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Sample records for position sensitive x-ray

  1. Gas position sensitive x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, A.F.

    1994-12-01

    The construction of gas x-ray detectors used to count and localize x-ray photons in one and two dimensions is reported. The principles of operation of the detectors are described, as well as the electronic modules comprised in the data acquisition system. Results obtained with detectors built at CBPF are shown, illustrating the performance of the Linear Position Sensitive Detectors. (author). 6 refs, 14 figs

  2. Position sensitive x-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macchione, E.L.A.

    1990-01-01

    A multi ware position sensitive gas counter for X-ray detection was developed in our laboratory, making use of commercial delay-lines for position sensing. Six delay-line chips (50 ns delay each, 40 Mhz cut-off frequency) cover a total sensitive length of 150 mm leading to a delay-risetime ratio that allows for a high-resolution position detection. Tests using the 5,9 keV X-ray line from a 55 Fe source and integral linearity better than 0,1% and a maximal differential linearity of ±4,0% were obtained operating the detector with an Ar-C H 4 (90%-10%) gas mixture at 700 torr. Similar tests were performed, using the 8,04 keV line from a Cu x-ray tube. A total resolution of 330 μm, and the same integral and differential linearities were obtained. (author)

  3. Position-sensitive X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrix, J.

    1982-01-01

    An overview is given of the different types of position-sensitive X-ray detectors used in kinetic studies of biological molecule state changes using X-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation as a probe. The detector requirements and principles of operation of proportional counters are outlined. Multiwire proportional chamber systems and their readout techniques are described. Other detectors discussed include a drift chamber type detector, microchannel plates, charge-couple devices and, for high count rates, an integrating TV-detector. (U.K.)

  4. Position-sensitive X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrix, J.

    1982-01-01

    In this review of the application of different types of position sensitive detectors to synchrotron radiation, discussion of the proportional counters based on the gas amplification principle forms a major part. Other topics reviewed are detector requirements, multiwire proportional chamber system, drift chamber type detectors, TV detectors, and recent developments, such as that based on a micro-channel plate as the amplifying element, and charge-coupled devices. (U.K.)

  5. A high resolution position sensitive X-ray MWPC for small angle X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.; Stephenson, R.; Tappern, G.J.

    1981-02-01

    A small sealed-off delay line readout MWPC X-ray detector has been designed and built for small angle X-ray diffraction applications. Featuring a sensitive area of 100 mm x 25 mm it yields a spatial resolution of 0.13 mm (standard deviation) with a high rate capability and good quantum efficiency for copper K radiation. (author)

  6. Assessing the efficiency position sensitive gaseous X-rays detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Souza, Maria Ines Silvani; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The efficiency of gaseous X-ray detectors can be evaluated from tabulated data, but this approach assumes that the whole detector volume is permeated by the electrostatic field produced by the anode-cathode. Indeed, the usual detectors are comprised by a cylindrical hull acting as cathode containing a wire at its axis as anode, a configuration which foods the space between them with the electrostatic field. Some specially designed detectors, however, as Position Sensitive Detectors, contain regions which are not submitted to the electrostatic field, and hence, their efficiency could not be assessed from the tabulated data. Direct measurements of this efficiency would require a mono-chromator or set of pure mono-energetic X-rays sources. As only very few of them are really mono-energetic, the detector response to a given energy would be spoiled by to the concomitant contribution of other energies. Yet, the information would not be completely lost, but only concealed due to the convolution carried out by the detector. Therefore, a proper unfolding would be capable to recover the information, yielding the individual detector efficiency for each of the contributing energies. The degraded information is retrieved in this work through a proper mathematical unfolding of the detector response, when exposed to Bremsstrahlung spectra from an X-ray tube submitted to different voltages. For this purpose, Lorentzian functions have been fitted to these spectra - obtained with a NaI(Tl) spectrometer - in order to characterize them with proper parameters. The mathematical convolution of these functions with a theoretical detector efficiency curve yields, after integration, values which, confronted with those experimentally measured, allow the determination of the parameters of the efficiency curve. As some parameters of this curve are well known, it is possible to represent it by proper functions. For argon-filled detectors, for instance, this efficiency has a

  7. Position sensitive detector for X-ray photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, A.F.

    1988-01-01

    This work reports the theoretical basis and the details of the construction process, characterization and application of gas X-ray position sensitive detectors. The unidimensional detector consists of a gas camera (argon and CH 4 ), a metallic anode, a cathode and a delay line. Details of the construction process are given in order to allow the reproduction of the detector. It has been characterized by measuring its spatial resolution, homogeneity and linerity. The built linear detector has been used to obtain diffraction diagrams from polycrystalline silicon, C 23 H 48 paraffin and glassy carbon. These diagrams have been compared with those obtained under equivalent conditions with a conventional proportional detector by the step scanning method. It has been shown that the detector provides diffraction diagrams of equivalent quality to those obtained by the step scanning method, in appreciably lower time intervals. (author) [pt

  8. An X-ray gas position sensitive detector: construction and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, A.F.; Gabriel, A.; Gabriel, A.; Craievich, A.

    1988-01-01

    A linear x-ray gas position sensitive detector with delay line readout has been constructed. The detector is described, characterized and used for detecting x-ray diffraction patterns from polycrystals. (author) [pt

  9. Position sensitive X-ray or X-ray detector and 3-D-tomography using same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A fan-shaped beam of penetrating radiation, such as X-ray or γ-ray radiation, is directed through a slice of the body to be analyzed into a position sensitive detector for deriving a shadowgraph of transmission or absorption of the penetrating radiation by the body. A number of such shadowgraphs are obtained for different angles of rotation of the fan-shaped beam relative to the center of the slice being analyzed. The detected fan beam shadowgraph data is reordered into shadowgraph data corresponding to sets of parallel paths of radiation through the body. The reordered parallel path shadowgraph data is then convoluted in accordance with a 3-D reconstruction method by convolution in a computer to derive a 3-D reconstructed tomograph of the body under analysis. In a preferred embodiment, the position sensitive detector comprises a multiwire detector wherein the wires are arrayed parallel to the direction of the divergent penetrating rays to be detected. A focussed grid collimator is interposed between the body and the position sensitive detector for collimating the penetrating rays to be detected. The source of penetrating radiation is preferably a monochromatic source

  10. A microprogrammable high-speed data collection system for position sensitive X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, H.

    1984-01-01

    A high-speed data acquisition system has been designed which collects digital data from one- and two-dimensional position sensitive X-ray detectors at a maximum average data rate of 1 MHz. The system consists of two separate fast buffer memories, a 64 K word by 20-bit main storage, two timers, a display controller, a computer interface and a keyboard, controlled by a specially designed microprogrammable microprocessor. Data collection is performed by executing a microprogram stored in the control storage; data coming from a detector are first accumulated in a small but fast buffer memory by hardware and transferred to the main storage under control of the microprogram. This design not only permits time-resolved data collections but also provides maximum speed, flexibility and cost-effectiveness simultaneously. The system also accepts data from integrated detectors such as TV cameras. The system has been designed for use in experiments at conventional and synchrotron X-ray sources. (orig.)

  11. Development of Position-Sensitive Magnetic Calorimeters for X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandler, SImon; Stevenson, Thomas; Hsieh, Wen-Ting

    2011-01-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMC) are one of the most promising devices to provide very high energy resolution needed for future astronomical x-ray spectroscopy. MMC detectors can be built to large detector arrays having thousands of pixels. Position-sensitive magnetic (PoSM) microcalorimeters consist of multiple absorbers thermally coupled to one magnetic micro calorimeter. Each absorber element has a different thermal coupling to the MMC, resulting in a distribution of different pulse shapes and enabling position discrimination between the absorber elements. PoSMs therefore achieve the large focal plane area with fewer number of readout channels without compromising spatial sampling. Excellent performance of PoSMs was achieved by optimizing the designs of key parameters such as the thermal conductance among the absorbers, magnetic sensor, and heat sink, as well as the absorber heat capacities. Micro fab ri - cation techniques were developed to construct four-absorber PoSMs, in which each absorber consists of a two-layer composite of bismuth and gold. The energy resolution (FWHM full width at half maximum) was measured to be better than 5 eV at 6 keV x-rays for all four absorbers. Position determination was demonstrated with pulse-shape discrimination, as well as with pulse rise time. X-ray microcalorimeters are usually designed to thermalize as quickly as possible to avoid degradation in energy resolution from position dependence to the pulse shapes. Each pixel consists of an absorber and a temperature sensor, both decoupled from the cold bath through a weak thermal link. Each pixel requires a separate readout channel; for instance, with a SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device). For future astronomy missions where thousands to millions of resolution elements are required, having an individual SQUID readout channel for each pixel becomes difficult. One route to attaining these goals is a position-sensitive detector in which a large continuous or

  12. A general technique for characterizing x-ray position sensitive arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufresne, E.; Bruning, R.; Sutton, M.; Stephenson, G.B.

    1994-03-01

    We present a general statistical technique for characterizing x-ray sensitive linear diode arrays and CCD arrays. We apply this technique to characterize the response of a linear diode array, Princeton Instrument model X-PDA, and a virtual phase CCD array, TI 4849, to direct illumination by x-rays. We find that the response of the linear array is linearly proportional to the incident intensity and uniform over its length to within 2 %. Its quantum efficiency is 38 % for Cu K α x-rays. The resolution function is evaluated from the spatial autocorrelation function and falls to 10 % of its peak value after one pixel. On the other hand, the response of the CCD detecting system to direct x-ray exposure is non-linear. To properly quantify the scattered x-rays, one must correct for the non- linearity. The resolution is two pixels along the serial transfer direction. We characterize the noise of the CCD and propose a model that takes into account the non-linearity and the resolution function to estimate the quantum efficiency of the detector. The quantum efficiency is 20 %

  13. Time-of-flight position-sensitive x-ray detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mowat, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    A new method for recording beam-foil time-of-flight data is described. A stationary, side-window, position-senstive proportional counter, oriented with anode wire parallel to the ion beam, views the decay in flight of excited ions through a Soller slit x-ray collimator. In contrast to the standard method, the exciter foil, placed within or upstream from the field of view, is not moved during the acquisition of a decay curve. Each point on the anode acts like an independent detector seeing a unique segment of the ion beam. The correspondence between the downstream distance at which an ion decays and the position along the anode at which the x-ray is detected makes a pulse-height spectrum of position pulses equivalent to a time-of-flight decay curve. Thus an entire decay curve can now be acquired without moving the foil. Increased efficiency is the most significant improvement over the standard method in which the radiation detector views only a small segment of the flight path at any one time. Experiments using translating foils are subject to a spurious dependence of x-ray intensity on foil position if the foil is non-uniform (or non-uniformly aged) and wobbles as it moves. This effect is eliminated here. Foil aging effects which influence excitation rates and introduce a slowly varying time dependence of the x-ray intensity are automatically normalized by this multichannel technique. The application of this method to metastable x-ray emitting states of low-Z ions are discussed

  14. Evaluation of the x-ray response of a position-sensitive microstrip detector with an integrated readout chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossington, C.; Jaklevic, J.; Haber, C.; Spieler, H.; Reid, J.

    1990-08-01

    The performance of an SVX silicon microstrip detector and its compatible integrated readout chip have been evaluated in response to Rh Kα x-rays (average energy 20.5 keV). The energy and spatial discrimination capabilities, efficient data management and fast readout rates make it an attractive alternative to the CCD and PDA detectors now being offered for x-ray position sensitive diffraction and EXAFS work. The SVX system was designed for high energy physics applications and thus further development of the existing system is required to optimize it for use in practical x-ray experiments. For optimum energy resolution the system noise must be decreased to its previously demonstrated low levels of 2 keV FWHM at 60 keV or less, and the data handling rate of the computer must be increased. New readout chips are now available that offer the potential of better performance. 15 refs., 7 figs

  15. Simultaneous acquisition of X-ray spectra using a multi-wire, position-sensitive gas flow detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaven, Peter A.; Marmotti, Mauro; Kampmann, Reinhard; Knoth, Joachim; Schwenke, Heinrich

    2003-01-01

    A multi-wire, gas-filled position-sensitive detector has been developed for the simultaneous recording of wavelength-dispersed X-ray signals that enables X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with a limited multi-element capability in the low Z element range. Details of the modular construction of the detector are given. The detector performance was characterized using Al-Kα radiation and a variable slit system. The detector has been applied in a laboratory spectrometer equipped with an electron source and a double multilayer mirror device as the wavelength-dispersing element. Spectra from Al and Si obtained in the simultaneous acquisition mode show good agreement with calculations performed using a ray-tracing model

  16. Design and performance of a 2-D multi-wire position sensitive X-ray ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of an anode plane with 10 µm SS wires at 3 mm spacing and a pair of orthogonal cathode read- out planes with 25 µm SS .... The electron multiplication process in high electric field is one of the prominent char- acteristics of .... be tested by irradiating the detector with a beam of X-rays of uniform intensity per unit area, and ...

  17. A primary scintillation gated high pressure position sensitive gas scintillation proportional counter (HPGSPC) for applications to x-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giarrusso, S.; Manzo, G.; Re, S.

    1985-01-01

    The authors describe a new instrument for x-ray astronomy. The instrument, based on a high pressure (5 atm.), xenon filled, position sensitive Gas Scintillation Proportional counter (HPGSPC) is expected to feature an energy resolution better than 4% at 60 keV, an angular resolution of approximately 20 arc-minutes over the full energy range (4 to 100 keV) and a field of view (FOV) of up to 30x30 degrees. A prototype flight unit of the gas cell on which the instrument is based is presently under technological development in the framework of the SAX project

  18. Application of a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector to a Kratky small-angle x-ray camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, T.P.; Stein, R.S.; Kopp, M.K.; Zedler, R.E.; Hendricks, R.W.; Lin, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    A conventional Kratky small-angle collimation system has been modified to allow the use of a one-dimensional position-sensitive x-ray detector. The detector was designed specifically for use with a long-slit camera and has uniform sensitivity over the entire beam in the slit-length direction. Procedures for alignment of the collimation system are given, and a variety of tests of the performance of the system are presented. Among the latter are measurements of electronic noise and parasitic scattering as well as comparisons against samples which were also measured on other cameras. The good agreement of these comparisons demonstrates the success of the use of a position-sensitive detector with the Kratky collimation system

  19. Application of a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector to a Kratky small-angle x-ray camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, T.P.; Stein, R.S.; Kopp, M.K.; Zedler, R.E.; Hendricks, R.W.; Lin, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    A conventional Kratky small-angle collimation system has been modified to allow the use of a one-dimensional position-sensitive x-ray detector. The detector was designed specifically for use with a long-slit camera and has uniform sensitivity over the entire beam in the slit-length direction. Procedures for alignment of the collimation system are given, and a variety of tests of the performance of the system are presented. Among the latter are measurements of electronic noise and parasitic scattering as well as comparisons against samples which were also measured on other cameras. The good agreement of these comparisons demonstrates the success of the use of a position-sensitive detector with the Kratky collimation system.

  20. Photodiode array for position-sensitive detection using high X-ray flux provided by synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jucha, A.; Bonin, D.; Dartyge, E.; Flank, A. M.; Fontaine, A.; Raoux, D.

    1984-09-01

    Synchrotron radiation provides a high intensity source over a large range of wavelengths. This is the prominent quality that has laid the foundations of the EXAFS development (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure). EXAFS data can be collected in different ways. A full scan requires 5 to 10 min, compared to the one-day data collection of a conventional Bremsstrahlung X-ray tube. Recently, by using the new photodiode array (R 1024 SFX) manufactured by Reticon, it has been possible to reduce the data collection time to less than 100 ms. The key elements of this new EXAFS method are a dispersive optics combined with a position sensitive detector able to work under very high flux conditions. The total aperture of 2500 μm × 25 μm for each pixel is well suited to spectroscopic applications. Besides its high dynamic range (> 10 4) and its linearity, the rapidity of the readout allows a flux of 10 9-10 10 photons/s over the 1024 sensing elements.

  1. A readout system for position sensitive measurements of X-ray using silicon strip detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Dabrowski, W; Grybos, P; Idzik, M; Kudlaty, J

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we describe the development of a readout system for X-ray measurements using silicon strip detectors. The limitation concerning the inherent spatial resolution of silicon strip detectors has been evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation and the results are discussed. The developed readout system is based on the binary readout architecture and consists of two ASICs: RX32 front-end chip comprising 32 channels of preamplifiers, shapers and discriminators, and COUNT32 counter chip comprising 32 20-bit asynchronous counters and the readout logic. This work focuses on the design and performance of the front-end chip. The RX32 chip has been optimised for a low detector capacitance, in the range of 1-3 pF, and high counting rate applications. It can be used with DC coupled detectors allowing the leakage current up to a few nA per strip. For the prototype chip manufactured in a CMOS process all basic parameters have been evaluated by electronic measurements. The noise below 140 el rms has been achieved for a ...

  2. X-ray Sensitive Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    TM 8772 5 Literature reports on BiI3/nylon composites used X-ray sources with a Mo target (Reference 18) or magnesium target (Reference 19). However...1981. Pp. D-155 to D-160. 22. G. Pretzsch, B. Dorschel, and T. Schonmuth. IEEE Transactions on Electrical Insulation, Vol. EI -21, No.3, June 1986

  3. A high count rate one-dimensional position sensitive detector and a data acquisition system for time resolved X-ray scattering studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernot, P.

    1982-01-01

    A curved multiwire proportional drift chamber has been built as a general purpose instrument for X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction experiments with synchrotron radiation. This parallaxe-free one-dimensional linear position sensitive detector has a parallel readout with a double hit logic. The data acquisition system, installed as a part of the D11 camera at LURE-DCI, is designed to perform time slicing and cyclic experiments; it has been used with either the fast multiwire chamber or a standard position sensitive detector with delay line readout [fr

  4. Performance of a position sensitive Si(Li) x-ray detector dedicated to Compton polarimetry of stored and trapped highly-charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, G; Braeuning, H; Hess, S; Maertin, R; Spillmann, U; Stoehlker, Th

    2010-01-01

    We report on a novel two-dimensional position sensitive Si(Li) detector dedicated to Compton polarimetry of x-ray radiation arising from highly-charged ions. The performance of the detector system was evaluated in ion-atom collision experiments at the ESR storage ringe at GSI, Darmstadt. Based on the data obtained, the polarimeter efficiency is estimated in this work.

  5. X-rays sensitive mammalian cell mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    A phenomenon that in x-ray-sensitive mammalian-cell mutants, cellular death due to x-ray radiation was not increased by caffeine, but on the contrary, the dead cells were resuscitated by it was discussed. The survival rate of mutant cells increased by caffein in a low concentration. This suggested that caffeine may have induced some mechanism to produce x-ray resistant mutant cells. Postirradiation treatment with caffeine increased considerably the survival rate of the mutant cells, and this suggested the existence of latent caffeine-sensitive potentially lethal damage repair system. This system, after a few hours, is thought to be substituted by caffeine-resistant repair system which is induced by caffeine, and this may be further substituted by x-ray-resistant repair system. The repair system was also induced by adenine. (Ueda, J.)

  6. UHV photoelectron x-ray beam position monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.D.; Oversluizen, T.

    1989-01-01

    As part of our research program to develop viable beam position monitors for both the X-ray and VUV beamlines at the NSLS, we have constructed vertical photon beam position monitors which are presently mounted in two front-ends in the X-ray ring. These area-type detectors are located before the safety shutters and are, therefore, able to monitor the beam position even during injection. The features of this type of monitor which contribute to its long-term stability, position sensitivity, and immunity to horizontal beam motion have been examined and will be discussed. 6 refs., 4 figs

  7. An apparatus for high speed measurements of small-angle x-ray scattering profiles with a linear position sensitive detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Takeji; Suehiro, Shoji; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro; Saijo, Kenji; Kawai, Hiromichi

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus for high speed measurements of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is described. This apparatus utilizes a 12 kW rotating anode X-ray generator, a linear position sensitive proportional counter (multicathode delay line PSPC), and a two-parameter multichannel pulse height analyzer (MCA) with 12 kwords (16 bits/word) memory area available for SAXA intensity data as a function of position (scattering angles) and time slice. The two-parameter MCA is constructed within a microcomputer system, by utilizing its R/W memory for data storage, and the memory incrementing and real-time CRT display is implemented by using two direct memory access (DMA) controllers. The cycle time of the access is about 10 μs. The measuring time for SAXS profiles with this apparatus can be shortened approximately by three orders of magnitude in comparison with the measuring time with SAXS apparatuses utilizing a conventional step-scanning goniometer and a conventional X-ray tube, thus permitting time-resolved analyses of SAXS profiles. Some applications of the apparatus to dynamic SAXS measurements are presented for polymeric systems, the preliminary results of which seem to indicate the possibility of obtaining a new class of data on dynamics in structural transformation, deformation, formation and annihilation in the scale of a few tens to several hundred Angstroms. (author)

  8. X ray sensitive area detection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor); Pusey, Marc L. (Inventor); Yost, Vaughn H. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A radiation sensitive area detection device is disclosed which comprises a phosphor-containing film capable of receiving and storing an image formed by a pattern of incoming x rays, UV, or other radiation falling on the film. The device is capable of fluorescing in response to stimulation by a light source in a manner directly proportional to the stored radiation pattern. The device includes: (1) a light source capable of projecting light or other appropriate electromagnetic wave on the film so as to cause it to fluoresce; (2) a means to focus the fluoresced light coming from the phosphor-containing film after light stimulation; and (3) at least one charged coupled detector or other detecting element capable of receiving and digitizing the pattern of fluoresced light coming from the phosphor-containing film. The device will be able to generate superior x ray images of high resolution from a crystal or other sample and will be particularly advantageous in that instantaneous near-real-time images of rapidly deteriorating samples can be obtained. Furthermore, the device can be made compact and sturdy, thus capable of carrying out x ray or other radiation imaging under a variety of conditions, including those experienced in space.

  9. On the use of one-dimensional position sensitive detector for x-ray diffraction reciprocal space mapping: Data quality and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, Olivier; Boulle, Alexandre; Guinebretiere, Rene; Lecomte, Andre; Dauger, Alain

    2005-01-01

    A homemade x-ray diffractometer using one-dimensional position sensitive detector (PSD) and well suited to the study of thin epitaxial layer systems is presented. It is shown how PSDs can be advantageously used to allow fast reciprocal space mapping, which is especially interesting when analyzing poor crystalline and defective layers as usually observed with oxides and ceramics films. The quality of the data collected with such a setup and the limitations of PSDs in comparison with the use of analyzer crystals are discussed. In particular, the effects of PSD on angular precision, instrument resolution and corrections that must be applied to raw data are presented

  10. Characterization of mutants of yeast sensitive to x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strike, T.L.

    1978-01-01

    This study deals with the characterization of mutants at the rad50 to rad57 loci selected on the basis of their sensitivity to x rays. They were also examined for sensitivity to uv and mms and for characteristics of mutation induction, heteroallelic reversion (gene conversion), liquid holding recovery from x rays, and sporulation. All the mutants were slightly to moderately sensitive to uv though they did not show the extreme sensitivity of the rad1 to rad22 mutations, and all demonstrated cross sensitivity to both x rays and MMS. If a mutant was very sensitive to x-rays, it was usually very sensitive to MMS also

  11. Charge collection and absorption-limited x-ray sensitivity of pixellated x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, M. Zahangir; Kasap, S.O.

    2004-01-01

    The charge collection and absorption-limited x-ray sensitivity of a direct conversion pixellated x-ray detector operating in the presence of deep trapping of charge carriers is calculated using the Shockley-Ramo theorem and the weighting potential of the individual pixel. The sensitivity of a pixellated x-ray detector is analyzed in terms of normalized parameters; (a) the normalized x-ray absorption depth (absorption depth/photoconductor thickness), (b) normalized pixel width (pixel size/thickness), and (c) normalized carrier schubwegs (schubweg/thickness). The charge collection and absorption-limited sensitivity of pixellated x-ray detectors mainly depends on the transport properties (mobility and lifetime) of the charges that move towards the pixel electrodes and the extent of dependence increases with decreasing normalized pixel width. The x-ray sensitivity of smaller pixels may be higher or lower than that of larger pixels depending on the rate of electron and hole trapping and the bias polarity. The sensitivity of pixellated detectors can be improved by ensuring that the carrier with the higher mobility-lifetime product is drifted towards the pixel electrodes

  12. Sample positioning effects in x-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.

    Instrument error due to variation in sample position in a crystal x-ray spectrometer can easily exceed the total instrumental error. Lack of reproducibility in sample position in the x-ray optics is the single largest source of system error. The factors that account for sample positioning error are described, and many of the details of flat crystal x-ray optics are discussed

  13. X-ray radiography equipment for patients in standing position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snijder, J.G.N.

    1974-01-01

    X-ray radiography equipment suited for patients in standing position is described. The patient's body centre of mass is indicated by its vertical projection line appearing on the X-ray image. To that end, an X-ray absorbing wire is positioned through the centre of mass by means of an electrical signal acting on a servomotor and derived from the pressure on three non-colinear points in the foot plate through an analogue computer

  14. Porous silicon: X-rays sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstenmayer, J.L.; Vibert, Patrick; Mercier, Patrick; Rayer, Claude; Hyvernage, Michel; Herino, Roland; Bsiesy, Ahmad

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrate that high porosity anodically porous silicon is radioluminescent. Interests of this study are double. Firstly: is the construction of porous silicon X-rays detectors (imagers) possible? Secondly: is it necessary to protect silicon porous based optoelectronic systems from ionising radiations effects (spatial environment)? ((orig.))

  15. Parameters estimation for X-ray sources: positions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avni, Y.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that the sizes of the positional error boxes for x-ray sources can be determined by using an estimation method which we have previously formulated generally and applied in spectral analyses. It is explained how this method can be used by scanning x-ray telescopes, by rotating modulation collimators, and by HEAO-A (author)

  16. The color of X-rays: Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schioppa, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray

  17. X-ray trace element analysis with positive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, R.H.

    1973-01-01

    A new trace element analysis having the advantage that many elements may be detected in a single measurement, based on positive charged particle induced X-ray florescence and on the production of X-rays by heavy ions, is described. Because of the large cross-sections for the production of discrete X-ray and the low yield of continuum radiation, positive charged particle X-ray florescence is a competitive, fast, analytic tool. In the experiment a beam of positive charged particles from an accelerator was directed toward a target. X-rays induced by the bombardment were detected by a Si(Li) detector the ouput from which was amplified and sorted in a multichannel analyzer. For rapid data handling and analysis, the multichannel analyzer or ADC unit was connected to an on-line computer. A large variety of targets prepared in collaboration with the oceanographers have been studied and spectra obtained for different particles having the same velocity are presented to show that the yield of discrete X-rays increases at least as rapidly as Z 2 . While protons of several MeV appear to be already competitive further advantage may be gained by heavy ions at lower energies since the continuum is reduced while the peak ''signals'' retain strength due to the Z 2 dependence. (S.B.)

  18. Reproducible positioning in chest X-ray radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    A device is described that can be used to ensure reproducibility in the positioning of the patient during X-ray radiography of the thorax. Signals are taken from an electrocardiographic monitor and from a device recording the respiratory cycle. Radiography is performed only when two preselected signals coincide

  19. X-ray sensitivity of somatic cell hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zampetti-Bosseler, F.; Heilporn, V.; Lievens, A.; Limbosch, S.

    1976-01-01

    Different somatic cell hybrids have been studied as a function of their x-ray survival and karyotypic properties. Hybrids between x-ray-sensitive mouse lymphoma cells and mouse fibroblasts, retaining a large proportion of both parental chromosomes, were much more resistant to irradiation than either of the parental cells. On the other hand, hybrids between sensitive mouse lymphoma cells and hamster fibroblasts which also retained a relatively high number of chromosomes from both parents had a sensitivity intermediate between the sensitivities of the parental cell lines. Finally, hybrids between mouse fibroblasts and hamster fibroblasts carrying at least one hamster genome and less than one mouse genome resembled the hamster parent with respect to survival capactity. The significance of these results is discussed

  20. The concordance of ultrasound technique versus X-ray to confirm endotracheal tube position in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhry, R; Dangman, B; Pinheiro, J M B

    2015-07-01

    Given the distressingly high incidence of ETT malposition in the neonatal population, patients are exposed to ionizing radiation to confirm endotracheal tube (ETT) position. Our objective is to determine if ultrasound technique is concordant with X-ray in determining whether an ETT is deeply positioned or not. Prospective observational clinical trial. After obtaining informed consent, patients with an ETT who required X-ray for clinical reasons underwent sonographic evaluation of the ETT by an ultrasound technologist or pediatric radiologist, usually within the hour. A total of 56 image pairs were obtained from 29 patients. Ninety-eight percent of the ultrasound/X-ray image pairs were suitable for analysis. The concordance of ultrasound with X-ray to identify deeply and not deeply positioned ETTs was 95% (53/56). The sensitivity of ultrasound to detect deeply positioned ETTs on X-ray was 86% (6/7). The specificity of ultrasound to detect ETTs that were not deeply positioned on X-ray was 96% (47/49). As the largest clinical trial of its kind to date, with the greatest number of ultrasound operators, we have further established US as a feasible imaging modality to determine whether an ETT is deeply positioned or not.

  1. Portable X-ray fluorescence analyzer of high sensitivity using X-ray tube excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatai, E.; Ando, L.

    1982-01-01

    A review of the three main methods of X-ray fluorescence analysis and their problems is given. The attainable accuracy and effectiveness of each method are discussed. The main properties of portable X-ray analyzers required by the industry are described. The results and experiences of R and D activities in ATOMKI (Debrecen, Hungary) for developing portable X-ray analyzers are presented. The only way for increasing the accuracy and decreasing the measuring time is the application of X-ray tube excitation instead of radioactive sources. The new ATOMKI equipment presently under construction and patenting uses X-ray tube excitation; it will increase the accuracy of concentration determination by one order of magnitude. (D.Gy.)

  2. Positioning X-Ray Film Inside A Flow Splitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darter, Charles; Pierce, Darryl

    1990-01-01

    Simple and inexpensive tool ensures secure placement for radiographic inspection. Holder places film positively and securely for x-ray inspection inside sections of tube with splitter welds. V-shaped piece of film fits on arms of holder. With arms squeezed together, holder inserted in opening of neck. Arms of holder cut from 0.020-in. (0.51-mm) thick stock of unspecified material.

  3. Method for reducing x-ray background signals from insertion device x-ray beam position monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Decker

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available A method is described that provides a solution to the long-standing problem of stray radiation-induced signals on photoemission-based x-ray beam position monitors (BPMs located on insertion device x-ray beam lines. The method involves the introduction of a chicane into the accelerator lattice that directs unwanted x radiation away from the photosensitive x-ray BPM blades. This technique has been implemented at the Advanced Photon Source, and experimental confirmation of the technique is provided.

  4. Bulk sensitive hard x-ray photoemission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, M., E-mail: m.patt@fz-juelich.de; Wiemann, C. [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-6) and JARA-FIT, Research Center Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Weber, N.; Escher, M.; Merkel, M. [Focus GmbH, Neukirchner Str. 2, D-65510 Hünstetten (Germany); Gloskovskii, A.; Drube, W. [DESY Photon Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Schneider, C. M. [Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-6) and JARA-FIT, Research Center Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Fakultät f. Physik and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE), Universität Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) has now matured into a well-established technique as a bulk sensitive probe of the electronic structure due to the larger escape depth of the highly energetic electrons. In order to enable HAXPES studies with high lateral resolution, we have set up a dedicated energy-filtered hard x-ray photoemission electron microscope (HAXPEEM) working with electron kinetic energies up to 10 keV. It is based on the NanoESCA design and also preserves the performance of the instrument in the low and medium energy range. In this way, spectromicroscopy can be performed from threshold to hard x-ray photoemission. The high potential of the HAXPEEM approach for the investigation of buried layers and structures has been shown already on a layered and structured SrTiO{sub 3} sample. Here, we present results of experiments with test structures to elaborate the imaging and spectroscopic performance of the instrument and show the capabilities of the method to image bulk properties. Additionally, we introduce a method to determine the effective attenuation length of photoelectrons in a direct photoemission experiment.

  5. The color of X-rays Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schioppa, Enrico Junior

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray fluorescence. The charge transport properties of the sensor are characterized using a high energy beam of charged particles at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Monochromatic X-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are used to determined the energy response function. These data are used to implement a physics-based CT projection operator that accounts for the transmission of the source spectrum through the sample and detector effects. Based on this projection operator, an iterative spectral CT reconstruction algorithm is developed by extending an Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) method. Subsequently, a maximum likelihood based algo...

  6. A highly sensitive x-ray imaging modality for hepatocellular carcinoma detection in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Danielle; Walsh, Edward G.; Derdak, Zoltan; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Innovations that improve sensitivity and reduce cost are of paramount importance in diagnostic imaging. The novel x-ray imaging modality called spatial frequency heterodyne imaging (SFHI) is based on a linear arrangement of x-ray source, tissue, and x-ray detector, much like that of a conventional x-ray imaging apparatus. However, SFHI rests on a complete paradigm reversal compared to conventional x-ray absorption-based radiology: while scattered x-rays are carefully rejected in absorption-based x-ray radiology to enhance the image contrast, SFHI forms images exclusively from x-rays scattered by the tissue. In this study we use numerical processing to produce x-ray scatter images of hepatocellular carcinoma labeled with a nanoparticle contrast agent. We subsequently compare the sensitivity of SFHI in this application to that of both conventional x-ray imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although SFHI is still in the early stages of its development, our results show that the sensitivity of SFHI is an order of magnitude greater than that of absorption-based x-ray imaging and approximately equal to that of MRI. As x-ray imaging modalities typically have lower installation and service costs compared to MRI, SFHI could become a cost effective alternative to MRI, particularly in areas of the world with inadequate availability of MRI facilities.

  7. Optimization of polarimetry sensitivity for X-ray CCD

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashida, K; Tsunemi, H; Hashimoto, Y; Ohtani, M

    1999-01-01

    X-ray polarimetry with CCD has been performed using a polarized X-ray beam from an electron impact X-ray source. The standard data reduction method employing double-pixel events yields the modulation factor M of 0.14 at 27 keV and 0.24 at 43 keV for the 12 mu m pixel size CCD chip. We develop a new data reduction method, in which multi-pixel events are employed, and which approximates the charge spread as an oval shape. We optimize the reduction parameters, so that we improve the P sub m sub i sub n (minimum detectable polarization degree) by factor of three from the value obtained through the usual double-pixel event method.

  8. The sensitizing phenomenon of X-ray film in the experiment of metals loaded with deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Suhe; Wang Dalun; Chen Wenjang; Li Yijun; Fu Yibei; Zhang Xinwei

    1993-01-01

    The sensitizing phenomenon of X-ray film was studied, in metals loaded with deuterium, by a cycle method of temperature and pressure (CMTP). The experimental results showed that the sensitization of X-ray film was derived from the chemical reaction and the anomalous effect of metals loaded with deuterium. (author)

  9. Sensitivity of in vivo X-ray fluorescence determination of skeletal lead stores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokas, R.K.; Besarab, A.; McDiarmid, M.A.; Shapiro, I.M.; Bloch, P.

    1990-01-01

    Eighteen patients with known past occupational lead exposure underwent parenteral diagnostic chelation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and x-ray fluorescent determination of in vivo skeletal lead stores at the distal styloid process of the ulna and at the temporal base bone using a cobalt 57 source and measuring lead Ka x-rays. X-ray fluorescent lead measurements in both locations correlated with results of diagnostic chelation. Using a post-chelation urinary excretion of greater than 600 micrograms lead/24 h as the definition of high-lead stores, sensitivity of x-ray fluorescence at the wrist and temple was 56% and 39%, respectively

  10. New X-ray beam position monitors with submicron resolution utilizing imaging of scattered X-rays at CHESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revesz, Peter; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Pauling, Alan K.

    2011-01-01

    At CHESS' A, F and G wiggler beam lines three new video beam position monitors (VBPMs) have been commissioned. These new VBPMs utilize X-rays scattered from the graphite filter (A and F line) or from a beryllium window (G-line) as the white wiggler beam passes through them. As the X-rays scatter in all directions from the scattering medium, a slit camera creates an image of the beam's footprint on a fluorescent screen. This image is then viewed by a CCD camera and analyzed using a computer program to calculate the intensity centroid, the beam profile and integrated intensity. These data are delivered to the CHESS signal archiving system for storage and display. The new systems employ digital cameras. These cameras are free of the noise inherent to the analog systems with long video signal connections. As a result, the beam position data delivered by the new systems are more reliable and accurate as shown by beam position traces using different beam position monitors on the same beam line.

  11. New X-ray beam position monitors with submicron resolution utilizing imaging of scattered X-rays at CHESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revesz, Peter, E-mail: pr20@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca 14850, NY (United States); Temnykh, Alexander B. [Cornell University, Laboratory for Elem-Particle Physics, Ithaca 14850, NY (United States); Pauling, Alan K. [Cornell University, Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca 14850, NY (United States)

    2011-09-01

    At CHESS' A, F and G wiggler beam lines three new video beam position monitors (VBPMs) have been commissioned. These new VBPMs utilize X-rays scattered from the graphite filter (A and F line) or from a beryllium window (G-line) as the white wiggler beam passes through them. As the X-rays scatter in all directions from the scattering medium, a slit camera creates an image of the beam's footprint on a fluorescent screen. This image is then viewed by a CCD camera and analyzed using a computer program to calculate the intensity centroid, the beam profile and integrated intensity. These data are delivered to the CHESS signal archiving system for storage and display. The new systems employ digital cameras. These cameras are free of the noise inherent to the analog systems with long video signal connections. As a result, the beam position data delivered by the new systems are more reliable and accurate as shown by beam position traces using different beam position monitors on the same beam line.

  12. Method and apparatus for enhanced sensitivity filmless medical x-ray imaging, including three-dimensional imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Sherwood

    1995-01-01

    A filmless X-ray imaging system includes at least one X-ray source, upper and lower collimators, and a solid-state detector array, and can provide three-dimensional imaging capability. The X-ray source plane is distance z.sub.1 above upper collimator plane, distance z.sub.2 above the lower collimator plane, and distance z.sub.3 above the plane of the detector array. The object to be X-rayed is located between the upper and lower collimator planes. The upper and lower collimators and the detector array are moved horizontally with scanning velocities v.sub.1, v.sub.2, v.sub.3 proportional to z.sub.1, z.sub.2 and z.sub.3, respectively. The pattern and size of openings in the collimators, and between detector positions is proportional such that similar triangles are always defined relative to the location of the X-ray source. X-rays that pass through openings in the upper collimator will always pass through corresponding and similar openings in the lower collimator, and thence to a corresponding detector in the underlying detector array. Substantially 100% of the X-rays irradiating the object (and neither absorbed nor scattered) pass through the lower collimator openings and are detected, which promotes enhanced sensitivity. A computer system coordinates repositioning of the collimators and detector array, and X-ray source locations. The computer system can store detector array output, and can associate a known X-ray source location with detector array output data, to provide three-dimensional imaging. Detector output may be viewed instantly, stored digitally, and/or transmitted electronically for image viewing at a remote site.

  13. Soft x-ray driven ablation and its positive use for a new efficient acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabe, Takashi; Kiyokawa, Shuji; Mochizuki, Takayasu; Sakabe, Shuji; Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    1983-01-01

    The ablation process driven by soft X-ray is investigated by one-dimensional hydrodynamic code coupled with LTE, average ion model and multi-group radiation package. The following two major results are obtained: (1) the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate scalings, and (2) a new acceleration scheme which positively uses the unique property of soft X-ray transport. (author)

  14. The X-ray sensitivity of semi-insulating polycrystalline CdZnTe thick films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Jae Ho; Kim, Ki Hyun; Suh, Jong Hee; Cho, Shin Hang; Cho, Pyong Kon; Hong, Jin Ki; Kim, Sun Ung

    2008-01-01

    The X-ray sensitivity is one of the important parameters indicating the detector performance. The X-ray sensitivity of semi-insulating polycrystalline CdZnTe:Cl thick films was investigated as a function of electric field, mean photon energy, film thickness, and charge carrier transport parameters and, compared with another promising detector materials. The X-ray sensitivities of the polycrystalline CdZnTe films with 350 μm thickness were about 2.2 and 6.2 μC/cm 2 /R in the ohmic-type and Schottky-type detector at 0.83 V/μm, respectively

  15. X-ray sensitivity of human tumor cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Nove, J.; Little, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    Clonally-derived cells from ten human malignant tumors considered radiocurable (breast, neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma) or non-radiocurable (osteosarcoma, hypernephroma, glioblastoma, melanoma) were studied in cell culture and their in vitro x-ray survival curve parameters determined (anti n, D 0 ). There were no significant differences among the tumor cell lines suggesting that survival parameters in vitro do not explain differences in clinical radiocurability. Preliminary investigation with density inhibited human tumor cells indicate that such an approach may yield information regarding inherent cellular differences in radiocurability

  16. Calibration method of the pulsed X-ray relative sensitivity for ST401 plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Hongwei; Song Guzhou; Wang Kuilu

    2011-01-01

    The relative sensitivity calibration method of the pulsed X-ray in ST401 plastic scintillator is presented. Experimental relative sensitivity calibrations of the plastic scintillators of different thicknesses from 1 mm to 50 mm are accomplished on the 'Chenguang' pulsed X-ray source and a Co radioactive source, The uncertainty of the calibration data is evaluated, which can be treated as the experimental evidence for the relative sensitivity conversion of ST401 plastic scintillator. (authors)

  17. Spatial resolution in depth-controlled surface sensitive x-ray techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, W.B.; Viccaro, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    The spatial resolution along the surface normal and the total depth probed are two important parameters in depth-controlled surface sensitive X-ray techniques employing grazing incidence geometry. The two parameters are analyzed in terms of optical properties (refractive indices) of the media involved and parameters of the incident X-ray beam: beam divergence, X-ray energy, and spectral bandwidth. We derive analytical expressions of the required beam divergence and spectral bandwidth of the incident beam as a function of the two parameters. Sample calculations are made for X-ray energies between 0.1 and 100 keV and for solid Be, Cu, and Au, representing material matrices consisting of low, medium, and high atomic number elements. A brief discussion on obtaining the required beam divergence and spectral bandwidth from present X-ray sources and optics is given

  18. Project Title: Radiochemical Analysis by High Sensitivity Dual-Optic Micro X-ray Fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havrilla, George J.; Gao, Ning

    2002-01-01

    A novel dual-optic micro X-ray fluorescence instrument will be developed to do radiochemical analysis of high-level radioactive wastes at DOE sites such as Savannah River Site and Hanford. This concept incorporates new X-ray optical elements such as monolithic polycapillaries and double bent crystals, which focus X-rays. The polycapillary optic can be used to focus X-rays emitted by the X-ray tube thereby increasing the X-ray flux on the sample over 1000 times. Polycapillaries will also be used to collect the X-rays from the excitation site and screen the radiation background from the radioactive species in the specimen. This dual-optic approach significantly reduces the background and increases the analyte signal thereby increasing the sensitivity of the analysis. A doubly bent crystal used as the focusing optic produces focused monochromatic X-ray excitation, which eliminates the bremsstrahlung background from the X-ray source. The coupling of the doubly bent crystal for monochromatic excitation with a polycapillary for signal collection can effectively eliminate the noise background and radiation background from the specimen. The integration of these X-ray optics increases the signal-to-noise and thereby increases the sensitivity of the analysis for low-level analytes. This work will address a key need for radiochemical analysis of high-level waste using a non-destructive, multi-element, and rapid method in a radiation environment. There is significant potential that this instrumentation could be capable of on-line analysis for process waste stream characterization at DOE sites

  19. In-situ X-ray diffraction system using sources and detectors at fixed angular positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, David M [Voorheesville, NY; Gibson, Walter M [Voorheesville, NY; Huang, Huapeng [Latham, NY

    2007-06-26

    An x-ray diffraction technique for measuring a known characteristic of a sample of a material in an in-situ state. The technique includes using an x-ray source for emitting substantially divergent x-ray radiation--with a collimating optic disposed with respect to the fixed source for producing a substantially parallel beam of x-ray radiation by receiving and redirecting the divergent paths of the divergent x-ray radiation. A first x-ray detector collects radiation diffracted from the sample; wherein the source and detector are fixed, during operation thereof, in position relative to each other and in at least one dimension relative to the sample according to a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample. A second x-ray detector may be fixed relative to the first x-ray detector according to the a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample, especially in a phase monitoring embodiment of the present invention.

  20. Single-shot beam-position monitor for x-ray free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tono, Kensuke; Kudo, Togo; Yabashi, Makina; Tachibana, Takeshi; Feng, Yiping; Fritz, David; Hastings, Jerome; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2011-02-01

    We have developed an x-ray beam-position monitor for detecting the radiation properties of an x-ray free electron laser (FEL). It is composed of four PIN photodiodes that detect backscattered x-rays from a semitransparent diamond film placed in the beam path. The signal intensities from the photodiodes are used to compute the beam intensity and position. A proof-of-principle experiment at a synchrotron light source revealed that the error in the beam position is reduced to below 7 μm by using a nanocrystal diamond film prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Owing to high dose tolerance and transparency of the diamond film, the monitor is suitable for routine diagnostics of extremely intense x-ray pulses from the FEL.

  1. Smart x-ray beam position monitor system for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, D.; Kuzay, T.

    1996-01-01

    In third-generation synchrotron radiation sources, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the sensitivity and reliability requirements for the x-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) are much higher than for earlier systems. Noise and contamination signals caused by radiation emitted from the bending magnet become a major problem. The regular XBPM calibration process can only provide signal correction for one set of conditions for the insertion devices (ID). During normal operation, parameters affecting the ID-emitted beam, such as the gap of the ID magnets and the beam current, are the variables. A new smart x-ray beam position monitor system (SBPM) has been conceived and designed for the APS. It has a built in self-learning structure with EEPROM memory that is large enough to open-quote open-quote remember close-quote close-quote a complete set of calibration data covering all the possible operating conditions. During the self-learning mode, the monitor system initializes a series of automatic scan motions with information for different ID setups and records them into the database array. During normal operation, the SBPM corrects the normalized output according to the ID setup information and the calibration database. So that, with this novel system, the SBPM is always calibrating itself with the changing ID set up conditions. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  2. Extremum seeking x-ray position feedback using power line harmonic leakage as the perturbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zohar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Small x-ray beam sizes necessary for probing nanoscale phenomena require exquisite stability to prevent data corruption by noise. One source of instability at synchrotron radiation x-ray beamlines is the slow detuning of x-ray optics to marginal alignment where the onset of clipping increases the beam’s susceptibility to higher frequency position oscillations. In this article, we show that a 1  μm amplitude horizontal x-ray beam oscillation driven by power line harmonic leakage into the electron storage ring can be used as perturbation for horizontal position extremum seeking feedback. Feedback performance is characterized by convergence to 1.5% away from maximum intensity at optimal alignment.

