WorldWideScience

Sample records for position light distribution

  1. Approximations to the electron energy distribution and positive column models for low-pressure discharge light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, G G; Sheverev, V A; Uhrlandt, D

    2002-01-01

    The applicability of 'fluid' models based on analytic approximations of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and of kinetic models for low-pressure discharge light sources is discussed. Traditionally, 'fluid' models of fluorescent lamps assume that the EEDF is Maxwellian up to the energy of the first excited state. It is shown that such an approach is sufficiently accurate in most cases of conventional as well as of 'highly loaded' fluorescent lamps. However, this assumption is strongly violated for many rare gas glow discharges for mercury free light sources. As an example, a neon dc discharge is studied. The densities of the four lowest excited states and the electric field have been measured. The experimental results can be fairly well reproduced by a kinetic positive column model. This article was scheduled to appear in issue 14 of J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. To access this special issue please follow this link: http://stacks.iop.org/0022-3727/35/i=14/

  2. Are Parton Distributions Positive?

    CERN Document Server

    Forte, Stefano; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Altarelli, Guido; Forte, Stefano; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    1999-01-01

    We show that the naive positivity conditions on polarized parton distributions which follow from their probabilistic interpretation in the naive parton model are reproduced in perturbative QCD at the leading log level if the quark and gluon distribution are defined in terms of physical processes. We show how these conditions are modified at the next-to-leading level, and discuss their phenomenological implications, in particular in view of the determination of the polarized gluon distribution

  3. Are parton distributions positive?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forte, Stefano; Altarelli, Guido; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    1999-01-01

    We show that the naive positivity conditions on polarized parton distributions which follow from their probabilistic interpretation in the naive parton model are reproduced in perturbative QCD at the leading log level if the quark and gluon distribution are defined in terms of physical processes. We show how these conditions are modified at the next-to-leading level, and discuss their phenomenological implications, in particular in view of the determination of the polarized gluon distribution

  4. Method to measure the position offset of multiple light spots in a distributed aperture laser angle measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiaoli; Cheng, Haobo; Xu, Chunyun; Feng, Yunpeng

    2017-02-20

    In this paper, an accurate measurement method of multiple spots' position offsets on a four-quadrant detector is proposed for a distributed aperture laser angle measurement system (DALAMS). The theoretical model is put forward, as well as the corresponding calculation method. This method includes two steps. First, as the initial estimation, integral approximation is applied to fit the distributed spots' offset function; second, the Boltzmann function is employed to compensate for the estimation error to improve detection accuracy. The simulation results attest to the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed method, and tolerance synthesis analysis of DALAMS is conducted to determine the maximum uncertainties of manufacturing and installation. The maximum angle error is less than 0.08° in the prototype distributed measurement system, which shows the stability and robustness for prospective applications.

  5. Light Meson Distribution Amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Arthur, R.; Brommel, D.; Donnellan, M.A.; Flynn, J.M.; Juttner, A.; de Lima, H.Pedroso; Rae, T.D.; Sachrajda, C.T.; Samways, B.

    2010-01-01

    We calculated the first two moments of the light-cone distribution amplitudes for the pseudoscalar mesons ($\\pi$ and $K$) and the longitudinally polarised vector mesons ($\\rho$, $K^*$ and $\\phi$) as part of the UKQCD and RBC collaborations' $N_f=2+1$ domain-wall fermion phenomenology programme. These quantities were obtained with a good precision and, in particular, the expected effects of $SU(3)$-flavour symmetry breaking were observed. Operators were renormalised non-perturbatively and extrapolations to the physical point were made, guided by leading order chiral perturbation theory. The main results presented are for two volumes, $16^3\\times 32$ and $24^3\\times 64$, with a common lattice spacing. Preliminary results for a lattice with a finer lattice spacing, $32^3\\times64$, are discussed and a first look is taken at the use of twisted boundary conditions to extract distribution amplitudes.

  6. Representation of chromatic distribution for lighting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Maurizio; Musante, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    For the luminaire manufacturer, the measurement of the lighting intensity distribution (LID) emitted by lighting fixture is based on photometry. So light is measured as an achromatic value of intensity and there is no the possibility to discriminate the measurement of white vs. colored light. At the Laboratorio Luce of Politecnico di Milano a new instrument for the measurement of spectral radiant intensities distribution for lighting system has been built: the goniospectra- radiometer. This new measuring tool is based on a traditional mirror gonio-photometer with a CCD spectraradiometer controlled by a PC. Beside the traditional representation of photometric distribution we have introduced a new representation where, in addition to the information about the distribution of luminous intensity in space, new details about the chromaticity characteristic of the light sources have been implemented. Some of the results of this research have been applied in developing and testing a new line of lighting system "My White Light" (the research project "Light, Environment and Humans" funded in the Italian Lombardy region Metadistretti Design Research Program involving Politecnico di Milano, Artemide, Danese, and some other SME of the Lighting Design district), giving scientific notions and applicative in order to support the assumption that colored light sources can be used for the realization of interior luminaries that, other than just have low power consumption and long life, may positively affect the mood of people.

  7. Light, distribution company in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meritet, S.

    2005-01-01

    Since the publication of the Roulet Report, Electricite de France (EDF), the French group is crossing tormented hours. Despite its good financial results in 2004 with a turnover of 46.9 Mds euros its debts are around 19.7 Mds euros and are mainly due to its international investments which were not all very profitable. The first source of concern remains the Latin America markets and more particularly the Brazilian one which recorded 1.6 Md euros of losses. The future of EDF investment in Brazil, through its acquisition of the distribution company, Light, is uncertain. Within a new electric power industry framework, after currency devaluation and a rationing, Light is now in a catastrophic financial situation. The last tariff revisions given by the Brazilian authorities and the economic characteristics of the concession put the distributor at the edge of the bankruptcy. This article presents the situation of EDF group and Light at the end of 2004. The main question is the future of the Brazilian distributor in general and more particularly within the French group EDF. (author)

  8. Application of high-brightness LEDs in aircraft position lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machi, Nicolo; Mangum, Scott; Singer, Jeffrey M.

    2004-10-01

    Solid state lighting devices have made their way into a number of niche markets and continue to make inroads into other markets as their price / performance ratios improve. One of these markets is aviation lighting. Although this paper will focus on the use of LEDs for aircraft position lights, much of the discussion is applicable to other installations on the interior and exterior of the aircraft. The color, light distribution and intensity levels for a position light are all closely regulated through Code of Federal Regulation (CFR; formerly Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR)) documents. These lighting requirements, along with harsh thermal and environmental requirements, drive the design. In this paper, we will look at these requirements and discuss what is required in order to use LEDs for this type of application. We will explore the optical, thermal and electrical issues associated with the use of LEDs for position lights and examine the specific case study of the Astreon forward position lights. Finally, we will discuss some of the challenges that we see with solid state lighting in current and future aircraft applications.

  9. States of light positive particles in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klamt, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    The states of light positively charged particles in metals are treated in tight-binding approximation. The polaron states of the particles are investigated. The 'molecular crystal model' and an interstitial model' are treated. Moreover, the particle-lattice coupling of excited particles is treated for fcc and bcc lattices. (BHO)

  10. 14 CFR 31.65 - Position lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Position lights. 31.65 Section 31.65 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS...; and z is not greater than 0.002. (2) Aviation white— x is not less than 0.300 and not greater than 0...

  11. On positivity of parton distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altarelli, G.; Forte, S.; Ridolfi, G.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the bounds on polarized parton distributions which follow from their definition in terms of cross section asymmetries. We spell out how the bounds obtained in the naive parton model can be derived within perturbative QCD at leading order when all quark and gluon distributions are defined in terms of suitable physical processes. We specify a convenient physical definition for the polarized and unpolarized gluon distributions in terms of Higgs production from gluon fusion. We show that these bounds are modified by subleading corrections, and we determine them up to NLO. We examine the ensuing phenomenological implications, in particular in view of the determination of the polarized gluon distribution. (orig.)

  12. On positivity of parton distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido; Ridolfi, G; Altarelli, Guido; Forte, Stefano; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the bounds on polarized parton distributions which follow from their definition in terms of cross section asymmetries. We spell out how the bounds obtained in the naive parton model can be derived within perturbative QCD at leading order when all quark and gluon distributions are defined in terms of suitable physical processes. We specify a convenient physical definition for the polarized and unpolarized gluon distributions in terms of Higgs production from gluon fusion. We show that these bounds are modified by subleading corrections, and we determine them up to NLO. We examine the ensuing phenomenological implications, in particular in view of the determination of the polarized gluon distribution.

  13. Hybrid solar lighting distribution systems and components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Jeffrey D [Lenoir City, TN; Earl, Dennis D [Knoxville, TN; Beshears, David L [Knoxville, TN; Maxey, Lonnie C [Powell, TN; Jordan, John K [Oak Ridge, TN; Lind, Randall F [Lenoir City, TN

    2011-07-05

    A hybrid solar lighting distribution system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates all components.

  14. Advanced Light Source beam position monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkson, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a synchrotron radiation facility nearing completion at LBL. As a third-generation machine, the ALS is designed to produce intense light from bend magnets, wigglers, and undulators (insertion devices). The facility will include a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator, a 1.5 GeV booster synchrotron, beam transport lines, a 1--2 GeV storage ring, insertion devices, and photon beam lines. Currently, the beam injection systems are being commissioned, and the storage ring is being installed. Electron beam position monitors (BPM) are installed throughout the accelerator and constitute the major part of accelerator beam diagnostics. The design of the BPM instruments is complete, and 50 units have been constructed for use in the injector systems. We are currently fabricating 100 additional instruments for the storage ring. In this paper I discuss engineering fabrication, testing and performance of the beam pickup electrodes and the BPM electronics

  15. Light distribution system comprising spectral conversion means

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    , longer wavelength,a spectral conversion characteristics of the spectral conversion fibre being essentially determined by the spectral absorption and emission properties of the photoluminescent agent, the amount of photo- luminescent agent,and the distribution of the photoluminescent agent in the spectral......System (200, 300) for the distribution of white light, having a supply side (201, 301, 401) and a delivery side (202, 302, 402), the system being configured for guiding light with a multitude of visible wavelengths in a propagation direction P from the supply side to the distribution side...... of providing a light distribution system and a method of correcting the spectral transmission characteristics of a light distribution system are disclosed....

  16. Improved spring model-based collaborative indoor visible light positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhijie; Zhang, WeiNan; Zhou, GuoFu

    2016-06-01

    Gaining accuracy with indoor positioning of individuals is important as many location-based services rely on the user's current position to provide them with useful services. Many researchers have studied indoor positioning techniques based on WiFi and Bluetooth. However, they have disadvantages such as low accuracy or high cost. In this paper, we propose an indoor positioning system in which visible light radiated from light-emitting diodes is used to locate the position of receivers. Compared with existing methods using light-emitting diode light, we present a high-precision and simple implementation collaborative indoor visible light positioning system based on an improved spring model. We first estimate coordinate position information using the visible light positioning system, and then use the spring model to correct positioning errors. The system can be employed easily because it does not require additional sensors and the occlusion problem of visible light would be alleviated. We also describe simulation experiments, which confirm the feasibility of our proposed method.

  17. Use of prismatic films to control light distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneipp, K.G. [3M Company Traffic Control, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    3M prismatic films are finding increasing utility in the construction of new hollow light guide fixtures which capitalize on the unique ways in which these novel materials interact with light. Often, the resulting systems provide features and end-user benefits which are difficult or impossible to achieve by alternative design or construction methods. It is apparent that the benefits may be applied to a wide variety of end-uses, and that the resulting products being developed will find utility in many diverse market areas. With the recognition that creating hollow light guide products and systems requires a substantial resource investment, and because of an existing prominent position in the traffic management market, 3M has decided to focus its current efforts in the development, manufacture, and distribution of value-added products for this market. However, through the sale of these prismatic films, a variety of companies have developed and are manufacturing and distributing other unrelated hollow light guide products which capitalize on the unique capabilities of these films in controlling and distributing light. There appears to be little doubt that the potential applications of this technology will grow both in numbers as well as in diversity.

  18. Subcellular Nanoparticle Distribution from Light Transmission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deatsch, Alison; Sun, Nan; Johnson, Jeffrey; Stack, Sharon; Tanner, Carol; Ruggiero, Steven

    We have measured the particle-size distribution (PSD) of subcellular structures in plant and animal cells. We have employed a new technique developed by our group, Light Transmission Spectroscopy-combined with cell fractionation-to accurately measure PSDs over a wide size range: from 10 nm to 3000nm, which includes objects from the size of individual proteins to organelles. To date our experiments have included cultured human oral cells and spinach cells. These results show a power-law dependence of particle density with particle diameter, implying a universality of the packing distribution. We discuss modeling the cell as a self-similar (fractal) body comprised of spheres on all size scales. This goal of this work is to obtain a better understanding of the fundamental nature of particle packing within cells in order to enrich our knowledge of the structure, function, and interactions of sub-cellular nanostructures across cell types.

  19. Migratory bats respond to artificial green light with positive phototaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian C Voigt

    Full Text Available Artificial light at night is spreading worldwide at unprecedented rates, exposing strictly nocturnal animals such as bats to a novel anthropogenic stressor. Previous studies about the effect of artificial light on bats focused almost exclusively on non-migratory species, yet migratory animals such as birds are known to be largely affected by light pollution. Thus, we conducted a field experiment to evaluate if bat migration is affected by artificial light at night. In late summer, we presented artificial green light of 520 nm wavelength to bats that were migrating south along the shoreline of the Baltic Sea. Using a light on-off treatment, we observed that the activity of Pipistrellus nathusii and P. pygmaeus, the two most abundant migratory species at our site, increased by more than 50% in the light-on compared to the light-off treatment. We observed an increased number of feeding buzzes during the light-on compared to the light-off treatment for P. nathusii. However, feeding activity was low in general and did not increase disproportionately during the light-on treatment in relation to the overall echolocation call activity of bats. Further, P. nathusii were attracted towards the green light at a distance of about 23 m, which is way beyond the echolocation detection range for insects of Nathusius' bats. We therefore infer that migratory bats were not attracted to artificial green light because of high insect densities, but instead by positive phototaxis. We conclude that artificial light at night may potentially impact bat migration in a yet unrecognized way.

  20. On positivity of time-frequency distributions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.J.E.M.; Claasen, T.A.C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Consideration is given to the problem of how to regard the fundamental impossibility with time-frequency energy distributions of Cohen's class always to be nonnegative and, at the same time, to have correct marginal distributions. It is shown that the Wigner distribution is the only member of a

  1. Forward and correctional OFDM-based visible light positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Huang, Zhitong; Zhao, Runmei; He, Peixuan; Ji, Yuefeng

    2017-09-01

    Visible light positioning (VLP) has attracted much attention in both academic and industrial areas due to the extensive deployment of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as next-generation green lighting. Generally, the coverage of a single LED lamp is limited, so LED arrays are always utilized to achieve uniform illumination within the large-scale indoor environment. However, in such dense LED deployment scenario, the superposition of the light signals becomes an important challenge for accurate VLP. To solve this problem, we propose a forward and correctional orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM)-based VLP (FCO-VLP) scheme with low complexity in generating and processing of signals. In the first forward procedure of FCO-VLP, an initial position is obtained by the trilateration method based on OFDM-subcarriers. The positioning accuracy will be further improved in the second correctional procedure based on the database of reference points. As demonstrated in our experiments, our approach yields an improved average positioning error of 4.65 cm and an enhanced positioning accuracy by 24.2% compared with trilateration method.

  2. Positivity of time-frequency distribution functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.J.E.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper deals with the question how various 'natural' conditions posed on time-frequency distribution functions prevent them to be nonnegative everywhere for all signals. The attention is restricted mainly to distribution functions that involve the signal bilinearly. This paper summarizes and

  3. Global positioning method based on polarized light compass system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Yang, Jiangtao; Wang, Yubo; Tang, Jun; Shen, Chong

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a global positioning method based on a polarized light compass system. A main limitation of polarization positioning is the environment such as weak and locally destroyed polarization environments, and the solution to the positioning problem is given in this paper which is polarization image de-noising and segmentation. Therefore, the pulse coupled neural network is employed for enhancing positioning performance. The prominent advantages of the present positioning technique are as follows: (i) compared to the existing position method based on polarized light, better sun tracking accuracy can be achieved and (ii) the robustness and accuracy of positioning under weak and locally destroyed polarization environments, such as cloudy or building shielding, are improved significantly. Finally, some field experiments are given to demonstrate the effectiveness and applicability of the proposed global positioning technique. The experiments have shown that our proposed method outperforms the conventional polarization positioning method, the real time longitude and latitude with accuracy up to 0.0461° and 0.0911°, respectively.

  4. Positivity bounds on double parton distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, Markus; Kasemets, Tomas

    2013-03-01

    Double hard scattering in proton-proton collisions is described in terms of double parton distributions. We derive bounds on these distributions that follow from their interpretation as probability densities, taking into account all possible spin correlations between two partons in an unpolarized proton. These bounds constrain the size of the polarized distributions and can for instance be used to set upper limits on the effects of spin correlations in double hard scattering. We show that the bounds are stable under leading-order DGLAP evolution to higher scales.

  5. Test report light duty utility arm power distribution system (PDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) Power Distribution System has completed vendor and post-delivery acceptance testing. The Power Distribution System has been found to be acceptable and is now ready for integration with the overall LDUA system

  6. The Design and Comparison of Central and Distributed Light Sensored Smart LED Lighting Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ali Özçelik

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of published peer-reviewed research comparing the efficiencies of distributed versus central sensor-controlled LED lighting systems. This research proposes improving the smart illumination of a room with external fenestration using central and distributed light sensors. The optical and electrical measurements of the daylight have been made in the case where the light was not distributed evenly and not sufficient. Test results show that the proposed distributed light sensor illumination system has increased the efficiency by 28% when compared to the proposed central system. It has also been shown that the two tested systems are more cost-effective than common smart illumination systems.

  7. Visible light communication based vehicle positioning using LED street light and rolling shutter CMOS sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Trong Hop; Yoo, Myungsik

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a vehicle positioning system using LED street lights and two rolling shutter CMOS sensor cameras. In this system, identification codes for the LED street lights are transmitted to camera-equipped vehicles through a visible light communication (VLC) channel. Given that the camera parameters are known, the positions of the vehicles are determined based on the geometric relationship between the coordinates of the LEDs in the images and their real world coordinates, which are obtained through the LED identification codes. The main contributions of the paper are twofold. First, the collinear arrangement of the LED street lights makes traditional camera-based positioning algorithms fail to determine the position of the vehicles. In this paper, an algorithm is proposed to fuse data received from the two cameras attached to the vehicles in order to solve the collinearity problem of the LEDs. Second, the rolling shutter mechanism of the CMOS sensors combined with the movement of the vehicles creates image artifacts that may severely degrade the positioning accuracy. This paper also proposes a method to compensate for the rolling shutter artifact, and a high positioning accuracy can be achieved even when the vehicle is moving at high speeds. The performance of the proposed positioning system corresponding to different system parameters is examined by conducting Matlab simulations. Small-scale experiments are also conducted to study the performance of the proposed algorithm in real applications.

  8. Position Detection Based on Intensities of Reflected Infrared Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Vie

    measurements of reflected light intensities, and includes easy calibration. The method for reconstructing 3D positions has been implemented in a prototype of a “non-Touch Screen” for a computer, so that the user can control a cursor in three dimensions by moving his/hers hand in front of the computer screen....... The 2D position reconstruction method is mplemented in a prototype of a human-machine interface (HMI) for an electrically powered wheelchair, such that the wheelchair user can control the movement of the wheelchair by head movements. Both “non-Touch Screen” prototype and wheelchair HMI has been tested...

  9. The physics of light distribution in hollow structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, L.A. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to serve as an introduction, for non-physicists, to the subject of light distribution in hollow structures. The motivation for light distribution is the importance of getting the maximum value from available light. We all recognize that photons cost money (one photon costs about $10{sup -25} to make) so we obviously want to try to make the maximum number of photons for a given cost. What is often overlooked, however, is that these photons have the highest value only if they are delivered to the right place in the correct quantity. This means that there is often substantial economic value in the high quality distribution of light. This problem is discussed from a very general perspective, in order to show the role of general optical films for manipulating light. The underlying physics at work in such films is described, and examples of common optical light deistribution films are provided.

  10. AMIC: an expandable integrated analog front-end for light distribution moments analysis

    OpenAIRE

    SPAGGIARI, MICHELE; Herrero Bosch, Vicente; Lerche, Christoph Werner; Aliaga Varea, Ramón José; Monzó Ferrer, José María; Gadea Gironés, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    In this article we introduce AMIC (Analog Moments Integrated Circuit), a novel analog Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) front-end for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) applications. Its working principle is based on mathematical analysis of light distribution through moments calculation. Each moment provides useful information about light distribution, such as energy, position, depth of interaction, skewness (deformation due to border effect) etc. A current buffer delivers a cop...

  11. Turn on the lights: leveraging visible light for communications and positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hranilovic, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The need for ubiquitous broadband connectivity is continually growing, however, radio spectrum is increasingly scarce and limited by interference. In addition, the energy efficiency of many radio transmitters is low and most input energy is converted to heat. A widely overlooked resource for positioning and broadband access is optical wireless communication reusing existing illumination installations. As many of the 14 billion incandescent bulbs in use worldwide are converted to energy efficient LED lighting, a unique opportunity exists to augment them with visible light communications (VLC) and visible light positioning (VLP). VLC- and VLP- enabled LED lighting is not only energy efficient but enables a host of new use cases such as location-aware ubiquitous high-speed wireless communication links. This talk presents the recent work of the Free-space Optical Communication Algorithms Laboratory (FOCAL) at McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada in developing novel signaling and indoor localization techniques using illumination devices. Developments in the signaling design for VLC systems will be presented along with several prototype VLC communication systems. Novel approaches to the integration of VLC networks with power line communications (PLC) are discussed. The role of visible light communications and ranging for automotive safety will also be highlighted. Several approaches to indoor positioning using illumination devices and simple smartphone-based receivers will be presented. Finally, a vision for VLC and VLP technologies will be presented along with our ongoing research directions.

  12. Integrated ultrasonic particle positioning and low excitation light fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernassau, A. L.; Al-Rawhani, M.; Beeley, J.; Cumming, D. R. S.

    2013-01-01

    A compact hybrid system has been developed to position and detect fluorescent micro-particles by combining a Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) imager with an acoustic manipulator. The detector comprises a SPAD array, light-emitting diode (LED), lenses, and optical filters. The acoustic device is formed of multiple transducers surrounding an octagonal cavity. By stimulating pairs of transducers simultaneously, an acoustic landscape is created causing fluorescent micro-particles to agglomerate into lines. The fluorescent pattern is excited by a low power LED and detected by the SPAD imager. Our technique combines particle manipulation and visualization in a compact, low power, portable setup

  13. Point processes and the position distribution of infinite boson systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichtner, K.H.; Freudenberg, W.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that to each locally normal state of a boson system one can associate a point process that can be interpreted as the position distribution of the state. The point process contains all information one can get by position measurements and is determined by the latter. On the other hand, to each so-called Σ/sup c/-point process Q they relate a locally normal state with position distribution Q

  14. Automatic diagnosis and control of distributed solid state lighting systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, J.; van Driel, W.D.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a new design concept of automatically diagnosing and compensating LED degradations in distributed solid state lighting (SSL) systems. A failed LED may significantly reduce the overall illumination level, and destroy the uniform illumination distribution achieved by a nominal

  15. On the maximum entropy distributions of inherently positive nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taavitsainen, A., E-mail: aapo.taavitsainen@gmail.com; Vanhanen, R.

    2017-05-11

    The multivariate log-normal distribution is used by many authors and statistical uncertainty propagation programs for inherently positive quantities. Sometimes it is claimed that the log-normal distribution results from the maximum entropy principle, if only means, covariances and inherent positiveness of quantities are known or assumed to be known. In this article we show that this is not true. Assuming a constant prior distribution, the maximum entropy distribution is in fact a truncated multivariate normal distribution – whenever it exists. However, its practical application to multidimensional cases is hindered by lack of a method to compute its location and scale parameters from means and covariances. Therefore, regardless of its theoretical disadvantage, use of other distributions seems to be a practical necessity. - Highlights: • Statistical uncertainty propagation requires a sampling distribution. • The objective distribution of inherently positive quantities is determined. • The objectivity is based on the maximum entropy principle. • The maximum entropy distribution is the truncated normal distribution. • Applicability of log-normal or normal distribution approximation is limited.

  16. Light source distribution and scattering phase function influence light transport in diffuse multi-layered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudelle, Fabrice; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre; Askoura, Mohamed Lamine

    2017-06-01

    Red and near-Infrared light is often used as a useful diagnostic and imaging probe for highly scattering media such as biological tissues, fruits and vegetables. Part of diffusively reflected light gives interesting information related to the tissue subsurface, whereas light recorded at further distances may probe deeper into the interrogated turbid tissues. However, modelling diffusive events occurring at short source-detector distances requires to consider both the distribution of the light sources and the scattering phase functions. In this report, a modified Monte Carlo model is used to compute light transport in curved and multi-layered tissue samples which are covered with a thin and highly diffusing tissue layer. Different light source distributions (ballistic, diffuse or Lambertian) are tested with specific scattering phase functions (modified or not modified Henyey-Greenstein, Gegenbauer and Mie) to compute the amount of backscattered and transmitted light in apple and human skin structures. Comparisons between simulation results and experiments carried out with a multispectral imaging setup confirm the soundness of the theoretical strategy and may explain the role of the skin on light transport in whole and half-cut apples. Other computational results show that a Lambertian source distribution combined with a Henyey-Greenstein phase function provides a higher photon density in the stratum corneum than in the upper dermis layer. Furthermore, it is also shown that the scattering phase function may affect the shape and the magnitude of the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution (BRDF) exhibited at the skin surface.

  17. Light distribution in diffractive multifocal optics and its optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portney, Valdemar

    2011-11-01

    To expand a geometrical model of diffraction efficiency and its interpretation to the multifocal optic and to introduce formulas for analysis of far and near light distribution and their application to multifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs) and to diffraction efficiency optimization. Medical device consulting firm, Newport Coast, California, USA. Experimental study. Application of a geometrical model to the kinoform (single focus diffractive optical element) was expanded to a multifocal optic to produce analytical definitions of light split between far and near images and light loss to other diffraction orders. The geometrical model gave a simple interpretation of light split in a diffractive multifocal IOL. An analytical definition of light split between far, near, and light loss was introduced as curve fitting formulas. Several examples of application to common multifocal diffractive IOLs were developed; for example, to light-split change with wavelength. The analytical definition of diffraction efficiency may assist in optimization of multifocal diffractive optics that minimize light loss. Formulas for analysis of light split between different foci of multifocal diffractive IOLs are useful in interpreting diffraction efficiency dependence on physical characteristics, such as blaze heights of the diffractive grooves and wavelength of light, as well as for optimizing multifocal diffractive optics. Disclosure is found in the footnotes. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Positivity properties of phase-plane distribution functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.J.E.M.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare the members of Cohen's class of phase-plane distributions with respect to positivity properties. It is known that certain averages (which are in a sense compatible with Heisenberg's uncertainty principle) of the Wigner distribution over the phase-plane yield

  19. Standard deviation of luminance distribution affects lightness and pupillary response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanari, Kei; Kaneko, Hirohiko

    2014-12-01

    We examined whether the standard deviation (SD) of luminance distribution serves as information of illumination. We measured the lightness of a patch presented in the center of a scrambled-dot pattern while manipulating the SD of the luminance distribution. Results showed that lightness decreased as the SD of the surround stimulus increased. We also measured pupil diameter while viewing a similar stimulus. The pupil diameter decreased as the SD of luminance distribution of the stimuli increased. We confirmed that these results were not obtained because of the increase of the highest luminance in the stimulus. Furthermore, results of field measurements revealed a correlation between the SD of luminance distribution and illuminance in natural scenes. These results indicated that the visual system refers to the SD of the luminance distribution in the visual stimulus to estimate the scene illumination.

  20. Spatial distribution of potential and positive Aedes aegypti breeding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Elías Cuartas

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: The spatial relationship between positive and potential A. aegypti breeding sites both indoors and outdoors is dynamic and highly sensitive to the characteristics of each territory. Knowing how positive and potential breeding sites are distributed contributes to the prioritization of resources and actions in vector control programs.

  1. Nucleon parton distributions in a light-front quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Continuing our analysis of parton distributions in the nucleon, we extend our light-front quark model in order to obtain both the helicity-independent and the helicity-dependent parton distributions, analytically matching the results of global fits at the initial scale μ∝ 1 GeV; they also contain the correct Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution. We also calculate the transverse parton, Wigner and Husimi distributions from a unified point of view, using our light-front wave functions and expressing them in terms of the parton distributions q_v(x) and δq_v(x). Our results are very relevant for the current and future program of the COMPASS experiment at SPS (CERN). (orig.)

  2. Nucleon parton distributions in a light-front quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutsche, Thomas [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Lyubovitskij, Valery E. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Tuebingen (Germany); Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Laboratory of Particle Physics, Mathematical Physics Department, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisica y Centro Cientifico Tecnologico de Valparaiso (CCTVal), Valparaiso (Chile); Schmidt, Ivan [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisica y Centro Cientifico Tecnologico de Valparaiso (CCTVal), Valparaiso (Chile)

    2017-02-15

    Continuing our analysis of parton distributions in the nucleon, we extend our light-front quark model in order to obtain both the helicity-independent and the helicity-dependent parton distributions, analytically matching the results of global fits at the initial scale μ∝ 1 GeV; they also contain the correct Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution. We also calculate the transverse parton, Wigner and Husimi distributions from a unified point of view, using our light-front wave functions and expressing them in terms of the parton distributions q{sub v}(x) and δq{sub v}(x). Our results are very relevant for the current and future program of the COMPASS experiment at SPS (CERN). (orig.)

  3. Distribution of tubulin, kinesin, and dynein in light- and dark-adapted octopus retinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, J M; Elfarissi, H; De Velasco, B; Ochoa, G H; Miller, A M; Clark, Y M; Matsumoto, B; Robles, L J

    2000-01-01

    Cephalopod retinas exhibit several responses to light and dark adaptation, including rhabdom size changes, photopigment movements, and pigment granule migration. Light- and dark-directed rearrangements of microfilament and microtubule cytoskeletal transport pathways could drive these changes. Recently, we localized actin-binding proteins in light-/dark-adapted octopus rhabdoms and suggested that actin cytoskeletal rearrangements bring about the formation and degradation of rhabdomere microvilli subsets. To determine if the microtubule cytoskeleton and associated motor proteins control the other light/dark changes, we used immunoblotting and immunocytochemical procedures to map the distribution of tubulin, kinesin, and dynein in dorsal and ventral halves of light- and dark-adapted octopus retinas. Immunoblots detected alpha- and beta-tubulin, dynein intermediate chain, and kinesin heavy chain in extracts of whole retinas. Epifluorescence and confocal microscopy showed that the tubulin proteins were distributed throughout the retina with more immunoreactivity in retinas exposed to light. Kinesin localization was heavy in the pigment layer of light- and dark-adapted ventral retinas but was less prominent in the dorsal region. Dynein distribution also varied in dorsal and ventral retinas with more immunoreactivity in light- and dark-adapted ventral retinas and confocal microscopy emphasized the granular nature of this labeling. We suggest that light may regulate the distribution of microtubule cytoskeletal proteins in the octopus retina and that position, dorsal versus ventral, also influences the distribution of motor proteins. The microtubule cytoskeleton is most likely involved in pigment granule migration in the light and dark and with the movement of transport vesicles from the photoreceptor inner segments to the rhabdoms.

  4. Changing lamp type and position to improve lighting quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anizar; Syahputri, K.; Sari, RM; Rizkya, I.; Hardianti, DA

    2018-03-01

    This study investigates the lighting quality on the production floor in a cigarette paper industry by measuring illumination level and luminance. Cigarette paper inspection is performed manually by operators, and the criteria of defects are the cigarette paper has a hole, is rough and dirty. Operators complain that the room is pretty dark, which makes them unable to see clearly the cigarette paper defect. The government of Indonesia Health Ministerial Decree No 1405 The Year 2002 states that illumination level for continuous manual labor is 200 lux. Illumination level is measured for four days at 08.00, 10.00, 12.30, and 14.00 o’clock with 4 in 1 environmental meter. From the measurement result, it is found that using 7 LED lamps of 60 Watts can produce average illumination level of 70 lux. Low illuminance is caused by illumination level that does not meet the need 0f 569.759 lumen. Alternatives that can be used to increase lumen number are changing lamp type and position. One of the possibilities is using 24 LED of 138 Watts set 5.7 meters apart from one another can meet this demand. Another is using 5 LED of 150 Watts installed above the field of work.

  5. Wigner distribution function of circularly truncated light beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaans, M.J.; Nijhawan, O.P.; Gupta, A.K.; Musla, A.K.; Singh, Kehar

    1998-01-01

    Truncating a light beam is expressed as a convolution of its Wigner distribution function and the WDF of the truncating aperture. The WDF of a circular aperture is derived and an approximate expression - which is exact in the space and the spatial-frequency origin and whose integral over the spatial

  6. A Positive and a Normative Theory of Income Distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Tinbergen (Jan)

    1970-01-01

    textabstractA positive theory of income distribution based on assumptions concerning the supply of and demand for each type of productive service is presented. The demand function of the organizers of production may be derived from the maximization of profits with the income scale and the production

  7. Position Reconstruction and Charge Distribution in LHCb VELO Silicon Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Versloot, TW; Akiba, K; Artuso, M; Van Beuzekom, M; Borel, J; Bowcock, TJV; Buytaert, J; Collins, P; Dumps, R; Dwyer, L; Eckstein, D; Eklund, L; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Frei, R; Gersabek M; Haefeli, G; Hennessy, K; Huse, T; Jans, E; John, M; Ketel, TJ; Keune, A; Lastoviicka, T; Mountain, R; Neufeld, N; Parkes, C; Stone, S; Szumlak, T; Tobin, M; Van Lysebetten, A; Viret, S; De Vries, H; Wang, J

    2007-01-01

    In 2006, a partially equipped LHCb VELO detector half was characterised in a test beam experiment (Alignment Challenge and Detector Commissioning, ACDC3). The position reconstruction and resolution for 2-strip R-sensor clusters was studied as a function of strip pitch and track inclination on the sensor surface. The Charge Density Distribution (CDD) is derived from the weighted charge distribution. It becomes asymmetric for tracks non-perpendicular to the strip surface. It is shown that the asymmetric broadening of the CDD around the track intercept position results in a linear eta-function at higher angles (>6 degrees). The sensor spatial resolution is determined both using a linear weighted mean of strip charges, as well as a third-order polynomial approximation via a eta-correction. The experimental results are in agreement with previous simulations. Future studies are underway to determine the angle and pitch dependent parameters which will be implemented in the LHCb VELO cluster position software tools.

  8. Modelling light distributions of homogeneous versus discrete absorbers in light irradiated turbid media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkruysse, W.; Lucassen, G. W.; de Boer, J. F.; Smithies, D. J.; Nelson, J. S.; van Gemert, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Laser treatment of port wine stains has often been modelled assuming that blood is distributed homogeneously over the dermal volume, instead of enclosed within discrete vessels. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the consequences of this assumption. Due to strong light absorption by blood,

  9. Light-cone distribution amplitudes of the baryon octet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bali, Gunnar S. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Regensburg,Universitätsstraße 31, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research,Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Braun, Vladimir M.; Göckeler, Meinulf; Gruber, Michael; Hutzler, Fabian; Schäfer, Andreas; Schiel, Rainer W.; Simeth, Jakob; Söldner, Wolfgang [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Regensburg,Universitätsstraße 31, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Sternbeck, Andre [Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena,Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Wein, Philipp [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Regensburg,Universitätsstraße 31, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2016-02-10

    We present results of the first ab initio lattice QCD calculation of the normalization constants and first moments of the leading twist distribution amplitudes of the full baryon octet, corresponding to the small transverse distance limit of the associated S-wave light-cone wave functions. The P-wave (higher twist) normalization constants are evaluated as well. The calculation is done using N{sub f}=2+1 flavors of dynamical (clover) fermions on lattices of different volumes and pion masses down to 222 MeV. Significant SU(3) flavor symmetry violation effects in the shape of the distribution amplitudes are observed.

  10. Light-cone distribution amplitudes of the baryon octet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bali, Gunnar S.; Braun, Vladimir M.; Göckeler, Meinulf; Gruber, Michael; Hutzler, Fabian; Schäfer, Andreas; Schiel, Rainer W.; Simeth, Jakob; Söldner, Wolfgang; Sternbeck, Andre; Wein, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    We present results of the first ab initio lattice QCD calculation of the normalization constants and first moments of the leading twist distribution amplitudes of the full baryon octet, corresponding to the small transverse distance limit of the associated S-wave light-cone wave functions. The P-wave (higher twist) normalization constants are evaluated as well. The calculation is done using N_f=2+1 flavors of dynamical (clover) fermions on lattices of different volumes and pion masses down to 222 MeV. Significant SU(3) flavor symmetry violation effects in the shape of the distribution amplitudes are observed.

  11. Distributed magnetic field positioning system using code division multiple access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigge, Eric A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus and methods for a magnetic field positioning system use a fundamentally different, and advantageous, signal structure and multiple access method, known as Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA). This signal architecture, when combined with processing methods, leads to advantages over the existing technologies, especially when applied to a system with a large number of magnetic field generators (beacons). Beacons at known positions generate coded magnetic fields, and a magnetic sensor measures a sum field and decomposes it into component fields to determine the sensor position and orientation. The apparatus and methods can have a large `building-sized` coverage area. The system allows for numerous beacons to be distributed throughout an area at a number of different locations. A method to estimate position and attitude, with no prior knowledge, uses dipole fields produced by these beacons in different locations.

  12. An Autonomous Distributed Fault-Tolerant Local Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a fault-tolerant, GPS-independent (Global Positioning System) distributed autonomous positioning system for static/mobile objects and present solutions for providing highly-accurate geo-location data for the static/mobile objects in dynamic environments. The reliability and accuracy of a positioning system fundamentally depends on two factors; its timeliness in broadcasting signals and the knowledge of its geometry, i.e., locations and distances of the beacons. Existing distributed positioning systems either synchronize to a common external source like GPS or establish their own time synchrony using a scheme similar to a master-slave by designating a particular beacon as the master and other beacons synchronize to it, resulting in a single point of failure. Another drawback of existing positioning systems is their lack of addressing various fault manifestations, in particular, communication link failures, which, as in wireless networks, are increasingly dominating the process failures and are typically transient and mobile, in the sense that they typically affect different messages to/from different processes over time.

  13. The rank of a normally distributed matrix and positive definiteness of a noncentral Wishart distributed matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steerneman, A. G. M.; van Perlo-ten Kleij, Frederieke

    2008-01-01

    If X similar to N-nxk(M, I-n circle times Sigma), then S = X'X has the noncentral Wishart distribution W-k(')(n, Sigma; A), where Lambda = M'M. Here Sigma is allowed to be singular. It is well known that if Lambda = 0, then S has a (central) Wishart distribution and. S is positive definite with

  14. Bright light exposure reduces TH-positive dopamine neurons: implications of light pollution in Parkinson's disease epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Stefania; Viaggi, Cristina; Di Camillo, Daniela; Willis, Allison W; Lozzi, Luca; Rocchi, Cristina; Capannolo, Marta; Aloisi, Gabriella; Vaglini, Francesca; Maccarone, Rita; Caleo, Matteo; Missale, Cristina; Racette, Brad A; Corsini, Giovanni U; Maggio, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the effect of continuous exposure to bright light on neuromelanin formation and dopamine neuron survival in the substantia nigra. Twenty-one days after birth, Sprague-Dawley albino rats were divided into groups and raised under different conditions of light exposure. At the end of the irradiation period, rats were sacrificed and assayed for neuromelanin formation and number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in the substantia nigra. The rats exposed to bright light for 20 days or 90 days showed a relatively greater number of neuromelanin-positive neurons. Surprisingly, TH-positive neurons decreased progressively in the substantia nigra reaching a significant 29% reduction after 90 days of continuous bright light exposure. This decrease was paralleled by a diminution of dopamine and its metabolite in the striatum. Remarkably, in preliminary analysis that accounted for population density, the age and race adjusted Parkinson's disease prevalence significantly correlated with average satellite-observed sky light pollution.

  15. Depth distributions of light action spectra for skin chromophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barun, V. V.; Ivanov, A. P.

    2010-03-01

    Light action spectra over wavelengths of 300-1000 nm are calculated for components of the human cutaneous covering: melanin, basal (bloodless) tissue, and blood oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin. The transformation of the spectra with depth in biological tissue results from two factors. The first is the wavelength dependence of the absorption coefficient corresponding to a particular skin chromophore and the second is the spectral selectivity of the radiation flux in biological tissue. This factor is related to the optical properties of all chromophores. A significant change is found to take place in the spectral distribution of absorbed radiant power with increasing depth. The action spectrum of light for the molecular oxygen contained in all components of biological tissue is also studied in the 625-645 nm range. The spectra are found to change with both the volume fraction of blood vessels and the degree of oxygenation of the blood. These results are useful for analyzing processes associated with optical absorption that are possible mechanisms for the interaction of light with biological tissues: photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin and the light-oxygen effect.

  16. Secure positioning technique based on encrypted visible light map for smart indoor service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Up; Jung, Gillyoung

    2018-03-01

    Indoor visible light (VL) positioning systems for smart indoor services are negatively affected by both cochannel interference from adjacent light sources and VL reception position irregularity in the three-dimensional (3-D) VL channel. A secure positioning methodology based on a two-dimensional (2-D) encrypted VL map is proposed, implemented in prototypes of the specific positioning system, and analyzed based on performance tests. The proposed positioning technique enhances the positioning performance by more than 21.7% compared to the conventional method in real VL positioning tests. Further, the pseudonoise code is found to be the optimal encryption key for secure VL positioning for this smart indoor service.

  17. Quantum key distribution with an entangled light emitting diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzurnak, B.; Stevenson, R. M.; Nilsson, J.; Dynes, J. F.; Yuan, Z. L.; Skiba-Szymanska, J.; Shields, A. J. [Toshiba Research Europe Limited, 208 Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-28

    Measurements performed on entangled photon pairs shared between two parties can allow unique quantum cryptographic keys to be formed, creating secure links between users. An advantage of using such entangled photon links is that they can be adapted to propagate entanglement to end users of quantum networks with only untrusted nodes. However, demonstrations of quantum key distribution with entangled photons have so far relied on sources optically excited with lasers. Here, we realize a quantum cryptography system based on an electrically driven entangled-light-emitting diode. Measurement bases are passively chosen and we show formation of an error-free quantum key. Our measurements also simultaneously reveal Bell's parameter for the detected light, which exceeds the threshold for quantum entanglement.

  18. Strength distributions of electromagnetic transitions in light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostin, V.Ya.; Koval', A.A.; Kopanets, E.G.; Tsytko, S.P.

    1980-01-01

    Distributions of probabilities of electromagnetic transitions from resonance levels of light nuclei with masses A=Z-40 for eight types of transition (epsilon1, epsilon2, M1, M8, isoscalar and isovector) are obtained. Recommended upper limits (RUL) of transition probabilities are determined for each type of transitions. A comparison with analogous characteristics for transitions between bound states is carried out. It has been causes found that RUL for resonance states substantially differ from RUL for transitions between bound states. Possible causes of such difference are discussed

  19. Lattice results for low moments of light meson distribution amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, R.; Boyle, P.A. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). SUPA, School of Physics; Broemmel, D.; Flynn, J.M.; Rae, T.D.; Sachrajda, C.T.C. [Southampton Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Donnellan, M.A. [NIC/DESY Zeuthen (Germany); Juettner, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). Physics Dept.

    2010-12-15

    As part of the UKQCD and RBC collaborations' N{sub f} = 2+1 domain-wall fermion phenomenology programme, we calculate the first two moments of the light-cone distribution amplitudes of the pseudoscalar mesons {pi} and K and the (longitudinally-polarised) vector mesons {rho}, K{sup *} and {phi}. We obtain the desired quantities with good precision and are able to discern the expected quark-mass dependence of SU(3)-flavour breaking effects. An important ingredient of the calculation is the nonperturbative renormalisation of lattice operators using the RI{sup '}/MOM technique. (orig.)

  20. Lattice Results for Low Moments of Light Meson Distribution Amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Arthur, R; Brommel, D; Donnellan, M A; Flynn, J M; Juttner, A; Rae, T D; Sachrajda, C T.C

    2011-01-01

    As part of the UKQCD and RBC collaborations' N_f=2+1 domain-wall fermion phenomenology programme, we calculate the first two moments of the light-cone distribution amplitudes of the pseudoscalar mesons pion and kaon and the (longitudinally-polarised) vector mesons rho, K-star and phi. We obtain the desired quantities with good precision and are able to discern the expected quark-mass dependence of SU(3)-flavour breaking effects. An important ingredient of the calculation is the nonperturbative renormalisation of lattice operators using the RI'/MOM technique.

  1. Lattice results for low moments of light meson distribution amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, R.; Boyle, P.A.; Juettner, A.

    2010-12-01

    As part of the UKQCD and RBC collaborations' N f = 2+1 domain-wall fermion phenomenology programme, we calculate the first two moments of the light-cone distribution amplitudes of the pseudoscalar mesons π and K and the (longitudinally-polarised) vector mesons ρ, K * and φ. We obtain the desired quantities with good precision and are able to discern the expected quark-mass dependence of SU(3)-flavour breaking effects. An important ingredient of the calculation is the nonperturbative renormalisation of lattice operators using the RI ' /MOM technique. (orig.)

  2. Positive concept of using Roll containers in consumer goods distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miličić Milica B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the products, at some point in the transport and logistics processes are carried on pallets. To meet the requirements of heterogeneous goods in the supply chain, pallet underwent certain modifications. The new pallet found application due to its specific characteristics (in terms of shape and dimensions (design, the material from which it is made, positive impact on the environment, ease the recycling process, ease of manipulation within the transport-manipulative processes and economy. The aim is to present the mentioned characteristics of roll containers for which this type of pallet has been used in large distribution chains-supermarkets.

  3. Patient positioning and its influence on dose distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrissey, J.; Moss, R.; Watkins, P.

    2000-01-01

    In comparison to conventional radiotherapy, the positioning of a patient for BNCT treatment has some unique aspects. In particular, the neutron beam coming from the core of a nuclear research reactor is fixed and horizontal. In particular, a head fixation mask, which is prepared at the patient referral hospital, is included in the CT images. The mask allows reproducible positioning for use during the treatment. Fiducial markers placed on the mask before imaging, provide reference points. The INEEL treatment planning code used in Petten produces a beam angle, and beam line entrance and exit co-ordinates. These are related to the fiducial marker co-ordinates. A spreadsheet, named COSINE, developed at Petten produces positioning co-ordinates from the data produced by the rtt MC code. These co-ordinates are related to a positioning frame, which allows the marking of the beams on the mask. In order to have reliable treatment data, the influence of small deviations of angle or target point on dose distribution must be known. To demonstrate this, a number of beams have been calculated with the Petten beam, with slight variations and compared with an approved plan. (author)

  4. Epistemological positions in the light of truth approximation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Theo A.F.

    2001-01-01

    I discuss in a systematic order the most important epistemological positions in the instrumentalism-realism debate, viz., instrumentalism, constructive empiricism, referential realism, and theory realism. My conclusions are as follows. There are good reasons for the instrumentalist to become a

  5. The distribution characteristics of pollutants released at different cross-sectional positions of a river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Heqing; Chen Guang; Zhang Qianfeng

    2010-01-01

    The distribution characteristics of heavier or lighter pollutants released at different cross-sectional positions of a wide river is investigated with a well-tested three-dimensional numerical model of gravity flows based on Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations and turbulence k-ε model. By focusing on investigating the influences of flow and buoyancy on pollutants, it is found that while carrying by the river flow downstream: i) a heavier pollutant released from the cross-sectional side position, forms transverse oscillation between two banks with decreased amplitude, i.e. forms kind of helical flow pattern along the straight part of channel bed; ii) a heavier pollutant released from the cross-sectional middle position, forms collapse oscillation in the middle of the straight channel part with reduced amplitude; iii) in the downstream sinuous channel, heavier pollutant is of higher concentration on the outer side of channel bends; iv) a light pollutant released from the cross-sectional side position, slips partly to the other side of the river, resulting in higher concentrations on two sides of the channel top; v) a light pollutant released from the cross-sectional middle position, splits into two parts symmetrically along two sides of the channel top; vi) in the downstream sinuous channel, light pollutant presents higher concentration on the inner side of channel bends. These findings may assist in cost-effective scientific countermeasures to be taken for accidental or planned pollutant releases into a river. - The distribution characteristics of heavier or lighter pollutants released at different cross-sectional positions of a river.

  6. Radionuclide distribution in LWR [light-water reactor] spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Baldwin, D.L.; Mendel, J.E.

    1990-09-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) provides well-characterized spent fuel from light-water reactors (LWRs) for use in laboratory tests relevant to nuclear waste disposal in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Interpretation of results from tests on spent fuel oxidation, dissolution, and cladding degradation requires information on the inventory and distribution of radionuclides in the initial test materials. The MCC is obtaining this information from examinations of Approved Testing Materials (ATMs), which include spent fuel with burnups from 17 to 50 MWd/kgM and fission gas releases (FGR) from 0.2 to 18%. The concentration and distribution of activation products and the release of volatile fission products to the pellet-cladding gap and rod plenum are of particular interest because these characteristics are not well understood. This paper summarizes results that help define the 14 C inventory and distribution in cladding, the ''gap and grain boundary'' inventory of radionuclides in fuels with different FGRs, and the structure and radionuclide inventory of the fuel rim region within a few hundred micrometers from the fuel edge. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  7. Momentum distributions in light halo nuclei and structure constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The core recoil momentum distribution of neutron-rich isotopes of light exotic nuclei is studied within a three-body model, where the nuclei are described by a core and two neutrons, with interactions dominated by the s-wave channel. In our framework, the two-body subsystems should have large scattering lengths in comparison with the interaction range allowing to use a three-body model with a zero-range force. The ground-state halo wave functions in momentum space are obtained by using as inputs the two-neutron separation energy and the energies of the singlet neutron-neutron and neutron-core virtual states. Within our model, we obtain the momentum probability densities for the Borromean exotic nuclei 11Li and 22C. In the case of the core recoil momentum distribution of 11Li, a fair reproduction of the experimental data was obtained, without free parameters, considering only the two-body low-energies. By analysing the obtained core momentum distribution in face of recent experimental data, we verify that such data are constraining the 22C two-neutron separation energy to a value between 100 and 400 keV.

  8. Distribution of light in the human retina under natural viewing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, Jorge C.

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness inAmerica. The fact that AMD wreaks most of the damage in the center of the retina raises the question of whether light, integrated over long periods, is more concentrated in the macula. A method, based on eye-tracking, was developed to measure the distribution of light in the retina under natural viewing conditions. The hypothesis was that integrated over time, retinal illumination peaked in the macula. Additionally a possible relationship between age and retinal illumination was investigated. The eye tracker superimposed the subject's gaze position on a video recorded by a scene camera. Five informed subjects were employed in feasibility tests, and 58 naive subjects participated in 5 phases. In phase 1 the subjects viewed a gray-scale image. In phase 2, they observed a sequence of photographic images. In phase 3 they viewed a video. In phase 4, they worked on a computer; in phase 5, the subjects walked around freely. The informed subjects were instructed to gaze at bright objects in the field of view and then at dark objects. Naive subjects were allowed to gaze freely for all phases. Using the subject's gaze coordinates, and the video provided by the scene camera, the cumulative light distribution on the retina was calculated for ˜15° around the fovea. As expected for control subjects, cumulative retinal light distributions peaked and dipped in the fovea when they gazed at bright or dark objects respectively. The light distribution maps obtained from the naive subjects presented a tendency to peak in the macula for phases 1, 2, and 3, a consistent tendency in phase 4 and a variable tendency in phase 5. The feasibility of using an eye-tracker system to measure the distribution of light in the retina was demonstrated, thus helping to understand the role played by light exposure in the etiology of AMD. Results showed that a tendency for light to peak in the macula is a characteristic of some

  9. Research on the Collinear Equation Model of Visual Positioning Based on Visible Light Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yuqi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A positioning method based on visible light communication is proposed, which receiving visible light information by low-resolution photodiode array and receiving visual information by the front camera of mobile phone. The terminal position is determined by matching spot information provided by photodiode array with visual information and position information provided by visible light communication. A collinear equation model is derived which based on mobile phone front camera. A hardware-in-loop simulation has been conducted to verify the collinear equation. The three-dimensional positioning error is on the level of decimeter. Moreover, the main factors which affect the positioning accuracy are analyzed in order to further improve the positioning accuracy.

  10. Measurement of spatial dose-rate distribution using a position sensitive detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emoto, T.; Torii, T.; Nozaki, T.; Ando, H.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, the radiation detectors using plastic scintillation fibers (PSF) have been developed to measure the positions exposed to radiation such as neutrons and high energy charged particles. In particular, the time of flight (TOF) method for measuring the difference of time that two directional signals of scintillation light reach both ends of a PSF is a rather simple method for the measurement of the spatial distribution of fast neutron fluence rate. It is possible to use the PSF in nuclear facility working areas because of its flexibility, small diameter and long length. In order to apply TOF method to measure spatial gamma dose rate distribution, the characteristic tests of a detector using PSFs were carried out. First, the resolution of irradiated positions and the counting efficiency were measured with collimated gamma ray. The sensitivity to unit dose rate was also obtained. The measurement of spatial dose rate distribution was also carried out. The sensor is made of ten bundled PSFs, and the experimental setup is described. The experiment and the results are reported. It was found that the PSF detector has the good performance to measure spatial gamma dose rate distribution. (K.I.)

  11. Light Reflectance Spectroscopy to Detect Positive Surgical Margins on Prostate Cancer Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Monica S C; Lay, Aaron H; Wang, Xinlong; Kapur, Payal; Ozayar, Asim; Sayah, Maryam; Zeng, Li; Liu, Hanli; Roehrborn, Claus G; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A

    2016-02-01

    Intraoperative frozen section analysis is not routinely performed to determine positive surgical margins at radical prostatectomy due to time requirements and unproven clinical usefulness. Light reflectance spectroscopy, which measures light intensity reflected or backscattered from tissues, can be applied to differentiate malignant from benign tissue. We used a novel light reflectance spectroscopy probe to evaluate positive surgical margins on ex vivo radical prostatectomy specimens and correlate its findings with pathological examination. Patients with intermediate to high risk disease undergoing radical prostatectomy were enrolled. Light reflectance spectroscopy was performed on suspected malignant and benign prostate capsule immediately following organ extraction. Each light reflectance spectroscopy at 530 to 830 nm was analyzed and correlated with pathological results. A regression model and forward sequential selection algorithm were developed for optimal feature selection. Eighty percent of light reflectance spectroscopy data were selected to train a logistic regression model, which was evaluated by the remaining 20% data. This was repeated 5 times to calculate averaged sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. Light reflectance spectroscopy analysis was performed on 17 ex vivo prostate specimens, on which a total of 11 histologically positive and 22 negative surgical margins were measured. Two select features from 700 to 830 nm were identified as unique to malignant tissue. Cross-validation when performing the predictive model showed that the optical probe predicted positive surgical margins with 85% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 86% accuracy and an AUC of 0.95. Light reflectance spectroscopy can identify positive surgical margins accurately in fresh ex vivo radical prostatectomy specimens. Further study is required to determine whether such analysis may be used in real time to improve surgical decision making and decrease positive surgical margin rates

  12. Bilinear phase-plane distribution functions and positivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.J.E.M.

    1985-01-01

    There is a theorem of Wigner that states that phase-plane distribution functions involving the state bilinearly and having correct marginals must take negative values for certain states. The purpose of this paper is to support the statement that these phase-plane distribution functions are for

  13. Non-regularized inversion method from light scattering applied to ferrofluid magnetization curves for magnetic size distribution analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijssel, Jos van; Kuipers, Bonny W.M.; Erné, Ben H.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical inversion method known from the analysis of light scattering by colloidal dispersions is now applied to magnetization curves of ferrofluids. The distribution of magnetic particle sizes or dipole moments is determined without assuming that the distribution is unimodal or of a particular shape. The inversion method enforces positive number densities via a non-negative least squares procedure. It is tested successfully on experimental and simulated data for ferrofluid samples with known multimodal size distributions. The created computer program MINORIM is made available on the web. - Highlights: • A method from light scattering is applied to analyze ferrofluid magnetization curves. • A magnetic size distribution is obtained without prior assumption of its shape. • The method is tested successfully on ferrofluids with a known size distribution. • The practical limits of the method are explored with simulated data including noise. • This method is implemented in the program MINORIM, freely available online

  14. Observation of lateral substructures in EAS by measurement of the time distribution of atmospheric Cerenkov light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosia, G.; Navarra, G.; Saavedra, O.

    1975-01-01

    The lateral structure of EAS is derived from the arrival time distribution of atmospheric Cerenkov light assuming a strict correlation between time structure and lateral particle distribution. Results of the Pic du Midi experiment are presented. Substructures in the time distribution of the Cerenkov light can be related to structures in the lateral density distribution of electrons. The frequency (a few %) of substructures can be explained within conventional models of high energy interactions. (orig.) [de

  15. Indoor anti-occlusion visible light positioning systems based on particle filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Meng; Huang, Zhitong; Li, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ruqi; Ji, Yuefeng

    2015-04-01

    As one of the most popular categories of mobile services, a rapid growth of indoor location-based services has been witnessed over the past decades. Indoor positioning methods based on Wi-Fi, radio-frequency identification or Bluetooth are widely commercialized; however, they have disadvantages such as low accuracy or high cost. An emerging method using visible light is under research recently. The existed visible light positioning (VLP) schemes using carrier allocation, time allocation and multiple receivers all have limitations. This paper presents a novel mechanism using particle filtering in VLP system. By this method no additional devices are needed and the occlusion problem in visible light would be alleviated which will effectively enhance the flexibility for indoor positioning.

  16. Distribution of coagulase-positive staphylococci in humans and dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Jurate Sleiniute; Jurate Siugzdaite

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococci form part of the normal flora of humans and a wide variety of animals. Some staphylococcal species also cause infections for human and household pets. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of coagulase-positive staphylococci in humans and dogs within a common household. Coagulase-positive staphylococci could not be identified phenotypically in all cases. Molecular methods were used for the correct identification of pathogenic staphylococci. The prevalence of St...

  17. Light distribution in leaf chambers and its consequences for photosynthesis measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogewoning, S.W.; Trouwborst, G.; Harbinson, J.; Ieperen, van W.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of a heterogeneous distribution of actinic light within a leaf chamber for photosynthetic measurements by gas exchange on the photosynthesis-irradiance relationship was investigated. High-resolution light distributions were measured over the area of a commercially available clamp-on leaf

  18. Application of 265-nm UVC LED Lighting to Sterilization of Typical Gram Negative and Positive Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Wook; Yoon, Hyung Do; Park, Jae-Hyoun; Ryu, Uh-Chan

    2018-05-01

    UV LED lightings have been displacing conventional UV lamps due to their high efficiency, long lifetime, etc. A sterilizing lighting was prepared by assembling a UV LED module composed of 265-nm UVC LEDs and a silica lens array with a driver module comprised of a driver IC controlling pulse width modulation and constant current. The silica lens array was designed and fabricated to focus UV beam and simultaneously to give a uniform light distribution over specimens. Then pasteurizing effect of the lighting was analyzed for four kinds of bacteria and one yeast which are dangerous to people with low immunity. Sterilizing tests on these germs were carried out at the both exposure distances of 10 and 100 mm for various exposure durations up to 600 s.

  19. Three dimensional indoor positioning based on visible light with Gaussian mixture sigma-point particle filter technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wenjun; Zhang, Weizhi; Wang, Jin; Amini Kashani, M. R.; Kavehrad, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, location based services (LBS) have found their wide applications in indoor environments, such as large shopping malls, hospitals, warehouses, airports, etc. Current technologies provide wide choices of available solutions, which include Radio-frequency identification (RFID), Ultra wideband (UWB), wireless local area network (WLAN) and Bluetooth. With the rapid development of light-emitting-diodes (LED) technology, visible light communications (VLC) also bring a practical approach to LBS. As visible light has a better immunity against multipath effect than radio waves, higher positioning accuracy is achieved. LEDs are utilized both for illumination and positioning purpose to realize relatively lower infrastructure cost. In this paper, an indoor positioning system using VLC is proposed, with LEDs as transmitters and photo diodes as receivers. The algorithm for estimation is based on received-signalstrength (RSS) information collected from photo diodes and trilateration technique. By appropriately making use of the characteristics of receiver movements and the property of trilateration, estimation on three-dimensional (3-D) coordinates is attained. Filtering technique is applied to enable tracking capability of the algorithm, and a higher accuracy is reached compare to raw estimates. Gaussian mixture Sigma-point particle filter (GM-SPPF) is proposed for this 3-D system, which introduces the notion of Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM). The number of particles in the filter is reduced by approximating the probability distribution with Gaussian components.

