatment has been psychotherapy. Recently, attempts to explain kleptomania within a neuropsychiatric paradigm have highlighted the possible links between mood disorders, addictive behaviors, and brain injury with kleptomania. These associations with kleptomania can be extrapolated to pharmacological strategies that can potentially help in treating kleptomania. A case of kleptomania, which was potentially exacerbated by multiple factors, will be reviewed. Treatment modalities used in this case, including the use of the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale as a surrogate marker to gauge response to treatment, will be discussed. PMID:22132369

  12. Metasynthesis findings: potential versus reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finfgeld-Connett, Deborah

    2014-11-01

    Early on, qualitative researchers predicted that metasynthesis research had the potential to significantly push knowledge development forward. More recently, scholars have questioned whether this is actually occurring. To examine this concern, a randomly selected sample of metasynthesis articles was systematically reviewed to identify the types of findings that have been produced. Based on this systematic examination, it appears that findings from metasynthesis investigations might not be reaching their full potential. Metasynthesis investigations frequently result in isolated findings rather than findings in relationship, and opportunities to generate research hypotheses and theoretical models are not always fully realized. With this in mind, methods for moving metasynthesis findings into relationship are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. The potential of wind farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauge Madsen, P.; Lundsager, P.

    1992-09-01

    Papers presented at the European wind energy conference on the potential of wind farms are presented. The aim of the conference was to bring into focus the problems, experiences and potential of the application of wind power in wind power farms as a contribution to the European and global energy supply. It was considered that the interchange of experience among representatives of science, utilities, industry, environment and energy planning, together with those who represent financial and insurance interests, would create a better understanding of all aspects of wind power for its future successful development. The subjects covered concern surveys of national planning and policies regarding wind energy utilization and national and global development of wind turbine arrays. The performance of some individual wind farms is described. Papers also deal with utility and project planning, wind prediction and certification, wind loads and fatigues, wakes, noise and control. (AB)

  14. In plant corrosion potential monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, B; Molander, A [Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1997-02-01

    Examples of in plant redox and corrosion potential monitoring in light water reactors are given. All examples are from reactors in Sweden. The measurements have either been performed in side-stream autoclaves connected to the reactor systems by sampling lines, or in-situ in the system piping itself. Potential monitoring can give quite different results depending upon the experimental method. For environments with small concentrations of oxidants sampling lines can introduce large errors. During such circumstances in-situ measurements are necessary. Electrochemical monitoring is a valuable technique as a complement to conventional water chemistry follow-up in plants. It can be used for water chemistry surveillance and can reveal unintentional and harmful water chemistry transients. (author). 15 figs.

  15. The potential of wind farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauge Madsen, P.; Lundsager, P.

    1992-09-01

    Papers presented at the European wind energy conference on the potential of wind farms are presented. The aim of the conference was to bring into focus the problems, experiences and potential of the application of wind power in wind power farms as a contribution to the European and global energy supply. It was considered that the interchange of experience among representatives of science, utilities, industry, environment and energy planning, together with those who represent financial and insurance interests, would create a better understanding of all aspects of wind power for its future successful development. The subjects covered concern surveys of national planning and policies regarding wind energy utilization and national and global development of wind turbine arrays. The performance of some individual wind farms is described. Papers also deal with utility and project planning, wind prediction and certification, wind loads and fatigus, wakes, noise and control. (AB)

  16. Virtual materiality, potentiality and subjctivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Dorte Marie

    2013-01-01

    , of movies and of dreams as they enter intra-activities in the comprehensive set of apparatuses that enact child agency, subjectivity and relational practices. The analyses and conceptual refinements are based on empirical cases involving interviews with and observations among 8-14 year old children.......How do we conceptualize virtual materiality, in terms of for instance avatars and weapons in computer games, virtual discourse and subjectivity as phenomena intra-acting with real life materiality, discourse and subjectivity in children’s everyday lives? How do we understand the intra......-activity of such elements in children’s night dreams? These are some of the questions discussed in this text. I bring together Karen Barad’s agential realism and Giorgi Agamben’s concept of potentiality to enable and refine an analytical approach to real-virtual enactments, thereby questioning the potentialities of gaming...

  17. Crystal potential retrieval in HRTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeching, M.J.; Spargo, A.E.C.

    1993-01-01

    A possible method for obtaining the crystal potential by inversion of the complex wavefield at the exit surface of the specimen, based on reversal of the multi-slice algorithm, is outlined. Results from preliminary testing of the method using computer simulated data are presented and appear promising, although the limits of applicability of the method are yet to be defined. 13 refs., 5 figs

  18. ADVERGAMES: CHARACTERISTICS, LIMITATIONS AND POTENTIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurau Calin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Advergames represent a new advertising concept that uses Internet technology to implement viral marketing campaigns. Despite the potential of this interactive advertising method, very few academic studies have been initiated to investigate the characteristics of advergames, and their influence on consumers’ perceptions and behaviour. Using secondary data, this paper attempts to evaluate the characteristics of effective advergames, and to analyse the effect of advergames on players’ perceptions and behaviour.

  19. Potentials in N=2 supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinov'ev, Yu.M.

    1985-01-01

    The potentials and Yukava interactions, that arise while introducing a gauge interaction of vector and scalar multiplets in N=2 supergravity are presented, in this the gauge group may be either compact or noncompact. The scalar multiplets geometry corresponds to nonlinear σ, models of the form Sp(2,2n)/Sp(2)xSp(2n), SU(2,n)/SU(2)SU(n)xU(1) and O(4,n)/O(4)xO(n)

  20. Wavepacket scattering in potential theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, T.A.; Hammer, C.L.

    1977-01-01

    A contour integration technique is developed which enforces the initial conditions for wavepacket-potential scattering. The expansion coefficients for the exact energy eigenstate expansion are automatically expressed in terms of the plane wave expansion coefficients of the initial wavepacket, thereby simplifying what is usually a tedious, mathematical process. The method is applicable regardless of the initial spatial separation of the wavepacket from the scattering center