  3. Position statement on use of hand-held portable dental X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-06-01

    The position statement focuses on justification in the medical field, in particular on the use of hand-held portable dental x-ray equipment. It supplements another HERCA position paper, providing a general overview of the use of all hand-held portable X-ray equipment. Key Messages: - HERCA finds that the use of hand-held portable X-ray devices should be discouraged except in special circumstances. - As a general rule, these devices should only be used in scenarios where an intraoral radiograph is deemed necessary for a patient and the use of a fixed or semi-mobile x-ray unit is impractical, e.g.: - nursing homes, residential care facilities or homes for persons with disabilities; - forensic odontology, - military operations abroad without dental facilities

  4. Settling time of dental x-ray tube head after positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol; Wang, Se Myung; Koh, Chang Sung

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce a method of obtaining the oscillation graphs of the dental x-ray tube heads relative to time using an accelerometer. An Accelerometer, Piezotron type 8704B25 (Kistler Instrument Co., Amherst, NY, USA) was utilized to measure the horizontal oscillation of the x-ray tube head immediately after positioning the tube head for an intraoral radiograph. The signal from the sensor was transferred to a dynamic signal analyzer, which displayed the magnitude of the acceleration on the Y-axis and time lapse on the X-axis. The horizontal oscillation of the tube head was measured relative to time, and the settling time was also determined on the basis of the acceleration graphs for 6 wall type, 5 floor-fixed type, and 4 mobile type dental x-ray machines. The oscillation graphs showed that tube head movement decreased rapidly over time. The settling time varied with x-ray machine types. Wall-type x-ray machines had a settling time of up to 6 seconds, 5 seconds for fixed floor-types, and 11 seconds for the mobile-types. Using an accelerometer, we obtained the oscillation graphs of the dental x-ray tube head relative to time. The oscillation graph with time can guide the operator to decide upon the optimum exposure moment after xray tube head positioning for better radiographic resolution.

  5. Settling time of dental x-ray tube head after positioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Se Myung; Koh, Chang Sung [Department of Mechatronics, Kwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    The aim of this study was to introduce a method of obtaining the oscillation graphs of the dental x-ray tube heads relative to time using an accelerometer. An Accelerometer, Piezotron type 8704B25 (Kistler Instrument Co., Amherst, NY, USA) was utilized to measure the horizontal oscillation of the x-ray tube head immediately after positioning the tube head for an intraoral radiograph. The signal from the sensor was transferred to a dynamic signal analyzer, which displayed the magnitude of the acceleration on the Y-axis and time lapse on the X-axis. The horizontal oscillation of the tube head was measured relative to time, and the settling time was also determined on the basis of the acceleration graphs for 6 wall type, 5 floor-fixed type, and 4 mobile type dental x-ray machines. The oscillation graphs showed that tube head movement decreased rapidly over time. The settling time varied with x-ray machine types. Wall-type x-ray machines had a settling time of up to 6 seconds, 5 seconds for fixed floor-types, and 11 seconds for the mobile-types. Using an accelerometer, we obtained the oscillation graphs of the dental x-ray tube head relative to time. The oscillation graph with time can guide the operator to decide upon the optimum exposure moment after xray tube head positioning for better radiographic resolution.

  6. The effect of liquid media on x-ray radiographic sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Razak bin Daud; Ahmad Suhaimi bin Abdullah; Azali bin Muhamad

    1991-01-01

    The effect of liquid media i.e. tap water, seawater and crude oil on X-Rays radiographic sensitivity for 120, 160, 200 kV X-Rays was investigated. Stainless steel plates were used as specimens. Image quality indicators were German standard DIN 54109 - wire type and penetrameter ASME-SE142. Result obtained shows that radiographic sensitivity percents obtained in the liquid media using wire type image quality indicator and penetrameter are lessened to about 20-25% and 40-44% respectively with respect to radiographic sensitivity obtained in air. Optimum thickness of specimen for appropriate X-ray energies where sensitivity is best does not vary in air, tap water, seawater or crude oil

  7. Phase-space evolution of x-ray coherence in phase-sensitive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2008-08-01

    X-ray coherence evolution in the imaging process plays a key role for x-ray phase-sensitive imaging. In this work we present a phase-space formulation for the phase-sensitive imaging. The theory is reformulated in terms of the cross-spectral density and associated Wigner distribution. The phase-space formulation enables an explicit and quantitative account of partial coherence effects on phase-sensitive imaging. The presented formulas for x-ray spectral density at the detector can be used for performing accurate phase retrieval and optimizing the phase-contrast visibility. The concept of phase-space shearing length derived from this phase-space formulation clarifies the spatial coherence requirement for phase-sensitive imaging with incoherent sources. The theory has been applied to x-ray Talbot interferometric imaging as well. The peak coherence condition derived reveals new insights into three-grating-based Talbot-interferometric imaging and gratings-based x-ray dark-field imaging.

  8. An experimental evaluation of monochromatic x-ray beam position monitors at diamond light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomer, Chris, E-mail: chris.bloomer@diamond.ac.uk; Rehm, Guenther; Dolbnya, Igor P. [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    Maintaining the stability of the X-ray beam relative to the sample point is of paramount importance for beamlines and users wanting to perform cutting-edge experiments. The ability to detect, and subsequently compensate for, variations in X-ray beam position with effective diagnostics has multiple benefits: a reduction in commissioning and start-up time, less ‘down-time’, and an improvement in the quality of acquired data. At Diamond Light Source a methodical evaluation of a selection of monochromatic X-ray Beam Position Monitors (XBPMs), using a range of position detection techniques, and from a range of suppliers, was carried out. The results of these experiments are presented, showing the measured RMS noise on the position measurement of each device for a given flux, energy, beam size, and bandwidth. A discussion of the benefits and drawbacks of each of the various devices and techniques is also included.

  9. An experimental evaluation of monochromatic x-ray beam position monitors at diamond light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomer, Chris; Rehm, Guenther; Dolbnya, Igor P.

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining the stability of the X-ray beam relative to the sample point is of paramount importance for beamlines and users wanting to perform cutting-edge experiments. The ability to detect, and subsequently compensate for, variations in X-ray beam position with effective diagnostics has multiple benefits: a reduction in commissioning and start-up time, less ‘down-time’, and an improvement in the quality of acquired data. At Diamond Light Source a methodical evaluation of a selection of monochromatic X-ray Beam Position Monitors (XBPMs), using a range of position detection techniques, and from a range of suppliers, was carried out. The results of these experiments are presented, showing the measured RMS noise on the position measurement of each device for a given flux, energy, beam size, and bandwidth. A discussion of the benefits and drawbacks of each of the various devices and techniques is also included.

  10. Measurements of reciprocity law failure in green-sensitive X-ray films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, B A; Eisenberg, H; Bjärngard, B E

    1978-02-01

    Reciprocity law failure was measured for four brands of medical x-ray films exposed with intensifying screens. Three of the films are green light-sensitized for use in combination with green light-emitting rare-earth screens. These films showed larger reciprocity failure effects than one conventional blue-sensitive film, Dupont Cronex-2. Development conditions had a small effect on reciprocity failure. As part of the investigation, a detector was constructed with a response that accurately monitors the light emission from the double screen-cassette combination over a wide range of x-ray photon energies.

  11. Ion beam induced surface graphitization of CVD diamond for x-ray beam position monitor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chian; Shu, D.; Kuzay, T.M.; Wen, L.; Melendres, C.A.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source at ANL is a third-generation synchrotron facility that generates powerful x-ray beams on its undulator beamlines. It is important to know the position and angle of the x- ray beam during experiments. Due to very high heat flux levels, several patented x-ray beam position monitors (XBPM) exploiting chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond have been developed. These XBPMs have a thin layer of low-atomic-mass metallic coating so that photoemission from the x rays generate a minute but measurable current for position determination. Graphitization of the CVD diamond surface creates a very thin, intrinsic and conducting layer that can stand much higher temperatures and minimal x-ray transmission losses compared to the coated metallic layers. In this paper, a laboratory sputter ion source was used to transform selected surfaces of a CVD diamond substrate into graphite. The effect of 1-5 keV argon ion bombardment on CVD diamond surfaces at various target temperatures from 200 to 500 C was studied using Auger electron spectroscopy and in-situ electrical resistivity measurements. Graphitization after the ion bombardment has been confirmed and optimum conditions for graphitization studied. Raman spectroscopy was used to identify the overall diamond structure in the bulk of CVD diamond substrate after the ion bombardments. It was found that target temperature plays an important role in stability and electrical conductivity of the irradiated CVD diamonds

  12. X-ray beam-position feedback system with easy-to-use beam-position monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Yeon; Kim, Yesul; Lee, Sangsul; Lim, Jun

    2018-05-01

    X-ray beam-position stability is indispensable in cutting-edge experiments using synchrotron radiation. Here, for the first time, a beam-position feedback system is presented that utilizes an easy-to-use X-ray beam-position monitor incorporating a diamond-fluorescence screen. The acceptable range of the monitor is above 500 µm and the feedback system maintains the beam position within 3 µm. In addition to being inexpensive, the system has two key advantages: it works without a scale factor for position calibration, and it has no dependence on X-ray energy, X-ray intensity, beam size or beam shape.

  13. Compton polarimetry with position-resolving X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Sebastian

    2010-02-01

    In the present thesis the prototype of a novel position-resolving and multi-hit able 2D Si(Li) strip detector is characterized, the planar detector crystal of which is simultaneously applied both as scatterer and as absorber. In the framework of this thesis the Si(Li) polarimeter could be applied in different experiments on the radiative electron capture and on the characteristic radiation at the experimental storage ring of the GSI. The characterization of the detector pursued by means of the highly polarized radiation of the electron capture into the K shell of naked xenon. In the following in two further experiments new values on the polarization of the electron capture into the K shell both of the naked and of the hydrogen-like uranium were performed.

  14. 3D elemental sensitive imaging using transmission X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yijin; Meirer, Florian; Wang, Junyue; Requena, Guillermo; Williams, Phillip; Nelson, Johanna; Mehta, Apurva; Andrews, Joy C; Pianetta, Piero

    2012-09-01

    Determination of the heterogeneous distribution of metals in alloy/battery/catalyst and biological materials is critical to fully characterize and/or evaluate the functionality of the materials. Using synchrotron-based transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM), it is now feasible to perform nanoscale-resolution imaging over a wide X-ray energy range covering the absorption edges of many elements; combining elemental sensitive imaging with determination of sample morphology. We present an efficient and reliable methodology to perform 3D elemental sensitive imaging with excellent sample penetration (tens of microns) using hard X-ray TXM. A sample of an Al-Si piston alloy is used to demonstrate the capability of the proposed method.

  15. Polymer gel dosimeters with enhanced sensitivity for use in x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirasek, A; Hilts, M; McAuley, K B

    2010-01-01

    A primary limitation of current x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry is the low contrast, and hence poor dose resolution, of dose images produced by the system. The low contrast is largely due to the low-dose sensitivity of current formulations of polymer gel for x-ray CT imaging. This study reports on the investigation of new dosimeter formulations with improved dose sensitivity for x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry. We incorporate an isopropanol co-solvent into an N-isopropylacrylamide-based gel formulation in order to increase the total monomer/crosslinker concentration (%T) within the formulation. It is shown that gels of high %T exhibit enhanced dose sensitivity and dose resolutions over traditional formulations. The gels are shown to be temporally stable and reproducible. A single formulation (16%T) is used to demonstrate the capabilities of the x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry system in measuring known dose distributions. A 1 L gel volume is exposed to three separate irradiations: a single-field percent depth dose, a two-field 'cross' and a three-field 'test case'. The first two irradiations are used to generate a dose calibration curve by which images are calibrated. The calibrated images are compared with treatment planning predictions and it is shown that the x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry system is capable of capturing spatial and dose information accurately. The proposed new gel formulation is shown to be sensitive, stable and to improve the dose resolution over current formulations so as to provide a feasible gel for clinical applications of x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry.

  16. Polymer gel dosimeters with enhanced sensitivity for use in x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jirasek, A [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Hilts, M [Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria BC V6R 2B6 (Canada); McAuley, K B, E-mail: jirasek@uvic.c [Department of Chemical Engineering, Queens University, Kingston, ON K7 L 3N6 (Canada)

    2010-09-21

    A primary limitation of current x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry is the low contrast, and hence poor dose resolution, of dose images produced by the system. The low contrast is largely due to the low-dose sensitivity of current formulations of polymer gel for x-ray CT imaging. This study reports on the investigation of new dosimeter formulations with improved dose sensitivity for x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry. We incorporate an isopropanol co-solvent into an N-isopropylacrylamide-based gel formulation in order to increase the total monomer/crosslinker concentration (%T) within the formulation. It is shown that gels of high %T exhibit enhanced dose sensitivity and dose resolutions over traditional formulations. The gels are shown to be temporally stable and reproducible. A single formulation (16%T) is used to demonstrate the capabilities of the x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry system in measuring known dose distributions. A 1 L gel volume is exposed to three separate irradiations: a single-field percent depth dose, a two-field 'cross' and a three-field 'test case'. The first two irradiations are used to generate a dose calibration curve by which images are calibrated. The calibrated images are compared with treatment planning predictions and it is shown that the x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry system is capable of capturing spatial and dose information accurately. The proposed new gel formulation is shown to be sensitive, stable and to improve the dose resolution over current formulations so as to provide a feasible gel for clinical applications of x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry.

  17. Experimental study of hard X-rays emitted from meter-scale positive discharges in air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.O. Kochkin (Pavlo); C.V. Nguyen; A. van Deursen (Arie); U. M. Ebert (Ute)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe investigate structure and evolution of long positive spark breakdown; and we study at which stage pulses of hard x-rays are emitted. Positive high-voltage pulses of standardized lightning impulse wave form of about 1 MV were applied to about 1 m of ambient air. The discharge evolution

  18. Correction of X-ray diffraction profiles in linear-type PSPC by position factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshio

    1992-01-01

    PSPC (Position Sensitive Proportional Counter) makes it possible to obtain one-dimentional diffraction profiles without mechanical scanning. In a linear-type PSPC, the obtained profiles need correcting, because the position factor influences the intensity of the diffracted X-ray beam and the counting rate at each position on PSPC. The distances from the specimen are not the same at the center and at the edge of the detector, and the intensity decreases at the edge because of radiation and absorption. The counting rate varies with the incident angle of the diffracted beam at each position on PSPC. The position factor f i at channel i of the multichannel-analyser is given by f i = cos 4 α i ·exp{-μR(1/cosα i -1)} where R is the distance between the specimen and the center of PSPC, μ is the linear absorption coefficient and α i is the incident angle of the diffracted beam at channel i. The background profiles of silica gel powder were measured with CrKα and CuKα. The parameters of the model function were fitted to the profiles by the non-linear least squares method. The agreement between these parameters and the calculated values shows that the position factor can correct the measured profiles properly. (author)

  19. X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations in Down lymphocytes: an explanation of their increased sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Unstimulated lymphocytes from individuals with Down Syndrome (trisomy 21) are more sensitive to the induction of dicentric and ring aberrations by X rays than normal lymphocytes. Several explanations involving the more rapid rejoining of X-ray--induced lesions in Down cells have been offered. It is shown here that the repair of the DNA damage converted into chromosome aberrations is more rapid in Down cells than normal cells. This more rapid repair results in a higher probability of producing chromosomes aberrations, and hence higher aberration frequencies in Down than normal cells

  20. X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations in Down lymphocytes: an explanation of their increased sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Unstimulated lymphocytes from individuals with Down Syndrome (trisomy 21) are more sensitive to the induction of dicentric and ring aberrations by X rays than normal lymphocytes. Several explanations involving the more rapid rejoining of X-ray-induced lesions in Down cells have been offered. It is shown here that the repair of the DNA damage converted into chromosome aberrations is more rapid in Down cells than normal cells. This more rapid repair results in a higher probability of producing chromosome aberrations, and hence higher aberration frequencies in Down than normal cells

  1. AN EXTENDED AND MORE SENSITIVE SEARCH FOR PERIODICITIES IN ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER/ALL-SKY MONITOR X-RAY LIGHT CURVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, Alan M.; Bradt, Hale V.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Harris, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a systematic search in ∼14 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer All-Sky Monitor (ASM) data for evidence of periodicities. Two variations of the commonly used Fourier analysis search method have been employed to significantly improve upon the sensitivity achieved by Wen et al. in 2006, who also searched for periodicities in ASM data. In addition, the present search is comprehensive in terms of sources studied and frequency range covered, and has yielded the detection of the signatures of the orbital periods of eight low-mass X-ray binary systems and of ten high-mass X-ray binaries not listed in the tables of Wen et al. Orbital periods, epochs, signal amplitudes, modulation fractions, and folded light curves are given for each of these systems. Seven of the orbital periods are the most precise reported to date. In the course of this work, the 18.545 day orbital period of IGR J18483-0311 was co-discovered, and the first detections in X-rays were made of the ∼3.9 day orbital period of LMC X-1 and the ∼3.79 hr orbital period of 4U 1636-536. The results inform future searches for orbital and other periodicities in X-ray binaries.

  2. X-ray-sensitive mutants of Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeggo, P.A.; Kemp, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    A standard technique of microbial genetics, which involves the transfer of cells from single colonies by means of sterile toothpicks, has been adapted to somatic cell genetics. Its use has been demonstrated in the isolation of X-ray-sensitive mutants of CHO cells. 9000 colonies have been tested and 6 appreciably X-ray-sensitive mutants were isolated. (D 10 values 5-10-fold of wild-type D 10 value.) A further 6 mutants were obtained which showed a slight level of sensitivity (D 10 values less than 2-fold of wild-type D 10 value). The 6 more sensitive mutants were also sensitive to bleomycin, a chemotherapeutic agent inducing X-ray-like damage. Cross-sensitivity to UV-irradiation and treatment with the alkylating agents, MMS, EMS and MNNG, was investigated for these mutants. Some sensitivity to these other agents was observed, but in all cases it was less severe than the level of sensitivity to X-irradiation. Each mutant showed a different overall response to the spectrum of agents examined and these appear to represent new mutant phenotypes derived from cultured mammalian cell lines. One mutant strain, xrs-7, was cross-sensitive to all the DNA-damaging agents, but was proficient in the repair of single-strand breaks. (Auth.)

  3. Improved X-ray position for XTE J1701-407

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, R.; Evans, P.

    2008-07-01

    We report an improved position for the transient source XTE J1701-407 (Markwardt et al. ATEL #1569, Degenaar et al. ATEL #1572) using Swift XRT data from the recently detected X-ray burst (Markwardt et al. ATEL #1616 ; Linares et al. ATEL #1618).

  4. An X-ray beam position monitor based on the photoluminescence of helium gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revesz, Peter; White, Jeffrey A.

    2005-03-01

    A new method for white beam position monitoring for both bend magnet and wiggler synchrotron X-ray radiation has been developed. This method utilizes visible light luminescence generated as a result of ionization by the intense X-ray flux. In video beam position monitors (VBPMs), the luminescence of helium gas at atmospheric pressure is observed through a view port using a CCD camera next to the beam line. The beam position, profile, integrated intensity and FWHM are calculated from the distribution of luminescence intensity in each captured image by custom software. Misalignment of upstream apertures changes the image profile making VBPMs helpful for initial alignment of upstream beam line components. VBPMs can thus provide more information about the X-ray beam than most beam position monitors (BPMs). A beam position calibration procedure, employing a tilted plane-parallel glass plate placed in front of the camera lens, has also been developed. The accuracy of the VBPM system was measured during a bench-top experiment to be better than 1 μm. The He-luminescence-based VBPM system has been operative on three CHESS beam lines (F hard-bend and wiggler, A-line wiggler and G-line wiggler) for about a year. The beam positions are converted to analog voltages and used as feedback signals for beam stabilization. In our paper we discuss details of VBPM construction and describe further results of its performance.

  5. X-ray-sensitive storage phosphors with the optically stable luminescent centres

    CERN Document Server

    Gorin, G B; Zvezdova, N P; Kochubey, D I; Sedova, Y G; Kochubey, D I; Kulipanov, G N; Lyakh, V V; Pindyurin, V F

    2000-01-01

    NaCl, KCl, KBr and LiF crystals doped by In, Tl, Ni, Pd and Ca were investigated as X-ray-sensitive materials. Influence of the way of doping of an impurity and growing of a crystal on such parameters of a material as: sensitivity to ionising radiation; radiative, optical and thermal stability of the image, obtained after an irradiation is investigated. As a result of the work, media for recording of the X-ray images are developed. These allow to reproduce the images in a mode of a photoluminescence. Spatial resolution and the dynamic range of registration of the developed materials concede to similar parameters of commercial storage luminophores like 'Image Plates' based on BaFBr : La. At the same time, as distinct from 'Image Plates', the developed radiophotoluminophores allow a long storage and multiple readout of the information recorded.

  6. The Einstein Observatory Extended Medium-Sensitivity Survey. I - X-ray data and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, I. M.; Maccacaro, T.; Schild, R. E.; Wolter, A.; Stocke, J. T.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the analysis of the X-ray data and the optical identification for the Einstein Observatory Extended Medium-Sensitivity Survey (EMSS). The survey consists of 835 serendipitous sources detected at or above 4 times the rms level in 1435 imaging proportional counter fields with centers located away from the Galactic plane. Their limiting sensitivities are about (5-300) x 10 to the -14th ergs/sq cm sec in the 0.3-3.5-keV energy band. A total area of 778 square deg of the high-Galactic-latitude sky has been covered. The data have been analyzed using the REV1 processing system, which takes into account the nonuniformities of the detector. The resulting EMSS catalog of X-ray sources is a flux-limited and homogeneous sample of astronomical objects that can be used for statistical studies.

  7. High-sensitive portable ASE-2 X-ray analyzer of sulfur in mineral oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anchugov, I.S.; Goganov, A.D.; Plotnikov, R.I.

    2007-01-01

    The high-sensitivity ASE-2 analyzer of sulfur on the basis of existing ASE-I device is designed. ASE-2 analyzer realizes a standard method of energy dispersion X-ray fluorescent determinations of a sulfur mass fraction in mineral oil and allows to carry out the quantitative determination of sulfur in hydrocarbonic raw material and fuel in a 0.002-5 mass.% range [ru

  8. Sensitivity of photon-counting based K-edge imaging in X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessl, Ewald; Brendel, Bernhard; Engel, Klaus-Jürgen; Schlomka, Jens-Peter; Thran, Axel; Proksa, Roland

    2011-09-01

    The feasibility of K-edge imaging using energy-resolved, photon-counting transmission measurements in X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been demonstrated by simulations and experiments. The method is based on probing the discontinuities of the attenuation coefficient of heavy elements above and below the K-edge energy by using energy-sensitive, photon counting X-ray detectors. In this paper, we investigate the dependence of the sensitivity of K-edge imaging on the atomic number Z of the contrast material, on the object diameter D , on the spectral response of the X-ray detector and on the X-ray tube voltage. We assume a photon-counting detector equipped with six adjustable energy thresholds. Physical effects leading to a degradation of the energy resolution of the detector are taken into account using the concept of a spectral response function R(E,U) for which we assume four different models. As a validation of our analytical considerations and in order to investigate the influence of elliptically shaped phantoms, we provide CT simulations of an anthropomorphic Forbild-Abdomen phantom containing a gold-contrast agent. The dependence on the values of the energy thresholds is taken into account by optimizing the achievable signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) with respect to the threshold values. We find that for a given X-ray spectrum and object size the SNR in the heavy element's basis material image peaks for a certain atomic number Z. The dependence of the SNR in the high- Z basis-material image on the object diameter is the natural, exponential decrease with particularly deteriorating effects in the case where the attenuation from the object itself causes a total signal loss below the K-edge. The influence of the energy-response of the detector is very important. We observed that the optimal SNR values obtained with an ideal detector and with a CdTe pixel detector whose response, showing significant tailing, has been determined at a synchrotron differ by factors of

  9. Development of a Hard X-ray Beam Position Monitor for Insertion Device Beams at the APS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Glenn; Rosenbaum, Gerd; Singh, Om

    2006-11-01

    Long-term pointing stability requirements at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are very stringent, at the level of 500 nanoradians peak-to-peak or better over a one-week time frame. Conventional rf beam position monitors (BPMs) close to the insertion device source points are incapable of assuring this level of stability, owing to mechanical, thermal, and electronic stability limitations. Insertion device gap-dependent systematic errors associated with the present ultraviolet photon beam position monitors similarly limit their ability to control long-term pointing stability. We report on the development of a new BPM design sensitive only to hard x-rays. Early experimental results will be presented.

  10. Development of confocal micro X-ray fluorescence instrument using two X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Kouichi; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Ding Xunliang

    2007-01-01

    A new confocal micro X-ray fluorescence instrument was developed. This instrument has two independent micro X-ray tubes with Mo targets. A full polycapillary X-ray lens was attached to each X-ray tube. Another half polycapillary lens was attached to a silicon drift X-ray detector (SDD). The focal spots of the three lenses were adjusted to a common position. The effects of the excitation of two X-ray beams were investigated. The instrument enabled highly sensitive three-dimensional X-ray fluorescence analysis. We confirmed that the X-ray fluorescence intensity from the sample increased by applying the two independent X-ray tubes in confocal configuration. Elemental depth profiling of black wheat was demonstrated with the result that each element in the surface coat of a wheat grain showed unique distribution

  11. Time-resolved and position-resolved X-ray spectrometry with a pixelated detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, Peter

    2012-12-07

    The aim of the work presented here was to measure X-ray spectra with a pixelated detector. Due to effects in the sensor the spectrum cannot be measured directly and has to be calculated by a deconvolution of the measured data. In the scope of this work the deconvolution of the measured spectra could be enhanced considerably by - amongst other things - the introduction of the Bayesian deconvolution method. Those improvements opened the possibilities for further measurements. For the measurements the detectors of the Medipix family have been used. They are nowadays used for a wide range of applications and scientific research. Their main advantage is the very high position resolution gained by a pixel pitch of 55 μm and a high number of 65536 pixels. The Timepix detector has, in particular, two special possibilities of measurement: the ToA mode and the ToT mode. In ToA mode the arrival time of an impinging photon is measured and in ToT mode the amount of deposited charge is measured. The most common method of operation is counting the number of impinging photons that release a charge higher than a preset threshold in each pixel. As this released charge is proportional to the energy deposition of the impinging photon, one can perform energy-sensitive measurements. To perform the deconvolution of the measured energy distribution there is a need of an energy response matrix describing the detector response on radiation. For some detectors it is possible to obtain an analytic model of the response functions. Due to the high discrepancy between the impinging spectrum and the measured spectrum in case of detectors of the Medipix family, there is so far no analytic model. Thus, the detector response has to be simulated. As I could improve the precision of the measurement quite extensively, I also intended to tune the simulation with more accurate and appropriate models to gain the same level of accuracy. The results of measurement and simulation have then been compared and

  12. Time-resolved and position-resolved X-ray spectrometry with a pixelated detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievers, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the work presented here was to measure X-ray spectra with a pixelated detector. Due to effects in the sensor the spectrum cannot be measured directly and has to be calculated by a deconvolution of the measured data. In the scope of this work the deconvolution of the measured spectra could be enhanced considerably by - amongst other things - the introduction of the Bayesian deconvolution method. Those improvements opened the possibilities for further measurements. For the measurements the detectors of the Medipix family have been used. They are nowadays used for a wide range of applications and scientific research. Their main advantage is the very high position resolution gained by a pixel pitch of 55 μm and a high number of 65536 pixels. The Timepix detector has, in particular, two special possibilities of measurement: the ToA mode and the ToT mode. In ToA mode the arrival time of an impinging photon is measured and in ToT mode the amount of deposited charge is measured. The most common method of operation is counting the number of impinging photons that release a charge higher than a preset threshold in each pixel. As this released charge is proportional to the energy deposition of the impinging photon, one can perform energy-sensitive measurements. To perform the deconvolution of the measured energy distribution there is a need of an energy response matrix describing the detector response on radiation. For some detectors it is possible to obtain an analytic model of the response functions. Due to the high discrepancy between the impinging spectrum and the measured spectrum in case of detectors of the Medipix family, there is so far no analytic model. Thus, the detector response has to be simulated. As I could improve the precision of the measurement quite extensively, I also intended to tune the simulation with more accurate and appropriate models to gain the same level of accuracy. The results of measurement and simulation have then been compared and

  13. SENSITIVITY OF STACKED IMAGING DETECTORS TO HARD X-RAY POLARIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muleri, Fabio; Campana, Riccardo, E-mail: fabio.muleri@iaps.inaf.it [INAF-IAPS, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    The development of multi-layer optics which allow to focus photons up to 100 keV and more promises an enormous jump in sensitivity in the hard X-ray energy band. This technology is already planned to be exploited by future missions dedicated to spectroscopy and imaging at energies >10 keV, e.g., Astro-H and NuSTAR. Nevertheless, our understanding of the hard X-ray sky would greatly benefit from carrying out contemporaneous polarimetric measurements, because the study of hard spectral tails and of polarized emission are often two complementary diagnostics of the same non-thermal and acceleration processes. At energies above a few tens of keV, the preferred technique to detect polarization involves the determination of photon directions after a Compton scattering. Many authors have asserted that stacked detectors with imaging capabilities can be exploited for this purpose. If it is possible to discriminate those events which initially interact in the first detector by Compton scattering and are subsequently absorbed by the second layer, then the direction of scattering is singled out from the hit pixels in the two detectors. In this paper, we give the first detailed discussion of the sensitivity of such a generic design to the X-ray polarization. The efficiency and the modulation factor are calculated analytically from the geometry of the instruments and then compared with the performance as derived by means of Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations.

  14. Numerical modeling of the sensitivity of x-ray driven implosions to low-mode flux asymmetries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R H H; Clark, D S; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Edwards, M J; Haan, S W; Jones, O S; Spears, B K; Marinak, M M; Town, R P J; Norreys, P A; Suter, L J

    2013-02-15

    The sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion implosions, of the type performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [1], to low-mode flux asymmetries is investigated numerically. It is shown that large-amplitude, low-order mode shapes (Legendre polynomial P(4), resulting from low-order flux asymmetries, cause spatial variations in capsule and fuel momentum that prevent the deuterium and tritium (DT) "ice" layer from being decelerated uniformly by the hot spot pressure. This reduces the transfer of implosion kinetic energy to internal energy of the central hot spot, thus reducing the neutron yield. Furthermore, synthetic gated x-ray images of the hot spot self-emission indicate that P(4) shapes may be unquantifiable for DT layered capsules. Instead the positive P(4) asymmetry "aliases" itself as an oblate P(2) in the x-ray images. Correction of this apparent P(2) distortion can further distort the implosion while creating a round x-ray image. Long wavelength asymmetries may be playing a significant role in the observed yield reduction of NIF DT implosions relative to detailed postshot two-dimensional simulations.

  15. Quality control of X-ray films with blue spectral sensitivity: comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrasco, F.; Ruiz Cruces, R.; Sendra, F.; Diez de los rios, A.

    1994-01-01

    In this work, seven X-ray films with blue-ultraviolet spectral sensitivity have been studied by means of light sensitometry, x-ray sensitometry and spatial resolution test. Three screens of different composition and speed were use. Only the films HPX44 and RG showed a high base plus for (>0,30), the remaining films maintained their values between 0,21 and 0,26. When blue light sensitometry was substituted by green light sensitometry, base plus fog practically did not show variations and gradient and speed changed less than 4% and 10% respectively. Speed and Gradient must be calculated from the relation between exposition and optical density, avoiding parameters referred to type optical density of a given step of the wedge. Two films with high speed (RG and HPX 44), four films with medium speed (Curix RP2, NewRX, Cronex 4 and X-Omat S) and one film with low speed but high resolution (Cronex 7) have been found. The obtained results present useful comparative data to select and adequate film according to the characteristic of the x-ray examination and the available screens. (Author)

  16. Design for an x-ray nanoprobe prototype, with a sub-10-nm positioning requirement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, D.; Maser, J.; Lai, B.; Vogt, S.

    2005-01-01

    We are developing a new hard x-ray nanoprobe beamline with 30 nm resolution at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Imaging and spectroscopy at this resolution level require staging of x-ray optics and specimens with a mechanical repeatability of better than 10 nm. We have developed a prototype instrument with a novel interferometrically controlled scanning stage system. The system consists of nine DC-motor-driven stages, four picomotor-driven stages, and two PZT-driven stages. An APS-designed custom-built laser Doppler displacement meter system provides two-dimensional differential displacement measurement with subnanometer resolution between the zone-plate x-ray optics and the sample holder. Also included is the alignment and stable positioning of two stacked zone plates for increasing the focusing efficiency. The entire scanning system was designed with high stiffness, high repeatability, low drift, flexible scanning schemes, and possibility of fast feedback for differential motion. Designs of the scanning stage system, as well as preliminary mechanical test results, are presented in this paper.

  17. Radio-sensitization of esophageal cancer EC9706 cells to X ray by histone deacetylase inhibiter Trichostatin A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Xiaoli; Qin Guangyong; Fang Huasheng; Zhang Fengqiu; Ya Huiyuan

    2009-01-01

    Cell apoptosis and the expression of DNA damage repair-related genes XRCC2, ATM and Lig4 were detected separately by flow cytometry analysis and real-time fluorescence quantitative (RT-PCR), in order to investigate the effect of Trichostatin A (TSA) pre-treatment on the radiosensitivity of esophageal cancer EC9706 cells to X ray in vitro. The results indicate that pre-irradiation exposure to TSA enhances cell apoptotic rate by X ray markedly (P<0.05) and the mRNA levels of XRCC2, ATM and Lig4 (except 8Gy) are up-regulated by X ray individually (P<0.05). TSA alone and TSA in combination with X ray all reduce mRNA levels of XRCC2, ATM and Lig4. In conclusions, TSA may radio-sensitize EC9706 cells to X ray by reducing mRNA levels of XRCC2, ATM and Lig4. (authors)

  18. An unexpected caffeine-enhanced survival in x-ray-sensitive variant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, Hiroshi

    1985-01-01

    The sensitivity of normal Chinese hamster cell lines, V79 and CHO, mouse cell lines, L5178Y and L, and human HeLa cells to the killing effect of x-ray is enhanced with addition of caffeine following x-ray irradiation in a dose-dependent fashion. However, the survival rate of variant cell (V79-AL162/S-10) increased with addition of low concentration of caffeine (caffeine-enhanced survival phenomenon). Therefore, the effects of protein synthesis-inhibiting agents, such as cycloheximide and puromycin, on caffeine-enhanced survival phenomenon were examined. This phenomenon was completely abolished by the inhibitory agents, but not abolished by DNA synthesis-damaging agents, such as excess thymidine and aphidicolin. DNA-damaging physiochemical factors, such as neutrons, U.V., methyl methanesulfonate and mitomycin C, were examined in relation to variant cells' sensitivity and caffeine-enhanced survival phenomenon. V79-AL162/S-10 cells showed high sensitivity to the killing effect of mitomycin C, but their survival rate returned to the rate of normal V79-B310H cells with addition of caffeine. (Namekawa, K.)

  19. The APS x-ray undulator photon beam position monitor and tests at CHESS and NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, D.; Rodricks, B.; Barraza, J.; Sanchez, T.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    The advent of third generation synchrotron radiation sources, like the Advanced Photon Source (APS), will provide significant increases in brilliance over existing synchrotron sources. The APS x-ray undulators will increase the brilliance in the 3-40 KeV range by several orders of magnitude. Thus, the design of the photon beam position monitor is a challenging engineering task. The beam position monitors must withstand the high thermal load, be able to achieve sub-micron spatial resolution while maintaining their stability, and be compatible with both undulators and wigglers. A preliminary APS prototype photon beam position monitor consisting of a CVD-diamond-based, tungsten-coated blade was tested on the APS/CHESS undulator at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Radiation Source (CHESS) and on the NSLS X-13 undulator beamline. Results from these tests, as well as the design of this prototype APS photon beam position monitor, will be discussed in this paper

  20. The APS X-ray undulator photon beam position monitor and tests at CHESS and NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, D.; Rodricks, B.; Barraza, J.; Sanchez, T.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    The advent of thirs generation synchrotron sources, like the Advanced Photon Source (APS), will provide significant increases in brilliance over existing synchrotron sources. The APS X-ray undulators will increase the brilliance in the 3-40 keV range by several orders of magnitude. Thus, the design of the photon beam position monitor is a challenging engineering task. The beam position monitors must withstand the high thermal load, be able to achieve submicron spatial resolution while maintaining their stability, and be compatible with both undulators and wigglers. A preliminary APS prototype photon beam position monitor consisting of a CVD-diamond-based, tungsten-coated blade was tested on the APS/CHESS undulator at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Radiation Source (CHESS) and on the NSLS X-13 undulator beamline. Results from these tests, as well as the design of this prototype APS photon beam position monitor, will be discussed in this paper. (orig.)

  1. Water equivalence of NIPAM based polymer gel dosimeters with enhanced sensitivity for x-ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorjiara, Tina; Hill, Robin; Bosi, Stephen; Kuncic, Zdenka; Baldock, Clive

    2013-10-01

    Two new formulations of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) based three dimensional (3D) gel dosimeters have recently been developed with improved sensitivity to x-ray CT readout, one without any co-solvent and the other one with isopropanol co-solvent. The water equivalence of the NIPAM gel dosimeters was investigated using different methods to calculate their radiological properties including: density, electron density, number of electrons per grams, effective atomic number, photon interaction probabilities, mass attenuation and energy absorption coefficients, electron collisional, radiative and total mass stopping powers and electron mass scattering power. Monte Carlo modelling was also used to compare the dose response of these gel dosimeters with water for kilovoltage and megavoltage x-ray beams and for megavoltage electron beams. We found that the density and electron density of the co-solvent free gel dosimeter are more water equivalent with less than a 2.6% difference compared to a 5.7% difference for the isopropanol gel dosimeter. Both the co-solvent free and isopropanol solvent gel dosimeters have lower effective atomic numbers than water, differing by 2.2% and 6.5%, respectively. As a result, their photoelectric absorption interaction probabilities are up to 6% and 19% different from water, respectively. Compton scattering and pair production interaction probabilities of NIPAM gel with isopropanol differ by up to 10% from water while for the co-solvent free gel, the differences are 3%. Mass attenuation and energy absorption coefficients of the co-solvent free gel dosimeter and the isopropanol gel dosimeter are up to 7% and 19% lower than water, respectively. Collisional and total mass stopping powers of both gel dosimeters differ by less than 2% from those of water. The dose response of the co-solvent free gel dosimeter is water equivalent (with x-ray beams over the energy range 180 keV-18 MV, both gel dosimeters have less than 2% discrepancy with water. For

  2. Present and perspective roles of soft X-ray tomography in tokamak plasma position measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynar, J.; Duval, B.P.; Horacek, J.; Lister, J.B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper shows the importance and feasibility of real-time tomography in fusion experiments for the example of soft X-ray (SXR) position measurements. The requirement of non-magnetic real-time diagnostics in low frequencies for ITER is discussed. This is illustrated by recent results of rapid tomographic inversion of SXR measurements on tokamak TCV. Comparison with the magnetic reconstruction data has not only shown the valuable resolution capabilities of both techniques, but also revealed a slight dependence of magnetic measurements on toroidal magnetic field and an unnoticed drift of plasma position observer. A feasibility study using current hardware capacities for programmable real-time tomographic system with plasma position feedback output was carried out. A compact solution is found to be tractable opening wide perspectives for development

  3. Skin fibroblasts from a D-deletion type retinoblastoma patient are abnormally X-ray sensitive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Nove, J.; Little, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is a rare malignant eye tumour that appears either spontaneously or in genetically predisposed persons. The latter group is composed of persons who inherit the tumour with a dominant mode of transmission (the familial type) and those who have a deletion in the long arm of chromosome 13 referred to as the D-deletion type. When this deletion is present it is observed in many somatic cells and is often associated with structural defects. Survivors of the genetic forms of retinoblastoma have an increased risk of the development of cancers at other sites. A single genetic locus is unlikely to predispose many somatic cells to tumour formation unless a fundamental molecular defect, possibly related to DNA repair, is present. In order to investigate this hypothesis a study was made of the in vitro X-ray sensitivity of skin fibroblasts derived from three retinoblastoma patients, comprising a pair of twins with the familial type accompanied by no gross chromosome abnormalities, and a patient with the D-deletion type. It was found that fibroblasts derived from the D-deletion patient were significantly more radiosensitive than those from the other two patients. X-ray survival curves are shown. It is concluded that skin fibroblasts derived from a patient with the D-deletion variant of retinoblastoma are abnormally radiosensitive. Future investigations may indicate a specific defect in molecular repair of DNA that will explain the predisposition of these patients to the development of other tumours. (U.K.)

  4. Unique sensitivity of the rabbit eye to X-ray-induced ocular inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bito, L Z; Klein, E M [Columbia Univ., New York (USA). Coll. of Physicians and Surgeons

    1981-10-01

    The effects of X-irradiation of the eye on ocular parameters known to be altered during the inflammatory process were studied on albino and pigmented rabbits, guinea pigs, owl monkeys, cats ducks and pigeons. Within 1.5-3.0 hr after exposure to 10 Gy (1000 rads), all irradiated eyes of either albino or pigmented rabbits showed a significant increase in intraocular pressure, iridial hyperemia, and development of flare and presence of cells in the anterior chamber. Four hours after exposure, the concentration of soluble proteins in the aqueous humor was increased, while that of ascorbic acid was decreased. In contrast, eyes of owl monkeys, cats guinea pigs, ducks and pigeons, exposed to the same or, in some cases, up to eight times higher doses of X-rays, showed no hypertension or development of other parameters of intraocular inflammation. These and previous findings suggest that rabbits, or possibly Lagomorphs in general, are unique among vertebrates in their sensitivity to the early intraocular inflammatory effects of X-rays. In addition, these results seriously question the use of this species as the primary, and frequently sole model for the study of ocular inflammation, its mediation and therapeutics.

  5. The unique sensitivity of the rabbit eye to X-ray-induced ocular inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bito, L.Z.; Klein, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of X-irradiation of the eye on ocular parameters known to be altered during the inflammatory process were studied on albino and pigmented rabbits, guinea pigs, owl monkeys, cats ducks and pigeons. Within 1.5-3.0 hr after exposure to 10 Gy (1000 rads), all irradiated eyes of either albino or pigmented rabbits showed a significant increase in intraocular pressure, iridial hyperemia, and development of flare and presence of cells in the anterior chamber. Four hours after exposure, the concentration of soluble proteins in the aqueous humor was increased, while that of ascorbic acid was decreased. In contrast, eyes of owl monkeys, cats guinea pigs, ducks and pigeons, exposed to the same or, in some cases, up to eight times higher doses of X-rays, showed no hypertension or development of other parameters of intraocular inflammation. These and previous findings suggest that rabbits, or possibly Lagomorphs in general, are unique among vertebrates in their sensitivity to the early intraocular inflammatory effects of X-rays. In addition, these results seriously question the use of this species as the primary, and frequently sole model for the study of ocular inflammation, its mediation and therapeutics. (author)

  6. Simbol-X: Imaging The Hard X-ray Sky with Unprecedented Spatial Resolution and Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Simbol-X Joint Scientific Mission Group

    2009-01-01

    Simbol-X is a hard X-ray mission, with imaging capability in the 0.5-80 keV range. It is based on a collaboration between the French and Italian space agencies with participation of German laboratories. The launch is foreseen in late 2014. It relies on a formation flight concept, with two satellites carrying one the mirror module and the other one the focal plane detectors. The mirrors will have a 20 m focal length, while the two focal plane detectors will be put one on top of the other one. This combination will provide over two orders of magnitude improvement in angular resolution and sensitivity in the hard X-ray range with respect to non-focusing techniques. The Simbol-X revolutionary instrumental capabilities will allow us to elucidate outstanding questions in high energy astrophysics such as those related to black-holes accretion physics and census, and to particle acceleration mechanisms. We will give an overall description of the mission characteristics, performances and scientific objectives.

  7. Pharmacologic requirements for obtaining sensitization of human tumor cells in vitro to combined 5-fluorouracil or ftorafur and x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byfield, J.E.; Calabro-Jones, P.; Klisak, I.; Kulhanian, F.

    1982-01-01

    The combined effects of X ray and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in tissue culture have been studied using two human adenocarcinoma lines (HeLa and HT-29 cells). Both showed similar sensitivities to 5-FU, HeLa cells appearing somewhat more resistant to higher concentrations. Combined treatment of both cell types with 5-FU and X rays led to a time-dependent enhancement of cell killing (''radiosensitization''). Only post-radiation incubation had any effect, prior exposure to 5-FU being strictly additive. Enhanced cell killing by combined 5-FU and X rays could not be explained by either the infliction of additional acute damage in the immediate post-radiation period or an inhibitory effect of 5-FU on the repair of sub-lethal X ray injury. Rather, the enhanced cytotoxicity proved to be dependent on a damage expressed in time periods exceeding the duration of a cell doubling time in vitro. Overall, the data equally suggest that X rays may sensitize the cells to 5-FU. The enhanced cell killing is maximized if the cells are continuously exposed to 5-FU for 48 hours following the X ray exposure. These results indicate that clinical treatment regimens might be useful in evaluating 5-FU infusional scheduling in accordance with these unique requirements, which are not met by conventional bolus 5-FU and X ray therapy fractionation regimens. Ftorafur, a drug proposed to act as a slow release form of 5-FU, was found to show limited cytotoxic potential in vitro and did not significantly enhance cell killing after X ray exposure

  8. High sensitivity phase retrieval method in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Chen, Jian; Wang, Dajiang; Wang, Shenghao; Chen, Heng; Bao, Yuan; Shao, Qigang; Wang, Zhili, E-mail: wangnsrl@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Zhang, Kai [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu, E-mail: wuzy@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029, China and Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging is considered as one of the most promising techniques for future medical imaging. Many different methods have been developed to retrieve phase signal, among which the phase stepping (PS) method is widely used. However, further practical implementations are hindered, due to its complex scanning mode and high radiation dose. In contrast, the reverse projection (RP) method is a novel fast and low dose extraction approach. In this contribution, the authors present a quantitative analysis of the noise properties of the refraction signals retrieved by the two methods and compare their sensitivities. Methods: Using the error propagation formula, the authors analyze theoretically the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the refraction images retrieved by the two methods. Then, the sensitivities of the two extraction methods are compared under an identical exposure dose. Numerical experiments are performed to validate the theoretical results and provide some quantitative insight. Results: The SNRs of the two methods are both dependent on the system parameters, but in different ways. Comparison between their sensitivities reveals that for the refraction signal, the RP method possesses a higher sensitivity, especially in the case of high visibility and/or at the edge of the object. Conclusions: Compared with the PS method, the RP method has a superior sensitivity and provides refraction images with a higher SNR. Therefore, one can obtain highly sensitive refraction images in grating-based phase contrast imaging. This is very important for future preclinical and clinical implementations.

  9. High sensitivity phase retrieval method in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Chen, Jian; Wang, Dajiang; Wang, Shenghao; Chen, Heng; Bao, Yuan; Shao, Qigang; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging is considered as one of the most promising techniques for future medical imaging. Many different methods have been developed to retrieve phase signal, among which the phase stepping (PS) method is widely used. However, further practical implementations are hindered, due to its complex scanning mode and high radiation dose. In contrast, the reverse projection (RP) method is a novel fast and low dose extraction approach. In this contribution, the authors present a quantitative analysis of the noise properties of the refraction signals retrieved by the two methods and compare their sensitivities. Methods: Using the error propagation formula, the authors analyze theoretically the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the refraction images retrieved by the two methods. Then, the sensitivities of the two extraction methods are compared under an identical exposure dose. Numerical experiments are performed to validate the theoretical results and provide some quantitative insight. Results: The SNRs of the two methods are both dependent on the system parameters, but in different ways. Comparison between their sensitivities reveals that for the refraction signal, the RP method possesses a higher sensitivity, especially in the case of high visibility and/or at the edge of the object. Conclusions: Compared with the PS method, the RP method has a superior sensitivity and provides refraction images with a higher SNR. Therefore, one can obtain highly sensitive refraction images in grating-based phase contrast imaging. This is very important for future preclinical and clinical implementations

  10. 9-β-arabinofuranosyladenine preferentially sensitizes radioresistant squamous cell carcinoma cell lines to x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, D.