  20. Distribution of positive ion species above a diffuse midnight aurora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    The origin of the hot plasma in the Earth's magnetosphere is still open to investigation. Mass composition is an indicator of source region, while the distribution functions bear the signatures of transport and energization processes. Only ions identified as H + and He ++ were detected, and the He ++ was statistically marginal. Coincident magnetic storms are likely to play a crucial role in populating the magnetosphere with energized ionospheric ions. The measured proton distribution was nearly isotropic over downcoming pitch angles at all energies and showed a depleted atmospheric source cone. The high-altitude proton energy distribution had a best fit temperature of 4.5 keV and a number density of 0.17 cm- 3 , corresponding to a peak intensity just over 10 5 cm -2 s -1 sr -1 keV -1 . Altitudinal variations are consistent with the theory of charge exchange of a time-steady incident proton population. Simultaneous electron measurements can be interpreted in terms of an incident electron distribution that is also thermal wih a similar number density but a temperature of 2.5 keV. Taken together, the ion and electron data are consistent with the model of diffuse auroras in which plasma convecting in from the magnetospheric tail precipitates due to strong pitch angle diffusion on auroral field lines linking the near Earth plasma sheet

  1. Distributed estimation of sensors position in underwater wireless sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandi, Rahman; Kamarei, Mahmoud; Amiri, Hadi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a localisation method for determining the position of fixed sensor nodes in an underwater wireless sensor network (UWSN) is introduced. In this simple and range-free scheme, the node localisation is achieved by utilising an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) that transverses through the network deployment area, and that periodically emits a message block via four directional acoustic beams. A message block contains the actual known AUV position as well as a directional dependent marker that allows a node to identify the respective transmit beam. The beams form a fixed angle with the AUV body. If a node passively receives message blocks, it could calculate the arithmetic mean of the coordinates existing in each messages sequence, to find coordinates at two different time instants via two different successive beams. The node position can be derived from the two computed positions of the AUV. The major advantage of the proposed localisation algorithm is that it is silent, which leads to energy efficiency for sensor nodes. The proposed method does not require any synchronisation among the nodes owing to being silent. Simulation results, using MATLAB, demonstrated that the proposed method had better performance than other similar AUV-based localisation methods in terms of the rates of well-localised sensor nodes and positional root mean square error.

  2. A cooperative positioning with Kalman filters and handover mechanism for indoor microcellular visible light communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jieqing; Huang, Zhitong; Zhuang, Kaiyu; Ji, Yuefeng

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel handover scheme for indoor microcellular visible light communication (VLC) network. With such a scheme, the room, which is fully coverage by light, is divided into several microcells according to the layout of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). However, the directionality of light arises new challenges in keeping the connectivity between the mobile devices and light source under the mobile circumstances. The simplest solution is that all LEDs broadcast data of every user simultaneously, but it wastes too much bandwidth resource, especially when the amount of users increases. To solve this key problem, we utilize the optical positioning assisting handover procedure in this paper. In the positioning stage, the network manager obtains the location information of user device via downlink and uplink signal strength information, which is white light and infrared, respectively. After that, a Kalman filter is utilized for improving the tracking performance of a mobile device. Then, the network manager decides how to initiate the handover process by the previous information. Results show that the proposed scheme can achieve low-cost, seamless data communication, and a high probability of successful handover.

  3. Multipoint alignment monitoring with amorphous silicon position detectors in a complex light path

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ferrando, A., E-mail: antonio.ferrando@ciemat.e [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calderon, A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain)

    2010-12-01

    This document presents an application of the new generation of amorphous silicon position detecting (ASPD) sensors to multipoint alignment. Twelve units are monitored along a 20 m long laser beam, where the light path is deflected by 90{sup o} using a pentaprism.

  4. Multipoint alignment monitoring with amorphous silicon position detectors in a complex light path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C.; Calderon, A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L.

    2010-01-01

    This document presents an application of the new generation of amorphous silicon position detecting (ASPD) sensors to multipoint alignment. Twelve units are monitored along a 20 m long laser beam, where the light path is deflected by 90 o using a pentaprism.

  5. Fusion Based on Visible Light Positioning and Inertial Navigation Using Extended Kalman Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhitian; Feng, Lihui; Yang, Aiying

    2017-05-11

    With the rapid development of smart technology, the need for location-based services (LBS) increases every day. Since classical positioning technology such as GPS cannot satisfy the needs of indoor positioning, new indoor positioning technologies, such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, and Visible light communication (VLC), have already cut a figure. VLC positioning has been proposed because it has higher accuracy, costs less, and is easier to accomplish in comparison to the other indoor positioning technologies. However, the practicality of VLC positioning is limited since it is easily affected by multipath effects and the layout of LEDs. Thus, we propose a fusion positioning system based on extended Kalman filters, which can fuse the VLC position and the inertial navigation data. The accuracy of the fusion positioning system is in centimeters, which is better compared to the VLC-based positioning or inertial navigation alone. Furthermore, the fusion positioning system has high accuracy, saves energy, costs little, and is easy to install, making it a promising candidate for future indoor positioning applications.

  6. Distributed stabilisation of spatially invariant systems: positive polynomial approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Augusta, Petr; Hurák, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 24, Č. 1 (2013), s. 3-21 ISSN 1573-0824 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0567 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Multidimensional systems * Algebraic approach * Control design * Positiveness Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/TR/augusta-0382623.pdf

  7. Positional information generated by spatially distributed signaling cascades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Muñoz-García

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The temporal and stationary behavior of protein modification cascades has been extensively studied, yet little is known about the spatial aspects of signal propagation. We have previously shown that the spatial separation of opposing enzymes, such as a kinase and a phosphatase, creates signaling activity gradients. Here we show under what conditions signals stall in the space or robustly propagate through spatially distributed signaling cascades. Robust signal propagation results in activity gradients with long plateaus, which abruptly decay at successive spatial locations. We derive an approximate analytical solution that relates the maximal amplitude and propagation length of each activation profile with the cascade level, protein diffusivity, and the ratio of the opposing enzyme activities. The control of the spatial signal propagation appears to be very different from the control of transient temporal responses for spatially homogenous cascades. For spatially distributed cascades where activating and deactivating enzymes operate far from saturation, the ratio of the opposing enzyme activities is shown to be a key parameter controlling signal propagation. The signaling gradients characteristic for robust signal propagation exemplify a pattern formation mechanism that generates precise spatial guidance for multiple cellular processes and conveys information about the cell size to the nucleus.

  8. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a {sup 22}Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm{sup 3}) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The

  9. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a 22 Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm 3 ) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The authors

  10. Distribution of CD163-positive cell and MHC class II-positive cell in the normal equine uveal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Yuto; Matsuda, Kazuya; Okamoto, Minoru; Takehana, Kazushige; Hirayama, Kazuko; Taniyama, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the uveal tract participate in ocular immunity including immune homeostasis and the pathogenesis of uveitis. In horses, although uveitis is the most common ocular disorder, little is known about ocular immunity, such as the distribution of APCs. In this study, we investigated the distribution of CD163-positive and MHC II-positive cells in the normal equine uveal tract using an immunofluorescence technique. Eleven eyes from 10 Thoroughbred horses aged 1 to 24 years old were used. Indirect immunofluorescence was performed using the primary antibodies CD163, MHC class II (MHC II) and CD20. To demonstrate the site of their greatest distribution, positive cells were manually counted in 3 different parts of the uveal tract (ciliary body, iris and choroid), and their average number was assessed by statistical analysis. The distribution of pleomorphic CD163- and MHC II-expressed cells was detected throughout the equine uveal tract, but no CD20-expressed cells were detected. The statistical analysis demonstrated the distribution of CD163- and MHC II-positive cells focusing on the ciliary body. These results demonstrated that the ciliary body is the largest site of their distribution in the normal equine uveal tract, and the ciliary body is considered to play important roles in uveal and/or ocular immune homeostasis. The data provided in this study will help further understanding of equine ocular immunity in the normal state and might be beneficial for understanding of mechanisms of ocular disorders, such as equine uveitis.

  11. New approach for control rod position indication system for light water power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahuguna, Sushil; Dhage, Sangeeta; Nawaj, S.; Salek, C.; Lahiri, S.K.; Marathe, P.P.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Taly, Y.K.

    2015-01-01

    Control rod position indication system is an important system in a nuclear power plant to monitor and display control rod position in all regimes of reactor operation. A new approach to design a control rod position indication system for sensing absolute position of control rod in Light Water Power Reactor has been undertaken. The proposed system employs an inductive type, hybrid measurement strategy providing both analog position as well as digital zone indication with built-in temperature compensation. The new design approach meets single failure criterion through redundancy in design without sacrificing measurement resolution. It also provides diversity in measurement technique by indirect position sensing based on analysis of drive coil current signature. Prototype development and qualification at room temperature of the control rod position indication system (CRPIS) has been demonstrated. The article presents the design philosophy of control rod position indication system, the new measurement strategy for sensing absolute position of control rod, position estimation algorithm for both direct and indirect sensing and a brief account associated processing electronics. (author)

  12. Lasing thresholds of helical photonic structures with different positions of a single light-amplifying helix turn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blinov, L M; Palto, S P [A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federaion (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-30

    Numerical simulation is used to assess the lasing threshold of helical structures of cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) in which only one turn amplifies light. This turn is located either in the centre of symmetric structures of various sizes or in an arbitrary place in asymmetric structures of preset size. In all cases, we find singularities in light amplification by a one-dimensional CLC structure for the most important band-edge modes (m1, m2 and m3) and plot the threshold gain coefficient k{sub th} against the position of the amplifying turn. For the symmetric structures, the lasing threshold of the m1 mode is shown to vary linearly with the inverse of the square of the cavity length. Moreover, modes with a lower density of photonic states (DOS) in the cavity may have a lower lasing threshold. This can be accounted for by the dependence of the density of photonic states on the position of the amplifying turn and, accordingly, by the nonuniform electromagnetic field intensity distribution along the cavity for different modes. In the asymmetric structures, the same field energy distribution is responsible for a correlation between k{sub th} and DOS curves. (lasers)

  13. Measurement of light-atom distributions in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blewer, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    We have developed a sensitive technique that is capable of nondestructively measuring the abundance and depth-distribution of isotopes of hydrogen or helium imbedded in a solid. The measurement is a form of ion-backscattering spectrometry which uses protons to probe within approximately 10μm of the surface of a solid. By analyzing the energy of the backscattered protons we can determine the number of atoms of a given mass present at various depths in the target material. This method permits detection of the lightest elements (i.e., those most difficult to detect by conventional ion-backscattering spectrometry) without sacrificing the capability of revealing the abundance and depth-distribution of heavier elements. For example, we have measured the initial distribution of helium implanted in a metal, then in subsequent measurements kept track of the helium migration

  14. Measuring the radial density distribution of light emission around the track of fast ions in nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibach, T.

    1983-01-01

    For analysing the emission and stopping of ionization electrons (σ-electrons) emitted by fast ions passing through a gas, the radial density distribution of the light emission of the (0,0) transition of two optical bands in nitrogen have been measured. The systems selected for the epxeriments are the 2nd positive system (2.PS) at 337.1 nm primarily excited by low-energy electrons of about 20 eV, and the first negative system (1.NS) at 391.4 nm excited by faster electrons and simultaneous ionization. The equipment developed for the experiments records the light emission with a telescope-type optical arrangement including interference filters, allowing high local resolution and dynamics of the measured range. The measurements have been carried out at pressures between 0.133 and 13.3 mbar, using photons of energies ranging from 270 keV to 2.8 MeV, helium 3 beams of 270 keV/u and 500 keV/u, and neon beams of 270 keV/u. Abel's inversion applied to the distance functions allows calculation of the spatial light emission density which is normalized for a gas density of 1 g/cm 3 . The profiles of the two bands indicate that the σ-electron spectrum gets harder in outward direction. Next to the beam the impact density decreases faster with increasing ion energy than the stopping power (increasing interaction range of the σ-electrons). With photon beams, about half of the whole light emission in the 1. NS, and of the ionization, is induced by primary interactions of the ion beam. This proportion decreases at constant energy per nucleon with increasing atomic number of the ions as compared with the σ-electrons. The primary σ-emission gets harder with higher atomic numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  15. AMIC: an expandable integrated analog front-end for light distribution moments analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaggiari, M; Herrero, V; Lerche, C W; Aliaga, R; Monzo, J M; Gadea, R, E-mail: michele.spaggiari@gmail.com [Instituto de Instrumentacion para Imagen Molecular (I3M), Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera, 46022, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    In this article we introduce AMIC (Analog Moments Integrated Circuit), a novel analog Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) front-end for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) applications. Its working principle is based on mathematical analysis of light distribution through moments calculation. Each moment provides useful information about light distribution, such as energy, position, depth of interaction, skewness (deformation due to border effect) etc. A current buffer delivers a copy of each input current to several processing blocks. The current preamplifier is designed in order to achieve unconditional stability under high input capacitance, thus allowing the use of both Photo-Multiplier Tubes (PMT) and Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPM). Each processing block implements an analog current filtering by multiplying each input current by a programmable 8-bit coefficient. The latter is implemented through a high linear MOS current divider ladder, whose high sensitivity to variations in output voltages requires the integration of an extremely stable fully differential current collector. Output currents are then summed and sent to the output stage, that provides both a buffered output current and a linear rail-to-rail voltage for further digitalization. Since computation is purely additive, the 64 input channels of AMIC do not represent a limitation in the number of the detector's outputs. Current outputs of various AMIC structures can be combined as inputs of a final AMIC, thus providing a fully expandable structure. In this version of AMIC, 8 programmable blocks for moments calculation are integrated, as well as an I2C interface in order to program every coefficient. Extracted layout simulation results demonstrate that the information provided by moment calculation in AMIC helps to improve tridimensional positioning of the detected event. A two-detector test-bench is now being used for AMIC prototype characterization and preliminary results are presented.

  16. An experimental evaluation of monochromatic x-ray beam position monitors at diamond light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomer, Chris, E-mail: chris.bloomer@diamond.ac.uk; Rehm, Guenther; Dolbnya, Igor P. [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    Maintaining the stability of the X-ray beam relative to the sample point is of paramount importance for beamlines and users wanting to perform cutting-edge experiments. The ability to detect, and subsequently compensate for, variations in X-ray beam position with effective diagnostics has multiple benefits: a reduction in commissioning and start-up time, less ‘down-time’, and an improvement in the quality of acquired data. At Diamond Light Source a methodical evaluation of a selection of monochromatic X-ray Beam Position Monitors (XBPMs), using a range of position detection techniques, and from a range of suppliers, was carried out. The results of these experiments are presented, showing the measured RMS noise on the position measurement of each device for a given flux, energy, beam size, and bandwidth. A discussion of the benefits and drawbacks of each of the various devices and techniques is also included.

  17. An experimental evaluation of monochromatic x-ray beam position monitors at diamond light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomer, Chris; Rehm, Guenther; Dolbnya, Igor P.

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining the stability of the X-ray beam relative to the sample point is of paramount importance for beamlines and users wanting to perform cutting-edge experiments. The ability to detect, and subsequently compensate for, variations in X-ray beam position with effective diagnostics has multiple benefits: a reduction in commissioning and start-up time, less ‘down-time’, and an improvement in the quality of acquired data. At Diamond Light Source a methodical evaluation of a selection of monochromatic X-ray Beam Position Monitors (XBPMs), using a range of position detection techniques, and from a range of suppliers, was carried out. The results of these experiments are presented, showing the measured RMS noise on the position measurement of each device for a given flux, energy, beam size, and bandwidth. A discussion of the benefits and drawbacks of each of the various devices and techniques is also included.

  18. The experimental method of measurement for spatial distribution of full aperture backscatter light by circular PIN-array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xuefeng; Wang Chuanke; Hu Feng; Kuang Longyu; Wang Zhebin; Li Sanwei; Liu Shengye; Jiang Gang

    2011-01-01

    The spatial distribution of backscatter light is very important for understanding the production of backscatter light. The experimental method of spatial distribution of full aperture backscatter light is based on the circular PIN array composed of concentric orbicular multi-PIN detectors. The image of backscatter light spatial distribution of full aperture SBS is obtained by measuring spatial distribution of full aperture backscatter light using the method in the experiment of laser hohlraum targets interaction at 'Shenguang II'. A preliminary method to measure spatial distribution of full aperture backscatter light is established. (authors)

  19. Design method of freeform light distribution lens for LED automotive headlamp based on DMD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianshe; Huang, Jianwei; Su, Ping; Cui, Yao

    2018-01-01

    We propose a new method to design freeform light distribution lens for light-emitting diode (LED) automotive headlamp based on digital micro mirror device (DMD). With the Parallel optical path architecture, the exit pupil of the illuminating system is set in infinity. Thus the principal incident rays of micro lens in DMD is parallel. DMD is made of high speed digital optical reflection array, the function of distribution lens is to distribute the emergent parallel rays from DMD and get a lighting pattern that fully comply with the national regulation GB 25991-2010.We use DLP 4500 to design the light distribution lens, mesh the target plane regulated by the national regulation GB 25991-2010 and correlate the mesh grids with the active mirror array of DLP4500. With the mapping relations and the refraction law, we can build the mathematics model and get the parameters of freeform light distribution lens. Then we import its parameter into the three-dimensional (3D) software CATIA to construct its 3D model. The ray tracing results using Tracepro demonstrate that the Illumination value of target plane is easily adjustable and fully comply with the requirement of the national regulation GB 25991-2010 by adjusting the exit brightness value of DMD. The theoretical optical efficiencies of the light distribution lens designed using this method could be up to 92% without any other auxiliary lens.

  20. Distributed control system for the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.; Culwick, B.B.; Goldstick, J.; Sheehan, J.; Smith, J.

    1979-01-01

    Until recently, accelerator and similar control systems have used modular interface hardware such as CAMAC or DATACON which translated digital computer commands transmitted over some data link into hardware device status and monitoring variables. Such modules possessed little more than local buffering capability in the processing of commands and data. The advent of the micro-processor has made available low cost small computers of significant computational capability. This paper describes how micro-computers including such micro-processors and associated memory, input/output devices and interrupt facilities have been incorporated into a distributed system for the control of the NSLS

  1. Constraining Light-Quark Yukawa Couplings from Higgs Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Bishara, Fady

    2017-03-20

    We propose a novel strategy to constrain the bottom and charm Yukawa couplings by exploiting LHC measurements of transverse momentum distributions in Higgs production. Our method does not rely on the reconstruction of exclusive final states or heavy-flavour tagging. Compared to other proposals it leads to an enhanced sensitivity to the Yukawa couplings due to distortions of the differential Higgs spectra from emissions which either probe quark loops or are associated to quark-initiated production. We derive constraints using data from LHC Run I, and we explore the prospects of our method at future LHC runs. Finally, we comment on the possibility of bounding the strange Yukawa coupling.

  2. Differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution using coherent light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, K.; Waks, E.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution based on two nonorthogonal states is described. A weak coherent pulse train is sent from Alice to Bob, in which the phase of each pulse is randomly modulated by {0,π}. Bob measures the differential phase by a one-bit delay circuit. The system has a simple configuration without the need for an interferometer and a bright reference pulse in Alice's site, unlike the conventional QKD system based on two nonorthogonal states, and has an advantage of improved communication efficiency. The principle of the operation is successfully demonstrated in experiments

  3. MATLAB implementation of satellite positioning error overbounding by generalized Pareto distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Khairol Amali; Ahmad, Shahril; Hashim, Fakroul Ridzuan

    2018-02-01

    In the satellite navigation community, error overbound has been implemented in the process of integrity monitoring. In this work, MATLAB programming is used to implement the overbounding of satellite positioning error CDF. Using a trajectory of reference, the horizontal position errors (HPE) are computed and its non-parametric distribution function is given by the empirical Cumulative Distribution Function (ECDF). According to the results, these errors have a heavy-tailed distribution. Sınce the ECDF of the HPE in urban environment is not Gaussian distributed, the ECDF is overbound with the CDF of the generalized Pareto distribution (GPD).

  4. Positional effects on distribution of ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, C.; Chun, K.J.; Williams, M.H. Jr.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    Ventilation is distributed predominantly to the dependent lung in normal persons in the decubitus position. We evaluated the distribution of ventilation in four patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using 81mKr gas. Patients were tested in the sitting and right and left decubitus positions with and without the application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP). In contrast to findings in controls, ventilation was predominantly distributed to the nondependent lung in patients in the decubitus position. Mean ventilation in the right lung decreased from 51% of the total in the sitting position to 31% in the right decubitus position; it increased with the application of 10 cm PEEP. Reduced ventilation in the dependent lung most likely is caused by closure of the airways after a decrease in volume. Application of PEEP resulted in increased lung volume and preferential distribution of ventilation to the dependent lung

  5. Position, Energy, and Transit Time Distributions in a Hemispherical Deflector Analyzer with Position Sensitive Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Sise

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Practical analytic equations, for the ideal field, and numerical results from SIMION simulations, for the fringing field, are presented for the exit radius rπ and transit time tπ of electrons in a hemispherical deflector analyzer (HDA over a wide range of analyzer parameters. Results are presented for a typically dimensioned HDA with mean radius R-=101.6 mm and interradial separation ΔR=R2-R1=58.4 mm able to accommodate a 40 mm diameter position sensitive detector (PSD. Results for three different entry positions R0 are compared: R0=R- (the conventional central entry and two displaced (paracentric entries: R0=82.55 mm and R0=116 mm. Exit spreads Δrπ, Δtπ and base energy resolution ΔEB are computed for HDA pass energies E0=10, 100, 500, and 1000 eV, entry aperture sizes Δr0≤1.5 mm, entry angular spreads |αmax|≤5°, and an electron beam with relative energy spread δE/E0≤0.4%. Overall, under realistic conditions, both paracentric entries demonstrate near ideal field behavior and clear superiority over the conventional entry at R0=R-. The R0=82.55 mm entry has better absolute energy and time spread resolutions, while the R0=116 mm has better relative energy resolutions, both offering attractive alternatives for time-of-flight and coincidence applications where both energy and timing resolutions are important.

  6. Constraining Light-Quark Yukawa Couplings from Higgs Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Fady; Haisch, Ulrich; Monni, Pier Francesco; Re, Emanuele

    2017-03-01

    We propose a novel strategy to constrain the bottom and charm Yukawa couplings by exploiting Large Hadron Collider (LHC) measurements of transverse momentum distributions in Higgs production. Our method does not rely on the reconstruction of exclusive final states or heavy-flavor tagging. Compared to other proposals, it leads to an enhanced sensitivity to the Yukawa couplings due to distortions of the differential Higgs spectra from emissions which either probe quark loops or are associated with quark-initiated production. We derive constraints using data from LHC run I, and we explore the prospects of our method at future LHC runs. Finally, we comment on the possibility of bounding the strange Yukawa coupling.

  7. Constraining Light-Quark Yukawa Couplings from Higgs Distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Fady; Haisch, Ulrich; Monni, Pier Francesco; Re, Emanuele

    2017-03-24

    We propose a novel strategy to constrain the bottom and charm Yukawa couplings by exploiting Large Hadron Collider (LHC) measurements of transverse momentum distributions in Higgs production. Our method does not rely on the reconstruction of exclusive final states or heavy-flavor tagging. Compared to other proposals, it leads to an enhanced sensitivity to the Yukawa couplings due to distortions of the differential Higgs spectra from emissions which either probe quark loops or are associated with quark-initiated production. We derive constraints using data from LHC run I, and we explore the prospects of our method at future LHC runs. Finally, we comment on the possibility of bounding the strange Yukawa coupling.

  8. Indoor/Outdoor Seamless Positioning Using Lighting Tags and GPS Cellular Phones for Personal Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namie, Hiromune; Morishita, Hisashi

    The authors focused on the development of an indoor positioning system which is easy to use, portable and available for everyone. This system is capable of providing the correct position anywhere indoors, including onboard ships, and was invented in order to evaluate the availability of GPS indoors. Although the performance of GPS is superior outdoors, there has been considerable research regarding indoor GPS involving sensitive GPS, pseudolites (GPS pseudo satellite), RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification) tags, and wireless LAN .However, the positioning rate and the precision are not high enough for general use, which is the reason why these technologies have not yet spread to personal navigation systems. In this regard, the authors attempted to implement an indoor positioning system using cellular phones with built-in GPS and infrared light data communication functionality, which are widely used in Japan. GPS is becoming increasingly popular, where GPGGS sentences of the NMEA outputted from the GPS receiver provide spatiotemporal information including latitude, longitude, altitude, and time or ECEF xyz coordinates. As GPS applications grow rapidly, spatiotemporal data becomes key to the ubiquitous outdoor and indoor seamless positioning services at least for the entire area of Japan, as well as to becoming familiar with satellite positioning systems (e.g. GPS). Furthermore, the authors are also working on the idea of using PDAs (Personal Digital Assistants), as cellular phones with built-in GPS and PDA functionality are also becoming increasingly popular.

  9. Polydisperse-particle-size-distribution function determined from intensity profile of angularly scattered light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alger, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    A new method for determining the particle-size-distribution function of a polydispersion of spherical particles is presented. The inversion technique for the particle-size-distribution function is based upon matching the measured intensity profile of angularly scattered light with a summation of the intensity contributions of a series of appropriately spaced, narrowband, size-distribution functions. A numerical optimization technique is used to determine the strengths of the individual bands that yield the best agreement with the measured scattered-light-intensity profile. Because Mie theory is used, the method is applicable to spherical particles of all sizes. Several numerical examples demonstrate the application of this inversion method

  10. Light-cone distribution amplitudes of the ground state bottom baryons in HQET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, A.; Wang, W. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hambrock, C. [Technische Univ. Dortmund (Germany); Parkhomenko, A.Ya. [P.G. Demidov Yaroslavl State Univ., Yaroslavl (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-15

    We provide the definition of the complete set of light-cone distribution amplitudes (LCDAs) for the ground state heavy bottom baryons with the spin-parities J{sup P}=1/2{sup +} and J{sup P}=3/2{sup +} in the heavy quark limit. We present the renormalization effects on the twist-2 light-cone distribution amplitudes and use the QCD sum rules to compute the moments of twist-2, twist-3, and twist-4 LCDAs. Simple models for the heavy baryon distribution amplitudes are analyzed with account of their scale dependence.

  11. Interactive football training based on rebounders with hit position sensing and audio/light feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller; Grønbæk, Kaj; Rasmussen, Majken Kirkegård

    A Danish football club has established a (24/7/365) football training facility, where the authors developed an interactive training installation (http://vimeo.com/28446312). The training installation consist of a 12*12 m square with 4 M­Station Pro rebounders equipped with sensors that enable hit...... position sensing. The rebounders are equipped with loudspeakers and lights being used to call for the ball. Here we discuss one game “Pass ­and ­Turn”, which is meant to train speed in controlling a returned ball, reaction to a call for the ball and turning to hit rebounders to the left, right, behind...

  12. Performance of the Lancelot Beam Position Monitor at the Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagani, H.; Garcia-Nathan, T. B.; Jiang, C.; Kachatkou, A.; Marchal, J.; Omar, D.; Tartoni, N.; van Silfhout, R. G.; Williams, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Lancelot beam position and profile monitor records the scattered radiation off a thin, low-density foil, which passes through a pinhole perpendicular to the path of the beam and is detected by a Medipix3RX sensor. This arrangement does not expose the detector to the direct beam at synchrotrons and results in a negligible drop in flux downstream of the module. It allows for magnified images of the beam to be acquired in real time with high signal-to-noise ratios, enabling measurements of tiny displacements in the position of the centroid of approximately 1 μm. It also provides a means for independently measuring the photon energy of the incident monoenergetic photon beam. A constant frame rate of up to 245 Hz is achieved. The results of measurements with two Lancelot detectors installed in different environments at the Diamond Light Source are presented and their performance is discussed.

  13. Numerical Investigations on a Distributed Fiber-Optic Lighting System with an End Reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuhua; Gong Huaping; Tu Yumeng; Meng Ying

    2011-01-01

    A novel distributed fiber-optic decorative lighting system with the reflection coating on the extremity of fiber-optic is designed, which used the multi-mold optical fiber made up of large core diameter(Diameter of core and cladding is 105μm and 125μm, respectly). After introducing the distributional optical fiber decorative lighting system briefly, the ralationship between corrosion depth of the optical fiber core and the leakage of fiber-optic has been analyzed with the Rsoft, and then the relationship of the lighting power and the uniformity of lighting power with the leakage rate of optical fiber lamp, the reflective of reflection coating has been discussed.The simulation analysis shows that, when the core diameter is corroded to 80∼85 μm, the leakage rate of optical fiber may achieve 5.0%, which suits the optical fiber decorative lighting. Considering all kinds of factors, when optical fiber lamp's quantity is 20, the coating index of reflection is 95%, optical fiber lamp's leakage of light rate is 5.0%, and the optical fiber lamp's distance is 1 meter, the quite high illuminating power may be achieved, as well as the good lighting uniformity.Finally the experimental study of decorative lighting system is given. And the experimental result is in keeping well with the theory simulation conclusion.

  14. The regiochemical distribution of positive charges along cholesterol polyamine carbamates plays significant roles in modulating DNA binding affinity and lipofection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geall, A J; Eaton, M A; Baker, T; Catterall, C; Blagbrough, I S

    1999-10-15

    We have quantified the effects of the regiochemical distribution of positive charges along the polyamine moiety in lipopolyamines for DNA molecular recognition. High affinity binding leads to charge neutralisation, DNA condensation and ultimately to lipofection. Binding affinities for calf thymus DNA were determined using an ethidium bromide displacement assay and condensation was detected by changes in turbidity using light scattering. The in vitro transfection competence of cholesterol polyamine carbamates was measured in CHO cells. In the design of DNA condensing and transfecting agents for non-viral gene therapy, the interrelationship of ammonium ions, not just their number, must be considered.

  15. POSITIVE SOLUTIONS TO TWO TYPES OF NEUTRAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH DISTRIBUTED DELAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study two types of neutral functional differential equations with finite or unbounded distributed deviating arguments. By Banach contraction princi-ple, we obtain some sufficient conditions for the existence of positive solutions to such equations.

  16. Three-dimensional high-precision indoor positioning strategy using Tabu search based on visible light communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qi; Guan, Weipeng; Wu, Yuxiang; Cai, Ye; Xie, Canyu; Wang, Pengfei

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional (3-D) high-precision indoor positioning strategy using Tabu search based on visible light communication. Tabu search is a powerful global optimization algorithm, and the 3-D indoor positioning can be transformed into an optimal solution problem. Therefore, in the 3-D indoor positioning, the optimal receiver coordinate can be obtained by the Tabu search algorithm. For all we know, this is the first time the Tabu search algorithm is applied to visible light positioning. Each light-emitting diode (LED) in the system broadcasts a unique identity (ID) and transmits the ID information. When the receiver detects optical signals with ID information from different LEDs, using the global optimization of the Tabu search algorithm, the 3-D high-precision indoor positioning can be realized when the fitness value meets certain conditions. Simulation results show that the average positioning error is 0.79 cm, and the maximum error is 5.88 cm. The extended experiment of trajectory tracking also shows that 95.05% positioning errors are below 1.428 cm. It can be concluded from the data that the 3-D indoor positioning based on the Tabu search algorithm achieves the requirements of centimeter level indoor positioning. The algorithm used in indoor positioning is very effective and practical and is superior to other existing methods for visible light indoor positioning.

  17. New shapes of light-cone distributions of the transversely polarized ρ-mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakulev, A.P.; Mikhajlov, S.V.

    2000-01-01

    The leading twist light-cone distributions for transversely polarized ρ-, ρ ' - and b 1 mesons are reanalyzed in the framework of QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates. Using different kinds of sum rules to obtain reliable predictions, we estimate the 2-, 4-, 6- and 8-th moments for transversely polarized ρ- and ρ ' -meson distributions and reestimate tensor couplings f ρ,ρ ' ,b 1 T . It is stressed that the results of standard sum rules also support our estimation of the second moment of the transversely polarized ρ-meson distribution. New models for light-cone distributions are briefly discussed. Our results are compared with those found by Ball and Braun (1996), and the latter is shown to be incomplete

  18. Virtual Geographic Simulation of Light Distribution within Three-Dimensional Plant Canopy Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyu Tang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Virtual geographic environments (VGEs have been regarded as an important new means of simulating, analyzing, and understanding complex geological processes. Plants and light are major components of the geographic environment. Light is a critical factor that affects ecological systems. In this study, we focused on simulating light transmission and distribution within a three-dimensional plant canopy model. A progressive refinement radiosity algorithm was applied to simulate the transmission and distribution of solar light within a detailed, three-dimensional (3D loquat (Eriobotrya japonica Lindl. canopy model. The canopy was described in three dimensions, and each organ surface was represented by a set of triangular facets. The form factors in radiosity were calculated using a hemi-cube algorithm. We developed a module for simulating the instantaneous light distribution within a virtual canopy, which was integrated into ParaTree. We simulated the distribution of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR within a loquat canopy, and calculated the total PAR intercepted at the whole canopy scale, as well as the mean PAR interception per unit leaf area. The ParaTree-integrated radiosity model simulates the uncollided propagation of direct solar and diffuse sky light and the light-scattering effect of foliage. The PAR captured by the whole canopy based on the radiosity is approximately 9.4% greater than that obtained using ray tracing and TURTLE methods. The latter methods do not account for the scattering among leaves in the canopy in the study, and therefore, the difference might be due to the contribution of light scattering in the foliage. The simulation result is close to Myneni’s findings, in which the light scattering within a canopy is less than 10% of the incident PAR. Our method can be employed for visualizing and analyzing the spatial distribution of light within a canopy, and for estimating the PAR interception at the organ and canopy

  19. Effect of LED-LCU light irradiance distribution on mechanical properties of resin based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhães Filho, T.R.; Weig, K.M. [Faculdade de Odontologia, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rua São Paulo 28, CEP 24020-150 Niterói (Brazil); Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais (COPPE), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CP 68505, CEP: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Costa, M.F. [Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais (COPPE), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CP 68505, CEP: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Werneck, M.M. [Engenharia Elétrica (COPPE), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CP 68504, CEP: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Barthem, R.B. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CP 68528, CEP: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Costa Neto, C.A., E-mail: celio@metalmat.ufrj.br [Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais (COPPE), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CP 68505, CEP: 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the light power distribution along the tip end of the light guide of three LED-LCUs (Light Curing Units) and to evaluate its effect on the mechanical properties of a polymer based dental composite. Firstly, the light power distribution over the whole area of LED-LCU light guide surface was analyzed by three methods: visual projection observation, spectral measurement and optical spectral analysis (OSA). The light power distribution and the total irradiance were different for the three LEDs used, but the wavelength was within the camphorquinone absorption spectrum. The use of a blank sheet was quite on hand to make a qualitative analysis of a beam, and it is costless. Secondly, specimens of a hybrid composite with approximately 8 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness were produced and polymerized by 20 s exposition time to each LED-LCU. Thirdly, the elastic modulus (E) and hardness (HV) were measured throughout the irradiated area by instrumented micro-indentation test (IIT), allowing to correlate localized power and mechanical properties. Both E and HV showed to be very sensitive to local power and wavelength dependent, but they followed the beam power profile. It was also shown that the mechanical properties could be directly correlated to the curing process. Very steep differences in mechanical properties over very short distances may impair the material performance, since residual stresses can easily be built over it. - Highlights: • A resin based composite (RBC) was polymerized by three different Light Emitting Diodes. • Each LED had its beam profile visually, wavelength and power analyzed. • The effective polymerization power (EPP) varied from 28% to 52% of the total beam power. • Wavelength seems to be as relevant as power in the light curing process. • Mechanical properties depend on the simultaneous effect of wavelength and power.

  20. Effect of LED-LCU light irradiance distribution on mechanical properties of resin based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhães Filho, T.R.; Weig, K.M.; Costa, M.F.; Werneck, M.M.; Barthem, R.B.; Costa Neto, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the light power distribution along the tip end of the light guide of three LED-LCUs (Light Curing Units) and to evaluate its effect on the mechanical properties of a polymer based dental composite. Firstly, the light power distribution over the whole area of LED-LCU light guide surface was analyzed by three methods: visual projection observation, spectral measurement and optical spectral analysis (OSA). The light power distribution and the total irradiance were different for the three LEDs used, but the wavelength was within the camphorquinone absorption spectrum. The use of a blank sheet was quite on hand to make a qualitative analysis of a beam, and it is costless. Secondly, specimens of a hybrid composite with approximately 8 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness were produced and polymerized by 20 s exposition time to each LED-LCU. Thirdly, the elastic modulus (E) and hardness (HV) were measured throughout the irradiated area by instrumented micro-indentation test (IIT), allowing to correlate localized power and mechanical properties. Both E and HV showed to be very sensitive to local power and wavelength dependent, but they followed the beam power profile. It was also shown that the mechanical properties could be directly correlated to the curing process. Very steep differences in mechanical properties over very short distances may impair the material performance, since residual stresses can easily be built over it. - Highlights: • A resin based composite (RBC) was polymerized by three different Light Emitting Diodes. • Each LED had its beam profile visually, wavelength and power analyzed. • The effective polymerization power (EPP) varied from 28% to 52% of the total beam power. • Wavelength seems to be as relevant as power in the light curing process. • Mechanical properties depend on the simultaneous effect of wavelength and power.

  1. In-medium pion valence distributions in a light-front model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, J.P.B.C. de, E-mail: joao.mello@cruzeirodosul.edu.br [Laboratório de Física Teórica e Computacional – LFTC, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, 01506-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Tsushima, K. [Laboratório de Física Teórica e Computacional – LFTC, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, 01506-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Ahmed, I. [Laboratório de Física Teórica e Computacional – LFTC, Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, 01506-000 São Paulo (Brazil); National Center for Physics, Quaidi-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2017-03-10

    Pion valence distributions in nuclear medium and vacuum are studied in a light-front constituent quark model. The in-medium input for studying the pion properties is calculated by the quark-meson coupling model. We find that the in-medium pion valence distribution, as well as the in-medium pion valence wave function, are substantially modified at normal nuclear matter density, due to the reduction in the pion decay constant.

  2. Numerical analysis of the beam position monitor pickup for the Iranian light source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafiee, M., E-mail: mehdish@ipm.ir [Radiation Applications Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Feghhi, S.A.H. [Radiation Applications Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahighi, J. [Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF), Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the design of a button type Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the low emittance storage ring of the Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF). First, we calculate sensitivities, induced power and intrinsic resolution based on solving Laplace equation numerically by finite element method (FEM), in order to find the potential at each point of BPM's electrode surface. After the optimization of the designed BPM, trapped high order modes (HOM), wakefield and thermal loss effects are calculated. Finally, after fabrication of BPM, it is experimentally tested by using a test-stand. The results depict that the designed BPM has a linear response in the area of 2×4 mm{sup 2} inside the beam pipe and the sensitivity of 0.080 and 0.087 mm{sup −1} in horizontal and vertical directions. Experimental results also depict that they are in a good agreement with numerical analysis.

  3. Study of different roles phosphorescent material played in different positions of organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keke, Gu; Jian, Zhong; Jiule, Chen; Yucheng, Chen; Ming, Deng

    2013-09-01

    Phosphorescent materials are crucial to improve the luminescence and efficiency of organic light emitting diodes (OLED), because its internal quantum efficiency can reach 100%. So the studying of optical and electrical properties of phosphorescent materials is propitious for the further development of phosphorescent OLED. Phosphorescent materials were generally doped into different host materials as emitting components, not only played an important role in emitting light but also had a profound influence on carrier transport properties. We studied the optical and electrical properties of the blue 4,4'-bis(2,2-diphenylvinyl)-1,1'-biphenyl (DPVBi)-based devices, adding a common yellow phosphorescent material bis[2-(4- tert-butylphenyl)benzothiazolato- N,C2'] iridium(acetylacetonate) [( t-bt)2Ir(acac)] in different positions. The results showed ( t-bt)2Ir(acac) has remarkable hole-trapping ability. Especially the ultrathin structure device, compared to the device without ( t-bt)2Ir(acac), had increased the luminance by about 60%, and the efficiency by about 97%. Then introduced thin 4,4'-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) host layer between DPVBi and ( t-bt)2Ir(acac), and got devices with stable white color.

  4. Efficient coding and detection of ultra-long IDs for visible light positioning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hualong; Yang, Chuanchuan

    2018-05-14

    Visible light positioning (VLP) is a promising technique to complement Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) such as Global positioning system (GPS) and BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) which features the advantage of low-cost and high accuracy. The situation becomes even more crucial for indoor environments, where satellite signals are weak or even unavailable. For large-scale application of VLP, there would be a considerable number of Light emitting diode (LED) IDs, which bring forward the demand of long LED ID detection. In particular, to provision indoor localization globally, a convenient way is to program a unique ID into each LED during manufacture. This poses a big challenge for image sensors, such as the CMOS camera in everybody's hands since the long ID covers the span of multiple frames. In this paper, we investigate the detection of ultra-long ID using rolling shutter cameras. By analyzing the pattern of data loss in each frame, we proposed a novel coding technique to improve the efficiency of LED ID detection. We studied the performance of Reed-Solomon (RS) code in this system and designed a new coding method which considered the trade-off between performance and decoding complexity. Coding technique decreases the number of frames needed in data processing, significantly reduces the detection time, and improves the accuracy of detection. Numerical and experimental results show that the detected LED ID can be much longer with the coding technique. Besides, our proposed coding method is proved to achieve a performance close to that of RS code while the decoding complexity is much lower.

  5. Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with correlated source-light-intensity errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cong; Yu, Zong-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2018-04-01

    We present an analysis for measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with correlated source-light-intensity errors. Numerical results show that the results here can greatly improve the key rate especially with large intensity fluctuations and channel attenuation compared with prior results if the intensity fluctuations of different sources are correlated.

  6. Temporal dynamics of light and nitrogen vertical distributions in canopies of sunflower, kenaf and cynara

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archontoulis, S.V.; Vos, J.; Yin, X.; Bastiaans, L.; Danalatos, N.G.; Struik, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    To enhance eco-physiological and modelling studies, we quantified vertical distributions of light and nitrogen in canopies of three Mediterranean bio-energy crops: sunflower (Helianthus annuus), kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) and cynara (Cynara cardunculus). Field crops were grown with and without

  7. Light distributions in a port wine stain model containing multiple cylindrical and curved blood vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, G. W.; Verkruysse, W.; Keijzer, M.; van Gemert, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Knowledge of the light distribution in skin tissue is important for the understanding, prediction, and improvement of the clinical results in laser treatment of port wine stains (PWS). The objective of this study is to improve modelling of PWS treated by laser using an improved and more realistic

  8. Optimization of spatial light distribution through genetic algorithms for vision systems applied to quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellini, P; Cecchini, S; Stroppa, L; Paone, N

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents an adaptive illumination system for image quality enhancement in vision-based quality control systems. In particular, a spatial modulation of illumination intensity is proposed in order to improve image quality, thus compensating for different target scattering properties, local reflections and fluctuations of ambient light. The desired spatial modulation of illumination is obtained by a digital light projector, used to illuminate the scene with an arbitrary spatial distribution of light intensity, designed to improve feature extraction in the region of interest. The spatial distribution of illumination is optimized by running a genetic algorithm. An image quality estimator is used to close the feedback loop and to stop iterations once the desired image quality is reached. The technique proves particularly valuable for optimizing the spatial illumination distribution in the region of interest, with the remarkable capability of the genetic algorithm to adapt the light distribution to very different target reflectivity and ambient conditions. The final objective of the proposed technique is the improvement of the matching score in the recognition of parts through matching algorithms, hence of the diagnosis of machine vision-based quality inspections. The procedure has been validated both by a numerical model and by an experimental test, referring to a significant problem of quality control for the washing machine manufacturing industry: the recognition of a metallic clamp. Its applicability to other domains is also presented, specifically for the visual inspection of shoes with retro-reflective tape and T-shirts with paillettes. (paper)

  9. Nucleon-generalized parton distributions in the light-front quark model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-12

    Jan 12, 2016 ... 1. Introduction. Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) are the important set of parameters that give us ... The AdS/CFT is the correspondence between the string theory on a higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter ... matching the soft-wall model of AdS/QCD and light-front QCD for EFFs of hadrons with arbitrary ...

  10. Ergonomic Evaluation of Space Shuttle Light-Weight Seat Lever Position and Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, J.; Rajulu, Sudhakar L.; Bond, Robert L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    During a Shuttle flight in the early part of 1999, one of the crewmembers was unable to operate the backrest lever for the light-weight seat in microgravity. It is essential that the crewmembers are able to adjust this back-rest lever, which is titled forward 2 degrees from vertical during launch and then moved backwards to 10 degrees aft of vertical upon reaching orbit. This adjustment is needed to cushion the crewmembers during an inadvertent crash landing situation. The original Shuttle seats, which had seat controls located on the front left and right sides of the seat, were replaced recently with the new light-weight seats. The controls for these new, seats were moved to the night side with one control at the front and the other at the back. While it was uncertain whether the problem encountered was unique to that crewmember or not it was clear to the personnel responsible for maintaining the Shuttle seats that not knowing the cause of the problem posed a safety concern for NASA. Hence the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) of the Johnson Space Center was requested to perform an evaluation of the seat controls and provide NASA with appropriate recommendations on whether the seat lever positions and operations should be modified. The ABF designed an experiment to investigate the amount of pull force exerted by subjects, wearing an unpressurized or pressurized crew launch escape suit, when controls were placed in the front and back (on the right side) of the light-weight seat. Single-axis load cells were attached to the seat levers, which measured the maximum static pull forces that were exerted by the subjects. Twelve subjects, six male and six female, participated in this study. Each subject was asked to perform the pull test at least three times for each combination of lever position and suit pressure conditions. The results from this study showed that as a whole (or in general), the subjects were able to pull on the lever at the back position with

  11. Characterization of spherical core–shell particles by static light scattering. Estimation of the core- and particle-size distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clementi, Luis A.; Vega, Jorge R.; Gugliotta, Luis M.; Quirantes, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    A numerical method is proposed for the characterization of core–shell spherical particles from static light scattering (SLS) measurements. The method is able to estimate the core size distribution (CSD) and the particle size distribution (PSD), through the following two-step procedure: (i) the estimation of the bivariate core–particle size distribution (C–PSD), by solving a linear ill-conditioned inverse problem through a generalized Tikhonov regularization strategy, and (ii) the calculation of the CSD and the PSD from the estimated C–PSD. First, the method was evaluated on the basis of several simulated examples, with polystyrene–poly(methyl methacrylate) core–shell particles of different CSDs and PSDs. Then, two samples of hematite–Yttrium basic carbonate core–shell particles were successfully characterized. In all analyzed examples, acceptable estimates of the PSD and the average diameter of the CSD were obtained. Based on the single-scattering Mie theory, the proposed method is an effective tool for characterizing core–shell colloidal particles larger than their Rayleigh limits without requiring any a-priori assumption on the shapes of the size distributions. Under such conditions, the PSDs can always be adequately estimated, while acceptable CSD estimates are obtained when the core/shell particles exhibit either a high optical contrast, or a moderate optical contrast but with a high ‘average core diameter’/‘average particle diameter’ ratio. -- Highlights: ► Particles with core–shell morphology are characterized by static light scattering. ► Core size distribution and particle size distribution are successfully estimated. ► Simulated and experimental examples are used to validate the numerical method. ► The positive effect of a large core/shell optical contrast is investigated. ► No a-priori assumption on the shapes of the size distributions is required.

  12. Lighting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  13. QUASARS ARE NOT LIGHT BULBS: TESTING MODELS OF QUASAR LIFETIMES WITH THE OBSERVED EDDINGTON RATIO DISTRIBUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Hernquist, Lars

    2009-01-01

    We use the observed distribution of Eddington ratios as a function of supermassive black hole (BH) mass to constrain models of quasar/active galactic nucleus (AGN) lifetimes and light curves. Given the observed (well constrained) AGN luminosity function, a particular model for AGN light curves L(t) or, equivalently, the distribution of AGN lifetimes (time above a given luminosity t(>L)) translates directly and uniquely (without further assumptions) to a predicted distribution of Eddington ratios at each BH mass. Models for self-regulated BH growth, in which feedback produces a self-regulating 'decay' or 'blowout' phase after the AGN reaches some peak luminosity/BH mass and begins to expel gas and shut down accretion, make specific predictions for the light curves/lifetimes, distinct from, e.g., the expected distribution if AGN simply shut down by gas starvation (without feedback) and very different from the prediction of simple phenomenological 'light bulb' scenarios. We show that the present observations of the Eddington ratio distribution, spanning nearly 5 orders of magnitude in Eddington ratio, 3 orders of magnitude in BH mass, and redshifts z = 0-1, agree well with the predictions of self-regulated models, and rule out phenomenological 'light bulb' or pure exponential models, as well as gas starvation models, at high significance (∼5σ). We also compare with observations of the distribution of Eddington ratios at a given AGN luminosity, and find similar good agreement (but show that these observations are much less constraining). We fit the functional form of the quasar lifetime distribution and provide these fits for use, and show how the Eddington ratio distributions place precise, tight limits on the AGN lifetimes at various luminosities, in agreement with model predictions. We compare with independent estimates of episodic lifetimes and use this to constrain the shape of the typical AGN light curve, and provide simple analytic fits to these for use in

  14. Three-dimensional mapping of light transmittance and foliage distribution using lidar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, K.W.; Csillag, F.; Atkinson, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    The horizontal and vertical distributions of light transmittance were evaluated as a function of foliage distribution using lidar (light detection and ranging) observations for a sugar maple (Acer saccharum) stand in the Turkey Lakes Watershed. Along the vertical profile of vegetation, horizontal slices of probability of light transmittance were derived from an Optech ALTM 1225 instrument's return pulses (two discrete, 15-cm diameter returns) using indicator kriging. These predictions were compared with (i) below canopy (1-cm spatial resolution) transect measurements of the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) and (ii) measurements of tree height. A first-order trend was initially removed from the lidar returns. The vertical distribution of vegetation height was then sliced into nine percentiles and indicator variograms were fitted to them. Variogram parameters were found to vary as a function of foliage height above ground. In this paper, we show that the relationship between ground measurements of FPAR and kriged estimates of vegetation cover becomes stronger and tighter at coarser spatial resolutions. Three-dimensional maps of foliage distribution were computed as stacks of the percentile probability surfaces. These probability surfaces showed correspondence with individual tree-based observations and provided a much more detailed characterization of quasi-continuous foliage distribution. These results suggest that discrete-return lidar provides a promising technology to capture variations of foliage characteristics in forests to support the development of functional linkages between biophysical and ecological studies. (author)

  15. Evaluation of the LightCycler Staphylococcus M GRADE kits on positive blood cultures that contained gram-positive cocci in clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Nabin K; Tuohy, Marion J; Padmanabhan, Ravindran A; Hall, Gerri S; Procop, Gary W

    2005-12-01

    We evaluated the Roche LightCycler Staphylococcus M(GRADE) kits to differentiate between Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci in blood cultures growing clusters of gram-positive cocci. Testing 100 bottles (36 containing S. aureus), the assay was 100% sensitive and 98.44% specific for S. aureus and 100% sensitive and specific for coagulase-negative staphylococci.

  16. Energy distribution extraction of negative charges responsible for positive bias temperature instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Shang-Qing; Yang Hong; Wang Wen-Wu; Tang Bo; Tang Zhao-Yun; Wang Xiao-Lei; Xu Hao; Luo Wei-Chun; Zhao Chao; Yan Jiang; Chen Da-Peng; Ye Tian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    A new method is proposed to extract the energy distribution of negative charges, which results from electron trapping by traps in the gate stack of nMOSFET during positive bias temperature instability (PBTI) stress based on the recovery measurement. In our case, the extracted energy distribution of negative charges shows an obvious dependence on energy, and the energy level of the largest energy density of negative charges is 0.01 eV above the conduction band of silicon. The charge energy distribution below that energy level shows strong dependence on the stress voltage. (paper)

  17. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  18. Effect of blood vessels on light distribution in optogenetic stimulation of cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimipour, Mehdi; Atry, Farid; Pashaie, Ramin

    2015-05-15

    In this Letter, the impact of blood vessels on light distribution during photostimulation of cortical tissue in small rodents is investigated. Brain optical properties were extracted using a double-integrating sphere setup, and optical coherence tomography was used to image cortical vessels and capillaries to generate a three-dimensional angiogram of the cortex. By combining these two datasets, a complete volumetric structure of the cortical tissue was developed and linked to a Monte Carlo code which simulates light propagation in this inhomogeneous structure and illustrates the effect of blood vessels on the penetration depth and pattern preservation in optogenetic stimulation.

  19. The influence of patient positioning uncertainties in proton radiotherapy on proton range and dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebl, Jakob, E-mail: jakob.liebl@medaustron.at [EBG MedAustron GmbH, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz (Austria); Paganetti, Harald; Zhu, Mingyao; Winey, Brian A. [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy allows radiation treatment delivery with high dose gradients. The nature of such dose distributions increases the influence of patient positioning uncertainties on their fidelity when compared to photon radiotherapy. The present work quantitatively analyzes the influence of setup uncertainties on proton range and dose distributions. Methods: Thirty-eight clinical passive scattering treatment fields for small lesions in the head were studied. Dose distributions for shifted and rotated patient positions were Monte Carlo-simulated. Proton range uncertainties at the 50%- and 90%-dose falloff position were calculated considering 18 arbitrary combinations of maximal patient position shifts and rotations for two patient positioning methods. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs), equivalent uniform doses (EUDs), and tumor control probabilities (TCPs) were studied for organs at risk (OARs) and target volumes of eight patients. Results: The authors identified a median 1σ proton range uncertainty at the 50%-dose falloff of 2.8 mm for anatomy-based patient positioning and 1.6 mm for fiducial-based patient positioning as well as 7.2 and 5.8 mm for the 90%-dose falloff position, respectively. These range uncertainties were correlated to heterogeneity indices (HIs) calculated for each treatment field (38% < R{sup 2} < 50%). A NTCP increase of more than 10% (absolute) was observed for less than 2.9% (anatomy-based positioning) and 1.2% (fiducial-based positioning) of the studied OARs and patient shifts. For target volumes TCP decreases by more than 10% (absolute) occurred in less than 2.2% of the considered treatment scenarios for anatomy-based patient positioning and were nonexistent for fiducial-based patient positioning. EUD changes for target volumes were up to 35% (anatomy-based positioning) and 16% (fiducial-based positioning). Conclusions: The influence of patient positioning uncertainties on proton range in therapy of small lesions

  20. Modeling the probability distribution of positional errors incurred by residential address geocoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazumdar Soumya

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assignment of a point-level geocode to subjects' residences is an important data assimilation component of many geographic public health studies. Often, these assignments are made by a method known as automated geocoding, which attempts to match each subject's address to an address-ranged street segment georeferenced within a streetline database and then interpolate the position of the address along that segment. Unfortunately, this process results in positional errors. Our study sought to model the probability distribution of positional errors associated with automated geocoding and E911 geocoding. Results Positional errors were determined for 1423 rural addresses in Carroll County, Iowa as the vector difference between each 100%-matched automated geocode and its true location as determined by orthophoto and parcel information. Errors were also determined for 1449 60%-matched geocodes and 2354 E911 geocodes. Huge (> 15 km outliers occurred among the 60%-matched geocoding errors; outliers occurred for the other two types of geocoding errors also but were much smaller. E911 geocoding was more accurate (median error length = 44 m than 100%-matched automated geocoding (median error length = 168 m. The empirical distributions of positional errors associated with 100%-matched automated geocoding and E911 geocoding exhibited a distinctive Greek-cross shape and had many other interesting features that were not capable of being fitted adequately by a single bivariate normal or t distribution. However, mixtures of t distributions with two or three components fit the errors very well. Conclusion Mixtures of bivariate t distributions with few components appear to be flexible enough to fit many positional error datasets associated with geocoding, yet parsimonious enough to be feasible for nascent applications of measurement-error methodology to spatial epidemiology.

  1. Descriptive Study of Electromagnetic Wave Distribution for Various Seating Positions: Using Digital Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seomun, GyeongAe; Kim, YoungHwan; Lee, Jung-Ah; Jeong, KwangHoon; Park, Seon-A; Kim, Miran; Noh, Wonjung

    2014-01-01

    To better understand environmental electromagnetic wave exposure during the use of digital textbooks by elementary school students, we measured numeric values of the electromagnetic fields produced by tablet personal computers (TPCs). Specifically, we examined the distribution of the electromagnetic waves for various students' seating positions in…

  2. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  3. Quantum tunneling recombination in a system of randomly distributed trapped electrons and positive ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Kulp, Christopher; Chaney, Charity-Grace; Tachiya, M

    2017-09-13

    During the past 10 years, quantum tunneling has been established as one of the dominant mechanisms for recombination in random distributions of electrons and positive ions, and in many dosimetric materials. Specifically quantum tunneling has been shown to be closely associated with two important effects in luminescence materials, namely long term afterglow luminescence and anomalous fading. Two of the common assumptions of quantum tunneling models based on random distributions of electrons and positive ions are: (a) An electron tunnels from a donor to the nearest acceptor, and (b) the concentration of electrons is much lower than that of positive ions at all times during the tunneling process. This paper presents theoretical studies for arbitrary relative concentrations of electrons and positive ions in the solid. Two new differential equations are derived which describe the loss of charge in the solid by tunneling, and they are solved analytically. The analytical solution compares well with the results of Monte Carlo simulations carried out in a random distribution of electrons and positive ions. Possible experimental implications of the model are discussed for tunneling phenomena in long term afterglow signals, and also for anomalous fading studies in feldspars and apatite samples.

  4. Capturing sunlight into a photobioreactor: Ray tracing simulations of the propagation of light from capture to distribution into the reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijffers, J.F.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.; Salim, S.

    2008-01-01

    The Green Solar Collector (GSC), a photobioreactor designed for area efficient outdoor cultivation of microalgae uses Fresnel lenses and light guides to focus, transport and distribute direct light into the algae suspension. Calculating the path of rays of light, so-called ray tracing, is used to

  5. Red light-induced shift of the fluence-response curve for first positive curvature of maize [Zea mays] coleoptiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, E.; Schäfer, E.

    1987-01-01

    The fluence-response curve for first positive phototropic curvture of dark-grown maize coleoptiles is shifted to ten-fold higher fluences if the coieoptiles are irradiated with red light 2 h prior to the phototropic induction with blue light. Fluence-response curves for this red-induced shift were obtained with unilateral red irradiations 2 h prior to inductive blue pulses of different fluences. They differ significantly depending on whether the red light was given from the same side as or the opposite side to the respective inductive blue pulse, thus demonstrating that the red light effect is a local response of the coleoptile. The fluence-response curves for an inductive blue pulse in the ascending part were compared with those for an inductive blue pulse in the descending part of the fluence-response curve for blue light induced phototropism. They are quite different in threshold of red light sensitivity and shape for irradiations from both the same and the opposite sides. This offers evidence for the hypothesis that at least two different photosystems are involved in phototropism, and that they are modulated differently by a red light preirradiation. All these fluence-response curves indicate that it is possible to increase the response in the coleoptile, if the red light preirradiation is given opposite to the inductive blue pulse. This is supported by blue light fluence-response curves obtained after a weak unilateral red preirradiation. (author)

  6. Do changes in the azimuthal distribution of maize leaves over time affect canopy light absorption?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drouet, J.L.; Moulia, B.; Bonhomme, R.

    1999-01-01

    In maize canopies, when modelling the architecture and light regime one usually assumes leaf azimuths are distributed uniformly. Once we had demonstrated azimuthal re-orientation of maize leaves during the vegetative phase, we tested the weight of this hypothesis on the light absorbed daily by the canopy. We thus modelled the three-dimensional (3D) geometry of maize canopies with various plant densities and at different developmental stages using plant digitizing under field conditions. We simulated radiative transfer using a volume-based approach within actual and hypothetical canopies, obtained by simply rearranging leaf azimuths. Simulations indicated that changes to horizontal heterogeneity have little effect on daily light absorption efficiency. It is concluded that changes in leaf azimuths do not have to be taken into account in crop-functioning models. (author) [fr

  7. The Effect of Differences in Day and Night Lighting Distributions on Drivers' Speed Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jonathan D; Perrone, John A; Isler, Robert B

    2017-06-01

    Previous research has shown that changes to contrast levels in the visual environment caused by fog can affect drivers' perceptions of speed. It is not easy, however, to extrapolate these results to other driving scenarios in which contrast is affected, such as during nighttime driving, because the measure of contrast is more complex when considering factors such as the illumination provided by headlights. Therefore, we investigated the differences in lighting distribution patterns between day- and nighttime driving on speed perception using prerendered 3D scenarios representing driving on a rural road. A two-alternative forced-choice design based on the method of constant stimuli was utilised, with 32 participants viewing a series of pairs of scenarios (day vs. night driving) from a driver's perspective while indicating for each pair whether the second scenario was faster or slower than the first scenario. Our results indicated that speed discrimination accuracy was minimally affected by changes in lighting distribution patterns between day and night.

  8. Spatial distribution of fluorescent light emitted from neon and nitrogen excited by low energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, A.; Kruecken, R.; Ulrich, A.; Wieser, J.

    2006-01-01

    Side-view intensity profiles of fluorescent light were measured for neon and nitrogen excited with 12 keV electron beams at gas pressures from 250 to 1400 hPa. The intensity profiles were compared with theoretical profiles calculated using the CASINO program which performs Monte Carlo simulations of electron scattering. It was assumed that the spatial distribution of fluorescent intensity is directly proportional to the spatial distribution of energy loss by primary electrons. The comparison shows good correlation of experimental data and the results of numeric simulations

  9. Universality of Generalized Parton Distributions in Light-Front Holographic QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Téramond, Guy F.; Liu, Tianbo; Sufian, Raza Sabbir; Dosch, Hans Günter; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Deur, Alexandre; Hlfhs Collaboration

    2018-05-01

    The structure of generalized parton distributions is determined from light-front holographic QCD up to a universal reparametrization function w (x ) which incorporates Regge behavior at small x and inclusive counting rules at x →1 . A simple ansatz for w (x ) that fulfills these physics constraints with a single-parameter results in precise descriptions of both the nucleon and the pion quark distribution functions in comparison with global fits. The analytic structure of the amplitudes leads to a connection with the Veneziano model and hence to a nontrivial connection with Regge theory and the hadron spectrum.

  10. Evaluation of light transmission and distribution materials for Lunar and Martian bioregenerative life support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuello, J L; Sadler, P; Jack, D; Ono, E; Jordan, K A

    1998-01-01

    The materials that were selected and evaluated in this study in the context of bioregenerative advanced life support included polymer optical cables, for transmission of photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), and light pipe, woven optical pad and light-emitting fiber (LEF) for PPF distribution. All materials exhibited significant fidelity in transmitting the spectral characteristics of the artificial lluminator's Xenon-Metal Halide lamp. The PPF attenuation values for the polymer cables EL-200, EL-300, EL-400, and EL-500 were not significantly distinguishable from one another nor from that of the fused-silica cable of 0.34 dB/m. With the exception of EL-100 and EL-700, which had significantly lower PPF transmission efficiencies of 54.9%/m and 66.6%/m, respectively, all the other polymer cables had PPF transmission efficiencies of over 85%/m which, except for EL-300, were not significantly different from one another nor from that of the fused-silica cable of 93.2%/m. The highest PPF output efficiency achieved for the 7.1-cm light pipe 14.7%, for its maximum pipe length of 100 cm. At a constant pipe length of 50 cm, the PPF output efficiency of the 10-cm light pipe of 0.71% was significantly lower than that of the 7.1-cm light pipe of 10.54%. The PPF output for the woven optical pad was determined to be 36.3%. The PPF output efficiency for the LEF without the optic fastener was determined to be 27.1%, whereas that for the LEF with the optic fastener was 50.3%, that is, the maximum value of PPF output efficiency in the study. The polymer optical cables, light pipe, woven optical pad, and LEF exhibited significant regularity and symmetry in their PPF output spatial distributions.