    1992-06-01

    The effect of 9-β-arabinofuranosyladenine (ara-A) on sensitivity to the deleterious effects of x-rays was studied in six squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Three lines were relatively radioresistant, having D 0 values of 2.31 to 2.89 Gy, and the other three lines were relatively radiosensitive, having D 0 values of between 1.07 and 1.45 Gy. Ara-A (50 or 500 μM) was added to cultures 30 min prior to irradiation and removed 30 min after irradiation, and sensitivity was measured in terms of cell survival. The radiosensitizing effect of ara-A was very dependent on the inherent radiosensitivity of the tumor cell line. Fifty micromolar concentrations of ara-A sensitized only the two most radioresistant lines, SCC-12B.2 and JSQ-3. Five hundred micromolar concentrations of ara-A sensitized the more sensitive cell lines, SQ-20B and SQ-9G, but failed to have any effect on the radiation response of the two most sensitive cell lines, SQ-38 and SCC-61. Concentrations of ara-A as low as 10 μM were equally efficient in inhibiting DNA synthesis in all six cell lines. These results suggest that the target for the radiosensitizing effect of ara-A is probably related to the factor controlling the inherent radiosensitivity of human tumor cells. Therefore, ara-A might be useful in overcoming radiation resistance in vivo

  11. 9-{beta}-arabinofuranosyladenine preferentially sensitizes radioresistant squamous cell carcinoma cell lines to x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, D. [Rush Univ. Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States). Therapeutic Radiology; Mustafi, R. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology; Schwartz, J.L. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-06-01

    The effect of 9-{beta}-arabinofuranosyladenine (ara-A) on sensitivity to the deleterious effects of x-rays was studied in six squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. Three lines were relatively radioresistant, having D{sub 0} values of 2.31 to 2.89 Gy, and the other three lines were relatively radiosensitive, having D{sub 0} values of between 1.07 and 1.45 Gy. Ara-A (50 or 500 {mu}M) was added to cultures 30 min prior to irradiation and removed 30 min after irradiation, and sensitivity was measured in terms of cell survival. The radiosensitizing effect of ara-A was very dependent on the inherent radiosensitivity of the tumor cell line. Fifty micromolar concentrations of ara-A sensitized only the two most radioresistant lines, SCC-12B.2 and JSQ-3. Five hundred micromolar concentrations of ara-A sensitized the more sensitive cell lines, SQ-20B and SQ-9G, but failed to have any effect on the radiation response of the two most sensitive cell lines, SQ-38 and SCC-61. Concentrations of ara-A as low as 10 {mu}M were equally efficient in inhibiting DNA synthesis in all six cell lines. These results suggest that the target for the radiosensitizing effect of ara-A is probably related to the factor controlling the inherent radiosensitivity of human tumor cells. Therefore, ara-A might be useful in overcoming radiation resistance in vivo.

  12. Isolation and cross-sensitivity of X-ray-sensitive mutants of V79-4 hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, N.J.; Cox, R.; Thacker, J.

    1987-01-01

    The V79-4 Chinese hamster line was mutagenized and surviving clones screened for X-ray sensitivity using a replica microwell technique. One slightly sensitive clone and 3 clearly sensitive clones were isolated from approximately 5000 screened, and designated irs 1 to irs 4. The 3 more sensitive clones showed different responses to the genotoxic agents mitomycin C (MMC), ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS) and ultraviolet light (UV). irs 1 showed considerable sensitivity to all the agents tested, in the order MMC >> EMS > UV. irs 2 and irs 3 had similar sensitivities to EMS and to UV (EMS > UV) but irs 3 was more sensitive than irs 2 to MMC. None of these mutants is identical in phenotype to previously published mutants. (Auth.)

  13. Sensitivity of triple-crystal X-ray diffractometers to microdefects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molodkin, V.B.; Olikhovskii, S.I.; Len, E.G.; Kislovskii, E.N.; Kladko, V.P.; Reshetnyk, O.V.; Vladimirova, T.P.; Sheludchenko, B.V.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamical theory, which describes both diffraction profiles and reciprocal space maps measured from imperfect crystals with account for instrumental factors of triple-crystal diffractometer (TCD), has been developed for adequate quantitative characterization of microdefects. Analytical expressions for coherent and diffuse scattering (DS) intensities measured by TCD in the Bragg diffraction geometry have been derived by using the generalized statistical dynamical theory of X-ray scattering in real single crystals with randomly distributed defects. The DS intensity distributions from single crystals containing clusters and dislocation loops have been described by explicit analytical expressions. Particularly, these expressions take into account anisotropy of displacement fields around defects with discrete orientations. Characteristics of microdefect structures in silicon single crystals grown by Czochralsky- and float-zone methods have been determined by analyzing the measured TCD profiles and reciprocal space maps. The sensitivities of reciprocal space maps and diffraction profiles to defect characteristics have been compared. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Noise and sensitivity of x-ray framing cameras at Nike (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawley, C. J.; Deniz, A. V.; Lehecka, T.

    1999-01-01

    X-ray framing cameras are the most widely used tool for radiographing density distributions in laser and Z-pinch driven experiments. The x-ray framing cameras that were developed specifically for experiments on the Nike laser system are described. One of these cameras has been coupled to a CCD camera and was tested for resolution and image noise using both electrons and x rays. The largest source of noise in the images was found to be due to low quantum detection efficiency of x-ray photons.

  15. X-ray sensitization of chromatids with unifilarly and bifilarly substituted DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, S.

    1981-01-01

    When cells are grown for two rounds of DNA replication in the presence of the thymidine analogue 5-bromodeoxyuridine, chromosomes containing one chromatid with unifilarly substituted DNA and one with bifilarly substituted DNA are found. These can be distinguished by harlequin staining techniques that stain one chromatid dark and one light. When the degree of substitution is 60% or greater, 3 times as many X-ray-induced chromatid breaks are produced as in unsubstituted chromatids. This represents maximal sensitization. The unifilarly substituted (dark) chromatid is as sensitive as its bifilarly substituted (light) sister chromatid. If cells are grown in low concentrations of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd), then the amount of substitution is less and the bifilarly substituted chromatic is more sensitive than the unifilarly substituted one. When large numbers of cells are grown in very low concentrations of BrdUrd, the analogue is almost completely depleted during the first round of replication leading to harlequin chromosomes containing one unsubstituted (dark) and one unifilarly substituted (light) chromatid. Under these conditions a maximal sensitization between light-staining and dark-staining chromatids can occur. This can be confused with the differential sensitivity between unifilarly and bifilarly substituted chromatids. The apparent discrepant results obtained by different investigators are most likely caused by the use of very low levels of BrdUrd in some of the experiments. (orig.)

  16. Comparisons of sensitivity on X-ray and diethyl sulfate in M1 seedling stage of welsh onion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.K.; Eun, J.S.; Park, H.B.

    1977-01-01

    In order to select useful mutants, dormant seeds of a Welsh onion variety ''Baekeunju'' were treated with different levels of X-ray and diethyl sulfate (DES). For this study, the sensitivities on germination, emergence, seedling height, and chromosome aberrations in root tip cells were investigated in M 1 seedling stage. The results obtained were summarized as follow: The germination rate was not influenced by X-ray irradiation but in plots of DES treatment it was significantly decreased according to increasing of the DES concentration. A significant reduction to emergence rate and seedling height measured on 30th day after sowing was in direct proportion to increasing of the X-ray dose and the DES concentration. Fifty per cent growth reduction dose and concentration was determined to about 33kR for X-ray, and about 0.12% for EES. The chromosome aberration, such as chromosome fragment, chromosome bridge and chromosomering, was shown much frequently in plants treated with high dose or concentration of the both mutagens. However, the DES made less aberration of chromosome than the X-ray in average of all the treated concentrations. A trend was also observed that the X-ray irradiation made more chromosome fragments than chromosome bridges and the DES treatment more chromosome bridges than chromosome fragments. (author)

  17. A sensitization effect of hematoporphyrin oligomer (HpO) and caffeine for X-ray radiation of skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiguro, Kazumori; Ueda, Keiichi; Miyoshi, Norio; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Fukuda, Masaru (Fukui Medical School, Matsuoka (Japan))

    1990-05-01

    Human malignant melanoma cells (G-361) were irradiated with X-ray for different irradiation times. The amount of DNA damage was much increased by the treatment of the cells with hematoporphyrin oligomer (HpO) before X-ray irradiation. Furthermore, it was found that the caffeine inhibited effectively the repair of the damaged DNA. Furthermore, HpO was administered before X-ray irradiation of transplantable skin tumor in C3H mice and/or caffeine was to be given the mouse after X-ray irradiation. The growth of the irradiated tumor combined with HpO and/or caffeine was more inhibited, and the necrotic area was more expanded than that of the tumor irradiated with X-ray only. Labeling Index utilizing bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) in the viable area of the treated tumor decreased when HpO and/or caffeine were administered. The amount of DNA damage more increased in the irradiated tumor cells given HpO than the only irradiated cells. And, the repair of the damaged DNA was more delayed in the irradiated tumor cells combined with HpO and caffeine than those with other treatments. In conclusion, it was considered that HpO might be a radioactive sensitizer and caffeine enhanced the inhibition of the repair of DNA damaged. We hope that the treatment of X-ray radiation combined with HpO and caffeine is useful for clinical treatment of human malignant tumor. (author) 54 refs.

  18. A sensitization effect of hematoporphyrin oligomer (HpO) and caffeine for X-ray radiation of skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Kazumori; Ueda, Keiichi; Miyoshi, Norio; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Fukuda, Masaru

    1990-01-01

    Human malignant melanoma cells (G-361) were irradiated with X-ray for different irradiation times. The amount of DNA damage was much increased by the treatment of the cells with hematoporphyrin oligomer (HpO) before X-ray irradiation. Furthermore, it was found that the caffeine inhibited effectively the repair of the damaged DNA. Furthermore, HpO was administered before X-ray irradiation of transplantable skin tumor in C3H mice and/or caffeine was to be given the mouse after X-ray irradiation. The growth of the irradiated tumor combined with HpO and/or caffeine was more inhibited, and the necrotic area was more expanded than that of the tumor irradiated with X-ray only. Labeling Index utilizing bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) in the viable area of the treated tumor decreased when HpO and/or caffeine were administered. The amount of DNA damage more increased in the irradiated tumor cells given HpO than the only irradiated cells. And, the repair of the damaged DNA was more delayed in the irradiated tumor cells combined with HpO and caffeine than those with other treatments. In conclusion, it was considered that HpO might be a radioactive sensitizer and caffeine enhanced the inhibition of the repair of DNA damaged. We hope that the treatment of X-ray radiation combined with HpO and caffeine is useful for clinical treatment of human malignant tumor. (author) 54 refs

  19. SWIFT J1749.4-2807 : X-ray decay, refined position and optical observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Y.J.; Russell, D. M.; Wijnands, R.; van der Klis, M.; Altamirano, D.; Patruno, A.; Watts, A.; Armas Padilla, M.; Cavecchi, Y.; Degenaar, N.; Kalamkar, M.; Kaur, R.; Linares, M.; Casella, P.; Rea, N.; Soleri, P.; Lewis, F.; Kong, A. K. H.

    We analyzed seven, target ID 31686, Swift follow-up observations of the neutron-star X-ray transient Swfit J1749.4-2807 (Wijnands et al. 2009) currently in outburst and which was found to be an accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar (ATel #2565). The observations span from April 11 to April 20.

  20. ESCADT: a FORTRAN code for computing the positions and areas of x-ray photoelectron spectral peaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, L.E.

    1979-09-01

    Program ESCADT uses least-squares-derived convoluting numbers to smooth and differentiate x-ray photoelectron spectra. Peak maxima are located by finding zero crossings of the first derivative and refined using a cubic polynomial fitting procedure. Background points are located using the product of the absolute value of the first derivative and the smoothed ordinate value. Peak areas, using both linear and scattered electron backgrounds, are computed. Spectra are corrected for changes in instrument sensitivity and energy calibration with gold-standard data retrieved from a disk file. Five determinations of the gold 4f peak positions yielded standard deviations of 0.011 and 0.031 eV for the 4f/sub 7/2/ and 4f/sub 5/2/ peaks, respectively. The relative standard deviation for the computed areas was 0.85%

  1. Water equivalence of NIPAM based polymer gel dosimeters with enhanced sensitivity for x-ray CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorjiara, Tina; Hill, Robin; Bosi, Stephen; Kuncic, Zdenka; Baldock, Clive

    2013-01-01

    Two new formulations of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) based three dimensional (3D) gel dosimeters have recently been developed with improved sensitivity to x-ray CT readout, one without any co-solvent and the other one with isopropanol co-solvent. The water equivalence of the NIPAM gel dosimeters was investigated using different methods to calculate their radiological properties including: density, electron density, number of electrons per grams, effective atomic number, photon interaction probabilities, mass attenuation and energy absorption coefficients, electron collisional, radiative and total mass stopping powers and electron mass scattering power. Monte Carlo modelling was also used to compare the dose response of these gel dosimeters with water for kilovoltage and megavoltage x-ray beams and for megavoltage electron beams. We found that the density and electron density of the co-solvent free gel dosimeter are more water equivalent with less than a 2.6% difference compared to a 5.7% difference for the isopropanol gel dosimeter. Both the co-solvent free and isopropanol solvent gel dosimeters have lower effective atomic numbers than water, differing by 2.2% and 6.5%, respectively. As a result, their photoelectric absorption interaction probabilities are up to 6% and 19% different from water, respectively. Compton scattering and pair production interaction probabilities of NIPAM gel with isopropanol differ by up to 10% from water while for the co-solvent free gel, the differences are 3%. Mass attenuation and energy absorption coefficients of the co-solvent free gel dosimeter and the isopropanol gel dosimeter are up to 7% and 19% lower than water, respectively. Collisional and total mass stopping powers of both gel dosimeters differ by less than 2% from those of water. The dose response of the co-solvent free gel dosimeter is water equivalent (with 100 keV, correction factor is required for the gels. • For MV electron, correction factor needed for the gels to

  2. X-ray holography with a position sensitive detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lausi, A.; Kopecký, Miloš; Busetto, E.; Savoia, A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 5 (2002), s. 621-628 ISSN 0587-4246 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : fluorescence holography * resolution atoms Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.345, year: 2002

  3. Response of the 'patient dose calibrator' chamber for incident positions and sizes of X-ray fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Cassio M.; Abrantes, Marcos Eugenio S.; Ferreira, Flavia C. Bastos; Lacerda, Marco A. de Souza; Alonso, Thessa C.; Silva, Teogenes A. da; Oliveira, Paulo Marcio C.

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of patient doses is an important tool for optimizing radiodiagnostic medical procedures with conventional X-ray equipment and for improving the quality of the radiographic image. The Patient Dose Calibrator (PDC) chamber is a dosimetric instrument that is used in the evaluation of the air kerma-area product (P KA ) quantity aiming the reduction of patient doses. The objective this work was to study the P KA variation caused by different field incident positions and sizes of the X-ray beam on the PDC chamber. Results showed that the PDC chamber has repeatability lower than 0.6%, beam position dependence of 3% and linearity response within ± 6%; these characteristics are to be taken into account during evaluation of the radiological protection conditions of conventional x-ray equipment. (author)

  4. Unambiguous determination of H-atom positions: comparing results from neutron and high-resolution X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardberg, Anna S; Del Castillo, Alexis Rae; Weiss, Kevin L; Meilleur, Flora; Blakeley, Matthew P; Myles, Dean A A

    2010-05-01

    The locations of H atoms in biological structures can be difficult to determine using X-ray diffraction methods. Neutron diffraction offers a relatively greater scattering magnitude from H and D atoms. Here, 1.65 A resolution neutron diffraction studies of fully perdeuterated and selectively CH(3)-protonated perdeuterated crystals of Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin (D-rubredoxin and HD-rubredoxin, respectively) at room temperature (RT) are described, as well as 1.1 A resolution X-ray diffraction studies of the same protein at both RT and 100 K. The two techniques are quantitatively compared in terms of their power to directly provide atomic positions for D atoms and analyze the role played by atomic thermal motion by computing the sigma level at the D-atom coordinate in simulated-annealing composite D-OMIT maps. It is shown that 1.65 A resolution RT neutron data for perdeuterated rubredoxin are approximately 8 times more likely overall to provide high-confidence positions for D atoms than 1.1 A resolution X-ray data at 100 K or RT. At or above the 1.0sigma level, the joint X-ray/neutron (XN) structures define 342/378 (90%) and 291/365 (80%) of the D-atom positions for D-rubredoxin and HD-rubredoxin, respectively. The X-ray-only 1.1 A resolution 100 K structures determine only 19/388 (5%) and 8/388 (2%) of the D-atom positions above the 1.0sigma level for D-rubredoxin and HD-rubredoxin, respectively. Furthermore, the improved model obtained from joint XN refinement yielded improved electron-density maps, permitting the location of more D atoms than electron-density maps from models refined against X-ray data only.

  5. A cell for extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies of oxygen sensitive products of redox reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furenlid, L.R.; Renner, M.W.; Fajer, J.

    1990-01-01

    We describe a cell suitable for extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies of oxygen and/or water sensitive products of redox reactions. The cell utilizes aluminized Mylar windows that are transparent to x rays, provide low gas permeability, and allow vacuum to be maintained in the cell. The windows are attached to the glassware with an epoxy that resists attack by common organic solvents. Additional side arms allow multiple spectroscopic probes of the same sample under anaerobic and anhydrous conditions

  6. Light-sensitive elements for radiographic use and process for the formation of an X-ray image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussi, G.; Cavallo, E.

    1990-01-01

    A light-sensitive silver halide element for radiographic use with X-ray intensifying screens comprising coated on at least one side of a transparent support base at least a spectrally sensitized silver halide emulsion layer and, between the base and a silver halide emulsion layer, a hydrophillic colloid layer containing a) substantially light-insensitivelow iodide silver bromoiodide grains having an avergae grain size in therange of from 0.01 to 0.1 μm on which a spectral sensitizing dye is adsorbed to form a J-band, said dye adsorbed on said grains having a significant portion of its absorption in a region of the electromagnetic spectrum corresponding substantially to the spectral sensitivity of the silver halide emulsion, and b) dispersed zinc oxide particles. The invention allows the use of low coverage weights of silver halide light-sensitive elements and provides X-ray images with a favorable image quality and sensitivity ratio. (author)

  7. Light-sensitive elements for radiographic use and process for the formation of an X-ray image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussi, G; Cavallo, E

    1990-12-15

    A light-sensitive silver halide element for radiographic use with X-ray intensifying screens comprising coated on at least one side of a transparent support base at least a spectrally sensitized silver halide emulsion layer and, between the base and a silver halide emulsion layer, a hydrophillic colloid layer containing (a) substantially light-insensitivelow iodide silver bromoiodide grains having an avergae grain size in therange of from 0.01 to 0.1 {mu}m on which a spectral sensitizing dye is adsorbed to form a J-band, said dye adsorbed on said grains having a significant portion of its absorption in a region of the electromagnetic spectrum corresponding substantially to the spectral sensitivity of the silver halide emulsion, and (b) dispersed zinc oxide particles. The invention allows the use of low coverage weights of silver halide light-sensitive elements and provides X-ray images with a favorable image quality and sensitivity ratio. (author).

  8. Relative survival of hybrid x-ray-resistant, and normally sensitive mammalian cells exposed to x rays and protons under aerobic and hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.R.; Gould, R.G.; Flynn, D.; Robertson, J.B.; Little, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    Survival of an x-ray-resistant hybrid cell line (HD 1 ) and a normally responsive cell line (H 4 ) have been compared when irradiated under induced hypoxia by both protons and X rays. The two cell lines are similarly protected when irradiated under hypoxic conditions with oxygen enhancement ratios of 2.8 and 2.7, respectively. The protection is consistent with a dose-modifying factor. No statistically significant difference is observed between cell inactivation by x rays and protons in either cell line, whether irradiated under aerobic or hypoxic conditions

  9. X-ray sensitive strains of CHO cells show decreased frequency of stable transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeggo, P.; Smith, J.

    1987-01-01

    Six X-ray sensitive (xrs) strains of the Chinese hamster ovary cell line have previously been isolated and shown to have a defect in double strand break rejoining. In this study, these strains have been investigated for their ability to take up and integrate foreign DNA. All the xrs strains investigated so far have shown a decreased frequency of stable transfectants compared to their parent line, in experiments using the plasmid pSV2gpt, which contains the selectable bacterial gene, guanine phosphoribosyl transferase. This decreased frequency is observed over a wide range of DNA concentrations (0.1 to 20 μg DNA) but is more pronounced at higher DNA concentrations. In contrast, these xrs strains show the same level of transfection proficiency as the wild type parent using a transient transfection system with a plasmid containing the bacterial CAT (chloramphenicol acetyl transferase) gene. Since the level of CAT activity does not depend on integration of foreign DNA, this suggests that the xrs strains are able to take up the same amount of DNA as the parent strains, but have a defect in the integration of foreign DNA. Since this integration of foreign DNA probably occurs by non-homologous recombination, this may indicate a role of the xrs gene product in this process

  10. Blade-type X-ray beam position monitors for SPring-8 undulator beamlines

    CERN Document Server

    Aoyagi, H; Kitamura, H

    2001-01-01

    The X-ray beam position monitors had been designed and installed for SPring-8 insertion device beamlines. These monitors are being utilized for photon beam diagnostics. The beam from the standard undulator in SPring-8 has the total power of 11 kW and the power density of 470 kW/mrad sup 2 , typically. Each monitor has four CVD diamond blades coated with metal for detector heads. We have already introduced three styles of monitors to match various insertion devices in SPring-8. A standard style, or a fixed-blade style, is used mainly for a standard in-vacuum undulator beamlines. A horizontal-blade-drive style and a four-blade-drive style are used for beamlines of a wiggler and a twin helical undulator that have wide power distributions, and for figure-8 undulators that have asymmetric power distributions, respectively. This report describes the design and the structure of these monitors and the beam-tests for the photon beam diagnostics in detail.

  11. Determination of lateral diffusivity in single pixel X-ray absorbers with implications for position dependent excess broadening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saab, T.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Iyomoto, N.; Herbert, B.D.; Bandler, S.R.; Chervenak, J.; Finkbeiner, F.; Kelley, R.L.; Kilbourne, C.A.; Porter, F.S.; Sadleir, J.

    2006-01-01

    An ideal microcalorimeter is characterized by a constant energy resolution across the sensor's dynamic range. Any dependence of pulse shape on the position within the absorber where an event occurs leads to a degradation in resolution that is linear with event's energy (excess broadening). In this paper we present a numerical simulation that was developed to model the variation in pulse shape with position based on the thermal conductivity within the absorber and between the absorber, sensor, and heat bath, for arbitrarily shaped absorbers and sensors. All the parameters required for the simulation can be measured from actual devices. We describe how the thermal conductivity of the absorber material is determined by comparing the results of this model with data taken from a position sensitive detector in which any position dependent effect is purposely emphasized by constructing a long, narrow absorber that is readout by sensors on both ends. Finally, we present the implications for excess broadening given the measured parameters of our X-ray microcalorimeters

  12. Cost and sensitivity of restricted active-space calculations of metal L-edge X-ray absorption spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinjari, Rahul V; Delcey, Mickaël G; Guo, Meiyuan; Odelius, Michael; Lundberg, Marcus

    2016-02-15

    The restricted active-space (RAS) approach can accurately simulate metal L-edge X-ray absorption spectra of first-row transition metal complexes without the use of any fitting parameters. These characteristics provide a unique capability to identify unknown chemical species and to analyze their electronic structure. To find the best balance between cost and accuracy, the sensitivity of the simulated spectra with respect to the method variables has been tested for two models, [FeCl6 ](3-) and [Fe(CN)6 ](3-) . For these systems, the reference calculations give deviations, when compared with experiment, of ≤1 eV in peak positions, ≤30% for the relative intensity of major peaks, and ≤50% for minor peaks. When compared with these deviations, the simulated spectra are sensitive to the number of final states, the inclusion of dynamical correlation, and the ionization potential electron affinity shift, in addition to the selection of the active space. The spectra are less sensitive to the quality of the basis set and even a double-ζ basis gives reasonable results. The inclusion of dynamical correlation through second-order perturbation theory can be done efficiently using the state-specific formalism without correlating the core orbitals. Although these observations are not directly transferable to other systems, they can, together with a cost analysis, aid in the design of RAS models and help to extend the use of this powerful approach to a wider range of transition metal systems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Low Dose X-Ray Speckle Visibility Spectroscopy Reveals Nanoscale Dynamics in Radiation Sensitive Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwohlt, Jan; Reiser, Mario; Randolph, Lisa; Matic, Aleksandar; Medina, Luis Aguilera; Madsen, Anders; Sprung, Michael; Zozulya, Alexey; Gutt, Christian

    2018-04-01

    X-ray radiation damage provides a serious bottleneck for investigating microsecond to second dynamics on nanometer length scales employing x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. This limitation hinders the investigation of real time dynamics in most soft matter and biological materials which can tolerate only x-ray doses of kGy and below. Here, we show that this bottleneck can be overcome by low dose x-ray speckle visibility spectroscopy. Employing x-ray doses of 22-438 kGy and analyzing the sparse speckle pattern of count rates as low as 6.7 ×10-3 per pixel, we follow the slow nanoscale dynamics of an ionic liquid (IL) at the glass transition. At the prepeak of nanoscale order in the IL, we observe complex dynamics upon approaching the glass transition temperature TG with a freezing in of the alpha relaxation and a multitude of millisecond local relaxations existing well below TG . We identify this fast relaxation as being responsible for the increasing development of nanoscale order observed in ILs at temperatures below TG .

  14. Lower Ionosphere Sensitivity to Solar X-ray Flares Over a Complete Solar Cycle Evaluated From VLF Signal Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macotela, Edith L.; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Manninen, Jyrki; Correia, Emília; Turunen, Tauno; Magalhães, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    The daytime lower ionosphere behaves as a solar X-ray flare detector, which can be monitored using very low frequency (VLF) radio waves that propagate inside the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. In this paper, we infer the lower ionosphere sensitivity variation over a complete solar cycle by using the minimum X-ray fluence (FXmin) necessary to produce a disturbance of the quiescent ionospheric conductivity. FXmin is the photon energy flux integrated over the time interval from the start of a solar X-ray flare to the beginning of the ionospheric disturbance recorded as amplitude deviation of the VLF signal. FXmin is computed for ionospheric disturbances that occurred in the time interval of December-January from 2007 to 2016 (solar cycle 24). The computation of FXmin uses the X-ray flux in the wavelength band below 0.2 nm and the amplitude of VLF signals transmitted from France (HWU), Turkey (TBB), and U.S. (NAA), which were recorded in Brazil, Finland, and Peru. The main result of this study is that the long-term variation of FXmin is correlated with the level of solar activity, having FXmin values in the range (1 - 12) × 10-7 J/m2. Our result suggests that FXmin is anticorrelated with the lower ionosphere sensitivity, confirming that the long-term variation of the ionospheric sensitivity is anticorrelated with the level of solar activity. This result is important to identify the minimum X-ray fluence that an external source of ionization must overcome in order to produce a measurable ionospheric disturbance during daytime.

  15. Sensitivity Analysis of X-ray Spectra from Scanning Electron Microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Thomas Martin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Patton, Bruce W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Weber, Charles F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bekar, Kursat B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to evaluate x-ray spectra generated within a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine elemental composition of small samples. This will be accomplished by performing Monte Carlo simulations of the electron and photon interactions in the sample and in the x-ray detector. The elemental inventories will be determined by an inverse process that progressively reduces the difference between the measured and simulated x-ray spectra by iteratively adjusting composition and geometric variables in the computational model. The intended benefit of this work will be to develop a method to perform quantitative analysis on substandard samples (heterogeneous phases, rough surfaces, small sizes, etc.) without involving standard elemental samples or empirical matrix corrections (i.e., true standardless quantitative analysis).

  16. Determination of dopant atomic positions with kinematical X-ray standing waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walz, Bente

    2011-11-01

    Recent advances in the kinematic X-ray standing wave technique (KXSW) for the determination of the atomic coordinates and displacement parameters in nonperfect crystalline materials are described in this thesis. The methodology has been improved by considering three significant aspects: - the inclusion of weak multiple beam contributions - the excitation of secondary fluorescence in multiple-element samples - the influence of the crystal mosaicity on the fluorescence yield. The improvements allowed to successfully apply the method to investigate complex oxide materials of current interest for potential device applications. The thermally-induced interdiffusion of cobalt and manganese thin films on zinc oxide single crystals has been studied to determine which lattice sites are occupied preferentially. The data analysis revealed that after thermal diffusion the adsorbed atoms occupied zinc sites in the host lattice. The mean deviation of the cobalt atomic position from the zinc lattice site was comparable to the thermal displacement parameter of the zinc atoms. In the case of manganese a secondary phase was found on the surface. Measurements performed on LaSrMnO 4 provided new insight concerning the rotation of the oxygen octahedron around the manganese atoms and the concomitant displacements of the strontium and lanthanum atoms. It was found that the oxygen octahedra are rotated around the [100]-direction by 4,5 . The measurements in transmission geometry performed on titanium dioxide (rutile) demonstrated that KXSW measurements in the Laue geometry is a viable technique. By performing KXSW under grazing-incidence conditions it is possible to achieve depth resolution. The results clearly show that the extended KXSW technique is a versatile method for characterizing complex material systems. (orig.)

  17. Soft X-ray radio-sensitivities of pollens in several fruit species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Chungen; Deng Xiuxin

    1996-01-01

    Irradiated with different dosages of soft X-ray, pollen germinations of prunus baimang, pear kieffer, trifoliate orange and pummelo, were investigated immediately or several days later after irradiation. The results revealed that the pollens of these fruit tress had different sensitivites to soft X-ray and various responses to storage duration. Therefore, even to the same kind of pollen, irradiation with different optimal exposure doses, as well as pollination at different times during storage, should be adopted variously according to the different aims and methods of breeding programs. (author)

  18. Biodegradable X-ray markers of controlled radio-opacity. Temporary position measurements in bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stallmann, H.P.; Faber, C.; Plokker, H.M.; Wuisman, P.I.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    In order to analyze X-ray markers for potential use in biodegradable implants or radiostereogrammatic analysis (RSA), we combined iopromide contrast fluid with biodegradable calcium phosphate cement. The radio-opacity of 10 × 10 mm markers containing different iodine concentrations (0,120, 240, 360

  19. Fluorescence detection of white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy: towards element-sensitive projections of local atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Dąbrowski, K. M.; Novikov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    A method for a direct measurement of X-ray projections of the atomic structure is described. Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO 3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO 3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA) pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. This kind of anisotropy results from the interference of X-rays inside a sample and, owing to the short coherence length of a white beam, is visible only at small angles around interatomic directions. Consequently, the main features of the recorded XAA corresponded to distorted real-space projections of dense-packed atomic planes and atomic rows. A quantitative analysis of XAA was carried out using a wavelet transform and allowed well resolved projections of Nb atoms to be obtained up to distances of 10 Å. The signal of nearest O atoms was detected indirectly by a comparison with model calculations. The measurement of white-beam XAA using characteristic radiation indicates the possibility of obtaining element-sensitive projections of the local atomic structure in more complex samples

  20. Stage sensitivity and dose response of meiotic chromosomes of pollen mother cells of Tradescantia to X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T H; Kontos, Jr, G J; Anderson, V A [Western Illinois Univ., Macomb (USA). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1980-05-01

    Chromosome damage induced by physical and chemical mutagens can be quantitated by the frequencies of micronuclei (MCN) produced in tetrads of the meiotic pollen mother cells of Tradescantia, i.e. the 'MCN-in-Tetrad' test. The stage sensitivity and dose response of these meiocytes to low exposures of X-rays was studied to improve the efficiency and reliability of this test. Stage sensitivity was determined by observing, at 3 hr intervals, the frequencies of X-ray (35 rads)-induced MCN in tetrads from a series of 16 fixations of tetrad-containing inflorescences. Late stages of meiosis (3-9 hr post-irradiation fixation groups) were insensitive (5-14 MCN/100 tetrads). Relatively high sensitivity was exhibited in the early stages of meiosis. The first and second sensitive peaks (62 and 61 MCN/100 tetrads) centered around the 21 and 39 hr post-irradiation fixation groups respectively. Control groups yielded around 3-4 MCN/100 tetrads. A dose-response relation for MCN was determined by treating early stages of meiotic pollen mother cells with X-ray exposures ranging from 9.5 to 57.5 rads. A linear regression line was established with about 20 MCN/100 tetrads per 10 rad increment.

  1. Stage sensitivity and dose response of meiotic chromosomes of pollen mother cells of Tradescantia to X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, T.-H.; Kontos, G.J. Jr.; Anderson, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    Chromosome damage induced by physical and chemical mutagens can be quantitated by the frequencies of micronuclei (MCN) produced in tetrads of the meiotic pollen mother cells of Tradescantia, i.e. the 'MCN-in-Tetrad' test. The stage sensitivity and dose response of these meiocytes to low exposures of X-rays was studied to improve the efficiency and reliability of this test. Stage sensitivity was determined by observing, at 3 hr intervals, the frequencies of X-ray (35 rads)-induced MCN in tetrads from a series of 16 fixations of tetrad-containing inflorescences. Late stages of meiosis (3-9 hr post-irradiation fixation groups) were insensitive (5-14 MCN/100 tetrads). Relatively high sensitivity was exhibited in the early stages of meiosis. The first and second sensitive peaks (62 and 61 MCN/100 tetrads) centered around the 21 and 39 hr post-irradiation fixation groups respectively. Control groups yielded around 3-4 MCN/100 tetrads. A dose-response relation for MCN was determined by treating early stages of meiotic pollen mother cells with X-ray exposures ranging from 9.5 to 57.5 rads. A linear regression line was established with about 20 MCN/100 tetrads per 10 rad increment. (author)

  2. Distributed transition-edge sensors for linearized position response in a phonon-mediated X-ray imaging spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Blas; Brink, Paul L.; Leman, Steven W.; Castle, Joseph P.; Tomada, Astrid; Young, Betty A.; Martínez-Galarce, Dennis S.; Stern, Robert A.; Deiker, Steve; Irwin, Kent D.

    2004-03-01

    For future solar X-ray satellite missions, we are developing a phonon-mediated macro-pixel composed of a Ge crystal absorber with four superconducting transition-edge sensors (TES) distributed on the backside. The X-rays are absorbed on the opposite side and the energy is converted into phonons, which are absorbed into the four TES sensors. By connecting together parallel elements into four channels, fractional total energy absorbed between two of the sensors provides x-position information and the other two provide y-position information. We determine the optimal distribution for the TES sub-elements to obtain linear position information while minimizing the degradation of energy resolution.

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can be taken to the patient in a hospital bed or the emergency room. The x-ray ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  6. Sensitivities and detection limits of X-ray fluorescence analysis with a 10 mCi241Am source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wundt, K.; Janghorbani, M.; Starke, K.

    1976-01-01

    Seven trace elements ranging from chromium to barium were preconcentrated on Amberlite IR-120 cation exchange paper and determined in an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence system using a 10 mCi 241 Am source. Sensitivities were experimentally determined and checked with theoretically calculated values. The detection limits are compared with elemental levels present in typical surface waters and those allowed in drinking water. Appropriate conclusions as to feasibility of such a system for environmental monitoring are drawn. (orig.) [de

  7. Patient positioning with X-ray detector self-calibration for image guided therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, B.P.; Sakas, G.; Stilla, U.; Groch, W.-D.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Automatic alignment estimation from projection images has a range of applications, but misaligned cameras induce inaccuracies. Calibration methods for optical cameras requiring calibration bodies or detectable features have been a matter of research for years. Not so for image guided therapy, although exact patient pose recovery is crucial. To image patient anatomy, X-ray instead of optical equipment is used. Feature detection is often infeasible. Furthermore, a method not requiring a calibration body, usable during treatment, would be desirable to improve accuracy of the patient alignment. We present a novel approach not relying on image features but combining intensity based calibration with 3D pose recovery. A stereoscopic X-ray camera model is proposed, and effects of erroneous parameters on the patient alignment are evaluated. The relevant camera parameters are automatically computed by comparison of X-ray to CT images and are incorporated in the patient alignment computation. The methods were tested with ground truth data of an anatomic phantom with artificially produced misalignments and available real-patient images from a particle therapy machine. We show that our approach can compensate patient alignment errors through mis-calibration of a camera from more than 5 mm to below 0.2 mm. Usage of images with artificial noise shows that the method is robust against image degradation of 2-5%. X-ray camera sel calibration improves accuracy when cameras are misaligned. We could show that rigid body alignment was computed more accurately and that self-calibration is possible, even if detection of corresponding image features is not. (author)

  8. Cosolvent-free polymer gel dosimeters with improved dose sensitivity and resolution for x-ray CT dose response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chain, J N M; McAuley, K B [Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Jirasek, A [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, V8W 3P6 (Canada); Schreiner, L J, E-mail: kim.mcauley@chee.queensu.ca [Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, K7L 5P9 (Canada)

    2011-04-07

    This study reports new N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel recipes with increased dose sensitivity and improved dose resolution for x-ray CT readout. NIPAM can be used to increase the solubility of N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide (Bis) in aqueous solutions from approximately 3% to 5.5% by weight, enabling the manufacture of dosimeters containing up to 19.5%T, which is the total concentration of NIPAM and Bis by weight. Gelatin is shown to have a mild influence on dose sensitivity when gels are imaged using x-ray CT, and a stronger influence when gels are imaged optically. Phantoms that contain only 3% gelatin and 5 mM tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride are sufficiently stiff for dosimetry applications. The best cosolvent-free gel formulation has a dose sensitivity in the linear range ({approx}0.88 H Gy{sup -1}) that is a small improvement compared to the best NIPAM-based gels that incorporate isopropanol as a cosolvent ({approx}0.80 H Gy{sup -1}). This new gel formulation results in enhanced dose resolution ({approx}0.052 Gy) for x-ray CT readout, making clinical applications of this imaging modality more feasible.

  9. Cosolvent-free polymer gel dosimeters with improved dose sensitivity and resolution for x-ray CT dose response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chain, J N M; McAuley, K B; Jirasek, A; Schreiner, L J

    2011-01-01

    This study reports new N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel recipes with increased dose sensitivity and improved dose resolution for x-ray CT readout. NIPAM can be used to increase the solubility of N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide (Bis) in aqueous solutions from approximately 3% to 5.5% by weight, enabling the manufacture of dosimeters containing up to 19.5%T, which is the total concentration of NIPAM and Bis by weight. Gelatin is shown to have a mild influence on dose sensitivity when gels are imaged using x-ray CT, and a stronger influence when gels are imaged optically. Phantoms that contain only 3% gelatin and 5 mM tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride are sufficiently stiff for dosimetry applications. The best cosolvent-free gel formulation has a dose sensitivity in the linear range (∼0.88 H Gy -1 ) that is a small improvement compared to the best NIPAM-based gels that incorporate isopropanol as a cosolvent (∼0.80 H Gy -1 ). This new gel formulation results in enhanced dose resolution (∼0.052 Gy) for x-ray CT readout, making clinical applications of this imaging modality more feasible.

  10. Single-Residue Sensitivity in Neutron Reflectivity and Resonant X-ray Reflectivity from Langmuir Monolayers of Synthetic Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzalka, Joseph; Satija, Sushil; Dimasi, Elaine; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Gog, Thomas; Blasie, J. Kent

    2004-03-01

    Labeling groups with ^2H to distinguish them in the scattering length density (SLD) profile constitutes the chief advantage of neutron reflectivity (NR) in studying Langmuir monolayers (LM) of lipids and proteins. Solid phase synthesis (SPPS) permits the labeling of a single residue in a peptide. Recent work demonstrates the sensitivity of NR to single ^2H-labeled residues in LM of vectorially oriented α -helical bundle peptides. NR requires comparison of isomorphic samples of all-^1H and ^2H-labeled peptides. Alternately, resonant x-ray reflectivity (RXR) uses only one sample. RXR exploits energy-dependent changes in the scattering factor from heavy atoms to distinguish them within the SLD profile. Peptides may be labeled by SPPS (e.g. Br-Phe), or may have inherent labels (e.g. Fe in heme proteins). As test cases, we studied LM of Br-labeled lipids and peptides with RXR. Both approaches require a model-independent means of obtaining SLD profiles from the reflectivity data. We have applied box-refinement to obtain the gradient SLD profile. This is fit uniquely with a sum of Gaussians and integrated analytically [Blasie et al., PRB 67 224201 (2003)] to provide the SLD profile. Label positions can then be determined to sub-Ångstrom accuracy. This work supported by the NIH (GM55876).

  11. Chromosomal sensitivity to X-rays in lymphocytes from patients with Turner syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heras, J.G.; Coco, R.

    1986-01-01

    Lymphocytes from patients with Turner syndrome were irradiated with X-rays to determine the chromosomal aberration frequency in first-division metaphases. Five patients with 45,X karyotype; three 45,X/46,Xi(X)q mosaics; one 45,X/47,XXX mosaic and 9 female controls were studied. Patients with a 45,X karyotype exhibited a radioinduced chromosomal aberration frequency similar to controls. In the mosaics, 45,X cells has a mean frequency of 38.75 +- 2.16; 46,Xi(X)q cells a mean of 38 +- 2.16 and the control group a rate of 36.25 +- 4.32. No differences were observed between 45,X and 46,Xi(X)q cells, 45,X and normal cells or 46,Xi(X)q and normal cells. Apparently neither the X monosomy nor the Xq isochromosome influences the 'in vitro' X-ray-induced chromosomal damage in Turner syndrome lymphocytes. (Auth.)

  12. Mathematical Formalism for Designing Wide-Field X-Ray Telescopes: Mirror Nodal Positions and Detector Tilts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; O'Dell, S. L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    We provide a mathematical formalism for optimizing the mirror nodal positions along the optical axis and the tilt of a commonly employed detector configuration at the focus of a x-ray telescope consisting of nested mirror shells with known mirror surface prescriptions. We adopt the spatial resolution averaged over the field-of-view as the figure of merit M. A more complete description appears in our paper in these proceedings.

  13. A New High-sensitivity solar X-ray Spectrophotometer SphinX:early operations and databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gburek, Szymon; Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Miroslaw; Siarkowski, Marek; Bakala, Jaroslaw; Podgorski, Piotr; Trzebinski, Witold; Plocieniak, Stefan; Kordylewski, Zbigniew; Kuzin, Sergey; Farnik, Frantisek; Reale, Fabio

    The Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) is an instrument operating aboard Russian CORONAS-Photon satellite. A short description of this unique instrument will be presented and its unique capabilities discussed. SphinX is presently the most sensitive solar X-ray spectrophotometer measuring solar spectra in the energy range above 1 keV. A large archive of SphinX mea-surements has already been collected. General access to these measurements is possible. The SphinX data repositories contain lightcurves, spectra, and photon arrival time measurements. The SphinX data cover nearly continuously the period since the satellite launch on January 30, 2009 up to the end-of November 2009. Present instrument status, data formats and data access methods will be shown. An overview of possible new science coming from SphinX data analysis will be discussed.

  14. Sensitivity of human peripheral lymphocyte chromosomes to various X-ray doses and subsequent storage in Plexiglass or glass containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.; Bulanova, M.; Geogieva, I.

    1979-01-01

    A study was performed to determine whether chromosomal aberrations produced in vitro by various X-ray doses in human lymphocytes were affected by post-irradiation storage of the blood in plastic or glass containers. Following X-ray doses of up to 400 R, the yields of cells with aberrations and the incidence of dicentrics, rings, interstitial deletions, symmetrical changes and chromosome fragments increased with dose. After storage of the irradiated lymphocytes in either Plexiglass or glass, the values for exchange aberrations, deletions and aberrant cells were compared. The only statistically significant difference was a slight increase in the percentage of aberrant cells stored in the plastic containers at the 400 R dose level. It was concluded that plastics appear to have a sensitizing effect on the genetic structure of the peripheral lymphocyte and thus the use of this material to store blood in biological dosimetry studies should be discouraged. (U.K.)

  15. A High Position Resolution X-ray Detector: an Edge on Illuminated Capillary Plate Combined with a Gas Amplification Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Iacobaeus, C.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Ostling, J.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Peskov, V.; Tokanai, F.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed and successfully tested a prototype of a new type of high position resolution hybrid X-ray detector. It contains a thin wall lead glass capillary plate converter of X-rays combined with a microgap parallel-plate avalanche chamber filled with gas at 1 atm. The operation of these converters was studied in a wide range of X-ray energies (from 6 to 60 keV) at incident angles varying from 0-90 degree. The detection efficiency, depending on the geometry, photon energy, incident angle and the mode of operation, was between 5-30 percent in a single step mode and up to 50 percent in a multi-layered combination. Depending on the capillary geometry, the position resolution achieved was between 0.050-0.250 mm in digital form and was practically independent of the photon energy or gas mixture. The usual lead glass capillary plates operated without noticeable charging up effects at counting rates of 50 Hz/mm2, and hydrogen treated capillaries up to 10E5 Hz/mm2. The developed detector may open new possibil...

  16. X-ray survival characteristics and genetic analysis for nine saccharomyces deletion mutants that show altered radiation sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Game, John C.; Williamson, Marsha S.; Baccari, Clelia

    2004-01-07

    The availability of a genome-wide set of Saccharomyces deletion mutants provides a chance to identify all the yeast genes involved in DNA repair. Using X-rays, we are screening these mutants to identify additional genes that show increased sensitivity to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation. For each mutant identified as sensitive, we are confirming that the sensitivity phenotype co-segregates with the deletion allele and are obtaining multipoint survival-versus-dose assays in at least two haploid and one homozygous diploid strains. We present data for deletion mutants involving the genes DOT1, MDM20, NAT3, SPT7, SPT20, GCN5, HFI1, DCC1 and VID21/EAF1, and discuss their potential roles in repair. Eight of these genes have a clear radiation-sensitive phenotype when deleted, but the ninth, GCN5, has at most a borderline phenotype. None of the deletions confer substantial sensitivity to ultra-violet radiation, although one or two may confer marginal sensitivity. The DOT1 gene is of interest because its only known function is to methylate one lysine residue in the core of the histone H3 protein. We find that histone H3 mutants (supplied by K. Struhl) in which this residue is replaced by other amino-acids are also X-ray sensitive, seeming to confirm that methylation of the lysine-79 residue is required for effective repair of radiation damage.

  17. Muskuloskeletal radiography as a specialty. A quality improvement project on positioning of musculoskeletal x-rays with a multimethodology and multidisciplinary approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Janni; Torfing, Trine

    treatment and/or unfavorable outcome for the patient. Guidelines developed by “European Guidelines on Quality Criteria for Diagnostic Radiographic Images” provide quality assessment tools regarding the technical aspect of x-rays (i.e. noise and resolution). One could argue what the quality of a perfectly......, i.e. the radiographers working with muskuloskeletal x-rays are specialized within this field. The primary purposes of this project are to perform continuous quantitative quality assessment and improvement of positioning of muskuloskeletal x-rays. Methods It has not yet been possible to find any...... of muskuloskeletal x-rays held by a radiologist, a reporting radiographer and an orthopedic surgeon, all from OUH • Radiographers are offered one-hour individual sessions with a reporting radiographer reviewing their own X-rays discussing positioning and pathology focusing on the association between positioning...

  18. Lattice positions of Sn in Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoparticles and thin films studied by synchrotron X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillner, E.; Paul, A.; Jutimoosik, J.; Chandarak, S.; Monnor, T.; Rujirawat, S.; Yimnirun, R.; Lin, X. Z.; Ennaoui, A.; Dittrich, Th.; Lux-Steiner, M.

    2013-06-01

    Lattice positions of Sn in kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 and Cu2SnS3 nanoparticles and thin films were investigated by XANES (x-ray absorption near edge structure) analysis at the S K-edge. XANES spectra were analyzed by comparison with simulations taking into account anti-site defects and vacancies. Annealing of Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoparticle thin films led to a decrease of Sn at its native and defect sites. The results show that XANES analysis at the S K-edge is a sensitive tool for the investigation of defect sites, being critical in kesterite thin film solar cells.

  19. Spectroscopic confirmation of the optical identification of X-ray sources used to determine accurate positions for the anomalous X-ray pulsars 1E 2259+58.6 and 4U 0142+61

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, M.; Verbunt, F.

    2001-03-01

    Optical spectra show that two proposed counterparts for X-ray sources detected near 1E 2259+58.6 are late G stars, and a proposed counterpart for a source near 4U 0142+61 is a dMe star. The X-ray luminosities are as expected for such stars. We thus confirm the optical identification of the three X-ray objects, and thereby the correctness of the accurate positions for 1E 2259+58.6 and 4U 0142+61 based on them. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias.

  20. Variations in sensitivity of synchronized Chinese hamster cells to oxic and anoxic X-ray exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siracka, E.; Littbrand, B.; Clifton, K.H.; Revesz, L.

    1975-01-01

    V-79 Chinese hamster cells in monolayer cultures on glass surfaces were synchronized by treatment with hydroxyurea and then exposed at different times to X-rays in air or in oxygen-free argon. Survival determinations indicated that the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) as expressed by the ratio of the respective D 0 values varied over a narrow range in the different phases of the cell cycle. These changes resulted from cyclic alterations in both aerobic and anaerobic D 0 values, possibly in n values. (author)

  1. Interspecific comparisons of the sensitivity to chromosome aberration production by x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewen, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    It is concluded that arm number probably plays a minor role, if any, in the relative radiosensitivity of a species. Instead the reported differences are probably a reflection of inherent basic biological mechanisms of repair that vary from one order of mammals to the next. It should be added, however, that the ultimate goal of all of these studies is to make a reasonable risk estimate for man. In that context the best approach is that of conservatism and the current data on mouse and man suggest that man has 1.5 to 2.0 times the risk of mice for chromosome rearrangement induction by x rays

  2. X-ray sensitivity of fibroblasts from patients with hereditary retinoblastoma and their families.

    OpenAIRE

    Pledger, J. V.; Craft, A. W.; Bartlett, K.; Long, D. R.

    1987-01-01

    The in vitro response to X-irradiation of cultured human fibroblasts was studied using a colony forming assay. A comprehensive reference range was established, giving a median D0 value of 98.5 cGy with an interquartile range of 86.5-110.5 cGy. Cells from 3 retinoblastoma family pedigrees were studied and the cell survival after exposure to X-rays was compared between affected (11 samples) and unaffected (26 samples) family members. No significant differences in response to ionising radiation ...

  3. Performance Test of the Next Generation X-Ray Beam Position Monitor System for The APS Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, B.; Lee, S.; Westferro, F.; Jaski, Y.; Lenkszus, F.; Sereno, N.; Ramanathan, M.

    2017-03-25

    The Advanced Photon Source is developing its next major upgrade (APS-U) based on the multi-bend achromat lattice. Improved beam stability is critical for the upgrade and will require keeping short-time beam angle change below 0.25 µrad and long-term angle drift below 0.6 µrad. A reliable white x-ray beam diagnostic system in the front end will be a key part of the planned beam stabilization system. This system includes an x-ray beam position monitor (XBPM) based on x-ray fluorescence (XRF) from two specially designed GlidCop A-15 absorbers, a second XBPM using XRF photons from the Exit Mask, and two white beam intensity monitors using XRF from the photon shutter and Compton-scattered photons from the front end beryllium window or a retractable diamond film in windowless front ends. We present orbit stability data for the first XBPM used in the feedback control during user operations, as well as test data from the second XBPM and the intensity monitors. They demonstrate that the XBPM system meets APS-U beam stability requirements.

  4. Chromosomal sensitivity to X-rays in lymphocytes from patients with Turner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heras, J G; Coco, R

    1986-03-01

    Lymphocytes from patients with Turner syndrome were irradiated with X-rays to determine the chromosomal aberration frequency in first-division metaphases. Five patients with 45,X karyotype; three 45,X/46,Xi(X)q mosaics; one 45,X/47,XXX mosaic and 9 female controls were studied. Patients with a 45,X karyotype exhibited a radioinduced chromosomal aberration frequency similar to controls. In the mosaics, 45,X cells has a mean frequency of 38.75 +- 2.16; 46,Xi(X)q cells a mean of 38 +- 2.16 and the control group a rate of 36.25 +- 4.32. No differences were observed between 45,X and 46,Xi(X)q cells, 45,X and normal cells or 46,Xi(X)q and normal cells. Apparently neither the X monosomy nor the Xq isochromosome influences the in vitro X-ray-induced chromosomal damage in Turner syndrome lymphocytes. (Auth.). 29 references, 4 tables.

  5. Integrated X-ray and charged particle active pixel CMOS sensor arrays using an epitaxial silicon sensitive region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinfelder, Stuart; Bichsel, Hans; Bieser, Fred; Matis, Howard S.; Rai, Gulshan; Retiere, Fabrice; Weiman, Howard; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2002-01-01

    Integrated CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (APS) arrays have been fabricated and tested using X-ray and electron sources. The 128 by 128 pixel arrays, designed in a standard 0.25 micron process, use a ∼10 micron epitaxial silicon layer as a deep detection region. The epitaxial layer has a much greater thickness than the surface features used by standard CMOS APS, leading to stronger signals and potentially better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). On the other hand, minority carriers confined within the epitaxial region may diffuse to neighboring pixels, blur images and reduce peak signal intensity. But for low-rate, sparse-event images, centroid analysis of this diffusion may be used to increase position resolution. Careful trade-offs involving pixel size and sense-node area verses capacitance must be made to optimize overall performance. The prototype sensor arrays, therefore, include a range of different pixel designs, including different APS circuits and a range of different epitaxial layer contact structures. The fabricated arrays were tested with 1.5 GeV electrons and Fe-55 X-ray sources, yielding a measured noise of 13 electrons RMS and an SNR for single Fe-55 X-rays of greater than 38

  6. Order of magnitude sensitivity increase in X-ray Fluorescence Computed Tomography (XFCT) imaging with an optimized spectro-spatial detector configuration: theory and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Moiz; Bazalova, Magdalena; Xiang, Liangzhong; Xing, Lei

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to increase the sensitivity of XFCT imaging by optimizing the data acquisition geometry for reduced scatter X-rays. The placement of detectors and detector energy window were chosen to minimize scatter X-rays. We performed both theoretical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations of this optimized detector configuration on a mouse-sized phantom containing various gold concentrations. The sensitivity limits were determined for three different X-ray spectra: a monoenergetic source, a Gaussian source, and a conventional X-ray tube source. Scatter X-rays were minimized using a backscatter detector orientation (scatter direction > 110(°) to the primary X-ray beam). The optimized configuration simultaneously reduced the number of detectors and improved the image signal-to-noise ratio. The sensitivity of the optimized configuration was 10 μg/mL (10 pM) at 2 mGy dose with the mono-energetic source, which is an order of magnitude improvement over the unoptimized configuration (102 pM without the optimization). Similar improvements were seen with the Gaussian spectrum source and conventional X-ray tube source. The optimization improvements were predicted in the theoretical model and also demonstrated in simulations. The sensitivity of XFCT imaging can be enhanced by an order of magnitude with the data acquisition optimization, greatly enhancing the potential of this modality for future use in clinical molecular imaging.

  7. The bio-positive effects of diagnostic doses of X-rays on growth of phaseolus-vulgaris plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortazavi, S.M.J.; Mehdipour, L.A.; Behnejad, B.B. [Rafsanjan Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Objective: Plants absorb radioactive elements from phosphate fertilizers, and also from naturally occurring radiation in the soil, air and water. It has long been known that low doses of ionizing radiation evoke stimulatory effects in a wide variety of living organisms. However, as far as we know, there is no published report on the bio-positive effects of diagnostic doses of X-rays on plant growth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bio-effects of low doses of diagnostic X-rays on growth rate of Phaseolus vulgaris (Pinto) plants. Materials and Methods: Before cultivation, Phaseolus vulgaris (Pinto) seeds were soaked in tap water for 2 days followed by another 2 days of covering under a wet cloth. Four hundred newly cultivated seeds were randomly divided into two groups of 200 plants each. In this experiment, two seeds were cultivated in each dish (100 dishes for irradiation group and 100 for sham-irradiation group). Fifteen days after starting cultivation, newly grown plants were irradiated with X-rays. Plants were exposed to a single dose of X-ray (80 kVp, 80 mAs) for 6 days. On day 29, plants were pulled out from the ' soil. Length of plant stem, length of root, number of leaves and plant weight were measured. Results: The stem length in irradiated and sham-irradiated plants was 296.5{+-}13.57 and 223.96{+-}15.02 mm respectively. This difference was statistically significant (P<0.001). Although the number of leaves in irradiated plants was higher than that of sham-irradiated plants (7.05{+-}0.18 and 6.74{+-}0.19 respectively), the difference was not statistically significant. The stem diameter in irradiated and sham-irradiated plants were 3.52{+-}0.12 and 3.35{+-}0.09 mm respectively, but the difference again was not statistically significant (P<0.00 1). Plant weight in irradiated samples was less than that of non-irradiated plants but it was not statistically significant. Conclusions: The overall results indicate that diagnostic doses of X-rays can

  8. Cytological characterization of Chinese hamster ovary X-ray-sensitive mutant cells xrs 5 and xrs 6. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darroudi, F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have determined the rate of progression of the cell cycle of irradiated cells in the presence of caffeine as well as the potentiating effect of caffeine on the frequency of chromosomal aberrations after X-irradiation. The characteristics for survival, frequency of chromosomal alterations and cell cycle progression in the presence or absence of 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) and caffeine of X-irradiated xrs 5, xrs 6 and parental wild-type CHO-K1 cells are discussed and compared to other X-ray-sensitive cells such as cells from ataxia telangiectasia patients. (Auth.)

  9. X ray sensitivity of diploid skin fibroblasts from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Ranjini

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were performed on Fanconi's anemia and normal human fibroblast cell lines growing in culture in an attempt to correlate cell cycle kinetics with genomic damage and determine their bearing on the mechanism of chromosome aberration induction. FA fibroblasts showed a significantly increased susceptibility to chromosomal breakage by x rays in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. No such response was observed in fibroblasts irradiated in the G0 phase. The observed increases in achromatic lesions and in chromatid deletions in FA cells as compared with normal cells appear to indicate that FA cells are deficient in strand break repair and also possibly in base damage excision repair. Experiments are now in progress to further elucidate the mechanisms involved.

  10. Position-sensitive superconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurakado, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors and superconducting transition- edge sensors (TESs) are representative superconductor detectors having energy resolutions much higher than those of semiconductor detectors. STJ detectors are thin, thereby making it suitable for detecting low-energy X rays. The signals of STJ detectors are more than 100 times faster than those of TESs. By contrast, TESs are microcalorimeters that measure the radiation energy from the change in the temperature. Therefore, signals are slow and their time constants are typically several hundreds of μs. However, TESs possess excellent energy resolutions. For example, TESs have a resolution of 1.6 eV for 5.9-keV X rays. An array of STJs or TESs can be used as a pixel detector. Superconducting series-junction detectors (SSJDs) comprise multiple STJs and a single-crystal substrate that acts as a radiation absorber. SSJDs are also position sensitive, and their energy resolutions are higher than those of semiconductor detectors. In this paper, we give an overview of position-sensitive superconductor detectors.

  11. TU-G-207-03: High Spatial Resolution and High Sensitivity X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, L.

    2015-01-01

    Last few years has witnessed the development of novel of X-ray imaging modalities, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT, and X-ray acoustic/fluorescence/luminescence imaging. This symposium will present the recent advances of these emerging X-ray imaging modalities and update the attendees with knowledge in various related topics, including X-ray photon-counting detectors, X-ray physics underlying the emerging applications beyond the traditional X-ray imaging, image reconstruction for the novel modalities, characterization and evaluation of the systems, and their practical implications. In addition, the concept and practical aspects of X-ray activatable targeted nanoparticles for molecular X-ray imaging will be discussed in the context of X-ray fluorescence and luminescence CT. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of various emerging X-ray imaging techniques, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT and X-ray fluorescence/luminescence CT. Discuss the practical need, technical aspects and current status of the emerging X-ray imaging modalities. Describe utility and future impact of the new generation of X-ray imaging applications

  12. Thin film organic photodetectors for indirect X-ray detection demonstrating low dose rate sensitivity at low voltage operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkenburg, Daken J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Johns, Paul M. [Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Detection Systems Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, USA; Baciak, James E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Nino, Juan C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA; Xue, Jiangeng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA

    2017-12-14

    Developments in the field of organic semiconductors have generated organic photodetectors with high quantum efficiency, wide spectral sensitivity, low power consumption, and unique form factors that are flexible and conformable to their substrate shape. In this work, organic photodetectors coupled with inorganic CsI(Tl) scintillators are used to showcase the low dose rate sensitivity that is enabled when high performance organic photodetectors and scintillator crystals are integrated. The detection capability of these organic-inorganic coupled systems to high energy radiation highlights their potential as an alternative to traditional photomultiplier tubes for nuclear spectroscopy applications. When exposed to Bremsstrahlung radiation produced from an X-ray generator, SubPc:C60, AlPcCl:C70, and P3HT:PC61BM thin film photodetectors with active layer thicknesses less than 100 nm show detection of incident radiation at low and no applied bias. Remarkably low dose rates, down to at least 0.28 µGy/s, were detectable with a characteristic linear relationship between exposure rate and photodetector current output. These devices also demonstrate sensitivities as high as 5.37 mC Gy-1 cm-2 when coupled to CsI(Tl). Additionally, as the tube voltage across the X-ray generator was varied, these organic-inorganic systems showed their ability to detect a range of continuous radiation spectra spanning several hundred keV.

  13. Thin film organic photodetectors for indirect X-ray detection demonstrating low dose rate sensitivity at low voltage operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkenburg, Daken J.; Johns, Paul M.; Baciak, James E.; Nino, Juan C.; Xue, Jiangeng

    2017-12-01

    Developments in the field of organic semiconductors have generated organic photodetectors with high quantum efficiency, wide spectral sensitivity, low power consumption, and unique form factors that are flexible and conformable to their substrate shape. In this work, organic photodetectors coupled with inorganic CsI(Tl) scintillators are used to showcase the low dose rate sensitivity that is enabled when high performance organic photodetectors and scintillator crystals are integrated. The detection capability of these organic-inorganic coupled systems to high energy radiation highlights their potential as an alternative to traditional photomultiplier tubes for nuclear spectroscopy applications. When exposed to Bremsstrahlung radiation produced from an X-ray generator, SubPc:C60, AlPcCl:C70, and P3HT:PC61BM thin film photodetectors with active layer thicknesses less than 100 nm show detection of incident radiation at low and no applied bias. Remarkably low dose rates, down to at least 0.18 μGy/s, were detectable with a characteristic linear relationship between exposure rate and photodetector current output. These devices also demonstrate sensitivities as high as 5.37 mC Gy-1 cm-2 when coupled to CsI(Tl). Additionally, as the tube voltage across the X-ray generator was varied, these organic-inorganic systems showed their ability to detect a range of continuous radiation spectra spanning several hundred keV.

  14. Development of a high resolution, high sensitivity cylindrical crystal spectrometer for line shape diagnostics of x-rays emitted from hot plasmas. Progress report, August 1, 1977--July 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.O.; Schnopper, H.

    1978-05-01

    This report oulines progress towards development of a high resolution, high throughput, curved crystal spectrometer suitable for line shape diagnostics of x-rays emitted from hot plasmas. The instrument is designed to interface with the MIT Tokamak (Alcator) with the initial aim of studying the prominent MoL lines which occur in the x-ray spectrum. However, it will have the versatility to function over an energy range of at least 1.5 keV to 7 keV allowing determination of temperature, charge state and density distributions for important impurity ions. The spectrometer employs a large, cylindrically bent crystal which focuses the dispersed x-rays along the cylinder axis where they are recorded by a position sensitive proportional counter. Thus, a wide energy range of the spectrum can be recorded simultaneously and sensitively from a short duration plasma. Computer control of data acquisition and analysis will allow real-time diagnostics

  15. Cross-sensitivity of X-ray-hypersensitive cells derived from LEC strain rats to DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okui, T.; Endoh, D.; Arai, S.; Isogai, E.; Hayashi, M.

    1996-01-01

    The cross-sensitivity of X-ray-hypersensitive lung fibroblasts from LEC strain (LEC) rats to other DNA-damaging agents was examined. The LEC cells were 2- to 3-fold more sensitive to bleomycin (BLM) that induces DNA double-strand breaks, and to a cross-linking agent, mitomycin C, than the cells from WKAH strain (WKAH) rats, while they were slightly sensitive to alkylating agents, ethyl nitrosourea and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, but not to UV-irradiation. Although no difference was observed in the initial yields of DNA double-strand breaks induced by BLM between LEC and WKAH cells, the repair process of DNA double-strand breaks was significantly slower in LEC cells than in WKAH cells

  16. Sensitization of KHT tumors to x-rays by Fluosol-DA (20%)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazlehurst, J.L.; Hirst, D.G.; Brown, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Perfluorocarbons have been used as blood substitutes in clinical situations where high oxygen carrying capacity is required, but whole blood transfusion is not possible. Recently, suitably buffered emulsion of perfluorocarbons such as Fluosol-DA have been used with success in the perfusion of isolated organs for transplant. Its low viscosity makes Fluosol-DA superior to whole blood as a perfusion medium, and it is logical to deduce that Fluosol-DA could be of benefit in the oxygenation of poorly perfused areas often found in malignant tumors and thought to contribute to hypoxia and radioresistance. A fraction (10-30%) of the blood of KHT tumor bearing mice was exchanged for an equal volume of Fluosol-DA (20%). This procedure gave ''Fluocrits'' ranging from 1.5-6.5%. Enhancement of cell killing by x-rays (20 Gy) was observed at the higher ''Fluocrits'', but only if the animals breathed 100 oxygen for 1 hr. prior to irradiation. Results are presented from studies in animals which had been anemic for various times before Fluosol-DA treatment, a model which simulates the anemia often encountered in the cancer patient

  17. X-ray sensitivity of fibroblasts from patients with hereditary retinoblastoma and their families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pledger, J.V.; Craft, A.W.; Bartlett, K.; Long, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The in vitro response to X-irradiation of cultured human fibroblasts was studied using a colony forming assay. A comprehensive reference range was established, giving a median Dsub(0) value of 98.5 cGy with an interquartile range of 86.5-110.5 cGy. Cells from 3 retinoblastoma family pedigrees were studied and the cell survival after exposure to X-rays was compared between affected (11 samples) and unaffected (26 samples) family members. No significant differences in response to ionising radiation were found between the controls, the affected and the unaffected members of the 3 families. The affected members had a median Dsub(0) of 97.5 cGy (interquartile range 87.5-107.5 cGy) and the unaffected members had a median Dsub(0) of 102 cGy (interquartile range 93-111 cGy). Thus radiosensitivity is not a useful marker for the detection of the retinoblastoma gene. (author)

  18. Comparison of sensitivities and detection limits between direct excitation and secondary excitation modes in energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artz, B.E.; Short, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison was made between the direct tube excitation mode and the secondary target excitation mode using a Kevex 0810 energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence system. Relative sensitivities and detection limits were determined with two system configurations. The first configuration used a standard, high power, x-ray fluorescence tube to directly excite the specimen. Several x-ray tubes, including chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten, both filtered and not filtered, were employed. The second configuration consisted of using the x-ray tube to excite a secondary target which in turn excited the specimen. Appropriate targets were compared to the direct excitation results. Relative sensitivities and detection limits were determined for K-series lines for elements from magnesium to barium contained in a low atomic number matrix and in a high atomic number matrix

  19. Implementation of double-C-arm synchronous real-time X-ray positioning system computer aided for aspiration biopsy of small lung lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Hong; Wang Dong; Ye Yukun; Zhou Yuan; Lu Jianfeng; Yang Jingyu; Wang Lining

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of a new type of real-time three-dimensional X-ray positioning system for aspiration biopsy of small lung lesions. Methods: Using X-ray imaging technology and X-ray collimator technology and combining with double-C-arm X-ray machine, two different synchronous real-time images were obtained from the vertical to the horizontal plane. Then, with the computer image processing and computer vision processing technologies, dynamic tracking for 3D information of a pulmonary lesion and the needle in aspiration, and the relative position of the two, were established. Results: There was no interference while the two imaging perpendicularly X-ray beam met, two synchronous real-time image acquisition and tracking of a lung lesion and a needle could be completed in free respiration. The average positioning system error was about 0.5 mm, the largest positioning error was about 1.0 mm, real-time display rate was 5 screen/sec. Conclusions: the establishment of a new type of double-C-arm synchronous real-time X-ray positioning system is feasible. It is available for the fast and accurate aspiration biopsy of small lung lesions. (authors)

  20. Skull x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  1. Neck x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - neck; Cervical spine x-ray; Lateral neck x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored so that the lowest amount of radiation is used to produce the image. Pregnant women and ...

  2. Smart x-ray beam position monitor system using artificial intelligence methods for the advanced photon source insertion-device beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, D.; Ding, H.; Barraza, J.; Kuzay, T.M.; Haeffner, D.; Ramanathan, M.

    1997-09-01

    At the Advanced Photon Source (APS), each insertion device (ID) beamline front-end has two XBPMs to monitor the X-ray beam position for both that vertical and horizontal directions. Performance challenges for a conventional photoemission type X-ray beam position monitor (XBPM) during operations are contamination of the signal from the neighboring bending magnet sources and the sensitivity of the XBPM to the insertion device (ID) gap variations. Problems are exacerbated because users change the ID gap during their operations, and hence the percentage level of the contamination in the front end XBPM signals varies. A smart XBPM system with a high speed digital signal processor has been built at the Advanced Photon Source for the ID beamline front ends. The new version of the software, which uses an artificial intelligence method, provides a self learning and self-calibration capability to the smart XBPM system. The structure of and recent test results with the system are presented in this paper

  3. Analysis of a Novel Diffractive Scanning-Wire Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for Discriminative Profiling of Electron Vs. X Ray Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatchyn, R.

    2011-01-01

    Recent numerical studies of Free Electron Lasers (FELs) operating in the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime indicate a large sensitivity of the gain to the degree of transverse overlap (and associated phase coherence) between the electron and photon beams traveling down the insertion device. Simulations of actual systems imply that accurate detection and correction for this relative loss of overlap, rather than correction for the absolute departure of the electron beam from a fixed axis, is the preferred function of an FEL amplifier's Beam Position Monitor (BPM) and corrector systems. In this note we propose a novel diffractive BPM with the capability of simultaneously detecting and resolving the absolute (and relative) transverse positions and profiles of electron and x-ray beams co-propagating through an undulator. We derive the equations governing the performance of the BPM and examine its predicted performance for the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), viz., for profiling multi-GeV electron bunches co-propagating with one-to-several-hundred keV x-ray beams. Selected research and development (r and d) tasks for fabricating and testing the proposed BPM are discussed.

  4. Fluorescence detection of white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy: towards element-sensitive projections of local atomic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Dąbrowski, K. M.; Novikov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA) pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. This kind of anisotropy results from the interference of X-rays inside a sample and, owing to the short coherence length of a white beam, is visible only at small angles around interatomic directions. Consequently, the main features of the recorded XAA corresponded to distorted real-space projections of dense-packed atomic planes and atomic rows. A quantitative analysis of XAA was carried out using a wavelet transform and allowed well resolved projections of Nb atoms to be obtained up to distances of 10 Å. The signal of nearest O atoms was detected indirectly by a comparison with model calculations. The measurement of white-beam XAA using characteristic radiation indicates the possibility of obtaining element-sensitive projections of the local atomic structure in more complex samples. PMID:21997909

  5. X-ray investigations of the hot ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, W. T.

    1993-01-01

    At energies less than one keV, the intensity of the galactic x-ray background dominates that of the extragalactic background in almost every direction on the sky. Below 1/4 keV, the galactic x-ray background has a galactic stellar component, but the dominant emitter seems to be hot interstellar matter. The origin of the general 3/4 keV x-ray background remains uncertain, but one component must also be the contribution from hot interstellar matter. An overview is given of recent x-ray investigations of the hot interstellar medium using data from the ROSAT X-ray Telescope/Position-Sensitive Proportional Counter (XRT/PSPC) instrument. Several prominent features in the low energy x-ray background that are interpreted as fossil supernova remnants are discussed.

  6. Analyzing three-dimensional position of region of interest using an image of contrast media using unilateral X-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harauchi, Hajime; Gotou, Hiroshi; Tanooka, Masao

    1994-01-01

    Analyzing three-dimensional internal structure of object in an X-ray study is usually performed by using two or more of the incidents of an X-ray direction. In this report, we analyzed the three-dimensional position of tubes with a phantom by using both contrast media and imaging of one direction in the X-ray study. The concentration of the iodine in contrast media can be known by using the log-subtraction image of only the one-directional incident X-ray. Also the diameter of tube filled with contrast media is calculated by the concentration of iodine. So we can show the three-dimensional position of tubes geometrically, by the diameter of tube and the measured value of the film. We verified this method by an experiment according to the theory. (author)

  7. Highly sensitive x-ray detectors in the low-energy range on n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Krishna C.; Muzykov, Peter G. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Russell Terry, J. [Space Science and Applications Group (ISR-1), Intelligence and Space Research Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-30

    Schottky diodes on n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layers have been fabricated for low-energy x-ray detection. The detectors were highly sensitive to soft x-rays and showed improved response compared to the commercial SiC UV photodiodes. Current-voltage characteristics at 475 K showed low leakage current revealing the possibility of high temperature operation. The high quality of the epi-layer was confirmed by x-ray diffraction and chemical etching. Thermally stimulated current measurements performed at 94-550 K revealed low density of deep levels which may cause charge trapping. No charge trapping on detectors' responsivity in the low x-ray energy was found.

  8. 5-chlorodeoxycytidine sensitizes cells to x-ray and is incorporated as 5-chlorodeoxyuridine in tumor DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, L.M.; Greer, S.

    1985-01-01

    5-Chlorodeoxycytidine (CldC) coadministered with tetrahydrouridine (H/sub 4/U), an inhibitor of its deamination, sensitizes HEp-2 cells to X-ray and is incorporated in DNA as 5-chlorodeoxyuridine (CldU). CldC possesses a reasonable Km value (56 μM) with respect to human deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) in contrast to the low affinities of BrdC and IdC (400 and 1000μM, respectively; the Km value for dC = 2μM). Preincubation with N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate (PALA) and 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FdU), inhibitors of pyrimidine biosynthesis, enhances sensitization. X-ray survival curves of HEp-2 cells treated with PALA and FdU (or FdC + H/sub 4/U) and CldC + H/sub 4/U are characterized by dose enhancement ratios of 2.5 or greater. Substantial sensitization by CldC + H/sub 4/U also occurs with Sarcoma-180 and RIF-1 cells in culture . CldC + H/sub 4/U should result in circumvention of catabolism and selective toxicity to tumors via inhibition of nucleoside reductase by CldUTP as well as selective incorporation of CldU in tumors possessing high levels of dCMP deaminase and dCK, enzymes that are markedly elevated in many human tumors. CldU, derived from CldC, is incorporated to a greater extent in the DNA of a solid tumor (S-180) than in normal tissue of the mouse. This may result in selective tumor radiosensitization

  9. Increased sensitivity in thick-target particle induced X-ray emission analyses using dry ashing for preconcentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lill, J.-O.; Harju, L.; Saarela, K.-E.; Lindroos, A.; Heselius, S.-J.

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity in thick-target particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analyses of biological materials can be enhanced by dry ashing. The gain depends mainly on the mass reduction factor and the composition of the residual ash. The enhancement factor was 7 for the certified reference material Pine Needles and the limits of detection (LODs) were below 0.2 μg/g for Zn, Cu, Rb and Sr. When ashing biological materials with low ash contents such as wood of pine or spruce (0.3% of dry weight) and honey (0.1% of wet weight) the gain was far greater. The LODs for these materials were 30 ng/g for wood and below 10 ng/g for honey. In addition, the ashed samples were more homogenous and more resistant to changes during the irradiation than the original biological samples. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. X-ray detectors based on image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A.P.R.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray detectors based on image sensors are described and a comparison is made between the advantages and the disadvantages of such a kind of detectors with the position sensitive detectors. (L.C.) [pt

  11. A new measurement method of actual focal spot position of an x-ray tube using a high-precision carbon-interspaced grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. W.; Lim, H. W.; Jeon, D. H.; Park, C. K.; Cho, H. S.; Seo, C. W.; Lee, D. Y.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, G. A.; Park, S. Y.; Kang, S. Y.; Park, J. E.; Kim, W. S.; Woo, T. H.; Oh, J. E.

    2018-06-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a new method for measuring the actual focal spot position of a diagnostic x-ray tube using a high-precision antiscatter grid and a digital x-ray detector in which grid magnification, which is directly related to the focal spot position, was determined from the Fourier spectrum of the acquired x-ray grid’s image. A systematic experiment was performed to demonstrate the viability of the proposed measurement method. The hardware system used in the experiment consisted of an x-ray tube run at 50 kVp and 1 mA, a flat-panel detector with a pixel size of 49.5 µm, and a high-precision carbon-interspaced grid with a strip density of 200 lines/inch. The results indicated that the focal spot of the x-ray tube (Jupiter 5000, Oxford Instruments) used in the experiment was located approximately 31.10 mm inside from the exit flange, well agreed with the nominal value of 31.05 mm, which demonstrates the viability of the proposed measurement method. Thus, the proposed method can be utilized for system’s performance optimization in many x-ray imaging applications.

  12. Determination of the metal distribution in tooth fillings in real teeth based on element sensitive X-ray tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masschaele, B.; Mondelaers, W.; Cauwels, P.; Jolie, J.; Baechler, S.; Materna, T.

    2000-01-01

    Since a couple of centuries people are using metal tooth-fillings in order to protect their teeth. In the beginning of the 19th century the amalgam or silver fillings were introduced for to first time. Nowadays, dentists mostly use amalgam. These fillings are a mixture of silver, tin and mercury. The mercury which is abundant, about 50%, is dangerous for any living organism. Mercury has a particular affinity for the brain tissue but is also accumulated in the liver, kidneys, lungs, gastrointestinal track and jawbone. Mercury Basely crosses the placenta and is gathered in the heart, pituitary gland and liver of the fetus. It is been proven that the mercury vaporises and enter enters the body via the lungs. Since a couple of years we apply the element sensitive X-ray tomography technique on heavy elements like uranium or lead. By scanning teeth using photons having two different energies, one just below and one just above the K-edge of the element under investigation, the tomography becomes element sensitive. The experiment has been done at the ESRF, beam line ID15A, with a very intense tunable monochromatic high energy X-ray beam. We made tomographies of different teeth with 20 μm image resolution. The slices were 20 μm apart. The results after reconstruction are three dimensional mercury maps which can tell us something about the possibility of mercury diffusion into the roots of the tooth. From there the mercury could enter the blood stream and end up in the organs. (author)

  13. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Chuji.

    1980-01-01

    A principal object of the present invention is to provide an X-ray apparatus which is such that the distance between the surface of the patient's table and the floor on which the apparatus is installed is sufficiently small in the horizontal position of the patient's table of the roentgenographical pedestal and that the rotation of the pedestal from the horizontal position to a tilted position and further to the vertical position of the table can be carried out smoothly. (auth)

  14. Hard X-ray polarimetry with position sensitve germanium detectors. Studies of the recombination transitions into highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tashenov, Stanislav

    2005-07-01

    In this work a first study of the photon polarization for the process of radiative recombination has been performed. This was done at the ESR storage ring at GSI for uranium ions colliding with N2 at various collision energies. For this measurement a high purity Ge Pixel Detector with a 4 x 4 segmentation matrix was applied. The investigation was performed at the Gas-jet target of the ESR. The detector was placed at 60 and 90 observation angles. The sensitivity of the Compton scattering effect to the linear polarization of the X-Ray radiation was employed for the polarization measurement. Detailed investigations of the scattering and geometrical effects inside the detector were performed in order to develop a method to interpret the experimental data and extract the degree of the linear polarization in the hard X-Ray regime with a high precision. A special emphasis was given to the geometry of the detector and it's influence on the measured pixel-to-pixel Compton scattering intensities. The developed method enabled to achieve a precision of the order of 10% with the Pixel Detector which is dominated by the statistical uncertainties. The obtained results show a good agreement with the theoretical values derived from the exact relativistic calculations. For the case of the linear polarization of the K-REC photons, the measured data con rm the theoretical prediction that strong depolarization effects occur for high projectile charges in the forward hemisphere. The latter is in disagreement with the nonrelativistic theory which predicts a 100 % polarization regardless of the emission angle. (orig.)

  15. Hard X-ray polarimetry with position sensitve germanium detectors. Studies of the recombination transitions into highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashenov, Stanislav

    2005-01-01

    In this work a first study of the photon polarization for the process of radiative recombination has been performed. This was done at the ESR storage ring at GSI for uranium ions colliding with N2 at various collision energies. For this measurement a high purity Ge Pixel Detector with a 4 x 4 segmentation matrix was applied. The investigation was performed at the Gas-jet target of the ESR. The detector was placed at 60 and 90 observation angles. The sensitivity of the Compton scattering effect to the linear polarization of the X-Ray radiation was employed for the polarization measurement. Detailed investigations of the scattering and geometrical effects inside the detector were performed in order to develop a method to interpret the experimental data and extract the degree of the linear polarization in the hard X-Ray regime with a high precision. A special emphasis was given to the geometry of the detector and it's influence on the measured pixel-to-pixel Compton scattering intensities. The developed method enabled to achieve a precision of the order of 10% with the Pixel Detector which is dominated by the statistical uncertainties. The obtained results show a good agreement with the theoretical values derived from the exact relativistic calculations. For the case of the linear polarization of the K-REC photons, the measured data con rm the theoretical prediction that strong depolarization effects occur for high projectile charges in the forward hemisphere. The latter is in disagreement with the nonrelativistic theory which predicts a 100 % polarization regardless of the emission angle. (orig.)

  16. An online x-ray based position validation system for prostate hypofractionated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arumugam, Sankar, E-mail: Sankar.Arumugam@sswahs.nsw.gov.au; Xing, Aitang [Department of Medical Physics, Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Sidhom, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Holloway, Lois [Department of Medical Physics, Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: Accurate positioning of the target volume during treatment is paramount for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). In this work, the authors present the development of an in-house software tool to verify target position with an Elekta-Synergy linear accelerator using kV planar images acquired during treatment delivery. Methods: In-house software, SeedTracker, was developed in MATLAB to perform the following three functions: 1. predict intended seed positions in a planar view perpendicular to any gantry angle, simulating a portal imaging device, from the 3D seed co-ordinates derived from the treatment planning system; 2. autosegment seed positions in kV planar images; and 3. report the position shift based on the seed positions in the projection images. The performance of SeedTracker was verified using a CIRS humanoid phantom (CIRS, VA, USA) implanted with three Civco gold seed markers (Civco, IA, USA) in the prostate. The true positive rate of autosegmentation (TPR{sub seg}) and the accuracy of the software in alerting the user when the isocenter position was outside the tolerance (TPR{sub trig}) were studied. Two-dimensional and 3D static position offsets introduced to the humanoid phantom and 3D dynamic offsets introduced to a gel phantom containing gold seeds were used for evaluation of the system. Results: SeedTracker showed a TPR{sub seg} of 100% in the humanoid phantom for projection images acquired at all angles except in the ranges of 80°–100° and 260°–280° where seeds are obscured by anatomy. This resulted in a TPR{sub trig} of 88% over the entire treatment range for considered 3D static offsets introduced to the phantom. For 2D static offsets where the position offsets were only introduced in the anterior–posterior and lateral directions, the TPR{sub trig} of SeedTracker was limited by both seed detectability and positional offset. SeedTracker showed a false positive trigger in the projection angle range between 130°–170° and

  17. Sensitization by wortmannin of heat- or X-ray induced cell death in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Masanori; Suzuki, Norio; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Hirano, Kazuya; Umeda, Noriko; Sakai, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    Here we found that wortmannin sensitized Chinese hamster V79 cells to hyperthermic treatment at 44.0 deg C as determined either by colony formation assay or by dye exclusion assay. Wortmannin enhanced heat-induced cell death accompanying cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP). Additionally, the induction of heat shock protein HSP70 was suppressed and delayed in wortmannin-treated cells. Heat sensitizing effect of wortmannin was obvious at more than 5 or 10 μM of final concentrations, while radiosensitization was apparent at 5 μM. Requirement for high concentration of wortmannin, i.e., order of μM, suggests a possible role of certain protein kinases, such as DNA-PK and/or ATM among PI3-kinase family. The sensitization was minimal when wortmannin was added at the end of heat treatment. This was similar to the case of X-ray. Since heat-induced cell death and PARP cleavage preceded HSP70 induction phenomenon, the sensitization to the hyperthermic treatment was considered mainly caused by enhanced apoptotic cell death rather than secondary to suppression or delay by wortmannin of HSP70 induction. Further, in the present system radiosensitization by wortmannin was also at least partly mediated through enhancement of apoptotic cell death. (author)

  18. X-ray diffractometry with spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeiner, K.

    1981-04-01

    X-ray diffractometry is one of the extensively used methods for investigation of the crystalline structure of materials. Line shape and position of a diffracted line are influenced by grain size, deformation and stress. Spatial resolution of one of these specimen characteristics is usually achieved by point-focused X-ray beams and subsequently analyzing different specimen positions. This work uses the method of image reconstruction from projections for the generation of distribution maps. Additional experimental requirements when using a conventional X-ray goniometer are a specimen scanning unit and a computer. The scanning unit repeatedly performs a number of translation steps followed by a rotation step in a fixed X-ray tube/detector (position sensitive detector) arrangement. At each specimen position a diffraction line is recorded using a line-shaped X-ray beam. This network of diffraction lines (showing line resolution) is mathematically converted to a distribution map of diffraction lines and going thus a point resolution. Specimen areas of up to several cm 2 may be analyzed with a linear resolution of 0.1 to 1 mm. Image reconstruction from projections must be modified for generation of ''function-maps''. This theory is discussed and demonstrated by computer simulations. Diffraction line analysis is done for specimen deformation using a deconvolution procedure. The theoretical considerations are experimentally verified. (author)

  19. Pressure effect in the X-ray intrinsic position resolution in noble gases and mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Azevedo, C.D.R.

    2016-12-13

    A study of the gas pressure effect in the position resolution of an interacting X- or gamma-ray photon in a gas medium is performed. The intrinsic position resolution for pure noble gases (Argon and Xenon) and their mixtures with CO2 and CH4 were calculated for several gas pressures (1-10bar) and for photon energies between 5.4 and 60.0 keV, being possible to establish a linear match between the intrinsic position resolution and the inverse of the gas pressure in that energy range. In order to evaluate the quality of the method here described, a comparison between the available experimental data and the calculated one in this work, is done and discussed. In the majority of the cases, a strong agreement is observed.

  20. High-resolution metallic magnetic calorimeters for β-spectroscopy on 187rhenium and position resolved X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porst, Jan-Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) for high resolution spectroscopy. MMCs are energy dispersive particle detectors based on the calorimetric principle which are typically operated at temperatures below 100 mK. The detectors make use of a paramagnetic temperature sensor to transform the temperature rise upon the absorption of a particle in the detector into a measurable magnetic flux change in a dc-SQUID. The application of MMCs for neutrino mass measurements and their advantages with respect to other approaches are discussed. In view of this application the development of an MMC optimized for β-endpoint spectroscopy on 187 rhenium is presented. A fully micro-fabricated X-ray detector is characterized and performs close to design values. Furthermore, a new technique to more efficiently couple rhenium absorbers mechanically and thermally to the sensor was developed and successfully tested. By employing a metallic contact, signal rise times faster than 5 μs could be observed with superconducting rhenium absorbers. In addition to the single pixel detectors, an alternative approach of reading out multiple pixels was developed in this work, too. Here, the individual absorbers have a different thermal coupling to only one temperature sensor resulting in a distribution of different pulse shapes. Straightforward position discrimination by means of rise time analysis is demonstrated for a four pixel MMC and a thermal model of the detector is provided. Unprecedented so far, an energy resolution of less than ΔE FWHM <5 eV for 5.9 keV X-rays was achieved across all absorbers. (orig.)

  1. TSDC and X-ray diffraction analysis of pure and malachite green sensitized polyvinyl carbazole films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Kathal, Rachana; Mishra, Jyoti; Pandey, Hariom; Khare, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the method for investigating the electrical properties of high solids via the study of thermal relaxation effects and offers an alternative scheme to the conventional bridge methods or the current voltage temperature measurements. For standard TSD experiment, this is comparable to a dielectric loss measurement, the low equivalent frequency and high sensitivity (ability to detect dipole concentration). The activation energies found by initial rise method are 0.31 ± 0.02 eV for pure and 0.43 ± 0.03 eV for malachite green sensitized PVK thermoelectrets. The peak current charges and activation energy associated with the peaks are affected by concentration of malachite green and have been explained in terms of formation of charge transfer complexes and molecular aggregates. The microscopic origin of a given current spectrum is explained by comparing the predictions of the general theories regarding the main polarization processes with the experimental data.