  11. A Weld Position Recognition Method Based on Directional and Structured Light Information Fusion in Multi-Layer/Multi-Pass Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinle Zeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-layer/multi-pass welding (MLMPW technology is widely used in the energy industry to join thick components. During automatic welding using robots or other actuators, it is very important to recognize the actual weld pass position using visual methods, which can then be used not only to perform reasonable path planning for actuators, but also to correct any deviations between the welding torch and the weld pass position in real time. However, due to the small geometrical differences between adjacent weld passes, existing weld position recognition technologies such as structured light methods are not suitable for weld position detection in MLMPW. This paper proposes a novel method for weld position detection, which fuses various kinds of information in MLMPW. First, a synchronous acquisition method is developed to obtain various kinds of visual information when directional light and structured light sources are on, respectively. Then, interferences are eliminated by fusing adjacent images. Finally, the information from directional and structured light images is fused to obtain the 3D positions of the weld passes. Experiment results show that each process can be done in 30 ms and the deviation is less than 0.6 mm. The proposed method can be used for automatic path planning and seam tracking in the robotic MLMPW process as well as electron beam freeform fabrication process.

  12. A Weld Position Recognition Method Based on Directional and Structured Light Information Fusion in Multi-Layer/Multi-Pass Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jinle; Chang, Baohua; Du, Dong; Wang, Li; Chang, Shuhe; Peng, Guodong; Wang, Wenzhu

    2018-01-05

    Multi-layer/multi-pass welding (MLMPW) technology is widely used in the energy industry to join thick components. During automatic welding using robots or other actuators, it is very important to recognize the actual weld pass position using visual methods, which can then be used not only to perform reasonable path planning for actuators, but also to correct any deviations between the welding torch and the weld pass position in real time. However, due to the small geometrical differences between adjacent weld passes, existing weld position recognition technologies such as structured light methods are not suitable for weld position detection in MLMPW. This paper proposes a novel method for weld position detection, which fuses various kinds of information in MLMPW. First, a synchronous acquisition method is developed to obtain various kinds of visual information when directional light and structured light sources are on, respectively. Then, interferences are eliminated by fusing adjacent images. Finally, the information from directional and structured light images is fused to obtain the 3D positions of the weld passes. Experiment results show that each process can be done in 30 ms and the deviation is less than 0.6 mm. The proposed method can be used for automatic path planning and seam tracking in the robotic MLMPW process as well as electron beam freeform fabrication process.

  13. Particle trapping in 3-D using a single fiber probe with an annular light distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R; Hnatovsky, C

    2003-10-20

    A single optical fiber probe has been used to trap a solid 2 ìm diameter glass bead in 3-D in water. Optical confinement in 2-D was produced by the annular light distribution emerging from a selectively chemically etched, tapered, hollow tipped metalized fiber probe. Confinement of the bead in 3-D was achieved by balancing an electrostatic force of attraction towards the tip and the optical scattering force pushing the particle away from the tip.

  14. Light distribution analysis of optical fibre probe-based near-field optical tweezers using FDTD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B H; Yang, L J; Wang, Y [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Heilongjiang, Harbin, 150001 (China)], E-mail: richelaw@163.com

    2009-09-01

    Optical fibre probe-based near-field optical tweezers overcomes the diffraction limit of conventional optical tweezers, utilizing strong mechanical forces and torque associated with highly enhanced electric fields to trap and manipulate nano-scale particles. Near-field evanescent wave generated at optical fibre probe decays rapidly with the distance that results a significant reduced trapping volume, thus it is necessary to analyze the near-field distribution of optical fibre probe. The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is applied to characterize the near-field distribution of optical fibre probe. In terms of the distribution patterns, depolarization and polarization, the near-field distributions in longitudinal sections and cross-sections of tapered metal-coated optical fibre probe are calculated. The calculation results reveal that the incident polarized wave becomes depolarized after exiting from the nano-scale aperture of probe. The near-field distribution of the probe is unsymmetrical, and the near-field distribution in the cross-section vertical to the incident polarized wave is different from that in the cross-section parallel to the incident polarized wave. Moreover, the polarization of incident wave has a great impact on the light intensity distribution.

  15. A CLASS OF DISTRIBUTION-FREE TESTS FOR INDEPENDENCE AGAINST POSITIVE QUADRANT DEPENDENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parameshwar V Pandit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A class of distribution-free tests based on convex combination of two U-statistics is considered for testing independence against positive quadrant dependence. The class of tests proposed by Kochar and Gupta (1987 and Kendall’s test are members of the proposed class. The performance of the proposed class is evaluated in terms of Pitman asymptotic relative efficiency for Block- Basu (1974 model and Woodworth family of distributions. It has been observed that some members of the class perform better than the existing tests in the literature.  Unbiasedness and consistency of the proposed class of tests have been established.

  16. Effects on Subtalar Joint Stress Distribution After Cannulated Screw Insertion at Different Positions and Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cheng-song; Chen, Wan; Chen, Chen; Yang, Guang-hua; Hu, Chao; Tang, Kang-lai

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects on subtalar joint stress distribution after cannulated screw insertion at different positions and directions. After establishing a 3-dimensional geometric model of a normal subtalar joint, we analyzed the most ideal cannulated screw insertion position and approach for subtalar joint stress distribution and compared the differences in loading stress, antirotary strength, and anti-inversion/eversion strength among lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion, traditional screw insertion, and ideal cannulated screw insertion. The screw insertion approach allowing the most uniform subtalar joint loading stress distribution was lateral screw insertion near the border of the talar neck plus medial screw insertion close to the ankle joint. For stress distribution uniformity, antirotary strength, and anti-inversion/eversion strength, lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion was superior to traditional double-screw insertion. Compared with ideal cannulated screw insertion, slightly poorer stress distribution uniformity and better antirotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength were observed for lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion. Traditional single-screw insertion was better than double-screw insertion for stress distribution uniformity but worse for anti-rotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength. Lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion was slightly worse for stress distribution uniformity than was ideal cannulated screw insertion but superior to traditional screw insertion. It was better than both ideal cannulated screw insertion and traditional screw insertion for anti-rotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength. Lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion is an approach with simple localization, convenient operation, and good safety. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Phenotyping polyclonal kappa and lambda light chain molecular mass distributions in patient serum using mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnidge, David R; Dasari, Surendra; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Fontan, Adrian; Willrich, Maria A V; Tschumper, Renee C; Jelinek, Diane F; Snyder, Melissa R; Dispenzieri, Angela; Katzmann, Jerry A; Murray, David L

    2014-11-07

    We previously described a microLC-ESI-Q-TOF MS method for identifying monoclonal immunoglobulins in serum and then tracking them over time using their accurate molecular mass. Here we demonstrate how the same methodology can be used to identify and characterize polyclonal immunoglobulins in serum. We establish that two molecular mass distributions observed by microLC-ESI-Q-TOF MS are from polyclonal kappa and lambda light chains using a combination of theoretical molecular masses from gene sequence data and the analysis of commercially available purified polyclonal IgG kappa and IgG lambda from normal human serum. A linear regression comparison of kappa/lambda ratios for 74 serum samples (25 hypergammaglobulinemia, 24 hypogammaglobulinemia, 25 normal) determined by microflowLC-ESI-Q-TOF MS and immunonephelometry had a slope of 1.37 and a correlation coefficient of 0.639. In addition to providing kappa/lambda ratios, the same microLC-ESI-Q-TOF MS analysis can determine the molecular mass for oligoclonal light chains observed above the polyclonal background in patient samples. In 2 patients with immune disorders and hypergammaglobulinemia, we observed a skewed polyclonal molecular mass distribution which translated into biased kappa/lambda ratios. Mass spectrometry provides a rapid and simple way to combine the polyclonal kappa/lambda light chain abundance ratios with the identification of dominant monoclonal as well as oligoclonal light chain immunoglobulins. We anticipate that this approach to evaluating immunoglobulin light chains will lead to improved understanding of immune deficiencies, autoimmune diseases, and antibody responses.

  18. Nanoparticle Distributions in Cancer and other Cells from Light Transmission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deatsch, Alison; Sun, Nan; Johnson, Jeffery; Stack, Sharon; Tanner, Carol; Ruggiero, Steven

    We have measured the optical properties of whole cells and lysates using light transmission spectroscopy (LTS). LTS provides both the optical extinction coefficient in the wavelength range from 220 to 1100 nm and (by spectral inversion using a Mie model) the particle distribution density in the size range from 1 to 3000 nm. Our current work involves whole cells and lysates of cultured human oral cells and other plant and animal cells. We have found systematic differences in the optical extinction between cancer and normal whole cells and lysates, which translate to different particle size distributions (PSDs) for these materials. We have also found specific power-law dependences of particle density with particle diameter for cell lysates. This suggests a universality of the packing distribution in cells that can be compared to ideal Apollonian packing, with the cell modeled as a fractal body comprised of spheres on all size scales.

  19. Exposure to blue wavelength light modulates anterior cingulate cortex activation in response to 'uncertain' versus 'certain' anticipation of positive stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkozei, Anna; Smith, Ryan; Killgore, William D S

    2016-03-11

    Blue wavelength light has been used as an effective treatment for some types of mood disorders and circadian rhythm related sleep problems. We hypothesized that acute exposure to blue wavelength light would directly affect the functioning of neurocircuity implicated in emotion regulation (i.e., ventromedial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, insula, and anterior cingulate cortex [ACC]) during 'certain' and 'uncertain' anticipation of negative and positive stimuli. Thirty-five healthy adults were randomized to receive a thirty-minute exposure to either blue (active) or amber (placebo) light, immediately followed by an emotional anticipation task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In contrast to placebo, participants in the blue light group showed significantly reduced activation within the rostral ACC during 'uncertain' anticipation (i.e., uncertainty regarding whether a positive or negative stimulus would be shown) in comparison to 'certain' anticipation of a positive stimulus. These findings may be explicable in terms of interactions between blue light exposure and the influence of specific neuromodulators on ACC-mediated decision-making mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental investigation of quantum key distribution with position and momentum of photon pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, M.P.; Walborn, S.P.; Souto Ribeiro, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the utility of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations of the position and momentum of photon pairs from parametric down-conversion in the implementation of a secure quantum key distribution protocol. We show that security is guaranteed by the entanglement between down-converted pairs, and can be checked by either direct comparison of Alice and Bob's measurement results or evaluation of an inequality of the sort proposed by Mancini et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 120401 (2002)

  1. FIN5 positively regulates far-red light responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, D.S.; Hong, S.H.; Nam, H.G.; Soh, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    We report the characterization of a semi-dominant mutation fin5-1 (far-red insensitive 5-1) of Arabidopsis, which was isolated from genetic screening of phytochrome A (phyA) signaling components. Plants with the fin5-1 mutation exhibited a long hypocotyl phenotype when grown under far-red (FR) light, but not under red light. Physiological analyses implied that FIN5 might be differentially involved in diverse responses that are regulated by phyA under continuous FR light. Anthocyanin accumulation, gravitropic response of hypocotyl growth, and FR light-preconditioned blocking of greening were also impaired in the fin5-1 mutant, whereas photoperiodic floral induction was not, if at all, significantly affected. Moreover, light-regulated expression of the CHS, PORA and PsbS genes was attenuated in fin5-1 mutant plants, while the light-induced expression of CAB was normal. The mutation exhibited semi-dominance regarding control of hypocotyl growth in FR light. We suggest that FIN5 defines a novel branch in the network of phyA signaling in Arabidopsis. (author)

  2. Experimental light scattering by positionally-controlled small particles — Implications for Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsevich, M.; Penttilä, A.; Maconi, G.; Kassamakov, I.; Martikainen, J.; Markkanen, J.; Vaisanen, T.; Helander, P.; Puranen, T.; Salmi, A.; Hæggström, E.; Muinonen, K.

    2017-12-01

    Electromagnetic scattering is a fundamental physical process that allows inferring characteristics of an object studied remotely. This possibility is enhanced by obtaining the light-scattering response at multiple wavelengths and viewing geometries, i.e., by considering a wider range of the phase angle (the angle between the incident light and the light reflected from the object) in the experiment. Within the ERC Advanced Grant project SAEMPL (http://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/107666_en.html) we have assembled an interdisciplinary group of scientists to develop a fully automated, 3D scatterometer that can measure scattered light at different wavelengths from small particulate samples. The setup comprises: (a) the PXI Express platform to synchronously record data from several photomultiplier tubes (PMTs); (b) a motorized rotation stage to precisely control the azimuthal angle of the PMTs around 360°; and (c) a versatile light source, whose wavelength, polarization, intensity, and beam shape can be precisely controlled. An acoustic levitator is used to hold the sample without touching it. The device is the first of its kind, since it measures controlled spectral angular scattering including all polarization effects, for an arbitrary object in the µm-cm size scale. It permits a nondestructive, disturbance-free measurement with control of the orientation and location of the scattering object. To demonstrate our approach we performed detailed measurements of light scattered by a Chelyabinsk LL5 chondrite particle, derived from the light-colored lithology sample of the meteorite. These measurements are cross-validated against the modeled light-scattering characteristics of the sample, i.e., the intensity and the degree of linear polarization of the reflected light, calculated with state-of-the-art electromagnetic techniques (see Muinonen et al., this meeting). We demonstrate a unique non-destructive approach to derive the optical properties of small grain samples

  3. Exploring the spatial distribution of light interception and photosynthesis of canopies by means of a functional–structural plant model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlikioti, V.; de Visser, P. H. B.; Marcelis, L. F. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims At present most process-based models and the majority of three-dimensional models include simplifications of plant architecture that can compromise the accuracy of light interception simulations and, accordingly, canopy photosynthesis. The aim of this paper is to analyse canopy heterogeneity of an explicitly described tomato canopy in relation to temporal dynamics of horizontal and vertical light distribution and photosynthesis under direct- and diffuse-light conditions. Methods Detailed measurements of canopy architecture, light interception and leaf photosynthesis were carried out on a tomato crop. These data were used for the development and calibration of a functional–structural tomato model. The model consisted of an architectural static virtual plant coupled with a nested radiosity model for light calculations and a leaf photosynthesis module. Different scenarios of horizontal and vertical distribution of light interception, incident light and photosynthesis were investigated under diffuse and direct light conditions. Key Results Simulated light interception showed a good correspondence to the measured values. Explicitly described leaf angles resulted in higher light interception in the middle of the plant canopy compared with fixed and ellipsoidal leaf-angle distribution models, although the total light interception remained the same. The fraction of light intercepted at a north–south orientation of rows differed from east–west orientation by 10 % on winter and 23 % on summer days. The horizontal distribution of photosynthesis differed significantly between the top, middle and lower canopy layer. Taking into account the vertical variation of leaf photosynthetic parameters in the canopy, led to approx. 8 % increase on simulated canopy photosynthesis. Conclusions Leaf angles of heterogeneous canopies should be explicitly described as they have a big impact both on light distribution and photosynthesis. Especially, the vertical

  4. Exploring the spatial distribution of light interception and photosynthesis of canopies by means of a functional-structural plant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlikioti, V; de Visser, P H B; Marcelis, L F M

    2011-04-01

    At present most process-based models and the majority of three-dimensional models include simplifications of plant architecture that can compromise the accuracy of light interception simulations and, accordingly, canopy photosynthesis. The aim of this paper is to analyse canopy heterogeneity of an explicitly described tomato canopy in relation to temporal dynamics of horizontal and vertical light distribution and photosynthesis under direct- and diffuse-light conditions. Detailed measurements of canopy architecture, light interception and leaf photosynthesis were carried out on a tomato crop. These data were used for the development and calibration of a functional-structural tomato model. The model consisted of an architectural static virtual plant coupled with a nested radiosity model for light calculations and a leaf photosynthesis module. Different scenarios of horizontal and vertical distribution of light interception, incident light and photosynthesis were investigated under diffuse and direct light conditions. Simulated light interception showed a good correspondence to the measured values. Explicitly described leaf angles resulted in higher light interception in the middle of the plant canopy compared with fixed and ellipsoidal leaf-angle distribution models, although the total light interception remained the same. The fraction of light intercepted at a north-south orientation of rows differed from east-west orientation by 10 % on winter and 23 % on summer days. The horizontal distribution of photosynthesis differed significantly between the top, middle and lower canopy layer. Taking into account the vertical variation of leaf photosynthetic parameters in the canopy, led to approx. 8 % increase on simulated canopy photosynthesis. Leaf angles of heterogeneous canopies should be explicitly described as they have a big impact both on light distribution and photosynthesis. Especially, the vertical variation of photosynthesis in canopy is such that the

  5. Seed germination of Pinus koraiensis Siebold and Zucc. in response to light regimes caused by shading and seed positions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, M.; Zhu, J.; Yan, Q.

    2012-07-01

    Pinus koraiensis Siebold and Zucc. (Korean pine), the dominant tree species in the mixed broadleaved Korean pine forests (regional climax), is severely restricted by its regeneration failure. To determine the effects of light regimes on P. koraiensis regeneration, the seed germination process was examined in shade houses and forest stands (before and after leaf expansion) with various light levels created by shading and seed positions. Despite the large size of P. koraiensis seeds (500-600 mg), both light intensity and quality significantly affected the germination percentage in both shade houses and forests. Substantial changes in light intensity and quality led the majority of seeds (80%) to germinate in leafless forests and shade houses, while only a minority ({<=}20%) germinated after leaf expansion in the forests. Moreover, seed germination in shade houses and leafless forests exhibited similar patterns; they consistently reached a 70% shading degree, which was optimal for the seed germination of P. koraiensis on topsoil. Seed positioning significantly affected germination for each shading degree, especially when litter and soil coverings drastically inhibited germination. In conclusion, (1) when seeds were not stressed by temperature and moisture, light irradiance played a critical role in the seed germination of P. koraiensis; (2) seed positioning, in relation to alterations in light intensity and quality, affected the germination of P. koraiensis; (3) a shade house experiment using neutral cloth provided an applicable and controllable way to monitor the P. koraiensis seed germination in early spring before leaf expansion. The light requirement for the germination of P. koraiensis played a key role in the regeneration of P. koraiensis throughout the temperate secondary forests. (Author) 41 refs.

  6. Optimization method of star tracker orientation for sun-synchronous orbit based on space light distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Geng; Xing, Fei; Wei, Minsong; Sun, Ting; You, Zheng

    2017-05-20

    Star trackers, optical attitude sensors with high precision, are susceptible to space light from the Sun and the Earth albedo. Until now, research in this field has lacked systematic analysis. In this paper, we propose an installation orientation method for a star tracker onboard sun-synchronous-orbit spacecraft and analyze the space light distribution by transforming the complicated relative motion among the Sun, Earth, and the satellite to the body coordinate system of the satellite. Meanwhile, the boundary-curve equations of the areas exposed to the stray light from the Sun and the Earth albedo were calculated by the coordinate-transformation matrix under different maneuver attitudes, and the installation orientation of the star tracker was optimized based on the boundary equations instead of the traditional iterative simulation method. The simulation and verification experiment indicate that this installation orientation method is effective and precise and can provide a reference for the installation of sun-synchronous orbit star trackers free from the stray light.

  7. Bidirectional reflectance distribution function /BRDF/ measurements of stray light suppression coatings for the Space Telescope /ST/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griner, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    The paper considers the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of black coatings used on stray light suppression systems for the Space Telescope (ST). The ST stray light suppression requirement is to reduce earth, moon, and sun light in the focal plane to a level equivalent to one 23 Mv star per square arcsecond, an attenuation of 14 orders of magnitude. It is impractical to verify the performance of a proposed baffle system design by full scale tests because of the large size of the ST, so that a computer analysis is used to select the design. Accurate computer analysis requires a knowledge of the diffuse scatter at all angles from the surface of the coatings, for all angles of incident light. During the early phases of the ST program a BRDF scanner was built at the Marshall Space Flight Center to study the scatter from black materials; the measurement system is described and the results of measurements on samples proposed for use on the ST are presented.

  8. A novel autonomous real-time position method based on polarized light and geomagnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yinlong; Chu, Jinkui; Zhang, Ran; Wang, Lu; Wang, Zhiwen

    2015-01-01

    Many animals exploit polarized light in order to calibrate their magnetic compasses for navigation. For example, some birds are equipped with biological magnetic and celestial compasses enabling them to migrate between the Western and Eastern Hemispheres. The Vikings' ability to derive true direction from polarized light is also widely accepted. However, their amazing navigational capabilities are still not completely clear. Inspired by birds' and Vikings' ancient navigational skills. Here we...

  9. Distributed Position-Based Consensus of Second-Order Multiagent Systems With Continuous/Intermittent Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qiang; Liu, Fang; Wen, Guanghui; Cao, Jinde; Yang, Xinsong

    2017-04-24

    This paper considers the position-based consensus in a network of agents with double-integrator dynamics and directed topology. Two types of distributed observer algorithms are proposed to solve the consensus problem by utilizing continuous and intermittent position measurements, respectively, where each observer does not interact with any other observers. For the case of continuous communication between network agents, some convergence conditions are derived for reaching consensus in the network with a single constant delay or multiple time-varying delays on the basis of the eigenvalue analysis and the descriptor method. When the network agents can only obtain intermittent position data from local neighbors at discrete time instants, the consensus in the network without time delay or with nonuniform delays is investigated by using the Wirtinger's inequality and the delayed-input approach. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the theoretical analysis.

  10. Light Scattering of Rough Orthogonal Anisotropic Surfaces with Secondary Most Probable Slope Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hai-Xia; Cheng Chuan-Fu

    2011-01-01

    We study the light scattering of an orthogonal anisotropic rough surface with secondary most probable slope distribution. It is found that the scattered intensity profiles have obvious secondary maxima, and in the direction perpendicular to the plane of incidence, the secondary maxima are oriented in a curve on the observation plane, which is called the orientation curve. By numerical calculation of the scattering wave fields with the height data of the sample, it is validated that the secondary maxima are induced by the side face element, which constitutes the prismoid structure of the anisotropic surface. We derive the equation of the quadratic orientation curve. Experimentally, we construct the system for light scattering measurement using a CCD. The scattered intensity profiles are extracted from the images at different angles of incidence along the orientation curves. The experimental results conform to the theory. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  11. Geometrically distributed one-dimensional photonic crystals for light-reflection in all angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagappan, G; Wu, P

    2009-07-06

    We demonstrate that a series of one-dimensional photonic crystals made of any dielectric materials, with the periods are distributed in a geometrical progression of a common ratio, r rc (theta,P), where rc is a structural parameter that depends on the angle of incidence, theta, and polarization, P, is capable of blocking light of any spectral range. If an omni-directional reflection is desired for all polarizations and for all incident angles smaller than thetao, then r rc (theta(o),p), where p is the polarization with the electric field parallel to the plane of incidence. We present simple and formula like expressions for rc, width of the bandgap, and minimum number of photonic crystals to achieve a perfect light reflection.

  12. Light-sheet fluorescence imaging to localize cardiac lineage and protein distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yichen; Lee, Juhyun; Ma, Jianguo; Sung, Kevin; Yokota, Tomohiro; Singh, Neha; Dooraghi, Mojdeh; Abiri, Parinaz; Wang, Yibin; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Nakano, Atsushi; Nguyen, Thao P.; Fei, Peng; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2017-02-01

    Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) serves to advance developmental research and regenerative medicine. Coupled with the paralleled advances in fluorescence-friendly tissue clearing technique, our cardiac LSFM enables dual-sided illumination to rapidly uncover the architecture of murine hearts over 10 by 10 by 10 mm3 in volume; thereby allowing for localizing progenitor differentiation to the cardiomyocyte lineage and AAV9-mediated expression of exogenous transmembrane potassium channels with high contrast and resolution. Without the steps of stitching image columns, pivoting the light-sheet and sectioning the heart mechanically, we establish a holistic strategy for 3-dimentional reconstruction of the “digital murine heart” to assess aberrant cardiac structures as well as the spatial distribution of the cardiac lineages in neonates and ion-channels in adults.

  13. Two-dimensional potential and charge distributions of positive surface streamer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Daiki; Matsuoka, Shigeyasu; Kumada, Akiko; Hidaka, Kunihiko

    2009-01-01

    Information on the potential and the field profile along a surface discharge is required for quantitatively discussing and clarifying the propagation mechanism. The sensing technique with a Pockels crystal has been developed for directly measuring the potential and electric field distribution on a dielectric material. In this paper, the Pockels sensing system consists of a pulse laser and a CCD camera for measuring the instantaneous two-dimensional potential distribution on a 25.4 mm square area with a 50 μm sampling pitch. The temporal resolution is 3.2 ns which is determined by the pulse width of the laser emission. The transient change in the potential distribution of a positive surface streamer propagating in atmospheric air is measured with this system. The electric field and the charge distributions are also calculated from the measured potential profile. The propagating direction component of the electric field near the tip of the propagating streamer reaches 3 kV mm -1 . When the streamer stops, the potential distribution along a streamer forms an almost linear profile with the distance from the electrode, and its gradient is about 0.5 kV mm -1 .

  14. Vertical Distribution of Daily Migrating Mesopelagic Fish in Respect to Nocturnal Lights

    KAUST Repository

    Prihartato, Perdana

    2014-12-01

    The nighttime distribution of vertically migrating mesopelagic fish in relation to nocturnal light was studied during a circumglobal survey, in the Red Sea, and in a fjord at high latitude. The study was based on data derived from ship borne echo sounders (circumglobal and the Red Sea) as well as using upward looking echo sounders mounted on the bottom (Masfjorden, Norway). We also applied a numerical model for analyzing diel vertical migration patterns. The effect of the lunar cycle was the focus in studies at low latitudes, while seasonal changes in nocturnal light climate was in focus at high latitude. Lunar phase significantly affected the distribution of mesopelagic fish at the global scale and in the Red Sea. During nights near full moon, scattering layers of mesopelagic fish distributed deeper than during darker phases of the moon. At high latitude, mesopelagic fish switched its behavior along with seasonal changes in nocturnal lights. In autumn, the population of the studied fish (Maurolicus mueleri) formed separated layers. Juveniles performed normal diel vertical migration followed by midnight sinking, with midnight sinking mainly related to temperature minima and also for avoiding predators. Meanwhile the adults did not migrate vertically, reducing foraging but increasing the adult survival. From late winter to mid-Spring, interrupted ascents behavior was noted in the afternoon. Predator avoidance, satiation, and finding temperature optimum might be the reason behind interrupted ascents. At lighter nights in mid-summer, M. muelleri took on schooling behavior, likely as an anti-predator behavior permitting access to the upper waters in the absence of darkness.

  15. Simulated and measured neutron/gamma light output distribution for poly-energetic neutron/gamma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S. A.; Zangian, M.; Aghabozorgi, S.

    2018-03-01

    In the present paper, the light output distribution due to poly-energetic neutron/gamma (neutron or gamma) source was calculated using the developed MCNPX-ESUT-PE (MCNPX-Energy engineering of Sharif University of Technology-Poly Energetic version) computational code. The simulation of light output distribution includes the modeling of the particle transport, the calculation of scintillation photons induced by charged particles, simulation of the scintillation photon transport and considering the light resolution obtained from the experiment. The developed computational code is able to simulate the light output distribution due to any neutron/gamma source. In the experimental step of the present study, the neutron-gamma discrimination based on the light output distribution was performed using the zero crossing method. As a case study, 241Am-9Be source was considered and the simulated and measured neutron/gamma light output distributions were compared. There is an acceptable agreement between the discriminated neutron/gamma light output distributions obtained from the simulation and experiment.

  16. Induction of chromosome shattering by ultraviolet light and caffeine: The influence of different distributions of photolesions

    OpenAIRE

    Cremer, Christoph; Cremer, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    Cells of synchonized and of asynchronously growing cultures of a V79 Chinese hamster line were microirradiated with a low poweer laser-UV-microbeam of wavelength 257 nm. Ultraviolet light was either focused onto a small part of the nucleus (mode I) or distributed over the whole nucleus (mode II). Following microirradiation, the cells were incubated for 7–20 h with caffeine (1–2 mM) until chromosome preparation was performed. After both modes of microirradation, shattering of the entire chromo...

  17. Higher order light-cone distribution amplitudes of the Lambda baryon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yong-Lu; Huang, Ming-Qiu; Cui, Chun-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The improved light-cone distribution amplitudes (LCDAs) of the Λ baryon are examined on the basis of the QCD conformal partial wave expansion approach. The calculations are carried out to the next-to-leading order of conformal spin accuracy with consideration of twist 6. The next leading order conformal expansion coefficients are related to the nonperturbative parameters defined by the local three-quark operator matrix elements with different Lorentz structures with a covariant derivative. The nonperturbative parameters are determined with the QCD sum rule method. The explicit expressions of the LCDAs are provided as the main results. (orig.)

  18. Higher order light-cone distribution amplitudes of the Lambda baryon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yong-Lu; Huang, Ming-Qiu [National University of Defense Technology, College of Science, Hunan (China); Cui, Chun-Yu [Third Military Medical University, Department of Physics, School of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing (China)

    2014-09-15

    The improved light-cone distribution amplitudes (LCDAs) of the Λ baryon are examined on the basis of the QCD conformal partial wave expansion approach. The calculations are carried out to the next-to-leading order of conformal spin accuracy with consideration of twist 6. The next leading order conformal expansion coefficients are related to the nonperturbative parameters defined by the local three-quark operator matrix elements with different Lorentz structures with a covariant derivative. The nonperturbative parameters are determined with the QCD sum rule method. The explicit expressions of the LCDAs are provided as the main results. (orig.)

  19. Impact of patient positioning on radiotherapy dose distribution: An assessment in parotid tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Sharma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We intended to study the impact of patient positioning on the dose distribution within target volume and organs at risk in patients with parotid malignancies treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT with photon wedge pair (WP or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT.Methods: Three patients with a non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the right parotid gland were consecutively immobilized using thermoplastic cast in 2 positions: supine with head in neutral position (HN and with head turned 90° to the left side (HT. Images for treatment planning purpose were acquired in both positions. For both positions, photon WP plans and 5 field IMRT plans were generated, after contouring clinical target volume (CTV, planning target volume (PTV= CTV + 5 mm margin and organs at risk (OAR. All plans were evaluated for target coverage and dose to OARs.Results: Both CTV and PTV were apparently larger in HN compared with HT (31.76±8.89 cc, 30.31±7.83 cc and 62.49±19.01 cc, 58.89±15.33 cc respectively. The CI value for PTV was slightly better for HT compared to HN position in both the WP and IMRT plans. The homogeneity was comparable in both the head positions in case of WP plan. The mean HI of PTV was increased in case of IMRT plan at HT versus HN position (1.108 vs. 1.097. A change in head position from HN to HT with wedge pair plan resulted in a reduction of brainstem Dmax and Dmean. Lesser dose was observed in HN position for contralateral parotid. A difference of 0.9 Gy in the average Dmax to spinal cord was seen. The values of Dmean to mandible, oral cavity, ipsilateral and contralateral cochlea were higher in the HT position. A change in head position from HN to HT with IMRT plan resulted in a dose reduction in average Dmax to brainstem. The spinal cord Dmax increased at the HT position by 1.2 Gy. The dose to contralateral parotid and cochlea was comparable in both the positions. However, the Dmean to oral cavity was reduced at HT position. Whereas

  20. Enhancement of light absorption in polyazomethines due to plasmon excitation on randomly distributed metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, P.; Antosiewicz, T. J.; Stefaniuk, T.; Ciesielski, A.; Iwan, A.; Wronkowska, A. A.; Wronkowski, A.; Szoplik, T.

    2015-05-01

    In photovoltaic devices, metal nanoparticles embedded in a semiconductor layer allow the enhancement of solar-toelectric energy conversion efficiency due to enhanced light absorption via a prolonged optical path, enhanced electric fields near the metallic inclusions, direct injection of hot electrons, or local heating. Here we pursue the first two avenues. In the first, light scattered at an angle beyond the critical angle for reflection is coupled into the semiconductor layer and confined within such planar waveguide up to possible exciton generation. In the second, light is trapped by the excitation of localized surface plasmons on metal nanoparticles leading to enhanced near-field plasmon-exciton coupling at the peak of the plasmon resonance. We report on results of a numerical experiment on light absorption in polymer- (fullerene derivative) blends, using the 3D FDTD method, where exact optical parameters of the materials involved are taken from our recent measurements. In simulations we investigate light absorption in randomly distributed metal nanoparticles dispersed in polyazomethine-(fullerene derivative) blends, which serve as active layers in bulkheterojunction polymer solar cells. In the study Ag and Al nanoparticles of different diameters and fill factors are diffused in two air-stable aromatic polyazomethines with different chemical structures (abbreviated S9POF and S15POF) mixed with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) or [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM). The mixtures are spin coated on a 100 nm thick Al layer deposited on a fused silica substrate. Optical constants of the active layers are taken from spectroscopic ellipsometry and reflectance measurements using a rotating analyzer type ellipsometer with auto-retarder performed in the wavelength range from 225 nm to 2200 nm. The permittivities of Ag and Al particles of diameters from 20 to 60 nm are assumed to be equal to those measured on 100 to 200 nm thick metal films.

  1. Indoor high precision three-dimensional positioning system based on visible light communication using modified genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Guan, Weipeng; Li, Simin; Wu, Yuxiang

    2018-04-01

    To improve the precision of indoor positioning and actualize three-dimensional positioning, a reversed indoor positioning system based on visible light communication (VLC) using genetic algorithm (GA) is proposed. In order to solve the problem of interference between signal sources, CDMA modulation is used. Each light-emitting diode (LED) in the system broadcasts a unique identity (ID) code using CDMA modulation. Receiver receives mixed signal from every LED reference point, by the orthogonality of spreading code in CDMA modulation, ID information and intensity attenuation information from every LED can be obtained. According to positioning principle of received signal strength (RSS), the coordinate of the receiver can be determined. Due to system noise and imperfection of device utilized in the system, distance between receiver and transmitters will deviate from the real value resulting in positioning error. By introducing error correction factors to global parallel search of genetic algorithm, coordinates of the receiver in three-dimensional space can be determined precisely. Both simulation results and experimental results show that in practical application scenarios, the proposed positioning system can realize high precision positioning service.

  2. Root distribution pattern of flue-cured tobacco in light and heavy soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaraj, G.; Gopalachari, N.C.

    1977-01-01

    Root distribution of flue-cured tobacco (variety : Kanakaprabha) in clayey and loamy sand soils was studied with the help of 32 P wick feeding technique. About 90 percent of the roots of tobacco plant in black soil on 40th day and in light soil on 60th day are present in a soil core of diameter 40 cm and depth 30 cm. On the 90th day of growth stage, no significant differences were observed in the root distribution of tobacco between the two types of soil. About 85 percent of the roots were present in a soil core of diameter 40 cm and depth 30 cm on 90th day in both the soils. (author)

  3. Clinicopathologic Risk Factor Distributions for MLH1 Promoter Region Methylation in CIMP-Positive Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, A Joan; Phipps, Amanda I; Baron, John A; Buchanan, Daniel D; Ahnen, Dennis J; Cohen, Stacey A; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Rosty, Christophe; Haile, Robert W; Laird, Peter W; Weisenberger, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    The CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) is a major molecular pathway in colorectal cancer. Approximately 25% to 60% of CIMP tumors are microsatellite unstable (MSI-H) due to DNA hypermethylation of the MLH1 gene promoter. Our aim was to determine if the distributions of clinicopathologic factors in CIMP-positive tumors with MLH1 DNA methylation differed from those in CIMP-positive tumors without DNA methylation of MLH1. We assessed the associations between age, sex, tumor-site, MSI status BRAF and KRAS mutations, and family colorectal cancer history with MLH1 methylation status in a large population-based sample of CIMP-positive colorectal cancers defined by a 5-marker panel using unconditional logistic regression to assess the odds of MLH1 methylation by study variables. Subjects with CIMP-positive tumors without MLH1 methylation were significantly younger, more likely to be male, and more likely to have distal colon or rectal primaries and the MSI-L phenotype. CIMP-positive MLH1-unmethylated tumors were significantly less likely than CIMP-positive MLH1-methylated tumors to harbor a BRAF V600E mutation and significantly more likely to harbor a KRAS mutation. MLH1 methylation was associated with significantly better overall survival (HR, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-0.82). These data suggest that MLH1 methylation in CIMP-positive tumors is not a completely random event and implies that there are environmental or genetic determinants that modify the probability that MLH1 will become methylated during CIMP pathogenesis. MLH1 DNA methylation status should be taken into account in etiologic studies. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Clinicopathological risk factor distributions for MLH1 promoter region methylation in CIMP positive tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, A. Joan; Phipps, Amanda I.; Baron, John A.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Cohen, Stacey A.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Rosty, Christophe; Haile, Robert W.; Laird, Peter W.; Weisenberger, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) is a major molecular pathway in colorectal cancer (CRC). Approximately 25% to 60% of CIMP tumors are microsatellite unstable (MSI-H) due to DNA hypermethylation of the MLH1 gene promoter. Our aim was to determine if the distributions of clinicopathologic factors in CIMP-positive tumors with MLH1 DNA methylation differed from those in CIMP-positive tumors without DNA methylation of MLH1. Methods We assessed the associations between age, sex, tumor-site, MSI status BRAF and KRAS mutations and family CRC history with MLH1 methylation status in a large population-based sample of CIMP-positive CRCs defined by a 5-marker panel using unconditional logistic regression to assess the odds of MLH1 methylation by study variables. Results Subjects with CIMP-positive tumors without MLH1 methylation were significantly younger, more likely to be male, more likely to have distal colon or rectal primaries and the MSI-L phenotype. CIMP-positive MLH1-unmethylated tumors were significantly less likely than CIMP-positive MLH1-methylated tumors to harbor a BRAF V600E mutation and significantly more likely to harbor a KRAS mutation. MLH1 methylation was associated with significantly better overall survival (HR=0.50; 95% Confidence Interval (0.31, 0.82)). Conclusions These data suggest that MLH1 methylation in CIMP-positive tumors is not a completely random event and implies that there are environmental or genetic determinants that modify the probability that MLH1 will become methylated during CIMP pathogenesis. Impact MLH1 DNA methylation status should be taken into account in etiologic studies. PMID:26512054

  5. Effects of Kaolin Application on Light Absorption and Distribution, Radiation Use Efficiency and Photosynthesis of Almond and Walnut Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Adolfo; Metcalf, Samuel G.; Buchner, Richard P.; Fulton, Allan E.; Lampinen, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Kaolin applied as a suspension to plant canopies forms a film on leaves that increases reflection and reduces absorption of light. Photosynthesis of individual leaves is decreased while the photosynthesis of the whole canopy remains unaffected or even increases. This may result from a better distribution of light within the canopy following kaolin application, but this explanation has not been tested. The objective of this work was to study the effects of kaolin application on light distribution and absorption within tree canopies and, ultimately, on canopy photosynthesis and radiation use efficiency. Methods Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) incident on individual leaves within the canopy of almond (Prunus dulcis) and walnut (Juglans regia) trees was measured before and after kaolin application in order to study PAR distribution within the canopy. The PAR incident on, and reflected and transmitted by, the canopy was measured on the same day for kaolin-sprayed and control trees in order to calculate canopy PAR absorption. These data were then used to model canopy photosynthesis and radiation use efficiency by a simple method proposed in previous work, based on the photosynthetic response to incident PAR of a top-canopy leaf. Key Results Kaolin increased incident PAR on surfaces of inner-canopy leaves, although there was an estimated 20 % loss in PAR reaching the photosynthetic apparatus, due to increased reflection. Assuming a 20 % loss of PAR, modelled photosynthesis and photosynthetic radiation use efficiency (PRUE) of kaolin-coated leaves decreased by only 6·3 %. This was due to (1) more beneficial PAR distribution within the kaolin-sprayed canopy, and (2) with decreasing PAR, leaf photosynthesis decreases less than proportionally, due to the curvature of the photosynthesis response-curve to PAR. The relatively small loss in canopy PRUE (per unit of incident PAR), coupled with the increased incident PAR on the leaf surface on

  6. Design rules for a compact and low-cost optical position sensing of MOEMS tilt mirrors based on a Gaussian-shaped light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Marcus; Tortschanoff, Andreas

    2013-05-01

    A tilt mirror's deflection angle tracking setup is examined from a theoretical point of view. The proposed setup is based on a simple optical approach and easily scalable. Thus, the principle is especially of interest for small and fast oscillating MEMS/MOEMS based tilt mirrors. An experimentally established optical scheme is used as a starting point for accurate and fast mirror angle-position detection. This approach uses an additional layer, positioned under the MOEMS mirror's backside, consisting of a light source in the center and two photodetectors positioned symmetrical around the center. The mirror's back surface is illuminated by the light source and the intensity change due to mirror tilting is tracked via the photodiodes. The challenge of this method is to get a linear relation between the measured intensity and the current mirror tilt angle even for larger angles. State-of-the-art MOEMS mirrors achieve angles up to ±30°, which exceeds the linear angle approximations. The use of an LED, small laser diode or VCSEL as a lightsource is appropriate due to their small size and inexpensive price. Those light sources typically emit light with a Gaussian intensity distribution. This makes an analytical prediction of the expected detector signal quite complicated. In this publication an analytical simulation model is developed to evaluate the influence of the main parameters for this optical mirror tilt-sensor design. An easy and fast to calculate value directly linked to the mirror's tilt-angle is the "relative differential intensity" (RDI = (I1 - I2) / (I1 + I2)). Evaluation of its slope and nonlinear error highlights dependencies between the identified parameters for best SNR and linearity. Also the energy amount covering the detector area is taken into account. Design optimizing rules are proposed and discussed based on theoretical considerations.

  7. Mid-ventilation position planning: Optimal model for dose distribution in lung tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benchalal, M.; Leseur, J.; Chajon, E.; Cazoulat, G.; Haigron, P.; Simon, A.; Bellec, J.; Lena, H.; Crevoisier, R. de

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - The dose distribution for lung tumour is estimated using a 3D-CT scan, and since a person breathes while the images are captured, the dose distribution doesn't reflect the reality. A 4D-CT scan integrates the motion of the tumour during breathing and, therefore, provides us with important information regarding tumour's motion in all directions, the motion volume (ITV) and the time-weighted average position (MVP). Patient and methods. - Based on these two concepts, we have estimated, for a lung carcinoma case a 3D dose distribution from a 3D-CT scan, and a 4D dose distribution from a 4-D CT scan. To this, we have applied a non-rigid registration to estimate the cumulative dose. Results. - Our study shows that the 4D dose estimation of the GTV is almost the same when made using MVP and ITV concepts, but sparring of the healthy lung is better done using the MPV model (MVP), as compared to the ITV model. This improvement of the therapeutic index allows, from a projection on the theoretical maximal dose to PTV (strictly restricted to doses for the lungs and the spinal cord), for an increase of about 11% on the total dose (maximal dose of 86 Gy for the ITV and 96 Gy for the MVP). Conclusion. - Further studies with more patients are needed to confirm our data. (authors)

  8. New light on an old problem: Reflections on barriers and enablers of distributed energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szatow, Anthony; Quezada, George; Lilley, Bill

    2012-01-01

    This viewpoint article, New light on an Old Problem, aims to stimulate thought and discussion on pathways to rapid emission reduction trajectories. It considers briefly the history of the Australian energy system and recent attempts to support emerging, distributed energy supply systems, before exploring the importance of new energy supply models and how they may emerge organically, ahead of further policy and regulatory shifts in Australia. The article is shaped by extensive primary research, literature review and engagement with policy makers, industry and community organisations, energy market institutions, colleagues and others over a period of four years. It outlines how new business models may reduce emissions ahead of policy and regulation, and the importance of keeping an open mind when considering ‘barriers’ to distributed energy. We hope this article will spark interest and dialogue with colleagues who may be experiencing and grappling with similar challenges. - Research highlights: ► We discuss documented barriers to distributed energy. ► We draw on socio-technical system literature and our research experience to outline a possible solution to distributed energy barriers. ► We describe a hypothetical energy service business model, led by the property sector, as a catalyst for energy market change. ► We outline reasons for our confidence in this property sector led energy services model.

  9. Effect of fractal silver electrodes on charge collection and light distribution in semiconducting organic polymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamousis, RL; Chang, LL; Watterson, WJ; Montgomery, RD; Taylor, RP; Moule, AJ; Shaheen, SE; Ilan, B; van de Lagemaat, J; Osterloh, FE

    2014-08-21

    Living organisms use fractal structures to optimize material and energy transport across regions of differing size scales. Here we test the effect of fractal silver electrodes on light distribution and charge collection in organic semiconducting polymer films made of P3HT and PCBM. The semiconducting polymers were deposited onto electrochemically grown fractal silver structures (5000 nm x 500 nm; fractal dimension of 1.71) with PEDOT:PSS as hole-selective interlayer. The fractal silver electrodes appear black due to increased horizontal light scattering, which is shown to improve light absorption in the polymer. According to surface photovoltage spectroscopy, fractal silver electrodes outperform the flat electrodes when the BHJ film thickness is large (>400 nm, 0.4 V photovoltage). Photocurrents of up to 200 microamperes cm(-2) are generated from the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photoelectrodes under 435 nm LED (10-20 mW cm(-2)) illumination in acetonitrile solution containing 0.005 M ferrocenium hexafluorophosphate as the electron acceptor. The low IPCE values (0.3-0.7%) are due to slow electron transfer to ferrocenium ion and due to shunting along the large metal-polymer interface. Overall, this work provides an initial assessment of the potential of fractal electrodes for organic photovoltaic cells.

  10. Interactive analysis of geographically distributed population imaging data collections over light-path data networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lew, Baldur; Botha, Charl P.; Milles, Julien R.; Vrooman, Henri A.; van de Giessen, Martijn; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.

    2015-03-01

    The cohort size required in epidemiological imaging genetics studies often mandates the pooling of data from multiple hospitals. Patient data, however, is subject to strict privacy protection regimes, and physical data storage may be legally restricted to a hospital network. To enable biomarker discovery, fast data access and interactive data exploration must be combined with high-performance computing resources, while respecting privacy regulations. We present a system using fast and inherently secure light-paths to access distributed data, thereby obviating the need for a central data repository. A secure private cloud computing framework facilitates interactive, computationally intensive exploration of this geographically distributed, privacy sensitive data. As a proof of concept, MRI brain imaging data hosted at two remote sites were processed in response to a user command at a third site. The system was able to automatically start virtual machines, run a selected processing pipeline and write results to a user accessible database, while keeping data locally stored in the hospitals. Individual tasks took approximately 50% longer compared to a locally hosted blade server but the cloud infrastructure reduced the total elapsed time by a factor of 40 using 70 virtual machines in the cloud. We demonstrated that the combination light-path and private cloud is a viable means of building an analysis infrastructure for secure data analysis. The system requires further work in the areas of error handling, load balancing and secure support of multiple users.

  11. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  12. Passive measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with orbital angular momentum and pulse position modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lian; Zhou, Yuan-yuan; Zhou, Xue-jun; Chen, Xiao

    2018-03-01

    Based on the orbital angular momentum and pulse position modulation, we present a novel passive measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) scheme with the two-mode source. Combining with the tight bounds of the yield and error rate of single-photon pairs given in our paper, we conduct performance analysis on the scheme with heralded single-photon source. The numerical simulations show that the performance of our scheme is significantly superior to the traditional MDI-QKD in the error rate, key generation rate and secure transmission distance, since the application of orbital angular momentum and pulse position modulation can exclude the basis-dependent flaw and increase the information content for each single photon. Moreover, the performance is improved with the rise of the frame length. Therefore, our scheme, without intensity modulation, avoids the source side channels and enhances the key generation rate. It has greatly utility value in the MDI-QKD setups.

  13. Study of position resolution for cathode readout MWPC with measurement of induced charge distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, J.; Iwasaki, H.; Kageyama, T.; Kuribayashi, S.; Nakamura, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takeda, T.

    1983-01-01

    A readout technqiue of multiwire proportional chambers by measurement of charges induced on cathode strips, orthogonal to anode wires, requires an algorithm to relate the measured charge distribution to the avalanche position. With given chamber parameters and under the influence of noise, resolution limits depend on the chosen algorithm. We have studied the position resolution obtained by the centroid method and by the charge-ratio method, both using three consecutive cathode strips. While the centroid method uses a single number, the center of gravity of the measured charges, the charge-ratio method uses the ratios of the charges Qsub(i-1)/Qsub(i) and Qsub(i+1)/Qsub(i) where Qsub(i) is the largest. To obtain a given resolution, the charge-ratio method generally allows wider cathode strips and therefore a smaller number of readout channels than the centroid method. (orig.)

  14. Filtering for distributed mechanical systems using position measurements: perspectives in medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moireau, Philippe; Chapelle, Dominique; Tallec, Patrick Le

    2009-01-01

    We propose an effective filtering methodology designed to perform estimation in a distributed mechanical system using position measurements. As in a previously introduced method, the filter is inspired by robust control feedback, but here we take full advantage of the estimation specificity to choose a feedback law that can act on displacements instead of velocities and still retain the same kind of dissipativity property which guarantees robustness. This is very valuable in many applications for which positions are more readily available than velocities, as in medical imaging. We provide an in-depth analysis of the proposed procedure, as well as detailed numerical assessments using a test problem inspired by cardiac biomechanics, as medical diagnosis assistance is an important perspective for this approach. The method is formulated first for measurements based on Lagrangian displacements, but we then derive a nonlinear extension allowing us to instead consider segmented images, which of course is even more relevant in medical applications

  15. The financial position and performance of the economic entities from the Light Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Camelia BABA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Romanian light industry plays a significant role within the national economy, especially if we refer to the number of jobs created in this field. In this regard, the assessment of the financial standing and performance of the business entities from this field is of particular importance not only for the national economy but also in terms of the interests pursued by the management of the company, its shareholders, trading partners and creditors. In this respect, this paper focuses first on the investigation and analysis of the financial reports of 45 business entities which are representative for the Romanian light industry (divided into three main constitutive parts: companies producing textiles, clothing and footwear and secondly, on highlighting the main similarities and differences from the point of view of the main financial indicators.

  16. Vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes on aluminum as a light-weight positive electrode for lithium-polysulfide batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liatard, S; Benhamouda, K; Fournier, A; Ramos, R; Barchasz, C; Dijon, J

    2015-05-04

    A light-weight, high specific surface current collector made of vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes grown on an aluminum substrate was fabricated and studied as a positive electrode in a semi-liquid lithium/polysulfide battery. This simple system delivered stable capacities over 1000 mA h gS(-1) and 2 mA h cm(-2) with almost no capacity loss over 50 cycles.

  17. Visible light communication and indoor positioning using a-SiCH device as receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, M. A.; Vieira, M.; Louro, P.; Vieira, P.; Fantoni, A.

    2017-08-01

    An indoor positioning system were trichromatic white LEDs are used both for illumination proposes and as transmitters and an optical processor, based on a-SiC:H technology, as mobile receiver is presented. OOK modulation scheme is used, and it provides a good trade-off between system performance and implementation complexity. The relationship between the transmitted data and the received digital output levels is decoded. The system topology for positioning is a self-positioning system in which the measuring unit is mobile. This unit receives the signals of several transmitters in known locations, and has the capability to compute its location based on the measured signals. LED bulbs work as transmitters, sending information together with different IDs related to their physical locations. A triangular topology for the unit cell is analysed. A 2D localization design, demonstrated by a prototype implementation is presented. Fine-grained indoor localization is tested. The received signal is used in coded multiplexing techniques for supporting communications and navigation concomitantly on the same channel. The position is estimated through the visible multilateration metodh using several non-collinear transmitters. The location and motion information is found by mapping position and estimates the location areas. Data analysis showed that by using a pinpin double photodiode based on a a-SiC:H heterostucture as receiver, and RBGLEDs as transmitters it is possible not only to determine the mobile target's position but also to infer the motion direction over time, along with the received information in each position.

  18. Operation of a general purpose stepping motor-encoder positioning subsystem at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1985-11-01

    Four copies of a general purpose subsystem for mechanical positioning of detectors, samples, and beam line optical elements which constitute experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory have been constructed and placed into operation. Construction of a fifth subsystem unit is nearing completion. The subsystems affect mechanical positioning by controlling a set of stepping motor-encoder pairs. The units are general purpose in the sense that they receive commands over a 9600 baud asynchronous serial line compatible with the RS-232-C electrical signal standard, generate TTL-compatible streams of stepping pulses which can be used with a wide variety of stepping motors, and read back position values from a number of different types and models of position encoder. The basic structure of the motor controller subsystem is briefly reviewed. Additions to the subsystem made in response to problems indicated by actual operation of the four installed units are described in more detail

  19. Light coupling and distribution for Si3N4/SiO2 integrated multichannel single-mode sensing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaźmierczak, Andrzej; Dortu, Fabian; Schrevens, Olivier; Giannone, Domenico; Bouville, David; Cassan, Eric; Gylfason, Kristinn B.; Sohlström, Hans; Sanchez, Benito; Griol, Amadeu; Hill, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We present an efficient and highly alignment-tolerant light coupling and distribution system for a multichannel Si3N4/SiO2 single-mode photonics sensing chip. The design of the input and output couplers and the distribution splitters is discussed. Examples of multichannel data obtained with the system are given.

  20. Effect of refraction index and thickness of the light guide in the position-sensitive gamma-ray detector using compact PS-PMTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, K.; Saito, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Hyodo, T.; Nagai, Y.; Muramatsu, S.; Nagai, S.

    2000-01-01

    We constructed a position-sensitive gamma-ray detector consisting of an array of BGO scintillators, a light guide and compact PS-PMTs. The effects of refractive index and thickness of the light guide of a glass plate on the detector performance were investigated. A light guide with higher refractive index and smaller thickness is found better for a good spatial resolution.

  1. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    1963-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  2. Lightness, chroma, and hue distributions in natural teeth measured by a spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustina-Krasniqi, Teuta; Shala, Kujtim; Staka, Gloria; Bicaj, Teuta; Ahmedi, Enis; Dula, Linda

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the distribution of color parameters, lightness (L*), chroma (C), hue (H), a* and b*, in the intercanine sector in maxilla. Patients' tooth color measurements were performed using an intraoral spectrophotometer VITA Easyshade ® (VITA Zahnfabrik H. Rauter GmbH and Co. KG, Bad Sackingen, Germany). The measurements were made in 255 subjects in the intercanine sector in maxilla. The mean values for the group of 255 subjects were as follows: L*, a*, b*, C, and H as 81.6, 0.67, 21.6, 21.7, and 92.7, respectively. For F=206.27 and P < 0.001 between L*, a*, b*, C, H, and central incisor/lateral incisor/canines, there were statistically significant differences. With the statistical analysis, it was determined that there are significant color differences between the teeth of the intercanine sector, which differences are clinically significant also.

  3. Femtosecond light distribution at skin and liver of rats: analysis for use in optical diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, H; Mehmood, M S; Ikram, M; Atif, M; Firdous, S; Kurachi, C; Grecco, C; Nicolodelli, G; Bagnato, V S

    2010-01-01

    In this study we investigated the light distribution under femtosecond laser illumination and its correlation with the collected diffuse scattering at the surface of ex-vivo rat skin and liver. The reduced scattering coefficients μ' s for liver and skin due to different scatterers have been determined with Mie-scattering theory for each wavelength (800, 630, and 490 nm). Absorption coefficients μ a were determined by diffusion approximation equation in correlation with measured diffused reflectance experimentally for each wavelength (800, 630, and 490 nm). The total attenuation coefficient for each wavelength and type of tissue were determined by linearly fitting the log based normalized intensity. Both tissues are strongly scattering thick tissues. Our results may be relevant when considering the use of femtosecond laser illumination as an optical diagnostic tool

  4. Prototype photon position monitors for undulator beams at the advanced light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, T.; Shu, D.; Rodricks, B.; Johnson, E.D.

    1992-01-01

    Design criteria are described, and test results are presented, for prototype ALS undulator beam position monitors. The design is based on monitors presently in use at NSLS, with modifications to account for the widely varying and large K values of the undulators to be installed at the ALS. In particular, we have modified the design to simplify the thermal engineering and we have explored techniques to suppress the response of the monitors to soft photons, so that the beam position can be determined by measuring the higher energy photons which are better collimated

  5. Seeing light at the end of the tunnel: Positive prospective mental imagery and optimism in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Julie L; Holmes, Emily A; Blackwell, Simon E

    2017-01-01

    Optimism is associated with positive outcomes across many health domains, from cardiovascular disease to depression. However, we know little about cognitive processes underlying optimism in psychopathology. The present study tested whether the ability to vividly imagine positive events in one's future was associated with dispositional optimism in a sample of depressed adults. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were conducted, using baseline (all participants, N=150) and follow-up data (participants in the control condition only, N=63) from a clinical trial (Blackwell et al., 2015). Vividness of positive prospective imagery, assessed on a laboratory-administered task at baseline, was significantly associated with both current optimism levels at baseline and future (seven months later) optimism levels, including when controlling for potential confounds. Even when depressed, those individuals able to envision a brighter future were more optimistic, and regained optimism more quickly over time, than those less able to do so at baseline. Strategies to increase the vividness of positive prospective imagery may aid development of mental health interventions to boost optimism. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Patterns of Cellular Distribution with the Sentinel Node Positive for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiapali, E.; Schmidt, M.M.; Dizon, D.; Steinhoff, M.; Gass, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) represents the standard of care in breast cancer axillary evaluation. Our study aims to characterize the patterns of malignant cell distribution within the sentinel nodes (SN). Methods. In a retrospective IRB-approved study, we examined the anatomic location of the nodal area with the highest radioactive signal or most intense blue staining (hot spot) and its distance from the metastatic foci. Results. 58 patients underwent SNB between January 2006 and February 2007. 12 patients with 19 positive SN were suitable for analysis. 4 (21%) metastases were located in the nodal hilum and 15 (79%) in the cortex. 6 (31%) metastases were found adjacent to the hotspot, and 9 (47%) within 4 mm of the hotspot. Conclusions. In our pilot series, SN metastases were within 4 mm of the hotspot in 78% of the cases. Pathologic analysis focused in that area may contribute to the more accurate identification of nodal metastases

  7. Oscillation for equations with positive and negative coefficients and with distributed delay I: General results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Berezansky

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available We study a scalar delay differential equation with a bounded distributed delay, $$ dot{x}(t+ int_{h(t}^t x(s,d_s R(t,s - int_{g(t}^t x(s,d_s T(t,s=0, $$ where $R(t,s$, $T(t,s$ are nonnegative nondecreasing in $s$ for any $t$, $$ R(t,h(t=T(t,g(t=0, quad R(t,s geq T(t,s. $$ We establish a connection between non-oscillation of this differential equation and the corresponding differential inequalities, and between positiveness of the fundamental function and the existence of a nonnegative solution for a nonlinear integral inequality that constructed explicitly. We also present comparison theorems, and explicit non-oscillation and oscillation results. In a separate publication (part II, we will consider applications of this theory to differential equations with several concentrated delays, integrodifferential, and mixed equations.

  8. Positive identity entry control system with geographically distributed portals and enrollment stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntire, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    A positive identity entry control system using distributed processing to allow reliable geographically separated portals and enrollment stations has been installed and is fully operational at a large area DOE site. Identity verification requires a credential, a memorized number and measurement of a physical characteristic of the user. Additionally, all portal activity is monitored by guards. The portal system is dual redundant such that no single point failure will shut down operations. Each portal site maintains its own subset of the master data base so off-site failure of the central data base manager or its communication links will not significantly affect local portal activity. The system is suitable for installations with large populations requiring access control at several remote sites scattered over a large area

  9. Descriptive study of electromagnetic wave distribution for various seating positions: using digital textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seomun, GyeongAe; Kim, YoungHwan; Lee, Jung-Ah; Jeong, KwangHoon; Park, Seon-A; Kim, Miran; Noh, Wonjung

    2014-04-01

    To better understand environmental electromagnetic wave exposure during the use of digital textbooks by elementary school students, we measured numeric values of the electromagnetic fields produced by tablet personal computers (TPCs). Specifically, we examined the distribution of the electromagnetic waves for various students' seating positions in an elementary school that uses digital textbooks. Electric and magnetic fields from TPCs were measured using the HI-3603 Visual Display Terminal/ Very Low Frequency (VDT/VLF) radiation measurement system. Electromagnetic field values from TPCs measured at a student's seat and at a teacher's computer were deemed not harmful to health. However, electromagnetic field values varied based on the distance between students, other electronic devices such as a desktop computers, and student posture while using a TPC. Based on these results, it is necessary to guide students to observe proper posture and to arrange seats at an appropriate distance in the classroom.