  2. Segmental Musculoskeletal Examinations using Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry (DXA: Positioning and Analysis Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas H. Hart, Sophia Nimphius, Tania Spiteri, Jodie L. Cochrane, Robert U. Newton

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal examinations provide informative and valuable quantitative insight into muscle and bone health. DXA is one mainstream tool used to accurately and reliably determine body composition components and bone mass characteristics in-vivo. Presently, whole body scan models separate the body into axial and appendicular regions, however there is a need for localised appendicular segmentation models to further examine regions of interest within the upper and lower extremities. Similarly, inconsistencies pertaining to patient positioning exist in the literature which influence measurement precision and analysis outcomes highlighting a need for standardised procedure. This paper provides standardised and reproducible: 1 positioning and analysis procedures using DXA and 2 reliable segmental examinations through descriptive appendicular boundaries. Whole-body scans were performed on forty-six (n = 46 football athletes (age: 22.9 ± 4.3 yrs; height: 1.85 ± 0.07 cm; weight: 87.4 ± 10.3 kg; body fat: 11.4 ± 4.5 % using DXA. All segments across all scans were analysed three times by the main investigator on three separate days, and by three independent investigators a week following the original analysis. To examine intra-rater and inter-rater, between day and researcher reliability, coefficients of variation (CV and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC were determined. Positioning and segmental analysis procedures presented in this study produced very high, nearly perfect intra-tester (CV ≤ 2.0%; ICC ≥ 0.988 and inter-tester (CV ≤ 2.4%; ICC ≥ 0.980 reliability, demonstrating excellent reproducibility within and between practitioners. Standardised examinations of axial and appendicular segments are necessary. Future studies aiming to quantify and report segmental analyses of the upper- and lower-body musculoskeletal properties using whole-body DXA scans are encouraged to use the patient positioning and image analysis procedures

  3. Segmental Musculoskeletal Examinations using Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry (DXA): Positioning and Analysis Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Nicolas H; Nimphius, Sophia; Spiteri, Tania; Cochrane, Jodie L; Newton, Robert U

    2015-09-01

    Musculoskeletal examinations provide informative and valuable quantitative insight into muscle and bone health. DXA is one mainstream tool used to accurately and reliably determine body composition components and bone mass characteristics in-vivo. Presently, whole body scan models separate the body into axial and appendicular regions, however there is a need for localised appendicular segmentation models to further examine regions of interest within the upper and lower extremities. Similarly, inconsistencies pertaining to patient positioning exist in the literature which influence measurement precision and analysis outcomes highlighting a need for standardised procedure. This paper provides standardised and reproducible: 1) positioning and analysis procedures using DXA and 2) reliable segmental examinations through descriptive appendicular boundaries. Whole-body scans were performed on forty-six (n = 46) football athletes (age: 22.9 ± 4.3 yrs; height: 1.85 ± 0.07 cm; weight: 87.4 ± 10.3 kg; body fat: 11.4 ± 4.5 %) using DXA. All segments across all scans were analysed three times by the main investigator on three separate days, and by three independent investigators a week following the original analysis. To examine intra-rater and inter-rater, between day and researcher reliability, coefficients of variation (CV) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were determined. Positioning and segmental analysis procedures presented in this study produced very high, nearly perfect intra-tester (CV ≤ 2.0%; ICC ≥ 0.988) and inter-tester (CV ≤ 2.4%; ICC ≥ 0.980) reliability, demonstrating excellent reproducibility within and between practitioners. Standardised examinations of axial and appendicular segments are necessary. Future studies aiming to quantify and report segmental analyses of the upper- and lower-body musculoskeletal properties using whole-body DXA scans are encouraged to use the patient positioning and image analysis procedures outlined in this

  4. Feasibility of using single photon counting X-ray for lung tumor position estimation based on 4D-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenbrenner, Katharina P.; Hesser, Juergen W. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Experimental Radiation Oncology; Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). IWR; Guthier, Christian V. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Experimental Radiation Oncology; Lyatskaya, Yulia [Brigham and Women' s Center, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Wenz, Frederik [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2017-10-01

    In stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung tumors, reliable position estimation of the tumor is necessary in order to minimize normal tissue complication rate. While kV X-ray imaging is frequently used, continuous application during radiotherapy sessions is often not possible due to concerns about the additional dose. Thus, ultra low-dose (ULD) kV X-ray imaging based on a single photon counting detector is suggested. This paper addresses the lower limit of photons to locate the tumor reliably with an accuracy in the range of state-of-the-art methods, i.e. a few millimeters. 18 patient cases with four dimensional CT (4D-CT), which serves as a-priori information, are included in the study. ULD cone beam projections are simulated from the 4D-CTs including Poisson noise. The projections from the breathing phases which correspond to different tumor positions are compared to the ULD projection by means of Poisson log-likelihood (PML) and correlation coefficient (CC), and template matching under these metrics. The results indicate that in full thorax imaging five photons per pixel suffice for a standard deviation in tumor positions of less than half a breathing phase. Around 50 photons per pixel are needed to achieve this accuracy with the field of view restricted to the tumor region. Compared to CC, PML tends to perform better for low photon counts and shifts in patient setup. Template matching only improves the position estimation in high photon counts. The quality of the reconstruction is independent of the projection angle. The accuracy of the proposed ULD single photon counting system is in the range of a few millimeters and therefore comparable to state-of-the-art tumor tracking methods. At the same time, a reduction in photons per pixel by three to four orders of magnitude relative to commercial systems with flatpanel detectors can be achieved. This enables continuous kV image-based position estimation during all fractions since the additional dose to the

  5. Feasibility of using single photon counting X-ray for lung tumor position estimation based on 4D-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbrenner, Katharina P; Guthier, Christian V; Lyatskaya, Yulia; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Wenz, Frederik; Hesser, Jürgen W

    2017-09-01

    In stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung tumors, reliable position estimation of the tumor is necessary in order to minimize normal tissue complication rate. While kV X-ray imaging is frequently used, continuous application during radiotherapy sessions is often not possible due to concerns about the additional dose. Thus, ultra low-dose (ULD) kV X-ray imaging based on a single photon counting detector is suggested. This paper addresses the lower limit of photons to locate the tumor reliably with an accuracy in the range of state-of-the-art methods, i.e. a few millimeters. 18 patient cases with four dimensional CT (4D-CT), which serves as a-priori information, are included in the study. ULD cone beam projections are simulated from the 4D-CTs including Poisson noise. The projections from the breathing phases which correspond to different tumor positions are compared to the ULD projection by means of Poisson log-likelihood (PML) and correlation coefficient (CC), and template matching under these metrics. The results indicate that in full thorax imaging five photons per pixel suffice for a standard deviation in tumor positions of less than half a breathing phase. Around 50 photons per pixel are needed to achieve this accuracy with the field of view restricted to the tumor region. Compared to CC, PML tends to perform better for low photon counts and shifts in patient setup. Template matching only improves the position estimation in high photon counts. The quality of the reconstruction is independent of the projection angle. The accuracy of the proposed ULD single photon counting system is in the range of a few millimeters and therefore comparable to state-of-the-art tumor tracking methods. At the same time, a reduction in photons per pixel by three to four orders of magnitude relative to commercial systems with flatpanel detectors can be achieved. This enables continuous kV image-based position estimation during all fractions since the additional dose to the

  6. Feasibility of using single photon counting X-ray for lung tumor position estimation based on 4D-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschenbrenner, Katharina P.; Hesser, Juergen W.; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Wenz, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    In stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung tumors, reliable position estimation of the tumor is necessary in order to minimize normal tissue complication rate. While kV X-ray imaging is frequently used, continuous application during radiotherapy sessions is often not possible due to concerns about the additional dose. Thus, ultra low-dose (ULD) kV X-ray imaging based on a single photon counting detector is suggested. This paper addresses the lower limit of photons to locate the tumor reliably with an accuracy in the range of state-of-the-art methods, i.e. a few millimeters. 18 patient cases with four dimensional CT (4D-CT), which serves as a-priori information, are included in the study. ULD cone beam projections are simulated from the 4D-CTs including Poisson noise. The projections from the breathing phases which correspond to different tumor positions are compared to the ULD projection by means of Poisson log-likelihood (PML) and correlation coefficient (CC), and template matching under these metrics. The results indicate that in full thorax imaging five photons per pixel suffice for a standard deviation in tumor positions of less than half a breathing phase. Around 50 photons per pixel are needed to achieve this accuracy with the field of view restricted to the tumor region. Compared to CC, PML tends to perform better for low photon counts and shifts in patient setup. Template matching only improves the position estimation in high photon counts. The quality of the reconstruction is independent of the projection angle. The accuracy of the proposed ULD single photon counting system is in the range of a few millimeters and therefore comparable to state-of-the-art tumor tracking methods. At the same time, a reduction in photons per pixel by three to four orders of magnitude relative to commercial systems with flatpanel detectors can be achieved. This enables continuous kV image-based position estimation during all fractions since the additional dose to the

  7. Evidence for three types of x-ray damage repair in yeast and sensitivity of totally repair deficient strains to sunlight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Game, J.C.; Schild, D.; Mortimer, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    Mutants of yeast that confer sensitivity to x-rays are known to fall into two epistasis groups, called here the RAD51 and RAD18 groups, which are each thought to control a different type of x-ray repair. They examine here the role of genes in a third repair pathways in x-ray repair. RAD1 and RAD3 are known to be important in the repair of pyrimidine dimers after uv-irradiation. They find that these genes can also play an important role in x-ray repair, but that this role is only exposed when both the other pathways of x-ray repair are blocked. Double mutants blocked in the RAD51 and RAD18 pathways are significantly less x-ray sensitive than triple mutants blocked in these pathways but also mutant in either the RAD1 or RAD3 genes. In a related experiment, they tested the importance of DNA repair in nature by determining the sensitivity to natural unfiltered sunlight of a strain lacking all known DNA repair pathways. They constructed a quadruple mutant strain containing RAD1-1, RAD18-2, RAD51-1 and PHR1-1. The latter mutation blocks the cell's ability to photoreactivate uv damage. They found that this strain was so sensitive to sunlight that less than three seconds' exposure would cause an average of one lethal hit per cell, and survival was less than 2% after ten seconds' exposure. Wild type yeast at sea level showed no killing after thirty minutes. the quadruple mutant is approximately one thousand times more sensitive to sunlight than the related wild type

  8. Nuclear scaffold organization in the X-ray sensitive Chinese hamster mutant cell line, xrs-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, L.S.; Fink, T.J.; Enrique, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear organization was probed in the radiation-sensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, xrs-5, and compared with parental CHO K1 cells using the resinless section technique and DNase I digestions. The resinless section data showed no gross morphological differences in core filaments from the nuclear scaffolds of unirradiated CHO K1 and xrs-5 cells. However, the nuclear scaffolds of irradiated xrs-5 cells (1 Gy) had significantly increased ground substance. Irradiated and unirradiated CHO K1 cell nuclear scaffolds were morphologically identical. These data suggest that both CHO K1 and xrs-5 cell nuclear scaffolds had internal nuclear scaffolding networks that could provide DNA attachment sites. (author)

  9. Chromosome condensation may enhance X-ray-related cell lethality in a temperature-sensitive mutant (tsBN2) of baby hamster kidney cells (BHK21)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, H.; Nishimoto, T.

    1987-01-01

    In the tsBN2 cell line, which has a temperature-sensitive defect in the regulatory mechanism for chromosome condensation, the lethal effect of X rays was enhanced by incubating the cells at a nonpermissive temperature (40 degrees C) following X irradiation. This enhancement was suppressed in the presence of cycloheximide, which inhibits induction of premature chromosome condensation. The findings obtained in the case of delayed incubation at 40 degrees C and in synchronized cells indicate that X-ray-related potentially lethal damage, which can be expressed by chromosome condensation, is produced in the cells at any stage of the cell cycle, but it is repairable for all cells except those at around the late G2-M phase, where chromosome condensation occurs at a permissive temperature (33.5 degrees C). These observations suggest that the high sensitivity of late G2-M cells to X rays is caused by the events associated with chromosome condensation

  10. Compton polarimetry with position-resolving X-ray detectors; Compton-Polarimetrie mit ortsaufloesenden Roentgendetektoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Sebastian

    2010-02-15

    In the present thesis the prototype of a novel position-resolving and multi-hit able 2D Si(Li) strip detector is characterized, the planar detector crystal of which is simultaneously applied both as scatterer and as absorber. In the framework of this thesis the Si(Li) polarimeter could be applied in different experiments on the radiative electron capture and on the characteristic radiation at the experimental storage ring of the GSI. The characterization of the detector pursued by means of the highly polarized radiation of the electron capture into the K shell of naked xenon. In the following in two further experiments new values on the polarization of the electron capture into the K shell both of the naked and of the hydrogen-like uranium were performed.

  11. Soft x-ray Planetary Imager

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project is to prototype a soft X-ray Imager for planetary applications that has the sensitivity to observe solar system sources of soft  X-ray emission. A strong...

  12. Time- and position-resolved synchrotron x-ray scattering for structure research on biological connective tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zizak, I.

    2000-03-01

    ELETTRA in Trieste. The results obtained during this thesis can be summarized in the following way: - If the tendon is stretched fast (0.1 %/second), the collagen fibers are not stretched an equal amount. Interfibrillar connections are responsible for about 50 % of the elongation of the tendon. - If the tendon is slowly stretched, the fibers creep, so they are stretched even less. At stretching speeds of 0.001 %/second the fibers are stretched only 10 % of the total tendon elongation. - There are two different processes in the collagen fiber which occur during the stretching. Stretching of the collagen triple helix is responsible for about 1/4 of the fibril elongation, and the rest can be described with the slippage of the helices, where only the cross-links between the molecules are stretched. There are indications that this process also depends on the velocity, what would include the viscose processes on the molecular level. Scanning small angle x-ray scattering of bone and cartilage Bone and cartilage are composite tissues consisting of an organic matrix (collagen) and small mineral particles (hydroxyapatite). The mineral particles have a typical thickness of about 3 nm and a length of a few hundreds of nanometers. At a higher hierarchical levels (sub-mm), the tissues have a foam like, trabecular structure with the trabeculae oriented along the main tension lines. The mechanical properties of bone depend on the structure at all levels of hierarchical organization. At the nanometer level, they are determined mainly by the size, shape and orientation of the (hard) mineral crystals within the (soft) organic matrix. In the course of this work, the hierarchical structure of the bone and cartilage was investigated using light- and scanning electron microscopy as well as position resolved scattering methods. A great advantage is the use of scanning small angle x-ray scattering (sSAXS) and wide angle scattering (WAXD, also x-ray diffraction, XRD), which provides simultaneous

  13. Structural sensitivity of x-ray Bragg projection ptychography to domain patterns in epitaxial thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hruszkewycz, S. O.; Zhang, Q.; Holt, M. V.; Highland, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Bragg projection ptychography (BPP) is a coherent diffraction imaging technique capable of mapping the spatial distribution of the Bragg structure factor in nanostructured thin films. Here, we show that, because these images are projections, the structural sensitivity of the resulting images depends on the film thickness and the aspect ratio and orientation of the features of interest and that image interpretation depends on these factors. Lastly, we model changes in contrast in the BPP reconstructions of simulated PbTiO_3 ferroelectric thin films with meandering 180° stripe domains as a function of film thickness, discuss their origin, and comment on the implication of these factors on the design of BPP experiments of general nanostructured films.

  14. Integral window/photon beam position monitor and beam flux detectors for x-ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Deming; Kuzay, Tuncer M.

    1995-01-01

    A monitor/detector assembly in a synchrotron for either monitoring the position of a photon beam or detecting beam flux may additionally function as a vacuum barrier between the front end and downstream segment of the beamline in the synchrotron. A base flange of the monitor/detector assembly is formed of oxygen free copper with a central opening covered by a window foil that is fused thereon. The window foil is made of man-made materials, such as chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and in certain configurations includes a central opening through which the beams are transmitted. Sensors of low atomic number materials, such as aluminum or beryllium, are laid on the window foil. The configuration of the sensors on the window foil may be varied depending on the function to be performed. A contact plate of insulating material, such as aluminum oxide, is secured to the base flange and is thereby clamped against the sensor on the window foil. The sensor is coupled to external electronic signal processing devices via a gold or silver lead printed onto the contact plate and a copper post screw or alternatively via a copper screw and a copper spring that can be inserted through the contact plate and coupled to the sensors. In an alternate embodiment of the monitor/detector assembly, the sensors are sandwiched between the window foil of chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and a front foil made of similar material.

  15. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    Intra-oral dental X-ray apparatus for panoramic radiography is described in detail. It comprises a tubular target carrier supporting at its distal end a target with an inclined forward face. Image definition is improved by positioning in the path of the X-rays a window of X-ray transmitting ceramic material, e.g. 90% oxide of Be, or Al, 7% Si0 2 . The target carrier forms a probe which can be positioned in the patient's mouth. X-rays are directed forwardly and laterally of the target to an X-ray film positioned externally. The probe is provided with a detachable sleeve having V-form arms of X-ray opaque material which serve to depress the tongue out of the radiation path and also shield the roof of the mouth and other regions of the head from the X-ray pattern. A cylindrical lead shield defines the X-ray beam angle. (author)

  16. X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enema. What you can expect During the X-ray X-rays are performed at doctors' offices, dentists' offices, ... as those using a contrast medium. Your child's X-ray Restraints or other techniques may be used to ...

  17. Abdominal x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdominal film; X-ray - abdomen; Flat plate; KUB x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  18. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the ... treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray ...

  19. Soft X-ray spectrographs for solar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in soft X-ray spectrometery are reviewed, with emphasis on techniques for studying the windowless region from roughly 1-100 A. Recent technological developments considered include multilayer mirrors, large-format CCD detectors which are sensitive to X-rays, position-sensitive photon counting detectors, new kinds of X-ray films, and optical systems based on gratings with nonuniform ruling spacings. Improvements in the extent and accuracy of the atomic physics data sets on which the analysis of spectroscopic observatons depend are also discussed.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of three dUTPases from Gram-positive bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Gui-Lan; Wang, Juan; Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2009-01-01

    All organisms examined to date possess a dUTPase that performs the important function of efficiently hydrolyzing dUTP to dUMP in order to prevent the incorporation of dUTP into DNA. Three putative dUTPases from Gram-positive bacteria have been studied in this work. All organisms examined to date possess a dUTPase that performs the important function of efficiently hydrolyzing dUTP to dUMP in order to prevent the incorporation of dUTP into DNA. Three putative dUTPases from Gram-positive bacteria have been studied in this work. Two dUTPase-encoding genes, yncF and yosS, have been identified in Bacillus subtilis. The gene dut, encoding dUTPase from the dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans, was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA. The three genes were cloned into expression vectors and overexpressed at high levels in Escherichia coli. Each protein was purified in two steps using chromatographic methods. Crystals of the YosS and YncF proteins and of S. mutans dUTPase were obtained using the vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected from crystals of selenomethionine-labelled YosS and S. mutans dUTPase to resolutions of 2.3 and 1.7 Å, respectively. The crystal of native YncF diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution

  1. Experimental Test of Data Analysis Methods from Staggered Pair X-ray Beam Position Monitors at Bending Magnet Beamlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buth, G.; Huttel, E.; Mangold, S.; Steininger, R.; Batchelor, D.; Doyle, S.; Simon, R.

    2013-03-01

    Different methods have been proposed to calculate the vertical position of the photon beam centroid from the four blade currents of staggered pair X-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) at bending magnet beamlines since they emerged about 15 years ago. The original difference-over-sum method introduced by Peatman and Holldack is still widely used, even though it has been proven to be rather inaccurate at large beam displacements. By systematically generating bumps in the electron orbit of the ANKA storage ring and comparing synchronized data from electron BPMs and XBPM blade currents, we have been able to show that the log-ratio method by S. F. Lin, B.G. Sun et al. is superior (meaning the characteristic being closer to linear) to the ratio method, which in turn is superior to the difference over sum method. These findings are supported by simulations of the XBPM response to changes of the beam centroid. The heuristic basis for each of the methods is investigated. The implications on using XBPM readings for orbit correction are discussed

  2. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacconi, R.; Gursky, H.

    1974-01-01

    This text contains ten chapters and three appendices. Following an introduction, chapters two through five deal with observational techniques, mechanisms for the production of x rays in a cosmic setting, the x-ray sky and solar x-ray emission. Chapters six through ten include compact x-ray sources, supernova remnants, the interstellar medium, extragalactic x-ray sources and the cosmic x-ray background. Interactions of x rays with matter, units and conversion factors and a catalog of x-ray sources comprise the three appendices. (U.S.)

  3. Imaging plate, a new type of x-ray area detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Nobuo; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Miyahara, Junji.

    1986-01-01

    In respective fields of X-ray crystallography, for the purpose of the efficient collection of reciprocal space information, two-dimensional X-ray detectors such as multiwire proportional chambers and X-ray television sets have been used together with conventional X-ray films. X-ray films are characterized by uniform sensitivity and high positional resolution over a wide area, but the sensitivity is low, and the range of action and the linearity of the sensitivity is problematic. They require the development process, accordingly lack promptitude. The MWPCs and X-ray television sets are superior in the sensitivity, its linearity, the range of action and promptitude, but interior in the uniformity and resolution to the films. Imaging plate is a new X-ray area detector developed by Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd., for digital X-ray medical image diagnosis. This detector is superior in all the above mentioned performances, and it seems very useful also for X-ray crystallography. In this paper, the system composed of an imaging plate and its reader is described, and the basic performance as an X-ray area detector and the results of having recorded the diffraction images of protein crystals as the example of applying it to X-ray crystallography are reported. The imaging plate is that the crystalline fluorescent powder of BaFBr doped with Eu 2+ ions is applied on plastic films. (Kako, I.)

  4. The relationship between cell killing, chromosome aberrations, spindle defects, and mitotic delay in mouse lymphoma cells of differential sensitivity to X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, D.; Zampetti-Bosseler, F.

    1980-01-01

    A study has been made of the effects of x radiation on an ultrasensitive subline of L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells. It has been shown that at survival levels above about 20 per cent, chromosome structural aberrations which lead to bridges and fragments at anaphase are about four times more frequent than spindle defects. The results demonstrated the higher frequency of structural aberrations and spindle defects, and the greater mitotic delay in the X-ray-sensitive than in the X-ray-resistant cell line. A model is proposed which causally relates these end-points to cell killing and DNA repair. (author)

  5. Analytical electron microscope based on scanning transmission electron microscope with wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to realize highly sensitive elemental imaging especially for light elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koguchi, Masanari; Tsuneta, Ruriko; Anan, Yoshihiro; Nakamae, Koji

    2017-01-01

    An analytical electron microscope based on the scanning transmission electron microscope with wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (STEM-WDX) to realize highly sensitive elemental imaging especially for light elements has been developed. In this study, a large-solid-angle multi-capillary x-rays lens with a focal length of 5 mm, long-time data acquisition (e.g. longer than 26 h), and a drift-free system made it possible to visualize boron-dopant images in a Si substrate at a detection limit of 0.2 atomic percent. (paper)

  6. Recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogous genes in X-ray sensitive and resistant CHO cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubnitchaya-Labudova, O.; Hoefer, M.; Portele, A.; Vacata, V.; Rink, H.; Lubec, G.

    1997-01-01

    The XRCC1 gene (X-ray repair cross complementing) complements the DNA repair deficiency of the radiation sensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant cell line EM9 but the mechanism of the correction is not elucidated yet. XRCC1 shows substantial homology to the RAG2 gene (recombination activating gene) and we therefore tried to answer the question, whether structural similarities (sequence of a putative recombination activating domain, aa 332-362 for XRCC1 and aa 286-316 in RAG2) would reflect similar functions of the homologous, putative recombination activating domain. PCR experiments revealed that no sequence homologous to the structural part of human XRCC1 was present in cDNA of CHO. Differential display demonstrated two putative recombination activating in the parental CHO line AA8 and one in the radiosensitive mutant EM9. Southern blot experiments showed the presence of several genes with partial homology to human XRCC1. Recombination studies consisted of expressing amplified target domains within chimeric proteins in recA - bacteria and subsequent detection of recombination events by sequencing the recombinant plasmids. Recombination experiments demonstrated recombination activating activity of all putative recombination activating domains amplified from AA8 and EM9 genomes as reflected by deletions within the inserts of the recombinant plasmids. The recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogues could explain a mechanism responsible for the correction of the DNA repair defect in EM9. (author)

  7. Comparison of Chest X-Ray Findings of Smear Positive and Smear Negative Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Azadeh; Mohammadifard, Mahyar; Naseh, Godratallah

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a chronic pulmonary infectious disease that has affected one-third of the people in the world. It causes nine million new cases and two million deaths per year. Chest radiography associated with Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast staining procedure significantly helps the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Chest radiography can help the diagnosis of tuberculosis in patients with a negative smear sample result that is mainly diagnosed with delay. In this study, chest X-ray findings of PTB were compared in two groups of smear positive and smear negative patients. In this retrospective descriptive-analytical study, 376 patients who had been confirmed with PTB were referred to Birjand Health Care Center from 2001 to 2006. Out of the 376 patients, 100 patients with a positive smear based on WHO criteria were selected. In addition, among negative smear patients, 100 were selected in whom similar demographic characteristics with positive smear patients were seen. All of them had undergone chest radiographies that were then interpreted by two expert radiologists independently. Moreover, all patients’ sputa were examined by an expert laboratory technician at the reference laboratory of the health center. The obtained data were analyzed by means of frequency distribution table and descriptive statistics using SPSS (version 15) and Chi-square statistical test. Except reticulo-nodular infiltration, the relative frequency of other radiographic findings in positive smear patients were more than negative smear patients; and only differences in calcification variables, mediastinal widening, patchy infiltration and hilar adenopathy were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Based on the results of this study, although radiographic findings are not diagnostic in PTB, they are helpful if the assessment associates with the view of clinical manifestations and sputum smears

  8. Use of soft x-ray diagnostic on the COMPASS tokamak for investigations of sawteeth crash neighborhood and of plasma position using fast inversion methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imrisek, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Weinzettl, V.; Mlynar, J.; Panek, R.; Hron, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Odstrcil, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Odstrcil, M. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Optical Research Center, University of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom); Ficker, O. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Pinzon, J. R. [Institue Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, Nancy (France); Ehrlacher, C. [ENS Cachan, Paris (France)

    2014-11-15

    The soft x-ray diagnostic is suitable for monitoring plasma activity in the tokamak core, e.g., sawtooth instability. Moreover, spatially resolved measurements can provide information about plasma position and shape, which can supplement magnetic measurements. In this contribution, fast algorithms with the potential for a real-time use are tested on the data from the COMPASS tokamak. In addition, the soft x-ray data are compared with data from other diagnostics in order to discuss possible connection between sawtooth instability on one side and the transition to higher confinement mode, edge localized modes and productions of runaway electrons on the other side.

  9. Impact of positive chest X-ray findings and blood cultures on adverse outcomes following hospitalized pneumococcal lower respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Marlene; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Benfield, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the clinical presentation and outcome of pneumococcal lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) without positive chest X-ray findings and blood cultures. We investigated the prognostic impact of a pulmonary infiltrate and bacteraemia on the clinical course of hospitalized...

  10. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ... of the inside of the chest. A chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and ...

  11. X-ray film calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, G.F.; Dittmore, C.H.; Henke, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of silver halide x-ray films for imaging and spectroscopy which is limited by the range of intensities that can be recorded and densitometered. Using the manufacturers processing techniques can result in 10 2-3 range in intensity recorded over 0-5 density range. By modifying the chemistry and processing times, ranges of 10 5-6 can be recorded in the same density range. The authors report on x-ray film calibration work and dynamic range improvements. Changes to the processing chemistry and the resulting changes in dynamic range and x-ray sensitivity are discussed

  12. X-ray sky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, M.; Koubsky, P.

    1977-01-01

    The history is described of the discoveries of X-ray sources in the sky. The individual X-ray detectors are described in more detail, i.e., gas counters, scintillation detectors, semiconductor detectors, and the principles of X-ray spectrometry and of radiation collimation aimed at increased resolution are discussed. Currently, over 200 celestial X-ray sources are known. Some were identified as nebulae, in some pulsations were found or the source was identified as a binary star. X-ray bursts of novae were also observed. The X-ray radiation is briefly mentioned of spherical star clusters and of extragalactic X-ray sources. (Oy)

  13. X-ray refractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tur'yanskij, A.G.; Pirshin, I.V.

    2001-01-01

    Paper introduces a new circuit of X-ray refractometer to study angular and spectral features of refracted radiation within hard X-ray range. Refractometer incorporates two goniometers, two crystal-analyzers and three radiation detectors. The maximum distance between radiation source focal point and a receiving slit of the second goniometer is equal to 1.4 m. For the first time one obtained refraction patterns of fine-film specimens including C/Si stressed structure. Paper describes a new technique of refractometry via specimen oscillation at fixed position of a detecting device. Paper presents the measurement results of oscillation refraction patterns for specimens of melted quartz and ZnSe single crystal [ru

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... technologist, an individual specially trained to perform radiology examinations, positions the patient on the x-ray table ... bone is forming), for comparison purposes. When the examination is complete, you may be asked to wait ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaged. When necessary, sandbags, pillows or other positioning devices will be used to help you maintain the ... here Images × Image Gallery Radiological technologist preparing to take an arm x-ray on a patient. View ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small ... the table in the area of the body being imaged. When necessary, sandbags, pillows or other positioning ...

  18. Semiconductor X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Barrie Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and measuring the elemental x-rays released when materials are examined with particles (electrons, protons, alpha particles, etc.) or photons (x-rays and gamma rays) is still considered to be the primary analytical technique for routine and non-destructive materials analysis. The Lithium Drifted Silicon (Si(Li)) X-Ray Detector, with its good resolution and peak to background, pioneered this type of analysis on electron microscopes, x-ray fluorescence instruments, and radioactive source- and accelerator-based excitation systems. Although rapid progress in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), and Compound Semiconductor Detectors, including renewed interest in alternative materials such as CdZnTe and diamond, has made the Si(Li) X-Ray Detector nearly obsolete, the device serves as a useful benchmark and still is used in special instances where its large, sensitive depth is essential. Semiconductor X-Ray Detectors focuses on the history and development of Si(Li) X-Ray Detect...

  19. The Mapping X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (MapX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, P.; Blake, D. F.; Marchis, F.; Bristow, T.; Thompson, K.

    2017-12-01

    Many planetary surface processes leave traces of their actions as features in the size range 10s to 100s of microns. The Mapping X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (MapX) will provide elemental imaging at 100 micron spatial resolution, yielding elemental chemistry at a scale where many relict physical, chemical, or biological features can be imaged and interpreted in ancient rocks on planetary bodies and planetesimals. MapX is an arm-based instrument positioned on a rock or regolith with touch sensors. During an analysis, an X-ray source (tube or radioisotope) bombards the sample with X-rays or alpha-particles / gamma-rays, resulting in sample X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). X-rays emitted in the direction of an X-ray sensitive CCD imager pass through a 1:1 focusing lens (X-ray micro-pore Optic (MPO)) that projects a spatially resolved image of the X-rays onto the CCD. The CCD is operated in single photon counting mode so that the energies and positions of individual X-ray photons are recorded. In a single analysis, several thousand frames are both stored and processed in real-time. Higher level data products include single-element maps with a lateral spatial resolution of 100 microns and quantitative XRF spectra from ground- or instrument- selected Regions of Interest (ROI). XRF spectra from ROI are compared with known rock and mineral compositions to extrapolate the data to rock types and putative mineralogies. When applied to airless bodies and implemented with an appropriate radioisotope source for alpha-particle excitation, MapX will be able to analyze biogenic elements C, N, O, P, S, in addition to the cations of the rock-forming elements >Na, accessible with either X-ray or gamma-ray excitation. The MapX concept has been demonstrated with a series of lab-based prototypes and is currently under refinement and TRL maturation.

  20. X-ray radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, D.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: The most common form of radio therapy is X-ray therapy, where a beam of photons or their parent electrons break down hydrogen bonds within the body's cells and remove certain DNA information necessary for cell multiplication. This process can eradicate malignant cells leading to complete recovery, to the remission of some cancers, or at least to a degree of pain relief. The radiotherapy instrument is usually an electron linac, and the electrons are used either directly in 'electrotherapy' for some 10% of patients, or the electrons bombard a conversion target creating a broad beam of high energy photons or 'penetration X-rays'. The simplest machine consists of several accelerating sections at around 3 GHz, accelerating electrons to 6 MeV; a cooled tungsten target is used to produce a 4 Gray/min X-ray field which can be collimated into a rectangular shape at the patient position. This tiny linac is mounted inside a rotating isocentric gantry above the patient who must remain perfectly still. Several convergent beams can also be used to increase the delivered dose. More sophisticated accelerators operate at up to 18 MeV to increase penetration depths and decrease skin exposure. Alternatively, electrotherapy can be used with different energies for lower and variable penetration depths - approximately 0.5 cm per MeV. In this way surface tissue may be treated without affecting deeper and more critical anatomical regions. This type of linac, 1 to 2 metres long, is mounted parallel to the patient with a bending magnet to direct the beam to the radiotherapy system, which includes the target, thick movable collimator jaws, a beam field equalizer, dose rate and optical field simulation and energy controls. There are over 2000 acceleratorbased X-ray treatment units worldwide. Western countries have up to two units per million population, whereas in developing countries such as Bangladesh, the density is only one per 100 million. Several

  1. Transient soft X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, S.; Murakami, T.; Nagase, F.; Tanaka, Y.; Yamashita, K.

    1976-01-01

    A rocket observation of cosmic soft X-rays suggests the existence of transient, recurrent soft X-ray sources which are found variable during the flight time of the rocket. Some of the soft X-ray sources thus far reported are considered to be of this time. These sources are listed and their positions are shown. (Auth.)

  2. Automatic weld joint X-ray inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, H.U.; Linke, D.; Siems, K.D.; Kruse, H.; Schuetze, E.

    1990-01-01

    A gantry mounted robotic x-ray inspection unit has been developed for the series testing of small and medium sized welded components (pipe bends and nozzles). The unit features computer controlled positioning of the x-ray tube and x-ray image amplifier. Image quality classes 2 and even 1 could be achieved without difficulty. (author)

  3. Measurement of position dependence of spectral distribution in primary X-ray beam of CT system using compton spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Masao; Maeda, Koji; Maeda, Koji

    2005-01-01

    Our purpose is to acquire the diagnostic x-ray spectra of the CT system easily under clinical conditions by Compton scatter spectroscopy using a high resolution Schottky CdTe detector recently developed and to estimate the quality and quantity of these spectra compared the relative exposure measured using an ionization chamber with curves measured by the reconstructed spectra. Although the spectral broadening and the fluctuation were slightly shown, the errors of the relative exposure were under 10%. Though the experimental arrangement of this method is so easy and reconstructed algorithm is simple, these results suggested that this method is little influenced by the variation of dose rates or property of the incident x rays. We therefore propose that the Compton scatter spectroscopy with the newly developed Schottky CdTe detector is suitable for measuring the diagnostic x-ray spectra of the CT system under the clinical conditions and useful for quality assurance and quality control of the clinical x-ray CT system. (author)

  4. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    Intra-oral dental X-ray apparatus for panoramic dental radiography is described in detail. It comprises an electron gun having an elongated tubular target carrier extending into the patient's mouth. The carrier supports an inclined target for direction of an X-ray pattern towards a film positioned externally of the patient's mouth. Image definition is improved by a focusing anode which focuses the electron beam into a sharp spot (0.05 to 0.10 mm diameter) on the target. The potential on the focusing anode is adjustable to vary the size of the spot. An X-ray transmitting ceramic (oxides of Be, Al and Si) window is positioned adjacent to the front face of the target. The electron beam can be magnetically deflected to change the X-ray beam direction. (author)

  5. Einstein pictures the x-ray sky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartline, B.K.

    1979-01-01

    The second High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-2, Einstein) is revolutionizing x-ray astronomy just as its namesake revolutionized physics. Earlier x-ray observatories, including HEAO-1, were designed to scan the sky for x-ray emitters. With Einstein, the challenge has shifted from discovering x-ray sources to understanding the processes producing the x-rays. But having 500 times the sensitivity of previous detectors, Einstein makes more than its share of discoveries, too. For example, it sees distant quasars and clusters of galaxies that can barely be detected by the largest optical telescopes

  6. Picosecond x-ray streak camera studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasyanov, Yu.S.; Malyutin, A.A.; Richardson, M.C.; Chevokin, V.K.

    1975-01-01

    Some initial results of direct measurement of picosecond x-ray emission from laser-produced plasmas are presented. A PIM-UMI 93 image converter tube, incorporating an x-ray sensitive photocathode, linear deflection, and three stages of image amplification was used to analyse the x-ray radiation emanating from plasmas produced from solid Ti targets by single high-intensity picosecond laser pulses. From such plasmas, the x-ray emission typically persisted for times of 60psec. However, it is shown that this detection system should be capable of resolving x-ray phenomena of much shorter duration. (author)

  7. Synchrotron x-ray microbeam characteristics for x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Atsuo; Noma, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis using a synchrotron x-ray microprobe has become an indispensable technique for non-destructive micro-analysis. One of the most important parameters that characterize the x-ray microbeam system for x-ray fluorescence analysis is the beam size. For practical analysis, however, the photon flux, the energy resolution and the available energy range are also crucial. Three types of x-ray microbeam systems, including monochromatic and continuum excitation systems, were compared with reference to the sensitivity, the minimum detection limit and the applicability to various types of x-ray spectroscopic analysis. 16 refs., 5 figs

  8. Soft X-ray radiation damage in EM-CCDs used for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, D.; Soman, M.; Holland, A.; Keelan, J.; Hall, D.; Holland, K.; Colebrook, D.

    2018-02-01

    Advancement in synchrotron and free electron laser facilities means that X-ray beams with higher intensity than ever before are being created. The high brilliance of the X-ray beam, as well as the ability to use a range of X-ray energies, means that they can be used in a wide range of applications. One such application is Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS). RIXS uses the intense and tuneable X-ray beams in order to investigate the electronic structure of materials. The photons are focused onto a sample material and the scattered X-ray beam is diffracted off a high resolution grating to disperse the X-ray energies onto a position sensitive detector. Whilst several factors affect the total system energy resolution, the performance of RIXS experiments can be limited by the spatial resolution of the detector used. Electron-Multiplying CCDs (EM-CCDs) at high gain in combination with centroiding of the photon charge cloud across several detector pixels can lead to sub-pixel spatial resolution of 2-3 μm. X-ray radiation can cause damage to CCDs through ionisation damage resulting in increases in dark current and/or a shift in flat band voltage. Understanding the effect of radiation damage on EM-CCDs is important in order to predict lifetime as well as the change in performance over time. Two CCD-97s were taken to PTB at BESSY II and irradiated with large doses of soft X-rays in order to probe the front and back surfaces of the device. The dark current was shown to decay over time with two different exponential components to it. This paper will discuss the use of EM-CCDs for readout of RIXS spectrometers, and limitations on spatial resolution, together with any limitations on instrument use which may arise from X-ray-induced radiation damage.

  9. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a ... posted: How to Obtain and Share ...

  10. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey Rubin, a radiologist ... about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! Spotlight Recently posted: ...

  11. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sell, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    A diagnostic x-ray device, readily convertible between conventional radiographic and tomographic operating modes, is described. An improved drive system interconnects and drives the x-ray source and the imaging device through coordinated movements for tomography

  12. X-ray - skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003381.htm X-ray - skeleton To use the sharing features on this ... Degenerative bone conditions Osteomyelitis Risks There is low radiation exposure. X-rays machines are set to provide the smallest ...

  13. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... I’d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most ... far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! ...

  14. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  15. Ataxia telangiectasia derived iPS cells show preserved x-ray sensitivity and decreased chromosomal instability

    OpenAIRE

    Fukawatase, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Okamura, Kohji; Nakamura, Ken-ichi; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Takada, Shuji; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Masuda, Akira; Nasu, Michiyo; Hata, Kenichiro; Hanaoka, Kazunori; Higuchi, Akon; Takubo, Kaiyo; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is a neurodegenerative inherited disease with chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. iPS cells lacking ATM (AT-iPS cells) exhibited hypersensitivity to X-ray irradiation, one of the characteristics of the disease. While parental ataxia telangiectasia cells exhibited significant chromosomal abnormalities, AT-iPS cells did not show any chromosomal instability in vitro for at least 80 passages (560 days). Whole exome analysis also showed a compa...

  16. Setup accuracy of stereoscopic X-ray positioning with automated correction for rotational errors in patients treated with conformal arc radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soete, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; Tournel, Koen; Storme, Guy

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated setup accuracy of NovalisBody stereoscopic X-ray positioning with automated correction for rotational errors with the Robotics Tilt Module in patients treated with conformal arc radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The correction of rotational errors was shown to reduce random and systematic errors in all directions. (NovalisBody TM and Robotics Tilt Module TM are products of BrainLAB A.G., Heimstetten, Germany)

  17. Development of an ionization chamber based high sensitivity detector for the measurement of radiation dose from X-ray whole body scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sunil K.; Tripathi, S.M.; LijiShaiju; Sathian, V.; Kulkarni, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Using walk through metal detectors and undergoing frisking for personals at airports, seaports, railway stations and other sensitive places no longer meets proper security requirements. Now a days use of plastic explosives, drug trafficking or illegal carriage of dangerous items concealed under cloths or body cavities has increased many folds which in many cases is not possible to detect by conventional methods. One of the systems which are capable to overcome the above mentioned difficulties is the use of X-ray based whole body scanners, either transmission type or backscatter type, depending upon the nature of requirement. While using these whole body scanners the person being scanned possesses a radiation risk whose safety aspects can be monitored by following international standards (recommending certain dose limits). In order to check the compliance of these dose limits, the dose per scan received by the person (from these whole body scanners) needs to be measured. A very high sensitive ionization chamber has been designed and fabricated for measuring these extremely low X- ray fields ( few μR) produced by a scanning X-ray beam over a large area. A methodology has been developed to measure exposure per scan using large volume ionization chambers. This value of exposure was used to calculate whole body dose as per the recommendations of ANSI standard for its compliance

  18. Flash X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Eiichi

    2003-01-01

    Generation of quasi-monochromatic X-ray by production of weakly ionized line plasma (flash X-ray), high-speed imaging by the X-ray and high-contrast imaging by the characteristic X-ray absorption are described. The equipment for the X-ray is consisted from the high-voltage power supply and condenser, turbo molecular pump, and plasma X-ray tube. The tube has a long linear anticathode to produce the line plasma and flash X-ray at 20 kA current at maximum. X-ray spectrum is measured by the imaging plate equipped in the computed radiography system after diffracted by a LiF single crystal bender. Cu anticathode generates sharp peaks of K X-ray series. The tissue images are presented for vertebra, rabbit ear and heart, and dog heart by X-ray fluoroscopy with Ce anticathode. Generation of K-orbit characteristic X-ray with extremely low bremsstrahung is to be attempted for medical use. (N.I.)

  19. Sensitivity of UF-R, UF-VCh, UF-VR films used for soft x-ray (lambda=2+10A) detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglitskij, E.V.; Bojko, V.A.; Kalinkina, T.A.

    1975-01-01

    The sensitometric characteristics of the following types of photographic film were measured in the range of wavelengths 2-10A: UF-R, UF-VCh, and UF-VR. It was demonstrated that UF-VR photographic film is four times as sensitive as UF-R film and 1.6 times as sensitive as UF-VCh film; it is also most suitable film for x-ray spectroscopy of multiply charged ions and for diagnosing high-temperature laser plasma

  20. High-resolution accelerator alignment using x-ray optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingxin Yang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel alignment technique utilizing the x-ray beam of an undulator in conjunction with pinholes and position-sensitive detectors for positioning components of the accelerator, undulator, and beam line in an x-ray free-electron laser. Two retractable pinholes at each end of the undulator define a stable and reproducible x-ray beam axis (XBA. Targets are precisely positioned on the XBA using a pinhole camera technique. Position-sensitive detectors responding to both x-ray and electron beams enable direct transfer of the position setting from the XBA to the electron beam. This system has the potential to deliver superior alignment accuracy (1–3   μm for target pinholes in the transverse directions over a long distance (200 m or longer. It can be used to define the beam axis of the electron-beam–based alignment, enabling high reproducibility of the latter. This x-ray–based concept should complement the electron-beam–based alignment and the existing survey methods to raise the alignment accuracy of long accelerators to an unprecedented level. Further improvement of the transverse accuracy using x-ray zone plates will be discussed. We also propose a concurrent measurement scheme during accelerator operation to allow real-time feedback for transverse position correction.

  1. Changes in X-ray sensitivity of mouse eggs from fertilization to the early pronuclear stage, and their repair capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Yoichi; Utsugi-Takeuchi, Toyoko; Tobari, Izuo; Seki, Naohiko; Chiba Univ.

    1989-01-01

    The analysis of potentiation effects of 3-aminobenzamide and caffeine on the yield of X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations demonstrated that the increase of radiosensitivity and the decrease of chromosome-type exchange induction with pronuclear formation, may be closely correlated with alterations in chromatin configuration in the pronuclei and in repair capacity of fertilized eggs at the pre-DNA-synthetic stage. No evidence based on repair efficiency was found for the marked difference in radiosensitivity between male and female genomes during pronuclear formation. (author)

  2. Ultraprecision motion control technique for high-resolution x-ray instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, D.; Toellner, T. S.; Alp, E. E.

    2000-07-17

    With the availability of third-generation hard x-ray synchrotron radiation sources, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory, x-ray inelastic scattering and x-ray nuclear resonant scattering provide powerful means for investigating the vibrational dynamics of a variety of materials and condensed matter systems. Novel high-resolution hard x-ray optics with meV energy resolution requires a compact positioning mechanism with 20--50-nrad angular resolution and stability. In this paper, the authors technical approach to this design challenge is presented. Sensitivity and stability test results are also discussed.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of the X-ray response of a germanium microstrip detector with energy and position resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, G; Fajardo, P; Morse, J

    1999-01-01

    We present Monte Carlo computer simulations of the X-ray response of a micro-strip germanium detector over the energy range 30-100 keV. The detector consists of a linear array of lithographically defined 150 mu m wide strips on a high purity monolithic germanium crystal of 6 mm thickness. The simulation code is divided into two parts. We first consider a 10 mu m wide X-ray beam striking the detector surface at normal incidence and compute the interaction processes possible for each photon. Photon scattering and absorption inside the detector crystal are simulated using the EGS4 code with the LSCAT extension for low energies. A history of events is created of the deposited energies which is read by the second part of the code which computes the energy histogram for each detector strip. Appropriate algorithms are introduced to account for lateral charge spreading occurring during charge carrier drift to the detector surface, and Fano and preamplifier electronic noise contributions. Computed spectra for differen...

  4. Signal processors for position-sensitive detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Ken-ichi [Hosei Univ., Koganei, Tokyo (Japan). Coll. of Engineering

    1996-07-01

    Position-sensitive detectors (PSD) are widely used in following various fields: condensed matter studies, material engineering, medical radiology particle physics, astrophysics and industrial applications. X-ray diffraction analysis is one of the field where PSDs are the most important instruments. In this field, many types of PSAs are employed: position-sensitive proportional counters (PSPC), multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC), imaging plates, image intensifiers combined CCD cameras and semiconductor array devices. Two readout systems used for PSDs, where one is a charge-division type with high stability and the other is an encoder with multiple delay, line readout circuits useful for fast counting, were reported in this paper. The multiple delay line encoding system can be applicable to high counting rate 1D and 2D gas proportional detectors. (G.K.)

  5. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culhane, J.L.; Sanford, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray astronomy has been established as a powerful means of observing matter in its most extreme form. The energy liberated by sources discovered in our Galaxy has confirmed that collapsed stars of great density, and with intense gravitational fields, can be studied by making observations in the X-ray part of the electromagnetic spectrum. The astronomical objects which emit detectable X-rays include our own Sun and extend to quasars at the edge of the Universe. This book describes the history, techniques and results obtained in the first twenty-five years of exploration. Space rockets and satellites are essential for carrying the instruments above the Earth's atmosphere where it becomes possible to view the X-rays from stars and nebulae. The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: the birth of X-ray astronomy; the nature of X-radiation; X-rays from the Sun; solar-flare X-rays; X-rays from beyond the solar system; supernovae and their remnants; X-rays from binary stars; white dwarfs and neutron stars; black holes; X-rays from galaxies and quasars; clusters of galaxies; the observatories of the future. (author)

  6. X-ray table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, J.R.; Otto, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    An X-ray radiographic or fluoroscopic table is described which includes a film holder with a frame attached to a cable running over end pulleys for positioning the holder longitudinally as desired under the table top. The holder has a front opening to receive a cassette-supporting tray which can be slid out on tracks to change the cassette. A reed switch on the frame is opened by a permanent magnet on the tray only when the tray is half-way out. When the switch is closed, an electromagnet locks the pulley and the holder in place. The holder is thus automatically locked in place not only during exposure (tray in) but when the tray is out for changing the cassette. To re-position the holder, the operator pulls the tray half-out and, using the tray itself, pushes the holder along the table, the holder being counterbalanced by a weight. (author)

  7. X-ray-assisted positioning of patients treated by conformal arc radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Comparison of setup accuracy using implanted markers versus bony structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soete, Guy; Cock, Mieke de; Verellen, Dirk; Michielsen, Dirk; Keuppens, Frans; Storme, Guy

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare setup accuracy of NovalisBody stereoscopic X-ray positioning using implanted markers in the prostate vs. bony structures in patients treated with dynamic conformal arc radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Random and systematic setup errors (RE and SE) of the isocenter with regard to the center of gravity of three fiducial markers were measured by means of orthogonal verification films in 120 treatment sessions in 12 patients. Positioning was performed using NovalisBody semiautomated marker fusion. The results were compared with a control group of 261 measurements in 15 patients who were positioned with NovalisBody automated bone fusion. In addition, interfraction and intrafraction prostate motion was registered in the patients with implanted markers. Results: Marker-based X-ray positioning resulted in a reduction of RE as well as SE in the anteroposterior, craniocaudal, and left-right directions compared with those in the control group. The interfraction prostate displacements with regard to the bony pelvis that could be avoided by marker positioning ranged between 1.6 and 2.8 mm for RE and between 1.3 and 4.3 mm for SE. Intrafraction random and systematic prostate movements ranged between 1.4 and 2.4 mm and between 0.8 and 1.3 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The problem of interfraction prostate motion can be solved by using implanted markers. In addition, the NovalisBody X-ray system performs more accurately with markers compared with bone fusion. Intrafraction organ motion has become the limiting factor for margin reduction around the clinical target volume

  8. Boundary-enhancement in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomosynthesis improves depth position characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Huifeng; Xu, Qiaofeng; Garson, Alfred B; Anastasio, Mark A

    2015-04-21

    Propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast (PB XPC) tomosynthesis combines the concepts of tomosynthesis and XPC imaging to realize the advantages of both for biological imaging applications. Tomosynthesis permits reductions in acquisition times compared with full-view tomography, while XPC imaging provides the opportunity to resolve weakly absorbing structures. In this note, an investigation of the depth resolving properties of PB XPC tomosynthesis is conducted. The results demonstrate that in-plane structures display strong boundary-enhancement while out-of-plane structures do not. This effect can facilitate the identification of in-plane structures in PB XPC tomosynthesis that could normally not be distinguished from out-of-plane structures in absorption-based tomosynthesis.

  9. Boundary-enhancement in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomosynthesis improves depth position characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Huifeng; Xu, Qiaofeng; Garson, Alfred B III; Anastasio, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast (PB XPC) tomosynthesis combines the concepts of tomosynthesis and XPC imaging to realize the advantages of both for biological imaging applications. Tomosynthesis permits reductions in acquisition times compared with full-view tomography, while XPC imaging provides the opportunity to resolve weakly absorbing structures. In this note, an investigation of the depth resolving properties of PB XPC tomosynthesis is conducted. The results demonstrate that in-plane structures display strong boundary-enhancement while out-of-plane structures do not. This effect can facilitate the identification of in-plane structures in PB XPC tomosynthesis that could normally not be distinguished from out-of-plane structures in absorption-based tomosynthesis. (note)

  10. X-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faigel, G.; Tegze, M.; Belakhovsky, M.; Marchesini, S.; Bortel, G.

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade holographic methods using hard X-rays were developed. They are able to resolve atomic distances, and can give the 3D arrangement of atoms around a selected element. Therefore, hard X-ray holography has potential applications in chemistry, biology and physics. In this article we give a general description of these methods and discuss the developments in the experimental technique. The capabilities of hard X-ray holography are demonstrated by examples

  11. Multichannel X-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khabakhpashev, A

    1980-10-01

    A typical design is discussed of multiwire proportional counters and their characteristic feature is explained, ie., the possibility of showing one or two coordinates of the X-ray quantum absorption site. The advantages of such instruments are listed, such as increased sensitivity of determination, the possibility of recording radiations of a different intensity, the possibility of on-line data processing and of the digital display of results. The fields of application include X-ray structural analysis in solid state physics, crystallography, molecular biology, astronomy, materials testing, and medicine.

  12. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, N.B.

    1977-01-01

    The principle, instrument and procedure of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry are described. It is a rapid, simple and sensitive method for the trace analysis of elements from sodium to uranium in powder, liquid or metal samples. (M.G.B.)

  13. Proton exciting X ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xinpei

    1986-04-01

    The analyzing capability of proton exciting X ray analysis for different elements in organisms was discussed, and dealing with examples of trace element analysis in the human body and animal organisms, such as blood serum, urine, and hair. The sensitivity, accuracy, and capability of multielement analysis were discussed. Its strong points for the trace element analysis in biomedicine were explained

  14. Providing x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallozzi, P.J.; Epstein, H.M.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides an apparatus for providing x-rays to an object that may be in an ordinary environment such as air at approximately atmospheric pressure. The apparatus comprises: means (typically a laser beam) for directing energy onto a target to produce x-rays of a selected spectrum and intensity at the target; a fluid-tight enclosure around the target; means for maintaining the pressure in the first enclosure substantially below atmospheric pressure; a fluid-tight second enclosure adjoining the first enclosure, the common wall portion having an opening large enough to permit x-rays to pass through but small enough to allow the pressure reducing means to evacuate gas from the first enclosure at least as fast as it enters through the opening; the second enclosure filled with a gas that is highly transparent to x-rays; the wall of the second enclosure to which the x-rays travel having a portion that is highly transparent to x-rays (usually a beryllium or plastic foil), so that the object to which the x-rays are to be provided may be located outside the second enclosure and adjacent thereto and thus receive the x-rays substantially unimpeded by air or other intervening matter. The apparatus is particularly suited to obtaining EXAFS (extended x-ray fine structure spectroscopy) data on a material

  15. Imaging X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elvis, M.

    1990-01-01

    The launch of the High Energy Astrophysical Observatory, more appealingly called the Einstein Observatory, marked one of the most revolutionary steps taken in astrophysics this century. Its greater sensitivity compared with earlier satellites and its ability to make high spacial and spectral resolution observations transformed X-ray astronomy. This book is based on a Symposium held in Cambridge, Massachusetts, to celebrate a decade of Einstein Observatory's achievements. It discusses the contributions that this satellite has made to each area of modern astrophysics and the diversity of the ongoing work based on Einstein data. There is a guide to each of the main data bases now coming on-line to increase the availability and to preserve this valuable archive for the future. A review of NASA's next big X-ray mission, AXAF, and a visionary program for novel X-ray astronomy satellites by Riccardo Giacconi conclude this wide-ranging volume. (author)

  16. Phase-contrast X-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Atsushi [Hitachi Ltd., Saitama (Japan). Advanced Research Laboratory; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji

    1995-12-01

    Phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT) enabling the observation of biological soft tissues without contrast enhancement has been developed. The X-ray phase shift caused by an object is measured and input to a standard CT reconstruction algorithm. A thousand times increase in the image sensitivity to soft tissues is achieved compared with the conventional CT using absorption contrast. This is because the X-ray phase shift cross section of light elements is about a thousand times larger than the absorption cross section. The phase shift is detected using an X-ray interferometer and computer analyses of interference patterns. Experiments were performed using a synchrotron X-ray source. Excellent image sensitivity is demonstrated in the observation of cancerous rabbit liver. The CT images distinguish cancer lesion from normal liver tissue and, moreover, visualize the pathological condition in the lesion. Although the X-ray energy employed and the present observation area size are not suitable for medical applications as they are, phase-contrast X-ray CT is promising for investigating the internal structure of soft tissue which is almost transparent for X-rays. The high sensitivity also provides the advantage of reducing X-ray doses. (author).

  17. Electronic noise in charge sensitive preamplifiers for X-ray spectroscopy and the benefits of a SiC input JFET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lioliou, G., E-mail: G.Lioliou@sussex.ac.uk; Barnett, A.M.

    2015-11-21

    A comprehensive summary and analysis of the electronic noise affecting the resolution of X-ray, γ-ray and particle counting spectroscopic systems which employ semiconductor detectors and charge sensitive preamplifiers is presented. The noise arising from the input transistor of the preamplifier and its contribution to the total noise is examined. A model for computing the noise arising from the front-end transistor is also presented and theoretical calculations comparing the noise contribution of transistors made of different materials are discussed, emphasizing the advantages of wide bandgap transistor technology.

  18. X-rays from supernova 1987A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y.; Sutherland, P.; Mccray, R.; Ross, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    Detailed calculations of the development of the X-ray spectrum of 1987A are presented using more realistic models for the supernova composition and density structure provided by Woosley. It is shown how the emergence of the X-ray spectrum depends on the parameters of the model and the nature of its central energy source. It is shown that the soft X-ray spectrum should be dominated by a 6.4 keV Fe K(alpha) emission line that could be observed by a sensitive X-ray telescope. 28 references

  19. TAS-116, a novel Hsp90 inhibitor, selectively enhances radio-sensitivity of human cancer cells to X-rays and carbon ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Younghyun; Sunada, Shigeaki; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Fujimori, Akira; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    Hsp90 inhibitors have been investigated as cancer therapeutics in mono-therapy and to augment radiotherapy, however serious adverse effects of early generation Hsp90 inhibitors limited their development. TAS-116 is a novel Hsp90 inhibitor with lower adverse effects than other Hsp90 inhibitors, and here we investigated the radio-sensitizing effects of TAS-116 in low LET X-ray, and high LET carbon ion irradiated human cancer cells and mouse tumor xenografts. TAS-116 decreased cell survival of both X-ray and carbon ion-irradiated human cancer cell lines (HeLa and H1299 cells), and similar to other Hsp90 inhibitors, it did not affect radiosensitivity of non-cancerous human fibroblasts. TAS-116 increased the number of radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci, and delayed the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). TAS-116 reduced the expression of proteins that mediate repair of DSBs by homologous recombination (RAD51) and non-homologous end joining (Ku, DNA-PKcs), and suppressed formation of RAD51 foci and phosphorylation/activation of DNA-PKcs. TAS-116 also decreased expression of the cdc25 cell cycle progression marker, markedly increasing G2/M arrest. Combined treatment of mouse tumor xenografts with carbon ions and TAS-116 showed promising delay in tumor growth compared to either individual treatment. These results demonstrate that TAS-116 radio-sensitizes human cancer cells to both X rays and carbon ions by inhibiting the two major DSB repair pathways, and these effects were accompanied by marked cell cycle arrest. The promising results of combination TAS-116 + carbon ion radiation therapy of tumor xenografts justify further exploration of TAS-116 as an adjunct to radiotherapy using low or high LET radiation. PMID:28062703

  20. Use of soft x-ray diagnostic on the COMPASS tokamak for investigations of sawteeth crash neighborhood and of plasma position using fast inversion methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Imríšek, Martin; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Mlynář, Jan; Odstrčil, T.; Odstrčil, M.; Ficker, O.; Pinzon, J.R.; Ehrlacher, C.; Pánek, Radomír; Hron, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 11 (2014), 11E433-11E433 ISSN 0034-6748. [Topical Conference on High-Temperature Plasma Diagnostics/20./. Atlanta, 01.06.2014-05.06.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2055; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Inversion methods * Plasma positions * Sawteeth * Soft X-ray Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.614, year: 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4894528

  1. Effective and cheap X-ray television detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artem'ev, A.N.; Potlovskij, K.G.; Rezvov, V.A.; Yudin, L.I.

    2002-01-01

    The position sensitive detector (PSD) is designed for investigations with traditional X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation from 3 to 30 keV. PSD consists of light-tight box, which transforms X-ray photons to light photons. Light photons are registered with the help of TV camera. Then an image is digitized and introduced into computer. Software provides registration of the dim beam images by means of accumulation of the information. Statistic processing of the image series allows to determine of the parameters of the image. Sensitivity is 41 phot/pixel. Spatial resolution is not worse then 400 μ [ru

  2. Applications for X-ray detectors in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remillard, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Position-sensitive X-Ray detectors continue to playa central role in high-energy astrophysics. The current science goals are reviewed with emphasis on requirements in terms of camera performance. Wide-field imaging techniques, including coded mask cameras, are an essential part of space programs because of the transient nature of high-priority targets, e.g. eruptions from black-hole binaries and cosmic explosions such as gamma ray bursts. Pointing X-ray telescopes are being planned with a wide range of photon energies and with collection designs that include both mirrors and coded masks. Requirements for high spectral resolution and high time resolution are driven by diverse types of X-ray sources such as msec pulsars, quasars with emission-line profiles shaped by general relativity, and X-ray binaries that exhibit quasi-periodic oscillations in the range of 40-1300 Hz. Many laboratories and universities are involved in space-qualification of new detector technologies, e.g. CZT cameras, X-ray calorimeters, new types of CCDs, and GEM detectors. Even X-ray interferometry is on the horizon of NASA's science roadmap. The difficulties in advancing new technologies for space science applications require careful coordinations between industry and science groups in order to solve science problems while minimizing risk

  3. Soft x-ray streak cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stradling, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is a discussion of the development and of the current state of the art in picosecond soft x-ray streak camera technology. Accomplishments from a number of institutions are discussed. X-ray streak cameras vary from standard visible streak camera designs in the use of an x-ray transmitting window and an x-ray sensitive photocathode. The spectral sensitivity range of these instruments includes portions of the near UV and extends from the subkilovolt x- ray region to several tens of kilovolts. Attendant challenges encountered in the design and use of x-ray streak cameras include the accommodation of high-voltage and vacuum requirements, as well as manipulation of a photocathode structure which is often fragile. The x-ray transmitting window is generally too fragile to withstand atmospheric pressure, necessitating active vacuum pumping and a vacuum line of sight to the x-ray signal source. Because of the difficulty of manipulating x-ray beams with conventional optics, as is done with visible light, the size of the photocathode sensing area, access to the front of the tube, the ability to insert the streak tube into a vacuum chamber and the capability to trigger the sweep with very short internal delay times are issues uniquely relevant to x-ray streak camera use. The physics of electron imaging may place more stringent limitations on the temporal and spatial resolution obtainable with x-ray photocathodes than with the visible counterpart. Other issues which are common to the entire streak camera community also concern the x-ray streak camera users and manufacturers

  4. X-ray interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, A.

    1980-01-01

    An improved type of amplitude-division x-ray interferometer is described. The wavelength at which the interferometer can operate is variable, allowing the instrument to be used to measure x-ray wavelength, and the angle of inclination is variable for sample investigation. (U.K.)

  5. Extremity x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003461.htm Extremity x-ray To use the sharing features on this page, ... in the body Risks There is low-level radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the ...

  6. X-rays utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebigan, F.

    1979-03-01

    The modality of X-ray utilization in different activities and economy is given. One presents firstly quantities and units used in radiation dosimetry and other fields. One gives the generation of X-rays, their properties as well as the elements of radiation protection. The utilization characteristics of these radiations in different fields are finally given. (author)

  7. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x- ...

  8. Ultra fast x-ray streak camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, L.W.; McConaghy, C.F.

    1975-01-01

    A unique ultrafast x-ray sensitive streak camera, with a time resolution of 50psec, has been built and operated. A 100A thick gold photocathode on a beryllium vacuum window is used in a modified commerical image converter tube. The X-ray streak camera has been used in experiments to observe time resolved emission from laser-produced plasmas. (author)

  9. X-ray microanalysis in plant physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, D.

    1979-01-01

    X-ray microanalysis represents a highly sensitive and modern method for the measurement of ions in the very small compartments of the cell. The limitations of X-ray microanalysis in biological objects exist in the preparation of the tissues and the quantitation of the results. In plant physiology this method has provided several surprising results and new insights for further investigations. (author)

  10. Proton induced X-ray emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Rashiduzzman

    1976-09-01

    The developments in proton induced X-ray emission analysis are reviewed. Techniques for analyzing thick and thin samples of different origin are described. Discussions on the application of proton induced X-ray emission analysis in different fields, comparison of the sensitivity of this method with other analytical techniques, its limitations and possible improvements are presented

  11. X-rays from stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güdel, Manuel

    2004-07-01

    Spectroscopic studies available from Chandra and XMM-Newton play a pivotal part in the understanding of the physical processes in stellar (magnetic and non-magnetic) atmospheres. It is now routinely possible to derive densities and to study the influence of ultraviolet radiation fields, both of which can be used to infer the geometry of the radiating sources. Line profiles provide important information on bulk mass motions and attenuation by neutral matter, e.g. in stellar winds. The increased sensitivity has revealed new types of X-ray sources in systems that were thought to be unlikely places for X-rays: flaring brown dwarfs, including rather old, non-accreting objects, and terminal shocks in jets of young stars are important examples. New clues concerning the role of stellar high-energy processes in the modification of the stellar environment (ionization, spallation, etc.) contribute significantly to our understanding of the "astro-ecology" in forming planetary systems. Technological limitations are evident. The spectral resolution has not reached the level where bulk mass motions in cool stars become easily measurable. Higher resolution would also be important to perform X-ray "Doppler imaging" in order to reconstruct the 3-D distribution of the X-ray sources around a rotating star. Higher sensitivity will be required to perform high-resolution spectroscopy of weak sources such as brown dwarfs or embedded pre-main-sequence sources. A new generation of satellites such as Constellation-X or XEUS should pursue these goals.

  12. Fluorescence-type Monochromatic X-ray Beam-position Monitor with High-spatial Resolution for the NSLS-II Beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Phil S.; Siddons, D. Peter

    2010-01-01

    We developed a fluorescence-type monochromatic X-ray beam-position monitor (X-BPM) with high-spatial resolution for end-station experiments at the initial project beamlines of the NSLS-II. We designed a ring array of multi-segmented Si PIN-junction photodiodes to use as a position sensor. Further, we integrated a low-noise charge-preamplification HERMES4 ASIC chip into an electronic readout system for photon-counting application. A series of precision measurements to characterize electronically the Si-photodiode sensor and the ASIC chip demonstrated that the inherent noise from the detector system is sufficiently low to meet our stringent requirements. Using a Gaussian beam, we parametrically modeled the optimum working distance to ensure the detector's best performance. Based upon the results from the parametric modeling, prototypes of the next versions of the X-BPM are being developed. In this paper, we describe the methodology for developing the new compact monochromatic X-ray BPM, including its instrumentation, detector modeling, and future plan.

  13. X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  14. LOBSTER - New Space X-Ray telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudec, R.; Pina, L.; Simon, V.; Sveda, L.; Inneman, A.; Semencova, V.; Skulinova, M.

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the technological and scientific aspects of fully innovative very wide-field X-ray telescopes with high sensitivity. The prototypes of Lobster telescopes designed, developed and tested are very promising, allowing the proposals for space projects with very wide-field Lobster Eye X-ray optics to be considered for the first time. The novel telescopes will monitor the sky with unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution of order of 1 arcmin. They are expected to contribute essentially to study of various astrophysical objects such as AGN, SNe, Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), X-ray flashes (XRFs), galactic binary sources, stars, CVs, X-ray novae, various transient sources, etc. For example, the Lobster optics based X-ray All Sky Monitor is capable to detect around 20 GRBs and 8 XRFs yearly and this will surely significantly contribute to the related science

  15. X-ray lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, Raymond C

    2012-01-01

    The first in its field, this book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to guide for specialists. It provides new entrants and others interested in the field with a comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. In one succinct volume, X-Ray Lasers collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development and conveys the exciting challenges and possibilities still to come._Add on for longer version of blurb_M>The reader is first introduced

  16. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, S.; Stagg, L.; Lambert, T.W.; Griswa, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    A patient support system for X-ray equipment in arteriographic studies of the heart is described in detail. The support system has been designed to overcome many of the practical problems encountered in using previous types of arteriographic X-ray equipment. The support system is capable of horizontal movement and, by a series of shafts attached to the main support system, the X-ray source and image intensifier or detector may be rotated through the same angle. The system is highly flexible and details are given of several possible operational modes. (U.K.)

  17. X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetten, N.R.; Houston, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    An ionization chamber for use in determining the spatial distribution of x-ray photons in tomography systems comprises a plurality of substantially parallel, planar anodes separated by parallel, planar cathodes and enclosed in a gas of high atomic weight at a pressure from approximately 10 atmospheres to approximately 50 atmospheres. The cathode and anode structures comprise metals which are substantially opaque to x-ray radiation and thereby tend to reduce the resolution limiting effects of x-ray fluoresence in the gas. In another embodiment of the invention the anodes comprise parallel conductive bars disposed between two planar cathodes. Guard rings eliminate surface leakage currents between adjacent electrodes. 8 figures

  18. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grady, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray apparatus is described which has a shutter between the X-ray source and the patient. The shutter controls the level of radiation to which the patient is exposed instead of merely discontinuing the electric power supplied to the source. When the shutter is opened a radiation sensor senses the level of X-radiation. When a preset quantity of X-radiation has been measured an exposure control closes the shutter. Instead of using the radiation sensor, the integrated power supplied to the anode of the X-ray source may be measured. (author)

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose ... limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is ...

  1. X-ray examination apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to an X-ray apparatus which includes an adjustable X-ray filter. In order to adjust an intensity profile of the X-ray beam, an X-ray absorbing liquid is transported to filter elements of the X-ray filter. Such transport is susceptible to gravitational forces which lead to an

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  5. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very small ... of an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  6. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Alan Hap [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90° Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated ~ 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 Å) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has been demonstrated as a

  7. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, A.H.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1998-01-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90 o Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated ∼ 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 (angstrom)) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has been

  8. Stellar X-Ray Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, J.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the stellar end-state black holes, pulsars, and white dwarfs that are X-ray sources should have polarized X-ray fluxes. The degree will depend on the relative contributions of the unresolved structures. Fluxes from accretion disks and accretion disk corona may be polarized by scattering. Beams and jets may have contributions of polarized emission in strong magnetic fields. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) will study the effects on polarization of strong gravity of black holes and strong magnetism of neutron stars. Some part of the flux from compact stars accreting from companion stars has been reflected from the companion, its wind, or accretion streams. Polarization of this component is a potential tool for studying the structure of the gas in these binary systems. Polarization due to scattering can also be present in X-ray emission from white dwarf binaries and binary normal stars such as RS CVn stars and colliding wind sources like Eta Car. Normal late type stars may have polarized flux from coronal flares. But X-ray polarization sensitivity is not at the level needed for single early type stars.

  9. X-rays and magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Peter; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Magnetism is among the most active and attractive areas in modern solid state physics because of intriguing phenomena interesting to fundamental research and a manifold of technological applications. State-of-the-art synthesis of advanced magnetic materials, e.g. in hybrid structures paves the way to new functionalities. To characterize modern magnetic materials and the associated magnetic phenomena, polarized x-rays have emerged as unique probes due to their specific interaction with magnetic materials. A large variety of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed to quantify in an element, valence and site-sensitive way properties of ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic systems, such as spin and orbital moments, and to image nanoscale spin textures and their dynamics with sub-ns time and almost 10 nm spatial resolution. The enormous intensity of x-rays and their degree of coherence at next generation x-ray facilities will open the fsec time window to magnetic studies addressing fundamental time scales in magnetism with nanometer spatial resolution. This review will give an introduction into contemporary topics of nanoscale magnetic materials and provide an overview of analytical spectroscopy and microscopy tools based on x-ray dichroism effects. Selected examples of current research will demonstrate the potential and future directions of these techniques. (report on progress)

  10. TH-AB-209-07: High Resolution X-Ray-Induced Acoustic Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, L; Tang, S [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Ahmad, M [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: X-ray radiographic absorption imaging is an invaluable tool in medical diagnostics, biology and materials science. However, the use of conventional CT is limited by two factors: the detection sensitivity to weak absorption material and the radiation dose from CT scanning. The purpose of this study is to explore X-ray induced acoustic computed tomography (XACT), a new imaging modality, which combines X-ray absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution to address these challenges. Methods: First, theoretical models was built to analyze the XACT sensitivity to X-ray absorption and calculate the minimal radiation dose in XACT imaging. Then, an XACT system comprised of an ultrashort X-ray pulse, a low noise ultrasound detector and a signal acquisition system was built to evaluate the X-ray induced acoustic signal generation. A piece of chicken bone and a phantom with two golden fiducial markers were exposed to 270 kVp X-ray source with 60 ns exposure time, and the X-ray induced acoustic signal was received by a 2.25MHz ultrasound transducer in 200 positions. XACT images were reconstructed by a filtered back-projection algorithm. Results: The theoretical analysis shows that X-ray induced acoustic signals have 100% relative sensitivity to X-ray absorption, but not to X-ray scattering. Applying this innovative technology to breast imaging, we can reduce radiation dose by a factor of 50 compared with newly FDA approved breast CT. The reconstructed images of chicken bone and golden fiducial marker phantom reveal that the spatial resolution of the built XACT system is 350µm. Conclusion: In XACT, the imaging sensitivity to X-ray absorption is improved and the imaging dose is dramatically reduced by using ultrashort pulsed X-ray. Taking advantage of the high ultrasonic resolution, we can also perform 3D imaging with a single X-ray pulse. This new modality has the potential to revolutionize x-ray imaging applications in medicine and biology.

  11. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  12. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also be useful to help diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  13. X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    A form of x-ray tube is described which provides satisfactory focussing of the electron beam when the beam extends for several feet from gun to target. Such a tube can be used for computerised tomographic scanning. (UK)

  14. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and ... have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to ...

  15. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray ... posted: How to Obtain and Share Your Medical Images Movement Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI ...

  16. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  17. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Pancreatic Cancer The Limitations of Online Dose Calculators Video: The ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  18. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exams and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the ... chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs ...

  19. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. ...

  20. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... June is Men's Health Month Recently posted: Pancreatic Cancer The Limitations of Online Dose Calculators Video: The ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  1. X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masswig, I.

    1986-01-01

    The tkb market survey comparatively evaluates the X-ray sources and replacement tubes for stationary equipment currently available on the German market. It lists the equipment parameters of 235 commercially available X-ray sources and their replacement tubes and gives the criteria for purchase decisions. The survey has been completed with December 1985, and offers good information concerning medical and technical aspects as well as those of safety and maintenance. (orig.) [de

  2. Preliminary investigation of the NMR, optical and x-ray CT dose-response of polymer gel dosimeters incorporating cosolvents to improve dose sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeva, V I; McAuley, K B [Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Olding, T [Department of Physics, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Jirasek, A [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6 (Canada); Schreiner, L J [Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, ON, K7L5P9 (Canada)], E-mail: kim.mcauley@chee.queensu.ca

    2009-05-07

    This study reports on efforts to increase the dose sensitivity of polymer gel dosimeters used in 3D radiation dosimetry. The potential of several different cosolvents is investigated, with the aim of increasing the solubility of N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide crosslinker in polymer gel dosimeters. Glycerol and isopropanol increase the limit for the crosslinker solubility from approximately 3% to 5% and 10% by weight, respectively. This enables the manufacture of polymer gel dosimeters with much higher levels of crosslinking than was previously possible. New dosimeter recipes containing up to 5 wt% N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide were subjected to spatially uniform radiation and were studied using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as x-ray and optical CT techniques. The resulting dosimeters exhibit dose sensitivities that are up to 2.7 times higher than measured for a typical dosimeters with 3% N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide without the addition of cosolvent. Two additional cosolvents (n-propanol and sec-butanol) were deemed unsuitable for practical dosimeters due to incompatibility with gelatin, cloudiness prior to irradiation, and immiscibility with water when large quantities of cosolvent were used. The dosimeters with high N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide content that used isopropanol or glycerol as cosolvents had high optical clarity prior to irradiation, but did not produce suitable optical CT results for non-uniformly irradiated gels due to polymer development outside of the high dose regions of the pencil beams and significant light scatter. Further experiments are required to determine whether cosolvents can be used to manufacture gels with sufficiently high dose sensitivity for readout using x-ray computed tomography.

  3. Preliminary investigation of the NMR, optical and x-ray CT dose-response of polymer gel dosimeters incorporating cosolvents to improve dose sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeva, V I; McAuley, K B; Olding, T; Jirasek, A; Schreiner, L J

    2009-01-01

    This study reports on efforts to increase the dose sensitivity of polymer gel dosimeters used in 3D radiation dosimetry. The potential of several different cosolvents is investigated, with the aim of increasing the solubility of N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide crosslinker in polymer gel dosimeters. Glycerol and isopropanol increase the limit for the crosslinker solubility from approximately 3% to 5% and 10% by weight, respectively. This enables the manufacture of polymer gel dosimeters with much higher levels of crosslinking than was previously possible. New dosimeter recipes containing up to 5 wt% N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide were subjected to spatially uniform radiation and were studied using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as x-ray and optical CT techniques. The resulting dosimeters exhibit dose sensitivities that are up to 2.7 times higher than measured for a typical dosimeters with 3% N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide without the addition of cosolvent. Two additional cosolvents (n-propanol and sec-butanol) were deemed unsuitable for practical dosimeters due to incompatibility with gelatin, cloudiness prior to irradiation, and immiscibility with water when large quantities of cosolvent were used. The dosimeters with high N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide content that used isopropanol or glycerol as cosolvents had high optical clarity prior to irradiation, but did not produce suitable optical CT results for non-uniformly irradiated gels due to polymer development outside of the high dose regions of the pencil beams and significant light scatter. Further experiments are required to determine whether cosolvents can be used to manufacture gels with sufficiently high dose sensitivity for readout using x-ray computed tomography.

  4. Gas Pixel Detectors for low energy X-ray polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spandre, Gloria

    2007-01-01

    Gas Pixel Detectors are position-sensitive proportional counters in which a complete integration between the gas amplification structure and the read-out electronics has been reached. Various generation of Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) have been designed in deep submicron CMOS technology to realize a monolithic device which is at the same time the charge collecting electrode and the analog amplifying and charge measuring front-end electronics. The experimental response of a detector with 22060 pixels at 80 μm pitch to polarized and un-polarized X-ray radiation is shown and the application of this device for Astronomical X-ray Polarimetry discussed

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of knee x-rays. A portable x-ray machine is a compact apparatus that can be taken ... of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ray examination. X-rays usually have no side effects in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. ... x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is taken during x-ray examinations to ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray ( ... leg (shin), ankle or foot. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  11. X-ray tube arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillard, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    A technique for ensuring the rapid correction of both amplitude and offset errors in the deflectional movement of an electron beam along an X-ray emissive target is described. The movement is monitored at at least two positions during a sweep and differences, between the two movements and a desired movement, at these positions are combined in different proportions to produce a corrective servo signal. Such arrangements find application, for example, in computerised tomographic scanners. (author)

  12. Confirming nasogastric tube placement: Is the colorimeter as sensitive and specific as X-ray? A diagnostic accuracy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordiffi, Siti Zubaidah; Goh, Mien Li; Phua, Jason; Chan, Yiong-Huak

    2016-09-01

    The effect of delivering enteral nutrition or medications via a nasogastric tube that is inadvertently located in the tracheobronchial tract can cause respiratory complications. Although radiographic examination is accepted as the gold standard for confirming the position of patients' enteral tubes, it is costly, involves risks of radiation, and is not failsafe. Studies using carbon dioxide sensors to detect inadvertent nasogastric tube placements have been conducted in intensive care settings. However, none involved patients in general wards. The objective of this study was to ascertain the diagnostic measure of colorimeter, with radiographic examination as the reference standard, to confirm the location of nasogastric tubes in patients. A prospective observational study of a diagnostic test. This study was conducted in the general wards of an approximately 1100-bed acute care tertiary hospital of an Academic Medical Center in Singapore. Adult patients with nasogastric tubes admitted to the general wards were recruited into the study. The colorimeter was attached to the nasogastric tube to detect for the presence of carbon dioxide, suggestive of a tracheobronchial placement. The exact location of the nasogastric tube was subsequently confirmed by a radiographic examination. A total of 192 tests were undertaken. The colorimeter detected carbon dioxide in 29 tested nasogastric tubes, of which radiographic examination confirmed that four tubes were located in the tracheobronchial tract. The colorimeter failed to detect carbon dioxide in one nasogastric tube that was located in the tracheobronchial tract, thus, demonstrating a sensitivity of 0.80 [95% CI (0.376, 0.964)]. The colorimeter detected absence of carbon dioxide in 163 tested nasogastric tubes in which radiographic examination confirmed 160 gastrointestinal and one tracheobronchial placements, demonstrating a specificity of 0.865 [95% CI (0.808, 0.907)]. The colorimeter detected one tracheobronchial

  13. Hard X-ray Photoelectric Polarimeter

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our objective is to determine the gas mixtures and pressures that would enable a sensitive, hard X-ray polarimeter using existing flight components with the goal of...

  14. Improvements in X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetten, N.R.; Houston, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    Multicellular, spatially separate, gaseous ionization detectors for use in computerized tomography are described. They have high sensitivity, short recovery time, fine spatial resolution and are relatively insensitive to the adverse effects of k shell x-ray fluoresecence.(UK)

  15. Observation of parametric X-ray radiation by an imaging plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takabayashi, Y.; Shchagin, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated experimentally the application of an imaging plate for registering the angular distribution of parametric X-ray radiation. The imaging plate was used as a two-dimensional position-sensitive X-ray detector. High-quality images of the fine structure in the angular distributions of the yield around the reflection of the parametric X-ray radiation produced in a silicon crystal by a 255-MeV electron beam from a linear accelerator have been observed in the Laue geometry. A fairly good agreement between results of measurements and calculations by the kinematic theory of parametric X-ray radiation is shown. Applications of the imaging plates for the observation of the angular distribution of X-rays produced by accelerated particles in a crystal are also discussed.

  16. Anodic electrode position of cyanometallates as sample preparation for the determination of transition metals from water samples using X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wundt, K.; Duschner, H.; Starke, K.

    1978-01-01

    The anodic separation of cyanometallates of propanol -2/Water mixtures at high electrical field strengths was developed as new technique for sample preparation. The optimization of the parameters of the system (high voltage applied, current density, separation time and composition of the solution) resulted in quantitative precipitation of the metallates of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Ag in homogeneous, thin and strong-adhering layer with mass densities of between 1 nmol cm -2 and 1 μmol cm -2 on high-purity aluminium foils. Metals not forming anionic complexes remain in solution with simualtaneous quantitative multielement separation. The described technique is part of a method to determine heavy metal traces in water samples. It comprises the nonspecific sorption on cation exchangers, the elution of the transition metals as cyanometallates, their electrode position on aluminium foil and the determination by X-ray fluorescence analysis. Model experiments illustrate the possible applications of the method. (orig.) [de

  17. Projection-type X-ray microscope based on a spherical compound refractive X-ray lens

    OpenAIRE

    Dudchik, Yu. I.; Gary, C. K.; Park, H.; Pantell, R. H.; Piestrup, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    New projection- type X-ray microscope with a compound refractive lens as the optical element is presented. The microscope consists of an X-ray source that is 1-2 mm in diameter, compound X-ray lens and X-ray camera that are placed in-line to satisfy the lens formula. The lens forms an image of the X-ray source at camera sensitive plate. An object is placed between the X-ray source and the lens as close as possible to the source, and the camera shows a shadow image of the object. Spatial resol...

  18. X-Ray Absorption with Transmission X-Ray Microscopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, F.M.F.

    2016-01-01

    In this section we focus on the use of transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) to measure the XAS spectra. In the last decade a range of soft X-ray and hard X-ray TXM microscopes have been developed, allowing the measurement of XAS spectra with 10–100 nm resolution. In the hard X-ray range the TXM

  19. Why do We Trust X-ray Crystallography?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    crystal X-ray diffraction pattern and good chemical sense that elevates X-ray crystallography to its position as the most trusted analytical technique. Suggested Reading. [1] William Clegg, Crystal Structure Determination, Oxford Chemistry Prim-.

  20. Variable X-ray sky with Lobster Eye Telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudec, R.; Pina, L.; Inneman, A.; Sveda, L.

    2004-01-01

    The variable X-ray sky requires wide-field monitoring with high sensitivity. We refer on novel X-ray telescopes with high sensitivity as well as large field of view. The results are very promising, allowing the proposals for space projects with very wide-field Lobster-eye X-ray optics to be considered. The novel telescopes will monitor the sky with unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution of order of 1 arcmin. They are expected to contribute essentially to study and to understand various astrophysical objects such as AGN, SNe, GRBs, X-ray flashes, galactic binary sources, stars, CVs, X-ray novae, various transient sources, etc

  1. Sequential x-ray diffraction topography at 1-BM x-ray optics testing beamline at the advanced photon source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoupin, Stanislav, E-mail: sstoupin@aps.anl.gov; Shvyd’ko, Yuri; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Liu, Zunping; Lang, Keenan; Huang, Xianrong; Wieczorek, Michael; Kasman, Elina; Hammonds, John; Macrander, Albert; Assoufid, Lahsen [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    We report progress on implementation and commissioning of sequential X-ray diffraction topography at 1-BM Optics Testing Beamline of the Advanced Photon Source to accommodate growing needs of strain characterization in diffractive crystal optics and other semiconductor single crystals. The setup enables evaluation of strain in single crystals in the nearly-nondispersive double-crystal geometry. Si asymmetric collimator crystals of different crystallographic orientations were designed, fabricated and characterized using in-house capabilities. Imaging the exit beam using digital area detectors permits rapid sequential acquisition of X-ray topographs at different angular positions on the rocking curve of a crystal under investigation. Results on sensitivity and spatial resolution are reported based on experiments with high-quality Si and diamond crystals. The new setup complements laboratory-based X-ray topography capabilities of the Optics group at the Advanced Photon Source.

  2. Repeated pulsed x-ray emission equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terauchi, Hikaru; Iida, Satoshi

    1982-01-01

    X-ray diffraction technique has been applied to determine the spatial positions of atoms which compose a material, and it is needless to say that the technique is a fundamental means regardless of the fields of research. However, the application of X-ray diffraction to the research on physical properties has been so far limited to know the spatial positions of atoms or molecules under thermal equilibrium condition. The addition of time element to the conventional technique, that is, the analysis of material structure including the time-varying processes under non-equilibrium conditions, is considered to approach the elucidation of the essence of materials. The authors call this dynamic structural analysis. The authors have planned to analyze X-ray diffraction intensity which has the resolution of about 10 -8 s in the real time which is conjugate with energy. However, present pulsed X-ray sources are not suitable for diffraction experiment because the pulse width is too long or X-ray wavelength is too short. Accordingly, the authors have made for trial a pulsed X-ray source for diffraction experiment. Its specifications are: diode voltage (X-ray tube voltage) from 200 to 300 kV, diode current from 2 to 5 kA, pulse width of about 30ns, maximum repetition frequency 10 pps, and X-ray focus size of 2 mm diameter. One of the features of this source is the repeated generation of pulsed X-ray. This is the first trial in the world, and is indispensable to the dynamic structural analysis described above. The quality of the emitted X-ray is also written. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  3. X-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webley, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    The object of the invention described is to provide an X-ray tube providing a scanned X-ray output which does not require a scanned electron beam. This is obtained by an X-ray tube including an anode which is rotatable about an axis, and a source of a beam of energy, for example an electron beam, arranged to impinge on a surface of the anode to generate X-radiation substantially at the region of incidence on the anode surface. The anode is rotatable about the axis to move the region of incidence over the surface. The anode is so shaped that the rotation causes the region of incidence to move in a predetermined manner relative to fixed parts of the tube so that the generated X-radiation is scanned in a predetermined manner relative to the tube. (UK)

  4. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacconi, R.; Setti, G.

    1980-01-01

    This book contains the lectures, and the most important seminars held at the NATO meeting on X-Ray astronomy in Erice, July 1979. The meeting was an opportune forum to discuss the results of the first 8-months of operation of the X-ray satellite, HEAO-2 (Einstein Observatory) which was launched at the end of 1978. Besides surveying these results, the meeting covered extragalactic astronomy, including the relevant observations obtained in other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum (ultra-violet, optical, infrared and radio). The discussion on galactic X-ray sources essentially covered classical binaries, globular clusters and bursters and its significance to extragalactic sources and to high energy astrophysics was borne in mind. (orig.)

  5. Phosphor Scanner For Imaging X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Hecht, Diana L.; Witherow, William K.

    1992-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic scanning apparatus generates digitized image of x-ray image recorded in phosphor. Scanning fiber-optic probe supplies laser light stimulating luminescence in areas of phosphor exposed to x rays. Luminescence passes through probe and fiber to integrating sphere and photomultiplier. Sensitivity and resolution exceed previously available scanners. Intended for use in x-ray crystallography, medical radiography, and molecular biology.

  6. X-ray survival characteristics and genetic analysis for nineSaccharomyces deletion mutants that affect radiation sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Game, John C.; Williamson, Marsha S.; Baccari, Clelia

    2006-07-21

    We examine ionizing radiation (IR) sensitivity and epistasisrelationships of several Saccharomyces mutants affectingpost-translational modifications of histones H2B and H3. Mutantsbre1delta, lge1delta, and rtf1delta, defective in histone H2B lysine 123ubiquitination, show IR sensitivity equivalent to that of the dot1deltamutant that we reported on earlier, consistent with published findingsthat Dot1p requires H2B K123 ubiquitination to fully methylate histone H3K79. This implicates progressive K79 methylation rather thanmono-methylation in IR resistance. The set2delta mutant, defective in H3K36 methylation, shows mild IR sensitivity whereas mutants that abolishH3 K4 methylation resemble wild type. The dot1delta, bre1delta, andlge1delta mutants show epistasis for IR sensitivity. The paf1deltamutant, also reportedly defective in H2B K123 ubiquitination, confers nosensitivity. The rad6delta, rad51null, rad50delta, and rad9deltamutations are epistatic to bre1? and dot1delta, but rad18delta andrad5delta show additivity with bre1delta, dot1delta, and each other. Thebre1delta rad18delta double mutant resembles rad6delta in sensitivity;thus the role of Rad6p in ubiquitinating H2B accounts for its extrasensitivity compared to rad18delta. We conclude that IR resistanceconferred by BRE1 and DOT1 is mediated through homologous recombinationalrepair, not postreplication repair, and confirm findings of a G1checkpoint role for the RAD6/BRE1/DOT1 pathway.

  7. High-resolution metallic magnetic calorimeters for {beta}-spectroscopy on {sup 187}rhenium and position resolved X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porst, Jan-Patrick

    2011-02-01

    This thesis describes the development of metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) for high resolution spectroscopy. MMCs are energy dispersive particle detectors based on the calorimetric principle which are typically operated at temperatures below 100 mK. The detectors make use of a paramagnetic temperature sensor to transform the temperature rise upon the absorption of a particle in the detector into a measurable magnetic flux change in a dc-SQUID. The application of MMCs for neutrino mass measurements and their advantages with respect to other approaches are discussed. In view of this application the development of an MMC optimized for {beta}-endpoint spectroscopy on {sup 187}rhenium is presented. A fully micro-fabricated X-ray detector is characterized and performs close to design values. Furthermore, a new technique to more efficiently couple rhenium absorbers mechanically and thermally to the sensor was developed and successfully tested. By employing a metallic contact, signal rise times faster than 5 {mu}s could be observed with superconducting rhenium absorbers. In addition to the single pixel detectors, an alternative approach of reading out multiple pixels was developed in this work, too. Here, the individual absorbers have a different thermal coupling to only one temperature sensor resulting in a distribution of different pulse shapes. Straightforward position discrimination by means of rise time analysis is demonstrated for a four pixel MMC and a thermal model of the detector is provided. Unprecedented so far, an energy resolution of less than {delta}E{sub FWHM}<5 eV for 5.9 keV X-rays was achieved across all absorbers. (orig.)

  8. Flash x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Q.; Pellinen, D.

    1976-01-01

    The complementary techniques of flash x-ray radiography (FXR) and flash x-ray diffraction (FXD) provide access to a unique domain in nondestructive materials testing. FXR is useful in studies of macroscopic properties during extremely short time intervals, and FXD, the newer technique, is used in studies of microscopic properties. Although these techniques are similar in many respects, there are some substantial differences. FXD generally requires low-voltage, line-radiation sources and extremely accurate timing; FXR is usually less demanding. Phenomena which can be profitably studied by FXR often can also be studied by FXD to permit a complete materials characterization

  9. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, M.S.

    1976-01-01

    The deployment of detectors outside the deleterious effects of the atmosphere by sending them in space vehicles, has been explained. This has thrown open the entire spectrum of the electromagnetic and particle radiation to direct observations, thus enlarging the vistas of the field of astronomy and astrophysics. The discovery of strong emitters of X-rays such as SCO X-1, NorX-2, transient sources such as Cen X-2, Cen X-4, Cen X-1, Supernova remnants Tan X-1, etc., are reported. The background of the X-ray spectrum as measured during two rocket flights over Thumba, India is presented. (K.B.)

  10. X-ray masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, J.C.; Satchell, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    In semiconductor manufacture, where X-ray irradiation is used, a thin silicon membrane can be used as an X-ray mask. This membrane has areas on which are patterns to define the regions to be irradiated. These regions are of antireflection material. With the thin, in the order of 3 microns, membranes used, fragility is a problem. Hence a number of ribs of silicon are formed integral with the membrane, and which are relatively thick, 5 to 10 microns. The ribs may be formed by localised deeper boron deposition followed by a selective etch. (author)

  11. X-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.; Whetten, N.R.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber for use in determining the spatial distribution of x-ray photons in tomography systems comprises a plurality of substantially parallel, planar anodes separated by parallel, planar cathodes and enclosed in a gas of high atomic weight at a pressure from approximately 10 atmospheres to approximately 50 atmospheres. The cathode and anode structures comprise metals which are substantially opaque to x-ray radiation and thereby tend to reduce the resolution limiting effects of xray fluoresence in the gas. In another embodiment of the invention the anodes comprise parallel conductive bars disposed between two planar cathodes. Guard rings eliminate surface leakage currents between adjacent electrodes

  12. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a very small dose of ... x-ray , is a two-dimensional (2-D) dental x-ray examination that captures the entire mouth ...

  13. Subluminous X-ray binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armas Padilla, M.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of the first X-ray binary, Scorpius X-1, by Giacconi et al. (1962), marked the birth of X-ray astronomy. Following that discovery, many additional X-ray sources where found with the first generation of X-ray rockets and observatories (e.g., UHURU and Einstein). The short-timescale

  14. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Pelvis KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Ray Exam: Hip Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  15. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Forearm KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  16. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  17. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  18. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  19. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  20. X-ray fluorescence analyzer arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatai, Endre; Ando, Laszlo; Gal, Janos.

    1981-01-01

    An x-ray fluorescence analyzer for the quantitative determination of one or more elements of complex samples is reported. The novelties of the invention are the excitation of the samples by x-rays or γ-radiation, the application of a balanced filter pair as energy selector, and the measurement of the current or ion charge of ionization detectors used as sensors. Due to the increased sensitivity and accuracy, the novel design can extend the application fields of x-ray fluorescence analyzers. (A.L.)

  1. Streaked, x-ray-transmission-grating spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceglio, N.M.; Roth, M.; Hawryluk, A.M.

    1981-08-01

    A free standing x-ray transmission grating has been coupled with a soft x-ray streak camera to produce a time resolved x-ray spectrometer. The instrument has a temporal resolution of approx. 20 psec, is capable of covering a broad spectral range, 2 to 120 A, has high sensitivity, and is simple to use requiring no complex alignment procedure. In recent laser fusion experiments the spectrometer successfully recorded time resolved spectra over the range 10 to 120 A with a spectral resolving power, lambda/Δlambda of 4 to 50, limited primarily by source size and collimation effects

  2. CRL X-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolchevsky, N.N.; Petrov, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    A novel types of X-ray tubes with refractive lenses are proposed. CRL-R X-ray tube consists of Compound Refractive Lens- CRL and Reflection X-ray tube. CRL acts as X-ray window. CRL-T X-ray consists of CRL and Transmission X-ray tube. CRL acts as target for electron beam. CRL refractive lens acts as filter, collimator, waveguide and focusing lens. Properties and construction of the CRL X-ray tube are discussed. (authors)

  3. X rays and condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daillant, J.

    1997-01-01

    After a historical review of the discovery and study of X rays, the various interaction processes between X rays and matter are described: Thomson scattering, Compton scattering, X-photon absorption through photoelectric effect, and magnetic scattering. X ray sources such as the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are described. The various X-ray applications are presented: imagery such as X tomography, X microscopy, phase contrast; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy; X-ray scattering and diffraction techniques

  4. Deep Convolutional Neural Networks for Endotracheal Tube Position and X-ray Image Classification: Challenges and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhani, Paras

    2017-08-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of deep convolutional neural networks (DCNNs) in differentiating subtle, intermediate, and more obvious image differences in radiography. Three different datasets were created, which included presence/absence of the endotracheal (ET) tube (n = 300), low/normal position of the ET tube (n = 300), and chest/abdominal radiographs (n = 120). The datasets were split into training, validation, and test. Both untrained and pre-trained deep neural networks were employed, including AlexNet and GoogLeNet classifiers, using the Caffe framework. Data augmentation was performed for the presence/absence and low/normal ET tube datasets. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC), area under the curves (AUC), and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Statistical differences of the AUCs were determined using a non-parametric approach. The pre-trained AlexNet and GoogLeNet classifiers had perfect accuracy (AUC 1.00) in differentiating chest vs. abdominal radiographs, using only 45 training cases. For more difficult datasets, including the presence/absence and low/normal position endotracheal tubes, more training cases, pre-trained networks, and data-augmentation approaches were helpful to increase accuracy. The best-performing network for classifying presence vs. absence of an ET tube was still very accurate with an AUC of 0.99. However, for the most difficult dataset, such as low vs. normal position of the endotracheal tube, DCNNs did not perform as well, but achieved a reasonable AUC of 0.81.

  5. X-ray beam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koller, T.J.; Randmer, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method of minimizing the preferential angular absorption of the divergent beam from an X-ray generator is described. The generator consists of an X-ray shielded housing with an X-ray transmissive window symmetrically placed in radial alignment with a focal spot area on a sloped target surface of an X-ray tube in the housing. The X-ray tube may be of the stationary anode type or of the rotating anode type. (U.K.)