  10. Usual Dietary Energy Density Distribution Is Positively Associated with Excess Body Weight in Mexican Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburto, Tania C; Cantoral, Alejandra; Hernández-Barrera, Lucia; Carriquiry, Alicia L; Rivera, Juan A

    2015-07-01

    Studies suggest a positive association between dietary energy density (DED) and body weight in adults, but evidence in children is inconclusive. The objective of this study was to compare usual DED distributions of nonoverweight vs. overweight or obese (OW/O) Mexican children. The study used 24-h recall (24HR) data from 2367 children aged 5-11 y from the 2012 Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT 2012). Repeated 24HR measures were obtained in a random sample (∼10%) to estimate usual intake distributions by using the Iowa State University (PC-Side) method. Implausible dietary reports were identified. Multivariate linear regression models were used to evaluate the relation between DED and body mass index status and to compare results with and without PC-Side adjustment and restriction to plausible reporters. A total of 35.1% of the children in the sample were OW/O. The usual DED mean was ∼175 kcal/100 g in both the complete sample and the plausible reporters subsample. Regression models adjusted by PC-Side and for potential confounders showed higher DED in OW/O relative to nonoverweight children for both plausible reporters (9.7 kcal/100 g; n = 1452, P 0.10). A positive association between usual DED and OW/O was found in Mexican children. The association was stronger when only plausible reporters were considered. This suggests that there is a need for strategies to reduce energy density in the diet of Mexican children. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  11. Spatial distribution of prominin-1 (CD133-positive cells within germinative zones of the vertebrate brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Jászai

    Full Text Available In mammals, embryonic neural progenitors as well as adult neural stem cells can be prospectively isolated based on the cell surface expression of prominin-1 (CD133, a plasma membrane glycoprotein. In contrast, characterization of neural progenitors in non-mammalian vertebrates endowed with significant constitutive neurogenesis and inherent self-repair ability is hampered by the lack of suitable cell surface markers. Here, we have investigated whether prominin-1-orthologues of the major non-mammalian vertebrate model organisms show any degree of conservation as for their association with neurogenic geminative zones within the central nervous system (CNS as they do in mammals or associated with activated neural progenitors during provoked neurogenesis in the regenerating CNS.We have recently identified prominin-1 orthologues from zebrafish, axolotl and chicken. The spatial distribution of prominin-1-positive cells--in comparison to those of mice--was mapped in the intact brain in these organisms by non-radioactive in situ hybridization combined with detection of proliferating neural progenitors, marked either by proliferating cell nuclear antigen or 5-bromo-deoxyuridine. Furthermore, distribution of prominin-1 transcripts was investigated in the regenerating spinal cord of injured axolotl.Remarkably, a conserved association of prominin-1 with germinative zones of the CNS was uncovered as manifested in a significant co-localization with cell proliferation markers during normal constitutive neurogenesis in all species investigated. Moreover, an enhanced expression of prominin-1 became evident associated with provoked, compensatory neurogenesis during the epimorphic regeneration of the axolotl spinal cord. Interestingly, significant prominin-1-expressing cell populations were also detected at distinct extraventricular (parenchymal locations in the CNS of all vertebrate species being suggestive of further, non-neurogenic neural function

  12. Development of a position-sensitive fission counter and measurement of neutron flux distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, Hideshi; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Kakuta, Tsunemi

    2001-08-01

    A position-sensitive fission counter (PSFC) that operates in high neutron flux and high gamma-ray background such as at the side of a power reactor vessel has been developed. Neutron detection using the PSFC with a solenoid electrode is based on a delay-line method. The PSFC that has the outer diameter of 25 mm and the sensitive length of 1000 mm was manufactured for investigation of the performances. The PSFC provided output current pulses that were sufficiently higher than the alpha noise, though the PSFC has a solenoid electrode and large electrode-capacitance. The S/N ratio of PSFC outputs proved to be higher than that of ordinary fission counters with 200 mm sensitive length. A performance test to measure neutron flux distributions by a neutron measuring system with the PSFC was carried out by the side of a graphite pile, W2.4 x H1.4 x L1.2 m, with neutron sources, Am-Be 370 GBq x 2. It was confirmed that the neutron flux distribution was well measured with the system. (author)

  13. OPTIMIZATION OF THE POSITION OF THE LOCAL DISTRIBUTION CENTRE OF THE REGIONAL POST LOGISTICS NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł DROŹDZIEL

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of the present postal services is the fact that, customers expect the lowest price while maintaining the availability, security and on time delivery of mail items. We can find that, the costs associated with transport of the postal substrate is one of the most important factors affecting the total cost of the postal services. These transport costs depend on various factors such as the investment in vehicles purchase, operational costs of the postal vehicles (costs of maintenance, repairs, fuel costs of the vehicle, etc. labour costs of the drivers and so on. For this reason, it is important to find such an operational - organizational solutions that can reduce the costs associated with the transportation of postal shipments, resulting in reducing the total cost of postal services. One option to do this is to minimize the length of postal transportation routes. This article presents the approach based on the application of graph theory to optimize existing connections of postal logistics network. Published results is oriented to revaluate existing position of local centre and find a location for the new local distribution centre potentially. New location of local distribution centre can to optimize (minimize the total transport costs of the local postal transportation network in area of the Lublin Province.

  14. Induction of chromosome shattering by ultraviolet light and caffeine: the influence of different distributions of photolesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, C.; Cremer, T.

    1986-01-01

    Cells of synchronized and of asynchronously growing cultures of a V79 Chinese hamster line were microirradiated with a low power laser-UV-microbeam of wavelength 257 nm. Ultraviolet light was either focused onto a small part of the nucleus (mode I) or distributed over the whole nucleus (mode II). Following microirradiation, the cells were incubated for 7-20 h with caffeine (1-2 mM) until chromosome preparation was performed. After both modes of microirradiation, shattering of the entire chromosome complement (generalized chromosome shattering, GCS) was observed. It is suggested that the probability by which GCS is induced depends on the total number of DNA lesions rather than on their distribution in the chromatin. The results are consistent with the prediction of a 'factor depletion model' which assumes that in a given cell, GCS takes place both in irradiated and non-irradiated chromosomes if the total number of daughter strand-repair sites surpasses a threshold value. (Auth.)

  15. Modeling random telegraph signal noise in CMOS image sensor under low light based on binomial distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yu; Wang Guangyi; Lu Xinmiao; Hu Yongcai; Xu Jiangtao

    2016-01-01

    The random telegraph signal noise in the pixel source follower MOSFET is the principle component of the noise in the CMOS image sensor under low light. In this paper, the physical and statistical model of the random telegraph signal noise in the pixel source follower based on the binomial distribution is set up. The number of electrons captured or released by the oxide traps in the unit time is described as the random variables which obey the binomial distribution. As a result, the output states and the corresponding probabilities of the first and the second samples of the correlated double sampling circuit are acquired. The standard deviation of the output states after the correlated double sampling circuit can be obtained accordingly. In the simulation section, one hundred thousand samples of the source follower MOSFET have been simulated, and the simulation results show that the proposed model has the similar statistical characteristics with the existing models under the effect of the channel length and the density of the oxide trap. Moreover, the noise histogram of the proposed model has been evaluated at different environmental temperatures. (paper)

  16. Applying wind turbines and battery storage to defer Orcas Power and Light Company distribution circuit upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaininger, H.W.; Barnes, P.R.

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to conduct a detailed assessment of the Orcas Power and Light Company (OPALCO) system to determine the potential for deferring the costly upgrade of the 25-kV Lopez- Eastsound circuit, by the application of a MW-scale wind farm and battery storage facilities as appropriate. Local wind resource data has been collected over the past year and used to determine MW-scale wind farm performance. This hourly wind farm performance data is used with measured hourly Eastsound load data, and recent OPALCO distribution system expansion plans and cost projections in performing this detailed benefit-cost assessment. The OPALCO distribution circuit expansion project and assumptions are described. MW-scale wind farm performance results are given. The economic benefit-cost results for the wind farm and battery storage applications on the OPALCO system using OPALCO system design criteria and cost assumptions are reported. A recalculation is presented of the benefit-cost results for similar potential wind farm and battery storage applications on other utility systems with higher marginal energy and demand costs. Conclusions and recommendations are presented. costs. Conclusions and recommendations are presented

  17. Cross-calibrating Spatial Positions of Light-viewing Diagnostics using Plasma Edge Sweeps in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, W.M.; Burrell, K.H.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.; Kaplan, D.

    2003-01-01

    An experimental technique is presented that permits diagnostics viewing light from the plasma edge to be spatially calibrated relative to one another. By sweeping the plasma edge, each chord of each diagnostic sweeps out a portion of the light emission profile. A nonlinear least-squares fit to such data provides superior cross-calibration of diagnostics located at different toroidal locations compared with simple surveying. Another advantage of the technique is that it can be used to monitor the position of viewing chords during an experimental campaign to ensure that alignment does not change over time. Moreover, should such a change occur, the data can still be cross-calibrated and its usefulness retained

  18. Distributed Extended Kalman Filter for Position, Velocity, Time, Estimation in Satellite Navigation Receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Jakubov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Common techniques for position-velocity-time estimation in satellite navigation, iterative least squares and the extended Kalman filter, involve matrix operations. The matrix inversion and inclusion of a matrix library pose requirements on a computational power and operating platform of the navigation processor. In this paper, we introduce a novel distributed algorithm suitable for implementation in simple parallel processing units each for a tracked satellite. Such a unit performs only scalar sum, subtraction, multiplication, and division. The algorithm can be efficiently implemented in hardware logic. Given the fast position-velocity-time estimator, frequent estimates can foster dynamic performance of a vector tracking receiver. The algorithm has been designed from a factor graph representing the extended Kalman filter by splitting vector nodes into scalar ones resulting in a cyclic graph with few iterations needed. Monte Carlo simulations have been conducted to investigate convergence and accuracy. Simulation case studies for a vector tracking architecture and experimental measurements with a real-time software receiver developed at CTU in Prague were conducted. The algorithm offers compromises in stability, accuracy, and complexity depending on the number of iterations. In scenarios with a large number of tracked satellites, it can outperform the traditional methods at low complexity.

  19. The influence of electrohydrodynamic flow on the distribution of chemical species in positive corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontiga, Francisco; Yanallah, Khelifa; Bouazza, R.; Chen, Junhong

    2015-09-01

    A numerical simulation of positive corona discharge in air, including the effect of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) motion of the gas, has been carried out. Air flow is assumed to be confined between two parallel plates, and corona discharge is produced around a thin wire, midway between the plates. Therefore, fluid dynamics equations, including electrical forces, have been solved together with the continuity equation of each neutral species. The plasma chemical model included 24 chemical reactions and ten neutral species, in addition to electrons and positive ions. The results of the simulation have shown that the influence of EHD flow on the spatial distributions of the species is quite different depending on the species. Hence, reactive species like atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen are confined to the vicinity of the wire, and they are weakly affected by the EHD gas motion. In contrast, nitrogen oxides and ozone are efficiently dragged outside the active region of the corona discharge by the EHD flow. This work was supported by the Spanish Government Agency ``Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación'' under Contract No. FIS2011-25161.

  20. Measurement of the radial density distribution of the light emissions near the trajectory of fast ions in nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibach, T.

    1983-11-01

    For the analysis of the emission and deceleration mechanisms of ionisation-electrons (delta-electrons) during the passage of fast ions through gases, the radial density distribution of the light emission has been measured, which is related with the (0,0)-transitions of two optical bands in nitrogen. These measurements have been made using a small aperture limited ion beam. The first band under study is the 2. positive system at 337.1 nm excited mainly by low energy electrons around 20 eV, and the second band is the 1. negative system at 391.4 nm excited by fast electrons with simultaneous ionisation. For these measurements an experimental setup has been developed with a telescope-like optical system and interference filters to detect the emitted light with a high spacial resolution (4x10 -4 of profile width) and a high dynamic range (10 6 ). The experiments have been performed using proton beams of different energies between 270 keV and 2.8 MeV, He-3 beams with 270 keV/u and 500 keV/u and a Ne beam with 270 keV/u with gas pressures in the range between 0.133 to 13.3 mbar. Based on the method of Abel inversion the spacial light emission density is deduced from the experimental distance functions and normalized to a gas density of 1 g/cm 3 . The results show that approximately half of the total light emission in the 1. negative system and the ionisation is caused by the primary interaction of the ion beam. For the same energy per nucleon this contribution decreases relative to the contribution of the delta-electrons with increasing atomic number. In addition the delta-radiation becomes harder with increasing atomic number. Good agreement is obtained by comparison with the results of other authors, which are based on probe techniques and Monte-Carlo-calculations. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Differentiation of penal policy in the light of positive paradigm and its confronting challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagher Shamlou

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Positivism is an empirical approach for understanding of human communication and phenomena, which raised firstly French famous thinker “August Comte”. Human and social Sciences were under domination of positive thought for a long time. In criminal law inter alia Italian famous thinkers sought to analyses the crime problem with a positive approach. However, some of their point of view such as born criminal thesis was not respected by penal scientist, but was affected by their idea was assumed that experiment is the only scientific criterion and basis of criminal law. They thought that value judgments and normative sentences have not scientific character. The positivist approach, developed the abstract thought of classic criminal fundamentalism which was before this, the dominate approach of penal policy towards of objectivism at etiology of crime on the basis of separation of objectivism and subjectivism. But it faced with insufficiency in both methodology and efficiency, so that somebody talked about returning punity approach of classic fundamentalism

  2. Barriers and benefits: implications of artificial night-lighting for the distribution of common bats in Britain and Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Fiona; Roche, Niamh; Aughney, Tina; Jones, Nicholas; Day, Julie; Baker, James; Langton, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Artificial lighting is a particular problem for animals active at night. Approximately 69% of mammal species are nocturnal, and one-third of these are bats. Due to their extensive movements—both on a nightly basis to exploit ephemeral food supplies, and during migration between roosts—bats have an unusually high probability of encountering artificial light in the landscape. This paper reviews the impacts of lighting on bats and their prey, exploring the direct and indirect consequences of lighting intensity and spectral composition. In addition, new data from large-scale surveys involving more than 265 000 bat calls at more than 600 locations in two countries are presented, showing that prevalent street-lighting types are not generally linked with increased activity of common and widespread bat species. Such bats, which are important to ecosystem function, are generally considered ‘light-attracted’ and likely to benefit from the insect congregations that form at lights. Leisler's bat (Nyctalus leisleri) may be an exception, being more frequent in lit than dark transects. For common pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus pipistrellus), lighting is negatively associated with their distribution on a landscape scale, but there may be local increases in habitats with good tree cover. Research is now needed on the impacts of sky glow and glare for bat navigation, and to explore the implications of lighting for habitat matrix permeability. PMID:25780236

  3. Effects of the light goose conservation order on non-target waterfowl distribution during spring migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinges, Andrew J.; Webb, Elisabeth B.; Vrtiska, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    The Light Goose Conservation Order (LGCO) was initiated in 1999 to reduce mid-continent populations of light geese (lesser snow geese Chen caerulescens and Ross's geese C. rossi). However, concern about potential for LGCO activities (i.e. hunting activities) to negatively impact non-target waterfowl species during spring migration in the Rainwater Basin (RWB) of Nebraska prompted agency personnel to limit the number of hunt days each week and close multiple public wetlands to LGCO activities entirely. To evaluate the effects of the LGCO in the RWB, we quantified waterfowl density at wetlands open and closed to LGCO hunting and recorded all hunter encounters during springs 2011 and 2012. We encountered a total of 70 hunting parties on 22 study wetlands, with over 90% of these encounters occurring during early season when the majority of waterfowl used the RWB region. We detected greater overall densities of dabbling ducks Anas spp., as well as for mallards A. platyrhynchos and northern pintails A. acuta on wetlands closed to the LGCO. We detected no effects of hunt day in the analyses of dabbling duck densities. We detected no differences in mean weekly dabbling duck densities among wetlands open to hunting, regardless of weekly or cumulative hunting encounter frequency throughout early season. Additionally, hunting category was not a predictor for the presence of greater white-fronted geese Anser albifronsin a logistic regression model. Given that dabbling duck densities were greater on wetlands closed to hunting, providing wetlands free from hunting disturbance as refugia during the LGCO remains an important management strategy at migration stopover sites. However, given that we did not detect an effect of hunt day or hunting frequency on dabbling duck density, our results suggest increased hunting frequency at sites already open to hunting would likely have minimal impacts on the distribution of non-target waterfowl species using the region for spring

  4. On the more accurate channel model and positioning based on time-of-arrival for visible light localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Changeez; Taherpour, Abbas; Khattab, Tamer; Gazor, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an improved propagation channel model for the visible light in indoor environments. We employ this model to derive an enhanced positioning algorithm using on the relation between the time-of-arrivals (TOAs) and the distances for two cases either by assuming known or unknown transmitter and receiver vertical distances. We propose two estimators, namely the maximum likelihood estimator and an estimator by employing the method of moments. To have an evaluation basis for these methods, we calculate the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) for the performance of the estimations. We show that the proposed model and estimations result in a superior performance in positioning when the transmitter and receiver are perfectly synchronized in comparison to the existing state-of-the-art counterparts. Moreover, the corresponding CRLB of the proposed model represents almost about 20 dB reduction in the localization error bound in comparison with the previous model for some practical scenarios.

  5. Son et lumière: Sound and light effects on spatial distribution and swimming behavior in captive zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei Sabet, Saeed; Van Dooren, Dirk; Slabbekoorn, Hans

    2016-05-01

    Aquatic and terrestrial habitats are heterogeneous by nature with respect to sound and light conditions. Fish may extract signals and exploit cues from both ambient modalities and they may also select their sound and light level of preference in free-ranging conditions. In recent decades, human activities in or near water have altered natural soundscapes and caused nocturnal light pollution to become more widespread. Artificial sound and light may cause anxiety, deterrence, disturbance or masking, but few studies have addressed in any detail how fishes respond to spatial variation in these two modalities. Here we investigated whether sound and light affected spatial distribution and swimming behavior of individual zebrafish that had a choice between two fish tanks: a treatment tank and a quiet and light escape tank. The treatments concerned a 2 × 2 design with noisy or quiet conditions and dim or bright light. Sound and light treatments did not induce spatial preferences for the treatment or escape tank, but caused various behavioral changes in both spatial distribution and swimming behavior within the treatment tank. Sound exposure led to more freezing and less time spent near the active speaker. Dim light conditions led to a lower number of crossings, more time spent in the upper layer and less time spent close to the tube for crossing. No interactions were found between sound and light conditions. This study highlights the potential relevance for studying multiple modalities when investigating fish behavior and further studies are needed to investigate whether similar patterns can be found for fish behavior in free-ranging conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhancing the Light-Extraction Efficiency of AlGaN Nanowires Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diode by using Nitride/Air Distributed Bragg Reflector Nanogratings

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal; Janjua, Bilal; Zhao, Chao; Priante, Davide; Alhamoud, Abdullah A.; Tangi, Malleswararao; Alanazi, Lafi M.; Alatawi, Abdullah A.; Albadri, Abdulrahman M.; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    The performance and efficiency of AlGaN ultraviolet light-emitting diodes have been limited by the extremely low light-extraction efficiency (LEE) due to the intrinsic material properties of AlGaN. Here, to enhance the LEE of the device, we demonstrate an AlGaN nanowires light-emitting diode (NWs-LED) integrated with nitride/air Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) nanogratings. Compared to a control device (only mesa), the AlGaN NWs-LED with the nitride/air DBR nanogratings exhibit enhancement in the light output power and external quantum efficiency (EQE) by a factor of ∼1.67. The higher light output power and EQE are attributed mainly to the multiple reflectances laterally for the transverse magnetic (TM)-polarized light and scattering introduced by the nanogratings. To further understand the LEE enhancement, the electrical field distribution, extraction ratio and polar pattern of the AlGaN NWs-LED with and without the nitride/air DBR nanogratings were analyzed using the finite-difference-time-domain method. It was observed that the TM-field emission was confined and scattered upward whereas the polar pattern was intensified for the AlGaN NWs-LED with the nanogratings. Our approach to enhance the LEE via the nitride/air DBR nanogratings can provide a promising route for increasing the efficiency of AlGaN-based LEDs, also, to functioning as facet mirror for AlGaN-based laser diodes.

  7. Enhancing the Light-Extraction Efficiency of AlGaN Nanowires Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diode by using Nitride/Air Distributed Bragg Reflector Nanogratings

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal

    2017-09-11

    The performance and efficiency of AlGaN ultraviolet light-emitting diodes have been limited by the extremely low light-extraction efficiency (LEE) due to the intrinsic material properties of AlGaN. Here, to enhance the LEE of the device, we demonstrate an AlGaN nanowires light-emitting diode (NWs-LED) integrated with nitride/air Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) nanogratings. Compared to a control device (only mesa), the AlGaN NWs-LED with the nitride/air DBR nanogratings exhibit enhancement in the light output power and external quantum efficiency (EQE) by a factor of ∼1.67. The higher light output power and EQE are attributed mainly to the multiple reflectances laterally for the transverse magnetic (TM)-polarized light and scattering introduced by the nanogratings. To further understand the LEE enhancement, the electrical field distribution, extraction ratio and polar pattern of the AlGaN NWs-LED with and without the nitride/air DBR nanogratings were analyzed using the finite-difference-time-domain method. It was observed that the TM-field emission was confined and scattered upward whereas the polar pattern was intensified for the AlGaN NWs-LED with the nanogratings. Our approach to enhance the LEE via the nitride/air DBR nanogratings can provide a promising route for increasing the efficiency of AlGaN-based LEDs, also, to functioning as facet mirror for AlGaN-based laser diodes.

  8. Nucleon momentum distribution in deuteron and other nuclei within the light-front dynamics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, A.N.; Gaidarov, M.K.; Ivanov, M.V.; Kadrev, D.N.; Krumova, G.Z.; Hodgson, P.E.; Geramb, H.V. von

    2002-01-01

    The relativistic light-front dynamics (LFD) method has been shown to give a correct description of the most recent data for the deuteron monopole and quadrupole charge form factors obtained at the Jefferson Laboratory for elastic electron-deuteron scattering for six values of the squared momentum transfer between 0.66 and 1.7 (GeV/c) 2 . The good agreement with the data is in contrast with the results of the existing nonrelativistic approaches. In this work we first make a complementary test of the LFD applying it to calculate another important characteristic, the nucleon momentum distribution n(q) of the deuteron, using six invariant functions f i (i=1,...,6) instead of two (S and D waves) in the nonrelativistic case. The comparison with the y-scaling data shows the decisive role of the function f 5 which at q≥500 MeV/c exceeds all other f functions (as well as the S and D waves) for the correct description of n(q) of the deuteron in the high-momentum region. Comparison with other calculations using S and D waves corresponding to various nucleon-nucleon potentials is made. Second, using clear indications that the high-momentum components of n(q) in heavier nuclei are related to those in the deuteron, we develop an approach within the natural orbital representation to calculate n(q) in (A,Z) nuclei on the basis of the deuteron momentum distribution. As examples, n(q) in 4 He, 12 C, and 56 Fe are calculated and good agreement with the y-scaling data is obtained

  9. Positive periodic solutions of periodic neutral Lotka-Volterra system with distributed delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongkun

    2008-01-01

    By using a fixed point theorem of strict-set-contraction, some criteria are established for the existence of positive periodic solutions of the following periodic neutral Lotka-Volterra system with distributed delays (dx i (t))/(dt) =x i (t)[a i (t)-Σ j=1 n b ij (t)∫ -T ij 0 K ij (θ)x j ( t+θ)dθ-Σ j=1 n c ij (t)∫ -T ij 0 K ij (θ) x j ' (t+θ)dθ],i=1,2,...,n, where a i ,b ij ,c ij element of C(R,R + ) (i, j = 1, 2, ..., n) are ω-periodic functions, T ij ,T ij element of (0,∞) (i, j = 1, 2, ..., n) and K ij ,K ij element of (R,R + ) satisfying ∫ -T ij 0 K ij (θ)dθ=1,∫ -T ij 0 K ij (θ)dθ=1, i, j = 1, 2, ..., n

  10. Calculated energy distributions for light 0.25--18-keV ions scattered from solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.E.; Harms, A.A.; Karapetsas, S.K.

    1975-01-01

    Scattered energy distributions are calculated for light ions incident on Nb and Mo surfaces of interest for controlled nulcear fusion reactors. The scattered energy is found to vary as a function of the reflection coefficient between a multiple-collision limit at low energies and a single-collision Rutherford scattering limit at high energies. High-energy peaking of the scattered particle distributions is also found for low incident energies

  11. The ρ-meson light-cone distribution amplitudes from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Vladimir M.; Bruns, Peter C.; Collins, Sara [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Regensburg,Universitätsstraße 31, 93040 Regensburg (Germany); Gracey, John A. [Theoretical Physics Division, Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Liverpool, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool, L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Gruber, Michael; Göckeler, Meinulf; Hutzler, Fabian; Pérez-Rubio, Paula; Schäfer, Andreas; Söldner, Wolfgang [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Regensburg,Universitätsstraße 31, 93040 Regensburg (Germany); Sternbeck, André [Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena,Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Wein, Philipp [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Regensburg,Universitätsstraße 31, 93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2017-04-13

    We present the results of a lattice study of the normalization constants and second moments of the light-cone distribution amplitudes of longitudinally and transversely polarized ρ mesons. The calculation is performed using two flavors of dynamical clover fermions at lattice spacings between 0.060 fm and 0.081 fm, different lattice volumes up to m{sub π}L=6.7 and pion masses down to m{sub π}=150 MeV. Bare lattice results are renormalized non-perturbatively using a variant of the RI{sup ′}-MOM scheme and converted to the (MS)-bar scheme. The necessary conversion coefficients, which are not available in the literature, are calculated. The chiral extrapolation for the relevant decay constants is worked out in detail. We obtain for the ratio of the tensor and vector coupling constants f{sub ρ}{sup T}/f{sub ρ}=0.629(8) and the values of the second Gegenbauer moments a{sub 2}{sup ∥}=0.132(27) and a{sub 2}{sup ⊥}=0.101(22) at the scale μ=2 GeV for the longitudinally and transversely polarized ρ mesons, respectively. The errors include the statistical uncertainty and estimates of the systematics arising from renormalization. Discretization errors cannot be estimated reliably and are not included. In this calculation the possibility of ρ→ππ decay at the smaller pion masses is not taken into account.

  12. A system for on-line monitoring of light element concentration distributions in thin samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brands, P.J.M. E-mail: p.j.m.brands@tue.nl; Mutsaers, P.H.A.; Voigt, M.J.A. de

    1999-09-02

    At the Cyclotron Laboratory, a scanning proton microprobe is used to determine concentration distributions in biomedical samples. The data acquired in these measurements used to be analysed in a time consuming off-line analysis. To avoid the loss of valuable measurement and analysis time, DYANA was developed. DYANA is an on-line method for the analysis of data from biomedical measurements. By using a database of background shapes, light elements such as Na and Mg, can be fitted even more precisely than in conventional fitting procedures. The entire analysis takes only several seconds and is performed while the acquisition system is gathering a new subset of data. Data acquisition must be guaranteed and may not be interfered by other parallel processes. Therefore, the analysis, the data acquisition and the experiment control is performed on a PCI-based Pentium personal computer (PC), running a real-time operating system. A second PC is added to run a graphical user interface for interaction with the experimenter and the monitoring of the analysed results. The system is here illustrated using atherosclerotic tissue but is applicable to all kinds of thin samples.

  13. Distributed illumination control with local sensing and actuation in networked lighting systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caicedo Fernandez, D.R.; Pandharipande, A.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the problem of illumination control in a networked lighting system wherein luminaires have local sensing and actuation capabilities. Each luminaire (i) consists of a light emitting diode (LED) based light source dimmable by a local controller, (ii) is actuated based on sensing

  14. Current, voltage and temperature distribution modeling of light-emitting diodes based on electrical and thermal circuit analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, J; Shim, J-I; Shin, D-S

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a modeling method based on the three-dimensional electrical and thermal circuit analysis to extract current, voltage and temperature distributions of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). In our model, the electrical circuit analysis is performed first to extract the current and voltage distributions in the LED. Utilizing the result obtained from the electrical circuit analysis as distributed heat sources, the thermal circuit is set up by using the duality between Fourier's law and Ohm's law. From the analysis of the thermal circuit, the temperature distribution at each epitaxial film is successfully obtained. Comparisons of experimental and simulation results are made by employing an InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well blue LED. Validity of the electrical circuit analysis is confirmed by comparing the light distribution at the surface. Since the temperature distribution at each epitaxial film cannot be obtained experimentally, the apparent temperature distribution is compared at the surface of the LED chip. Also, experimentally obtained average junction temperature is compared with the value calculated from the modeling, yielding a very good agreement. The analysis method based on the circuit modeling has an advantage of taking distributed heat sources as inputs, which is essential for high-power devices with significant self-heating. (paper)

  15. Computation of aquatic primary production: Extended formalism to include effect of angular and spectral distribution of light

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sathyendranath, S.; Platt, T.

    and utilization by algal cells. Neglecting the effect of angular distribution on the light absorbed by phytoplankton can lead to underestimation of primary production. For the stations studied as examples, the minimum correction required is 5-l3% for daily, column...

  16. Investigating the Cherenkov light lateral distribution function for primary proton and iron nuclei in extensive air showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Rubaiee, A.A.; Hashim, U.; Al-Douri, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The lateral distribution function (LDF) of Cherenkov radiation in extensive air showers (EAS) was simulated by CORSIKA program for the conditions of Yakutsk Cherenkov array at high energy range (10 13 -10 16 eV) for two primary particles (p and Fe) for different zenith angles. Using Breit-Wigner function for analyzing Cherenkov light LDF, a parameterization of Cherenkov light LDF was reconstructed by depending on CORSIKA simulation as a function of primary energy. The comparison between the estimated Cherenkov light LDF and the LDF that was measured on the Yakutsk EAS array gives the ability of particle identification that initiated the shower and determination of particle's energy around the knee region. The extrapolation of approximated Cherenkov light LDF for energies 20 and 30 PeV was obtained for primary particles (p and Fe)

  17. Modelling the cosmic spectral energy distribution and extragalactic background light over all time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, S. K.; Driver, S. P.; Davies, L. J. M.; Lagos, C. d. P.; Robotham, A. S. G.

    2018-02-01

    We present a phenomological model of the cosmic spectral energy distribution (CSED) and the integrated galactic light (IGL) over all cosmic time. This model, based on an earlier model by Driver et al., attributes the cosmic star formation history (CSFH) to two processes - first, chaotic clump accretion and major mergers, resulting in the early-time formation of bulges and secondly, cold gas accretion, resulting in late-time disc formation. Under the assumption of a Universal Chabrier initial mass function, we combine the Bruzual & Charlot stellar libraries, the Charlot & Fall dust attenuation prescription and template spectra for emission by dust and active galactic nuclei to predict the CSED - pre- and post-dust attenuation - and the IGL throughout cosmic time. The phenomological model, as constructed, adopts a number of basic axioms and empirical results and has minimal free parameters. We compare the model output, as well as predictions from the semi-analytic model GALFORM to recent estimates of the CSED out to z = 1. By construction, our empirical model reproduces the full energy output of the Universe from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared extremely well. We use the model to derive predictions of the stellar and dust mass densities, again finding good agreement. We find that GALFORM predicts the CSED for z < 0.3 in good agreement with the observations. This agreement becomes increasingly poor towards z = 1, when the model CSED is ˜50 per cent fainter. The latter is consistent with the model underpredicting the CSFH. As a consequence, GALFORM predicts a ˜30 per cent fainter IGL.

  18. Ultra-low power anti-crosstalk collision avoidance light detection and ranging using chaotic pulse position modulation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Jie; Gong Ma-li; Du Peng-fei; Lu Bao-jie; Zhang Fan; Zhang Hai-tao; Fu Xing

    2016-01-01

    A novel concept of collision avoidance single-photon light detection and ranging (LIDAR) for vehicles has been demonstrated, in which chaotic pulse position modulation is applied on the transmitted laser pulses for robust anti-crosstalk purposes. Besides, single-photon detectors (SPD) and time correlated single photon counting techniques are adapted, to sense the ultra-low power used for the consideration of compact structure and eye safety. Parameters including pulse rate, discrimination threshold, and number of accumulated pulses have been thoroughly analyzed based on the detection requirements, resulting in specified receiver operating characteristics curves. Both simulation and indoor experiments were performed to verify the excellent anti-crosstalk capability of the presented collision avoidance LIDAR despite ultra-low transmitting power. (paper)

  19. A simple procedure to analyze positions of interest in infectious cell cultures by correlative light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madela, Kazimierz; Banhart, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Anja; Piesker, Janett; Bannert, Norbert; Laue, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Plastic cell culture dishes that contain a thin bottom of highest optical quality including an imprinted finder grid (μ-Dish Grid-500) are optimally suited for routine correlative light and electron microscopy using chemical fixation. Such dishes allow high-resolution fluorescence and bright-field imaging using fixed and living cells and are compatible with standard protocols for scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Ease of use during cell culture and imaging, as well as a tight cover render the dishes particularly suitable for working with infectious organisms up to the highest biosafety level. Detailed protocols are provided and demonstrated by showing two examples: monitoring the production of virus-like particles of the Human Endogenous Retrovirus HERV-K(HML-2) by HeLa cells and investigation of Rab11-positive membrane-compartments of HeLa cells after infection with Chlamydia trachomatis. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Archaeal phylogeny: reexamination of the phylogenetic position of Archaeoglobus fulgidus in light of certain composition-induced artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woese, C. R.; Achenbach, L.; Rouviere, P.; Mandelco, L.

    1991-01-01

    A major and too little recognized source of artifact in phylogenetic analysis of molecular sequence data is compositional difference among sequences. The problem becomes particularly acute when alignments contain ribosomal RNAs from both mesophilic and thermophilic species. Among prokaryotes the latter are considerably higher in G + C content than the former, which often results in artificial clustering of thermophilic lineages and their being placed artificially deep in phylogenetic trees. In this communication we review archaeal phylogeny in the light of this consideration, focusing in particular on the phylogenetic position of the sulfate reducing species Archaeoglobus fulgidus, using both 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA sequences. The analysis shows clearly that the previously reported deep branching of the A. fulgidus lineage (very near the base of the euryarchaeal side of the archaeal tree) is incorrect, and that the lineage actually groups with a previously recognized unit that comprises the Methanomicrobiales and extreme halophiles.

  1. Influence of the catheter-top-position upon the distribution pattern of continuous intra-arterially infused chemotherapeutic agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinohe, Hyobu

    1980-01-01

    The whole body scanning showed the distribution pattern of infused drug in continuous intra-arterially infused chemotherapy by using a gamma camera and infused RI (sup(99m)Tc-MAA) from catheter. I measured the whole body scanning counts without shield (A) and with lead shield (B) on ROI and natural back ground counts (BG). Then I calculated the distribution ratio on ROI as following. [(A-B)/(A-BG)] x 100(%). It was easy to find a certain relation between the catheter-top-position and the distribution ratio. As a result of investigating data, there were about 4 catheter-top-positions in aorta. Case by case, we putted the catheter-top in better position and prevented technical side effects and measured roughly total dose on ROI. (author)

  2. Statistical distribution of hydrogen over three positions in the brucite Mg(OH)2 structure from electron diffractometry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukhlistov, A.A.; Avilov, A.S.; Ferraris, D.; Zvyagin, B.B.; Plotnikov, V.P.

    1997-01-01

    The method of improved automatic electron diffractometry for measuring and recording intensities to two-dimensionally distributed reflections of texture-type electron diffraction patterns has been used for the analysis of the brucite Mg(OH) 2 structure. The experimental accuracy of the measured intensities proved to be sufficient for studying fine structural details of the statistical distribution of hydrogen atoms over three structure positions located around the threefold axis of the brucite structure

  3. THE EFFECT OF BUILDING FAÇADE MODEL ON LIGHT DISTRIBUTION (CASE STUDY: MENARA PHINISI BUILDING OF UNM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Jamala

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Global warming issues influence the temperature of the earth surface. It is an impact on energy consumption, especially in buildings. Utilization of daylight is one of the factors that need to be considered, in order to minimize energy consumption as a source of artificial lighting. This study analyzed the distribution of light on the Menara Phinisi building of Makassar State University. Quantitative research method that is to describe the data of simulation in Autodesk Ecotect program. The research objective was to determine the effect of the building facade model on the value of illumination inside the building. Results of the study concluded that the decrease percentage of the distribution of light on the building facade using and not using the facade is 3,16% or 236 lux. Distribution of light in horizontal and diagonal facade models differ in the amount of 2,5%. Design analysis of the building serves as a guide for analyzing the influence of the building facade model so that it can create energy efficient buildings.

  4. Large area flexible lighting foils using distributed bare LED dies on polyester substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, D.A. van den; Kusters, R.H.L.; Cauwe, M.; Waal, A. van der; Brand, J. van den

    2013-01-01

    Integration of LEDs on flexible foil substrates is of interest for flexible lighting applications and for backlights for flexible displays. Such a large area lighting device can be made by integrating a matrix of closely spaced LEDs on a flexible foil substrate. Preferably, these LEDs are integrated

  5. A series approximation model for optical light transport and output intensity field distribution in large aspect ratio cylindrical scintillation crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias, Benjamin John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-09

    A series approximation has been derived for the transport of optical photons within a cylindrically symmetric light pipe and applied to the task of evaluating both the origin and angular distribution of light reaching the output plane. This analytic expression finds particular utility in first-pass photonic design applications since it may be evaluated at a very modest computational cost and is readily parameterized for relevant design constraints. It has been applied toward quantitative exploration of various scintillation crystal preparations and their impact on both quantum efficiency and noise, reproducing sensible dependencies and providing physical justification for certain gamma ray camera design choices.

  6. Impact of organic Rankine cycle system installation on light duty vehicle considering both positive and negative aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usman, Muhammad; Imran, Muhammad; Yang, Youngmin; Park, Byung-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Positive and negative effects of waste heat recovery unit on vehicle were studied. • Organic Rankine cycle based power system for waste heat recovery. • Relationship of ORC unit weight and power was developed. • Impact of added weight, Part load operation and back pressure are presented. • Power enhancement of 5.82% of engine when positive & negative effects considered. - Abstract: This paper presents the analysis of organic Rankine cycle (ORC) based waste heat recovery system. Both the positive and negative effects of ORC system installation on a light duty vehicle were evaluated. Engine exhaust data for a light duty vehicle was used to design an ORC based system. Optimum cycle design suggests that ORC system installation is feasible. Results presented that for the vehicle operation at 100 km/h, engine power can be enhanced by 10.88% which is 5.92 kW of additional power and at the lower speed of 23.5 km/h, the engine power enhancement was 2.34%. ORC component weight data from manufacturers were used to estimate the weight of the designed system. The performance decline due to added weight is calculated. Effects of added back pressure and performance decline due to the part-load operation of ORC unit were also calculated and an overall effect of waste heat recovery system was evaluated. The results then suggested that maximum power enhancement is 5.82% at the vehicle speed of 100 km/h instead of previously mentioned 10.88% can be achieved if negative effects are also considered. Furthermore, it was concluded that at speeds lower than 48 km/h the waste heat recovery system was not beneficial at all and low-speed operation was in fact not preferable as it results in additional power demand from the engine by 6.39% at 23.5 km/h. The vehicles for city driving cycles are not recommended for ORC installation. Another finding revealed that if exhaust heat recovery heat exchanger is designed for maximum heat recovery, at part load operation, the

  7. Analytical estimation of emission zone mean position and width in organic light-emitting diodes from emission pattern image-source interference fringes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, Ariel; Tessler, Nir; Einziger, Pinchas D.; Roberts, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytical method for evaluating the first and second moments of the effective exciton spatial distribution in organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) from measured emission patterns. Specifically, the suggested algorithm estimates the emission zone mean position and width, respectively, from two distinct features of the pattern produced by interference between the emission sources and their images (induced by the reflective cathode): the angles in which interference extrema are observed, and the prominence of interference fringes. The relations between these parameters are derived rigorously for a general OLED structure, indicating that extrema angles are related to the mean position of the radiating excitons via Bragg's condition, and the spatial broadening is related to the attenuation of the image-source interference prominence due to an averaging effect. The method is applied successfully both on simulated emission patterns and on experimental data, exhibiting a very good agreement with the results obtained by numerical techniques. We investigate the method performance in detail, showing that it is capable of producing accurate estimations for a wide range of source-cathode separation distances, provided that the measured spectral interval is large enough; guidelines for achieving reliable evaluations are deduced from these results as well. As opposed to numerical fitting tools employed to perform similar tasks to date, our approximate method explicitly utilizes physical intuition and requires far less computational effort (no fitting is involved). Hence, applications that do not require highly resolved estimations, e.g., preliminary design and production-line verification, can benefit substantially from the analytical algorithm, when applicable. This introduces a novel set of efficient tools for OLED engineering, highly important in the view of the crucial role the exciton distribution plays in determining the device performance.

  8. Analytical estimation of emission zone mean position and width in organic light-emitting diodes from emission pattern image-source interference fringes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, Ariel, E-mail: ariel.epstein@utoronto.ca; Tessler, Nir, E-mail: nir@ee.technion.ac.il; Einziger, Pinchas D. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Roberts, Matthew, E-mail: mroberts@cdtltd.co.uk [Cambridge Display Technology Ltd, Building 2020, Cambourne Business Park, Cambourne, Cambridgeshire CB23 6DW (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-14

    We present an analytical method for evaluating the first and second moments of the effective exciton spatial distribution in organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) from measured emission patterns. Specifically, the suggested algorithm estimates the emission zone mean position and width, respectively, from two distinct features of the pattern produced by interference between the emission sources and their images (induced by the reflective cathode): the angles in which interference extrema are observed, and the prominence of interference fringes. The relations between these parameters are derived rigorously for a general OLED structure, indicating that extrema angles are related to the mean position of the radiating excitons via Bragg's condition, and the spatial broadening is related to the attenuation of the image-source interference prominence due to an averaging effect. The method is applied successfully both on simulated emission patterns and on experimental data, exhibiting a very good agreement with the results obtained by numerical techniques. We investigate the method performance in detail, showing that it is capable of producing accurate estimations for a wide range of source-cathode separation distances, provided that the measured spectral interval is large enough; guidelines for achieving reliable evaluations are deduced from these results as well. As opposed to numerical fitting tools employed to perform similar tasks to date, our approximate method explicitly utilizes physical intuition and requires far less computational effort (no fitting is involved). Hence, applications that do not require highly resolved estimations, e.g., preliminary design and production-line verification, can benefit substantially from the analytical algorithm, when applicable. This introduces a novel set of efficient tools for OLED engineering, highly important in the view of the crucial role the exciton distribution plays in determining the device performance.

  9. Position detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Toshifumi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to detect the position of an moving object in a control rod position detector, stably in a digital manner at a high accuracy and free from the undesired effects of circumstantial conditions such as the reactor temperature. Constitution: Coils connected in parallel with each other are disposed along the passage of a moving object and variable resistors and relays are connected in series with each of the coils respectively. Light emitting diodes is connected in series with the contacts of the respective relays. The resistance value of the variable resistors are adjusted depending on the changes in the circumstantial conditions and temperature distribution upon carrying out the positional detection. When the object is inserted into a coils, the relevant relay is deenergized, by which the relay contacts are closed to light up the diode. In the same manner, as the object is successively inserted into the coils, the diodes are lighted-up successively thereby enabling highly accurate and stable positional detection in a digital manner, free from the undesired effects of the circumstantial conditions. (Horiuchi, T.)

  10. The law of distribution of light beam direction fluctuations in telescopes. [normal density functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divinskiy, M. L.; Kolchinskiy, I. G.

    1974-01-01

    The distribution of deviations from mean star trail directions was studied on the basis of 105 star trails. It was found that about 93% of the trails yield a distribution in agreement with the normal law. About 4% of the star trails agree with the Charlier distribution.

  11. Distribution of light and heavy fractions of soil organic carbon as related to land use and tillage practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhengxi; Lal, R.; Owens, L.; Izaurralde, R. C.

    2007-01-01

    Mass distributions of different soil organic carbon (SOC) fractions are influenced by land use and management. Concentrations of C and N in light- and heavy fractions of bulk soils and aggregates in 0–20 cm were determined to evaluate the role of aggregation in SOC sequestration under conventional tillage (CT), no-till (NT), and forest treatments. Light- and heavy fractions of SOC were separated using 1.85 g mL−1 sodium polytungstate solution. Soils under forest and NT preserved, respectively, 167% and 94% more light fraction than those under CT. The mass of light fraction decreased with an increase in soil depth, but significantly increased with an increase in aggregate size. C concentrations of light fraction in all aggregate classes were significantly higher under NT and forest than under CT. C concentrations in heavy fraction averaged 20, 10, and 8 g kg−1 under forest, NT, and CT, respectively. Of the total SOC pool, heavy fraction C accounted for 76% in CT soils and 63% in forest and NT soils. These data suggest that there is a greater protection of SOC by aggregates in the light fraction of minimally disturbed soils than that of disturbed soil, and the SOC loss following conversion from forest to agriculture is attributed to reduction in C concentrations in both heavy and light fractions. In contrast, the SOC gain upon conversion from CT to NT is primarily attributed to an increase in C concentration in the light fraction.

  12. Theoretical role of adjunctive implant positional support in stress distribution of distal-extension mandibular removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Li, Zhiyong; Shen, Shiqian; Chen, Shaowu; Wang, Yining; Wang, Jiawei

    2014-01-01

    This preliminary study evaluated the adjunctive supporting role of diverse implant positions on stress distribution in a Class I removable partial denture (RPD) design. Nine three-dimensional finite element models were prepared to simulate mandibular RPD designs with three different loading conditions applied. Implant supported designs demonstrated lower stress value concentrations and mucosal displacement.

  13. Bidirectional reflectance distribution function of Spectralon white reflectance standard illuminated by incoherent unpolarized and plane-polarized light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Anak; Hamre, Børge; Frette, Øvynd; Zhao, Lu; Stamnes, Jakob J; Kildemo, Morten

    2011-06-01

    A Lambert surface would appear equally bright from all observation directions regardless of the illumination direction. However, the reflection from a randomly scattering object generally has directional variation, which can be described in terms of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). We measured the BRDF of a Spectralon white reflectance standard for incoherent illumination at 405 and 680 nm with unpolarized and plane-polarized light from different directions of incidence. Our measurements show deviations of the BRDF for the Spectralon white reflectance standard from that of a Lambertian reflector that depend both on the angle of incidence and the polarization states of the incident light and detected light. The non-Lambertian reflection characteristics were found to increase more toward the direction of specular reflection as the angle of incidence gets larger.

  14. Hot electron spatial distribution under presence of laser light self-focusing in over-dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, T; Yabuuchi, T; Habara, H; Kondo, K; Kodama, R; Mima, K; Tanaka, K A; Lei, A L

    2008-01-01

    In fast ignition for laser thermonuclear fusion, an ultra intense laser (UIL) pulse irradiates an imploded plasma in order to fast-heat a high-density core with hot electrons generated in laser-plasma interactions. An UIL pulse needs to make plasma channel via laser self-focusing and to propagate through the corona plasma to reach close enough to the core. Hot electrons are used for heating the core. Therefore the propagation of laser light in the high-density plasma region and spatial distribution of hot electron are important in issues in order to study the feasibility of this scheme. We measure the spatial distribution of hot electron when the laser light propagates into the high-density plasma region by self-focusing

  15. A comparison of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) methods to characterize nanoparticle size distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoo, Christopher M.; Starostin, Natasha; West, Paul; Mecartney, Martha L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper compares the accuracy of conventional dynamic light scattering (DLS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) for characterizing size distributions of polystyrene nanoparticles in the size range of 20-100 nm. Average DLS values for monosize dispersed particles are slightly higher than the nominal values whereas AFM values were slightly lower than nominal values. Bimodal distributions were easily identified with AFM, but DLS results were skewed toward larger particles. AFM characterization of nanoparticles using automated analysis software provides an accurate and rapid analysis for nanoparticle characterization and has advantages over DLS for non-monodispersed solutions.

  16. Regulation of Light Energy Utilization and Distribution of Photosynthesis in Five Subtropical Woody Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Liu; Chang-Lian Peng; Zhi-Fang Lin; Gui-Zhu Lin; Xiao-Ping Pan

    2007-01-01

    The adaptations and responses of photosynthesis to long- and short-term growth light gradient treatments were investigated in five subtropical forest plants, namely Pinus massoniana Lamb., Schima superba Gardn. et Champ.,Castanopsis fissa (Champ. ex Benth.) Rehd. et Wils., Acmena acuminatissima (BI.) Merr et Perry, and Cryptocarya concinna Hance. With diurnal changes in sunlight and air temperature, the de-epoxidation state and lutein content in the five woody plants under three light intensifies first increased and then decreased during the day. However,maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm; where Fm is the maximum fluorescence yield and Fv is variable fluorescence) and the photochemical quantum yields of photosystem (PS) Ⅱ (ΦPSII) of the species examined changed in the opposite manner, with those in plants grown under 100% natural light changing the most. After long-term treatment (21 months), anti-oxidant capacity (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH·)-scavenging capacity) and utilization of excitation energy showed differences in modulation by different light intensities. It was shown that A.acuminatissima and C. concinna, as dominant species in the late succession stage of a subtropical forest in Dinghu mountain, South China, were better able to adapt to different light environments. However, P. massoniana, the pioneer species of this forest, exhibited less adaptation to Iow light intensity and was definitely eliminated by the forest successlon process.

  17. Parameterization of Cherenkov Light Lateral Distribution Function as a Function of the Zenith Angle around the Knee Region

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulsttar, Marwah M.; Al-Rubaiee, A. A.; Ali, Abdul Halim Kh.

    2016-01-01

    Cherenkov light lateral distribution function (CLLDF) simulation was fulfilled using CORSIKA code for configurations of Tunka EAS array of different zenith angles. The parameterization of the CLLDF was carried out as a function of the distance from the shower core in extensive air showers (EAS) and zenith angle on the basis of the CORSIKA simulation of primary proton around the knee region with the energy 3.10^15 eV at different zenith angles. The parameterized CLLDF is verified in comparison...

  18. Similar distributions of repaired sites in chromatin of normal and xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells damaged by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    Excision repair of damage from ultraviolet light in both normal and xeroderma pigmentosum variant fibroblasts at early times after irradiation occurred preferentially in regions of DNA accessible to micrococcal nuclease digestion. These regions are predominantly the linker regions between nucleosomes in chromatin. The alterations reported at polymerization and ligation steps of excision repair in the variant are therefore not associated with changes in the relative distributions of repair sites in linker and core particle regions of DNA. (Auth.)

  19. Distributed transition-edge sensors for linearized position response in a phonon-mediated X-ray imaging spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Blas; Brink, Paul L.; Leman, Steven W.; Castle, Joseph P.; Tomada, Astrid; Young, Betty A.; Martínez-Galarce, Dennis S.; Stern, Robert A.; Deiker, Steve; Irwin, Kent D.

    2004-03-01

    For future solar X-ray satellite missions, we are developing a phonon-mediated macro-pixel composed of a Ge crystal absorber with four superconducting transition-edge sensors (TES) distributed on the backside. The X-rays are absorbed on the opposite side and the energy is converted into phonons, which are absorbed into the four TES sensors. By connecting together parallel elements into four channels, fractional total energy absorbed between two of the sensors provides x-position information and the other two provide y-position information. We determine the optimal distribution for the TES sub-elements to obtain linear position information while minimizing the degradation of energy resolution.

  20. The adder (Vipera berus in Southern Altay Mountains: population characteristics, distribution, morphology and phylogenetic position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaopeng Cui

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As the most widely distributed snake in Eurasia, the adder (Vipera berus has been extensively investigated in Europe but poorly understood in Asia. The Southern Altay Mountains represent the adder’s southern distribution limit in Central Asia, whereas its population status has never been assessed. We conducted, for the first time, field surveys for the adder at two areas of Southern Altay Mountains using a combination of line transects and random searches. We also described the morphological characteristics of the collected specimens and conducted analyses of external morphology and molecular phylogeny. The results showed that the adder distributed in both survey sites and we recorded a total of 34 sightings. In Kanas river valley, the estimated encounter rate over a total of 137 km transects was 0.15 ± 0.05 sightings/km. The occurrence of melanism was only 17%. The small size was typical for the adders in Southern Altay Mountains in contrast to other geographic populations of the nominate subspecies. A phylogenetic tree obtained by Bayesian Inference based on DNA sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b (1,023 bp grouped them within the Northern clade of the species but failed to separate them from the subspecies V. b. sachalinensis. Our discovery extends the distribution range of V. berus and provides a basis for further researches. We discuss the hypothesis that the adder expands its distribution border to the southwest along the mountains’ elevation gradient, but the population abundance declines gradually due to a drying climate.

  1. SU-F-T-24: Impact of Source Position and Dose Distribution Due to Curvature of HDR Transfer Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, A; Yue, N [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is a highly targeted from of radiotherapy. While this may lead to ideal dose distributions on the treatment planning system, a small error in source location can lead to change in the dose distribution. The purpose of this study is to quantify the impact on source position error due to curvature of the transfer tubes and the impact this may have on the dose distribution. Methods: Since the source travels along the midline of the tube, an estimate of the positioning error for various angles of curvature was determined using geometric properties of the tube. Based on the range of values a specific shift was chosen to alter the treatment plans for a number of cervical cancer patients who had undergone HDR brachytherapy boost using tandem and ovoids. Impact of dose to target and organs at risk were determined and checked against guidelines outlined by radiation oncologist. Results: The estimate of the positioning error was 2mm short of the expected position (the curved tube can only cause the source to not reach as far as with a flat tube). Quantitative impact on the dose distribution is still in the process of being analyzed. Conclusion: The accepted positioning tolerance for the source position of a HDR brachytherapy unit is plus or minus 1mm. If there is an additional 2mm discrepancy due to tube curvature, this can result in a source being 1mm to 3mm short of the expected location. While we do always attempt to keep the tubes straight, in some cases such as with tandem and ovoids, the tandem connector does not extend as far out from the patient so the ovoid tubes always contain some degree of curvature. The dose impact of this may be significant.

  2. Monochromic radiation through light-emitting diode (LED positively augments in vitro shoot regeneration in Orchid (Dendrobium sonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandita Billore

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Monochromatic lights emitted by light-emitting diodes (LEDs have generated great interest for efficient and controlled growth in vitro, especially of plants which are endangered or require specific intensity and wavelength of light. In the present study, we have evaluated the effect of monochromatic LEDs on in vitro morphogenesis: growth, proliferation of shoot cultures, and rooting of Dendrobium sonia. Different light sources viz. white LEDs (W, blue LEDs (B, yellow LEDs (Y and red LEDs (R were tested under photoperiod of 16 h of exposure and 8 h of dark. The frequency of morphogenesis depended on the wavelength of the applied monochromatic light. Higher wavelength monochromatic light (yellow light was observed to induce higher shoot proliferation (98%, early PLB (protocorm-like bodies formation, differentiation into green buds and shoot initiation as compared to red, blue and white light treatments. Yellow light also yielded higher number of shoots per explants (29 shoots/explant than red, blue and white light treatments. The results suggest that the monochromatic light sources stimulate morphogenic effects on in vitro culture of Dendrobium sonia, and that yellow light treatment can be used to enhance the efficiency of micropropagation.

  3. Staring at the Cold Sun: Blue Light Regulation Is Distributed within the Genus Acinetobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golic, Adrián; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Nemec, Alexandr; Viale, Alejandro M.; Actis, Luis A.; Mussi, María Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    We previously showed that the opportunistic nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is able to sense and respond to light via BlsA, a BLUF (Blue-Light-sensing Using FAD)-domain photoreceptor protein. Here, we extend our previous studies showing that light regulation is not restricted to A. baumannii, but rather widespread within the genus Acinetobacter. First, we found that blue light modulates motility and biofilm formation in many species of the genus, including members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex. In many of these species blue light acts as a key factor guiding the decision between motility or sessility at 24°C, whereas in A. baumannii, light inhibits both motility and biofilm formation. We also show that light regulation of motility occurred not only at 24°C but also at 37°C in non-A. baumannii species, contrasting the situation of A. baumannii which only shows photoregulation at 24°C. Second, we show that Acinetobacter baylyi (strain ADP1) BLUF-photoreceptors can functionally replace in vivo the A. baumannii 17978 BlsA protein and that the pathways leading to biofilm formation are inversely regulated at 24°C between these two microorganisms. Finally, we found the presence of predicted genes coding BLUF-containing proteins in all Acinetobacter sequenced genomes, even though the copy number is variable among them. Phylogenetic analysis suggests a common origin for all BLUF domains present in members of this genus, and could distinguish well-differentiated clusters that group together BLUF homologs from different species, a situation particularly clear for members of the ACB complex. Despite a role played by these BLUF domain-containing proteins in the photoregulation observed in the members of the genus Acinetobacter is a likely scenario given our findings in A. baumannii and A. baylyi, further research will contribute to confirm this possibility. PMID:23358859

  4. Staring at the cold sun: blue light regulation is distributed within the genus Acinetobacter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Golic

    Full Text Available We previously showed that the opportunistic nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is able to sense and respond to light via BlsA, a BLUF (Blue-Light-sensing Using FAD-domain photoreceptor protein. Here, we extend our previous studies showing that light regulation is not restricted to A. baumannii, but rather widespread within the genus Acinetobacter. First, we found that blue light modulates motility and biofilm formation in many species of the genus, including members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex. In many of these species blue light acts as a key factor guiding the decision between motility or sessility at 24°C, whereas in A. baumannii, light inhibits both motility and biofilm formation. We also show that light regulation of motility occurred not only at 24°C but also at 37°C in non-A. baumannii species, contrasting the situation of A. baumannii which only shows photoregulation at 24°C. Second, we show that Acinetobacter baylyi (strain ADP1 BLUF-photoreceptors can functionally replace in vivo the A. baumannii 17978 BlsA protein and that the pathways leading to biofilm formation are inversely regulated at 24°C between these two microorganisms. Finally, we found the presence of predicted genes coding BLUF-containing proteins in all Acinetobacter sequenced genomes, even though the copy number is variable among them. Phylogenetic analysis suggests a common origin for all BLUF domains present in members of this genus, and could distinguish well-differentiated clusters that group together BLUF homologs from different species, a situation particularly clear for members of the ACB complex. Despite a role played by these BLUF domain-containing proteins in the photoregulation observed in the members of the genus Acinetobacter is a likely scenario given our findings in A. baumannii and A. baylyi, further research will contribute to confirm this possibility.

  5. Light Distribution in the E3 and E4 Scintillation Counters of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment is an important component of the ATLAS calorimetry because they play a crucial role in the search for new particles. The E3 and E4 are crack scintillators of TileCal that extend into the gap region between the EM barrel and EM endcaps. They thus sample the energy of the EM showers produced by particles interacting with the dead material in the EM calorimeters and with the inner detector cables. This project focuses on the study of the light collection uniformity in the E3 and E4 scintillating tiles using low energy electrons as the ionising particles. It is important to have uniform light response in the tiles because it would ensure a good energy resolution for the dead region. However, many factors affect the uniform light collection within the scintillating tiles.

  6. SU-E-T-324: The Influence of Patient Positioning Uncertainties in Proton Radiotherapy On Proton Range and Dose Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebl, J [EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Paganetti, H; Winey, B [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy allows radiation treatment delivery with high dose gradients. The nature of such dose distributions increases the influence of patient positioning uncertainties on their fidelity when compared to photon radiotherapy. The present work quantitatively analyzes the influence of setup uncertainties on proton range and dose distributions. Methods: 38 clinical passive scattering treatment fields for small lesions in the head were studied. Dose distributions for shifted and rotated patient positions were Monte Carlo-simulated. Proton range uncertainties at the 50% and 90%-dose falloff position were calculated considering 18 arbitrary combinations of maximal patient position shifts and rotations for two patient positioning methods. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs), equivalent uniform doses (EUDs) and tumor control probabilities (TCPs) were studied for organs at risk (OARs) and target volumes of eight patients. Results: We identified a median 1σ proton range uncertainty at the 50%-dose falloff of 2.8 mm for anatomy-based patient positioning and 1.6 mm for fiducial-based patient positioning as well as 7.2 mm and 5.8 mm for the 90%-dose falloff position respectively. These range uncertainties were correlated to heterogeneity indices (HIs) calculated for each treatment field (38% < R{sup 2} < 50%). A NTCP increase of more than 10% (absolute) was observed for less than 2.9% (anatomy-based positioning) and 1.2% (fiducial-based positioning) of the studied OARs and patient shifts. TCP decreases larger than 10% (absolute) were seen for less than 2.2% of the target volumes or non-existent. EUD changes were up to 178% for OARs and 35% for target volumes. Conclusion: The influence of patient positioning uncertainties on proton range in therapy of small lesions in the human brain and target and OAR dosimetry were studied. Observed range uncertainties were correlated with HIs. The clinical practice of using multiple compensator

  7. Unequally distributed psychological assets: are there social disparities in optimism, life satisfaction, and positive affect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Julia K; Chen, Ying; Williams, David R; Ryff, Carol; Kubzansky, Laura D

    2015-01-01

    Socioeconomic status is associated with health disparities, but underlying psychosocial mechanisms have not been fully identified. Dispositional optimism may be a psychosocial process linking socioeconomic status with health. We hypothesized that lower optimism would be associated with greater social disadvantage and poorer social mobility. We also investigated whether life satisfaction and positive affect showed similar patterns. Participants from the Midlife in the United States study self-reported their optimism, satisfaction, positive affect, and socioeconomic status (gender, race/ethnicity, education, occupational class and prestige, income). Social disparities in optimism were evident. Optimistic individuals tended to be white and highly educated, had an educated parent, belonged to higher occupational classes with more prestige, and had higher incomes. Findings were generally similar for satisfaction, but not positive affect. Greater optimism and satisfaction were also associated with educational achievement across generations. Optimism and life satisfaction are consistently linked with socioeconomic advantage and may be one conduit by which social disparities influence health.

  8. Identification and positional distribution analysis of transcription factor binding sites for genes from the wheat fl-cDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen-Yong; Guo, Xiao-Jiang; Chen, Zhong-Xu; Chen, Wei-Ying; Wang, Ji-Rui

    2017-06-01

    The binding sites of transcription factors (TFs) in upstream DNA regions are called transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). TFBSs are important elements for regulating gene expression. To date, there have been few studies on the profiles of TFBSs in plants. In total, 4,873 sequences with 5' upstream regions from 8530 wheat fl-cDNA sequences were used to predict TFBSs. We found 4572 TFBSs for the MADS TF family, which was twice as many as for bHLH (1951), B3 (1951), HB superfamily (1914), ERF (1820), and AP2/ERF (1725) TFs, and was approximately four times higher than the remaining TFBS types. The percentage of TFBSs and TF members showed a distinct distribution in different tissues. Overall, the distribution of TFBSs in the upstream regions of wheat fl-cDNA sequences had significant difference. Meanwhile, high frequencies of some types of TFBSs were found in specific regions in the upstream sequences. Both TFs and fl-cDNA with TFBSs predicted in the same tissues exhibited specific distribution preferences for regulating gene expression. The tissue-specific analysis of TFs and fl-cDNA with TFBSs provides useful information for functional research, and can be used to identify relationships between tissue-specific TFs and fl-cDNA with TFBSs. Moreover, the positional distribution of TFBSs indicates that some types of wheat TFBS have different positional distribution preferences in the upstream regions of genes.