  6. Is ExacTrac x-ray system an alternative to CBCT for positioning patients with head and neck cancers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemente, Stefania; Chiumento, Costanza; Fiorentino, Alba; Cozzolino, Mariella; Oliviero, Caterina; Califano, Giorgia; Caivano, Rocchina; Fusco, Vincenzo; Simeon, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of a six-degrees-of freedom (6D) correction using ExacTrac robotics system in patients with head-and-neck (HN) cancer receiving radiation therapy.Methods: Local setup accuracy was analyzed for 12 patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Patient position was imaged daily upon two different protocols, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and ExacTrac (ET) images correction. Setup data from either approach were compared in terms of both residual errors after correction and punctual displacement of selected regions of interest (Mandible, C2, and C6 vertebral bodies).Results: On average, both protocols achieved reasonably low residual errors after initial correction. The observed differences in shift vectors between the two protocols showed that CBCT tends to weight more C2 and C6 at the expense of the mandible, while ET tends to average more differences among the different ROIs.Conclusions: CBCT, even without 6D correction capabilities, seems preferable to ET for better consistent alignment and the capability to see soft tissues. Therefore, in our experience, CBCT represents a benchmark for positioning head and neck cancer patients

  7. X-ray Optics Development at MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Dharma P.

    2017-01-01

    Development of high resolution focusing telescopes has led to a tremendous leap in sensitivity, revolutionizing observational X-ray astronomy. High sensitivity and high spatial resolution X-ray observations have been possible due to use of grazing incidence optics (paraboloid/hyperboloid) coupled with high spatial resolution and high efficiency detectors/imagers. The best X-ray telescope flown so far is mounted onboard Chandra observatory launched on July 23,1999. The telescope has a spatial resolution of 0.5 arc seconds with compatible imaging instruments in the energy range of 0.1 to 10 keV. The Chandra observatory has been responsible for a large number of discoveries and has provided X-ray insights on a large number of celestial objects including stars, supernova remnants, pulsars, magnetars, black holes, active galactic nuclei, galaxies, clusters and our own solar system.

  8. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used to ...

  9. X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonse, U.

    1979-11-01

    The author describes several possibilities for the production of X-radiation. Especially he discusses the use of bremsstrahlung at electron impact on solid targets and the synchrotron radiation. He presents some equations for the calculation of X-ray intensities. Especially the X-radiation from the DORIS storage ring is discussed. (HSI)

  10. Medical x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli; Gui Ah Auu; Husaini Salleh; Idris Besar; Mohd Ashhar Khalid; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Shaharuddin Mohd; Siti Najila Mohd Janib; Mohamed Ali Abdul Khader; Mahalatchimi Dave; Mohd Fazly Abdul Rahim; Ng Chee Moon; Ram Piari; Teoh Hoon Heng; Lee Peter

    2004-01-01

    This book describes the fundamental subject about medical radiography. It is a multidisciplinary field that requires cross professional input from scientists, engineers and medical doctors. However, it is presented in simple language to suit different levels of readers from x-ray operators and radiographers to physists, general practitioners and radiology specialists.The book is written in accordance to the requirements of the standard syllabus approved by the Ministry of Health Malaysia for the training of medical x-ray operator and general practitioners. In general, the content is not only designed to provide relevant and essential subject for related professionals in medical radiological services such as x-ray operator, radiographer and radiologists, but also to address those in associated radiological services including nurses, medical technologists and physicists.The book is organized and arranged sequentially into 3 parts for easy reference: Radiation safety; X-ray equipment and associated facilities; Radiography practices. With proper grasping of all these parts, the radiological services could be provided with confident and the highest professional standard. Thus, medical imaging with highest quality that can provide useful diagnostic information at minimum doses and at cost effective could be assured

  11. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... change into a gown. You may have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to ... You Sponsored by About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ...

  12. Reconstruction of brachytherapy seed positions and orientations from cone-beam CT x-ray projections via a novel iterative forward projection matching method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Murphy, Martin J; Todor, Dorin A; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey F

    2011-01-01

    To generalize and experimentally validate a novel algorithm for reconstructing the 3D pose (position and orientation) of implanted brachytherapy seeds from a set of a few measured 2D cone-beam CT (CBCT) x-ray projections. The iterative forward projection matching (IFPM) algorithm was generalized to reconstruct the 3D pose, as well as the centroid, of brachytherapy seeds from three to ten measured 2D projections. The gIFPM algorithm finds the set of seed poses that minimizes the sum-of-squared-difference of the pixel-by-pixel intensities between computed and measured autosegmented radiographic projections of the implant. Numerical simulations of clinically realistic brachytherapy seed configurations were performed to demonstrate the proof of principle. An in-house machined brachytherapy phantom, which supports precise specification of seed position and orientation at known values for simulated implant geometries, was used to experimentally validate this algorithm. The phantom was scanned on an ACUITY CBCT digital simulator over a full 660 sinogram projections. Three to ten x-ray images were selected from the full set of CBCT sinogram projections and postprocessed to create binary seed-only images. In the numerical simulations, seed reconstruction position and orientation errors were approximately 0.6 mm and 5 degrees, respectively. The physical phantom measurements demonstrated an absolute positional accuracy of (0.78 +/- 0.57) mm or less. The theta and phi angle errors were found to be (5.7 +/- 4.9) degrees and (6.0 +/- 4.1) degrees, respectively, or less when using three projections; with six projections, results were slightly better. The mean registration error was better than 1 mm/6 degrees compared to the measured seed projections. Each test trial converged in 10-20 iterations with computation time of 12-18 min/iteration on a 1 GHz processor. This work describes a novel, accurate, and completely automatic method for reconstructing seed orientations, as well as

  13. Reconstruction of brachytherapy seed positions and orientations from cone-beam CT x-ray projections via a novel iterative forward projection matching method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Murphy, Martin J.; Todor, Dorin A.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To generalize and experimentally validate a novel algorithm for reconstructing the 3D pose (position and orientation) of implanted brachytherapy seeds from a set of a few measured 2D cone-beam CT (CBCT) x-ray projections. Methods: The iterative forward projection matching (IFPM) algorithm was generalized to reconstruct the 3D pose, as well as the centroid, of brachytherapy seeds from three to ten measured 2D projections. The gIFPM algorithm finds the set of seed poses that minimizes the sum-of-squared-difference of the pixel-by-pixel intensities between computed and measured autosegmented radiographic projections of the implant. Numerical simulations of clinically realistic brachytherapy seed configurations were performed to demonstrate the proof of principle. An in-house machined brachytherapy phantom, which supports precise specification of seed position and orientation at known values for simulated implant geometries, was used to experimentally validate this algorithm. The phantom was scanned on an ACUITY CBCT digital simulator over a full 660 sinogram projections. Three to ten x-ray images were selected from the full set of CBCT sinogram projections and postprocessed to create binary seed-only images. Results: In the numerical simulations, seed reconstruction position and orientation errors were approximately 0.6 mm and 5 deg., respectively. The physical phantom measurements demonstrated an absolute positional accuracy of (0.78{+-}0.57) mm or less. The {theta} and {phi} angle errors were found to be (5.7{+-}4.9) deg. and (6.0{+-}4.1) deg., respectively, or less when using three projections; with six projections, results were slightly better. The mean registration error was better than 1 mm/6 deg. compared to the measured seed projections. Each test trial converged in 10-20 iterations with computation time of 12-18 min/iteration on a 1 GHz processor. Conclusions: This work describes a novel, accurate, and completely automatic method for reconstructing

  14. X-ray state analysis by means of electron capture decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaki, Yoichi [Miyagi Univ. of Education, Sendai (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    K{alpha} X-ray induced by EC decay of {sup 55}Fe and {sup 71}Ge-labeled compounds were measured by wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometer equipped position sensitive proportional detector. In both nuclides, peak energies of K{alpha}{sub 2} X-rays are lower (-0.4 - -0.6 eV) than those of Mn and Ga compounds by photoionization. It is thought that the causes of these differences are intensity of high energy satellite peaks by shake up process. (author)

  15. Novel X-ray telescopes for wide-field X-ray monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudec, R.; Inneman, A.; Pina, L.; Sveda, L.

    2005-01-01

    We report on fully innovative very wide-field of view X-ray telescopes with high sensitivity as well as large field of view. The prototypes are very promising, allowing the proposals for space projects with very wide-field Lobster-eye X-ray optics to be considered. The novel telescopes will monitor the sky with unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution of order of 1 arcmin. They are expected to contribute essentially to study and to understand various astrophysical objects such as AGN, SNe, Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), X-ray flashes (XRFs), galactic binary sources, stars, CVs, X-ray novae, various transient sources, etc. The Lobster optics based X-ray All Sky Monitor is capable to detect around 20 GRBs and 8 XRFs yearly and this will surely significantly contribute to the related science

  16. Stellar and solar X-ray polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novick, R [Columbia Univ., New York (USA)

    1975-12-01

    The scientific motivation for X-ray polarimetry is discussed with particular emphasis on the information that might be obtained on the binary X-ray pulsars in addition to a number of other classes of objects including solar flares. Detailed discussions are given for Thomson-scattering and Bragg-crystal polarimeters with numerical estimates for the sensitivity of various existing and proposed instruments.

  17. Characteristic of x-ray picture of urolithiasis in children and juveniles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramnij, Yi.O.; Bortnij, M.O.; Voron'zhev, Yi.O.; Ul'yanchenko, Yi.M.

    1999-01-01

    More exactly the characteristics of urolithiasis x-ray picture in children and juveniles was defined. X-ray study of 42 patients. Mainly x-ray positive calculi localized in the pelvis and ureters occur in children patients

  18. Reproducibility of the interpretation of pelvic x-ray 3 months after hysteroscopic sterilization with Essure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veersema, Sebastiaan; Mol, Ben W J; Brölmann, Hans A M

    2010-09-01

    To estimate the diagnostic accuracy and the interobserver reproducibility of pelvic x-rays in the diagnosis of successful bilateral sterilization with Essure after a 3-month follow-up period. Interobserver study. Outpatient department of obstetrics and gynecology in a Dutch teaching hospital. Patients with successful bilateral Essure placement. Hysteroscopic sterilization with Essure and pelvic x-ray and hysterosalpingography after a 3-month follow-up period. Six observers evaluations of 47 pelvic x-rays from 47 patients 3 months after a technical successful bilateral placement of microinserts to estimate the reliability of the sterilization. Diagnostic accuracy of pelvic x-ray per observer in detecting incorrectly positioned microinserts was expressed in terms of sensitivity and specificity, with hysterosalpingography as the reference strategy. Reproducibility of the interpretation of the pelvic x-ray was expressed as kappa-values. The sensitivity and specificity for x-rays read by gynecologists was 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.96) and 0.79 (95% CI, 0.58-1.00) and for radiologists 1.0 and 0.5 (95% CI, 0.36-0.64). The interobserver agreement in reliability of pelvic x-ray of hysteroscopic sterilization assessment with Essure ranged from slight (kappa-value=0.09) for gynecologists to moderate (kappa-value=0.52) for radiologists. Test characteristics of pelvic x-ray as the imaging technique to assess the position of the Essure microinserts and tubal patency were poor, as was the reproducibility, particularly if gynecologists performed the evaluation. We do not recommend the use of pelvic x-ray for the assessment of the positioning of microinserts after hysteroscopic sterilization. Copyright (c) 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of a solar panel as a directionally sensitive large-area radiation monitor for direct and scattered x-rays and gamma-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Majid, S

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of a 25.4 X 91 cm solar cell panel used as an x-ray and gamma-ray radiation monitor are presented. Applications for monitoring the primary x-ray beam are described at different values of operating currents and voltages as well as for directional dependence of scattered radiation. Other applications in gamma-ray radiography are also given. The detector showed linear response to both x-ray and gamma-ray exposures. The equipment is rigid, easy to use, relatively inexpensive and requires no power supply or any complex electronic equipment.

  20. Scintillating ribbon x-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinchen, B.E.; Rogers, A.

    1995-01-01

    A patent in the early 1970's by Aerojet Corporation in Sacramento, CA put forth the idea of using an array of scintillating fibers for x-ray detection and imaging. In about 1975, Pratt and Whitney Aircraft in East Hartford, CT designed and manufactured an imaging system based on the patent. The device was 1.75 in thick in the direction of the x-ray beam and about 4 in. by 4 in. square. The device was used with a 8 MeV x-ray source to image and measure internal clearances within operating aircraft, gas turbines engines. There are significant advantages of fiber optic detectors in x-ray detection. However, the advantages are often outweighed by the disadvantages. Two of the advantages of scintillating fiber optic x-ray detectors are: (1) high limiting spatial frequency -- between 20 and 25 lp/mm; and (2) excellent x-ray stopping power -- they can be made thick and retain spatial resolution. In traditional fiber optic detectors the x-rays are oriented parallel to the long axis of the fiber. For the scintillating ribbon x-ray sensor, the x-rays are oriented normal to the fiber long axis. This ribbon sensor technique has a number of advantages over the two current radiographic techniques digital x-radiography and x-ray film: The main advantage the ribbon has is size and shape. It can be as thin as 0.05 in., virtually any width or length, and flexible. Once positioned in a given location, 20 to 100 square inches of the object being inspected can be imaged with a single x-ray beam sweep. It is clear that conventional digital cameras do not lend themselves to placement between walls of aircraft structures or similar items requiring x-ray inspections. A prototype scintillating ribbon x-ray sensor has been fabricated and tested by Synergistic Detector Designs. Images were acquired on corrosion test panels of aluminum fabricated by Iowa State University

  1. X-ray diagnosis of erosive gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taskov, A.; Krastin, A.

    1993-01-01

    A series of 602 patients are studied according to a standard protocol including double contrast examination, taking films with dosed compression and complete filling (accordingly 3+3+1 radiographs). A barium suspension at concentration 200.0 BaSO 4 in 100 ml water is used as a positive contrast medium, and effervescent powder or pills - as a negative contrast. Erosive gastritis is diagnosed in 48 patients (7.9%) of which 38 present complete erosions (79.2%), 6 (12.6%) - incomplete, and 4 (8.3%) - mixed erosions. In 35 cases (72.9%) erosions are differentiated in double-contrast films, while in 21 (43.8%) - in those with compression. The advantage of the double contrast technique consists in visualization of erosions of the body of the stomach and discovering of incomplete erosions. In 483 patients a comparative assessment is done of the X-ray and endoscopic findings. There are recorded 5 false-positive and 25 false-negative radiological results. The sensitivity of the X-ray study in terms of erosive gastritis amounts to 59.7%. 15 refs., 4 figs. (orig.)

  2. Radiography of X-ray in coral reefs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djoli Soembogo

    2016-01-01

    The application of X-ray radiography has been developed and it is already widely used in metal materials such as metal steel and carbon steel. This radiography using a source of radiation from X-ray machines. This research attempts to use the application of digital radiography X-ray source and use scanner Epson V700 positive films media for digitization results of conventional radiographic films on coral reefs. It has been testing radiography using Fuji film 100 to get the contrast medium, the sensitivity of the medium and image quality is good, Single Wall Single Image method , and using the media scanner films positive and X-ray sources, observation parameter are density radiographic film and the defect shape. Radiography uses Fuji film 100 to obtain a good contrast medium, good medium sensitivity and good quality image. Radiography of X-ray on coral reefs aims to find defects or discontinuities coral reefs such as porosity which would interfere with the determination of the age of the coral reefs. X-ray exposure time is 1 seconds for a thickness of 5.45 mm and 5.60 mm coral reefs by using a high voltage X-ray machine Rigaku of 130 kV. The result of the positive film scanner in the form of digital radiography that allows for the transfer of digital data or digital computerized data storage. The test results of radiographic on coral reefs with Single Wall Single Image method obtained radiographic film density parameter for Fuji film 100 on coral reefs No. 2 are 2.55; 2.53; 2.59 and on coral reefs No. 4 are 2.62; 2.65; 2.66, unsharpness geometric of radiographic results obtained 0.022 mm and 0.023 mm, sensitivity radiography are 1.648% and 1.604%. No defect found of Porosity that is significant. Status is acceptable for Fuji film 100, because the density of the film is in conformity with the standards referred to. Status of coral reefs No. 2 and No. 4 can be accepted, because it has conformed with the standards referred. (author)

  3. X-ray imaging with monochromatic synchrotron radiation. Fluorescent and phase-contrast method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2002-05-01

    To obtain the high sensitive x-ray images of biomedical object, new x-ray imaging techniques using fluorescent x-ray and phase-contrast x-ray are being developed in Japan. Fluorescent x-ray CT can detect very small amounts of specific elements in the order of ppm at one pixel, whereas phase-contrast x-ray imaging with interferometer can detect minute differences of biological object. Here, our recent experimental results are presented. (author)

  4. X ray Production. Chapter 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowotny, R. [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    The differential absorption of X rays in tissues and organs, owing to their atomic composition, is the basis for the various imaging methods used in diagnostic radiology. The principles in the production of X rays have remained the same since their discovery. However, much refinement has gone into the design of X ray tubes to achieve the performance required for today’s radiological examinations. In this chapter, an outline of the principles of X ray production and a characterization of the radiation output of X ray tubes will be given. The basic processes producing X rays are dealt with in Section 1.4.

  5. The MIRAX x-ray astronomy transient mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, João; Mejía, Jorge

    2006-06-01

    The Monitor e Imageador de Raios-X (MIRAX) is a small (~250 kg) X-ray astronomy satellite mission designed to monitor the central Galactic plane for transient phenomena. With a field-of-view of ~1000 square degrees and an angular resolution of ~6 arcmin, MIRAX will provide an unprecedented discovery-space coverage to study X-ray variability in detail, from fast X-ray novae to long-term (~several months) variable phenomena. Chiefly among MIRAX science objectives is its capability of providing simultaneous complete temporal coverage of the evolution of a large number of accreting black holes, including a detailed characterization of the spectral state transitions in these systems. MIRAX's instruments will include a soft X-ray (2-18 keV) and two hard X-ray (10-200 keV) coded-aperture imagers, with sensitivities of ~5 and ~2.6 mCrab/day, respectively. The hard X-ray imagers will be built at the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Brazil, in close collaboration with the Center for Astrophysics & Space Sciences (CASS) of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and the Institut fur Astronomie und Astrophysik of the University of Tubingen (IAAT) in Germany; UCSD will provide the crossed-strip position-sensitive (0.5- mm spatial resolution) CdZnTe (CZT) hard X-ray detectors. The soft X-ray camera, provided by the Space Research Organization Netherlands (SRON), will be the spare flight unit of the Wide Field Cameras that flew on the Italian-Dutch satellite BeppoSAX. MIRAX is an approved mission of the Brazilian Space Agency (Agnecia Espacial Brasileira - AEB) and is scheduled to be launched in 2011 in a low-altitude (~550 km) circular equatorial orbit. In this paper we present recent developments in the mission planning and design, as well as Monte Carlo simulations performed on the GEANT-based package MGGPOD environment (Weidenspointner et al. 2004) and new algorithms for image digital processing. Simulated images of the central Galactic plane as it

  6. X-ray filter for x-ray powder diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsheimer, John Jay; Conley, Raymond P.; Bouet, Nathalie C. D.; Dooryhee, Eric; Ghose, Sanjit

    2018-01-23

    Technologies are described for apparatus, methods and systems effective for filtering. The filters may comprise a first plate. The first plate may include an x-ray absorbing material and walls defining first slits. The first slits may include arc shaped openings through the first plate. The walls of the first plate may be configured to absorb at least some of first x-rays when the first x-rays are incident on the x-ray absorbing material, and to output second x-rays. The filters may comprise a second plate spaced from the first plate. The second plate may include the x-ray absorbing material and walls defining second slits. The second slits may include arc shaped openings through the second plate. The walls of the second plate may be configured to absorb at least some of second x-rays and to output third x-rays.

  7. X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endrizzi, Marco

    2018-01-01

    X-ray imaging is a standard tool for the non-destructive inspection of the internal structure of samples. It finds application in a vast diversity of fields: medicine, biology, many engineering disciplines, palaeontology and earth sciences are just few examples. The fundamental principle underpinning the image formation have remained the same for over a century: the X-rays traversing the sample are subjected to different amount of absorption in different parts of the sample. By means of phase-sensitive techniques it is possible to generate contrast also in relation to the phase shifts imparted by the sample and to extend the capabilities of X-ray imaging to those details that lack enough absorption contrast to be visualised in conventional radiography. A general overview of X-ray phase contrast imaging techniques is presented in this review, along with more recent advances in this fast evolving field and some examples of applications.

  8. A New Generation of X-ray Baggage Scanners Based on a Different Physical Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Speller

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available X-ray baggage scanners play a basic role in the protection of airports, customs, and other strategically important buildings and infrastructures. The current technology of baggage scanners is based on x-ray attenuation, meaning that the detection of threat objects relies on how various objects differently attenuate the x-ray beams going through them. This capability is enhanced by the use of dual-energy x-ray scanners, which make the determination of the x-ray attenuation characteristics of a material more precise by taking images with different x-ray spectra, and combining the information appropriately. However, this still has limitations whenever objects with similar attenuation characteristics have to be distinguished. We describe an alternative approach based on a different x-ray interaction phenomenon, x-ray refraction. Refraction is a familiar phenomenon in visible light (e.g., what makes a straw half immersed in a glass of water appear bent, which also takes place in the x-ray regime, only causing deviations at much smaller angles. Typically, these deviations occur at the boundaries of all objects. We have developed a system that, like other “phase contrast” based instruments, is capable of detecting such deviations, and therefore of creating precise images of the contours of all objects. This complements the material-related information provided by x-ray attenuation, and helps contextualizing the nature of the individual objects, therefore resulting in an increase of both sensitivity (increased detection rate and specificity (reduced rate of false positives of baggage scanners.

  9. X-ray generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucarias, A; Shepherd, J W

    1982-09-08

    An X-ray tube has a tubular envelope with a cathode for directing an electron beam onto a focal spot area of a spaced anode target to generate X-rays. The target is mounted for axial rotation on one end of a rotor disposed in an end portion of the envelope and encircled by a stator of an alternating current induction motor. An annular shield of high permeability magnetic material extends transversely between the electron beam and the stator of the induction motor for shunting stray or fringe electromagnetic fields established by the stator away from the electron beam to avoid consequent lateral deflections of the electron and corresponding lateral movements of the focal spot area.

  10. X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunsmuir, J.H.; Ferguson, S.R.; D'Amico, K.L.; Stokes, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe the application of a new high-resolution X-ray tomographic microscope to the study of porous media. The microscope was designed to exploit the properties of a synchrotron X-ray source to perform three dimensional tomography on millimeter sized objects with micron resolution and has been used in materials science studies with both synchrotron and conventional and synchrotron sources will be compared. In this work the authors have applied the microscope to measure the three dimensional structure of fused bead packs and berea sandstones with micron resolution and have performed preliminary studies of flow in these media with the microscope operated in a digital subtraction radiography mode. Computer graphics techniques have been applied to the data to visually display the structure of the pore body system. Tomographic imaging after flow experiments should detect the structure of the oil-water interface in the pore network and this work is ongoing

  11. Structural studies on volatile, air and moisture sensitive liquids at ambient and elevated temperatures using liquid X-ray scattering. The structure of liquid gallium (III) chloride systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvenlund, Stefan; Bengtsson, Lars A.

    1994-09-01

    An X-ray scattering method is presented which provides accurate structural information on air and moisture sensitive liquids at ambient and elevated temperatures using a standard θ-θ X-ray diffractometer. The method utilizes capillary glass tubes as sample containers and requires no corrections for sample container absorption or scattering, as shown by structural studies of well-known systems such as benzene, carbon tetrachloride and antimony trichloride. Artefacts produced by the sample holder are insignificant and very easy to correct for. The major drawback of the method is the long time of experiment, due to the small (compared with the standard set-up) area/volume ratio of the liquid which contributes to the intensity of the scattered radiation. However, the time required is not unduly long except for liquids containing light elements only (very low scattering power) or very heavy ones (high liner absorptivity). Liquid GaCl 3 is shown to have a dimeric structure consisting of edge-sharing GaCl 4 tetrahedra. This structure is analogous to that previously found for GaCl 3 in the gaseous and solid state and for AlCl 3 in the gaseous and liquid state. Concentrated solutions of GaCl 3 in benzene have been shown to comprise monomeric GaCl 3 units with C3v symmetry. However, it is suggested that such units form as a result of a radiolytically induced cleavage of the Ga 2Cl 6 moieties. No GaC correlation is resolved, which is explained by assuming a σ-type complex GaCl 3 and benzene and/or an ill-defined interaction between the GaCl 3 unit and benzene. The former sitution would most probably produce too few GaC correlation to be observable by the present method, whereas the latter situation would produce a very broad GaC correlation difficult to separate from the background. However, the deviation from the D3h symmetry adopted by GaCl 3 in the gas phase indicates a specific interation between GaCl 3 and benzene.

  12. Collimating device for x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, C.H.

    1978-01-01

    A position indicating device which attaches to an X-ray machine is provided with a collar onto which a lead lined cylinder may be threaded. The cylinder has an end plate through which a rectangular opening is formed in order to provide a rectangular X-ray beam for use in cephalometric radiography. When the cylinder is removed, a circular beam is emitted for use in intra-oral radiography

  13. Study on the chemical stability of catalyst counter electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells using a simple X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-based method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Kim, Jungmin; Chung, Jongwon; Park, SungHoon; Baek, WoonJoong; Kim, Yongsu; Kim, Seongheon; Kwon, Young-Nam; Chung, JaeGwan; Kyoung, Yongkoo; Kim, Ki-Hong; Heo, Sung

    2014-12-01

    Since the chemical/electrical stability and catalytic activity are essential conditions for catalyst counter electrodes (CCEs) in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), a simple dipping method is employed for evaluating the chemical stability of CCE candidates in an iodine-based liquid electrolyte (I-electrolyte). The chemical stabilities and transition mechanisms of the CCEs are successfully analyzed by studying the chemical transitions in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core levels after dipping in the I-electrolyte. All films including the Pt film undergo degradation depending on the type of material. While dipping in the I-electrolyte, Cu and Au films scarcely dissolves as their respective metal sulfides, and the Al film gradually loss its metallic properties owing to Al2O3 growth. On the other hand, a previously unknown transition mechanism of organic conducting CCEs is determined based on the proposed method. Compared to the other metal films, the poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/PEDOT:PSS films undergo an entirely unique transition mechanism, which results from the chemical adsorption of organic molecules onto PEDOT:PSS molecules in the I-electrolyte. Consequently, these chemical structure transitions correspond well to the degrees of alternation in the electrical properties of DSSCs with all the investigated CCEs.

  14. Optics Developments for X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Brian

    2014-01-01

    X-ray optics has revolutionized x-ray astronomy. The degree of background suppression that these afford, have led to a tremendous increase in sensitivity. The current Chandra observatory has the same collecting area (approx. 10(exp 3)sq cm) as the non-imaging UHURU observatory, the first x-ray observatory which launched in 1970, but has 5 orders of magnitude more sensitivity due to its focusing optics. In addition, its 0.5 arcsec angular resolution has revealed a wealth of structure in many cosmic x-ray sources. The Chandra observatory achieved its resolution by using relatively thick pieces of Zerodur glass, which were meticulously figured and polished to form the four-shell nested array. The resulting optical assembly weighed around 1600 kg, and cost approximately $0.5B. The challenge for future x-ray astronomy missions is to greatly increase the collecting area (by one or more orders of magnitude) while maintaining high angular resolution, and all within realistic mass and budget constraints. A review of the current status of US optics for x-ray astronomy will be provided along with the challenges for future developments.

  15. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein, J.R.; Wei, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    We have been interested in structural elucidation by x-ray diffraction of compounds of biological interest. Understanding exactly how atoms are arranged in three-dimensional arrays as molecules can help explain the relationship between structure and functions. The species investigated may vary in size and shape; our recent studies included such diverse substances as antischistosomal drugs, a complex of cadmium with nucleic acid base, nitrate salts of adenine, and proteins

  16. X-ray Ordinance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, R.; Zerlett, G.

    1983-01-01

    This commentary, presented as volume 2 of the Deutsches Strahlenschutzrecht (German legislation on radiation protection) deals with the legal provisions of the ordinance on the protection against harmful effects of X-radiation (X-ray Ordinance - RoeV), of March 1, 1973 (announced in BGBl.I, page 173), as amended by the ordinance on the protection against harmful effects of ionizing radiation, of October 13, 1976 (announced in BGBl. I, page 2905). Thus volume 2 completes the task started with volume 1, namely to present a comprehensive view and account of the body of laws governing radiation protection, a task which was thought useful as developments in the FRG led to regulations being split up into the X-ray Ordinance, and the Radiation Protection Ordinance. In order to present a well-balanced commentary on the X-ray Ordinance, it was necessary to discuss the provisions both from the legal and the medical point of view. This edition takes into account the Fourth Public Notice of the BMA (Fed. Min. of Labour and Social Affairs) concerning the implementation of the X-ray Ordinance of January 4, 1982, as well as court decisions and literature published in this field, until September 1982. In addition, the judgment of the Federal Constitutional Court, dated October 19, 1982, concerning the voidness of the law on government liability, and two decisions by the Federal High Court, dated November 23, 1982, concerning the right to have insight into medical reports - of great significance in practice - have been considered. This commentary therefore is up to date with current developments. (orig.) [de

  17. Position-sensitive transition-edge sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyomoto, N.; Bandler, S.R.; Brekosky, R.P.; Chervenak, J.A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Finkbeiner, F.M.; Kelley, R.L.; Kilbourne, C.A.; Lindeman, M.A.; Murphy, K.; Porter, F.S.; Saab, T.; Sadleir, J.E.; Talley, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    We report the latest results from our development of Position-Sensitive Transition-edge sensors (PoSTs), which are one-dimensional imaging spectrometers. In PoSTs with segmented Au absorbers, we obtained 8eV energy resolution on K Kα lines, which is consistent to the baseline energy resolution and the design values, on all of the nine pixels, by choosing the best combination of the thermal conductance in absorbers and in links that connects the absorbers. The pulse decay time of 193μs is fast enough for our purpose. In a PoST with a continuous Bi/Cu absorber, by dividing the events into 63 effective pixels, we obtained energy resolutions of 16eV at the center 'pixel', which is comparable to the baseline energy resolution, and 33eV at the outer 'pixel'. The degradation of the energy resolution in the outer 'pixel' is due to position dependence, which we can cancel out by dividing the events into smaller 'pixels' when we have sufficient X-ray events

  18. Producing x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallozzi, P.J.; Epstein, H.M.; Jung, R.G.; Applebaum, D.C.; Fairand, B.P.; Gallagher, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    A method of producing x-rays by directing radiant energy from a laser onto a target is described. Conversion efficiency of at least about 3 percent is obtained by providing the radiant energy in a low-power precursor pulse of approximately uniform effective intensity focused onto the surface of the target for about 1 to 30 nanoseconds so as to generate an expanding unconfined coronal plasma having less than normal solid density throughout and comprising a low-density (underdense) region wherein the plasma frequency is less than the laser radiation frequency and a higher-density (overdense) region wherein the plasma frequency is greater than the laser radiation frequency and, about 1 to 30 nanoseconds after the precursor pulse strikes the target, a higher-power main pulse focused onto the plasma for about 10 -3 to 30 nanoseconds and having such power density and total energy that the radiant energy is absorbed in the underdense region and conducted into the overdense region to heat it and thus to produce x-rays therefrom with the plasma remaining substantially below normal solid density and thus facilitating the substantial emission of x-rays in the form of spectral lines arising from nonequilibrium ionization states

  19. X-ray fluorescence method for trace analysis and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Shinjiro

    2000-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis has a long history as conventional bulk elemental analysis with medium sensitivity. However, with the use of synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence method has become a unique analytical technique which can provide tace elemental information with the spatial resolution. To obtain quantitative information of trace elemental distribution by using the x-ray fluorescence method, theoretical description of x-ray fluorescence yield is described. Moreover, methods and instruments for trace characterization with a scanning x-ray microprobe are described. (author)

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. A bone ... bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no special preparation. You ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  2. X-ray detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The object of the invention (an ionization chamber X-ray detector array for use with high speed computerised tomographic imaging apparatus) is to reduce the time required to produce a tomographic image. The detector array described determines the distribution of X-ray intensities in one or more flat, coplanar X-ray beams. It comprises three flat anode sheets parallel to the X-ray beam, a plurality of rod-like cathodes between the anodes, a detector gas between the electrodes and a means for applying a potential between the electrodes. Each of the X-ray sources is collimated to give a narrow, planar section of X-ray photons. Sets of X-ray sources in the array are pulsed simultaneously to obtain X-ray transmission data for tomographic image reconstruction. (U.K.)

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... changes seen in metabolic conditions. assist in the detection and diagnosis of bone cancer . locate foreign objects ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that ...

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were maintained on ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wrist, arm, elbow, shoulder, spine, pelvis, hip, thigh, knee, leg (shin), ankle or foot. top of page ... the patient standing upright, as in cases of knee x-rays. A portable x-ray machine is ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ... body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray ...

  9. X-ray Microprobe for Fluorescence and Diffraction Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ice, G.E.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (see unit 1.1) and x-ray excited fluorescence analysis are powerful techniques for the nondestructive measurement of crystal structure and chemical composition. X-ray fluorescence analysis is inherently nondestructive with orders of magnitude lower power deposited for the same detectable limit as with fluorescence excited by charged particle probes (Sparks, 1980). X-ray diffraction analysis is sensitive to crystal structure with orders-of-magnitude greater sensitivity to crystallographic strain than electron probes (Rebonato, et al. 1989). When a small-area x-ray microbeam is used as the probe, chemical composition (Z>14), crystal structure, crystalline texture, and crystalline strain distributions can be determined. These distributions can be studied both at the surface of the sample and deep within the sample (Fig. 1). Current state-of-the-art can achieve an ∼1 mm-D x-ray microprobe and an ∼0.1 mm-D x-ray microprobe has been demonstrated (Bilderback, et al., 1994). Despite their great chemical and crystallographic sensitivities, x-ray microprobe techniques have until recently been restricted by inefficient x-ray focusing optics and weak x-ray sources; x-ray microbeam analysis was largely superseded by electron techniques in the 50's. However, interest in x-ray microprobe techniques has now been revived (Howells, et al., 1983; Ice and Sparks, 1984; Chevallier, et al., 1997; Riekel 1992; Thompson, el al., 1992; and Making and Using... 1997) by the development of efficient x-ray focusing optics and ultra-high intensity synchrotron x-ray sources (Buras and Tazzari, 1984; Shenoy, et al., 1988). These advances have increased the achievable microbeam flux by more than 11 orders of magnitude (Fig. 2) (Ice, 1997); the flux in a tunable 1 mm-D beam on a 'so called' 3rd-generation synchrotron source such as the APS can exceed the flux in a fixed-energy mm2 beam on a conventional source. These advances make x-ray microfluorescence and x-ray

  10. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higley, Daniel J., E-mail: dhigley@stanford.edu; Yuan, Edwin [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Jal, Emmanuelle; Lutman, Alberto A.; Coslovich, Giacomo; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Stöhr, Joachim; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Schlotter, William F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Liu, Tianmin; MacArthur, James P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); and others

    2016-03-15

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L{sub 3,2}-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature.

  11. A study of the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite on melt quenched Bioglass using surface sensitive shallow angle X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R A; Twyman, H; Qiu, D; Knowles, J C; Newport, R J

    2009-04-01

    Melt quenched silicate glasses containing calcium, phosphorous and alkali metals have the ability to promote bone regeneration and to fuse to living bone. These glasses, including 45S5 Bioglass((R)) [(CaO)(26.9)(Na(2)O)(24.4)(SiO(2))(46.1)(P(2)O(5))(2.6)], are routinely used as clinical implants. Consequently there have been numerous studies on the structure of these glasses using conventional diffraction techniques. These studies have provided important information on the atomic structure of Bioglass((R)) but are of course intrinsically limited in the sense that they probe the bulk material and cannot be as sensitive to thin layers of near-surface dissolution/growth. The present study therefore uses surface sensitive shallow angle X-ray diffraction to study the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite on Bioglass((R)) samples, pre-reacted in simulated body fluid (SBF). Unreacted Bioglass((R)) is dominated by a broad amorphous feature around 2.2 A(-1) which is characteristic of sodium calcium silicate glass. After reacting Bioglass((R)) in SBF a second broad amorphous feature evolves ~1.6 A(-1) which is attributed to amorphous calcium phosphate. This feature is evident for samples after only 4 h reacting in SBF and by 8 h the amorphous feature becomes comparable in magnitude to the background signal of the bulk Bioglass((R)). Bragg peaks characteristic of hydroxyapatite form after 1-3 days of reacting in SBF.

  12. Sensitivity tests on the rates of the excited states of positron decays during the rapid proton capture process of the one-zone X-ray burst model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Rita

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the sensitivities of positron decays on a one-zone model of type-I X-ray bursts. Most existing studies have multiplied or divided entire beta decay rates (electron captures and beta decay rates) by 10. Instead of using the standard Fuller & Fowler (FFNU) rates, we used the most recently developed weak library rates [1], which include rates from Langanke et al.'s table (the LMP table) (2000) [2], Langanke et al.'s table (the LMSH table) (2003) [3], and Oda et al.'s table (1994) [4] (all shell model rates). We then compared these table rates with the old FFNU rates [5] to study differences within the final abundances. Both positron decays and electron capture rates were included in the tables. We also used pn-QRPA rates [6,7] to study the differences within the final abundances. Many of the positron rates from the nuclei's ground states and initial excited energy states along the rapid proton capture (rp) process have been measured in existing studies. However, because temperature affects the rates of excited states, these studies should have also acknowledged the half-lives of the nuclei's excited states. Thus, instead of multiplying or dividing entire rates by 10, we studied how the half-lives of sensitive nuclei in excited states affected the abundances by dividing the half-lives of the ground states by 10, which allowed us to set the half-lives of the excited states. Interestingly, we found that the peak of the final abundance shifted when we modified the rates from the excited states of the 105Sn positron decay rates. Furthermore, the abundance of 80Zr also changed due to usage of pn-QRPA rates instead of weak library rates (the shell model rates).

  13. Computed tomography with thermal neutrons and gaseous position sensitive detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Maria Ines Silvani

    2001-12-01

    A third generation tomographic system using a parallel thermal neutron beam and gaseous position sensitive detector has been developed along three discrete phases. At the first one, X-ray tomographic images of several objects, using a position sensitive detector designed and constructed for this purpose have been obtained. The second phase involved the conversion of that detector for thermal neutron detection, by using materials capable to convert neutrons into detectable charged particles, testing afterwards its performance in a tomographic system by evaluation the quality of the image arising from several test-objects containing materials applicable in the engineering field. High enriched 3 He, replacing the argon-methane otherwise used as filling gas for the X-ray detection, as well as, a gadolinium foil, have been utilized as converters. Besides the pure enriched 3 He, its mixture with argon-methane and later on with propane, have been also tested, in order to evaluate the detector efficiency and resolution. After each gas change, the overall performance of the tomographic system using the modified detector, has been analyzed through measurements of the related parameters. This was done by analyzing the images produced by test-objects containing several materials having well known attenuation coefficients for both thermal neutrons and X-rays. In order to compare the performance of the position sensitive detector as modified to detect thermal neutrons, with that of a conventional BF 3 detector, additional tomographs have been conducted using the last one. The results have been compared in terms of advantages, handicaps and complementary aspects for different kinds of radiation and materials. (author)

  14. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Hip What's in this article? What It Is Why ... You Have Questions Print What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... X-rays are a form of radiation like light or radio waves. X-rays pass through most objects, including the body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for bone x-rays consists of ... and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available in emergency ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The x-ray tube is connected to a flexible arm that is extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath the patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ...

  18. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Ankle What's in this article? What It Is Why ... You Have Questions Print What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  19. X-ray methods for the chemical characterization of atmospheric aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaklevic, J.M.; Thompson, A.C.

    1981-05-01

    The development and use of several x-ray methods for the chemical characterization of atmospherical aerosol particulate samples are described. These methods are based on the emission, absorption, and scattering of x-ray photons with emphasis on the optimization for the non-destructive analysis of dilute specimens. Techniques discussed include photon induced energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence, extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation and high-rate x-ray powder diffractometry using a position-sensitive gas proportional counter. These x-ray analysis methods were applied to the measurement of the chemical compositions of size-segregated aerosol particulate samples obtained with dichotomous samplers. The advantages of the various methods for use in such measurements are described and results are presented. In many cases, the complementary nature of the analytical information obtained from the various measurements is an important factor in the characterization of the sample. For example, the multiple elemental analyses obtained from x-ray fluorescence can be used as a cross check on the major compounds observed by powder diffraction

  20. X-ray Fluorescence Holography: Principles, Apparatus, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Korecki, Pawel

    2018-06-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is an atomic structure determination technique that combines the capabilities of X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. It provides a unique means of gaining fully three-dimensional information about the local atomic structure and lattice site positions of selected elements inside compound samples. In this work, we discuss experimental and theoretical aspects that are essential for the efficient recording and analysis of X-ray fluorescence holograms and review the most recent advances in XFH. We describe experiments performed with brilliant synchrotron radiation as well as with tabletop setups that employ conventional X-ray tubes.

  1. Photoemission measurements for low energy x-ray detector applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Photoemission has been studied for nearly 100 years as both a means of investigating quantum physics, and as a practical technique for transducing optical/x-ray photons into electrical currents. Numerous x-ray detection schemes, such as streak cameras and x-ray sensitive diodes, exploit this process because of its simplicity, adaptability, and speed. Recent emphasis on diagnostics for low temperature, high density, and short-lived, plasmas for inertial confinement fusion has stimulated interest in x-ray photoemission in the sub-kilovolt regime. In this paper, a review of x-ray photoemission measurements in the 50 eV to 10 keV x-ray region is given and the experimental techniques are reviewed. A semiempirical model of x-ray photoemission is discussed and compared to experimental measurements. Finally, examples of absolutely calibrated instruments are shown

  2. The application of synchrotron radiation to X-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiller, E.; Eastman, D.E.; Feder, R.; Grobman, W.D.; Gudat, W.; Topalian, J.

    1976-06-01

    Synchrotron radiation from the German electron synchrotron DESY in Hamburg has been used for X-ray lithograpgy. Replications of different master patterns (for magnetic bubble devices, fresnel zone plates, etc.) were made using various wavelengths and exposures. High quality lines down to 500 A wide have been reproduced using very soft X-rays. The sensitivities of X-ray resists have been evaluated over a wide range of exposures. Various critical factors (heating, radiation damage, etc.) involved with X-ray lithography using synchrotron radiation have been studied. General considerations of storage ring sources designed as radiation sources for X-ray lithography are discussed, together with a comparison with X-ray tube sources. The general conclusion is that X-ray lithography using synchrotron radiation offers considerable promise as a process for forming high quality sub-micron images with exposure times as short as a few seconds. (orig.) [de

  3. X-Ray Optics: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, William W.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray astronomy started with a small collimated proportional counter atop a rocket in the early 1960s. It was immediately recognized that focusing X-ray optics would drastically improve both source location accuracy and source detection sensitivity. In the past 5 decades, X-ray astronomy has made significant strides in achieving better angular resolution, large photon collection area, and better spectral and timing resolutions, culminating in the three currently operating X-ray observatories: Chandra, XMM/Newton, and Suzaku. In this talk I will give a brief history of X-ray optics, concentrating on the characteristics of the optics of these three observatories. Then I will discuss current X-ray mirror technologies being developed in several institutions. I will end with a discussion of the optics for the International X-ray Observatory that I have been developing at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  4. High-Resolution Detector For X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Withrow, William K.; Pusey, Marc L.; Yost, Vaughn H.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed x-ray-sensitive imaging detector offers superior spatial resolution, counting-rate capacity, and dynamic range. Instrument based on laser-stimulated luminescence and reusable x-ray-sensitive film. Detector scans x-ray film line by line. Extracts latent image in film and simultaneously erases film for reuse. Used primarily for protein crystallography. Principle adapted to imaging detectors for electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy and general use in astronomy, engineering, and medicine.

  5. SMM x ray polychromator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  6. Obstetric X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mwachi, M.K.

    2006-01-01

    Radiography of the pelvis should never be taken to diagnose early pregnancy, because of potential hazards of radiation damage to the growing foetus. the only indication occurs in the last week of pregnancy (37 weeks). Obstetric X-ray will help you answer like confirmation of malposition,multiple pregnancies; fetal abnormalities e.g. hydrocephalus, foetal disposition. The choice of radiographic projection will help give foetal presentation, disposition as well as foetal maturity. The search pattern helps you determine maternal and spine deformity, foetal spine and head , foetal presentation and any other anomalies

  7. X-ray film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, U.W.; Gilmore, D.J.; Wonacott, A.J.

    1977-01-01

    The performance of film as an X-ray detector is discussed and its behaviour is compared with that of a perfect Poissonian detector. The efficiency of microdensitometry as a method of extracting the information recorded on the film is discussed. More emphasis is placed in the precision of microdensitometric measurements than on the more obvious characteristic of film speed. The effects of chemical fog and background on the precision of the measurements is considered and it is concluded that the final limit to precision is set by the chemical fog. (B.D.)

  8. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.L. de.

    1976-01-01

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of literature on X-ray diffraction begins with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips' organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. This is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is divided according to the equipment (cameras, diffractometers, monochromators) and its applications. The applications are subdivided into sections for high/low temperature and pressure, effects due to the equipment, small angle scattering and a part for stress, texture and phase analyses of metals and quantitative analysis of minerals

  9. Flat Field Anomalies in an X-Ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-Ray Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael Haugh

    2008-01-01

    The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. It determines how accurately NIF can point the laser beams and is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 (micro)m square pixels, and 15 (micro)m thick. A multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 2mA, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/ΔE ∼ 12. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within ±1.5% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. The efficiency pattern follows the properties of Si. The maximum quantum efficiency is 0.71. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation was >8% at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was less than the measurement uncertainty below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris on the CCD chip. The debris showed maximum contrast at the lowest energy used, 930 eV, and disappeared by 4 keV. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager

  10. Soft x-ray lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs

  11. Determination of dopant atomic positions with kinematical X-ray standing waves; Untersuchung von Fremdatomen in kristallinen Materialien mit kinematischen stehenden Roentgenwellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walz, Bente

    2011-11-15

    Recent advances in the kinematic X-ray standing wave technique (KXSW) for the determination of the atomic coordinates and displacement parameters in nonperfect crystalline materials are described in this thesis. The methodology has been improved by considering three significant aspects: - the inclusion of weak multiple beam contributions - the excitation of secondary fluorescence in multiple-element samples - the influence of the crystal mosaicity on the fluorescence yield. The improvements allowed to successfully apply the method to investigate complex oxide materials of current interest for potential device applications. The thermally-induced interdiffusion of cobalt and manganese thin films on zinc oxide single crystals has been studied to determine which lattice sites are occupied preferentially. The data analysis revealed that after thermal diffusion the adsorbed atoms occupied zinc sites in the host lattice. The mean deviation of the cobalt atomic position from the zinc lattice site was comparable to the thermal displacement parameter of the zinc atoms. In the case of manganese a secondary phase was found on the surface. Measurements performed on LaSrMnO{sub 4} provided new insight concerning the rotation of the oxygen octahedron around the manganese atoms and the concomitant displacements of the strontium and lanthanum atoms. It was found that the oxygen octahedra are rotated around the [100]-direction by 4,5 . The measurements in transmission geometry performed on titanium dioxide (rutile) demonstrated that KXSW measurements in the Laue geometry is a viable technique. By performing KXSW under grazing-incidence conditions it is possible to achieve depth resolution. The results clearly show that the extended KXSW technique is a versatile method for characterizing complex material systems. (orig.)