  9. Moving mesh finite element method for finite time extinction of distributed parameter systems with positive exponential feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnadi, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    In the distributed parameter systems with exponential feedback, non-global existence of solution is not always exist. For some positive initial values, there exist finite time T such that the solution goes to infinity, i.e. finite time extinction or blow-up. Here is present a numerical solution using Moving Mesh Finite Element to solve the distributed parameter systems with exponential feedback close to blow-up time. The numerical behavior of the mesh close to the time of extinction is the prime interest in this study

  10. Light microscopical demonstration and zonal distribution of parasinusoidal cells (Ito cells) in normal human liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Junge, Jette; Nielsen, O

    1988-01-01

    The parasinusoidal cells of the liver (Ito cells) were demonstrated light microscopically in autopsy specimens fixed in formalin and stained with Oil red O after dichromate treatment. The method allows examination of large samples containing numerous acini. Quantitative assessment showed a zonal...

  11. Light microscopical demonstration and zonal distribution of parasinusoidal cells (Ito cells) in normal human liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Junge, Jette; Nielsen, O

    1988-01-01

    The parasinusoidal cells of the liver (Ito cells) were demonstrated light microscopically in autopsy specimens fixed in formalin and stained with Oil red O after dichromate treatment. The method allows examination of large samples containing numerous acini. Quantitative assessment showed a zonal ...

  12. Reconstruction of lattice parameters and beam momentum distribution from turn-by-turn beam position monitor readings in circular accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Edmonds

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In high chromaticity circular accelerators, rapid decoherence of the betatron motion of a particle beam can make the measurement of lattice and bunch values, such as Courant-Snyder parameters and betatron amplitude, difficult. A method for reconstructing the momentum distribution of a beam from beam position measurements is presented. Further analysis of the same beam position monitor data allows estimates to be made of the Courant-Snyder parameters and the amplitude of coherent betatron oscillation of the beam. The methods are tested through application to data taken on the linear nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator, EMMA.

  13. Light Absorption in Coralline Algae (Rhodophyta: A Morphological and Functional Approach to Understanding Species Distribution in a Coral Reef Lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Román M. Vásquez-Elizondo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Red coralline algae are a cosmopolitan group with the ability to precipitate CaCO3 within the walls of their vegetative cells. The resultant carbonate structure is key for explaining their ecological success, as it provides protection against herbivores and resistance to water motion. However, its potential contribution to enhance thallus light absorption efficiency through multiple light scattering on algal skeleton, similar to the effect documented for scleractinian corals, has not been yet investigated. Here, we initiate this analysis, characterizing thallus optical properties of three coralline species, which differed in pigment content and thallus mass area (TMA, gDW m−2. The three species, the rhodolith Neogoniolithon sp., the crustose coralline alga (CCA, Lithothamnion sp., and the articulated alga Amphiroa tribulus, represent the more distinctive coralline growth-forms and are able to colonize contrasting light environments in Caribbean coral reefs. The thicker thalli of the rhodoliths were the most efficient light collectors, as evidenced by their higher pigment absorption efficiency (a*Chla; m2 mgChla−1 and photosynthetic rates per unit area. This could explain rhodolith success in oligotrophic, highly illuminated reef environments. In contrast, the thinner thalli of the CCA, a low-light specialist, showed the highest metabolic rates normalized to mass and the highest light absorption efficiencies per unit mass (a*M; m2 gdw−1. Therefore, the ecological success of the CCA in cryptic habitats within the reef cannot be explained only by its low-light physiology, but also by its capacity to reduce the structural costs of their thalli, and thus of its new growth. Lastly, the ecological success of Amphiroa tribulus, which displayed intermediate values for the efficiency of light absorption, metabolic rates and TMA, was explained by its ability to construct the largest light collectors (algal canopies thanks to the presence of flexible

  14. B→ππ form factors from light-cone sum rules with B-meson distribution amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Shan; Khodjamirian, Alexander [Theoretische Physik 1, Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Fakultät,Department Physik, Universität Siegen,Walter-Flex-Strasse 3, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Virto, Javier [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics,Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern,Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2017-05-30

    We study B→ππ form factors using QCD light-cone sum rules with B-meson distribution amplitudes. These form factors describe the semileptonic decay B→ππℓν̄{sub ℓ}, and constitute an essential input in B→ππℓ{sup +}ℓ{sup −} and B→πππ decays. We employ the correlation functions where a dipion isospin-one state is interpolated by the vector light-quark current. We obtain sum rules where convolutions of the P-wave B̄{sup 0}→π{sup +}π{sup 0} form factors with the timelike pion vector form factor are related to universal B-meson distribution amplitudes. These sum rules are valid in the kinematic regime where the dipion state has a large energy and a low invariant mass, and reproduce analytically the known light-cone sum rules for B→ρ form factors in the limit of ρ-dominance and zero width, thus providing a systematics for so far unaccounted corrections to B→ρ transitions. Using data for the pion vector form factor, we estimate finite-width effects and the contribution of excited ρ-resonances to the B→ππ form factors. We find that these contributions amount up to ∼20% in the small dipion mass region where they can be effectively regarded as a nonresonant (P-wave) background to the B→ρ transition.

  15. Consonant acquisition: a first approach to the distribution of errors in four positions in the word

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Llach

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to describe the behavior of errors in two types of onsets (initial and intervocalic and two types of codas (in the middle and end of the word in order to determine if any of these positions are more prone to specific types of errors than the others.We have looked into the errors that are frequently produced in these four contexts during the acquisition of consonant sounds in the Catalan language. The data were taken from a study on the acquisition of consonants in Catalan, carried out on 90 children between the ages of 3 and 5 years from several kindergarten schools. The results do show that there are characteristic errors depending on the position within the word.

  16. Atomic displacement distributions for light energetic atoms incident on heavy atom targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brice, D.K.

    1975-01-01

    The depth distributions of atomic displacements produced by 4 to 100 keV H, D, and He ions incident on Cr, Mo, and W targets have been calculated using a sharp displacement threshold, E/sub d/ = 35 eV, and a previously described calculational procedure. These displacement depth distributions have been compared with the depth distributions of energy deposited into atomic processes to determine if a proportionality (modified Kinchin--Pease relationship) can be established. Such a relationship does exist for He ions and D ions incident on these metals at energies above 4 keV and 20 keV, respectively. For H ions the two distributions have significantly different shapes at all incident energies considered

  17. USING COORDINATED OBSERVATIONS IN POLARIZED WHITE LIGHT AND FARADAY ROTATION TO PROBE THE SPATIAL POSITION AND MAGNETIC FIELD OF AN INTERPLANETARY SHEATH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Ming; Feng, Xueshang; Liu, Ying D. [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Davies, Jackie A.; Harrison, Richard A. [Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) Space, Harwell Oxford (United Kingdom); Owens, Mathew J.; Davis, Chris J., E-mail: mxiong@spacweather.ac.cn [Reading University, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can be continuously tracked through a large portion of the inner heliosphere by direct imaging in visible and radio wavebands. White light (WL) signatures of solar wind transients, such as CMEs, result from Thomson scattering of sunlight by free electrons and therefore depend on both viewing geometry and electron density. The Faraday rotation (FR) of radio waves from extragalactic pulsars and quasars, which arises due to the presence of such solar wind features, depends on the line-of-sight magnetic field component B{sub ∥} and the electron density. To understand coordinated WL and FR observations of CMEs, we perform forward magnetohydrodynamic modeling of an Earth-directed shock and synthesize the signatures that would be remotely sensed at a number of widely distributed vantage points in the inner heliosphere. Removal of the background solar wind contribution reveals the shock-associated enhancements in WL and FR. While the efficiency of Thomson scattering depends on scattering angle, WL radiance I decreases with heliocentric distance r roughly according to the expression I∝r {sup –3}. The sheath region downstream of the Earth-directed shock is well viewed from the L4 and L5 Lagrangian points, demonstrating the benefits of these points in terms of space weather forecasting. The spatial position of the main scattering site r{sub sheath} and the mass of plasma at that position M{sub sheath} can be inferred from the polarization of the shock-associated enhancement in WL radiance. From the FR measurements, the local B{sub ∥sheath} at r{sub sheath} can then be estimated. Simultaneous observations in polarized WL and FR can not only be used to detect CMEs, but also to diagnose their plasma and magnetic field properties.

  18. Effect of position and momentum constraints on charge distribution in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajni; Kumar, Suneel

    2012-01-01

    The rich phenomenology of multifragmentation has been widely explored after two decades of its discovery. It has been experimentally shown that in one single heavy ion collision many intermediate mass fragments (IMFs) are produced, where IMFs are defined as fragments with 5 ≤ A ≤ A tot /6. In the earlier literature, the multifragmentation was studied by Jakobsson et al. who measured the charge particle distribution along with their kinetic energy spectra in 16 O/ 36 Ar induced reaction between 25 and 200 MeV/nucleon representing the various phenomena in heavy ion collisions

  19. Influence of second kind collisions on the electron distribution function in the positive column of low pressure nitrogen discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohlena, K.; Ruzicka, T.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation for the electron gas in the positive column of a DC discharge in nitrogen is presented. The Boltzmann equation was solved with the inclusion of the second-kind (superelastic) collisions proceeding from the first six excited vibrational levels of molecular nitrogen. The vibrational level population is supposed to follow the Boltzmann distribution for the given vibrational temperature Tsub(v), with a possible deviation of the ground level, which can be overpopulated in the given ratio γ. Apart from the electron distribution functions, which were gained for various values of E/p 0 , Tsub(v) and γ, the values of some production frequencies and kinetic coefficients are presented in form of tables and plots. It is found that the electron distribution (and also the corresponding production rates) only above a certain energy limit depends on Tsub(v) and γ through the normalization constant. (author)

  20. Distribution of events of positive selection and population differentiation in a metabolic pathway: the case of asparagine N-glycosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dall’Olio Giovanni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asparagine N-Glycosylation is one of the most important forms of protein post-translational modification in eukaryotes. This metabolic pathway can be subdivided into two parts: an upstream sub-pathway required for achieving proper folding for most of the proteins synthesized in the secretory pathway, and a downstream sub-pathway required to give variability to trans-membrane proteins, and involved in adaptation to the environment and innate immunity. Here we analyze the nucleotide variability of the genes of this pathway in human populations, identifying which genes show greater population differentiation and which genes show signatures of recent positive selection. We also compare how these signals are distributed between the upstream and the downstream parts of the pathway, with the aim of exploring how forces of population differentiation and positive selection vary among genes involved in the same metabolic pathway but subject to different functional constraints. Results Our results show that genes in the downstream part of the pathway are more likely to show a signature of population differentiation, while events of positive selection are equally distributed among the two parts of the pathway. Moreover, events of positive selection are frequent on genes that are known to be at bifurcation points, and that are identified as being in key position by a network-level analysis such as MGAT3 and GCS1. Conclusions These findings indicate that the upstream part of the Asparagine N-Glycosylation pathway has lower diversity among populations, while the downstream part is freer to tolerate diversity among populations. Moreover, the distribution of signatures of population differentiation and positive selection can change between parts of a pathway, especially between parts that are exposed to different functional constraints. Our results support the hypothesis that genes involved in constitutive processes can be expected to show

  1. Microsensor Studies of Oxygen and Light-Distribution in the Green Macroalga Codium Fragile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LASSEN, C.; BEBOUT, LE; PAERL, HW

    1994-01-01

    to multiple scattering in the medullary tissue. The constant intensity of visible light below 0.2 mm was thus a result of the combined effects of absorption and backscattering from the medulla. The oxygen exchange between the alga and the surrounding water was diffusion-limited with a steep O-2 gradient......Scalar irradiance, oxygen concentration, and oxygenic photosynthesis were measured at 0.1 mm spatial resolution within the tissue of the siphonous green macroalga Codium fragile subsp. tomentosoides (van Goer) Silva by fiber-optic scalar irradiance microsensors and oxygen microelectrodes......, The scalar irradiance of visible light was strongly attenuated in the outer 0.2 mm of the tissue but was nearly constant for the subsequent 1.0 mm of photosynthetic tissue. Far-red scalar irradiance at 750 nm increased below the tissue surface to a maximum of 200% of incident irradiance at 1.2 mm depth due...

  2. Optimization of turbine positioning in water distribution networks. A Sicilian case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milici, Barbara; Messineo, Simona; Messineo, Antonio

    2017-11-01

    The potential energy of water in Water Distribution Networks (WDNs), is usually dissipated by Pressure Reduction Valves (PRVs), thanks to which water utilities manage the pressure level in selected nodes of the network. The present study explores the use of economic hydraulic machines, pumps as turbines (PATs), to produce energy in a small network with the aim to avoid dissipation in favour of renewable energy production. The proposed study is applied to a WDN located in a town close to Palermo (Sicily), where users often install private tanks, to collect water during the period of water scarcity conditions. As expected, the economic benefit of PATs installation in WDNs is affected by the presence of private tanks, whose presence deeply modifies the network from designed condition. The analysis is carried out by means of a mathematical model, which is able to simulate dynamically water distribution networks with private tanks and PATs. As expected, the advantage of PATs' installation in terms of renewable energy recovery is strictly conditioned by their placement in the WDN.

  3. Techniques and training with GreenLight HPS120-W laser therapy of the prostate: Position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muir, Gordon; Gomez Sancha, Fernando; Bachmann, Alexander; Choi, Benjamin; Collins, Edward; de la Rosette, Jean; Reich, Oliver; Tabatabaei, Shahin; Woo, Henry

    2008-01-01

    We report the technical recommendations of the International GreenLight User Group on photoselective vaporization of the prostate in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia using the GreenLight HPS system (American Medical Systems, Minnetonka, Minnesota, USA). This high-power system employs a 120-W

  4. Influence of the spectral distribution of light on the characteristics of photovoltaic panel. Comparison between simulation and experimental

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadel, Meriem; Bouzaki, Mohammed Moustafa; Chadel, Asma; Petit, Pierre; Sawicki, Jean-Paul; Aillerie, Michel; Benyoucef, Boumediene

    2017-02-01

    We present and analyze experimental results obtained with a laboratory setup based on a hardware and smart instrumentation for the complete study of performance of PV panels using for illumination an artificial radiation source (Halogen lamps). Associated to an accurate analysis, this global experimental procedure allows the determination of effective performance under standard conditions thanks to a simulation process originally developed under Matlab software environment. The uniformity of the irradiated surface was checked by simulation of the light field. We studied the response of standard commercial photovoltaic panels under enlightenment measured by a spectrometer with different spectra for two sources, halogen lamps and sunlight. Then, we bring a special attention to the influence of the spectral distribution of light on the characteristics of photovoltaic panel, that we have performed as a function of temperature and for different illuminations with dedicated measurements and studies of the open circuit voltage and short-circuit current.

  5. Effect of organ size and position on out-of-field dose distributions during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarboro, Sarah B; White, Allen; Yaldo, Derek; Kry, Stephen F; Howell, Rebecca M; Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A

    2010-01-01

    Mantle field irradiation has historically been the standard radiation treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma. It involves treating large regions of the chest and neck with high doses of radiation (up to 30 Gy). Previous epidemiological studies on the incidence of second malignancies following radiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma have revealed an increased incidence of second tumors in various organs, including lung, breast, thyroid and digestive tract. Multiple other studies, including the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results, indicated an increased incidence in digestive tract including stomach cancers following mantle field radiotherapy. Assessment of stomach dose is challenging because the stomach is outside the treatment field but very near the treatment border where there are steep dose gradients. In addition, the stomach can vary greatly in size and position. We sought to evaluate the dosimetric impact of the size and variable position of the stomach relative to the field border for a typical Hodgkin lymphoma mantle field irradiation. The mean stomach dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimetry for nine variations in stomach size and position. The mean doses to the nine stomach variations ranged from 0.43 to 0.83 Gy when 30 Gy was delivered to the treatment isocenter. Statistical analyses indicated that there were no significant differences in the mean stomach dose when the stomach was symmetrically expanded up to 3 cm or shifted laterally (medial, anterior or posterior shifts) by up to 3 cm. There was, however, a significant (P > 0.01) difference in the mean dose when the stomach was shifted superiorly or inferiorly by ≥2.5 cm.

  6. Method for uniformly distributing carbon flakes in a positive electrode, the electrode made thereby and compositions. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrazek, F.C.; Smaga, J.A.; Battles, J.E.

    1981-01-19

    A positive electrode for a secondary electrochemical cell is described wherein an electrically conductive current collector is in electrical contact with a particulate mixture of gray cast iron and an alkali metal sulfide and an electrolyte including alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides. Also present may be a transition metal sulfide and graphite flakes from the conversion of gray cast iron to iron sulfide. Also disclosed is a method of distributing carbon flakes in a cell wherein there is formed an electrochemical cell of a positive electrode structure of the type described and a suitable electrolyte and a second electrode containing a material capable of alloying with alkali metal ions. The cell is connected to a source of electrical potential to electrochemically convert gray cast iron to an iron sulfide and uniformly to distribute carbon flakes formerly in the gray cast iron throughout the positive electrode while forming an alkali metal alloy in the negative electrode. Also disclosed are compositions useful in preparing positive electrodes.

  7. Exploring the Vertical Distribution of Structural Parameters and Light Radiation in Rice Canopies by the Coupling Model and Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjiu Guo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Canopy structural parameters and light radiation are important for evaluating the light use efficiency and grain yield of crops. Their spatial variation within canopies and temporal variation over growth stages could be simulated using dynamic models with strong application and predictability. Based on an optimized canopy structure vertical distribution model and the Beer-Lambert law combined with hyperspectral remote sensing (RS technology, we established a new dynamic model for simulating leaf area index (LAI, leaf angle (LA distribution and light radiation at different vertical heights and growth stages. The model was validated by measuring LAI, LA and light radiation in different leaf layers at different growth stages of two different types of rice (Oryza sativa L., i.e., japonica (Wuxiangjing14 and indica (Shanyou63. The results show that the simulated values were in good agreement with the observed values, with an average RRMSE (relative root mean squared error between simulated and observed LAI and LA values of 14.75% and 21.78%, respectively. The RRMSE values for simulated photosynthetic active radiation (PAR transmittance and interception rates were 14.25% and 9.22% for Wuxiangjing14 and 15.71% and 4.40% for Shanyou63, respectively. In addition, the corresponding RRMSE values for red (R, green (G and blue (B radiation transmittance and interception rates were 16.34%, 15.96% and 15.36% for Wuxiangjing14 and 5.75%, 8.23% and 5.03% for Shanyou63, respectively. The results indicate that the model performed well for different rice cultivars and under different cultivation conditions.

  8. Distribution and clinical determinants of time-to-positivity of blood cultures in patients with neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambregts, Merel M C; Warreman, Eva B; Bernards, Alexandra T; Veelken, Hendrik; von dem Borne, Peter A; Dekkers, Olaf M; Visser, Leo G; de Boer, Mark G

    2018-02-01

    Blood cultures (BCs) are essential in the evaluation of neutropenic fever. Modern BC systems have significantly reduced the time-to-positivity (TTP) of BC. This study explores the probability of bacteraemia when BCs have remained negative for different periods of time. All adult patients with neutropenia and bacteraemia were included (January 2012-February 2016). Predictive clinical factors for short (≤16 hours) and long (>24 hours) TTP were determined. The residual probability of bacteraemia was estimated for the scenario of negative BC 24 hours after collection. The cohort consisted of 154 patients, accounting for 190 episodes of bacteraemia. Median age of 61 years, 60.5% were male. In 123 (64.7%) episodes, BC yielded a single Gram-positive micro-organism and in 49 (25.8%) a Gram-negative micro-organism (median TTP 16.7, 14.5 hours respectively, P hours in 91.6% of episodes. Central line-associated bacteraemia was associated with long TTP. The probability of bacteraemia if BC had remained negative for 24 hours was 1%-3%. The expected TTP offers guidance in the management of patients with neutropenia and suspected bacteraemia. The knowledge of negative BC can support a change in working diagnosis, and impact clinical decisions as soon as 24 hours after BC collection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The distribution of stars around the Milky Way's central black hole. II. Diffuse light from sub-giants and dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schödel, R.; Gallego-Cano, E.; Dong, H.; Nogueras-Lara, F.; Gallego-Calvente, A. T.; Amaro-Seoane, P.; Baumgardt, H.

    2018-01-01

    Context. This is the second of three papers that search for the predicted stellar cusp around the Milky Way's central black hole, Sagittarius A*, with new data and methods. Aims: We aim to infer the distribution of the faintest stellar population currently accessible through observations around Sagittarius A*. Methods: We used adaptive optics assisted high angular resolution images obtained with the NACO instrument at the ESO VLT. Through optimised PSF fitting we removed the light from all detected stars above a given magnitude limit. Subsequently we analysed the remaining, diffuse light density. Systematic uncertainties were constrained by the use of data from different observing epochs and obtained with different filters. We show that it is necessary to correct for the diffuse emission from the mini-spiral, which would otherwise lead to a systematically biased light density profile. We used a Paschen α map obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope for this purpose. Results: The azimuthally averaged diffuse surface light density profile within a projected distance of R ≲ 0.5 pc from Sagittarius A* can be described consistently by a single power law with an exponent of Γ = 0.26 ± 0.02stat ± 0.05sys, similar to what has been found for the surface number density of faint stars in Paper I. Conclusions: The analysed diffuse light arises from sub-giant and main-sequence stars with Ks ≈ 19-22 with masses of 0.8-1.5 M⊙. These stars can be old enough to be dynamically relaxed. The observed power-law profile and its slope are consistent with the existence of a relaxed stellar cusp around the Milky Way's central black hole. We find that a Nuker law provides an adequate description of the nuclear cluster's intrinsic shape (assuming spherical symmetry). The 3D power-law slope near Sgr A* is γ = 1.13 ± 0.03model ± 0.05sys. The stellar density decreases more steeply beyond a break radius of about 3 pc, which corresponds roughly to the radius of influence of the

  10. A system for on-line monitoring of light element concentration distributions in thin samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, P.J.M.; Mutsaers, P.H.A.; Voigt, de M.J.A.

    1999-01-01

    At the Cyclotron Laboratory, a scanning proton microprobe is used to determine concentration distributions in biomedical samples. The data acquired in these measurements used to be analysed in a time consuming off-line analysis. To avoid the loss of valuable measurement and analysis time, DYANA was

  11. The spectral energy distribution of the scattered light from dark clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Kalevi; Schnur, G. F. O.

    1989-01-01

    A dark cloud is exposed to the ambient radiation field of integrated starlight in the Galaxy. Scattering of starlight by the dust particles gives rise to a diffuse surface brightness of the dark nebula. The intensity and the spectrum of this diffuse radiation can be used to investigate, e.g., the scattering parameters of the dust, the optical thickness of the cloud, and as a probe of the ambient radiation field at the location of the cloud. An understanding of the scattering process is also a prerequisite for the isolation of broad spectral features due to fluorescence or to any other non-scattering origin of the diffuse light. Model calculations are presented for multiple scattering in a spherical cloud. These calculations show that the different spectral shapes of the observed diffuse light can be reproduced with standard dust parameters. The possibility to use the observed spectrum as a diagnostic tool for analyzing the thickness of the cloud and the dust particle is discussed.

  12. Position-specific 13C distributions within propane from experiments and natural gas samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, Alison; Sessions, Alex; Lawson, Michael; Ferreira, A. A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Lewan, Michael D.; Eiler, John M.

    2018-01-01

    Site-specific carbon isotope measurements of organic compounds potentially recover information that is lost in a conventional, 'bulk' isotopic analysis. Such measurements are useful because isotopically fractionating processes may have distinct effects at different molecular sites, and thermodynamically equilibrated populations of molecules tend to concentrate heavy isotopes in one molecular site versus another. Most recent studies of site-specific 13C in organics use specialized Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques or complex chemical degradations prior to mass spectrometric measurements. Herein we present the first application of a new mass spectrometric technique that reconstructs the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane based on measurements of the 13C/12C ratios of two or more fragment ions that sample different proportions of the terminal and central carbon sites. We apply this method to propane from laboratory experiments and natural gas samples to explore the relationships between site-specific carbon isotope composition, full-molecular δ13C, thermal maturity, and variation in organic matter precursors. Our goal is to advance the understanding of the sources and histories of short-chain alkanes within geologic systems. Our findings suggest that propane varies in its site-specific carbon isotope structure, which is correlated with increasing thermal maturity, first increasing in terminal position δ13C and then increasing in both center and terminal position δ13C. This pattern is observed in both experimental and natural samples, and is plausibly explained by a combination of site-specific, temperature-dependent isotope effects associated with conversion of different precursor molecules (kerogen, bitumen, and/or oil) to propane, differences in site-specific isotopic contents of those precursors, and possibly distillation of reactive components of those precursors with increasing maturity. We hypothesize that the largest changes in

  13. Position-specific 13C distributions within propane from experiments and natural gas samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, Alison; Sessions, Alex L.; Lawson, Michael; Ferreira, A.A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Lewan, Michael; Eilers, J.M.

    2018-01-01

    Site-specific carbon isotope measurements of organic compounds potentially recover information that is lost in a conventional, ‘bulk’ isotopic analysis. Such measurements are useful because isotopically fractionating processes may have distinct effects at different molecular sites, and thermodynamically equilibrated populations of molecules tend to concentrate heavy isotopes in one molecular site versus another. Most recent studies of site-specific 13C in organics use specialized Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques or complex chemical degradations prior to mass spectrometric measurements. Herein we present the first application of a new mass spectrometric technique that reconstructs the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane based on measurements of the 13C/12C ratios of two or more fragment ions that sample different proportions of the terminal and central carbon sites. We apply this method to propane from laboratory experiments and natural gas samples to explore the relationships between site-specific carbon isotope composition, full-molecular δ13C, thermal maturity, and variation in organic matter precursors. Our goal is to advance the understanding of the sources and histories of short-chain alkanes within geologic systems. Our findings suggest that propane varies in its site-specific carbon isotope structure, which is correlated with increasing thermal maturity, first increasing in terminal position δ13C and then increasing in both center and terminal position δ13C. This pattern is observed in both experimental and natural samples, and is plausibly explained by a combination of site-specific, temperature-dependent isotope effects associated with conversion of different precursor molecules (kerogen, bitumen, and/or oil) to propane, differences in site-specific isotopic contents of those precursors, and possibly distillation of reactive components of those precursors with increasing maturity. We hypothesize that the largest changes in

  14. Measurement and analysis of neutron flux distribution of STACY heterogeneous core by position sensitive proportional counter. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murazaki, Minoru; Uno, Yuichi; Miyoshi, Yoshinori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    We have measured neutron flux distribution around the core tank of STACY heterogeneous core by position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) to develop the method to measure reactivity for subcritical systems. The neutron flux distribution data in the position accuracy of {+-}13 mm have been obtained in the range of uranium concentration of 50g/L to 210g/L both in critical and in subcritical state. The prompt neutron decay constant, {alpha}, was evaluated from the measurement data of pulsed neutron source experiments. We also calculated distribution of neutron flux and {sup 3}He reaction rates at the location of PSPC by using continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP. The measurement data was compared with the calculation results. As results of comparison, calculated values agreed generally with measurement data of PSPC with Cd cover in the region above half of solution height, but the difference between calculated value and measurement data was large in the region below half of solution height. On the other hand, calculated value agreed well with measurement data of PSPC without Cd cover. (author)

  15. Measurement and analysis of neutron flux distribution of STACY heterogeneous core by position sensitive proportional counter. Contract research

    CERN Document Server

    Murazaki, M; Uno, Y

    2003-01-01

    We have measured neutron flux distribution around the core tank of STACY heterogeneous core by position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) to develop the method to measure reactivity for subcritical systems. The neutron flux distribution data in the position accuracy of +-13 mm have been obtained in the range of uranium concentration of 50g/L to 210g/L both in critical and in subcritical state. The prompt neutron decay constant, alpha, was evaluated from the measurement data of pulsed neutron source experiments. We also calculated distribution of neutron flux and sup 3 He reaction rates at the location of PSPC by using continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP. The measurement data was compared with the calculation results. As results of comparison, calculated values agreed generally with measurement data of PSPC with Cd cover in the region above half of solution height, but the difference between calculated value and measurement data was large in the region below half of solution height. On the other hand, ...

  16. Distributions of positive correlations in sectoral value added growth in the global economic network*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluck, Julian; Donner, Reik V.

    2017-02-01

    International trade has grown considerably during the process of globalization. Complex supply chains for the production of goods have resulted in an increasingly connected International Trade Network (ITN). Traditionally, direct trade relations between industries have been regarded as mediators of supply and demand spillovers. With increasing network connectivity the question arises if higher-order relations become more important in explaining a national sector's susceptibility to supply and demand changes of its trading partner. In this study we address this question by investigating empirically to what extent the topological properties of the ITN provide information about positive correlations in the production of two industry sectors. We observe that although direct trade relations between industries serve as important indicators for correlations in the industries' value added growth, opportunities of substitution for required production inputs as well as second-order trade relations cannot be neglected. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the relation between trade and economic productivity and can serve as a basis for the improvement of crisis spreading models that evaluate contagion threats in the case of a node's failure in the ITN.

  17. A semi-classical model for the description of angular distribution of light particles emitted in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingshang

    1990-04-01

    A semi-classical model of multi-step direct and compound nuclear reactions has been proposed to describe the angular distributions of light particles emitted in reaction processes induced by nucleons with energies of several tens of MeV. The exact closed solution for the time-dependent master equation of the exciton model is applied. Based on the Fermi gas model, the scattering kernel for two-nucleon collisions includes the influence of the Fermi motion and the Pauli exclusion principle, which give a significant improvement in the description of the rise of the backward distributions. The angle-energy correlation for the first few steps of the collision process (multi-step direct process) yields further improvements in the description of the angular distribution. The pick-up mechanism is employed to describe the composite particle emission. This reasonable physical picture reproduces the experimental data of the energy spectra of composite particles satisfactorily. The angular distribution of the emitted composite particles is determined by an angular factor in terms of the momentum conservation of the nucleons forming the composite cluster. The generalized master equation is employed for the multi-step compound process. Thus a classical approach has been established to calculate the double differential cross sections for all kinds of particles emitted in multi-step nuclear reaction processes. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

  18. Three-dimensional light distribution near the focus of a tightly focused beam of few-cycle optical pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romallosa, Kristine Marie; Bantang, Johnrob; Saloma, Caesar

    2003-01-01

    Via the Richards-Wolf vector diffraction theory, we analyze the three-dimensional intensity distribution of the focal volume that is produced by a strongly focused 750-nm beam of ultrafast, Gaussian-shaped optical pulses (10 -9 s≥ pulse width τ≥1 fs=10 -15 s). Knowledge of the three-dimensional distribution near focus is essential in determining the diffraction-limited resolution of an optical microscope. The optical spectrum of a short pulse is characterized by side frequencies about the carrier frequency. The effect of spectral broadening on the focused intensity distribution is evaluated via the Linfoot's criteria of fidelity, structural content, and correlation quality and with reference to a 750-nm cw focused beam. Different values are considered for τ and numerical aperture of the focusing lens (0.1≤X NA ≤1.2). At X NA =0.8, rapid deterioration of the focused intensity distribution is observed at τ=1.2 fs. This happens because a 750-nm optical pulse with τ=1.2 fs has an associated coherence length of 359.7 nm which is less than the Nyquist sampling interval of 375 nm that is required to sample 750 nm sinusoid without loss of information. The ill-effects of spectral broadening is weaker in two-photon excitation microscope than in its single-photon counterpart for the same focusing lens and light source

  19. All fiber cladding mode stripper with uniform heat distribution and high cladding light loss manufactured by CO2 laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebali, M. A.; Basso, E. T.

    2018-02-01

    Cladding mode strippers are primarily used at the end of a fiber laser cavity to remove high-power excess cladding light without inducing core loss and beam quality degradation. Conventional manufacturing methods of cladding mode strippers include acid etching, abrasive blasting or laser ablation. Manufacturing of cladding mode strippers using laser ablation consist of removing parts of the cladding by fused silica ablation with a controlled penetration and shape. We present and characterize an optimized cladding mode stripper design that increases the cladding light loss with a minimal device length and manufacturing time. This design reduces the localized heat generation by improving the heat distribution along the device. We demonstrate a cladding mode stripper written on a 400um fiber with cladding light loss of 20dB, with less than 0.02dB loss in the core and minimal heating of the fiber and coating. The manufacturing process of the designed component is fully automated and takes less than 3 minutes with a very high throughput yield.

  20. Electron energy distribution function in the positive column of a neon glow discharge using the black wall approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hawat, Sh; Naddaf, M

    2005-01-01

    The electron energy distribution function (EEDF) was determined from the second derivative of the I-V Langmuir probe characteristics and, thereafter, theoretically calculated by solving the plasma kinetic equation, using the black wall (BW) approximation, in the positive column of a neon glow discharge. The pressure has been varied from 0.5 to 4 Torr and the current from 10 to 30 mA. The measured electron temperature, density and electric field strength were used as input data for solving the kinetic equation. Comparisons were made between the EEDFs obtained from experiment, the BW approach, the Maxwellian distribution and the Rutcher solution of the kinetic equation in the elastic energy range. The best conditions for the BW approach are found to be under the discharge conditions: current density j d = 4.45 mA cm -2 and normalized electric field strength E/p = 1.88 V cm -1 Torr -1

  1. Electron energy distribution function in the positive column of a neon glow discharge using the black wall approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hawat, Sh; Naddaf, M.

    2005-04-01

    The electron energy distribution function (EEDF) was determined from the second derivative of the I-V Langmuir probe characteristics and, thereafter, theoretically calculated by solving the plasma kinetic equation, using the black wall (BW) approximation, in the positive column of a neon glow discharge. The pressure has been varied from 0.5 to 4 Torr and the current from 10 to 30 mA. The measured electron temperature, density and electric field strength were used as input data for solving the kinetic equation. Comparisons were made between the EEDFs obtained from experiment, the BW approach, the Maxwellian distribution and the Rutcher solution of the kinetic equation in the elastic energy range. The best conditions for the BW approach are found to be under the discharge conditions: current density jd = 4.45 mA cm-2 and normalized electric field strength E/p = 1.88 V cm-1 Torr-1.

  2. Transitory provisions on public gas distribution in the light of the Marzano law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedaschi, Arianna

    2005-01-01

    The article begins by describing community law on public gas distribution service, then it examines legislative decree 164/2000( also called Letta Decree), which implements directive no. 98/30/CE. This directive reforms the gas sector and in particular it reforms the way gas is distributed. Art. 14 of the Letta Decree states that the distribution of natural gas shall be a public service, contractors shall be selected through a public tender and contracts shall be stipulate for a maximum of 12 years. Thus it is evident that the new model is radically different from the previous one. Before, the service was provided by the local authorities (either directly or through a long-term lease); now the new model aims at liberalizing the market by out sourcing gas distribution. Out sourcing is carried out through a public tender and for short periods of time. In order to allow a gradual transition from the old model to the new one, the Letta Decree provides for a transitory period articulated in various phases. This has the aim of guaranteeing a balance between the interest of local authorities, on one hand and the firms that distributed gas before the reform came into effect, on the other. The first part of the article focuses on interpretative problems that arose after law no. 239/2004 (so called Marzano law) was passed. In the second half it compares the different judicial interpretations concerning: a) duration of the transitory period; b) possibility of increasing duration as provided for by art. 15, par.7 of legislative decree 164/2000; c) efficacy of the abrogation of art. 15, par.8 of legislative decree 164/2000 and finally d) whether advanced redemption of the gas distribution service is still possible. With regards to the transitory period, the article compares judgement no. 111/2005 by the Administrative Tribunal of Lombardia, with judgement no. 6187/2005 delivered by the Sixth Section of the State Council. It then argues that the prohibition of concentration has

  3. The efficient model to define a single light source position by use of high dynamic range image of 3D scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu-yang; Zhdanov, Dmitry D.; Potemin, Igor S.; Wang, Ying; Cheng, Han

    2016-10-01

    One of the challenges of augmented reality is a seamless combination of objects of the real and virtual worlds, for example light sources. We suggest a measurement and computation models for reconstruction of light source position. The model is based on the dependence of luminance of the small size diffuse surface directly illuminated by point like source placed at a short distance from the observer or camera. The advantage of the computational model is the ability to eliminate the effects of indirect illumination. The paper presents a number of examples to illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method.

  4. Investigation of oxygen distribution in HTSC-insulator in film structures on light ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbitskaya, E.M.; Grekhov, I.V.; Eremin, V.K.; Konnikov, S.G.; Linijchuk, I.A.; Razumov, S.V.; Semchinova, O.K.; Strokan, N.B.; Dyumin, A.N.; Lebedev, V.M.

    1992-01-01

    Use of nuclear reaction method on accelerated ions for profiling of oxygen concentration in thin-film HTSC structures is considered. Reaction on 16 O(d, α) 14 N deuterons, in course of which ∼ 2.6 MeV α-particles are generated, is used. Detected in experiment 2.0-2.6 MeV α-particle spectrum permits to recognstruct oxygen concentration profile in sample depth. Results obtained on YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ and Y 2 BaCuO 5 film om MgO sunstrates, relating to the case of both uniform and nonuniform oxygen distribution, are presented. Resolution in the depth ∼ 200 A and accuracy of concentration measurement (relatively MgO substrate) of several percents are attained during oxygen profiling

  5. Piketty in the light of Pasinetti and Foley: Income distribution, economic growth and financial fragility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARWIL J. DÁVILA-FERNÁNDEZ

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The paper discusses the hypothesis that the functional distribution of income is not necessary stable along the growth path of a capitalist economy. We reviewed Pasinetti and Foley models showing that if we use the traditional definition of capital, i.e., capital as the value of productive resources (i r > g is a necessary condition for the existence of balanced growth, and it will not lead to an explosive process of income concentration and (ii r > i is a necessary condition for a financially robust growth path. Thus we conclude that from a post-Keynesian perspective, Piketty's argument that the root of the increase of inequality in capitalism is that the capital return rate is higher than the growth rate of the economy is wrong.

  6. Fast and secure key distribution using mesoscopic coherent states of light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Geraldo A.

    2003-01-01

    This work shows how two parties A and B can securely share unlimited sequences of random bits at optical speeds. A and B possess true-random physical sources and exchange random bits by using a random sequence received to cipher the following one to be sent. A starting shared secret key is used and the method can be described as a one-time-pad unlimited extender. It is demonstrated that the minimum probability of error in signal determination by the eavesdropper can be set arbitrarily close to the pure guessing level. Being based on the M-ry encryption protocol this method also allows for optical amplification without security degradation, offering practical advantages over the Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol for key distribution

  7. Laterally resolved ion-distribution functions at the substrate position during magnetron sputtering of indium-tin oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plagemann, A.; Ellmer, K.; Wiesemann, K.

    2007-01-01

    During the magnetron sputtering from an indium-tin oxide (ITO) target (76 mm diameter) we measured the ion-distribution functions (IDFs) of energetic ions (argon, indium, and oxygen ions) at the substrate surface using a combination of a quadrupole mass spectrometer and an electrostatic energy analyzer. We obtained the IDFs for argon sputtering pressures in the range from 0.08 to 2 Pa and for dc as well as rf (13.56 MHz) plasma excitation with powers from 10 to 100 W. The IDF measurements were performed both over the target center at a target-to-substrate distance of 65 mm and at different positions along the target radius in order to scan the erosion track of the target. The mean kinetic energies of argon ions calculated from the IDFs in the dc plasma decreased from about 30 to 15 eV, when the argon pressure increased from 0.08 to 2 Pa, which is caused by a decrease of the electron temperature also by a factor of 2. Indium atoms exhibit higher mean energies due to their additional energy from the sputtering process. The total metal ion flux turns out to be proportional to the discharge power and the pressure, the latter dependence being due to Penning ionization of the metal atoms (In and Sn). From the scans across the target surface the lateral distributions of metal, oxygen, and argon ions were derived. In the dc discharge the position of the erosion track is reproduced by increased ion intensities, while it is not the case for the rf excited plasma. The lateral variations of the observed species do not influence the lateral resistivity distributions of the deposited ITO films

  8. The burden, distribution and risk factors for cervical oncogenic human papilloma virus infection in HIV positive Nigerian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezechi, Oliver Chukwujekwu; Ostergren, Per Olof; Nwaokorie, Francisca Obiageri; Ujah, Innocent Achaya Otobo; Odberg Pettersson, Karen

    2014-01-15

    The expected reduction in cervical cancer incidence as a result of increased access to antiretroviral therapy is yet to be seen. In this study we investigated the effect of HIV infection and treatment on high-risk (hr) human papilloma virus (HPV) prevalence and distribution. Cervical cells from 515 (220 HIV positive and 295 HIV negative) women, recruited during community cervical cancer screening programme in states of Ogun and Lagos and at the cervical cancer screen clinic, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research Lagos were evaluated for the presence of 13 hr HPV genotypes by polymerase chain reaction based assay. The prevalence of high-risk HPV was 19.6% in the studied population. HPV 16 (3.9%), 35 (3.5%), 58 (3.3%) and 31 (3.3%) were the most common hr HPV infections detected. We observed that the prevalence of hr HPV was higher in HIV positives (24.5%) than 15.9% in HIV negative women (OR = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.1-2.7). A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed a lower hr HPV prevalence in HIV positive women on antiretroviral drugs (OR = 0.4; 95% CI: 0.3-0.5) and with CD4 count of 500 and above (OR = 0.7; 95% CI: 0.5-0.8). A higher prevalence of hr HPV was also noted in HIV positive women with CD4 count prevalence of HPV 16 and 35 in HIV positive women than in HIV negative women. The use of antiretroviral drugs was found to be associated with a lower prevalence of hr HPV infection, compared to those not on treatment. This study raises important issues that should be further investigated to enable the development of robust cervical cancer prevention and control strategies for women in our setting.

  9. The energy distribution and the recent light history of X Persei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persi, P.; Viotti, R.; Ferrari-Toniolo, M.

    1977-01-01

    Recent UVBRI and near-infrared photometry of X Per, the optical counterpart of 3U 0352 + 30, is used to derive the physical parameters of the Be star and of the circumstellar envelope. A stellar radius of 4.9 R (sun) and a luminosity of 2.1 x 10 4 L (sun), 1 mag fainter than for a main sequence BO star, are derived for the primary. The colour excess is Esub(B-V) 12 cm -3 . The infrared excess is absent during the stage of lower luminosity (1974 to 75). The intrinsic energy distribution of the Be star is also anomalous with a variable Balmer excess. It is suggested that the long-term photometric history of X Per is the result of a size variation of the atmospheric envelope of the Be star which probably affects both the X-ray emission and the infrared excess. Wind accretion on to a nearby compact companion (neutron star) might be responsible for the X-ray emission. A mass loss of about 10 -9 M(sun) yr -1 is thus derived for the Be star. (author)

  10. Calculation of mass flow and steam quality distribution on fuel elements of light-water cooled boiling water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermanns, H.J.

    1977-04-01

    By the example of light-water cooled nuclear reactors, the state of the calculation methods at disposal for calculating mass flow and steam quality distribution (sub-channel analysis) is indicated. Particular regard was paid to the transport phenomena occurring in reactor fuel elements in the range of two phase flow. Experimentally determined values were compared with recalculations of these experiments with the sub-channel code COBRA; from the results of these comparing calculations, conclusions could be drawn on the suitability of this code for defined applications. Limits of reliability could be determined to some extent. Based on the experience gained and the study of individual physical model concepts, recognized as being important, a sub-channel model was drawn up and the corresponding numerical computer code (SIEWAS) worked out. Experiments made at GE could be reproduced with the code SIEWAS with sufficient accuracy. (orig.) [de

  11. New approach for absolute fluence distribution calculations in Monte Carlo simulations of light propagation in turbid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Böcklin, Christoph; Baumann, Dirk; Fröhlich, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    A novel way to attain three dimensional fluence rate maps from Monte-Carlo simulations of photon propagation is presented in this work. The propagation of light in a turbid medium is described by the radiative transfer equation and formulated in terms of radiance. For many applications, particularly in biomedical optics, the fluence rate is a more useful quantity and directly derived from the radiance by integrating over all directions. Contrary to the usual way which calculates the fluence rate from absorbed photon power, the fluence rate in this work is directly calculated from the photon packet trajectory. The voxel based algorithm works in arbitrary geometries and material distributions. It is shown that the new algorithm is more efficient and also works in materials with a low or even zero absorption coefficient. The capabilities of the new algorithm are demonstrated on a curved layered structure, where a non-scattering, non-absorbing layer is sandwiched between two highly scattering layers

  12. The distribution of sexually-transmitted Human Papillomaviruses in HIV positive and negative patients in Zambia, Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hause Lara

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Papillomaviruses (HPV are double-stranded DNA viruses, considered to be the primary etiological agents in cervical intraepithelial neoplasias and cancers. Approximately 15–20 of the 40 mucosal HPVs confer a high-risk of progression of lesions to invasive cancer. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of sexually transmitted HPVs in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV positive and negative patients in Zambia, Africa. The rate of high-risk HPV genotypes worldwide varies within each country. Thus, we sought to investigate the rates of HPV infection in sub-Saharan Africa and the potential role of HIV in affecting the HPV genotype distribution. Methods This retrospective cross-sectional study reports findings on the association and effects of HIV on HPV infections in an existing cohort of patients at University Teaching Hospital (UTH Lusaka, Zambia. The objective of this study was to assess HPV prevalence, genotype distribution and to identify co-factors that influence HPV infection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR with two standard consensus primer sets (CpI/II and GP5+/6+ was used to test for the presence of HPV DNA. Primers specific for β-actin were used to monitor DNA quality. Vaginal lavage samples, collected between 1998-1999 from a total of 70 women, were part of a larger cohort that was also analyzed for HIV and human herpesvirus infection. Seventy of the samples yielded usable DNA. HIV status was determined by two rapid assays, Capillus and Determine. The incidence of HIV and HPV infections and HPV genotype distributions were calculated and statistical significance was determined by Chi-Squared test. Results We determined that most common HPV genotypes detected among these Zambian patients were types 16 and 18 (21.6% each, which is approximately three-fold greater than the rates for HPV16, and ten-fold greater than the rates for HPV18 in the United States. The worldwide prevalence of HPV16 is approximately 14

  13. Equality or Justice? The Position of Labour Laws in Jordan, the UAE and England of Discrimination against Women in the Light of the Requirements of CEDAW

    OpenAIRE

    KASSASBEH, Firas Y.

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the position of labour laws in Jordan, the United Arab Emirates (hereafter UAE) and England towards the issue of equality between woman and man in the workplace in light of the requirements of CEDAW to which the three mentioned countries are parties. Generally speaking, CEDAW tends to be a convention aiming at achieving equality between man and woman in all aspects, inter alia, equality in work opportunities and rights. This vision is more suitable to English law, wher...

  14. Effects of light intensity on the distribution of anthocyanins in Kalanchoe brasiliensis Camb. and Kalanchoe pinnata (Lamk.) Pers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Bruna P; Chedier, Luciana M; Peixoto, Paulo H P; Fabri, Rodrigo L; Pimenta, Daniel S

    2012-03-01

    This paper compares two medicinal species of Kalanchoe, which are often used interchangeably by the population, regarding the distribution of anthocyanins under the influence of four luminosity levels for 6 months. For the morphoanatomical analysis, the 6th stem node of each plant was sectioned. Usual histochemical tests revealed the presence of anthocyanins by cross sections of the stems, petioles and leaf blades. The petioles and leaf blades were submitted to the extraction with acidified methanol, and the anthocyanins were quantified by spectrophotometric readings. At the macroscopic level, it was noticed for both species a higher presence of anthocyanins in stems and petioles of plants under full sunlight. The microscopy of K. brasiliensis stems evidenced the deposition of anthocyanins in the subjacent tissue to the epidermis and cortex, which increased with light intensity. In K. pinnata a subepidermal collenchyma was observed, which interfered in the visualization of anthocyanins. In petioles and leaf blades of K. brasiliensis the deposition of anthocyanins was peripheral, and in K. pinnata it was also throughout the cortex. The quantification of anthocyanins in petioles showed in 70% of light higher averages than in 25%, but in leaf blades there were no significant results. This study contributes to the pharmacognosy of Kalanchoe and it is sustained by the description of flavonoids as biological markers of the genus.

  15. Design of an indoor self-positioning system for the visually impaired--simulation with RFID and Bluetooth in a visible light communication system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohan; Makino, Hideo; Kobayashi, Suguru; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2007-01-01

    After a public experiment of the indoor guidance system using FLC (fluorescent light communication), we found that FLC provides a promising medium for the installation of a guidance system for the visually impaired. However, precise self-positioning was not satisfactorily achieved. In this article, we propose a new self-positioning method, one that uses a combination of RFID (Radio-frequency identification), Bluetooth and FLC. We analyzed the situation and developed a model that combined the three communication modes. Then we performed a series of experiments and get some results in the first step.

  16. Influence of white light illumination on the performance of a-IGZO thin film transistor under positive gate-bias stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lan-Feng; Yu, Guang; Lu, Hai; Wu, Chen-Fei; Qian, Hui-Min; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, You-Dou; Huang, Xiao-Ming

    2015-08-01

    The influence of white light illumination on the stability of an amorphous InGaZnO thin film transistor is investigated in this work. Under prolonged positive gate bias stress, the device illuminated by white light exhibits smaller positive threshold voltage shift than the device stressed under dark. There are simultaneous degradations of field-effect mobility for both stressed devices, which follows a similar trend to that of the threshold voltage shift. The reduced threshold voltage shift under illumination is explained by a competition between bias-induced interface carrier trapping effect and photon-induced carrier detrapping effect. It is further found that white light illumination could even excite and release trapped carriers originally exiting at the device interface before positive gate bias stress, so that the threshold voltage could recover to an even lower value than that in an equilibrium state. The effect of photo-excitation of oxygen vacancies within the a-IGZO film is also discussed. Project supported by the State Key Program for Basic Research of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB301900 and 2011CB922100) and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China.

  17. Comparative distribution of relaxin-3 inputs and calcium-binding protein-positive neurons in rat amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio N Santos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The neural circuits involved in mediating complex behaviors are being rapidly elucidated using various newly developed and powerful anatomical and molecular techniques, providing insights into the neural basis for anxiety disorders, depression, addiction, and dysfunctional social behaviors. Many of these behaviors and associated physiological processes involve the activation of the amygdala in conjunction with cortical and hippocampal circuits. Ascending subcortical projections provide modulatory inputs to the extended amygdala and its related nodes (or ‘hubs’ within these key circuits. One such input arises from the nucleus incertus (NI in the tegmentum, which sends amino acid- and peptide-containing projections throughout the forebrain. Notably, a distinct population of GABAergic NI neurons expresses the highly-conserved neuropeptide, relaxin-3, and relaxin-3 signaling has been implicated in the modulation of reward/motivation and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in rodents via actions within the extended amygdala. Thus, a detailed description of the relaxin-3 innervation of the extended amygdala would provide an anatomical framework for an improved understanding of NI and relaxin-3 modulation of these and other specific amygdala-related functions. Therefore, in this study, we examined the distribution of NI projections and relaxin-3-positive elements (axons/fibers/terminals within the amygdala, relative to the distribution of neurons expressing the calcium-binding proteins, parvalbumin, calretinin and/or calbindin. Anterograde tracer injections into the NI revealed a topographic distribution of NI efferents within the amygdala that was near identical to the distribution of relaxin-3-immunoreactive fibers. Highest densities of anterogradely-labeled elements and relaxin-3-immunoreactive fibers were observed in the medial nucleus of the amygdala, medial divisions of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST and in the endopiriform

  18. The effect of on-line position correction on the dose distribution in focal radiotherapy for bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooijen, Dominique C van; Kamer, Jeroen B van de; Pool, René; Hulshof, Maarten CCM; Koning, Caro CE; Bel, Arjan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-09-24

    The purpose of this study was to determine the dosimetric effect of on-line position correction for bladder tumor irradiation and to find methods to predict and handle this effect. For 25 patients with unifocal bladder cancer intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with 5 beams was planned. The requirement for each plan was that 99% of the target volume received 95% of the prescribed dose. Tumor displacements from -2.0 cm to 2.0 cm in each dimension were simulated, using 0.5 cm increments, resulting in 729 simulations per patient. We assumed that on-line correction for the tumor was applied perfectly. We determined the correlation between the change in D{sub 99%} and the change in path length, which is defined here as the distance from the skin to the isocenter for each beam. In addition the margin needed to avoid underdosage was determined and the probability that an underdosage occurs in a real treatment was calculated. Adjustments for tumor displacement with perfect on-line position correction resulted in an altered dose distribution. The altered fraction dose to the target varied from 91.9% to 100.4% of the prescribed dose. The mean D{sub 99%} (± SD) was 95.8% ± 1.0%. There was a modest linear correlation between the difference in D{sub 99%} and the change in path length of the beams after correction (R{sup 2} = 0.590). The median probability that a systematic underdosage occurs in a real treatment was 0.23% (range: 0 - 24.5%). A margin of 2 mm reduced that probability to < 0.001% in all patients. On-line position correction does result in an altered target coverage, due to changes in average path length after position correction. An extra margin can be added to prevent underdosage.

  19. The effect of on-line position correction on the dose distribution in focal radiotherapy for bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koning Caro CE

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to determine the dosimetric effect of on-line position correction for bladder tumor irradiation and to find methods to predict and handle this effect. Methods For 25 patients with unifocal bladder cancer intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT with 5 beams was planned. The requirement for each plan was that 99% of the target volume received 95% of the prescribed dose. Tumor displacements from -2.0 cm to 2.0 cm in each dimension were simulated, using 0.5 cm increments, resulting in 729 simulations per patient. We assumed that on-line correction for the tumor was applied perfectly. We determined the correlation between the change in D99% and the change in path length, which is defined here as the distance from the skin to the isocenter for each beam. In addition the margin needed to avoid underdosage was determined and the probability that an underdosage occurs in a real treatment was calculated. Results Adjustments for tumor displacement with perfect on-line position correction resulted in an altered dose distribution. The altered fraction dose to the target varied from 91.9% to 100.4% of the prescribed dose. The mean D99% (± SD was 95.8% ± 1.0%. There was a modest linear correlation between the difference in D99% and the change in path length of the beams after correction (R2 = 0.590. The median probability that a systematic underdosage occurs in a real treatment was 0.23% (range: 0 - 24.5%. A margin of 2 mm reduced that probability to Conclusion On-line position correction does result in an altered target coverage, due to changes in average path length after position correction. An extra margin can be added to prevent underdosage.

  20. The effect of on-line position correction on the dose distribution in focal radiotherapy for bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooijen, Dominique C; van de Kamer, Jeroen B; Pool, René; Hulshof, Maarten CCM; Koning, Caro CE; Bel, Arjan

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the dosimetric effect of on-line position correction for bladder tumor irradiation and to find methods to predict and handle this effect. Methods For 25 patients with unifocal bladder cancer intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with 5 beams was planned. The requirement for each plan was that 99% of the target volume received 95% of the prescribed dose. Tumor displacements from -2.0 cm to 2.0 cm in each dimension were simulated, using 0.5 cm increments, resulting in 729 simulations per patient. We assumed that on-line correction for the tumor was applied perfectly. We determined the correlation between the change in D99% and the change in path length, which is defined here as the distance from the skin to the isocenter for each beam. In addition the margin needed to avoid underdosage was determined and the probability that an underdosage occurs in a real treatment was calculated. Results Adjustments for tumor displacement with perfect on-line position correction resulted in an altered dose distribution. The altered fraction dose to the target varied from 91.9% to 100.4% of the prescribed dose. The mean D99% (± SD) was 95.8% ± 1.0%. There was a modest linear correlation between the difference in D99% and the change in path length of the beams after correction (R2 = 0.590). The median probability that a systematic underdosage occurs in a real treatment was 0.23% (range: 0 - 24.5%). A margin of 2 mm reduced that probability to < 0.001% in all patients. Conclusion On-line position correction does result in an altered target coverage, due to changes in average path length after position correction. An extra margin can be added to prevent underdosage. PMID:19775479

  1. The effect of on-line position correction on the dose distribution in focal radiotherapy for bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooijen, Dominique C van; Kamer, Jeroen B van de; Pool, René; Hulshof, Maarten CCM; Koning, Caro CE; Bel, Arjan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the dosimetric effect of on-line position correction for bladder tumor irradiation and to find methods to predict and handle this effect. For 25 patients with unifocal bladder cancer intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with 5 beams was planned. The requirement for each plan was that 99% of the target volume received 95% of the prescribed dose. Tumor displacements from -2.0 cm to 2.0 cm in each dimension were simulated, using 0.5 cm increments, resulting in 729 simulations per patient. We assumed that on-line correction for the tumor was applied perfectly. We determined the correlation between the change in D 99% and the change in path length, which is defined here as the distance from the skin to the isocenter for each beam. In addition the margin needed to avoid underdosage was determined and the probability that an underdosage occurs in a real treatment was calculated. Adjustments for tumor displacement with perfect on-line position correction resulted in an altered dose distribution. The altered fraction dose to the target varied from 91.9% to 100.4% of the prescribed dose. The mean D 99% (± SD) was 95.8% ± 1.0%. There was a modest linear correlation between the difference in D 99% and the change in path length of the beams after correction (R 2 = 0.590). The median probability that a systematic underdosage occurs in a real treatment was 0.23% (range: 0 - 24.5%). A margin of 2 mm reduced that probability to < 0.001% in all patients. On-line position correction does result in an altered target coverage, due to changes in average path length after position correction. An extra margin can be added to prevent underdosage

  2. Electron energy distribution function in the positive column of a neon glow discharge using the black wall approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hawat, Sh; Naddaf, M [Physics Department, Atomic Energy Commission, PO Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2005-04-21

    The electron energy distribution function (EEDF) was determined from the second derivative of the I-V Langmuir probe characteristics and, thereafter, theoretically calculated by solving the plasma kinetic equation, using the black wall (BW) approximation, in the positive column of a neon glow discharge. The pressure has been varied from 0.5 to 4 Torr and the current from 10 to 30 mA. The measured electron temperature, density and electric field strength were used as input data for solving the kinetic equation. Comparisons were made between the EEDFs obtained from experiment, the BW approach, the Maxwellian distribution and the Rutcher solution of the kinetic equation in the elastic energy range. The best conditions for the BW approach are found to be under the discharge conditions: current density j{sub d} = 4.45 mA cm{sup -2} and normalized electric field strength E/p = 1.88 V cm{sup -1} Torr{sup -1}.

  3. Fitness consequences of habitat variability, trophic position, and energy allocation across the depth distribution of a coral-reef fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, E. D.; D'Alessandro, E. K.; Sponaugle, S.

    2017-09-01

    Environmental clines such as latitude and depth that limit species' distributions may be associated with gradients in habitat suitability that can affect the fitness of an organism. With the global loss of shallow-water photosynthetic coral reefs, mesophotic coral ecosystems ( 30-150 m) may be buffered from some environmental stressors, thereby serving as refuges for a range of organisms including mobile obligate reef dwellers. Yet habitat suitability may be diminished at the depth boundary of photosynthetic coral reefs. We assessed the suitability of coral-reef habitats across the majority of the depth distribution of a common demersal reef fish ( Stegastes partitus) ranging from shallow shelf (SS, restrict foraging. Fish in MP environments had a broader diet niche, higher trophic position, and higher muscle C:N ratios compared to shallower environments. High C:N ratios suggest increased tissue lipid content in fish in MP habitats that coincided with higher investment in reproduction based on gonado-somatic index. These results suggest that peripheral MP reefs are suitable habitats for demersal reef fish and may be important refuges for organisms common on declining shallow coral reefs.

  4. Influence of patient position and implant material on the stress distribution in an artificial intervertebral disc of the lumbar vertebrae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpiński Robert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to determine the effect of using cobalt and titanium-based alloys as implant materials for the lumbar vertebrae with an artificial intervertebral disc on the stress distribution. The lumbar vertebrae were chosen for the study because they carry considerably higher loads, especially while standing or sitting. Finite element method (FEM simulations were conducted for three standard loads reflecting three patient's positions: recumbent, standing and sitting. The FEM analysis was performed using the SolidWorks Simulation module. Artificial units containing a pair of vertebrae with a prosthesis between them were designed by the Solid Edge software, based on micro-computed tomography CT scans of the patient's spine. The implant model was designed with its shape based on the geometry of surrounding vertebrae, consisting of an upper pad, a bottom pad and an insert (intervertebral disc. Two implant material configurations were studied. One involved the use of titanium alloy for the upper and bottom pads, while in the other, these pads were made of cobalt alloy. In both cases, a polyethylene insert was used. The FEM results demonstrate that both material configurations meet the requirements for prosthesis design. In both material configurations, the maximum stresses in each prosthesis element are almost twice higher in a sitting posture than in a recumbent position.

  5. The Light-Field of Microbenthic Communities - Radiance Distribution and Microscale Optics of Sandy Coastal Sediments Rid A-1977-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    KUHL, M.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    radiance distribution. Comparison of light fields in wet and dry quartz sand showed that the lower refractive index of air than of water caused a more forward-biased scattering in wet sand. Light penetration was therefore deeper and surface irradiance reflectance was lower in wet sand than in dry sand......The light field in coastal sediments was investigated at a spatial resolution of 0.2-0.5 mm by spectral measurements (450-850 nm) of field radiance and scalar irradiance using fiber-optic microprobes. Depth profiles of field radiance were measured with radiance microprobes at representative angles...... relative to vertically incident collimated light in rinsed quartz sand and in a coastal sandy sediment colonized by microalgae. Upwelling and downwelling components of irradiance and scalar irradiance were calculated from the radiance distributions. Calculated total scalar irradiance agreed well...

  6. The beam based alignment technique for the measurements of beam position monitors offsets and beam offsets from quadrupoles in the Pohang Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.H.; Huang, J.Y.; Ko, I.S.