  12. X-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowicz, A.A.; Van Grieken, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    In the period under review, i.e, through 1984 and 1985, some 600 articles on XRS (X-ray spectrometry) were published; most of these have been scanned and the most fundamental ones are discussed. All references will refer to English-language articles, unless states otherwise. Also general books have appeared on quantitative EPXMA (electron-probe X-ray microanalysis) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) as well as an extensive review on the application of XRS to trace analysis of environmental samples. In the period under review no radically new developments have been seen in XRS. However, significant improvements have been made. Gain in intensities has been achieved by more efficient excitation, higher reflectivity of dispersing media, and better geometry. Better understanding of the physical process of photon- and electron-specimen interactions led to complex but more accurate equations for correction of various interelement effects. Extensive use of micro- and minicomputers now enables fully automatic operation, including qualitative analysis. However, sample preparation and presentation still put a limit to further progress. Although some authors find XRS in the phase of stabilization or even stagnation, further gradual developments are expected, particularly toward more dedicated equipment, advanced automation, and image analysis systems. Ways are outlined in which XRS has been improved in the 2 last years by excitation, detection, instrumental, methodological, and theoretical advances. 340 references

  13. The application of confocal technology based on polycapillary X-ray optics in surface topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Guangcui; Sun, Tianxi; Liu, Zhiguo; Yuan, Hao; Li, Yude; Liu, Hehe; Zhao, Weigang; Zhang, Ruixia; Min, Qin; Peng, Song

    2013-01-01

    A confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence (MXRF) technology based on polycapillary X-ray optics was proposed for determining surface topography. This confocal topography method involves elemental sensitivity and can be used to classify the objects according to their elemental composition while obtaining their surface topography. To improve the spatial resolution of this confocal topography technology, the center of the confocal micro-volume was overlapped with the output focal spot of the polycapillary X-ray, focusing the lens in the excitation channel. The input focal spot of the X-ray lens parallel to the detection channel was used to determine the surface position of the sample. The corresponding surface adaptive algorithm was designed to obtain the surface topography. The surface topography of a ceramic chip was obtained. This confocal MXRF surface topography method could find application in the materials sciences

  14. Time-resolved materials science opportunities using synchrotron x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, B.C.; Tischler, J.Z.

    1995-06-01

    The high brightness, high intensity, and pulsed time-structure of synchrotron sources provide new opportunities for time-resolved x-ray diffraction investigations. With third generation synchrotron sources coming on line, high brilliance and high brightness are now available in x-ray beams with the highest flux. In addition to the high average flux, the instantaneous flux available in synchrotron beams is greatly enhanced by the pulsed time structure, which consists of short bursts of x-rays that are separated by ∼tens to hundreds of nanoseconds. Time-resolved one- and two-dimensional position sensitive detection techniques that take advantage of synchrotron radiation for materials science x-ray diffraction investigations are presented, and time resolved materials science applications are discussed in terms of recent diffraction and spectroscopy results and materials research opportunities

  15. Effect of Electric Voltage and Current of X-ray Chamber on the Element inthe Zirconium Alloy Analysis X-ray by X-ray Fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuf-Nampira; Narko-Wibowo, L; Rosika-Krisnawati; Nudia-Barenzani

    2000-01-01

    The using of x-ray fluorescence in the chemical analysis depend heavilyon the parameters of x-ray chamber, for examples : electric voltage andelectric current. That parameter give effect in the result of determine ofSn, Cr, Fe and Ni in the zirconium alloy. 20 kV electric voltages are used onthe Mo x-ray chamber shall product x-ray of zirconium in the sample materialcan give effect in the stability of the analysis result (deviation more than5%). The result of analysis of elements in the zirconium alloy shall givedeviation less than 5% when using of electric voltage of the x-ray chamberless than 19 kV. The sensitivity of analysis can be reached by step upelectric current of x-ray chamber. (author)

  16. The NuSTAR Extragalactic Survey: A First Sensitive Look at the High-Energy Cosmic X-Ray Background Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, D. M.; Stern, D.; DelMoro, A.; Lansbury, G. B.; Assef, R. J.; Aird, J.; Ajello, M.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first 10 identifications of sources serendipitously detected by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) to provide the first sensitive census of the cosmic X-ray background source population at approximately greater than 10 keV. We find that these NuSTAR-detected sources are approximately 100 times fainter than those previously detected at approximately greater than 10 keV and have a broad range in redshift and luminosity (z = 0.020-2.923 and L(sub 10-40 keV) approximately equals 4 × 10(exp 41) - 5 × 10(exp 45) erg per second; the median redshift and luminosity are z approximately equal to 0.7 and L(sub 10-40 keV) approximately equal to 3 × 10(exp 44) erg per second, respectively. We characterize these sources on the basis of broad-band approximately equal to 0.5 - 32 keV spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, and broad-band ultraviolet-to-mid-infrared spectral energy distribution analyses. We find that the dominant source population is quasars with L(sub 10-40 keV) greater than 10(exp 44) erg per second, of which approximately 50% are obscured with N(sub H) approximately greater than 10(exp 22) per square centimeters. However, none of the 10 NuSTAR sources are Compton thick (N(sub H) approximately greater than 10(exp 24) per square centimeters) and we place a 90% confidence upper limit on the fraction of Compton-thick quasars (L(sub 10-40 keV) greater than 10(exp 44) erg per second) selected at approximately greater than 10 keV of approximately less than 33% over the redshift range z = 0.5 - 1.1. We jointly fitted the rest-frame approximately equal to 10-40 keV data for all of the non-beamed sources with L(sub 10-40 keV) greater than 10(exp 43) erg per second to constrain the average strength of reflection; we find R less than 1.4 for gamma = 1.8, broadly consistent with that found for local active galactic nuclei (AGNs) observed at approximately greater than 10 keV. We also constrain the host-galaxy masses and find a median stellar

  17. Insensitivity of the chicken eye to the inflammatory effects of x-rays in contrast to its sensitivity to other inflammatory agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stetz, D.E.; Bito, L.Z.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of x-rays and three chemical agents, known to cause intraocular inflammation in mammalian eyes, were studied on the chicken eye because this species was reported to be insensitive to the cataractogenic effects of x-rays. Intravitreal injection of Shigella endotoxin and topical and/or intravitreal administration of PGE2, PGF2α, or arachidonic acid caused a breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier, as indicated by flare and increased protein concentration in the aqueous humor. Following endotoxin injection, there was also a large accumulation of cells in the anterior chamber. The ocular inflammatory effects of endotoxin and arachidonic acid were inhibited by indomethacin. Thus the chicken eye reacts to these inflammatory agents in a manner similar to that previously described for the rabbit. In contrast, the inflammatory response which was reported to occur in the rabbit eye 3 to 4 hr after exposure to 500 or 1000 rads of x-rays was not observed in the chicken eye even after exposure to 10,000 rads. Minimal flare and a small cellular infiltration were observed in some eyes only after extensive swelling of the surrounding tissues had developed. It is concluded that the insensitivity of the chicken eye to x-rays is due to some unique difference in the chain of events which mediates, or prevents, the effects of ionizing radiation rather than to a general insensitivity to inflammatory agents

  18. Flat Field Anomalies in an X-ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-ray Source (HTPD 08 paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugh, M; Schneider, M B

    2008-01-01

    The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. The intensity distribution taken by the SXI camera during a NIF shot is used to determine how accurately NIF can aim laser beams. This is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 (micro)m square pixels, and 15 (micro)m thick. A multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 10W, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/ΔE ∼ 10. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within ±1% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation occurred at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was not observable below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris, damage, and surface defects on the CCD chip. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager

  19. X-ray calibration facility for plasma diagnostics of the MegaJoule laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, S.; Prevot, V.

    2013-01-01

    The Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) located at CEA-CESTA will be equipped with x-ray plasma diagnostics using different kinds of x-ray components such as filters, mirrors, crystals, detectors and cameras. To guarantee LMJ measurements, detectors such as x-ray cameras need to be regularly calibrated. An x-ray laboratory is devoted to this task and performs absolute x-ray calibrations for similar x-ray cameras running on Laser Integration Line (LIL). This paper presents the x-ray calibration bench with its x-ray tube based High Energy x-ray Source (HEXS) and some calibration results. By mean of an ingenious transposition system under vacuum absolute x-ray calibration of x-ray cameras, like streak and stripline ones, can be carried out. Coupled to a new collimation system with micrometric accuracy on aperture sensitivity quantum efficiency measurements can be achieved with reduced uncertainties. (authors)

  20. X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmayne, I.G.B.

    1988-01-01

    The patent concerns a warning and protection system for mobile x-ray equipment used for 'on site' radiography, so that workers in the vicinity of such a working unit can be alerted to its presence. The invention is a local repeater warning system which gives a preliminary warning that energisation of the tubehead is imminent, as well as a switch near the tubehead to abort or inhibit energisation. The latter switch allows personnel caught in the vicinity of the tubehead to prevent energisation. The preliminary warning may be flashing lamps or by a klaxon. The control unit for the equipment may include a monitoring circuit to detect failure of the warning light or klaxon. (U.K.)

  1. X-ray equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmayne, I.G.B.

    1988-01-06

    The patent concerns a warning and protection system for mobile x-ray equipment used for 'on site' radiography, so that workers in the vicinity of such a working unit can be alerted to its presence. The invention is a local repeater warning system which gives a preliminary warning that energisation of the tubehead is imminent, as well as a switch near the tubehead to abort or inhibit energisation. The latter switch allows personnel caught in the vicinity of the tubehead to prevent energisation. The preliminary warning may be flashing lamps or by a klaxon. The control unit for the equipment may include a monitoring circuit to detect failure of the warning light or klaxon. (U.K.).

  2. Shielding of the child's head during x-ray studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolmach, Eh.U.

    1985-01-01

    Three devices for X-ray shielding of child's head are suggested; the first one is a protective attachment for shielding a child being in horizontal position on an X-ray table; the second one is a protective stand for shielding head and body at roentgenofraphy of upper extremities of a child sitting near the X-ray table; the third one is a prot ctive suspension for shielding the head of a child being in vertical position

  3. Crossover and valence band Kβ X-rays of chromium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazinic, Stjepko; Mandic, Luka; Kavcic, Matjaz; Bozicevic, Iva

    2011-01-01

    X-ray spectra of chromium metal and selected chromium oxides were measured twice using medium resolution flat crystal spectrometer and high resolution spectrometer employing Johansson geometry after excitation with 2 MeV proton beams. The positions and intensities of crossover (Kβ'') and valence (Kβ 2,5 ) band X-rays relative to the primary Kβ X-ray components were extracted in a consistent way. The results were compared with the existing data obtained by proton and photon induced ionization mechanisms and theoretical predictions. The obtained results in peak relative positions and intensities were analyzed in order to study dependence on the chromium oxidation states and chromium-oxygen bond lengths in selected chromium oxides. Our results obtained by both spectrometers confirm that the linear trend observed for the valence peak relative energy shift as a function of chromium oxidation number does not depend on the experimental resolution. Experimental results for normalized intensities (i.e. relative intensities divided with the number of chromium-oxygen pairs) of crossover and valence band X-rays obtained by both spectrometers are in very good agreement, and follow exponential relationship with the average Cr-O bond lengths in corresponding chromium oxides. The observed trends in crossover and valence X-rays normalized intensities could be used to measure the average chromium-oxygen bond length in various chromium oxides, with the sum of both crossover and valence X-ray normalized intensities being the most sensitive measure.

  4. X-Ray Lasers 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, Sergei; Daido, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2018-01-01

    These proceedings comprise a selection of invited and contributed papers presented at the 15th International Conference on X-Ray Lasers (ICXRL 2016), held at the Nara Kasugano International Forum, Japan, from May 22 to 27, 2016. This conference was part of an ongoing series dedicated to recent developments in the science and technology of x-ray lasers and other coherent x-ray sources with additional focus on supporting technologies, instrumentation and applications.   The book showcases recent advances in the generation of intense, coherent x-rays, the development of practical devices and their applications across a wide variety of fields. It also discusses emerging topics such as plasma-based x-ray lasers, 4th generation accelerator-based sources and higher harmonic generations, as well as other x-ray generation schemes.

  5. X-ray instrumentation in astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuhlane, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of a conference devoted to x-ray instrumentation in astronomy. Special sections are: AXAF X-Ray Optical Systems; Specialized X-Ray Systems; X-Ray Optical Systems I; X-Ray Optical Systems II; Gas Filled X-Ray Detectors II; The NASA Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility; X-Ray and EUV Spectrometers; Microchannel Plates; and Solid State Detectors

  6. High-temperature x-ray camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Il' inskii, A G; Romanova, A V; Prikhod' ko, N P

    1974-03-25

    A high-temperature x-ray chamber for taking x-ray photographs of flat horizontally set samples in a vacuum or gas medium is described. The chamber is fitted out with a water-cooled vacuum closed hull with a window letting the x-rays pass, a centering mechanism and a device for heating the samples. To widen its functional abilities the chamber is provided with a goniometric device, fixed immovably to the body foundation by means of two stands. Bearings are mounted to the stands; one of them is equipped with a screw wheel and an endless screw with a limb in the ring; a traverse to which a counter for the x-ray radiation is installed is attached to the shafts of both the bearings. The centering mechanism has a cooled metalic rod, which is connected through a spiral screw thread with the limb fixable by a fork. The position of the shaft of rotation of the counter is adjusted with the help of a nit, extended through the plug openings, positioned on the stands. The chamber can be applied for x-ray structural analyses.

  7. Development of multiwire gas detectors for X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, Eraldo de

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the prototype of a 2D position sensitive gas detector for application in X-ray scattering and diffraction experiments. Starting from a detector initially developed for other applications and will show the required changes on the original concept of this device. The strategy used to determine the necessary adaptations were based on searching in the literature for the overall characteristics of a multi-wire X-ray detector (choice of gas, pressure, window, etc.), the use of simulations, implementation of the changes and finally operational tests. Computational tools were used to calculate the mechanical strength and attenuation of the X-ray photons that helped to determine the most appropriate material for the construction of the entrance window. Detector simulations were built with Garfield software and were used to study the overall properties of the detector, and to determine the optimum parameters for the equipment operation. Typical parameters are the distance between the wires, wire diameter, high voltage to be used, among several other parameters. The results obtained showed that the multi-wire detector concept with the implemented adaptations allowed the detection of X-rays. However, depending on the application, it may be necessary improve the resolution of the equipment, in order to have a better description of the collected data. Several ideas are suggested for this improvement. It is also presented interesting results obtained with a microscopic pattern detector called triple GEM. This device belongs to the Gas Detectors Development group (GDD group) at CERN and was used in my training at this institution. The results showed the potential of the equipment for detection of X-rays. The results and simulations presented in this work, confirmed that the changes in the concept of the original detector permitted it use on X-ray detection applications. Also, it was possible to obtain several indications for further optimization, which may

  8. Handbook of X-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Keith A. (Editor); Smith, Randall K.; Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2011-01-01

    X-ray astronomy was born in the aftermath of World War II as military rockets were repurposed to lift radiation detectors above the atmosphere for a few minutes at a time. These early flights detected and studied X-ray emission from the Solar corona. The first sources beyond the Solar System were detected during a rocket flight in 1962 by a team headed by Riccardo Giaccom at American Science and Engineering, a company founded by physicists from MIT. The rocket used Geiger counters with a system designed to reduce non-X-ray backgrounds and collimators limiting the region of sky seen by the counters. As the rocket spun, the field of view (FOV) happened to pass over what was later found to be the brightest non-Solar X-ray source; later designated See X-1. It also detected a uniform background glow which could not be resolved into individual sources. A follow-up campaign using X-ray detectors with better spatial resolution and optical telescopes identified See X-1 as an interacting binary with a compact (neutron star) primary. This success led to further suborbital rocket flights by a number of groups. More X-ray binaries were discovered, as well as X-ray emission from supernova remnants, the radio galaxies M87 and Cygnus-A, and the Coma cluster. Detectors were improved and Geiger counters were replaced by proportional counters, which provided information about energy spectra of the sources. A constant challenge was determining precise positions of sources as only collimators were available.

  9. Low energy x-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d = 9.95A) crystal. To preclude higher order (n > 1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than approx. 1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surface photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminium light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any uv generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral energy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni Lα 1 2 lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy x-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable. 16 figures

  10. Developments in gas detectors for synchrotron x-ray radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J.; Radeka, V.; Smith, G.C.

    1985-09-01

    New results on the physical limitations to position resolution in gas detectors for x-rays (approx. =3 to 20 keV) due to the range of photoelectrons and Auger electrons are discussed. These results were obtained with a small gap detector in which position readout was accomplished by using a very low noise centroid finding technique. A description is given of position sensitive detectors for medium rates (a few x 10 5 photons per second), using delay line readout, and for very high rates (approx. =10 8 photons per second), using fast signal shaping on the output of each anode wire

  11. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  12. X-ray examinations pose little risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servomaa, A.; Komppa, T.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray examinations account for about 15 per cent of Finns' radiation exposure and for roughly one out of a hundred deaths from cancer. The risk is small when compared to other risks in life and to the health benefits obtained from the examinations. About 4.1 million x-ray examinations were conducted in Finland in 1995, i.e. an average of 0.8 examinations per inhabitant. The mean effective dose was about 0.67 mSv per examination and about 0.54 mSv per inhabitant. Natural background radiation causes an annual radiation dose of approximately 3 mSv per person. Examinations of bones and soft tissues accounted for the highest number of x-ray images, roughly 2.1 million, of which half were examinations of the extremities. Some 1.3 million x-ray images were taken of the pulmonary organs, most of them being examinations of the lungs. Computed tomography and examinations of the gastrointestinal tract accounted for about 130,000 images each. To assess the radiation risk involved in x-ray examinations, we need knowledge or an estimate of the radiation doses of organs sensitive to radiation. Efficient calculation methods are available for this purpose. (orig.)

  13. Picosecond chronography at x-ray wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, P.R.; Bradley, D.J.; Roddie, A.G.; Sibbett, W.; Key, M.H.; Lamb, M.J.; Lewis, C.L.S.

    1975-01-01

    An ultrafast streak camera for vacuum U-V to X-ray radiation is described. Preliminary measurements on laser-produced plasmas are presented with time resolution down to 150 psecs and space resolution down to 40μm for 1keV X-ray emission from a plasma generated by 2GW laser pulses focussed on a Cu target. High sensitivity and wide spectral bandwidth is due to front surface photoemission at oblique incidence. Time resolution capability of 40 psec and simultaneous spatial resolution down to a few microns is theoretically possible with this system. (author)

  14. LOBSTER: new space x-ray telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudec, R.; Sveda, L.; Pína, L.; Inneman, A.; Semencova, V.; Skulinova, M.

    2017-11-01

    The LOBSTER telescopes are based on the optical arrangement of the lobster eye. The main difference from classical X-ray space telescopes in wide use is the very large field of view while the use of optics results in higher efficiency if compared with detectors without optics. Recent innovative technologies have enabled to design, to develop and to test first prototypes. They will provide deep sensitive survey of the sky in X-rays for the first time which is essential for both long-term monitoring of celestial high-energy sources as well as in understanding transient phenomena. The technology is now ready for applications in space.

  15. Development on mini X-ray diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shaoen; Sun Kexu; Peng Nengling; Huang Tianxuan; Cui Yanli; Yi Rongqing; Chen Jiusen

    2004-01-01

    The mini X-ray diode (M-XRD) was developed, and was used in mini soft X-ray spectrometer. Compared with traditional XRD, M-XRD's volume reduces to 1/30. M-XRD's property was experimentally examined on Shenguang II laser facility. The experimental results indicated that the temporal response and sensitivity of M-XRD are basically consistent with traditional XRD. The equivalent circuit of XRD was analyzed, and its response time and linear saturated current were calculated. (authors)

  16. Hard x-ray telescope mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorenstein, P.; Worrall, D.; Joensen, K.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Hard X-Ray Telescope was selected for study as a possible new intermediate size mission for the early 21st century. Its principal attributes are: (1) multiwavelength observing with a system of focussing telescopes that collectively observe from the UV to over 1 MeV, (2) much higher sensitivity...

  17. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  18. X-ray filtration apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to an X-ray shielding support device. In spite of considerable development in X-ray taking techniques, a need still exists for effective shielding, inter alia, to compensate for variations in the thickness, density and the absorption properties of the object being studied. By appropriate shielding, the X-ray image produced is of sufficient detail, contrast and intensity over its entire area to constitute a useful diagnostic aid. It is also desirable to subject the patient to the smallest possible X-ray dosage. 4 figs

  19. IXPE - The Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) is a Small Explorer Mission that will be proposed in response to NASA's upcoming Announcement of Opportunity. IXPE will transform our understanding of the most energetic and exotic astrophysical objects, especially neutron stars and black holes, by measuring the linear polarization of astronomical objects as a function of energy, time and, where relevant, position. As the first dedicated polarimetry observatory IXPE will add a new dimension to the study of cosmic sources, enlarging the observational phase space and providing answers to fundamental questions. IXPE will feature x-ray optics fabricated at NASA/MSFC and gas pixel focal plane detectors provided by team members in Italy (INAF and INFN). This presentation will give an overview of the proposed IXPE mission, detailing the payload configuration, the expected sensitivity, and a typical observing program.

  20. Curved anode wire chambers for x-ray diffraction applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Wiedenbeck, P.; Wagner, C.N.J.; Woelfel, E.

    1983-01-01

    Curved position sensitive proportional detectors are described. The first has a radius of curvature of 135 mm and a 60 0 angular range. The second has a radius of curvature of 360 mm and a 45 0 angular range. For high quantum efficiency for x-ray energies up to 60 keV, a relatively large x-ray path and high gas pressure are required. The anode wires are suspended in circular arcs by the interaction of a current flowing through them and a magnetic field provided by two permanent magnets placed above and below the wire running parallel to it over the full length of the curved chambers. Anode wire stability under the combined action of the magnetic and electrostatic forces is discussed

  1. Quantifying the Exospheric Component of Soft X-ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, Steven L.; Robertson, Ina; Hansen, Kenneth; Cravens, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    High charge state heavy ions in the solar wind exchange charge with ambient neutral gas. This process creates a product ion in an excited state. During the radiative cascade process, EUV and X-ray photons are emitted with energies in the range of about 100 eV to 1 keV. Because the terrestrial exospheric density at the nominal magnetopause location is relatively high, approx. 10 cu cm, solar wind charge exchange, or SWCX, can be observed by Earth-orbiting soft X-ray instruments such as the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counters (PSPC). In this presentation, we will compare simulated and observed soft Xray emission during an event on August 18-19, 1991 and discuss the role of exospheric SWCX emission for this and other events.

  2. ISS Ammonia Leak Detection Through X-Ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan; Barthelmy, Scott; Skinner, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia leaks are a significant concern for the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS has external transport lines that direct liquid ammonia to radiator panels where the ammonia is cooled and then brought back to thermal control units. These transport lines and radiator panels are subject to stress from micrometeorites and temperature variations, and have developed small leaks. The ISS can accommodate these leaks at their present rate, but if the rate increased by a factor of ten, it could potentially deplete the ammonia supply and impact the proper functioning of the ISS thermal control system, causing a serious safety risk. A proposed ISS astrophysics instrument, the Lobster X-Ray Monitor, can be used to detect and localize ISS ammonia leaks. Based on the optical design of the eye of its namesake crustacean, the Lobster detector gives simultaneously large field of view and good position resolution. The leak detection principle is that the nitrogen in the leaking ammonia will be ionized by X-rays from the Sun, and then emit its own characteristic Xray signal. The Lobster instrument, nominally facing zenith for its astrophysics observations, can be periodically pointed towards the ISS radiator panels and some sections of the transport lines to detect and localize the characteristic X-rays from the ammonia leaks. Another possibility is to use the ISS robot arm to grab the Lobster instrument and scan it across the transport lines and radiator panels. In this case the leak detection can be made more sensitive by including a focused 100-microampere electron beam to stimulate X-ray emission from the leaking nitrogen. Laboratory studies have shown that either approach can be used to locate ammonia leaks at the level of 0.1 kg/day, a threshold rate of concern for the ISS. The Lobster instrument uses two main components: (1) a microchannel plate optic (also known as a Lobster optic) that focuses the X-rays and directs them to the focal plane, and (2) a CCD (charge

  3. A New Development in the Method of Measurement of Reciprocity-Law Failure and Its Application to Screen/Green-Sensitive X-Ray Film Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hiroshi; Uchida, Suguru

    1981-01-01

    Since it has been confirmed by experiment that the intensity of X-rays varies approximately as the focus-film distance (FFD) to the minus 2.12th power, the X-ray intensity can be changed by varying the FFD. It is shown in this paper that two types of reciprocity failure curve, density vs. exposure time for constant exposure and relative exposure vs. exposure time for constant density, can easily be obtained from several time-scale characteristic curves taken experimentally for several FFD’s in the rare-earth screen-film systems used. Only low-intensity reciprocity failure is present for exposure times of more than about 0.1 sec for one film, but both low-intensity and high-intensity reciprocity failures occur in the other one. The effects of reciprocity failure on the H & D curves can be seen in the shape of the curves and the relative speed.

  4. A new development in the method of measurement of reciprocity-law failure and its application to screen/green-sensitive x-ray film systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Hiroshi; Uchida, Suguru.

    1981-01-01

    Since it has been confirmed by experiment that the intensity of X-rays varies approximately as the focus-film distance (FFD) to the minus 2.12th power, the X-ray intensity can be changed by varying the FFD. It is shown in this paper that two types of reciprocity failure curve, density vs. exposure time for constant exposure and relative exposure vs. exposure time for constant density, can easily be obtained from several time-scale characteristic curves taken experimentally for several FFD's in the rare-earth screen-film systems used. Only low-intensity reciprocity failure is present for exposure times of more than about 0.1 sec for one film, but both low-intensity and high-intensity reciprocity failures occur in the other one. The effects of reciprocity failure on the H D curves can be seen in the shape of the relative speed. (author)

  5. X-ray emission spectroscopy. X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despujols, J.

    1992-01-01

    Principles of X-ray emission spectrometry are first recalled, then wave-length dispersive and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer are described. They are essentially designed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of elements (Z>10). Sample preparation, calibration, corrections, interferences, accuracy are reviewed. Examples of use in different industries are given. (71 refs.)

  6. Different X-ray spectral evolution for black hole X-ray binaries in dual tracks of radio-X-ray correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Xiao-Feng; Wu, Qingwen; Dong, Ai-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Recently, an 'outlier' track of radio-X-ray correlation was found, which is much steeper than the former universal correlation, where dual tracks were speculated to be triggered by different accretion processes. In this work, we test this issue by exploring hard X-ray spectral evolution in four black-hole X-ray binaries with multiple, quasi-simultaneous radio and X-ray observations. First, we find that hard X-ray photon indices, Γ, are negatively and positively correlated with X-ray fluxes when the X-ray flux, F 3-9 keV , is below and above a critical flux, F X, crit , which are consistent with predictions of the advection-dominated accretion flow and the disk-corona model, respectively. Second, and most importantly, we find that the radio-X-ray correlations are also clearly different when the X-ray fluxes are higher and lower than the critical flux as defined by X-ray spectral evolution. The data points with F 3-9 keV ≳ F X, crit have a steeper radio-X-ray correlation (F X ∝F R b and b ∼ 1.1-1.4), which roughly forms the ''outlier'' track. However, the data points with anti-correlation of Γ – F 3-9 keV either stay in the universal track with b ∼ 0.61 or stay in the transition track (from the universal to 'outlier' tracks or vice versa). Therefore, our results support that the universal and ''outlier'' tracks of radio-X-ray correlations are regulated by radiatively inefficient and radiatively efficient accretion model, respectively.

  7. X-Ray Calorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the evolving universe. The grating spectrometers on the XMM and Chandra satellites started a new era in x-ray astronomy, but there remains a need for instrumentation that can provide higher spectral resolution with high throughput in the Fe-K band (around 6 keV) and can enable imaging spectroscopy of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and galaxy clusters. The instrumentation needed is a broad-band imaging spectrometer - basically an x-ray camera that can distinguish tens of thousands of x-ray colors. The potential benefits to astrophysics of using a low-temperature calorimeter to determine the energy of an incident x-ray photon via measurement of a small change in temperature was first articulated by S. H. Moseley over two decades ago. In the time since, technological progress has been steady, though full realization in an orbiting x-ray telescope is still awaited. A low-temperature calorimeter can be characterized by the type of thermometer it uses, and three types presently dominate the field. The first two types are temperature-sensitive resistors - semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a paramagnetic thermometer. These types can be considered the three generations of x-ray calorimeters; by now each has demonstrated a resolving power of 2000 at 6 keV, but only a semiconductor calorimeter system has been developed to spaceflight readiness. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2013, will use an array of silicon thermistors with I-IgTe x-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays, kilo-pixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are just now being produced, and it is anticipated that much larger arrays will require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetic thermometers.

  8. Subgroup report on hard x-ray microprobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ice, G.E.; Barbee, T.; Bionta, R.; Howells, M.; Thompson, A.C.; Yun, W.

    1994-01-01

    The increasing availability of synchrotron x-ray sources has stimulated the development of advanced hard x-ray (E≥5 keV) microprobes. New x-ray optics have been demonstrated which show promise for achieving intense submicron hard x-ray probes. These probes will be used for extraordinary elemental detection by x-ray fluorescence/absorption and for microdiffraction to identify phase and strain. The inherent elemental and crystallographic sensitivity of an x-ray microprobe and its inherently nondestructive and penetrating nature makes the development of an advanced hard x-ray microprobe an important national goal. In this workshop state-of-the-art hard x-ray microprobe optics were described and future directions were discussed. Gene Ice, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), presented an overview of the current status of hard x-ray microprobe optics and described the use of crystal spectrometers to improve minimum detectable limits in fluorescent microprobe experiments. Al Thompson, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), described work at the Center for X-ray Optics to develop a hard x-ray microprobe based on Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) optics. Al Thompson also showed the results of some experimental measurements with their KB optics. Malcolm Howells presented a method for bending elliptical mirrors and Troy Barbee commented on the use of graded d spacings to achieve highest efficiency in KB multilayer microfocusing. Richard Bionta, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), described the development of the first hard x-ray zone plates and future promise of so called open-quotes jelly rollclose quotes or sputter slice zone plates. Wenbing Yun, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), described characterization of jelly roll and lithographically produced zone plates and described the application of zone plates to focus extremely narrow bandwidths by nuclear resonance. This report summarizes the presentations of the workshop subgroup on hard x-ray microprobes

  9. X-ray tomographic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    An x-ray tomographic system consists of a radiation source such as gamma or x radiation which produces a fan-shaped beam. The fan is wide enough to encompass the patient circle. The system further includes means for rotating the radiation source about the patient for less than a full rotation, and detectors for detecting the radiation at positions that surround the patient by 180 0 plus the angle of the fan beam plus the angle between adjacent fan detectors. Attenuation data from the detectors is sorted into detector fans of attenuation data, then processed. The convolved data is back-projected into an image memory and displayed on a video monitor

  10. X-ray tube monitor apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, W.P.; Pellergrino, A.

    1981-01-01

    An x-ray tube with a rotating anode target is provided with a detector of x-rays located outside a port of a housing of the tube and positioned at or near a tangent line to the radiating surface for observing variations in the radiation intensity due to rotation of the target, the variations being pronounced due to the heel effect of the radiation pattern. The x-ray detector can employ a scintillation material and be coupled by a light guide to a photodetector which is removed from the path of the radiation and detects scintillations of the x-ray detector. Alternatively, the photodetector and light pipe may be replaced by a detector of germanium, silicon or an ion chamber which converts x-ray photons directly to an electric current. An electronic unit determines the speed of rotation from the electric signal and can also, by fourier transform and signature analysis techniques, monitor the state of the radiating surface. (author)

  11. X-ray scattering measurements from thin-foil x-ray mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; BYRNAK, BP; Hornstrup, Allan

    1992-01-01

    Thin foil X-ray mirrors are to be used as the reflecting elements in the telescopes of the X-ray satellites Spectrum-X-Gamma (SRG) and ASTRO-D. High resolution X-ray scattering measurements from the Au coated and dip-lacquered Al foils are presented. These were obtained from SRG mirrors positioned...... in a test quadrant of the telescope structure and from ASTRO-D foils held in a simple fixture. The X-ray data is compared with laser data and other surface structure data such as STM, atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM, and electron micrography. The data obtained at Cu K-alpha(1), (8.05 keV) from all...

  12. Modern X-ray spectroscopy 3. X-ray fluorescence holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kouichi

    2008-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) provides three dimensional atomic images around specified elements. The XFH uses atoms as a wave source or monitor of interference field within a crystal sample, and therefore it can record both intensity and phase of scattered X-rays. Its current performance makes it possible to apply to ultra thin film, impurity and quasicrystal. In this article, I show the theory including solutions for twin image problem, advanced measuring system, data processing for reconstruction of the atomic images and for obtaining accurate atomic positions, applications using resonant X-ray scattering and X-ray excited optical luminescence, and an example of XFH result on the local structure around copper in silicon steal. (author)

  13. Structural refinement and extraction of hydrogen atomic positions in polyoxymethylene crystal based on the first successful measurements of 2-dimensional high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction and wide-angle neutron diffraction patterns of hydrogenated and deuterated species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Kohji; Hanesaka, Makoto; Ohhara, Takashi; Kurihara, Kazuo; Tamada, Taro; Kuroki, Ryota; Fujiwara, Satoru; Ozeki, Tomoji; Kitano, Toshiaki; Nishu, Takashi; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2007-01-01

    2-Dimensional X-ray and neutron diffraction patterns have been successfully measured for deuterated and hydrogenated polyoxymethylene (POM) samples obtained by γ-ray induced solid-state polymerization reaction. More than 700 reflections were collected from the X-ray diffraction data at -150degC by utilizing a high-energy synchrotron X-ray beam at SPring-8, Japan, from which the crystal structure of POM has been refined thoroughly including the extraction of hydrogen atomic positions at clearly seen in the difference Fourier synthesis map. As the first trial the nonuniform (9/5) helical model was analyzed with the reliability factor (R factor) 6.9%. The structural analysis was made also using the X-ray reflections of about 400 observed at room temperature (R 8.8%), and the thermal parameters of constituent atoms were compared between the low and high temperatures to discuss the librational thermal motion of the chains. The 2-dimensional neutron diffraction data, collected for the deuterated and hydrogenated POM samples using an imaging plate system specifically built-up for neutron scattering experiment, have allowed us to pick up the D and H atomic positions clearly in the Fourier synthesis maps. Another possible model, (29/16) helix, which was proposed by several researches, has been also investigated on the basis of the X-ray diffraction data at -150degC. The direct method succeeded in extracting this (29/16) model straightforwardly. The R factor was 8.6%, essentially the same as that of (9/5) helical model. This means that the comparison of the diffraction intensity between the data collected from the full-rotation X-ray diffraction pattern and the intensity calculated for both the (9/5) and (29/16) models cannot be used for the unique determination of the superiority of the model, (9/5) or (29/16) helix. However, we have found the existence of 001 and 002 reflections which give the longer repeating period 55.7 A. Besides there observed a series of meridional

  14. Reflection-mode x-ray powder diffraction cell for in situ studies of electrochemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, G.A.; Stewart, K.D.

    2004-01-01

    The design and operation of an electrochemical cell for reflection-mode powder x-ray diffraction experiments are discussed. The cell is designed for the study of electrodes that are used in rechargeable lithium batteries. It is designed for assembly in a glove box so that air-sensitive materials, such as lithium foil electrodes and carbonate-based electrolytes with lithium salts, can be used. The cell uses a beryllium window for x-ray transmission and electrical contact. A simple mechanism for compressing the electrodes is included in the design. Sample results for the cell are shown with a Cu Kα source and a position-sensitive detector

  15. Stabilization of synchrotron radiation x-ray beam by MOSTAB

    CERN Document Server

    Kudo, T P; Tanida, H; Furukawa, Y; Hirono, T; Ishikawa, T; Nishino, Y

    2003-01-01

    Monochromator stabilization (MOSTAB) is a feedback control system to stabilize an x-ray beam of synchrotron radiation. It applies a feedback voltage to a piezo electric transducer attached to a double-crystal monochromator. We developed MOSTAB modules and examined their performances using SPring-8 beamlines. The x-ray beam position stabilization using MOSTAB was realized simultaneously with the x-ray beam intensity stabilization. As an example of its application, we performed EXAFS measurement with MOSTAB. (author)

  16. Chest X-ray of the neonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, S.; Hoermann, M.; Rand, T.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.; Ponhold, W.; Kuhle, S.; Rebhandl, W.

    2000-01-01

    In diagnostic imaging of thoracic pathologies in mature and especially immature neonates, chest X-ray has a leading position. Profound knowledge of the normal chest X-ray and the potential physiological perinatal changes is the basic requirement for interpretation of the X-ray of a neonate. Childhood pathologie: Many congenital and acquired diseases that the radiologist is faced with in neonatology are unknown in the imaging of adults. Many of these changes are life-threatening or may have an impact on the patient's future quality of life. Therefore, early diagnosis in close cooperation with the paediatrician is essential. We give here an overview of the most important pathologic changes that the radiologist may be confronted with in daily routine. (orig.) [de

  17. Teratogenic effects of x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faisal, Arif

    1981-01-01

    The application of x-rays in the medical field has positive and negative effects. The effects of x-ray radiation to the intrauterine embryo and foetus depend on the period of gestation. In the first trimester the embryo may be resorbed and aborted and may also be born with serious defects. In the late trimester radiation may cause less serious defects and it may disturb the function of organs. Many defects involve nerve tissues and are associated with symptoms of mental retardation. To prevent radiation exposure to embryo and foetus, it is necessary to observe the ''ten-day rule'', when x-ray examination is performed. The threshold doses for embryo and foetus are still unknown. (author)

  18. X-ray binaries, part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerschlag-Hensberge, G.C.M.J.

    1977-01-01

    Optical observations of X-ray binaries and their interpretation are described. A number of early-type stars which are identified as companions of X-ray sources are photometrically and spectroscopically observed. The spectra were obtained with the coude spectrograph attached to the 1.5 m telescope of the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile. Registrations of the spectra were made with the Faul-Coradi microphotometer of the Observatory at Utrecht. To study radial velocity variations, the positions of the spectral lines were measured with the Grant comparator of the University of Groningen

  19. Air ionizatio at X-ray departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesela, O.; Mosatova, A.; Kubova, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in electroionic microclimate are dealt with at X-ray workplaces and their dynamics in the course of the day during normal operation. Following exposure to X-ray radiation the specific concentration of light air ions of both polarities increases due to increased input of ionization energy. Within the first minutes following the termination of exposure a sharp decline takes place in the specific concentration of light air ions with subsequent well of positive ions in the air. (author). 1 tab., 19 refs

  20. Gamma detector for use with luggage X-ray systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, H.; Quam, W.

    1998-01-01

    A new gamma radiation sensor has been designed for installation on several types of luggage x-ray machines and mobile x-ray vans operated by the U.S. Customs Service and the U.S. Department of State. The use of gamma detectors on x-ray machines imposed difficulties not usually encountered in the design of gamma detectors because the spectrum of scattered x-rays, which varied from machine to machine, extended to energies significantly higher than those of the low-energy isotopic emissions. In the original design, the lower level discriminator was raised above the x-ray end point energy resulting in the loss of the americium line associated with plutonium. This reduced the overall sensitivity to unshielded plutonium by a factor of approximately 100. An improved method was subsequently developed wherein collimation was utilized in conjunction with a variable counting threshold to permit accommodation of differing conditions of x-ray scattering. This design has been shown to eliminate most of the problems due to x-ray scattering while still capturing the americium emissions. The overall sensitivity has remained quite high, though varying slightly from one model of x-ray machine to another, depending upon the x-ray scattering characteristics of each model. (author)

  1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attekum, P.M.T.M. van.

    1979-01-01

    The methods and results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the study of plasmons, alloys and gold compounds are discussed. After a comprehensive introduction, seven papers by the author, previously published elsewhere, are reprinted and these cover a wide range of the uses of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. (W.D.L.)

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and easiest ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams ...

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top of page What are the limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? ...

  4. Traditional x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Methods of imaging x-rays, with particular reference to medicine, are reviewed. The history and nature of x-rays, their production and spectra, contrast, shapes and fine structure, image transducers, including fluorescent screens, radiography, fluoroscopy, and image intensifiers, image detection, perception and enhancement and clinical applications are considered. (U.K.)

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety How to Read Your Radiology Report ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are a form of radiation like light or radio waves. X-rays pass through most objects, including the body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different parts of the body absorb the x-rays in ...

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... lowest radiation dose possible while producing the best images for ... organizations continually review and update the technique standards used ...

  10. Three Bright X-ray Sources in NGC 1313

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, E.; Petre, R.; Schlegel, E.

    1992-12-01

    Three bright X-ray sources were detected in a recent (April/May 1991) ROSAT PSPC observation of the nearby (D ~ 4.5 Mpc) face--on barred spiral galaxy NGC 1313. Two of the sources were at positions coincident with X-ray sources detected by Fabbiano & Trinchieri (ApJ 315, 1987) in a previous (Jan 1980) Einstein IPC observation. The position of the brightest Einstein source is near the center of NGC 1313, and the second Einstein source is ~ 7' south of the ``nuclear'' source, in the outskirts of the spiral arms. A third bright X-ray source was detected in the ROSAT observation ~ 7' southwest of the ``nuclear'' source. We present X-ray spectra and X-ray images for the three bright sources found in the ROSAT observation of NGC 1313, and compare with previous Einstein results. Spectral analysis of these sources require them to have very large soft X-ray luminosities ( ~ 10(40) erg s(-1) ) when compared with typical X-ray sources in our Galaxy. Feasible explanations for the X-ray emission are presented. The third X-ray source is positively identified with the recently discovered (Ryder et. al., ApJ 1992) peculiar type-II supernova 1978K.

  11. Transforming Our Understanding of the X-ray Universe: The Imaging X-ray Polarimeter Explorer (IXPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Matt, Giorgio; Marshall, Herman; ODell, Stephen L.; Pavlov, George; Ramsey, Brian; Romani, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Accurate X-ray polarimetry can provide unique information on high-energy-astrophysical processes and sources. As there have been no meaningful X-ray polarization measurements of cosmic sources since our pioneering work in the 1970's, the time is ripe to explore this new parameter space in X-ray astronomy. To accomplish this requires a well-calibrated and well understood system that-particularly for an Explorer mission-has technical, cost, and schedule credibility. The system that we shall present satisfies these conditions, being based upon completely calibrated imaging- and polarization-sensitive detectors and proven X-ray-telescope technology.

  12. X-ray imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A novel, high-speed apparatus for use in X-ray computerised tomography is described in detail. It consists of a semi-circular array of X-ray sources, collimators and an ion chamber array for detection of the X-rays. The X-ray sources may be pulsed in salvos such that the corresponding detectors in the array are only illuminated by one source. The use of computer controlled salvos speeds up the image processing by at least a factor of two. The ion chamber array is designed to have a constant detection efficiency for varying angles of X-ray incidence. A detailed description of the detector construction and suggested gaseous fillings are given. It is claimed that the present tomographic system allows fast and accurate imaging of internal body organs and is insensitive to the blurring effects which motion of these organs tends to produce. (UK)

  13. Medical imaging: Material change for X-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, John A.

    2017-10-01

    The X-ray sensitivity of radiology instruments is limited by the materials used in their detectors. A material from the perovskite family of semiconductors could allow lower doses of X-rays to be used for medical imaging. See Letter p.87

  14. Self-propelled pulse X-ray apparatus Sirena-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danil'chenko, N.T.; Ershov, L.S.; Il'chenko, A.V.; Krasil'nikov, S.B.; Kristalinskij, A.L.; Lozovoj, L.N.; Markov, S.N.; Morgovskij, L.Ya.

    1984-01-01

    The structure and specifications of a self-propelled pulse X-ray apparatus ''Sirena-1'' for testing oilt and gas pipelines welded joints are described. The apparatus is designed on the base of pulse X-ray apparatus MIRA. Apparatus control is realized by means of the 137 Cs source or manual control desk. The apparatus ensures perfect control sensitivity

  15. JEM-X: The X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Niels; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    1999-01-01

    and identification of gamma ray sources as well as in the analysis and scientific interpretation of the combined X-ray and gamma ray data. JEM-X is a coded aperture X-ray telescope consisting of two identical detectors. Each detector has a sensitive area of 500 cm(2), and views the sky (6.6 deg FOV, FWHM) through...

  16. X-ray diagnostics for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Goeler, S.; Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.

    1982-12-01

    A short description of the x-ray diagnostic preparation for the TFTR tokamak is given. The x-ray equipment consists of the limiter x-ray monitoring system, the soft x-ray pulse-height-analysis-system, the soft x-ray imaging system and the x-ray crystal spectrometer. Particular attention is given to the radiation protection of the x-ray systems from the neutron environment

  17. X-ray filter for chest X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferlic, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    A description is given of an X-ray filter comprised of a sheet of radiation absorbing material with an opening corresponding to the spine and central portion of the heart. The upper portion of the filter exhibits a relatively narrow opening which becomes gradually wider toward the lower portion of the filter. This filter will permit an acceptable density level of x-ray exposure for the lungs while allowing a higher level of x-ray exposure for the mediastinum areas of the body. (author)

  18. X-ray filter for chest x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferlic, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    Filter for use in medical x-ray apparatus to permit higher intensity x-ray exposure in the heart and mediastinum area while maintaining a normal level of x-ray exposure in other areas of the body, particlarly in the lung area. The filter comprises a sheet of radiation absorbing material having an opening therein, said opening corresponding to the spine and central portion of the heart. Accordingly, the upper portion of the filter exhibits a relatively narrow opening which becomes gradually wider toward the lower portion of the filter

  19. Shield device for controlling the dose of x-rays applied in an x-ray machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charrier, P.

    1983-01-01

    This invention provides an improved shield for use with an x-ray machine. The shield can control the dose of x-rays applied by the machine in different areas without affecting the power of the x-rays. This is achieved with a shield especially designed and positioned to intercept with x-rays for longer or shorter periods in different areas during the taking of the picture, but not for the whole period of time necessary for taking this picture. Each area of the subject being x-rayed is exposed to full power x-rays. However, owing to the shield, the areas that require smaller dose receive these full power x-rays for a shorter portion of the time required to take the picture while the other areas that require larger dose of x-rays, receive the full power x-rays for a longer portion of the full period of time required to take the picture. To ensure this differential exposure, the shield is placed through the path of the x-rays and rotated about an axis which is generally transverse to the direction of travel of the x-rays to cut out some of said x-rays for different portions of the period of time necessary for taking the picture. The shield is preferably shaped to intercept x-rays for a longer period in some areas than in others depending on the required doses. A plurality of differently shaped shields can be provided to suit different picture taking situations

  20. Automated processing of X-ray images in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babij, Ya.S.; B'yalyuk, Ya.O.; Yanovich, I.A.; Lysenko, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical and practical achievements in application of computing technology means for processing of X-ray images in medicine were generalized. The scheme of the main directions and tasks of processing of X-ray images was given and analyzed. The principal problems appeared in automated processing of X-ray images were distinguished. It is shown that for interpretation of X-ray images it is expedient to introduce a notion of relative operating characteristic (ROC) of a roentgenologist. Every point on ROC curve determines the individual criteria of roentgenologist to put a positive diagnosis for definite situation