    1999-01-01

    The beam based alignment (BBA) technique is applied to the 2-GeV storage ring of the Pohang Light Source to measure the offsets of beam position monitors. This measurement is particularly necessary for beam position monitors (BPMs) plugged into a long (∼10 m) aluminum chamber, since the mechanical deformation of the vacuum chamber is experienced after repeated heating for the outgassing process, and the BPM positions are changed accordingly. A part of the excitation current of each quadrupole magnet is shunted through an electronic shunt circuit. Then, the closed orbit receives a perturbation due to the current reduction. Using two quadrupole magnets, we can measure the offset of each BPM. Also, the BBA technique is applied to measure the beam offsets from the center of quadrupole magnets, and gives information to the survey team about which quadrupole magnets should be aligned mostly. In this process, we introduce the merit function to reduce various errors such as BPM characteristic changes and the lattice imperfection. By minimizing the merit function, we can get the beam offset as the maximized expectation value. This paper presents the BBA technique used and experimental results taken from the 2-GeV Pohang Light Source (PLS) storage ring. When the BPM offset is measured, it is observed that a 3% of the shunt current is suitable. (author)

  7. Evaluation of size distribution of starch granules in selected wheat varieties by the Low Angle Laser Light Scattering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capouchová, I.; Petr, J.; Marešová, D.

    2003-01-01

    The distribution of the size of wheat starch granules using the method LALLS (Low Angle Laser Light Scattering), followed by the evaluation of the effect of variety, experimental site and intensity of cultivation on the vol. % of the starch A (starch granules > 10 μm) was determined. The total starch content and crude protein content in dry matter of flour T530 in selected collection of five winter wheat varieties were determined. Vol. % of the starch A in evaluated collection of wheat varieties varied between 65.31 and 72.34%. The effect of a variety on the vol. % of starch A seemed to be more marked than the effect of site and intensity of cultivation. The highest vol. % of starch A reached evaluated varieties from the quality group C, i.e. varieties unsuitable for baking utilisation (except variety Contra with high total content of starch in dry matter of flour T530, but relatively low vol. % of starch A). A low vol. % of starch A was also found in the variety Hana (very good variety for baking utilisation). Certain variety differences followed from the evaluation of distribution of starch fractions of starch granules, forming starch A. In the case of varieties Hana, Contra and Siria higher representation of fractions up to 30 μm was recorded, while starch A in the varieties Estica and Versailles was formed in higher degree by size fractions of starch granules over 30 μm and particularly size fraction > 50 μm was greatest in these varieties of all evaluated samples. With increasing total starch content in dry matter of flour T530 the crude protein content decreased; the vol. % of starch A not always increased proportionally with increasing total starch content. (author)

  8. Magnetized retarding field energy analyzer measuring the particle flux and ion energy distribution of both positive and negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane; Dudin, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a magnetized retarding field energy analyzer (MRFEA) used for positive and negative ion analysis. The two-stage analyzer combines a magnetic electron barrier and an electrostatic ion energy barrier allowing both positive and negative ions to be analyzed without the influence of electrons (co-extracted or created downstream). An optimal design of the MRFEA for ion-ion beams has been achieved by a comparative study of three different MRFEA configurations, and from this, scaling laws of an optimal magnetic field strength and topology have been deduced. The optimal design consists of a uniform magnetic field barrier created in a rectangular channel and an electrostatic barrier consisting of a single grid and a collector placed behind the magnetic field. The magnetic barrier alone provides an electron suppression ratio inside the analyzer of up to 6000, while keeping the ion energy resolution below 5 eV. The effective ion transparency combining the magnetic and electrostatic sections of the MRFEA is measured as a function of the ion energy. It is found that the ion transparency of the magnetic barrier increases almost linearly with increasing ion energy in the low-energy range (below 200 eV) and saturates at high ion energies. The ion transparency of the electrostatic section is almost constant and close to the optical transparency of the entrance grid. We show here that the MRFEA can provide both accurate ion flux and ion energy distribution measurements in various experimental setups with ion beams or plasmas run at low pressure and with ion energies above 10 eV

  9. Effect of the irradiance distribution from light curing units on the local micro-hardness of the surface of dental resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haenel, Thomas; Hausnerová, Berenika; Steinhaus, Johannes; Price, Richard B T; Sullivan, Braden; Moeginger, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    An inhomogeneous irradiance distribution from a light-curing unit (LCU) can locally cause inhomogeneous curing with locally inadequately cured and/or over-cured areas causing e.g. monomer elution or internal shrinkage stresses, and thus reduce the lifetime of dental resin based composite (RBC) restorations. The aim of the study is to determine both the irradiance distribution of two light curing units (LCUs) and its influence on the local mechanical properties of a RBC. Specimens of Arabesk TOP OA2 were irradiated for 5, 20, and 80s using a Bluephase® 20i LCU in the Low mode (666mW/cm(2)), in the Turbo mode (2222mW/cm(2)) and a Celalux® 2 (1264mW/cm(2)). The degree of conversion (DC) was determined with an ATR-FTIR. The Knoop micro-hardness (average of five specimens) was measured on the specimen surface after 24h of dark and dry storage at room temperature. The irradiance distribution affected the hardness distribution across the surface of the specimens. The hardness distribution corresponded well to the inhomogeneous irradiance distributions of the LCU. The highest reaction rates occurred after approximately 2s light exposure. A DC of 40% was reached after 3.6 or 5.7s, depending on the LCU. The inhomogeneous hardness distribution was still evident after 80s of light exposure. The irradiance distribution from a LCU is reflected in the hardness distribution across the surface. Irradiance level of the LCU and light exposure time do not affect the pattern of the hardness distribution--only the hardness level. In areas of low irradiation this may result in inadequate resin polymerization, poor physical properties, and hence premature failure of the restorations as they are usually much smaller than the investigated specimens. It has to be stressed that inhomogeneous does not necessarily mean poor if in all areas of the restoration enough light intensity is introduced to achieve a high degree of cure. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by

  10. Hacking the Bell test using classical light in energy-time entanglement-based quantum key distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jogenfors, Jonathan; Elhassan, Ashraf Mohamed; Ahrens, Johan; Bourennane, Mohamed; Larsson, Jan-Åke

    2015-12-01

    Photonic systems based on energy-time entanglement have been proposed to test local realism using the Bell inequality. A violation of this inequality normally also certifies security of device-independent quantum key distribution (QKD) so that an attacker cannot eavesdrop or control the system. We show how this security test can be circumvented in energy-time entangled systems when using standard avalanche photodetectors, allowing an attacker to compromise the system without leaving a trace. We reach Bell values up to 3.63 at 97.6% faked detector efficiency using tailored pulses of classical light, which exceeds even the quantum prediction. This is the first demonstration of a violation-faking source that gives both tunable violation and high faked detector efficiency. The implications are severe: the standard Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality cannot be used to show device-independent security for energy-time entanglement setups based on Franson's configuration. However, device-independent security can be reestablished, and we conclude by listing a number of improved tests and experimental setups that would protect against all current and future attacks of this type.

  11. Factorization, the light-cone distribution amplitude of the B-meson and the radiative decay $B \\to \\gamma l \

    CERN Document Server

    Descotes-Genon, S

    2003-01-01

    We study the radiative decay B -> gamma l nu_l in the framework of QCD factorization. We demonstrate explicitly that, in the heavy-quark limit and at one-loop order in perturbation theory, the amplitude does factorize, i.e. that it can be written as a convolution of a perturbatively calculable hard-scattering amplitude with the (non-perturbative) light-cone distribution amplitude of the B-meson. We evaluate the hard-scattering amplitude at one-loop order and verify that the large logarithms are those expected from a study of the b->u transition in the Soft-Collinear Effective Theory. Assuming that this is also the case at higher orders, we resum the large logarithms and perform an exploratory phenomenological analysis. The questions addressed in this study are also relevant for the applications of the QCD factorization formalism to two-body non-leptonic B-decays, in particular to the component of the amplitude arising from hard spectator interactions.

  12. Energy spectrum of surface electrons over a {sup 3}He – {sup 4}He solution with a spatially non-uniform distribution of the light isotope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezsmolnyy, Ya.Yu.; Sokolova, E.S.; Sokolov, S.S. [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 47 Prospekt Nauky, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Studart, Nelson [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Av. dos Estados, 5001, 09210-580 Santo André, São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, via Washington Luís, km 235, 13565-905 Säo Carlos, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    The energy gap between the ground and first excited energy levels of surface electrons deposited over a dilute {sup 3}He - {sup 4}He solution is evaluated. Two spatial distributions of {sup 3}He atoms near the free surface solution are considered. One consists of a thin though macroscopic {sup 3}He film and in the other the {sup 3}He concentration varies continuously from the surface inside the liquid. The energy gap is calculated as a function of the parameters of the {sup 3}He spatial distribution for these distributions. It is shown that the energy gap dependence on the distribution parameters allows using measurements of intersubband transitions of the surface electrons to determine the {sup 3}He concentration distribution and, in principle, the nature of the spatial distribution of the light isotope near the surface of the solution.

  13. Loss Distribution Analysis of a Three-Port Converter for Low-Power Stand-Alone Light-to-Light Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mira Albert, Maria del Carmen; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2016-01-01

    In locations far from the equator achieving high conversion efficiency in low-power solar systems is challenging due to low solar irradiance levels. This paper presents a high efficiency three-port converter (TPC) for light-to-light (LtL) applications where no direct solar conversion is required...... demonstrates high efficiency in both power flow paths. At low irradiation level, the power flow from the photovoltaic panel to the battery shows a peak efficiency of 99.1% at at 1.5 W output power, and the LED driver stage presents a peak efficiency of 97.3% at 3 W output power....

  14. Reflection of circularly polarized light and the effect of particle distribution on circular dichroism in evaporation induced self-assembled cellulose nanocrystal thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Hewson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Evaporation induced self-assembled (EISA thin films of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs have shown great potential for displaying structural colour across the visible spectrum. They are believed primarily to reflect left handed circularly polarised (LCP light due to their natural tendency to form structures comprising left handed chirality. Accordingly the fabrication of homogenously coloured CNC thin films is challenging. Deposition of solid material towards the edge of a dried droplet, via the coffee-stain effect, is one such difficulty in achieving homogenous colour across CNC films. These effects are most easily observed in films prepared from droplets where observable reflection of visible light is localised around the edge of the dry film. We report here, the observation of both left and right hand circularly polarised (LCP/RCP light in reflection from distinct separate regions of CNC EISA thin films and we elucidate how these reflections are dependent on the distribution of CNC material within the EISA thin film. Optical models of reflection are presented which are based on structures revealed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM images of film cross sections. We have also employed spectroscopic characterisation techniques to evaluate the distribution of solid CNC material within a selection of CNC EISA thin films and we have correlated this distribution with polarised light spectra collected from each film. We conclude that film regions from which RCP light was reflected were associated with lower CNC concentrations and thicker film regions.

  15. Differential photosynthetic and morphological adaptations to low light affect depth distribution of two submersed macrophytes in lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianfeng; Cao, Te; Zhang, Xiaolin; Xi, Yilong; Ni, Leyi; Jeppesen, Erik

    2016-10-03

    To evaluate the relative importance of photosynthetic versus morphological adaptations of submersed macrophytes to low light intensity in lakes, rapid light curves (RLCs), morphological parameters, relative growth rate (RGR), clonal reproduction and abundance of two submersed macrophytes (Potamogeton maackianus and Vallisneria natans) were examined under 2.8%, 7.1%, 17.1% and 39.5% ambient light in a field and outdoor experimental study. The plants increased their initial slope of RLCs (α) and decreased their minimum saturating irradiance (E k ) and maximum relative electron transport rate (ETRm) of RLCs under low light stress, but V. natans was more sensitive in RLCs than P. maackianus. Accordingly, the RGR, plant height and abundance of P. maackianus were higher in the high light regimes (shallow water) but lower in the low light regimes than those of V. natans. At the 2.8% ambient light, V. natans produced ramets and thus fulfilled its population expansion, in contrast to P. maackianus. The results revealed that P. maackianus as a canopy-former mainly elongated its shoot length towards the water surface to compensate for the low light conditions, however, it became limited in severe low light stress conditions. V. natans as a rosette adapted to low light stress mainly through photosynthetic adjustments and superior to severely low light than shoot elongation.

  16. Electroluminescence property improvement by adjusting quantum wells’ position relative to p-doped region in InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well light emitting diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Chen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The hole distribution and electroluminescence property improvement by adjusting the relative position between quantum wells and p-doped region in InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well structures are experimentally and theoretically investigated. Five designed samples with different barrier layer parameters of multiple-quantum-well structure are grown by MOCVD and then fabricated into devices. The electroluminescence properties of these samples are measured and compared. It is found that the output electroluminescence intensity of samples is enhanced if the position of quantum wells shifts towards p-side, while the output power is reduced if their position is shifted towards the n-side. The theoretical calculation of characteristics of these devices using the simulation program APSYS agrees well with the experimental data, illustrating that the effect of relative position between p-doped region and quantum wells on the improvement of hole distribution and electroluminescence performance is significant, especially for InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well devices operated under high injection condition.

  17. Effects of Drought, Pest Pressure and Light Availability on Seedling Establishment and Growth: Their Role for Distribution of Tree Species across a Tropical Rainfall Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaviria, Julian; Engelbrecht, Bettina M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Tree species distributions associated with rainfall are among the most prominent patterns in tropical forests. Understanding the mechanisms shaping these patterns is important to project impacts of global climate change on tree distributions and diversity in the tropics. Beside direct effects of water availability, additional factors co-varying with rainfall have been hypothesized to play an important role, including pest pressure and light availability. While low water availability is expected to exclude drought-intolerant wet forest species from drier forests (physiological tolerance hypothesis), high pest pressure or low light availability are hypothesized to exclude dry forest species from wetter forests (pest pressure gradient and light availability hypothesis, respectively). To test these hypotheses at the seed-to-seedling transition, the potentially most critical stage for species discrimination, we conducted a reciprocal transplant experiment combined with a pest exclosure treatment at a wet and a dry forest site in Panama with seeds of 26 species with contrasting origin. Establishment success after one year did not reflect species distribution patterns. However, in the wet forest, wet origin species had a home advantage over dry forest species through higher growth rates. At the same time, drought limited survival of wet origin species in the dry forest, supporting the physiological tolerance hypothesis. Together these processes sort species over longer time frames, and exclude species outside their respective home range. Although we found pronounced effects of pests and some effects of light availability on the seedlings, they did not corroborate the pest pressure nor light availability hypotheses at the seed-to-seedling transition. Our results underline that changes in water availability due to climate change will have direct consequences on tree regeneration and distributions along tropical rainfall gradients, while indirect effects of light and pests

  18. Evaluation of Weed Diversity and Modelling Light Interception and Distribution in Multiple and Sole Cropping of Millet (Setaria italica L. and Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Koocheki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the weed diversity and modeling light interception in sole and intercropping millet and bean an experiment was conducted as complete randomized block design with 4 treatments and 4 replications at the Agricultural Research Station, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran, during 2008. Treatments included monocultures, intercropping of millet and bean and a control treatment where weeds grew without crops. In this experiment Shannon diversity index and Sorensen similarity index was investigated at six stages. Results indicated that in each stage Shannon index was affected by treatments. In first stage intercropping had the lowest weed diversity but in another stages it has no significant with monocultures. Control treatment has highest weed diversity. For modeling light interception were used INTERCOM model. Results showed that in light interception plant height and leaf distribution was more effective than LAI (Leaf Area Index. Light interception in intercropping was more effective than monoculture.

  19. Dissect Kif5b in nuclear positioning during myogenesis: The light chain binding domain and the autoinhibitory peptide are both indispensable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zai, E-mail: wangzai81@hotmail.com [Department of Biochemistry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Hong Kong); Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, China–Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Xue, Wenqian; Li, Xiuling; Lin, Raozhou [Department of Biochemistry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Hong Kong); Cui, Ju [Department of Biochemistry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Hong Kong); Beijing Institute of Geriatrics, Beijing Hospital, Ministry of Health (China); Huang, Jian-Dong, E-mail: jdhuang@hku.hk [Department of Biochemistry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Hong Kong)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Kif5b localizes at myonuclear membrane and is responsible for nuclear dispersion. ► Kif5b stalk/tail domain contains signal for nuclear membrane targeting. ► Kif5b stalk/tail domain directly binds to a nesprin 4 in vitro. ► KLC binding domain and autoinhibitory peptide are both functionally indispensable. -- Abstract: The microtubule motor kinesin-1 is responsible for the nuclear positioning during myogenesis. Here we show that the coiled-coil stalk/tail domain containing the kinesin light chain (KLC) binding sites targets to the perinuclear region like endogenous Kif5b, while the globular tail domain cannot. To investigate which fragments of kinesin heavy chain (Kif5b) is responsible for the myonuclear positioning, we transfect Kif5b expression constructs into Kif5b deficient myoblasts and test their ability to rescue the myonuclear phenotype. We find that the KLC binding domain and the autoinhibitory peptide in the globular tail region are both indispensable for the nuclear membrane localization of Kif5b and the kinesin-1-mediated myonuclear positioning. These results suggest that while the KLC binding domain may directly targets Kif5b to the myonuclear membrane, the autoinhibitory peptide may play an indirect role in regulating the kinesin-1-mediated myonuclear positioning.

  20. Bilirubin isomer distribution in jaundiced neonates during phototherapy with LED light centered at 497 nm (turquoise) vs. 459 nm (blue).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbesen, Finn; Madsen, Poul H; Vandborg, Pernille K; Jakobsen, Lasse H; Trydal, Torleif; Vreman, Hendrik J

    2016-10-01

    Phototherapy using blue light is the treatment of choice worldwide for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. However, treatment with turquoise light may be a desirable alternative. Therefore, the aim of this randomized, controlled study was to compare the bilirubin isomer distribution in serum of jaundiced neonates after 24 h of therapy with narrow-band (LED) light centered at 497 nm (turquoise) vs. 459 nm (blue), of essentially equal irradiance. Eighty-three neonates (≥33 wk gestational age) with uncomplicated hyperbilirubinemia were included in the study. Forty neonates were exposed to light centered at 497 nm and 43 infants with light centered at 459 nm. Irradiances were 5.2 × 10(15) and 5.1 × 10(15) photons/cm(2)/s, respectively. After 24 h of treatment no significant differences in serum concentrations of total bilirubin isomers and Z,Z-bilirubin were observed between the 2 groups. Interestingly, concentrations of Z,E-bilirubin, and thus also total bilirubin isomers formed during therapy, were highest for infants receiving light centered at 459 nm, while the concentration of E,Z-bilirubin was highest for those receiving light centered at 497 nm. No significant difference was found between concentrations of E,Z-lumirubin. Therapy with LED light centered at 497 nm vs. 459 nm, applied with equal irradiance on the infants, resulted in a different distribution of bilirubin isomers in serum.

  1. Longitudinal development of air-shower electrons studied from the arrival time distributions of atmospheric Cerenkov light measured at 5200 m above sea level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, N.; Kaneko, T.; Yoshii, H.

    1985-01-01

    The longitudinal development of electrons in extensive air showers before the maximum has been studied by measuring the arrival time distributions of atmospheric Cerenkov light from air showers, with primary energies in the range 6 x 10 15 to 2 x 10 17 eV, in the Chacaltaya air-shower array. These arrival time distributions are consistent with those calculated using a model of particle interactions which contain Feynman scaling in the fragmentation region, an Esup(1/2) multiplicity law in the pionisation region and a rising cross section for primary protons. Such a model also reproduces the arrival time distributions of Cerenkov light measured in the Akeno air-shower array as described in the preceding paper, which implies a very fast development before the maximum and a slow development after the maximum. (author)

  2. Proline: the distribution, frequency, positioning, and common functional roles of proline and polyproline sequences in the human proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A Morgan

    Full Text Available Proline is an anomalous amino acid. Its nitrogen atom is covalently locked within a ring, thus it is the only proteinogenic amino acid with a constrained phi angle. Sequences of three consecutive prolines can fold into polyproline helices, structures that join alpha helices and beta pleats as architectural motifs in protein configuration. Triproline helices are participants in protein-protein signaling interactions. Longer spans of repeat prolines also occur, containing as many as 27 consecutive proline residues. Little is known about the frequency, positioning, and functional significance of these proline sequences. Therefore we have undertaken a systematic bioinformatics study of proline residues in proteins. We analyzed the distribution and frequency of 687,434 proline residues among 18,666 human proteins, identifying single residues, dimers, trimers, and longer repeats. Proline accounts for 6.3% of the 10,882,808 protein amino acids. Of all proline residues, 4.4% are in trimers or longer spans. We detected patterns that influence function based on proline location, spacing, and concentration. We propose a classification based on proline-rich, polyproline-rich, and proline-poor status. Whereas singlet proline residues are often found in proteins that display recurring architectural patterns, trimers or longer proline sequences tend be associated with the absence of repetitive structural motifs. Spans of 6 or more are associated with DNA/RNA processing, actin, and developmental processes. We also suggest a role for proline in Kruppel-type zinc finger protein control of DNA expression, and in the nucleation and translocation of actin by the formin complex.

  3. Genetic diversity, phylogroup distribution and virulence gene profile of pks positive Escherichia coli colonizing human intestinal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarshar, Meysam; Scribano, Daniela; Marazzato, Massimiliano; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Aprea, Maria Rita; Aleandri, Marta; Pronio, Annamaria; Longhi, Catia; Nicoletti, Mauro; Zagaglia, Carlo; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Conte, Maria Pia

    2017-11-01

    Some Escherichia coli strains of phylogroup B2 harbor a (pks) pathogenicity island that encodes a polyketide-peptide genotoxin called colibactin. It causes DNA double-strand breaks and megalocytosis in eukaryotic cells and it may contribute to cancer development. Study of bacterial community that colonizes the adenomatous polyp lesion, defined as precancerous lesions, could be helpful to assess if such pathogenic bacteria possess a role in the polyp progression to cancer. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 1500 E. coli isolates were obtained from biopsies of patients presenting adenomatous colon polyps, the normal tissues adjacent to the polyp lesion and patients presenting normal mucosa. pks island frequency, phylogenetic grouping, fingerprint genotyping, and virulence gene features of pks positive (pks + ) E. coli isolates were performed. We found pks + E. coli strongly colonize two patients presenting polypoid lesions and none were identified in patients presenting normal mucosa. Predominant phylogroups among pks + E. coli isolates were B2, followed by D. Clustering based on fragment profiles of composite analysis, typed the pks + isolates into 5 major clusters (I-V) and 17 sub-clusters, demonstrating a high level of genetic diversity among them. The most prevalent virulence genes were fimH and fyuA (100%), followed by vat (92%), hra and papA (69%), ibeA (28%), and hlyA (25%). Our results revealed that pks + E. coli can colonize the precancerous lesions, with a high distribution in both the polyp lesions and in normal tissues adjacent to the lesion. The high differences in fingerprinting patterns obtained indicate that pks + E. coli strains were genetically diverse, possibly allowing them to more easily adapt to environmental variations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Positional Distribution of Fatty Acids in Triacylglycerols and Phospholipids from Fillets of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo Salar) Fed Vegetable and Fish Oil Blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Lopez, Noemi; Stubhaug, Ingunn; Ipharraguerre, Ignacio; Rimbach, Gerald; Menoyo, David

    2015-07-10

    The nutritional and functional characteristics of dietary fat are related to the fatty acid (FA) composition and its positional distribution in the triacylglycerol (TAG) fraction. Atlantic salmon is an important source of healthy long chain omega 3 FA (particularly, eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docoxahexaenoic (DHA) acids). However, the impact of lipid sources in salmon feeds on the regiospecificity of FA in the fish TAG remains to be explored. The present study determines the effect of feeding salmon with blends of palm, rapeseed, and fish oil, providing two different EPA + DHA concentrations (high: H-ED 10.3% and low: L-ED 4.6%) on the fillet lipid class composition and the positional distribution of FA in TAG and phospholipids. The regiospecific analysis of fillet TAG showed that around 50% of the EPA and around 80% of DHA was located in the sn-2 position. The positional distribution of FA in phosphatidylcholine (PC), showed that around 80% of the EPA and around 90% of DHA were located in the sn-2. Fish fed the vegetable-rich diets showed higher EPA in the sn-2 position in PC (77% vs. 83% in the H-ED and L-ED diets, respectively) but similar DHA concentrations. It is concluded that feeding salmon with different EPA + DHA concentrations does not affect their positional distribution in the fillet TAG.

  5. Positional Distribution of Fatty Acids in Triacylglycerols and Phospholipids from Fillets of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo Salar Fed Vegetable and Fish Oil Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi Ruiz-Lopez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional and functional characteristics of dietary fat are related to the fatty acid (FA composition and its positional distribution in the triacylglycerol (TAG fraction. Atlantic salmon is an important source of healthy long chain omega 3 FA (particularly, eicosapentaenoic (EPA and docoxahexaenoic (DHA acids. However, the impact of lipid sources in salmon feeds on the regiospecificity of FA in the fish TAG remains to be explored. The present study determines the effect of feeding salmon with blends of palm, rapeseed, and fish oil, providing two different EPA + DHA concentrations (high: H-ED 10.3% and low: L-ED 4.6% on the fillet lipid class composition and the positional distribution of FA in TAG and phospholipids. The regiospecific analysis of fillet TAG showed that around 50% of the EPA and around 80% of DHA was located in the sn-2 position. The positional distribution of FA in phosphatidylcholine (PC, showed that around 80% of the EPA and around 90% of DHA were located in the sn-2. Fish fed the vegetable-rich diets showed higher EPA in the sn-2 position in PC (77% vs. 83% in the H-ED and L-ED diets, respectively but similar DHA concentrations. It is concluded that feeding salmon with different EPA + DHA concentrations does not affect their positional distribution in the fillet TAG.

  6. Multi-channel up-conversion infrared spectrometer and method of detecting a spectral distribution of light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    A multi-channel infrared spectrometer for detecting an infrared spectrum of light received from an object. The spectrometer comprises a wavelength converter system comprising a nonlinear material and having an input side and an output side. The wavelength converter system comprises at least a first...... on the first side into light in a second output wavelength range output on the second side. The spectrometer further comprises a demultiplexer configured for demultiplexing light in the first up-conversion channel and light in the second up-conversion channel. The demultiplexer is located on the first side...

  7. Development and analysis of a variable position thermostat for smart cooling system of a light duty diesel vehicles and engine emissions assessment during NEDC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Eid S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new concept of the variable position electromagnetic thermostat in MCS is proposed. • A series of experiments were conducted on a light duty diesel vehicle operated over the NEDC test. • A comparative study was done on emission characteristics of the MCS and the conventional cooling system. • Engine cold start and steady-state coolant flow rate and emissions are presented. • The effect of MCS on engine accumulation FC and emissions over NEDC are evaluated. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted - Abstract: Smart cooling control systems for IC engines can better regulate the combustion process and heat, a variable position thermostat and electric coolant pumps (EWP) for IC engines are under development by a number of researchers. However, the aim of this study is to assess the performance of a variable position electromagnetic thermostat (VPEMT) to provide more flexible control of the engine temperature and coolant mass flow rate of modification cooling system (MCS). The measurement procedure was applied to two phases under new European drive cycle (NEDC) on a chassis dynamometer, with conventional cooling system (baseline engine) and MCS of a light duty diesel engine. The experimental results revealed that MCS using a VPEMT and EWP contributed to a reduction of engine warm-up period. As a consequence, important reduces in coolant flow rate and most exhaust emission compounds (THC, CO_2, CO and smoke opacity) were obtained. In contrast, NOx emission was observed to increase in these conditions. Comparative results are given for various engine speeds during a cold start and engine fully warm-up tests when the engine was equipped by conventional cooling system and MCS operation under NEDC, revealing the effect of MCS on engine fuel consumption and exhaust emissions.

  8. A positive correlation between energetic electron butterfly distributions and magnetosonic waves in the radiation belt slot region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chang; Su, Z.; Xiao, F.; Zheng, H.

    2017-01-01

    Energetic (hundreds of keV) electrons in the radiation belt slot region have been found to exhibit the butterfly pitch angle distributions. Resonant interactions with magnetosonic and whistler-mode waves are two potential mechanisms for the formation of these peculiar distributions. Here we perform a statistical study of energetic electron pitch angle distribution characteristics measured by Van Allen Probes in the slot region during a three-year period from May 2013 to May 2016. Our results show that electron butterfly distributions are closely related to magnetosonic waves rather than to whistlermode waves. Both electron butterfly distributions and magnetosonic waves occur more frequently at the geomagnetically active times than at the quiet times. In a statistical sense, more distinct butterfly distributions usually correspond to magnetosonic waves with larger amplitudes and vice versa. The averaged magnetosonic wave amplitude is less than 5 pT in the case of normal and flat-top distributions with a butterfly index BI = 1 but reaches ~ 35–95 pT in the case of distinct butterfly distributions with BI > 1:3. For magnetosonic waves with amplitudes > 50 pT, the occurrence rate of butterfly distribution is above 80%. Our study suggests that energetic electron butterfly distributions in the slot region are primarily caused by magnetosonic waves.

  9. Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Jones

    1985-01-01

    Quaking aspen is the most widely distributed native North American tree species (Little 1971, Sargent 1890). It grows in a great diversity of regions, environments, and communities (Harshberger 1911). Only one deciduous tree species in the world, the closely related Eurasian aspen (Populus tremula), has a wider range (Weigle and Frothingham 1911)....

  10. ZeroSDN: A Message Bus for Flexible and Light-weight Network Control Distribution in SDN

    OpenAIRE

    Dürr, Frank; Kohler, Thomas; Grunert, Jonas; Kutzleb, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen an evolution of SDN control plane architectures, starting from simple monolithic controllers, over modular monolithic controllers, to distributed controllers. We observe, however, that today's distributed controllers still exhibit inflexibility with respect to the distribution of control logic. Therefore, we propose a novel architecture of a distributed SDN controller in this paper, providing maximum flexibility with respect to distribution. Our architecture splits cont...

  11. Distribution of kappa and lambda light chain isotypes among human blood immunoglobulin-secreting cells after vaccination with pneumococcal polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilmann, C; Barington, T

    1989-01-01

    The light chain isotype of immunoglobulin-secreting blood cells was investigated by means of monolayer plaque-forming cell assays allowing direct immunofluorescence staining for cytoplasmic kappa and lambda light chains in centre cells. The study revealed that cultured, polyclonally activated...

  12. Mobile lighting apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

    2013-05-14

    A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

  13. The Differences across Distributed Leadership Practices by School Position According to the Comprehensive Assessment of Leadership for Learning (CALL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, Mark H.; Modeste, Marsha

    2015-01-01

    The Comprehensive Assessment of Leadership for Learning (CALL) is a multi-source assessment of distributed instructional leadership. As part of the validation of CALL, researchers examined differences between teacher and leader ratings in assessing distributed leadership practices. The authors utilized a t-test for equality of means for the…

  14. Root and soil carbon distribution at shoulderslope and footslope positions of temperate toposequences cropped to winter wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirinda, Ngoni; Roncossek, Svenja Doreen; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    2014-01-01

    Crop root residues are an important source of soil organic carbon (SOC) in arable systems. However, the spatial distribution of root biomass in arable systems remains largely unknown. In this study, we determined the spatial distribution of macro-root and shoot biomass of winter wheat at shoulder...

  15. b-baryon light-cone distribution amplitudes and a dynamical theory for [bq] [ anti b anti q]-tetraquarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hambrock, Christian

    2011-04-01

    In my thesis I present our work on the bottom-baryon light-cone distribution amplitudes (LCDAs) and on the [bq][ anti b anti q]-tetraquarks. For the former we extended the known LCDAs for the ground state baryon Λ b to the entire b-baryon ground state multiplets and included s-quark mass-breaking effects. The LCDAs form crucial input for the calculations of characteristic properties of b-baryon decays. In this context they can for example be used in the calculation of form factors for semileptonic flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) decays. For the [bq][ anti b anti q]-tetraquarks, we calculated the tetraquark mass spectrum for all quarks q=u,d,s,c in a constituent Hamiltonian quark model. We estimated the electronic width by introducing a generalized Van Royen-Weisskopf formula for the tetraquarks, and evaluated the partial hadronic two-body and total decay widths for the tetraquarks with quantum numbers J PC =1 -- . With this input, we performed a Breit-Wigner fit, including the tetraquark contributions, to the inclusive R b -spectrum measured by BaBar. The obtained χ 2 /d.o.f. of the BaBar R b -scan data is fairly good. The resulting fits are suggestive of tetraquark states but not conclusive. We developed a model to describe the transitions e + e - →Y b →Υ(nS)(π + π - ,K + K - ,ηπ 0 ), in which Y b is a 1 -- tetraquark state. The model includes the exchange of light tetraquark and meson states. We used this model to fit the invariant-mass and helicity spectra for the dipionic final state measured by Belle and used the results to estimate the spectra of the channels e + e - →Y b →Υ(nS)(K + K - ,ηπ 0 ). The spectra are enigmatic in shape and magnitude and defy an interpretation in the framework of the standard bottomonia, requesting either an interpretation in terms of exotic states, such as tetraquarks, or a radical alteration of the, otherwise successful, QCD-based bottomonium-model. The tetraquark hypothesis describes the current data well

  16. Effects of light intensity on the distribution of anthocyanins in Kalanchoe brasiliensis Camb. and Kalanchoe pinnata (Lamk. Pers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna P. Cruz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares two medicinal species of Kalanchoe, which are often used interchangeably by the population, regarding the distribution of anthocyanins under the influence of four luminosity levels for 6 months. For the morphoanatomical analysis, the 6th stem node of each plant was sectioned. Usual histochemical tests revealed the presence of anthocyanins by cross sections of the stems, petioles and leaf blades. The petioles and leaf blades were submitted to the extraction with acidified methanol, and the anthocyanins were quantified by spectrophotometric readings. At the macroscopic level, it was noticed for both species a higher presence of anthocyanins in stems and petioles of plants under full sunlight. The microscopy of K. brasiliensis stems evidenced the deposition of anthocyanins in the subjacent tissue to the epidermis and cortex, which increased with light intensity. In K. pinnata a subepidermal collenchyma was observed, which interfered in the visualization of anthocyanins. In petioles and leaf blades of K. brasiliensis the deposition of anthocyanins was peripheral, and in K. pinnata it was also throughout the cortex. The quantification of anthocyanins in petioles showed in 70% of light higher averages than in 25%, but in leaf blades there were no significant results. This study contributes to the pharmacognosy of Kalanchoe and it is sustained by the description of flavonoids as biological markers of the genus.Este trabalho compara duas espécies medicinais de Kalanchoe utilizadas muitas vezes de forma indiferenciada pela população, quanto à distribuição de antocianinas sob influência de quatro níveis de luminosidade por 6 meses. Para a análise morfoanatômica foi seccionado o 6 º nó do caule de cada planta. Testes histoquímicos clássicos evidenciaram a presença de antocianinas em cortes transversais dos caules, pecíolos e lâminas foliares. Os pecíolos e lâminas foliares foram submetidos à extração com metanol

  17. b-baryon light-cone distribution amplitudes and a dynamical theory for [bq] [ anti b anti q]-tetraquarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hambrock, Christian

    2011-04-15

    In my thesis I present our work on the bottom-baryon light-cone distribution amplitudes (LCDAs) and on the [bq][ anti b anti q]-tetraquarks. For the former we extended the known LCDAs for the ground state baryon {lambda}{sub b} to the entire b-baryon ground state multiplets and included s-quark mass-breaking effects. The LCDAs form crucial input for the calculations of characteristic properties of b-baryon decays. In this context they can for example be used in the calculation of form factors for semileptonic flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) decays. For the [bq][ anti b anti q]-tetraquarks, we calculated the tetraquark mass spectrum for all quarks q=u,d,s,c in a constituent Hamiltonian quark model. We estimated the electronic width by introducing a generalized Van Royen-Weisskopf formula for the tetraquarks, and evaluated the partial hadronic two-body and total decay widths for the tetraquarks with quantum numbers J{sup PC}=1{sup --}. With this input, we performed a Breit-Wigner fit, including the tetraquark contributions, to the inclusive R{sub b}-spectrum measured by BaBar. The obtained {chi}{sup 2}/d.o.f. of the BaBar R{sub b}-scan data is fairly good. The resulting fits are suggestive of tetraquark states but not conclusive. We developed a model to describe the transitions e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}Y{sub b}{yields}{upsilon}(nS)({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -},K{sup +}K{sup -},{eta}{pi}{sup 0}), in which Y{sub b} is a 1{sup --} tetraquark state. The model includes the exchange of light tetraquark and meson states. We used this model to fit the invariant-mass and helicity spectra for the dipionic final state measured by Belle and used the results to estimate the spectra of the channels e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}Y{sub b}{yields}{upsilon}(nS)(K{sup +}K{sup -},{eta}{pi}{sup 0}). The spectra are enigmatic in shape and magnitude and defy an interpretation in the framework of the standard bottomonia, requesting either an interpretation in terms of exotic states, such as

  18. Distribution of Clay Minerals in Light Coal Fractions and the Thermal Reaction Products of These Clay Minerals during Combustion in a Drop Tube Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sida Tian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the contribution of clay minerals in light coal fractions to ash deposition in furnaces, we investigated their distribution and thermal reaction products. The light fractions of two Chinese coals were prepared using a 1.5 g·cm−3 ZnCl2 solution as a density separation medium and were burned in a drop-tube furnace (DTF. The mineral matter in each of the light coal fractions was compared to that of the relevant raw coal. The DTF ash from light coal fractions was analysed using hydrochloric acid separation. The acid-soluble aluminium fractions of DTF ash samples were used to determine changes in the amorphous aluminosilicate products with increasing combustion temperature. The results show that the clay mineral contents in the mineral matter of both light coal fractions were higher than those in the respective raw coals. For the coal with a high ash melting point, clay minerals in the light coal fraction thermally transformed more dehydroxylation products compared with those in the raw coal, possibly contributing to solid-state reactions of ash particles. For the coal with a low ash melting point, clay minerals in the light coal fraction produced more easily-slagging material compared with those in the raw coal, playing an important role in the occurrence of slagging. Additionally, ferrous oxide often produces low-melting substances in coal ash. Due to the similarities of zinc oxide and ferrous oxide in silicate reactions, we also investigated the interactions of clay minerals in light coal fractions with zinc oxide introduced by a zinc chloride solution. The extraneous zinc oxide could react, to a small extent, with clay minerals in the coal during DTF combustion.

  19. Comparison of the Distribution of Unsaturated Fatty Acids at the Sn-2 Position of Phospholipids and Triacylglycerols in Marine Fishes and Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beppu, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Keiko; Okada, Ayako; Hirosaki, Yoshitsugu; Okazaki, Masako; Gotoh, Naohiro

    2017-11-01

    Highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA) binding at the sn-2 position of phospholipids (PL) becomes a resource for prostaglandin, leukotriene, resolvin, and protectin synthesis. Both triacylglycerol (TAG) and PL synthesis pathways in vivo are via phosphatidic acid; therefore, the distribution of fatty acid species at the sn-2 position must theoretically be the same for TAG and PL if rearrangement does not occur. However, it is known that little HUFA is located at the sn-2 position of TAG in marine mammals. Therefore, distribution of fatty acid species at the sn-2 position of TAG and PL was compared between marine fishes and mammals in this study. The composition of fatty acids binding at the sn-2 or sn-1,3 position of PL and TAG was analyzed via hydrolysis with enzymes and GC-FID. The results showed that 20:4n-6, 20:5n-3, 22:5n-3, and 22:6n-3 were primarily located at the sn-1,3 positions of TAG in marine mammals. Comparison of the binding positions of HUFA and 16:0 in PL and TAG suggested the existence of Lands' cycle in marine fishes and mammals. In conclusion, both marine fishes and mammals condensed HUFA as a source of eicosanoid at the sn-2 position of PL. Furthermore, abundance ratios for 22:5n-3 or 22:6n-3 at the sn-2 position (sn-2 ratio) in TAG and PL (calculated by the equation: [abundance ratio at sn-2 position of TAG]/[abundance ratio at sn-2 position of PL]) was less than 0.35 in marine mammals; however, it was greater than 0.80 in marine fishes. These differences suggested that the HUFA consisted of 22 carbon atoms and had different roles in marine fishes and mammals.

  20. Adaptive Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    the investigations of lighting scenarios carried out in two test installations: White Cube and White Box. The test installations are discussed as large-scale experiential instruments. In these test installations we examine what could potentially occur when light using LED technology is integrated and distributed......Adaptive Lighting Adaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities...... differently into an architectural body. We also examine what might occur when light is dynamic and able to change colour, intensity and direction, and when it is adaptive and can be brought into interaction with its surroundings. In short, what happens to an architectural space when artificial lighting ceases...

  1. Exploring Relationships between Canopy Architecture, Light Distribution, and Photosynthesis in Contrasting Rice Genotypes Using 3D Canopy Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J. Burgess

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The arrangement of leaf material is critical in determining the light environment, and subsequently the photosynthetic productivity of complex crop canopies. However, links between specific canopy architectural traits and photosynthetic productivity across a wide genetic background are poorly understood for field grown crops. The architecture of five genetically diverse rice varieties—four parental founders of a multi-parent advanced generation intercross (MAGIC population plus a high yielding Philippine variety (IR64—was captured at two different growth stages using a method for digital plant reconstruction based on stereocameras. Ray tracing was employed to explore the effects of canopy architecture on the resulting light environment in high-resolution, whilst gas exchange measurements were combined with an empirical model of photosynthesis to calculate an estimated carbon gain and total light interception. To further test the impact of different dynamic light patterns on photosynthetic properties, an empirical model of photosynthetic acclimation was employed to predict the optimal light-saturated photosynthesis rate (Pmax throughout canopy depth, hypothesizing that light is the sole determinant of productivity in these conditions. First, we show that a plant type with steeper leaf angles allows more efficient penetration of light into lower canopy layers and this, in turn, leads to a greater photosynthetic potential. Second the predicted optimal Pmax responds in a manner that is consistent with fractional interception and leaf area index across this germplasm. However, measured Pmax, especially in lower layers, was consistently higher than the optimal Pmax indicating factors other than light determine photosynthesis profiles. Lastly, varieties with more upright architecture exhibit higher maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis indicating a canopy-level impact on photosynthetic efficiency.

  2. The effect of temperature and the control rod position on the spatial neutron flux distribution in the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, K.; Omar, H.; Ghazi, N.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of water and fuel temperature increase and changes in the control rod positions on the spatial neutron flux distribution in the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) is discussed. The cross sections of all the reactor components at different temperatures are generated using the WIMSD4 code. These group constants are used then in the CITATION code to calculate the special neutron flux distribution using four energy groups. This work shows that water and fuel temperature increase in the reactor during the reactor daily operating time does not affect the spatial neutron flux distribution in the reactor. Changing the control rod position does not affect as well the spatial neutron flux distribution except in the region around the control rod position. This stability in the spatial neutron flux distribution, especially in the inner and outer irradiation sites, makes MNSR as a good tool for the neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique and production of radioisotopes with medium or short half lives during the reactor daily operating time. (author)

  3. Demonstrating of Cosmic Ray Characteristics by Estimating the Cherenkov Light Lateral Distribution Function for Yakutsk Array as a Function of the Zenith Angle

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulsttar, Marwah M.; Al-Rubaiee, A. A.; Ali, Abdul Halim Kh.

    2016-01-01

    Cherenkov light lateral distribution function (CLLDF) in Extensive Air Showers (EAS) for different primary particles (e-, n , p, F, K and Fe) was simulated using CORSIKA code for conditions and configurations of Yakutsk EAS array with the fixed primary energy 3 PeV around the knee region at different zenith angles. Basing on the results of CLLDF numerical simulation, sets of approximated functions are reconstructed for different primary particles as a function of the zenith angle. A compariso...

  4. Accumulation of Phenylpropanoids by White, Blue, and Red Light Irradiation and Their Organ-Specific Distribution in Chinese Cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Jeong; Kim, Yeon Bok; Li, Xiaohua; Choi, Su Ryun; Park, Suhyoung; Park, Jong Seok; Lim, Yong Pyo; Park, Sang Un

    2015-08-05

    This study investigated optimum light conditions for enhancing phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and the distribution of phenylpropanoids in organs of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis). Blue light caused a high accumulation of most phenolic compounds, including p-hydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, quercetin, and kaempferol, at 12 days after irradiation (DAI). This increase was coincident with a noticeable increase in expression levels of BrF3H, BrF3'H, BrFLS, and BrDFR. Red light led to the highest ferulic acid content at 12 DAI and to elevated expression of the corresponding genes during the early stages of irradiation. White light induced the highest accumulation of kaempferol and increased expression of BrPAL and BrDFR at 9 DAI. The phenylpropanoid content analysis in different organs revealed organ-specific accumulation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid, quercetin, and kaempferol. These results demonstrate that blue light is effective at increasing phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in Chinese cabbage, with leaves and flowers representing the most suitable organs for the production of specific phenylpropanoids.

  5. Determination of User Distribution Image Size and Position of Each Observation Area of Meteorological Imager in COMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Soo Seo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, requirements of Meteorological Administration about Meteorological Imager (MI of Communications, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite (COMS is analyzed for the design of COMS ground station and according to the analysis results, the distribution image size of each observation area suitable for satellite Field Of View (FOV stated at the requirements of meteorological administration is determined and the precise satellite FOV and the size of distribution image is calculated on the basis of the image size of the determined observation area. The results in this paper were applied to the detailed design for COMS ground station and also are expected to be used for the future observation scheduling and the scheduling of distribution of user data.

  6. Influence of the weighing bar position in vessel on measurement of cement’s particle size distribution by using the buoyancy weighing-bar method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambun, R.; Sihombing, R. O.; Simanjuntak, A.; Hanum, F.

    2018-02-01

    The buoyancy weighing-bar method is a new simple and cost-effective method to determine the particle size distribution both settling and floating particle. In this method, the density change in a suspension due to particle migration is measured by weighing buoyancy against a weighing-bar hung in the suspension, and then the particle size distribution is calculated using the length of the bar and the time-course change in the mass of the bar. The apparatus of this method consists of a weighing-bar and an analytical balance with a hook for under-floor weighing. The weighing bar is used to detect the density change in suspension. In this study we investigate the influences of position of weighing bar in vessel on settling particle size distribution measurements of cement by using the buoyancy weighing-bar method. The vessel used in this experiment is graduated cylinder with the diameter of 65 mm and the position of weighing bar is in center and off center of vessel. The diameter of weighing bar in this experiment is 10 mm, and the kerosene is used as a dispersion liquids. The results obtained show that the positions of weighing bar in vessel have no significant effect on determination the cement’s particle size distribution by using buoyancy weighing-bar method, and the results obtained are comparable to those measured by using settling balance method.

  7. Exploring the spatial distribution of light interception and photosynthesis of canopies by means of a functional-structural plant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarlikioti, V.; Visser, de P.H.B.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims - At present most process-based models and the majority of three-dimensional models include simplifications of plant architecture that can compromise the accuracy of light interception simulations and, accordingly, canopy photosynthesis. The aim of this paper is to analyse canopy

  8. Moving mesh finite element method for finite time extinction of distributed parameter systems with positive exponential feedback; Lokakarya Komputasi dalam Sains dan Teknologi Nuklir VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnadi, A D [Department of Matematics, Bogor Institute of Agriculture, Bogor (Indonesia)

    1997-07-01

    In the distributed parameter systems with exponential feedback, non-global existence of solution is not always exist. For some positive initial values, there exist finite time T such that the solution goes to infinity, i.e. finite time extinction or blow-up. Here is present a numerical solution using Moving Mesh Finite Element to solve the distributed parameter systems with exponential feedback close to blow-up time. The numerical behavior of the mesh close to the time of extinction is the prime interest in this study.

  9. Angular distributions of 250 GeV/c positive particles axially channeled in germanium crystal. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, C.R.; Gibson, W.M.; Kim, I.J.; Williams, G.O.; Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Chrisman, B.L.; Toohig, T.E.; Guzik, Z.; Nigmanov, T.S.; Tsyganov, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    Channeling phenomena are observed for charged particles of momentum up to 250 GeV/c in a germanium crystal. The angular distributions of the channeled particles are compared with theoretical predictions based on a diffusion model. The results indicate additional mechanisms leading to dechanneling of the particles although channeling effects are observed for particles incident at up to several times the critical angle, in contrast with the results from low energy channeling. (orig.)

  10. USE OF COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS TO SIMULATE TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN BROILER HOUSES WITH NEGATIVE AND POSITIVE TUNNEL TYPE VENTILATION SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Osorio Saraz, Jairo Alexander; Arêdes Martins, Marcio; Oliveira Rocha, Keller Sullivan; Silva Machado, Neiton; Ciro Velasques, Hector José

    2013-01-01

    In tropical and subtropical countries such as Brazil, temperatures inside agricultural facilities reach values greater than those considered suitable for thermal comfort for both animals and people. To predict the behavior and distribution of temperature in all directions of the structure and make correct decisions about the inside environment, the classic research method would require a significant experimental arrangement. Consequently, classic methodologies do not offer immediate informati...

  11. Phylogenetic distribution of intron positions in alpha-amylase genes of bilateria suggests numerous gains and losses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Da Lage

    Full Text Available Most eukaryotes have at least some genes interrupted by introns. While it is well accepted that introns were already present at moderate density in the last eukaryote common ancestor, the conspicuous diversity of intron density among genomes suggests a complex evolutionary history, with marked differences between phyla. The question of the rates of intron gains and loss in the course of evolution and factors influencing them remains controversial. We have investigated a single gene family, alpha-amylase, in 55 species covering a variety of animal phyla. Comparison of intron positions across phyla suggests a complex history, with a likely ancestral intronless gene undergoing frequent intron loss and gain, leading to extant intron/exon structures that are highly variable, even among species from the same phylum. Because introns are known to play no regulatory role in this gene and there is no alternative splicing, the structural differences may be interpreted more easily: intron positions, sizes, losses or gains may be more likely related to factors linked to splicing mechanisms and requirements, and to recognition of introns and exons, or to more extrinsic factors, such as life cycle and population size. We have shown that intron losses outnumbered gains in recent periods, but that "resets" of intron positions occurred at the origin of several phyla, including vertebrates. Rates of gain and loss appear to be positively correlated. No phase preference was found. We also found evidence for parallel gains and for intron sliding. Presence of introns at given positions was correlated to a strong protosplice consensus sequence AG/G, which was much weaker in the absence of intron. In contrast, recent intron insertions were not associated with a specific sequence. In animal Amy genes, population size and generation time seem to have played only minor roles in shaping gene structures.

  12. Distribution, vertical position and ecological implications of shallow gas in Bahía Blanca estuary (Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, M. E.; Aliotta, S.; Fiori, S.; Ginsberg, S.

    2018-03-01

    There has been a growing interest in the study of shallow gas due its importance in relation to the marine environment, climate change and human activities. In Bahía Blanca estuary, Argentina, shallow gas has a wide distribution. Acoustic turbidity and blanking are the main seismic evidence for the presence of shallow gas in the estuary. The former prevails in the inner sector of the estuary where gas is either near or in contact with the seabed. Gas deposits are generally associated with paleochannels corresponding to the Holocene paleodeltaic environment. Distribution studies of shallow gas in this estuary are necessary because its presence implies not only a geological risk for harbor activities but also because it may have noxious effects on the marine ecosystem, mainly on benthic communities. The comparison of benthic communities at a gas site (GS) with those at a control site (CS) indicated that gas could generate impoverishment in terms of individuals' abundance (GS: N = 357; CS: N = 724). Also, diversity indices showed great differences in the community structure at each site. This indicates that methane gas may act as a natural disturbance agent in estuarine ecosystems. The presence of gas in seabed sediments must therefore be taken into account when distribution studies are conducted of estuarine benthic communities.

  13. Projectile fragmentation of neutron-rich nuclei on light target (momentum distribution and nucleon-removal cross section)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Tanihata, I.; Suzuki, T.

    1992-01-01

    Transverse momentum distributions of the projectile fragments from β-unstable nuclei have been measured with various projectile and target combinations. The momentum correlation of two neutrons in the neutron halo is extracted from the P c t distribution of 9 Li and hat of the neutrons. It is found that the two neutrons are moving in the same direction on average and thus strongly suggests the formation of a di-neutron in 11 Li. (Author)

  14. EMISSION HEIGHT AND TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION OF WHITE-LIGHT EMISSION OBSERVED BY HINODE/SOT FROM THE 2012 JANUARY 27 X-CLASS SOLAR FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kyoko; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Masuda, Satoshi; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Ohno, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    White-light emissions were observed from an X1.7 class solar flare on 2012 January 27, using three continuum bands (red, green, and blue) of the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite. This event occurred near the solar limb, and so differences in the locations of the various emissions are consistent with differences in heights above the photosphere of the various emission sources. Under this interpretation, our observations are consistent with the white-light emissions occurring at the lowest levels of where the Ca II H emission occurs. Moreover, the centers of the source regions of the red, green, and blue wavelengths of the white-light emissions are significantly displaced from each other, suggesting that those respective emissions are emanating from progressively lower heights in the solar atmosphere. The temperature distribution was also calculated from the white-light data, and we found the lower-layer emission to have a higher temperature. This indicates that high-energy particles penetrated down to near the photosphere, and deposited heat into the ambient lower layers of the atmosphere

  15. Near-infrared spectroscopy of the adult head: effect of scattering and absorbing obstructions in the cerebrospinal fluid layer on light distribution in the tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, H; Delpy, D T

    2000-09-01

    Previous modeling of near-infrared (NIR) light distribution in models of the adult head incorporating a clear nonscattering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layer have shown the latter to have a profound effect on the resulting photon measurement density function (PMDF). In particular, the presence of the CSF limits the PMDF largely to the outer cortical gray matter with little signal contribution from the deeper white matter. In practice, the CSF is not a simple unobstructed clear layer but contains light-scattering membranes and is crossed by various blood vessels. Using a radiosity-diffusion finite-element model, we investigated the effect on the PMDF of introducing intrusions within the clear layer. The results show that the presence of such obstructions does not significantly increase the light penetration into the brain tissue, except immediately adjacent to the obstruction and that its presence also increases the light sampling of the adjacent skull tissues, which would lead to additional contamination of the NIR spectroscopy signal by the surface tissue layers.

  16. Coupling an Intercalibration of Radiance-Calibrated Nighttime Light Images and Land Use/Cover Data for Modeling and Analyzing the Distribution of GDP in Guangdong, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyang Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatialized GDP data is important for studying the relationships between human activities and environmental changes. Rapid and accurate acquisition of these datasets are therefore a significant area of study. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS radiance-calibrated nighttime light (RC NTL images exhibit the potential for providing superior estimates for GDP spatialization, as they are not restricted by the saturated pixels which exist in nighttime stable light (NSL images. However, the drawback of light overflow is the limited accuracy of GDP estimation, and GDP data estimations based on RC NTL images cannot be directly used for temporal analysis due to a lack of on-board calibration. This study develops an intercalibration method to address the comparability problem. Additionally, NDVI images are used to reduce the light overflow effect. In this way, the secondary and tertiary industry outputs are estimated by using intercalibrated RC NTL images. Primary industry production is estimated by using land use/cover data. Ultimately, four 1 km gridded GDP maps of Guangdong for 2000, 2004, 2006 and 2010 are generated. The verification results of the proposed intercalibration method demonstrate that this method is reasonable and can be effectively implemented. These maps can be used to analyze the distribution and spatiotemporal changes of GDP density in Guangdong.

  17. Subcellular pigment distribution is altered under far-red light acclimation in cyanobacteria that contain chlorophyll f.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Erica L-W; Wolf, Benjamin M; Liu, Haijun; Berg, R Howard; Timlin, Jerilyn A; Chen, Min; Blankenship, Robert E

    2017-11-01

    Far-Red Light (FRL) acclimation is a process that has been observed in cyanobacteria and algae that can grow solely on light above 700 nm. The acclimation to FRL results in rearrangement and synthesis of new pigments and pigment-protein complexes. In this study, cyanobacteria containing chlorophyll f, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7335 and Halomicronema hongdechloris, were imaged as live cells with confocal microscopy. H. hongdechloris was further studied with hyperspectral confocal fluorescence microscopy (HCFM) and freeze-substituted thin-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Under FRL, phycocyanin-containing complexes and chlorophyll-containing complexes were determined to be physically separated and the synthesis of red-form phycobilisome and Chl f was increased. The timing of these responses was observed. The heterogeneity and eco-physiological response of the cells was noted. Additionally, a gliding motility for H. hongdechloris is reported.

  18. Changes in the positron-electron momentum distribution in GaAs brought about by chopped light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.; Fung, S.; Beling, C.D.; Ling, C.C.

    2001-01-01

    We report on an attempt to observe the EL2→ EL2 * transition in semi-insulating GaAs using Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation spectroscopy. Unlike the original observation of this transition using positron annihilation spectroscopy, the present method has sought to observe the production of EL2 * through a light chopping experiment, where on the half cycle of illumination the EL2 * state is formed and on the second half cycle the EL2 * thermally quenches back to EL2. While results are at a preliminary state we have obtained evidence for the production of EL2 * from the broad-band emission of a Xenon lamp. While calculations suggest that we should be able to see the EL2 * from the IR emission (1.3eV) of GaAs light emitting diodes we have not yet been able to achieve this. Reasons why are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Distribution of multi-resistant Gram-negative versus Gram-positive bacteria in the hospital inanimate environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmen, S W; Häfner, H; Zolldann, D; Stanzel, S; Lütticken, R

    2004-03-01

    We prospectively studied the difference in detection rates of multi-resistant Gram-positive and multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in the inanimate environment of patients harbouring these organisms. Up to 20 different locations around 190 patients were surveyed. Fifty-four patients were infected or colonized with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and 136 with multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. The environmental detection rate for MRSA or VRE was 24.7% (174/705 samples) compared with 4.9% (89/1827 samples) for multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (PGram-positive bacteria were isolated more frequently than Gram-negatives from the hands of patients (PGram-positive and Gram-negative isolates. Our results suggest that the inanimate environment serves as a secondary source for MRSA and VRE, but less so for Gram-negative bacteria. Thus, strict contact isolation in a single room with complete barrier precautions is recommended for MRSA or VRE; however, for multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, contact isolation with barrier precautions for close contact but without a single room seems sufficient. This benefits not only the patients, but also the hospital by removing some of the strain placed on already over-stretched resources.

  20. Effect of body mass distribution on the ontogeny of positional behaviors in non-human primates: Longitudinal follow-up of infant captive olive baboons (Papio anubis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druelle, François; Aerts, Peter; Berillon, Gilles

    2016-11-01

    The diversity of primates' positional capabilities is unique among mammals. Indeed, they exhibit a daily repertoire composed of various locomotor and postural modes that may be linked to their particular morphological pattern. Because ontogeny undergoes parallel behavioral and morphological modifications, it may be useful to investigate the biomechanical consequences of the changing body shape. We, therefore, collected accurate quantitative and longitudinal data on positional behaviors, body mass distribution patterns, activities, and environment on a sample of six infant olive baboons, Papio anubis. These baboons are kept at the Primatology Station of the CNRS, France, where they live within the same social group. Individual behaviors were quantified using the focal sampling method. The body mass distribution was estimated according to a geometric model based on direct external measurements. Multivariate analysis enabled us to analyze the interactions between the data. Our results show that body mass distribution changes together with the ontogenetic changes in positional behaviors. At an early age, individuals have distally heavy segment masses in the limbs and an important fraction of the behavioral repertoire involves efficient grasping abilities. At the end of infancy, the same individuals have relatively more mass in proximal segments of the limbs and the proportion of quadrupedal walking is significantly higher while other climbing and suspensory behaviors decreased substantially. The present study experimentally confirms the association between body mass distribution and the positional repertoire of primates. These relationships, when interpreted in the context of basic biomechanical concepts, may improve our understanding of primate locomotion. We discuss further the implications of these functional relationships when modeling the evolutionary pathway of primates. Am. J. Primatol. 78:1201-1221, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley

  1. Electron and ion angular distributions in resonant dissociative photoionization of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} using linearly polarized light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Jorge; MartIn, Fernando [Departamento de Quimica C-9, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: fernando.martin@uam.es

    2009-04-15

    We have evaluated fully differential electron angular distributions in H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} dissociative photoionization by using linearly polarized light of 20, 27 and 33 eV. At 20 eV, the distributions exhibit simple p-wave patterns, which is the signature of direct ionization through the X{sup 2}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}(1s{sigma}{sub g}) channel. At 27 eV, where the Q{sub 1} autoionizing states are populated, we observe a similar pattern, except when the molecule is oriented perpendicularly to the polarization direction and the energy of the ejected electron is small. In contrast, at 33 eV, autoionization from the Q{sub 1} and Q{sub 2} states leads to interferences between the X{sup 2}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}(1s{sigma}{sub g}) and {sup 2}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +}(2p{sigma}{sub u}) ionization channels that result in a strong asymmetry of the electron angular distributions along the molecular axis. This asymmetry changes rapidly with the energy of the ejected electron. Electron angular distributions integrated over all possible molecular orientations or ion angular distributions integrated over electron emission angle show no reminiscence of the above phenomena, but the corresponding asymmetry parameters dramatically change with electron and ion energies in the region of autoionizing states.

  2. Colorimetric and dynamic light scattering detection of DNA sequences by using positively charged gold nanospheres: a comparative study with gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylaev, T. E.; Khanadeev, V. A.; Khlebtsov, B. N.; Dykman, L. A.; Bogatyrev, V. A.; Khlebtsov, N. G.

    2011-07-01

    We introduce a new genosensing approach employing CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide)-coated positively charged colloidal gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to detect target DNA sequences by using absorption spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. The approach is compared with a previously reported method employing unmodified CTAB-coated gold nanorods (GNRs). Both approaches are based on the observation that whereas the addition of probe and target ssDNA to CTAB-coated particles results in particle aggregation, no aggregation is observed after addition of probe and nontarget DNA sequences. Our goal was to compare the feasibility and sensitivity of both methods. A 21-mer ssDNA from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1 U5 long terminal repeat (LTR) sequence and a 23-mer ssDNA from the Bacillus anthracis cryptic protein and protective antigen precursor (pagA) genes were used as ssDNA models. In the case of GNRs, unexpectedly, the colorimetric test failed with perfect cigar-like particles but could be performed with dumbbell and dog-bone rods. By contrast, our approach with cationic CTAB-coated GNPs is easy to implement and possesses excellent feasibility with retention of comparable sensitivity—a 0.1 nM concentration of target cDNA can be detected with the naked eye and 10 pM by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. The specificity of our method is illustrated by successful DLS detection of one-three base mismatches in cDNA sequences for both DNA models. These results suggest that the cationic GNPs and DLS can be used for genosensing under optimal DNA hybridization conditions without any chemical modifications of the particle surface with ssDNA molecules and signal amplification. Finally, we discuss a more than two-three-order difference in the reported estimations of the detection sensitivity of colorimetric methods (0.1 to 10-100 pM) to show that the existing aggregation models are inconsistent with the detection limits of about 0.1-1 pM DNA and that

  3. A Precision-Positioning Method for a High-Acceleration Low-Load Mechanism Based on Optimal Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Inertial Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available High-speed and precision positioning are fundamental requirements for high-acceleration low-load mechanisms in integrated circuit (IC packaging equipment. In this paper, we derive the transient nonlinear dynamicresponse equations of high-acceleration mechanisms, which reveal that stiffness, frequency, damping, and driving frequency are the primary factors. Therefore, we propose a new structural optimization and velocity-planning method for the precision positioning of a high-acceleration mechanism based on optimal spatial and temporal distribution of inertial energy. For structural optimization, we first reviewed the commonly flexible multibody dynamic optimization using equivalent static loads method (ESLM, and then we selected the modified ESLM for optimal spatial distribution of inertial energy; hence, not only the stiffness but also the inertia and frequency of the real modal shapes are considered. For velocity planning, we developed a new velocity-planning method based on nonlinear dynamic-response optimization with varying motion conditions. Our method was verified on a high-acceleration die bonder. The amplitude of residual vibration could be decreased by more than 20% via structural optimization and the positioning time could be reduced by more than 40% via asymmetric variable velocity planning. This method provides an effective theoretical support for the precision positioning of high-acceleration low-load mechanisms.

  4. Determination of 114Pd cumulative yield and investigation of the fine-structure at light peak in mass distribution of 252Cf spontaneous fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Runlan; Li Xueliang; Cui Anzhi; Guo Jingru; Yan Shuhen; Tang Peijia; Liu Daming

    1991-07-01

    A rapid radiochemical procedure for Pd separation was developed. It was the first time to use radiochemical techniques to determine 114 Pd cumulative yield (2.50 ± 0.14)% in 252 Cf spontaneous fission. The cumulative yields of (3.50 ± 0.13)% and (3.70 ± 0.11)% for 112 Pd and 113g Ag were also obtained. These are in agreement with Skovorodkin's results. The cumulative yields determined show that there is a fine-structure at light peak of mass number A = 113 in the mass distribution of 252 Cf spontaneous fission

  5. Dynamic Method of Neutral Axis Position Determination and Damage Identification with Distributed Long-Gauge FBG Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yongsheng; Ren, Zhongdao

    2017-02-20

    The neutral axis position (NAP) is a key parameter of a flexural member for structure design and safety evaluation. The accuracy of NAP measurement based on traditional methods does not satisfy the demands of structural performance assessment especially under live traffic loads. In this paper, a new method to determine NAP is developed by using modal macro-strain (MMS). In the proposed method, macro-strain is first measured with long-gauge Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors; then the MMS is generated from the measured macro-strain with Fourier transform; and finally the neutral axis position coefficient (NAPC) is determined from the MMS and the neutral axis depth is calculated with NAPC. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, some experiments on FE models, steel beam and reinforced concrete (RC) beam were conducted. From the results, the plane section was first verified with MMS of the first bending mode. Then the results confirmed the high accuracy and stability for assessing NAP. The results also proved that the NAPC was a good indicator of local damage. In summary, with the proposed method, accurate assessment of flexural structures can be facilitated.

  6. Dynamic Method of Neutral Axis Position Determination and Damage Identification with Distributed Long-Gauge FBG Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Tang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The neutral axis position (NAP is a key parameter of a flexural member for structure design and safety evaluation. The accuracy of NAP measurement based on traditional methods does not satisfy the demands of structural performance assessment especially under live traffic loads. In this paper, a new method to determine NAP is developed by using modal macro-strain (MMS. In the proposed method, macro-strain is first measured with long-gauge Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG sensors; then the MMS is generated from the measured macro-strain with Fourier transform; and finally the neutral axis position coefficient (NAPC is determined from the MMS and the neutral axis depth is calculated with NAPC. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, some experiments on FE models, steel beam and reinforced concrete (RC beam were conducted. From the results, the plane section was first verified with MMS of the first bending mode. Then the results confirmed the high accuracy and stability for assessing NAP. The results also proved that the NAPC was a good indicator of local damage. In summary, with the proposed method, accurate assessment of flexural structures can be facilitated.

  7. Experimental demonstration of robust entanglement distribution over reciprocal noisy channels assisted by a counter-propagating classical reference light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Rikizo; Nozaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Takashi; Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2017-07-06

    Embedding a quantum state in a decoherence-free subspace (DFS) formed by multiple photons is one of the promising methods for robust entanglement distribution of photonic states over collective noisy channels. In practice, however, such a scheme suffers from a low efficiency proportional to transmittance of the channel to the power of the number of photons forming the DFS. The use of a counter-propagating coherent pulse can improve the efficiency to scale linearly in the channel transmission, but it achieves only protection against phase noises. Recently, it was theoretically proposed [Phys. Rev. A 87, 052325(2013)] that the protection against bit-flip noises can also be achieved if the channel has a reciprocal property. Here we experimentally demonstrate the proposed scheme to distribute polarization-entangled photon pairs against a general collective noise including the bit flip noise and the phase noise. We observed an efficient sharing rate scaling while keeping a high quality of the distributed entangled state. Furthermore, we show that the method is applicable not only to the entanglement distribution but also to the transmission of arbitrary polarization states of a single photon.

  8. Angular distributions of light projectile fragments in deep inelastic Pb+Em interactions at 160 A GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adamovich, M I; Alexandrov, Yu A; Andreeva, N P; Badyal, S K; Basova, E E; Bhalla, K B; Bhasin, A; Bhatia, V S; Bradnova, V; Bubnov, V I; Cai, X; Chasnikov, I Yu; Chen, G M; Chernova, L P; Chernyavsky, M M; Dhamija, S; El-Chenawi, K F; Felea, D; Feng, S Q; Gaitinov, A S; Ganssauge, E R; Garpman, S I A; Gerassimov, S G; Gheata, A; Gheata, M; Grote, J; Gulamov, K G; Sen-Gupta, S K; Gupta, V K; Henjes, U; Jakobsson, B; Kanygina, E K; Karabova, M; Kharlamov, S P; Kovalenko, A D; Krasnov, S A; Kumar, V; Larionova, V G; Lepekhin, F G; Levitskaya, O V; Li, Y X; Liu, L S; Lokanathan, S; Lord, J J; Lukicheva, N S; Lu, Y; Luo, S B; Mangotra, L K; Manhas, I; Mittra, I S; Musaeva, A K; Nasyrov, S Z; Navotny, V S; Nystrand, J; Otterlund, I; Peresadko, N G; Qian, W Y; Qin, Y M; Raniwala, R; Rao, N K; Röper, M D; Rusakova, V V; Saidkhanov, N; Salmanova, N A; Seitimbetov, A M; Seliverstov, D M; Simonov, B B; Sethi, R; Singh, B; Skelding, D; Söderström, K; Stenlund, E; Svechnikova, L N; Svensson, T; Tawfik, A M; Tothova, M; Tretyakova, M I; Trofimova, T P; Tuleeva, U I; Vashisht, V; Vokal, S; Vrláková, J; Wang, H Q; Wang, X R; Weng, Z Q; Wilkes, R J; Yang, C B; Yin, Z B; Yu, L Z; Zhang, D H; Zheng, P Y; Zhokhova, S I; Zhou, D C

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear emulsion was exposed at CERN by the lead projectile at 160 A GeV. The angles between any pair of fragments with Z=2-4 have been measured in the emulsion plane for the events which did not contain heavy fragments. The constant characterizing the normal angle ( phi ) distribution of the fragment momentum projection onto the emulsion plane with respect to initial projectile momentum p/sub 0/ is found to be sigma /sub phi /=(0.37+or-0.02) mrad. Corresponding value sigma /sub 0/=(121+or-6) MeV/c of nucleon momentum distribution in the lead nucleus coincides with that expected from Fermi momentum distribution for this nucleus. The peak in the pair-angle distribution of double-charged fragments, /sup 8/Be to 2 alpha , is presented for the region of small angles (<0.1 mrad). The fraction of alpha -particles coming from the decay of the ground state /sup 8/Be is found to be (13+or-2)601130f their whole number. (14 refs).

  9. Effects of emission layer doping on the spatial distribution of charge and host recombination rate density in organic light emitting devices: A numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanli; Zhou, Maoqing; Zheng, Tingcai; Yao, Bo; Peng, Yingquan

    2013-12-01

    Based on drift-diffusion theory, a numerical model of the doping of a single energy level trap in the emission layer of an organic light emitting device (OLED) was developed, and the effects of doping of this single energy level trap on the distribution of the charge density, the recombination rate density, and the electric field in single- and double-layer OLEDs were studied numerically. The results show that by doping the n-type (p-type) emission layer with single energy electron (hole) traps, the distribution of the recombination rate density can be tuned and shifted, which is useful for improvement of the device performance by reduced electrode quenching or for realization of desirable special functions, e.g., emission spectrum tuning in multiple dye-doped white OLEDs.

  10. Effects of emission layer doping on the spatial distribution of charge and host recombination rate density in organic light emitting devices: A numerical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yanli; Zhou, Maoqing; Zheng, Tingcai; Yao, Bo [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Peng, Yingquan, E-mail: yqpeng@lzu.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2013-12-28

    Based on drift-diffusion theory, a numerical model of the doping of a single energy level trap in the emission layer of an organic light emitting device (OLED) was developed, and the effects of doping of this single energy level trap on the distribution of the charge density, the recombination rate density, and the electric field in single- and double-layer OLEDs were studied numerically. The results show that by doping the n-type (p-type) emission layer with single energy electron (hole) traps, the distribution of the recombination rate density can be tuned and shifted, which is useful for improvement of the device performance by reduced electrode quenching or for realization of desirable special functions, e.g., emission spectrum tuning in multiple dye-doped white OLEDs.

  11. Effects of emission layer doping on the spatial distribution of charge and host recombination rate density in organic light emitting devices: A numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yanli; Zhou, Maoqing; Zheng, Tingcai; Yao, Bo; Peng, Yingquan

    2013-01-01

    Based on drift-diffusion theory, a numerical model of the doping of a single energy level trap in the emission layer of an organic light emitting device (OLED) was developed, and the effects of doping of this single energy level trap on the distribution of the charge density, the recombination rate density, and the electric field in single- and double-layer OLEDs were studied numerically. The results show that by doping the n-type (p-type) emission layer with single energy electron (hole) traps, the distribution of the recombination rate density can be tuned and shifted, which is useful for improvement of the device performance by reduced electrode quenching or for realization of desirable special functions, e.g., emission spectrum tuning in multiple dye-doped white OLEDs

  12. Distribution of the ACME-arcA gene among meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus and identification of a novel ccr allotype in ACME-arcA-positive isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Borui; Yu, Meihong; Chen, Yagang; Yu, Yunsong; Li, Lanjuan

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of ACME (arginine catabolic mobile element)-arcA-positive isolates among meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus (MRSH). ACME-arcA, native arcA and SCCmec elements were detected by PCR. Susceptibilities to 10 antimicrobial agents were compared between ACME-arcA-positive and -negative isolates by chi-square test. PFGE was used to investigate the clonal relatedness of ACME-arcA-positive isolates. The phylogenetic relationships of ACME-arcA and native arcA were analysed using the neighbour-joining methods of mega software. A total of 42 (47.7 %) of 88 isolates distributed in 13 PFGE types were positive for the ACME-arcA gene. There were no significant differences in antimicrobial susceptibility between ACME-arcA-positive and -negative isolates. A novel ccr allotype (ccrAB(SHP)) was identified in ACME-arcA-positive isolates. Among 42 ACME-arcA-positive isolates: 8 isolates harboured SCCmec V, 8 isolates harboured class C1 mec complex and ccrAB(SHP); 22 isolates harbouring class C1 mec complex and 4 isolates harbouring class C2 mec complex were negative for all known ccr allotypes. The ACME-arcA-positive isolates were first found in MRSH with high prevalence and clonal diversity, which suggests a mobility of ACME within MRSH. The results from this study revealed that MRSH is likely to be one of the potential reservoirs of ACME for Staphylococcus aureus.

  13. Light-flavor sea-quark distributions in the nucleon in the SU(3) chiral quark soliton model. I. Phenomenological predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakamatsu, M.

    2003-01-01

    Theoretical predictions are given for the light-flavor sea-quark distributions in the nucleon including the strange quark ones on the basis of the flavor SU(3) version of the chiral quark soliton model. Careful account is taken of the SU(3) symmetry breaking effects due to the mass difference Δm s between the strange and nonstrange quarks, which is the only one parameter necessary for the flavor SU(3) generalization of the model. A particular emphasis of study is put on the light-flavor sea-quark asymmetry as exemplified by the observables d-bar(x)-u-bar(x),d-bar(x)/u-bar(x),Δu-bar(x)-Δd-bar(x) as well as on the particle-antiparticle asymmetry of the strange quark distributions represented by s(x)-s-bar(x),s(x)/s-bar(x),Δs(x)-Δs-bar(x) etc. As for the unpolarized sea-quark distributions, the predictions of the model seem qualitatively consistent with the available phenomenological information provided by the NMC data for d-bar(x)-u-bar(x), the E866 data for d-bar(x)/u-bar(x), the CCFR data and the fit of Barone et al. for s(x)/s-bar(x), etc. The model is shown to give several unique predictions also for the spin-dependent sea-quark distribution, such that Δs(x)<<Δs-bar(x) < or approx. 0 and Δd-bar(x)<0<Δu-bar(x), although the verification of these predictions must await more elaborate experimental investigations in the near future

  14. Distribution and densitometry mapping of L1-CAM Immunoreactivity in the adult mouse brain – light microscopic observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamasaki Hironobu

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of L1 expression in the matured brain is suggested by physiological and behavioral studies showing that L1 is related to hippocampal plasticity and fear conditioning. The distribution of L1 in mouse brain might provide a basis for understanding its role in the brain. Results We examined the overall distribution of L1 in the adult mouse brain by immunohistochemistry using two polyclonal antibodies against different epitopes for L1. Immunoreactive L1 was widely but unevenly distributed from the olfactory bulb to the upper cervical cord. The accumulation of immunoreactive L1 was greatest in a non-neuronal element of the major fibre bundles, i.e. the lateral olfactory tract, olfactory and temporal limb of the anterior commissure, corpus callosum, stria terminalis, globus pallidus, fornix, mammillothalamic tract, solitary tract, and spinal tract of the trigeminal nerve. High to highest levels of non-neuronal and neuronal L1 were found in the grey matter; i.e. the piriform and entorhinal cortices, hypothalamus, reticular part of the substantia nigra, periaqueductal grey, trigeminal spinal nucleus etc. High to moderate density of neuronal L1 was found in the olfactory bulb, layer V of the cerebral cortex, amygdala, pontine grey, superior colliculi, cerebellar cortex, solitary tract nucleus etc. Only low to lowest levels of neuronal L1 were found in the hippocampus, grey matter in the caudate-putamen, thalamus, cerebellar nuclei etc. Conclusion L1 is widely and unevenly distributed in the matured mouse brain, where immunoreactivity was present not only in neuronal elements; axons, synapses and cell soma, but also in non-neuronal elements.

  15. Paraxial light distribution in the focal region of a lens: a comparison of several analytical solutions and a numerical result

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yang; Kelly, Damien P.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution of the complex field in the focal region of a lens is a classical optical diffraction problem. Today, it remains of significant theoretical importance for understanding the properties of imaging systems. In the paraxial regime, it is possible to find analytical solutions in the neighborhood of the focus, when a plane wave is incident on a focusing lens whose finite extent is limited by a circular aperture. For example, in Born and Wolf's treatment of this problem, two different, but mathematically equivalent analytical solutions, are presented that describe the 3D field distribution using infinite sums of ? and ? type Lommel functions. An alternative solution expresses the distribution in terms of Zernike polynomials, and was presented by Nijboer in 1947. More recently, Cao derived an alternative analytical solution by expanding the Fresnel kernel using a Taylor series expansion. In practical calculations, however, only a finite number of terms from these infinite series expansions is actually used to calculate the distribution in the focal region. In this manuscript, we compare and contrast each of these different solutions to a numerically calculated result, paying particular attention to how quickly each solution converges for a range of different spatial locations behind the focusing lens. We also examine the time taken to calculate each of the analytical solutions. The numerical solution is calculated in a polar coordinate system and is semi-analytic. The integration over the angle is solved analytically, while the radial coordinate is sampled with a sampling interval of ? and then numerically integrated. This produces an infinite set of replicas in the diffraction plane, that are located in circular rings centered at the optical axis and each with radii given by ?, where ? is the replica order. These circular replicas are shown to be fundamentally different from the replicas that arise in a Cartesian coordinate system.

  16. Paraxial light distribution in the focal region of a lens: a comparison of several analytical solutions and a numerical result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yang; Kelly, Damien P

    2014-12-12

    The distribution of the complex field in the focal region of a lens is a classical optical diffraction problem. Today, it remains of significant theoretical importance for understanding the properties of imaging systems. In the paraxial regime, it is possible to find analytical solutions in the neighborhood of the focus, when a plane wave is incident on a focusing lens whose finite extent is limited by a circular aperture. For example, in Born and Wolf's treatment of this problem, two different, but mathematically equivalent analytical solutions, are presented that describe the 3D field distribution using infinite sums of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] type Lommel functions. An alternative solution expresses the distribution in terms of Zernike polynomials, and was presented by Nijboer in 1947. More recently, Cao derived an alternative analytical solution by expanding the Fresnel kernel using a Taylor series expansion. In practical calculations, however, only a finite number of terms from these infinite series expansions is actually used to calculate the distribution in the focal region. In this manuscript, we compare and contrast each of these different solutions to a numerically calculated result, paying particular attention to how quickly each solution converges for a range of different spatial locations behind the focusing lens. We also examine the time taken to calculate each of the analytical solutions. The numerical solution is calculated in a polar coordinate system and is semi-analytic. The integration over the angle is solved analytically, while the radial coordinate is sampled with a sampling interval of [Formula: see text] and then numerically integrated. This produces an infinite set of replicas in the diffraction plane, that are located in circular rings centered at the optical axis and each with radii given by [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the replica order. These circular replicas are shown to be fundamentally

  17. Determining roof surfaces suitable for the installation of PV (photovoltaic) systems, based on LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) data, pyranometer measurements, and distribution network configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srećković, Nevena; Lukač, Niko; Žalik, Borut; Štumberger, Gorazd

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation of distributed generation units, integrated within the distribution network requires increased attention to their proper placements. In urban areas, buildings' rooftops are expected to have greater involvement in the deployment of PV (photovoltaic) systems. This paper proposes a novel procedure for determining roof surfaces suitable for their installation. The PV potential of roof surfaces is assessed based on Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) data and pyranometer measurements. Then, the time-dependent PV generation profiles, electricity distribution network configuration, and time-dependent loading profiles are used together over time-steps for selecting those roof surfaces with the highest PV potential, which would lead to the highest reduction of network losses per year. The presented procedure was implemented within a real urban area distribution network. The results obtained confirmed that PV potential assessment could be an insufficient criterion when selecting those roof surfaces suitable for the installation of PV systems. In order to obtain relevant results, network configuration and time-dependent loading and generation profiles must be considered as well. - Highlights: • Roof surfaces, suitable for installation of PV systems are evaluated and ranked. • Improved PV potential based procedure is proposed for their selection in urban areas. • Time-dependent network loading and PV generation profiles are considered. • Losses in a real electricity network are minimized in the optimization procedure. • Final selection of ranked roof surfaces is based on results of optimization.

  18. Influence of slope steepness, foot position and turn phase on plantar pressure distribution during giant slalom alpine ski racing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Falda-Buscaiot

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the evolution of ground reaction force during alpine skiing turns. Specifically, this study investigated how turn phases and slope steepness affected the whole foot normal GRF pattern while performing giant slalom turns in a race-like setting. Moreover, the outside foot was divided into different plantar regions to see whether those parameters affected the plantar pressure distribution. Eleven skiers performed one giant slalom course at race intensity. Runs were recorded synchronously using a video camera in the frontal plane and pressure insoles under both feet's plantar surface. Turns were divided according to kinematic criteria into four consecutive phases: initiation, steering1, steering2 and completion; both steering phases being separated by the gate passage. Component of the averaged Ground Reaction Force normal to the ski's surface([Formula: see text], /BW, and Pressure Time Integral relative to the entire foot surface (relPTI, % parameters were calculated for each turn phases based on plantar pressure data. Results indicated that [Formula: see text] under the total foot surface differed significantly depending on the slope (higher in steep sections vs. flat sections, and the turn phase (higher during steering2 vs. three other phases, although such modifications were observable only on the outside foot. Moreover, [Formula: see text] under the outside foot was significantly greater than under the inside foot.RelPTI under different foot regions of the outside foot revealed a global shift from forefoot loading during initiation phase, toward heel loading during steering2 phase, but this was dependent on the slope studied. These results suggest a differentiated role played by each foot in alpine skiing turns: the outside foot has an active role in the turning process, while the inside foot may only play a role in stability.

  19. Implementation of a practical model for light and heat distribution using laser-induced thermotherapy near to a large vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhey, J F; Mohammed, Y; Ludwig, A; Giese, K

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces a simulation model for light and heat transport in tissues including perfusion effects. The model enables an efficient simulation of the damaged zone induced with an optical fibre for laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT). It is designed specially for, but not limited to, tissue ablation in the neck region near to vessels. We describe in detail the effects of the rise in temperature caused by the absorption of light in tissue, using the heat equation and including the cooling effects of flow in vessels and of microperfusion in tissue in order to determine the extent of thermal damage. The extent of the necrosis zone is calculated with a damage function at each point of a finite element method (FEM) mesh. The FEM mesh is implemented with FEMLAB 2.3 as an add-on for finite element modelling for Matlab 6.5. LITT for tumour ablation in liver and some other anatomical regions is a well-known and established method (Bundesaerztekammer und Kassenaerztliche Bundesvereinigung 2002 Assessment der Bundesaerztekammer und der Kassenaerztlichen Bundesvereinigung, Koeln). Investigations of treatments using LITT in the neck region are still in progress. We propose a refined model to validate the LITT method in the future in another anatomic region, e.g., in the highly sensitive region of the neck. Our calculations show that in order to induce a lesion with a maximum diameter of about 1 cm near to a large vessel, an application time between 3 and 4 min is needed using a laser power of about 10 W with a Nd:YAG 1064 nm radiation wavelength

  20. Implementation of a practical model for light and heat distribution using laser-induced thermotherapy near to a large vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhey, J F [Department of Medical Informatics, University of Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, D-37075 Goettingen (Germany); Mohammed, Y [Department of Medical Informatics, University of Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, D-37075 Goettingen (Germany); Ludwig, A [Department of Craneo-Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, D-37075 Goettingen (Germany); Giese, K [Department of Medical Informatics, University of Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, D-37075 Goettingen (Germany)

    2003-11-07

    This paper introduces a simulation model for light and heat transport in tissues including perfusion effects. The model enables an efficient simulation of the damaged zone induced with an optical fibre for laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT). It is designed specially for, but not limited to, tissue ablation in the neck region near to vessels. We describe in detail the effects of the rise in temperature caused by the absorption of light in tissue, using the heat equation and including the cooling effects of flow in vessels and of microperfusion in tissue in order to determine the extent of thermal damage. The extent of the necrosis zone is calculated with a damage function at each point of a finite element method (FEM) mesh. The FEM mesh is implemented with FEMLAB 2.3 as an add-on for finite element modelling for Matlab 6.5. LITT for tumour ablation in liver and some other anatomical regions is a well-known and established method (Bundesaerztekammer und Kassenaerztliche Bundesvereinigung 2002 Assessment der Bundesaerztekammer und der Kassenaerztlichen Bundesvereinigung, Koeln). Investigations of treatments using LITT in the neck region are still in progress. We propose a refined model to validate the LITT method in the future in another anatomic region, e.g., in the highly sensitive region of the neck. Our calculations show that in order to induce a lesion with a maximum diameter of about 1 cm near to a large vessel, an application time between 3 and 4 min is needed using a laser power of about 10 W with a Nd:YAG 1064 nm radiation wavelength.

  1. Street light detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Disclosed is a method, a vehicle and a system for measuring light from one or more outdoor lamps on a road, the system comprising a number of light sensors configured to be arranged in a fixed position relative to a vehicle, where at least a first part of the light sensors is configured...... for measuring light from the one or more outdoor lamps, wherein at least a second part of the light sensors comprises at least two light sensors configured for detecting the angle which the light from the one or more outdoor lamps arrives at in the second part of the light sensors; a processing unit configured...... for calculating the position relative to the vehicle of the one or more outdoor lamps based on the detected angle which the light arrives in, and wherein the processing unit is configured for calculating the light on the road based on the light measured in the fixed position relative to the vehicle and based...

  2. [Positive Distribution Rate of Coombs Test in Patients with Clinical Anemia and Blood Transfusion and Its Effect on Clinical Blood Transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Duan, Yu-Han

    2018-02-01

    To study the positive distribution rate of Coombs test in patients with clinical anemia and blood transfusion, and its effect on clinical blood transfusion. Seventy patients with hemoglobin level in the normal range were enrolled into control group, while 130 patients with anemia or blood transfusion who' s hemoglobin level was lower comfirmed by micro-column gel antihuman globin detection card and 70 surgical patients with anemia or blood transfusion who' s hemoglobin level was lower comfirmed by micro-column gel anti-human globin card were enrolled into anemia or blood transfusion (A or BT) group. And coomb' s test performed for all the patients, in which the positive patients in Department of Internal Medicine need to be re-typed. Among 70 surgical patients with anemia or blood transfusion, 14 cases were directly detected to be anti-human globine positive with detection rate 20%; among 130 internal medicine patients with anemia or blood transfusion, 54 cases were directly detected to be anti-human globine positive with detection rate 41.4%. Among 270 cases, the highest positive rate (66.7%) was observed in patients with 50-59 g/L of hemoglobin. According to type test, the samples of 54 patients with anemia in Department of Internal Medicine, who were directly selected to be anti-human globin positive, could be divided into anti-C3d(7 cases, accounting for 13.0%), anti-IgG(12 cases accounting for, 22.2%) and anti-C3d+anti-IgG(35 cases, accounting for 64.8%), while according to diseases, the anti-human globin positive ratio was high in tumor cancer, hephropathy and gastroenteropathy patients, and patients in intensive care unit, moreover the blood transfusion frequency of these patients was higher than that of patients with anti-human globin negative(Pblood transfusion, so as to ensure the effectiveness of blood transfusion.

  3. Column Store for GWAC: A High-cadence, High-density, Large-scale Astronomical Light Curve Pipeline and Distributed Shared-nothing Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Meng; Wu, Chao; Wang, Jing; Qiu, Yulei; Xin, Liping; Mullender, Sjoerd; Mühleisen, Hannes; Scheers, Bart; Zhang, Ying; Nes, Niels; Kersten, Martin; Huang, Yongpan; Deng, Jinsong; Wei, Jianyan

    2016-11-01

    The ground-based wide-angle camera array (GWAC), a part of the SVOM space mission, will search for various types of optical transients by continuously imaging a field of view (FOV) of 5000 degrees2 every 15 s. Each exposure consists of 36 × 4k × 4k pixels, typically resulting in 36 × ˜175,600 extracted sources. For a modern time-domain astronomy project like GWAC, which produces massive amounts of data with a high cadence, it is challenging to search for short timescale transients in both real-time and archived data, and to build long-term light curves for variable sources. Here, we develop a high-cadence, high-density light curve pipeline (HCHDLP) to process the GWAC data in real-time, and design a distributed shared-nothing database to manage the massive amount of archived data which will be used to generate a source catalog with more than 100 billion records during 10 years of operation. First, we develop HCHDLP based on the column-store DBMS of MonetDB, taking advantage of MonetDB’s high performance when applied to massive data processing. To realize the real-time functionality of HCHDLP, we optimize the pipeline in its source association function, including both time and space complexity from outside the database (SQL semantic) and inside (RANGE-JOIN implementation), as well as in its strategy of building complex light curves. The optimized source association function is accelerated by three orders of magnitude. Second, we build a distributed database using a two-level time partitioning strategy via the MERGE TABLE and REMOTE TABLE technology of MonetDB. Intensive tests validate that our database architecture is able to achieve both linear scalability in response time and concurrent access by multiple users. In summary, our studies provide guidance for a solution to GWAC in real-time data processing and management of massive data.

  4. Inverter sizing of grid-connected photovoltaic systems in the light of local solar resource distribution characteristics and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, Bruno [Fraunhofer-Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Department of Electrical Energy Systems, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Ruether, Ricardo [LABSOLAR-Laboratorio de Energia Solar, LabEEE-Laboratorio de Eficiencia Energetica em Edificacoes, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina/UFSC, Caixa Postal 476, Florianopolis-SC 88040-900 (Brazil)

    2006-01-15

    Inverter sizing strategies for grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems often do not take into account site-dependent peculiarities of ambient temperature, inverter operating temperature and solar irradiation distribution characteristics. The operating temperature affects PV modules and inverters in different ways and PV systems will hardly ever have a DC output equal to or above their STC-rated nominal power. Inverters are usually sized with a nominal AC output power some 30% (sometimes even more) below the PV array nominal power. In this paper, we show that this practice might lead to considerable energy losses, especially in the case of PV technologies with high temperature coefficients of power operating at sites with cold climates and of PV technologies with low temperature coefficients of power operating at sites with warm climates and an energy distribution of sunlight shifted to higher irradiation levels. In energy markets where PV kWh are paid premium tariffs, like in Germany, energy yield optimization might result in a favorable payback of the extra capital invested in a larger inverter. This paper discusses how the time resolution of solar radiation data influences the correct sizing of PV plants. We demonstrate that using instant (10s) irradiation values instead of average hourly irradiation values leads to considerable differences in optimum inverter sizing. When calculating inverter yearly efficiency values using both, hourly averages and 1-min averages, we can show that with increased time resolution of solar irradiation data there are higher calculated losses due to inverter undersizing. This reveals that hourly averages hide important irradiation peaks that need to be considered. We performed these calculations for data sets from pyranometer readings from Freiburg (48{sup o}N, Germany) and Florianopolis (27{sup o}S, Brazil) to further show the peculiarities of the site-dependent distribution of irradiation levels and its effects on inverter sizing

  5. Effect of solvent and temperature on the size distribution of casein micelles measured by dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliciu, C M; Moraru, C I

    2009-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of the solvent on the accuracy of casein micelle particle size determination by dynamic light scattering (DLS) at different temperatures and to establish a clear protocol for these measurements. Dynamic light scattering analyses were performed at 6, 20, and 50 degrees C using a 90Plus Nanoparticle Size Analyzer (Brookhaven Instruments, Holtsville, NY). Raw and pasteurized skim milk were used as sources of casein micelles. Simulated milk ultrafiltrate, ultrafiltered water, and permeate obtained by ultrafiltration of skim milk using a 10-kDa cutoff membrane were used as solvents. The pH, ionic concentration, refractive index, and viscosity of all solvents were determined. The solvents were evaluated by DLS to ensure that they did not have a significant influence on the results of the particle size measurements. Experimental protocols were developed for accurate measurement of particle sizes in all solvents and experimental conditions. All measurements had good reproducibility, with coefficients of variation below 5%. Both the solvent and the temperature had a significant effect on the measured effective diameter of the casein micelles. When ultrafiltered permeate was used as a solvent, the particle size and polydispersity of casein micelles decreased as temperature increased. The effective diameter of casein micelles from raw skim milk diluted with ultrafiltered permeate was 176.4 +/- 5.3 nm at 6 degrees C, 177.4 +/- 1.9 nm at 20 degrees C, and 137.3 +/- 2.7 nm at 50 degrees C. This trend was justified by the increased strength of hydrophobic bonds with increasing temperature. Overall, the results of this study suggest that the most suitable solvent for the DLS analyses of casein micelles was casein-depleted ultrafiltered permeate. Dilution with water led to micelle dissociation, which significantly affected the DLS measurements, especially at 6 and 20 degrees C. Simulated milk ultrafiltrate seemed to give

  6. The spectral and spatial distribution of light pollution in the waters of the northern Gulf of Aqaba (Eilat).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Raz; Lerner, Amit; Haspel, Carynelisa; Dubinsky, Zvy; Iluz, David

    2017-02-10

    The urbanization of the shores of the Gulf of Aqaba has exposed the marine environment there, including unique fringing coral reefs, to strong anthropogenic light sources. Here we present the first in situ measurements of artificial nighttime light under water in such an ecosystem, with irradiance measured in 12 wavelength bands, at 19 measurement stations spread over 44 square km, and at 30 depths down to 30-m depth. At 1-m depth, we find downwelling irradiance values that vary from 4.6 × 10 -4  μW cm -2  nm -1 500 m from the city to 1 × 10 -6  μW cm -2  nm -1 in the center of the gulf (9.5 km from the city) in the yellow channel (589-nm wavelength) and from 1.3 × 10 -4  μW cm -2  nm -1 to 4.3 × 10 -5  μW cm -2  nm -1 in the blue channel (443-nm wavelength). Down to 10-m depth, we find downwelling irradiance values that vary from 1 × 10 -6  μW cm -2  nm -1 to 4.6 × 10 -4  μW cm -2  nm -1 in the yellow channel and from 2.6 × 10 -5  μW cm -2  nm -1 to 1.3 × 10 -4  μW cm -2  nm -1 in the blue channel, and we even detected a signal at 30-m depth. This irradiance could influence such biological processes as the tuning of circadian clocks, the synchronization of coral spawning, recruitment and competition, vertical migration of demersal plankton, feeding patterns, and prey/predator visual interactions.

  7. Dependence of light scattering profile in tissue on blood vessel diameter and distribution: a computer simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duadi, Hamootal; Fixler, Dror; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2013-11-01

    Most methods for measuring light-tissue interactions focus on the volume reflectance while very few measure the transmission. We investigate both diffusion reflection and diffuse transmission at all exit angles to receive the full scattering profile. We also investigate the influence of blood vessel diameter on the scattering profile of a circular tissue. The photon propagation path at a wavelength of 850 nm is calculated from the absorption and scattering constants via Monte Carlo simulation. Several simulations are performed where a different vessel diameter and location were chosen but the blood volume was kept constant. The fraction of photons exiting the tissue at several central angles is presented for each vessel diameter. The main result is that there is a central angle that below which the photon transmission decreased for lower vessel diameters while above this angle the opposite occurred. We find this central angle to be 135 deg for a two-dimensional 10-mm diameter circular tissue cross-section containing blood vessels. These findings can be useful for monitoring blood perfusion and oxygen delivery in the ear lobe and pinched tissues. © 2013 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

  8. Light from dark: A relictual troglobite reveals a broader ancestral distribution for kimulid harvestmen (Opiliones: Laniatores: Kimulidae) in South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, F. Sara; Monte, Bruno G. O.; Proud, Daniel N.; DaSilva, Márcio Bernardino; Bichuette, Maria E.

    2017-01-01

    A new troglobitic harvestman, Relictopiolus galadriel gen. nov et sp. nov., is described from Olhos d’Água cave, Itacarambi, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Morphological characters, including male genitalia and exomorphology, suggest that this species belongs to the family Kimulidae, and it appears to share the greatest similarities with Tegipiolus pachypus. Bayesian inference analyses of a molecular dataset strongly support the inclusion of this species in Kimulidae and confirm the hypothesized sister-group relationship between R. galadriel and T. pachypus. A time calibrated phylogeny indicates that these sister-taxa diverged from a common ancestor approximately 40 Mya, during the Paleogene. The current range of Kimulidae illustrates a remarkable disjunct distribution, and leads us to hypothesize that the ancestral distribution of Kimulidae was once much more widespread across eastern Brazil. This may be attributed to the Eocene radiation associated with the warming (and humidifying) events in the Cenozoic when the best conditions for evergreen tropical vegetation in South America were established and followed by the extinction of kimulid epigean populations together with the retraction of rain forests during the Oligocene to Miocene cooling. The discovery of this relictual troglobite indicates that the Olhos d’Água cave was a stable refugium for this ancient lineage of kimulids and acted as a "museum" of biodiversity. Our findings, considered collectively with the diverse troglofauna of the Olhos d’Água cave, highlight it as one of the most important hotspots of troglobite diversity and endemism in the Neotropics. Given the ecological stresses on this habitat, the cavernicolous fauna are at risk of extinction and we emphasize the urgent need for appropriate conservation actions. Finally, we propose the transfer of Acanthominua, Euminua, Euminuoides and Pseudominua from Kimulidae to Zalmoxidae, resulting in two new synonymies and 13 new combinations. PMID

  9. Brimstone chemistry under laser light assists mass spectrometric detection and imaging the distribution of arsenic in minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Swapnil; Zheng, Zhaoyu; Pavlov, Julius; Attygalle, Athula B

    2018-05-23

    Singly charged As2n+1 ion clusters (n = 2-11) were generated from elemental arsenic by negative-ion laser-ablation mass spectrometry. The overall abundance of the gaseous As ions generated upon laser irradiation was enhanced nearly a hundred times when As-bearing samples were admixed with sulfur. However, sulfur does not act purely as an inert matrix: irradiating arsenic-sulfur mixtures revealed a novel pathway to generate and detect a series of [AsSn]- clusters (n = 2-6). Intriguingly, the spectra recorded from As2O3, NaAsO2, Na3AsO4, cacodylic acid and 3-amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid together with sulfur as the matrix were remarkably similar to that acquired from an elemental arsenic and sulfur mixture. This result indicated that arsenic sulfide cluster-ions are generated directly from arsenic compounds by a hitherto unknown pathway. The mechanism of elemental sulfur extracting chemically bound arsenic from compounds and forming [AsSn]- clusters is enigmatic; however, this discovery has a practical value as a general detection method for arsenic compounds. For example, the method was employed for the detection of As in its minerals, and for the imaging of arsenic distribution in minerals such as domeykite. LDI-MS data recorded from a latent image imprinted on a piece of paper from a flat mineral surface, and wetting the paper with a solution of sulfur, enabled the localization of arsenic in the mineral. The distribution of As was visualized as false-color images by extracting from acquired data the relative intensities of m/z 139 (AsS2-) and m/z 171 (AsS3-) ions.

  10. Charge and angular distributions as well as sequential decay and γ-ray emission in heavy ion collisions viewed in the light of the diffusion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.

    1977-08-01

    The hierarchy of the collective relaxation times in heavy ion reactions is briefly reviewed. An improved diffusion model is introduced and applied to interpret the fragment Z and angular distributions for some typical reactions. The equilibrium in the neutron-to-proton ratio as well as the sharing of the excitation energy between fragments is studied by a coincidence method which leads to the measurement of the charge, mass and mean number of nucleons emitted by each fragment. The final destiny of the dissipative energy is determined by measuring the atomic number of two coincident fragments, thus obtaining the missing charge as a function of bombarding energy and the Q of the reaction. The sequential fission probability of the heavy recoil is established as a function of the Z and kinetic energy of the light partner. The out-of-plane angular distribution of the fission fragments is correlated with the fissionability and interpreted in terms of various sources of angular momentum misalignment. The γ-ray multiplicities and the γ-ray angular distributions associated with deep inelastic event are discussed in terms of the angular momentum transfer and in terms of the diffusion model

  11. Tritium distribution between the fuel can and the oxide of fuel elements of light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, M.

    1986-12-01

    The study on the measurement of tritium and other radionuclide contained in zircaloy fuel cans of the water cooled reactor fuel elements had two aims: the first was to estimate with accuracy the distribution of tritium in a fuel element (can + oxide). The measurement of tritium in the zircaloy fuel cans of the BORSSELE fuel elements associated with the measurement of tritium in the oxide allowed the establishment of a complete tritium balance on an industrial spent fuel element. This result has been compared to the values calculated by the code CEA/SEN and will allow to validate or adjust this calculation. The second aim delt with the characterization of the other radionuclides gaseous (Kr85) or not (Cs 134 and 137) contained in the solid zircaloy wastes (hulls) coming from the industrial reprocessing of ''water cooled'' fuel elements. These activity measurements in the hulls allowed to estimate the residual content of tritium, Kr 85 and other radionuclides which may be found in these solid wastes (high-level βγ radioactive wastes). Original experimental methods have been developed to reach these aims (dissolution in ammonium bifluoride medium and quantitative recovery of gases produced, radiochromatography, and liquid scintillation after double distillation). One tries to explain the presence of Kr 85 in the irradiated can [fr

  12. Development of low angle grain boundaries in lightly deformed superconducting niobium and their influence on hydride distribution and flux perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Z.-H.; Wang, M.; Polyanskii, A. A.; Santosh, C.; Balachandran, S.; Compton, C.; Larbalestier, D. C.; Bieler, T. R.; Lee, P. J.

    2017-05-01

    This study shows that low angle grain boundaries (LAGBs) can be created by small 5% strains in high purity (residual resistivity ratio ≥ 200) superconducting radio frequency (SRF)-grade single crystalline niobium (Nb) and that these boundaries act as hydrogen traps as indicated by the distribution of niobium hydrides (Nb1-xHx). Nb1-xHx is detrimental to SRF Nb cavities due to its normal conducting properties at cavity operating temperatures. By designing a single crystal tensile sample extracted from a large grain (>5 cm) Nb ingot slice for preferred slip on one slip plane, LAGBs and dense dislocation boundaries developed. With chemical surface treatments following standard SRF cavity fabrication practice, Nb1-xHx phases were densely precipitated at the LAGBs upon cryogenic cooling (8-10 K/min). Micro-crystallographic analysis confirmed heterogeneous hydride precipitation, which included significant hydrogen atom accumulation in LAGBs. Magneto-optical imaging analysis showed that these sites can then act as sites for both premature flux penetration and eventually flux trapping. However, this hydrogen related degradation at LAGBs did not completely disappear even after an 800 °C/2 h anneal typically used for hydrogen removal in SRF Nb cavities. These findings suggest that hydride precipitation at an LAGB is facilitated by a non-equilibrium concentration of vacancy-hydrogen (H) complexes aided by mechanical deformation and the hydride phase interferes with the recovery process under 800 °C annealing.

  13. The enigmatic SAR202 cluster up close: shedding light on a globally distributed dark ocean lineage involved in sulfur cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrshad, Maliheh; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; López-García, Purificación; Ghai, Rohit

    2018-03-01

    The dark ocean microbiota represents the unknown majority in the global ocean waters. The SAR202 cluster belonging to the phylum Chloroflexi was the first microbial lineage discovered to specifically inhabit the aphotic realm, where they are abundant and globally distributed. The absence of SAR202 cultured representatives is a significant bottleneck towards understanding their metabolic capacities and role in the marine environment. In this work, we use a combination of metagenome-assembled genomes from deep-sea datasets and publicly available single-cell genomes to construct a genomic perspective of SAR202 phylogeny, metabolism and biogeography. Our results suggest that SAR202 cluster members are medium sized, free-living cells with a heterotrophic lifestyle, broadly divided into two distinct clades. We present the first evidence of vertical stratification of these microbes along the meso- and bathypelagic ocean layers. Remarkably, two distinct species of SAR202 cluster are highly abundant in nearly all deep bathypelagic metagenomic datasets available so far. SAR202 members metabolize multiple organosulfur compounds, many appear to be sulfite-oxidizers and are predicted to play a major role in sulfur turnover in the dark water column. This concomitantly suggests an unsuspected availability of these nutrient sources to allow for the high abundance of these microbes in the deep sea.

  14. Global Positioning System – A new tool to measure the distribution of anaemia and nutritional status of children (5-10years in a rural area, South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathish Chandra MR

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Global Positioning System (GPS is a satellite based navigation system which is of late being used in the health field. Objectives: 1.To describe the geographical distribution of anaemia and malnutrition with GPS; 2.To assess the prevalence of anaemia and malnutrition in children aged 5-10 years. Subjects and methods: This exploratory study was conducted over a period of 2 months in the rural field practice area of a medical college situated in Bangalore during the months of June - July, 2012. Children in the age group of 5-10 years of age were the study subjects. Results: GPS was used for the describing the geographical distribution of anaemia and nutrition status on the Google earth map. The prevalence of anaemia in the study subjects was 8.7%.The prevalence of underweight, stunting, thinness and severe thinness among the study subjects was 52.8%, 28.5%, 23.5 % and 29.1% respectively, however  overweight  and obesity was observed only in 0.9 % and 1.2% of the study subjects respectively. Conclusion: GPS was easy to use and was able to demonstrate the actual distribution of morbidity at the household level in the rural area.

  15. Distribution of anti-HAV IgM positivity according to age and months of a year in Van region,Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Parlak

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study we investigated the anti-HAVIgM positivity rates and their distribution according to ageand season of a year in Van region of Turkey.Materials and methods: During five-year period between2006-2010, the presence of anti-HAV IgM weredetermined in the serum samples sent to our laboratorythat have prediagnosis of hepatitis A by ELISA test, usingAxSYM (Abbott Diagnostics, Germany and i2000SR Architect(Abbott Diagnostics, Germany analyzers. For statisticalanalyze of Anti-HAV IgM positivity rates, patients’age and gender and time of year when specimen wasobtain were compared.Results: The presence of anti-HAV IgM was investigatedin a total of 8851 patients, including 5303 (60% childrenand 3548 (40% adults. Anti-HAV IgM in children and adultpatients were determined as 9.8% and 2.6%, respectively,and this difference was found statistically significant (p<0.01. Anti-HAV IgM positivity rate began to rise in August,reached the highest level in November-Decemberand decreased to the initial level in January. The highestfrequency detected during the November-December periodwas statistically significantly higher than rates foundduring other months.Conclusions: The prevalence of Hepatitis A was found tobe similar with previous studies performed in our country.The prevalence of disease was significantly increased especiallybetween November and December.Key words: Anti-HAV IgM, seasonal distribution, seroprevalence,age

  16. Three-energy focusing Laue monochromator for the diamond light source x-ray pair distribution function beamline I15-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutter, John P., E-mail: john.sutter@diamond.ac.uk; Chater, Philip A.; Hillman, Michael R.; Keeble, Dean S.; Wilhelm, Heribert [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Tucker, Matt G. [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); ISIS Neutron and Muon Source, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    The I15-1 beamline, the new side station to I15 at the Diamond Light Source, will be dedicated to the collection of atomic pair distribution function data. A Laue monochromator will be used consisting of three silicon crystals diffracting X-rays at a common Bragg angle of 2.83°. The crystals use the (1 1 1), (2 2 0), and (3 1 1) planes to select 40, 65, and 76 keV X-rays, respectively, and will be bent meridionally to horizontally focus the selected X-rays onto the sample. All crystals will be cut to the same optimized asymmetry angle in order to eliminate image broadening from the crystal thickness. Finite element calculations show that the thermal distortion of the crystals will affect the image size and bandpass.

  17. Three-energy focusing Laue monochromator for the diamond light source x-ray pair distribution function beamline I15-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutter, John P.; Chater, Philip A.; Hillman, Michael R.; Keeble, Dean S.; Wilhelm, Heribert; Tucker, Matt G.

    2016-01-01

    The I15-1 beamline, the new side station to I15 at the Diamond Light Source, will be dedicated to the collection of atomic pair distribution function data. A Laue monochromator will be used consisting of three silicon crystals diffracting X-rays at a common Bragg angle of 2.83°. The crystals use the (1 1 1), (2 2 0), and (3 1 1) planes to select 40, 65, and 76 keV X-rays, respectively, and will be bent meridionally to horizontally focus the selected X-rays onto the sample. All crystals will be cut to the same optimized asymmetry angle in order to eliminate image broadening from the crystal thickness. Finite element calculations show that the thermal distortion of the crystals will affect the image size and bandpass.

  18. Distributions of /sup 35/S-sulfate and /sup 3/H-glucosamine in the angular region of the hamster: light and electron microscopic autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.

    1983-06-01

    The distribution of /sup 35/S-sulfate and /sup 3/H-glucosamine in the angular region of the hamster was studied by light and electron microscopic autoradiography following intraperitoneal injection of these compounds to hamsters. Exposed silver grains of /sup 35/S-sulfate were concentrated in the trabecular meshwork, sclera, and cornea, and grains of /sup 3/H-glucosamine were localized in the trabecular region. The radioactivity of both isotopes was observed in the Golgi apparatuses of the endothelial cells of the angular aqueous plexus and the trabecular meshwork. The grains were noted over the entire cytoplasm, except for the nucleus, and then were incorporated into the amorphous substance and collagen fibers in the region adjacent to the angular aqueous sinus. These results suggest that endothelial cells in the angular region synthesize and secrete the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and hyaluronic acid.

  19. Distributions of 35S-sulfate and 3H-glucosamine in the angular region of the hamster: light and electron microscopic autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The distribution of 35 S-sulfate and 3 H-glucosamine in the angular region of the hamster was studied by light and electron microscopic autoradiography following intraperitoneal injection of these compounds to hamsters. Exposed silver grains of 35 S-sulfate were concentrated in the trabecular meshwork, sclera, and cornea, and grains of 3 H-glucosamine were localized in the trabecular region. The radioactivity of both isotopes was observed in the Golgi apparatuses of the endothelial cells of the angular aqueous plexus and the trabecular meshwork. The grains were noted over the entire cytoplasm, except for the nucleus, and then were incorporated into the amorphous substance and collagen fibers in the region adjacent to the angular aqueous sinus. These results suggest that endothelial cells in the angular region synthesize and secrete the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and hyaluronic acid

  20. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  1. Efficient generation of 1.9  W yellow light by cascaded frequency doubling of a distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Kragh; Christensen, Mathias; Noordegraaf, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Watt-level yellow emitting lasers are interesting for medical applications, due to their high hemoglobin absorption, and for efficient detection of certain fluorophores. In this paper, we demonstrate a compact and robust diode-based laser system in the yellow spectral range. The system generates ...... of a laser diode enables the modulation of the pump wavelength by controlling the drive current. This is utilized to achieve a power modulation depth above 90% for the second harmonic light, with a rise time below 40  μs.......Watt-level yellow emitting lasers are interesting for medical applications, due to their high hemoglobin absorption, and for efficient detection of certain fluorophores. In this paper, we demonstrate a compact and robust diode-based laser system in the yellow spectral range. The system generates 1.......9 W of single-frequency light at 562.4 nm by cascaded single-pass frequency doubling of the 1124.8 nm emission from a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) tapered laser diode. The absence of a free-space cavity makes the system stable over a base-plate temperature range of 30 K. At the same time, the use...

  2. WOW: light print, light propel, light point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Bañas, Andrew; Aabo, Thomas; Palima, Darwin

    2012-10-01

    We are presenting so-called Wave-guided Optical Waveguides (WOWs) fabricated by two-photon polymerization and capable of being optically manipulated into any arbitrary orientation. By integrating optical waveguides into the structures we have created freestanding waveguides which can be positioned anywhere in a sample at any orientation using real-time 3D optical micromanipulation with six degrees of freedom. One of the key aspects of our demonstrated WOWs is the change in direction of in-coupled light and the marked increase in numerical aperture of the out-coupled light. Hence, each light propelled WOW can tap from a relatively broad incident beam and generate a much more tightly confined light at its tip. The presentation contains both numerical simulations related to the propagation of light through a WOW and preliminary experimental demonstrations on our BioPhotonics Workstation. In a broader context, this research shows that optically trapped micro-fabricated structures can potentially help bridge the diffraction barrier. This structure-mediated paradigm may be carried forward to open new possibilities for exploiting beams from far-field optics down to the sub-wavelength domain.

  3. Mass balance, meteorology, area altitude distribution, glacier-surface altitude, ice motion, terminus position, and runoff at Gulkana Glacier, Alaska, 1996 balance year

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Rod S.

    2003-01-01

    The 1996 measured winter snow, maximum winter snow, net, and annual balances in the Gulkana Glacier Basin were evaluated on the basis of meteorological, hydrological, and glaciological data. Averaged over the glacier, the measured winter snow balance was 0.87 meter on April 18, 1996, 1.1 standard deviation below the long-term average; the maximum winter snow balance, 1.06 meters, was reached on May 28, 1996; and the net balance (from August 30, 1995, to August 24, 1996) was -0.53 meter, 0.53 standard deviation below the long-term average. The annual balance (October 1, 1995, to September 30, 1996) was -0.37 meter. Area-averaged balances were reported using both the 1967 and 1993 area altitude distributions (the numbers previously given in this abstract use the 1993 area altitude distribution). Net balance was about 25 percent less negative using the 1993 area altitude distribution than the 1967 distribution. Annual average air temperature was 0.9 degree Celsius warmer than that recorded with the analog sensor used since 1966. Total precipitation catch for the year was 0.78 meter, 0.8 standard deviations below normal. The annual average wind speed was 3.5 meters per second in the first year of measuring wind speed. Annual runoff averaged 1.50 meters over the basin, 1.0 standard deviation below the long-term average. Glacier-surface altitude and ice-motion changes measured at three index sites document seasonal ice-speed and glacier-thickness changes. Both showed a continuation of a slowing and thinning trend present in the 1990s. The glacier terminus and lower ablation area were defined for 1996 with a handheld Global Positioning System survey of 126 locations spread out over about 4 kilometers on the lower glacier margin. From 1949 to 1996, the terminus retreated about 1,650 meters for an average retreat rate of 35 meters per year.

  4. Study on the Light Scattering from Random Rough Surfaces by Kirrhoff Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keding Yan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the space distribution characteristics of light scattering from random rough surfaces, the linear filtering method is used to generate a series of Gaussian randomly rough surfaces, and the Kirchhoff Approximation is used to calculate the scattered light intensity distribution from random metal and dielectric rough surfaces. The three characteristics of the scattered light intensity distribution peak, the intensity distribution width and the position of peak are reviewed. Numerical calculation results show that significant differences between scattering characteristics of metal surfaces and the dielectric surfaces exist. The light scattering characteristics are jointly influenced by the slope distribution and reflectance of surface element. The scattered light intensity distribution is affected by common influence of surface local slope distribution and surface local reflectivity. The results can provide a basis theory for the research to lidar target surface scattering characteristics.

  5. A lighting metric for quantitative evaluation of accent lighting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acholo, Cyril O.; Connor, Kenneth A.; Radke, Richard J.

    2014-09-01

    Accent lighting is critical for artwork and sculpture lighting in museums, and subject lighting for stage, Film and television. The research problem of designing effective lighting in such settings has been revived recently with the rise of light-emitting-diode-based solid state lighting. In this work, we propose an easy-to-apply quantitative measure of the scene's visual quality as perceived by human viewers. We consider a well-accent-lit scene as one which maximizes the information about the scene (in an information-theoretic sense) available to the user. We propose a metric based on the entropy of the distribution of colors, which are extracted from an image of the scene from the viewer's perspective. We demonstrate that optimizing the metric as a function of illumination configuration (i.e., position, orientation, and spectral composition) results in natural, pleasing accent lighting. We use a photorealistic simulation tool to validate the functionality of our proposed approach, showing its successful application to two- and three-dimensional scenes.

  6. A Novel Passive Islanding Detection Scheme for Distributed Generations Based on Rate of Change of Positive Sequence Component of Voltage and Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostami, Ali; Jalilian, Amin; Naderi, Seyed Behzad

    2017-01-01

    ) based wind turbine and synchronous diesel generator DGs by MATLAB/Simulink software. Different non-islanding case studies are taken into account to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. The simulation results show that the proposed method has advantage of detecting the islanding rapidly......Islanding operation is one of serious hazards of distributed generation (DG) applications. According to IEEE 1547 standard, its occurrence must be detected within two seconds. This paper presents a novel passive islanding detection method based on rate of change of positive sequence component...... of RCPSC and RCPSV exceed the predetermined threshold values, it is concluded that the islanding condition has occurred. Otherwise, it is considered as a non-islanding event. The performance of the proposed method is investigated on a sample network in the presence of doubly fed induction generator (DFIG...

  7. The Potential and Challenges of Digital Well-Being Interventions: Positive Technology Research and Design in Light of the Bitter-Sweet Ambivalence of Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    Along with the dissemination of technical assistance in nearly every part of life, there has been growing interest in the potential of technology to support well-being and human flourishing. "Positive technology" thereby takes the responsible role of a "digital coach," supporting people in achieving personal goals and behavior change. The design of such technology requires knowledge of different disciplines such as psychology, design and human-computer interaction. However, possible synergies are not yet used to full effect, and it needs common frameworks to support a more deliberate design of the "therapeutic interaction" mediated through technology. For positive technology design, positive psychology, and resource oriented approaches appear as particularly promising starting point. Besides a general fit of the basic theoretical conceptions of human change, many elements of established interventions could possibly be transferred to technology design. However, besides the power of focusing on the positive, another psychological aspect to consider are the bitter components inherent to change, such as the confrontation with a negative status quo, threat of self-esteem, and the effort required. The present research discusses the general potential and challenges within positive technology design from an interdisciplinary perspective with theoretical and practical contributions. Based on the bitter-sweet ambivalence of change as present in many psychological approaches of motivation and behavior change, the bitter-sweet continuum serves as a proxy for the mixed emotions and cognitions related to change. An empirical investigation of those factors among 177 users of self-improvement technologies provides initial support for the usefulness of the bitter-sweet perspective in understanding change dynamics. In a next step, the bitter-sweet concept is transformed into different design strategies to support positive change. The present article aims to deepen the discussion

  8. The Potential and Challenges of Digital Well-Being Interventions: Positive Technology Research and Design in Light of the Bitter-Sweet Ambivalence of Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Diefenbach

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Along with the dissemination of technical assistance in nearly every part of life, there has been growing interest in the potential of technology to support well-being and human flourishing. “Positive technology” thereby takes the responsible role of a “digital coach,” supporting people in achieving personal goals and behavior change. The design of such technology requires knowledge of different disciplines such as psychology, design and human-computer interaction. However, possible synergies are not yet used to full effect, and it needs common frameworks to support a more deliberate design of the “therapeutic interaction” mediated through technology. For positive technology design, positive psychology, and resource oriented approaches appear as particularly promising starting point. Besides a general fit of the basic theoretical conceptions of human change, many elements of established interventions could possibly be transferred to technology design. However, besides the power of focusing on the positive, another psychological aspect to consider are the bitter components inherent to change, such as the confrontation with a negative status quo, threat of self-esteem, and the effort required. The present research discusses the general potential and challenges within positive technology design from an interdisciplinary perspective with theoretical and practical contributions. Based on the bitter-sweet ambivalence of change as present in many psychological approaches of motivation and behavior change, the bitter-sweet continuum serves as a proxy for the mixed emotions and cognitions related to change. An empirical investigation of those factors among 177 users of self-improvement technologies provides initial support for the usefulness of the bitter-sweet perspective in understanding change dynamics. In a next step, the bitter-sweet concept is transformed into different design strategies to support positive change. The present article

  9. The Potential and Challenges of Digital Well-Being Interventions: Positive Technology Research and Design in Light of the Bitter-Sweet Ambivalence of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    Along with the dissemination of technical assistance in nearly every part of life, there has been growing interest in the potential of technology to support well-being and human flourishing. “Positive technology” thereby takes the responsible role of a “digital coach,” supporting people in achieving personal goals and behavior change. The design of such technology requires knowledge of different disciplines such as psychology, design and human-computer interaction. However, possible synergies are not yet used to full effect, and it needs common frameworks to support a more deliberate design of the “therapeutic interaction” mediated through technology. For positive technology design, positive psychology, and resource oriented approaches appear as particularly promising starting point. Besides a general fit of the basic theoretical conceptions of human change, many elements of established interventions could possibly be transferred to technology design. However, besides the power of focusing on the positive, another psychological aspect to consider are the bitter components inherent to change, such as the confrontation with a negative status quo, threat of self-esteem, and the effort required. The present research discusses the general potential and challenges within positive technology design from an interdisciplinary perspective with theoretical and practical contributions. Based on the bitter-sweet ambivalence of change as present in many psychological approaches of motivation and behavior change, the bitter-sweet continuum serves as a proxy for the mixed emotions and cognitions related to change. An empirical investigation of those factors among 177 users of self-improvement technologies provides initial support for the usefulness of the bitter-sweet perspective in understanding change dynamics. In a next step, the bitter-sweet concept is transformed into different design strategies to support positive change. The present article aims to deepen the

  10. Aerosol measurement: the use of optical light scattering for the determination of particulate size distribution, and particulate mass, including the semi-volatile fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Hans; Eatough, Delbert J

    2009-01-01

    The GRIMM model 1.107 monitor is designed to measure particle size distribution and particulate mass based on a light scattering measurement of individual particles in the sampled air. The design and operation of the instrument are described. Protocols used to convert the measured size number distribution to a mass concentration consistent with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency protocols for measuring particulate matter (PM) less than 10 microm (PM10) and less than 2.5 microm (PM2.5) in aerodynamic diameter are described. The performance of the resulting continuous monitor has been evaluated by comparing GRIMM monitor PM2.5 measurements with results obtained by the Rupprecht and Patashnick Co. (R&P) filter dynamic measurement system (FDMS). Data were obtained during month-long studies in Rubidoux, CA, in July 2003 and in Fresno, CA, in December 2003. The results indicate that the GRIMM monitor does respond to total PM2.5 mass, including the semi-volatile components, giving results comparable to the FDMS. The data also indicate that the monitor can be used to estimate water content of the fine particles. However, if the inlet to the monitor is heated, then the instrument measures only the nonvolatile material, more comparable to results obtained with a conventional heated filter tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) monitor. A recent modification of the model 180, with a Nafion dryer at the inlet, measures total PM2.5 including the nonvolatile and semi-volatile components, but excluding fine particulate water. Model 180 was in agreement with FDMS data obtained in Lindon, UT, during January through February 2007.

  11. On-board measurement of particle numbers and their size distribution from a light-duty diesel vehicle: Influences of VSP and altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Ge, Yunshan; Wang, Xin; Hao, Lijun; Tan, Jianwei; Peng, Zihang; Zhang, Chuanzhen; Gong, Huiming; Huang, Ying

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the particle size-resolved distribution from a China-3 certificated light-duty diesel vehicle was measured by using a portable emission measurement system (PEMS). In order to examine the influences of vehicle specific power (VSP) and high-altitude operation, measurements were conducted at 8 constant speeds, which ranged from 10 to 80km/hr at 10km/hr intervals, and two different high altitudes, namely 2200 and 3200m. The results demonstrated that the numbers of particles in all size ranges decreased significantly as VSP increased when the test vehicle was running at lower speeds (vehicle resulted in increased particle number emissions at low and high driving speeds; however, particle numbers obtained at moderate speeds decreased as altitude rose. When the test vehicle was running at moderate speeds, particle numbers measured at the two altitudes were very close, except for comparatively higher number concentrations of nanoparticles measured at 2200m. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. An explanation of efficiency droop in InGaN-based light emitting diodes: saturated radiative recombination rate at randomly distributed In-rich active areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Jong-In; Kim, Hyun-Sung; Shin, Dong-Soo; Yoo, Han-Youl

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive model of the dependence of the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) on both the temperature and the carrier density in InGaN-based blue and green light emitting diodes (LEDs). In our model, carriers are dominantly located and recombine both radiatively and nonradiatively inside randomly distributed In-rich areas of the InGaN quantum wells (QWs). In those areas, the carrier density is very high even at a small current density. We propose that the saturated radiative recombination rate is a primary factor determining the IQE droop of InGaN based LEDs. In typical InGaN-based QWs, it is common for the total carrier recombination rate to be smaller than the carrier injection rate even at a small current density. This is mostly attributable to the saturation of the radiative recombination rate. The saturation of the radiative recombination rate increases carrier density in InGaN QWs, enlarges nonradiative carrier losses, and eventually gives rise to the large IQE droop with increasing current. We show how the radiative recombination rate saturates and the radiative recombination rate has influence on the IQE droop in InGaN-based QW LEDs.

  13. Proposal for the award of an industrial services contract for electrical installation work and maintenance of lighting and low-voltage distribution

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an Industrial Services contract for electrical installation work and maintenance of lighting and low-voltage distribution. Following a market survey carried out among 127 firms in fifteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2754/ST) was sent on 2 June 2000 to three firms and four consortia, each consisting of two firms, in four Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received tenders from two firms and two consortia in four Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium SPIE TRINDEL(FR) ? CONTROLMATIC (DE), the lowest bidder complying with the specified requirements, for an initial period of three years from 1 July 2001 for a total amount of 41 705 497 Swiss francs, not subject to revision until 31 December 2003. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period for a total amount of 27 803 664 Swiss francs, for which CERN will seek approval by the Finance ...

  14. Analysis of chromatic dispersion compensation by measuring time domain optical spectrum distribution of light pulse; Hikari pulse chu no hacho jikan bunpu sokutei ni yoru bunsan hosho gijutsu no hyokaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, M.; Kurono, M. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-01

    A large number of single mode fibers (SMF) for 1.3 {mu}m light are installed in electric power communication facilities. On the other hand, light of 1.5 {mu}m band is being used more in the capacity increasing technology to minimize transmission loss. If this is applied to the current SMF, waveform distortion is generated due to wavelength dispersion, thus the transmission speed and distance are limited. In order to evaluate quantitatively the effects of a wavelength dispersion compensating technology, a method was developed to derive time change in each wavelength component in light pulse. No sufficient wavelength separation is possible if permeation bandwidth of a wavelength filter is wider than the wavelength width of the light pulse. Therefore, a method was developed to derive time change in the wavelength components in the light pulse from small difference in the measured light waveforms after transmission when the central wavelength of a wavelength variable filter is varied. It was possible from comparing the method to derive the wavelength dispersion amount and the dispersion compensation amount. Since the method reveals simultaneously the distribution of strength against wavelength and time contained in light pulse, the method is advantageous in elucidating compensation limit and causes for compensation errors. The effectiveness of the method was verified by a 1.5-{mu}m light transmission test. 14 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Influence of water vapour on the height distribution of positive ions, effective recombination coefficient and ionisation balance in the quiet lower ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barabash

    2014-03-01

    vapour concentration upper limit at altitudes between 75 and 87 km, beyond which the water vapour concentration ceases to influence the numerical densities of Cl2+ and Cl1+, the effective recombination coefficient and the electron number density in the summer ionosphere. This water vapour concentration limit corresponds to values found in the H2O-1 profile that was observed in the summer mesosphere by the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS. The electron density modelled using the H2O-1 profile agreed well with the electron density measured in the summer ionosphere when the measured profiles did not have sharp gradients. For sharp gradients in electron and positive ion number densities, a water profile that can reproduce the characteristic behaviour of the ionospheric parameters should have an inhomogeneous height distribution of water vapour.

  16. Different percentages of false-positive results obtained using five methods for the calculation of reference change values based on simulated normal and ln-normal distributions of data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Flemming; Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Fraser, Callum G

    2016-01-01

    a homeostatic set point that follows a normal (Gaussian) distribution. This set point (or baseline in steady-state) should be estimated from a set of previous samples, but, in practice, decisions based on reference change value are often based on only two consecutive results. The original reference change value......-positive results. The aim of this study was to investigate false-positive results using five different published methods for calculation of reference change value. METHODS: The five reference change value methods were examined using normally and ln-normally distributed simulated data. RESULTS: One method performed...... best in approaching the theoretical false-positive percentages on normally distributed data and another method performed best on ln-normally distributed data. The commonly used reference change value method based on two results (without use of estimated set point) performed worst both on normally...

  17. High sensitivity detection of Plasmodium species reveals positive correlations between infections of different species, shifts in age distribution and reduced local variation in Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Thomas A

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When diagnosed by standard light microscopy (LM, malaria prevalence can vary significantly between sites, even at local scale, and mixed species infections are consistently less common than expect in areas co-endemic for Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium malariae. The development of a high-throughput molecular species diagnostic assay now enables routine PCR-based surveillance of malaria infections in large field and intervention studies, and improves resolution of species distribution within and between communities. Methods This study reports differences in the prevalence of infections with all four human malarial species and of mixed infections as diagnosed by LM and post-PCR ligase detection reaction – fluorescent microsphere (LDR-FMA assay in 15 villages in the central Sepik area of Papua New Guinea. Results Significantly higher rates of infection by P. falciparum, P. vivax, P. malariae and Plasmodium ovale were observed in LDR-FMA compared to LM diagnosis (p P. malariae (3.9% vs 13.4% and P. ovale (0.0% vs 4.8%. In contrast to LM diagnosis, which suggested a significant deficit of mixed species infections, a significant excess of mixed infections over expectation was detected by LDR-FMA (p P. falciparum (LM: 7–9 yrs 47.5%, LDR-FMA: 10–19 yrs 74.2% and P. vivax (LM: 4–6 yrs 24.2%, LDR-FMA: 7–9 yrs 50.9% but not P. malariae infections (10–19 yrs, LM: 7.7% LDR-FMA: 21.6%. Significant geographical variation in prevalence was found for all species (except for LM-diagnosed P. falciparum, with the extent of this variation greater in LDR-FMA than LM diagnosed infections (overall, 84.4% vs. 37.6%. Insecticide-treated bednet (ITN coverage was also the dominant factor linked to geographical differences in Plasmodium species infection prevalence explaining between 60.6% – 74.5% of this variation for LDR-FMA and 81.8% – 90.0% for LM (except P. falciparum, respectively. Conclusion The present study

  18. The extent and distribution of inequalities in childhood mortality by cause of death according to parental socioeconomic positions: a birth cohort study in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongoh; Son, Mia; Kawachi, Ichiro; Oh, Juhwan

    2009-10-01

    It has been shown that childhood mortality is affected by parental socioeconomic positions; in this article, we investigate the extent and distribution of inequalities across major causes of childhood death. We built a retrospective birth cohort using individually linked national birth and death records in South Korea. 1,329,540 children were followed up to exact age eight from 1995 to 1996 and total observed person-years were 10,594,168.18. Causes of death were identified from death records while parental education, occupation and birth characteristics were identified from birth records. Survival analysis was performed according to parental socioeconomic positions. Cox proportional hazard analysis was done according to parental education and occupation with adjustment of birth characteristics such as sex, parental age, gestational age, birth weight, multiple birth, the number of total births, and previous death of children. Cumulative incidence of mortality by age was obtained through a competing-risk method in each cause according to maternal education. From these results, distribution of inequalities across major causes of death was calculated. In total, 7018 deaths occurred during the eight years and mortality rate was 66.24 per 100,000 person-years. External cause was the most common cause of death followed by congenital malformations, nervous system diseases, perinatal diseases, cancer, respiratory, cardiovascular, infectious and gastrointestinal diseases. For all-cause mortality, hazard ratios (HR) were 1.98 (95% CI: 1.83-2.13) for paternal education, 1.90 (1.75-2.07) for maternal education, 1.40 (1.33-1.47) for paternal occupation and 2.33(1.98-2.73) for maternal occupation (between middle school graduation or lower and university or more for education, between manual and non-manual for occupation). Mortality differentials were found in every cause of death. External cause, respiratory, cardiovascular and infectious diseases showed larger HR than all

  19. Negative-binomial multiplicity distributions in the interaction of light ions with 12C at 4.2 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucholski, A.; Bogdanowicz, J.; Moroz, Z.; Wojtkowska, J.

    1989-01-01

    Multiplicity distribution of single-charged particles in the interaction of p, d, α and 12 C projectiles with C target nuclei at 4.2 GeV/c were analysed in terms of the negative binomial distribution. The experimental data obtained by the Dubna Propane Bubble Chamber Group were used. It is shown that the experimental distributions are satisfactorily described by the negative-binomial distribution. Values of the parameters of these distributions are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Green lights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Peter Kielberg

    This study investigates the effect of drought on economic activity globally using remote sensing data. In particular, predicted variation in greenness is correlated with changes in the density of artificial light observed at night on a grid of 0.25 degree latitude-longitude pixels. I define drought...... as greenness estimated by lagged variation in monthly rainfall and temperature. This definition of drought performs well in identifying self-reported drought events since 2000 compared with measures of drought that do not take greenness into account, and the subsequent analysis indicates that predicted...... variation in greenness is positively associated with year-on-year changes in luminosity: If a unit of observation experiences a predicted variation in greenness that lies 1 standard deviation below the global mean, on average 1.5 - 2.5 light pixels out of 900 are extinguished that year. Finally, an attempt...

  1. Light Pollution: Outdoor lighting is a growing threat to astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, K W

    1973-03-30

    There have been major qualitative and quantitative changes in outdoor lighting technology in the last decade. The level of skylight caused by outdoor lighting systems is growing at a very high rate, about 20 percent per year nationwide. In addition, the spectral distribution of man-made light pollution may change in the next decade from one containing a few mercury lines to one containing dozens of lines and a significantly increased continuum level. Light pollution is presently damaging to some astronomical programs, and it is likely to become a major factor limiting progress in the next decade. Suitable sites in the United States for new dark sky observing facilities are very difficult to find. Some of the increase in outdoor illumination is due to the character of national growth and development. Some is due to promotional campaigns, in which questionable arguments involving public safety are presented. There are protective measures which might be adopted by the government; these would significantly aid observational astronomy, without compromising the legitimate outdoor lighting needs of society. Observatories should establish programs to routinely monitor sky brightness as a function of position, wavelength, and time. The astronomical community should establish a mechanism by which such programs can be supported and coordinated.

  2. Geolocation by light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisovski, Simeon; Hewson, Chris M.; Klaassen, Raymond H. G.

    2012-01-01

    1. Geolocation by light allows for tracking animal movements, based on measurements of light intensity over time by a data-logging device (‘geolocator’). Recent developments of ultra-light devices (.... However, an inherent problem of geolocators is that any factor or process that changes the natural light intensity pattern also affects the positions calculated from these light patterns. Although the most important factors have been identified, estimation of their effect on the accuracy and precision...... of positions estimated has been lacking but is very important for the analyses and interpretation of geolocator data. 2. The ‘threshold method’ is mainly used to derive positions by defining sunrise and sunset times from the light intensity pattern for each recorded day. This method requires calibration...

  3. Shaping light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser, a high- power laser to shoot down missiles, fills an entire Boeing 747! By customising the laser resonator it is possible to design light to order. Laser technology has been around for 50 years, yet new research and ideas are ensuring... that it will remain an active area of investigation for years to come. ? Professor Andrew Forbes is Chief Researcher and Research Group Leader at the CSIR National Laser Centre, and holds honorary positions in the Schools of Physics at both the University...

  4. [Data distribution and transformation in population based sampling survey of viral load in HIV positive men who have sex with men in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Z; Chen, J; Jiang, Z; Song, W L; Xu, J; Wu, Z Y

    2017-11-10

    Objective: To understand the distribution of population viral load (PVL) data in HIV infected men who have sex with men (MSM), fit distribution function and explore the appropriate estimating parameter of PVL. Methods: The detection limit of viral load (VL) was ≤ 50 copies/ml. Box-Cox transformation and normal distribution tests were used to describe the general distribution characteristics of the original and transformed data of PVL, then the stable distribution function was fitted with test of goodness of fit. Results: The original PVL data fitted a skewed distribution with the variation coefficient of 622.24%, and had a multimodal distribution after Box-Cox transformation with optimal parameter ( λ ) of-0.11. The distribution of PVL data over the detection limit was skewed and heavy tailed when transformed by Box-Cox with optimal λ =0. By fitting the distribution function of the transformed data over the detection limit, it matched the stable distribution (SD) function ( α =1.70, β =-1.00, γ =0.78, δ =4.03). Conclusions: The original PVL data had some censored data below the detection limit, and the data over the detection limit had abnormal distribution with large degree of variation. When proportion of the censored data was large, it was inappropriate to use half-value of detection limit to replace the censored ones. The log-transformed data over the detection limit fitted the SD. The median ( M ) and inter-quartile ranger ( IQR ) of log-transformed data can be used to describe the centralized tendency and dispersion tendency of the data over the detection limit.

  5. Modeling Kepler Transit Light Curves as False Positives: Rejection of Blend Scenarios for Kepler-9, and Validation of Kepler-9 d, a Super-Earth-Size Planet in a Multiple System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, Francois; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Brown, Timothy M.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Charbonneau, David; Ciardi, David R.; Dunham, Edward W.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Light curves from the Kepler Mission contain valuable information on the nature of the phenomena producing the transit-like signals. To assist in exploring the possibility that they are due to an astrophysical false positive we describe a procedure (BLENDER) to model the photometry in terms of a blend rather than a planet orbiting a star. A blend may consist of a background or foreground eclipsing binary (or star-planet pair) whose eclipses are attenuated by the light of the candidate and possibly other stars within the photometric aperture. We apply BLENDER to the case of Kepler-9 (KIC 3323887), a target harboring two previously confirmed Saturn-size planets (Kepler-9 b and Kepler-9 c) showing transit timing variations, and an additional shallower signal with a 1.59 day period suggesting the presence of a super-Earth-size planet. Using BLENDER together with constraints from other follow-up observations we are able to rule out all blends for the two deeper signals and provide independent validation of their planetary nature. For the shallower signal, we rule out a large fraction of the false positives that might mimic the transits. The false alarm rate for remaining blends depends in part (and inversely) on the unknown frequency of small-size planets. Based on several realistic estimates of this frequency, we conclude with very high confidence that this small signal is due to a super-Earth-size planet (Kepler-9 d) in a multiple system, rather than a false positive. The radius is determined to be 1.64(exp)(sub-14),R, and current spectroscopic observations are as yet insufficient to establish its mass.

  6. Li distribution characterization in Li-ion batteries positive electrodes containing LixNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 secondary particles (0.75 ⩽ x ⩽ 1.0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mima, K.; Gonzalez-Arrabal, R.; Azuma, H.; Yamazaki, A.; Okuda, C.; Ukyo, Y.; Sawada, H.; Fujita, K.; Kato, Y.; Perlado, J.M.; Nakai, S.

    2012-01-01

    The elemental distribution of as-received (non-charged) and charged Li-ion battery positive electrodes containing Li x Ni 0.8 Co 0.15 Al 0.05 O 2 (0.75 ⩽ x ⩽ 1.0) microparticles as active material is characterized by combining μ-PIXE and μ-PIGE techniques. PIGE measurements evidence that the Li distribution is inhomogeneous (existence of Li-rich and Li-depleted regions) in as-received electrodes corresponding with the distribution of secondary particles but it is homogeneous within the studied individual secondary micro-particles. The dependence of the Li distribution on electrode thickness and on charging conditions is characterized by measuring the Li distribution maps in specifically fabricated cross-sectional samples. These data show that decreasing the electrode thickness down to 35 μm and charging the batteries at slow rate give rise to more homogeneous Li depth profiles.

  7. Three-dimensional imaging of absolute blood flow velocity and blood vessel position under low blood flow velocity based on Doppler signal information included in scattered light from red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoden, Tomoaki; Akiguchi, Shunsuke; Tajiri, Tomoki; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Hachiga, Tadashi

    2017-11-01

    The development of a system for in vivo visualization of occluded distal blood vessels for diabetic patients is the main target of our research. We herein describe two-beam multipoint laser Doppler velocimetry (MLDV), which measures the instantaneous multipoint flow velocity and can be used to observe the blood flow velocity in peripheral blood vessels. By including a motorized stage to shift the measurement points horizontally and in the depth direction while measuring the velocity, the path of the blood vessel in the skin could be observed using blood flow velocity in three-dimensional space. The relationship of the signal power density between the blood vessel and the surrounding tissues was shown and helped us identify the position of the blood vessel. Two-beam MLDV can be used to simultaneously determine the absolute blood flow velocity distribution and identify the blood vessel position in skin.

  8. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type distribution in 3603 HIV-positive and HIV-negative women in the general population of Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dartell, Myassa Arkam; Rasch, Vibeke; Kahesa, Crispin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the Prevention of Cervical Cancer in Tanzania (PROTECT) study is to assess the prevalence of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) and to determine the type distribution among women in the general population according to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status, in preparation for a po......The aim of the Prevention of Cervical Cancer in Tanzania (PROTECT) study is to assess the prevalence of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) and to determine the type distribution among women in the general population according to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status, in preparation...

  9. Public lighting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The function of public lighting and the relationship between public lighting and accidents are considered briefly as aspects of effective countermeasures. Research needs and recent developments in installation and operational described. Public lighting is an efficient accident countermeasure, but

  10. Light Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, Kurt W.

    1973-01-01

    Outdoor lighting is light pollution which handicaps certain astronomical programs. Protective measures must be adopted by the government to aid observational astronomy without sacrificing legitimate outdoor lighting needs. (PS)

  11. Distribution of adoptively transferred porcine T-lymphoblasts tracked by 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and position emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, Olof; Sadeghi, Arian; Carlsson, Bjoern; Eich, Torsten; Lundgren, Torbjoern; Nilsson, Bo; Toetterman, Thomas; Korsgren, Olle; Sundin, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Autologous or allogeneic transfer of tumor-infiltrating T-lymphocytes is a promising treatment for metastatic cancers, but a major concern is the difficulty in evaluating cell trafficking and distribution in adoptive cell therapy. This study presents a method of tracking transfusion of T-lymphoblasts in a porcine model by 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) and positron emission tomography. Methods: T-lymphoblasts were labeled with the positron-emitting tracer [ 18 F]FDG through incubation. The T-lymphoblasts were administered into the bloodstream, and the distribution was followed by positron emission tomography for 120 min. The cells were administered either intravenously into the internal jugular vein (n=5) or intraarterially into the ascending aorta (n=1). Two of the pigs given intravenous administration were pretreated with low-molecular-weight dextran sulphate. Results: The cellular kinetics and distribution were readily quantifiable for up to 120 min. High (78.6% of the administered cells) heterogeneous pulmonary uptake was found after completed intravenous transfusion. The pulmonary uptake was decreased either by preincubating and coadministrating the T-lymphoblasts with low-molecular-weight dextran sulphate or by administrating them intraarterially. Conclusions: The present work shows the feasibility of quantitatively monitoring and evaluating cell trafficking and distribution following administration of [ 18 F]FDG-labeled T-lymphoblasts. The protocol can potentially be transferred to the clinical setting with few modifications.

  12. Distribution of adoptively transferred porcine T-lymphoblasts tracked by {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and position emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Olof, E-mail: olof.eriksson@radiol.uu.se [Division of Radiology, Department of Oncology, Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala 751 87 (Sweden); Uppsala Imanet AB, GE Healthcare, Uppsala 751 85 (Sweden); Sadeghi, Arian; Carlsson, Bjoern; Eich, Torsten [Division of Immunology, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala 751 87 (Sweden); Lundgren, Torbjoern [Division of Transplantation Surgery, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm 171 77 (Sweden); Nilsson, Bo; Toetterman, Thomas; Korsgren, Olle [Division of Immunology, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala 751 87 (Sweden); Sundin, Anders [Division of Radiology, Department of Oncology, Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala 751 87 (Sweden); Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital and Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm 171 77 (Sweden)

    2011-08-15

    Introduction: Autologous or allogeneic transfer of tumor-infiltrating T-lymphocytes is a promising treatment for metastatic cancers, but a major concern is the difficulty in evaluating cell trafficking and distribution in adoptive cell therapy. This study presents a method of tracking transfusion of T-lymphoblasts in a porcine model by {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG) and positron emission tomography. Methods: T-lymphoblasts were labeled with the positron-emitting tracer [{sup 18}F]FDG through incubation. The T-lymphoblasts were administered into the bloodstream, and the distribution was followed by positron emission tomography for 120 min. The cells were administered either intravenously into the internal jugular vein (n=5) or intraarterially into the ascending aorta (n=1). Two of the pigs given intravenous administration were pretreated with low-molecular-weight dextran sulphate. Results: The cellular kinetics and distribution were readily quantifiable for up to 120 min. High (78.6% of the administered cells) heterogeneous pulmonary uptake was found after completed intravenous transfusion. The pulmonary uptake was decreased either by preincubating and coadministrating the T-lymphoblasts with low-molecular-weight dextran sulphate or by administrating them intraarterially. Conclusions: The present work shows the feasibility of quantitatively monitoring and evaluating cell trafficking and distribution following administration of [{sup 18}F]FDG-labeled T-lymphoblasts. The protocol can potentially be transferred to the clinical setting with few modifications.

  13. A code to determine the energy distribution, the incident energy and the flux of a beam of light ions into a stack of foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonzogni, A.A.; Romo, A.S.M.A.; Frosch, W.R.; Nassiff, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The stacked-foil technique is one of the most used methods to obtain excitation functions of nuclear reactions using light ions as projectiles. The purpose of this program is the calculation of the energy of the beam in the stack, as well as to obtain the incident energy and the flux of the beam by using monitor excitation functions. (orig.)

  14. Thermal CFD Analysis of Tubular Light Guides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Šikula

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tubular light guides are applicable for daylighting of windowless areas in buildings. Despite their many positive indoor climate aspects they can also present some problems with heat losses and condensation. A computer CFD model focused on the evaluation of temperature distribution and air flow inside tubular light guides of different dimensions was studied. The physical model of the tested light guides of lengths more than 0.60 m proves shows that Rayleigh numbers are adequate for a turbulent air flow. The turbulent model was applied despite the small heat flux differences between the turbulent and laminar model. The CFD simulations resulted into conclusions that the growing ratio of length/diameter increases the heat transmission loss/linear transmittance as much as by 50 percent. Tubular light guides of smaller diameters have lower heat transmission losses compared to the wider ones of the same lengths with the same outdoor temperature being taken into account. The simulation results confirmed the thermal bridge effect of the tubular light guide tube inside the insulated flat roof details. The thermal transmittance of the studied light guides in the whole roof area was substituted with the point thermal bridges. This substitution gives possibility for simple thermal evaluation of the tubular light pipes in roof constructions.

  15. WOW: light print, light propel, light point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Aabo, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    anywhere in a sample at any orientation using real-time 3D optical micromanipulation with six degrees of freedom. One of the key aspects of our demonstrated WOWs is the change in direction of in-coupled light and the marked increase in numerical aperture of the out-coupled light. Hence, each light...... propelled WOW can tap from a relatively broad incident beam and generate a much more tightly confined light at its tip. The presentation contains both numerical simulations related to the propagation of light through a WOW and preliminary experimental demonstrations on our BioPhotonics Workstation...

  16. Vertical leaf area distribution, light transmittance, and application of the Beer-Lambert Law in four mature hardwood stands in the southern Appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Vose; Neal H. Sullivan; Barton D. Clinton; Paul V. Bolstad

    1995-01-01

    We quantified stand leaf area index and vertical leaf area distribution, and developed canopy extinction coefficients (k), in four mature hardwood stands. Leaf area index, calculated from litter fall and specific leaf area (cm²·g-1), ranged from 4.3 to 5.4 m²·m-2. In three of the four stands, leaf area was distributed in...

  17. A formal power series expansion-regularization approach for Lévy stable distributions: the symmetric case with \\alpha =2/M (M positive integer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisanto-Neto, J. C.; da Luz, M. G. E.; Raposo, E. P.; Viswanathan, G. M.

    2016-09-01

    In practice, the Lévy α-stable distribution is usually expressed in terms of the Fourier integral of its characteristic function. Indeed, known closed form expressions are relatively scarce given the huge parameters space: 0\\lt α ≤slant 2 ({{L\\'{e}vy}} {{index}}), -1≤slant β ≤slant 1 ({{skewness}}),σ \\gt 0 ({{scale}}), and -∞ \\lt μ \\lt ∞ ({{shift}}). Hence, systematic efforts have been made towards the development of proper methods for analytically solving the mentioned integral. As a further contribution in this direction, here we propose a new way to tackle the problem. We consider an approach in which one first solves the Fourier integral through a formal (thus not necessarily convergent) series representation. Then, one uses (if necessary) a pertinent sum-regularization procedure to the resulting divergent series, so as to obtain an exact formula for the distribution, which is amenable to direct numerical calculations. As a concrete study, we address the centered, symmetric, unshifted and unscaled distribution (β =0, μ =0, σ =1), with α ={α }M=2/M, M=1,2,3\\ldots . Conceivably, the present protocol could be applied to other sets of parameter values.

  18. Measurements of UGR of LED light by a DSLR colorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shau-Wei; Chen, Cheng-Hsien; Jiaan, Yuh-Der

    2012-10-01

    We have developed an image-based measurement method on UGR (unified glare rating) of interior lighting environment. A calibrated DSLR (digital single-lens reflex camera) with an ultra wide-angle lens was used to measure the luminance distribution, by which the corresponding parameters can be automatically calculated. A LED lighting was placed in a room and measured at various positions and directions to study the properties of UGR. The testing results are fitted with visual experiences and UGR principles. To further examine the results, a spectroradiometer and an illuminance meter were respectively used to measure the luminance and illuminance at the same position and orientation of the DSLR. The calculation of UGR by this image-based method may solve the problem of non-uniform luminance-distribution of LED lighting, and was studied on segmentation of the luminance graph for the calculations.

  19. Light contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepeda Pena, William Enrique

    1998-01-01

    The article tries on the wrong use of the artificial light, of the main problems of the light contamination, dispersion of the light, noxious effects of the light contamination, ecological effects, effects on the man's biological rhythm, economic effects and effects about the civic and vial security, among other topics

  20. Light Beam Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing a set of controllable light beams by provision of a system for synthesizing a set of light beams, comprising a spatially modulated light source for generation of electromagnetic radiation with a set of replicas of a predetermined......(x-xs, y-ys), a Fourier transforming lens for Fourier transforming the electromagnetic radiation, a first spatial light modulator for phase shifting the Fourier transformed electromagnetic radiation with the phase -F(u, v) of S*, S* is the complex conjugate of the Fourier transformed symbol s, a Fourier...... transforming lens for Inverse Fourier transforming the spatially modulated radiation, whereby a set of light beams are formed propagating through the inverse Fourier plane (x', y') at desired positions (x's, y's), and a controller for controlling the position of a replica of the symbol, s, for movement...

  1. Influence of Implant Position on Stress Distribution in Implant-Assisted Distal Extension Removable Partial Dentures: A 3D Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memari, Yeganeh; Geramy, Allahyar; Fayaz, Amir; Rezvani Habib Abadi, Shirin; Mansouri, Yasaman

    2014-09-01

    Distal extension removable partial denture is a prosthesis with lack of distal dental support with a 13-fold difference in resiliency between the mucosa and the periodontal ligament, resulting in leverage during compression forces. It may be potentially destructive to the abutments and the surrounding tissues. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of implant location on stress distribution, in distal extension implant assisted removable partial dentures. Three-dimensional models of a bilateral distal extension partially edentulous mandible containing anterior teeth and first premolar in both sides of the arch, a partial removable denture and an implant (4×10mm) were designed. With the aid of the finite element program ANSYS 8.0, the models were meshed and strictly vertical forces of 10 N were applied to each cusp tip. Displacement and von Mises Maps were plotted for visualization of results. When an implant was placed in the second premolar region, the highest stress on implant, abutment tooth and cancellous bone was shown. The lowest stress was shown on implant and bone in the 1(st) molar area. Implants located in the first molar area showed the least distribution of stresses in the analyzed models.

  2. Influence of Implant Position on Stress Distribution in Implant-Assisted Distal Extension Removable Partial Dentures: A 3D Finite Element Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeganeh Memari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Distal extension removable partial denture is a prosthesis with lack of distal dental support with a 13-fold difference in resiliency between the mucosa and the periodontal ligament, resulting in leverage during compression forces. It may be potentially destructive to the abutments and the surrounding tissues. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of implant location on stress distribution, in distal extension implant assisted removable partial dentures.Three-dimensional models of a bilateral distal extension partially edentulous mandible containing anterior teeth and first premolar in both sides of the arch, a partial removable denture and an implant (4×10mm were designed. With the aid of the finite element program ANSYS 8.0, the models were meshed and strictly vertical forces of 10 N were applied to each cusp tip. Displacement and von Mises Maps were plotted for visualization of results.When an implant was placed in the second premolar region, the highest stress on implant, abutment tooth and cancellous bone was shown. The lowest stress was shown on implant and bone in the 1(st molar area.Implants located in the first molar area showed the least distribution of stresses in the analyzed models.

  3. Cell sorting using efficient light shaping approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Villangca, Mark Jayson

    2016-01-01

    distributions aimed at the positions of the detected cells. Furthermore, the beam shaping freedom provided by GPC can allow optimizations in the beam’s propagation and its interaction with the catapulted cells. © (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading...... is gentler, less invasive and more economical compared to conventional FACS systems. As cells are less responsive to plastic or glass beads commonly used in the optical manipulation literature, and since laser safety would be an issue in clinical use, we develop efficient approaches in utilizing lasers...... and light modulation devices. The Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method that can be used for efficiently illuminating spatial light modulators or creating well-defined contiguous optical traps is supplemented by diffractive techniques capable of integrating the available light and creating 2D or 3D beam...

  4. Hyperfine structure and isotope shift of transitions in YbI using UV and deep-UV cw laser light and the angular distribution of fluorescence radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zinkstok, R.T.; van Duijn, E.J.; Witte, S.; Hogervorst, W.

    2002-01-01

    Using the third harmonic of a cw titanium:sapphire laser, the hyperfine structure (HFS) and isotope shift (IS) of three deep-UV transitions of neutral Yb have been measured for the first time. By exploiting the angular distribution of fluorescence radiation, accurate and complete results are

  5. "Tangible Lights"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tor; Merritt, Timothy; Andersen, Oskar

    2015-01-01

    While there has been much focus on tangible lighting interfaces embedded in physical objects and smartphones as remote control, there has not been sufficient attention on how the expressivity of bodily movement can be used when designing interactions with light. Therefore, we investigate...... interaction with lighting technology beyond the smartphone and physical controllers. We examine the usefulness of the in-air gestural interaction style for lighting control. We bring forward "Tangible Lights", which serves as a novel interface for in-air interaction with lighting, drawing on existing...

  6. Solid-state lighting-a benevolent technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, E Fred; Kim, Jong Kyu; Luo Hong; Xi, J-Q

    2006-01-01

    Solid-state light sources are in the process of profoundly changing the way humans generate light for general lighting applications. Solid-state light sources possess two highly desirable features, which set them apart from most other light sources: (i) they have the potential to create light with essentially unit power efficiency and (ii) the properties of light, such as spectral composition and temporal modulation, can be controlled to a degree that is not possible with conventional light sources such as incandescent and fluorescent lamps. The implications are enormous and, as a consequence, many positive developments are to be expected including a reduction in global energy consumption, reduction of global-warming-gas and pollutant emissions and a multitude of new functionalities benefiting numerous applications. This review will assess the impact of solid-state lighting technology on energy consumption, the environment and on emerging application fields that make use of the controllability afforded by solid-state sources. The review will also discuss technical areas that fuel continued progress in solid-state lighting. Specifically, we will review the use of novel phosphor distributions in white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and show the strong influence of phosphor distribution on efficiency. We will also review the use of reflectors in LEDs with emphasis on 'perfect' reflectors, i.e. reflectors with highly reflective omni-directional characteristics. Finally, we will discuss a new class of thin-film materials with an unprecedented low refractive index. Such low-n materials may strongly contribute to the continuous progress in solid-state lighting

  7. Unpolarized state of light revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, H.; Chandra, N.

    1981-04-01

    The general form of probability distribution function of analytic signal for unpolarized light is found using simple classical arguments. It is shown that the concepts of unpolarized light given in some common standard books are, strictly speaking, not correct. It is proved that if any two orthogonally polarized components of unpolarized light are statistically independent of each other, the light is of chaotic nature. (author)

  8. Transient elastography discloses identical distribution of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C between HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients on HAART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grünhage F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Progressive immunodeficiency associated with HIV-infection leads to a progressive course of liver disease in HIV/HCV-co-infected patients. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART efficiently restores and preserves immune functions and has recently been demonstrated to also result in reduced liver-related mortality in HIV/HCV-co-infected patients. Methods To analyse differences in current liver fibrosis as a possible effect of HAART on fibrosis progression we assessed hepatic fibrosis by transient elastography in a cross-sectional comparison between HCV-mono-infected and HIV/HCV-co-infected patients presenting at our outpatient department in 2007. Results Overall, we did not find any difference in the distribution of liver stiffness between mono- (n = 84 and double-infected (n = 57 patients (14.4 kPa (10.8 - 18.2 versus 12.4 kPa (9.1 - 16.1, mean (95%-CI. However, in the 8 HIV+ patients with CD4 counts Conclusions These findings are in line with other data that show an improved prognosis of chronic hepatitis C in HIV+ patients under effective HAART, and may be a hint that fibrosis progression in well-treated HIV+ patients will no longer be different from that in HCV-mono-infected patients.

  9. Comparison of laser-light diffraction method with other methods of analyzing the particle size distribution in suspensions of latex, pollen, and quartz, and in suspended particulate matter in river water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyn, R.D.; Zimmermann, H.U.

    1983-01-01

    This report gives an idea of different methods being used for the particle size analysis, including a laser light diffraction method and an image analysis method. These comparing measurements have been carried out with suspensions consisting of fresh water and standard particles, ranging between 1 and 100 μm, as well as with suspended particulate matter of the Elbe river. As to standard particles, statistical errors are subject to the width of the size distribution. When using the light diffraction method, the errors vary between 0,7 and 16%, however, when applying the image analysis method, they range between 0,5 and 26%. As a result of the measurements of the suspended particulate matter of the Elbe river, a statistical error of 21% has occured with regard to the image analysis method, whilst the light diffraction method has shown an error of about 4 - 11%. Possible reasons for systematical and random errors have been discussed as to both of these methods. (orig.) [de

  10. Light Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    Light Robotics - Structure-Mediated Nanobiophotonics covers the latest means of sculpting of both light and matter for achieving bioprobing and manipulation at the smallest scales. The synergy between photonics, nanotechnology and biotechnology spans the rapidly growing field of nanobiophotonics...

  11. Measurement of activation reaction rate distribution on a mercury target with a lead-reflector and light-water-moderator for high energy proton bombardment using AGS accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasugai, Yoshimi; Takada, Hiroshi; Meigo, Shin-ichiro

    2001-02-01

    Characteristic of spallation neutrons driven by GeV protons from a mercury target with a lead-reflector and light-water-moderator was studied experimentally using the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory in a framework of the ASTE (AGS Spallation Target Experiment) collaboration. Several reaction rates along with the mercury target were measured with the activation method at incident proton energies of 1.94, 12 and 24 GeV. Indium, niobium, aluminum, cobalt, nickel and bismuth were used as activation detectors to cover the threshold energy of between 0.33 and 40.9 MeV. This report summarizes the experimental procedure with all the measured data. (author)

  12. Synthesis and crystal structure of a new Cu3Au-type ternary phase in the Au-In-Pd system: distribution of atoms over crystallographic positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptashkina, Evgeniya A; Kabanova, Elizaveta G; Tursina, Anna I; Yatsenko, Alexandr V; Kuznetsov, Victor N

    2018-03-01

    A new Cu 3 Au-type ternary phase (τ phase) is found in the AuPd-rich part of the Au-In-Pd system. It has a broad homogeneity range based on extensive (Pd,Au) and (In,Au) replacement, with the composition varying between Au 17.7 In 25.3 Pd 57.0 and Au 50.8 In 16.2 Pd 33.0 . The occupancies of the crystallographic positions were studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction for three samples of different composition. The sites with m-3m symmetry are occupied by atoms with a smaller scattering power than the atoms located on 4/mmm sites. Two extreme structure models were refined. Within the first, the occupation type changes from (Au,In,Pd) 3 (Pd,In) to (Au,Pd) 3 (In,Pd,Au) with an increase in the Au gross content. For the second model, the occupation type (Au,In,Pd) 3 (Pd,Au) remains essentially unchanged for all Au concentrations. Although the diffraction data do not allow the choice of one of these models, the latter model, where Au substitutes In on 4/mmm sites, seems to be preferable, since it agrees with the fact that the homogeneity range of the τ phase is inclined to the Au corner and provides the same occupation type for all the studied samples of different compositions.

  13. Surgical lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knulst, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    The surgical light is an important tool for surgeons to create and maintain good visibility on the surgical task. Chapter 1 gives background to the field of (surgical) lighting and related terminology. Although the surgical light has been developed strongly since its introduction a long time ago,

  14. Twisted light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Research at the Mathematical Optics Group uses "twisted" light to study new quatum-based information security systems. In order to understand the structure of "twisted" light, it is useful to start with an ordinary light beam with zero twist, namely...

  15. Spectrally balanced chromatic landing approach lighting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, W. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Red warning lights delineate the runway approach with additional blue lights juxtaposed with the red lights such that the red lights are chromatically balanced. The red/blue point light sources result in the phenomenon that the red lights appear in front of the blue lights with about one and one-half times the diameter of the blue. To a pilot observing these lights along a glide path, those red lights directly below appear to be nearer than the blue lights. For those lights farther away seen in perspective at oblique angles, the red lights appear to be in a position closer to the pilot and hence appear to be above the corresponding blue lights. This produces a very pronounced three dimensional effect referred to as chromostereopsis which provides valuable visual cues to enable the pilot to perceive his actual position above the ground and the actual distance to the runway.

  16. Lighting in the urban context case study: Exterior decorative lighting of St. Marko's Church in Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đokić Lidija

    2006-01-01

    façade; Glass facades in daylight conditions reflect the surroundings creating an attractive effect, especially due to the intensity and color change of daylight. In night conditions, glass facades are adequate for negative lighting, enabling the transformation of the façade into a transparent surface exhibiting the building interior. St. Marko's Church in Belgrade is chosen as a case study, due to the fact that the quality of its exterior decorative lighting provided this building an attractive night presentation, strengthened its role as a city landmark and its significance in the panoramic view of the city. The range of possibilities, which can contribute to the presentation, and significance of a building in an urban context are presented through an analysis of different factors, which influenced the quality of exterior decorative lighting of St. Marko's Church. Excellent lighting quality was achieved through lamp color appearance and rendering, as well as through the position of the luminaries. The lighting rhythm follows the rhythm of the façade and allows moderate contrasts. Particular spot lighting is devoted to highly valuable details. The result is a luminance distribution which contributes in great deal to the recognition and expression of the building, as well as to the visual comfort of the observers. The dynamic expression and rhythm, which represent the two main characteristics of the façade of St. Marko's Church, are stressed by warm color of light and adequate luminance distribution on surfaces different in value. Dome lighting, greatly important for the panoramic view of St. Marko's Church, contributes as much to its experience from the immediate surroundings, as well as from the street view. The decorative lighting of St. Marko's Church represents a contribution to its appearance and the presentation of its architecture.

  17. The positive pharmacy care law: an area-level analysis of the relationship between community pharmacy distribution, urbanity and social deprivation in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Adam; Copeland, Alison; Husband, Andy; Kasim, Adetayo; Bambra, Clare

    2014-08-12

    To: (1) determine the percentage of the population in England that have access to a community pharmacy within 20 min walk; (2) explore any relationship between the walking distance and urbanity; (3) explore any relationship between the walking distance and social deprivation; and (4) explore any interactions between urbanity, social deprivation and community pharmacy access. This area level analysis spatial study used postcodes for all community pharmacies in England. Each postcode was assigned to a population lookup table and lower super output area (LSOA). The LSOA was then matched to urbanity (urban, town and fringe or village, hamlet and isolated dwellings) and deprivation decile (using the Index of Multiple Deprivation score). Access to a community pharmacy within 20 min walk. Overall, 89.2% of the population is estimated to have access to a community pharmacy within 20 min walk. For urban areas, that is 98.3% of the population, for town and fringe, 79.9% of the population, while for rural areas, 18.9% of the population. For areas of lowest deprivation (deprivation decile 1) 90.2% of the population have access to a community pharmacy within 20 min walk, compared to 99.8% in areas of highest deprivation (deprivation decile 10), a percentage difference of 9.6% (8.2, 10.9). Our study shows that the majority of the population can access a community pharmacy within 20 min walk and crucially, access is greater in areas of highest deprivation--a positive pharmacy care law. More research is needed to explore the perceptions and experiences of people--from various levels of deprivation--around the accessibility of community pharmacy services. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Optical investigation of microscopic defect distribution in semi-polar (1-101 and 11-22) InGaN light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, Shopan; Andrade, Nicolas; Monavarian, Morteza; Izyumskaya, Natalia; Das, Saikat; Zhang, Fan; Avrutin, Vitaliy; Morkoç, Hadis; Özgür, Ümit

    2016-02-01

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy was applied to investigate the spatial variations of extended defects and their effects on the optical quality for semi-polar (1-101) and (11-22) InGaN light emitting diodes (LEDs). (1-101) and (11-22) oriented InGaN LEDs emitting at 450-470 nm were grown on patterned Si (001) 7° offcut substrates and m-sapphire substrates by means of nano-epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO), respectively. For (1-101) structures, the photoluminescence (PL) at 85 K from the near surface c+ wings was found to be relatively uniform and strong across the sample. However, emission from the c- wings was substantially weaker due to the presence of high density of threading dislocations (TDs) and basal plane stacking faults (BSFs) as revealed from the local PL spectra. In case of (11-22) LED structures, near-field PL intensity correlated with the surface features and the striations along the direction parallel to the c-axis projection exposed facets where the Indium content was higher as deduced from shift in the PL peak energy.

  19. Effects of canopy light distribution characteristics and leaf nitrogen content on efficiency of radiation use in dry matter accumulation of soybean [Glycine max] cultivars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraiwa, T.; Hashikawa, U.; Taka, S.; Sakai, A.

    1994-01-01

    The amount of dry matter produced per photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) intercepted by the canopy (EPAR) and factors which might affect EPAR were determined for various soybean cultivars, and their relationships were also analyzed in two field experiments. In 1989 and 1990, 11 cultivars and 27 cultivars respectively, were grown on an experimental field in shiga Prefectural Junior College. Changes of intercepted PAR, top dry matter weight, light extinction coefficient (KPAR), nitrogen content per leaf area (SLN) and nitrogen accumulation in the top (1990 only) were measured. EPAR averaged for all the cultivars was 2.48g MJ(-1) in both years and its coefficient of variance among cultivars was +- 9% in 1989 and +- 17% in 1990. In general, recent cultivars showed greater EPAR than older ones. The correlation coefficients between SLN and EPAR were 0.548 in 1989 and 0.651-- in 1990, while there was no correlation between KPAR and EPAR. Since SLN showed close correlation with SLW (r = 0.954 in 1989, r = 0.170-- in 1990), the difference in EPAR between old and new cultivars was considered to be attributable mainly to the improved leaf morphological trait and consequently greater leaf photosynthesis of newer cultivars. SLN further correlated with total top nitrogen content (r = 0.736-- in 1990) thus seemed to be limited by nitrogen accumulation

  20. Differences in vertical and horizontal distribution of fish larvae and zooplankton, related to hydrography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höffle, Hannes; Nash, Richard D.M.; Falkenhaug, Tone

    2013-01-01

    Planktonic fish larvae have little influence on their horizontal distribution, while they are able to control their vertical position in the water column. While prey and light are among the factors with an apparent influence on the vertical distribution, the effects of other factors are less clea...

  1. Maximum likelihood positioning for gamma-ray imaging detectors with depth of interaction measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, Ch.W.; Ros, A.; Monzo, J.M.; Aliaga, R.J.; Ferrando, N.; Martinez, J.D.; Herrero, V.; Esteve, R.; Gadea, R.; Colom, R.J.; Toledo, J.; Mateo, F.; Sebastia, A.; Sanchez, F.; Benlloch, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The center of gravity algorithm leads to strong artifacts for gamma-ray imaging detectors that are based on monolithic scintillation crystals and position sensitive photo-detectors. This is a consequence of using the centroids as position estimates. The fact that charge division circuits can also be used to compute the standard deviation of the scintillation light distribution opens a way out of this drawback. We studied the feasibility of maximum likelihood estimation for computing the true gamma-ray photo-conversion position from the centroids and the standard deviation of the light distribution. The method was evaluated on a test detector that consists of the position sensitive photomultiplier tube H8500 and a monolithic LSO crystal (42mmx42mmx10mm). Spatial resolution was measured for the centroids and the maximum likelihood estimates. The results suggest that the maximum likelihood positioning is feasible and partially removes the strong artifacts of the center of gravity algorithm.

  2. Maximum likelihood positioning for gamma-ray imaging detectors with depth of interaction measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerche, Ch.W. [Grupo de Sistemas Digitales, ITACA, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: lerche@ific.uv.es; Ros, A. [Grupo de Fisica Medica Nuclear, IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 46980 Paterna (Spain); Monzo, J.M.; Aliaga, R.J.; Ferrando, N.; Martinez, J.D.; Herrero, V.; Esteve, R.; Gadea, R.; Colom, R.J.; Toledo, J.; Mateo, F.; Sebastia, A. [Grupo de Sistemas Digitales, ITACA, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Sanchez, F.; Benlloch, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Medica Nuclear, IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 46980 Paterna (Spain)

    2009-06-01

    The center of gravity algorithm leads to strong artifacts for gamma-ray imaging detectors that are based on monolithic scintillation crystals and position sensitive photo-detectors. This is a consequence of using the centroids as position estimates. The fact that charge division circuits can also be used to compute the standard deviation of the scintillation light distribution opens a way out of this drawback. We studied the feasibility of maximum likelihood estimation for computing the true gamma-ray photo-conversion position from the centroids and the standard deviation of the light distribution. The method was evaluated on a test detector that consists of the position sensitive photomultiplier tube H8500 and a monolithic LSO crystal (42mmx42mmx10mm). Spatial resolution was measured for the centroids and the maximum likelihood estimates. The results suggest that the maximum likelihood positioning is feasible and partially removes the strong artifacts of the center of gravity algorithm.

  3. Evolution of the F0F1 ATP synthase complex in light of the patchy distribution of different bioenergetic pathways across prokaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassiliki Lila Koumandou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria and archaea are characterized by an amazing metabolic diversity, which allows them to persist in diverse and often extreme habitats. Apart from oxygenic photosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation, well-studied processes from chloroplasts and mitochondria of plants and animals, prokaryotes utilize various chemo- or lithotrophic modes, such as anoxygenic photosynthesis, iron oxidation and reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. Most bioenergetic pathways have a similar general structure, with an electron transport chain composed of protein complexes acting as electron donors and acceptors, as well as a central cytochrome complex, mobile electron carriers, and an ATP synthase. While each pathway has been studied in considerable detail in isolation, not much is known about their relative evolutionary relationships. Wanting to address how this metabolic diversity evolved, we mapped the distribution of nine bioenergetic modes on a phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA sequences from 272 species representing the full diversity of prokaryotic lineages. This highlights the patchy distribution of many pathways across different lineages, and suggests either up to 26 independent origins or 17 horizontal gene transfer events. Next, we used comparative genomics and phylogenetic analysis of all subunits of the F0F1 ATP synthase, common to most bacterial lineages regardless of their bioenergetic mode. Our results indicate an ancient origin of this protein complex, and no clustering based on bioenergetic mode, which suggests that no special modifications are needed for the ATP synthase to work with different electron transport chains. Moreover, examination of the ATP synthase genetic locus indicates various gene rearrangements in the different bacterial lineages, ancient duplications of atpI and of the beta subunit of the F0 subcomplex, as well as more recent stochastic lineage-specific and species-specific duplications of all subunits. We

  4. AUTOMATIC LIGHT CONTROL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artzt, M.

    1957-08-27

    A control system for a projection kinescope used in a facsimile scanning system and, in particular, meams for maintaining substantially constant the light emanating from the flying spot on the face of the kinescope are described. In general, the invention provides a feeler member disposed in such a position with respect to a projecting lens as to intercept a portion of the light striking the lens. Suitable circuitry in conjunction with a photomultiplier tube provides a signal proportional to the light intensity of the flying spot. The grid bias on the kinescope is controlled by this signal to maintain the intensity of the spot substantially constant.

  5. Position Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Position Information Data Asset provides the ability to search for active SSA position descriptions using various search criteria. An individual may search by PD...

  6. Lighting. Eclairage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    Increasing energy costs have led to a review of the high costs of lighting. The use of new energy-efficient lighting equipment, coupled with the use of the proper quantity and quality of lighting only where it is needed, creates a potential for cost reduction. A manual is provided to aid the process of adapting Canadian industrial, commercial, and institutional enterprises to these higher costs. An introductory review of lighting fundamentals is presented, providing a basic understanding of concepts such as illumination, light output measurements, power requirements, lighting quality, and energy audit methods. The currently available lighting equipment used to achieve cost savings is then reviewed, including energy saving lamps and ballasts, controls, and automatic energy control systems. A number of energy management opportunities are identified, such as modification of lighting usage patterns, calculation of the optimum number of lighting fixtures, replacement of existing lamps, and the application of task lighting. Examples are included to show the cost savings possible when applying some of the techniques suggested. 27 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. A new method to determine the mixing state of light absorbing carbonaceous using the measured aerosol optical properties and number size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ma

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the mixing state of light absorbing carbonaceous (LAC was investigated with a two-parameter aerosol optical model and in situ aerosol measurements at a regional site in the North China Plain (NCP. A closure study between the hemispheric backscattering fraction (HBF measured by an integrating nephelometer and that calculated with a modified Mie model was conducted. A new method was proposed to retrieve the ratio of the externally mixed LAC mass to the total mass of LAC (rext-LAC based on the assumption that the ambient aerosol particles were externally mixed and consisted of a pure LAC material and a core-shell morphology in which the core is LAC and the shell is a less absorbing material. A Monte Carlo simulation was applied to estimate the overall influences of input parameters of the algorithm to the retrieved rext-LAC. The diurnal variation of rext-LAC was analyzed and the PartMC-MOSAIC model was used to simulate the variation of the aerosol mixing state. Results show that, for internally mixed particles, the assumption of core-shell mixture is more appropriate than that of homogenous mixture which has been widely used in aerosol optical calculations. A significant diurnal pattern of the retrieved rext-LAC was found, with high values during the daytime and low values at night. The consistency between the retrieved rext-LAC and the model results indicates that the diurnal variation of LAC mixing state is mainly caused by the diurnal evolution of the mixing layer.

  8. MULTI-VIEWPOINT OBSERVATIONS OF A WIDELY DISTRIBUTED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT: THE ROLE OF EUV WAVES AND WHITE-LIGHT SHOCK SIGNATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouloumvakos, A.; Patsourakos, S.; Nindos, A. [Section of Astrogeophysics, Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Vourlidas, A. [The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Anastasiadis, A.; Sandberg, I. [Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, 15236 Penteli (Greece); Hillaris, A. [Section of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, Department of Physics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 15783 Athens (Greece)

    2016-04-10

    On 2012 March 7, two large eruptive events occurred in the same active region within 1 hr from each other. Each consisted of an X-class flare, a coronal mass ejection (CME), an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave, and a shock wave. The eruptions gave rise to a major solar energetic particle (SEP) event observed at widely separated (∼120°) points in the heliosphere. From multi-viewpoint energetic proton recordings we determine the proton release times at STEREO B and A (STB, STA) and the first Lagrange point (L1) of the Sun–Earth system. Using EUV and white-light data, we determine the evolution of the EUV waves in the low corona and reconstruct the global structure and kinematics of the first CME’s shock, respectively. We compare the energetic proton release time at each spacecraft with the EUV waves’ arrival times at the magnetically connected regions and the timing and location of the CME shock. We find that the first flare/CME is responsible for the SEP event at all three locations. The proton release at STB is consistent with arrival of the EUV wave and CME shock at the STB footpoint. The proton release time at L1 was significantly delayed compared to STB. Three-dimensional modeling of the CME shock shows that the particle release at L1 is consistent with the timing and location of the shock’s western flank. This indicates that at L1 the proton release did not occur in low corona but farther away from the Sun. However, the extent of the CME shock fails to explain the SEP event observed at STA. A transport process or a significantly distorted interplanetary magnetic field may be responsible.

  9. Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

  10. A novel method for assessing position-sensitive detector performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinthorne, N.H.; Rogers, W.L.; Shao, L.; Hero, A.O. III; Koral, K.F.

    1989-01-01

    A marked point process model of a position-sensitive detector is developed which includes the effects of detector efficiency, spatial response, energy response, and source statistics. The average mutual information between the incident distribution of γ rays and the detector response is derived and used as a performance index for detector optimization. A brief example is presented which uses this figure-of-merit for optimization of light guide dimensions for a modular scintillation camera

  11. Ubiquitous positioning

    CERN Document Server

    Mannings, Robin

    2008-01-01

    This groundbreaking resource offers a practical, in-depth understanding of Ubiquitous Positioning - positioning systems that identify the location and position of people, vehicles and objects in time and space in the digitized networked economy. The future and growth of ubiquitous positioning will be fueled by the convergence of many other areas of technology, from mobile telematics, Internet technology, and location systems, to sensing systems, geographic information systems, and the semantic web. This first-of-its-kind volume explores ubiquitous positioning from a convergence perspective, of

  12. Nordic Lighting?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Anders V.

    2018-01-01

    The Danish designer Poul Henningsen wrote very elaborated theories of interior lighting from the mid-1920s on. He fought against the cold and reduced light quality of electric bulbs and tried to tame and cultivate this technology by design. He wanted a more rich light for domestic purpose...... worthwhile discussing than other design categories to interpret, whether experience of nature and climatic conditions play a role in Scandinavian Design, as repeatedly stated. This discussion contributes both to understanding of interior lighting and the historiographical critique of Scandinavian Design...... and shaped it through lamp design, colour reflections and differentiated use of several lamps in the room to make a more dim lighting, but with greater variation and softer contrasts. It was a ‘culture’ of lighting, he promoted, but he didn’t saw it as linked to the Nordic countries. His sensibility...

  13. Adaptive Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Lighting Adaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities...... offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled in ways that meaningfully adapt according to people’s situations and design intentions. This book discusses...... differently into an architectural body. We also examine what might occur when light is dynamic and able to change colour, intensity and direction, and when it is adaptive and can be brought into interaction with its surroundings. In short, what happens to an architectural space when artificial lighting ceases...

  14. Positioning consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkier, Bente; Keller, Margit

    2014-01-01

    positionings emerges based on empirical examples of research in parent–children consumption. Positionings are flexible discursive fixations of the relationship between the performances of the practitioner, other practitioners, media discourse and consumption activities. The basic positioning types...... are the practice maintenance and the practice change position, with different sorts of adapting in between. Media discourse can become a resource for a resistant position against social control or for an appropriating position in favour of space for action. Regardless of the current relation to a particular media......This article analyses the ways in which media discourses become a part of contested consumption activities. We apply a positioning perspective with practice theory to focus on how practitioners relate to media discourse as a symbolic resource in their everyday practices. A typology of performance...

  15. s-process studies in the light of new experimental cross sections: Distribution of neutron fluences and r-process residuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeppeler, F.; Beer, H.; Wisshak, K.; Clayton, D.D.; Macklin, R.L.; Ward, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    A best set of neutron-capture cross sections has been evaluated for the most important s-process isotopes. With this data base, s-process studies have been carried out using the traditional model which assumes a steady neutron flux and an exponential distribution of neutron irradiations. The calculated sigmaN-curve is in excellent agreement with the empirical sigmaN-values of pure s-process nuclei. Simultaneously, good agreement is found between the difference of solar and s-process abundances and the abundances of pure r-process nuclei. We also discuss the abundance pattern of the iron group elements where our s-process results complement the abundances obtained from explosive nuclear burning. The results obtained from the traditional s-process model such as seed abundances, mean neutron irradiations, or neutron densities are compared to recent stellar model calculations which assume the He-burning shells of red giant stars as the site for the s-process. (orig.) [de

  16. Dyadic distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubov, B I

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the concept of pointwise dyadic derivative dyadic distributions are introduced as continuous linear functionals on the linear space D d (R + ) of infinitely differentiable functions compactly supported by the positive half-axis R + together with all dyadic derivatives. The completeness of the space D' d (R + ) of dyadic distributions is established. It is shown that a locally integrable function on R + generates a dyadic distribution. In addition, the space S d (R + ) of infinitely dyadically differentiable functions on R + rapidly decreasing in the neighbourhood of +∞ is defined. The space S' d (R + ) of dyadic distributions of slow growth is introduced as the space of continuous linear functionals on S d (R + ). The completeness of the space S' d (R + ) is established; it is proved that each integrable function on R + with polynomial growth at +∞ generates a dyadic distribution of slow growth. Bibliography: 25 titles.

  17. Current and potential distributions on positive plates with conductive Pb{sub 3}O{sub 4} and BaPbO{sub 3} in their formation and discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yonglang; Liu, Huan [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108 (China)

    2008-08-15

    The positive plates with conductive materials, Pb{sub 3}O{sub 4} and BaPbO{sub 3}, in automotive lead-acid batteries were investigated by measuring their current and potential distributions in the course of formation and discharge. It is found that these two conductive materials, especially Pb{sub 3}O{sub 4}, enhance the formation in the initial stage greatly and that they make the current and potential distributions more uniform. In the discharge, the addition of Pb{sub 3}O{sub 4} increases the capacity of the positive plate, but it is unfavorable to the paste curing and causes poor contact between active mass (AM) particles so that the polarization increases greatly at 3 C discharge rate. The BaPbO{sub 3} additive improves not only the formation but also the discharge performance because of its stability in acidic media and at high polarization. The violent charge at high polarization around the plates in the initial formation can lead to poor AM contact and high polarization resistance. (author)

  18. Adaptive Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Kongshaug, Jesper; Søndergaard, Karin

    2015-01-01

    offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled in ways that meaningfully adapt according to people’s situations and design intentions. This book discusses...... to be static, and no longer acts as a kind of spatial constancy maintaining stability and order? Moreover, what new potentials open in lighting design? This book is one of four books that is published in connection with the research project entitled LED Lighting; Interdisciplinary LED Lighting Research...

  19. Development of a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Hamamura, Fuka; Kato, Katsuhiko; Ogata, Yoshimune; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun; Watabe, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Cerenkov-light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects visible photons from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. However, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging remains unclear. If a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system were developed, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging would be clarified by directly comparing these two imaging modalities. Methods: The authors developed and tested a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system that consists of a dual-head PET system, a reflection mirror located above the subject, and a high sensitivity charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The authors installed these systems inside a black box for imaging the Cerenkov-light. The dual-head PET system employed a 1.2 × 1.2 × 10 mm 3 GSO arranged in a 33 × 33 matrix that was optically coupled to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube to form a GSO block detector. The authors arranged two GSO block detectors 10 cm apart and positioned the subject between them. The Cerenkov-light above the subject is reflected by the mirror and changes its direction to the side of the PET system and is imaged by the high sensitivity CCD camera. Results: The dual-head PET system had a spatial resolution of ∼1.2 mm FWHM and sensitivity of ∼0.31% at the center of the FOV. The Cerenkov-light imaging system's spatial resolution was ∼275μm for a 22 Na point source. Using the combined PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, the authors successfully obtained fused images from simultaneously acquired images. The image distributions are sometimes different due to the light transmission and absorption in the body of the subject in the Cerenkov-light images. In simultaneous imaging of rat, the authors found that 18 F-FDG accumulation was observed mainly in the Harderian gland on the PET image, while the distribution of Cerenkov-light was observed in the eyes. Conclusions: The authors conclude that their developed PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging

  20. Natural light illumination system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Allen Jong-Woei; Chen, Yi-Yung; Yang, Shu-Hua; Pan, Po-Hsuan; Chou, Kao-Hsu; Lee, Yu-Chi; Lee, Zong-Yi; Chen, Chi-An; Chen, Cheng-Nan

    2010-12-10

    In recent years, green energy has undergone a lot of development and has been the subject of many applications. Many research studies have focused on illumination with sunlight as a means of saving energy and creating healthy lighting. Natural light illumination systems have collecting, transmitting, and lighting elements. Today, most daylight collectors use dynamic concentrators; these include Sun tracking systems. However, this design is too expensive to be cost effective. To create a low-cost collector that can be easily installed on a large building, we have designed a static concentrator, which is prismatic and cascadable, to collect sunlight for indoor illumination. The transmission component uses a large number of optical fibers. Because optical fibers are expensive, this means that most of the cost for the system will be related to transmission. In this paper, we also use a prismatic structure to design an optical coupler for coupling n to 1. With the n-to-1 coupler, the number of optical fibers necessary can be greatly reduced. Although this new natural light illumination system can effectively guide collected sunlight and send it to the basement or to other indoor places for healthy lighting, previously there has been no way to manage the collected sunlight when lighting was not desired. To solve this problem, we have designed an optical switch and a beam splitter to control and separate the transmitted light. When replacing traditional sources, the lighting should have similar characteristics, such as intensity distribution and geometric parameters, to those of traditional artificial sources. We have designed, simulated, and optimized an illumination lightpipe with a dot pattern to redistribute the collected sunlight from the natural light illumination system such that it equals the qualities of a traditional lighting system. We also provide an active lighting module that provides lighting from the natural light illumination system or LED auxiliary