WorldWideScience

Sample records for position fail safe

  1. Fail-safe reactivity compensation method for a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Erik T.; Angelo, Peter L.; Aase, Scott B.

    2018-01-23

    The present invention relates generally to the field of compensation methods for nuclear reactors and, in particular to a method for fail-safe reactivity compensation in solution-type nuclear reactors. In one embodiment, the fail-safe reactivity compensation method of the present invention augments other control methods for a nuclear reactor. In still another embodiment, the fail-safe reactivity compensation method of the present invention permits one to control a nuclear reaction in a nuclear reactor through a method that does not rely on moving components into or out of a reactor core, nor does the method of the present invention rely on the constant repositioning of control rods within a nuclear reactor in order to maintain a critical state.

  2. ISAT promises fail-safe computer-based reactor protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    AEA Technology's ISAT system is a multiplexed microprocessor-based reactor protection system which has very extensive self-monitoring capabilities and is inherently fail safe. It provides a way of addressing software reliability problems that have tended to hamper widespread introduction of computer-based reactor protection. (author)

  3. Fail-safe first wall for preclusion of little leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibui, Masanao; Nakahira, Masataka; Tada, Eisuke; Takatsu, Hideyuki

    1994-05-01

    Leakages although excluded by design measures would occur most probably in highly stressed areas, weldments and locations without possibility to classify the state by in-service inspection. In a water-cooled first wall, allowable leak rate of water is generally very small, and therefore, locating of the leak portion under highly activated environment will be very difficult and be time-consuming. The double-wall concept is promising for the ITER first wall, because it can be made fail-safe by the application of the leak-before-break and the multiple load path concepts, and because it has a potential capability to solve the little leak problem. When the fail safe strength is well defined, subcritical crack growth in the damaged wall can be permitted. This will enable to detect stable leakage of coolant without deteriorating plasma operation. The paper deals with the little leak problem and presents method for evaluating small leak rate of a liquid coolant from crack-like defects. The fail-safe first wall with the double-wall concept is also proposed for preclusion of little leakage and its fail-safety is discussed. (author)

  4. Fail-safe computer-based plant protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keats, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    A fail-safe mode of operation for computers used in nuclear reactor protection systems was first evolved in the UK for application to a sodium cooled fast reactor. The fail-safe properties of both the hardware and the software were achieved by permanently connecting test signals to some of the multiplexed inputs. This results in an unambiguous data pattern, each time the inputs are sequentially scanned by the multiplexer. The ''test inputs'' simulate transient excursions beyond defined safe limits. The alternating response of the trip algorithms to the ''out-of-limits'' test signals and the normal plant measurements is recognised by hardwired pattern recognition logic external to the computer system. For more general application to plant protection systems, a ''Test Signal Generator'' (TSG) is used to compute and generate test signals derived from prevailing operational conditions. The TSG, from its knowledge of the sensitivity of the trip algorithm to each of the input variables, generates a ''test disturbance'' which is superimposed upon each variable in turn, to simulate a transient excursion beyond the safe limits. The ''tripped'' status yielded by the trip algorithm when using data from a ''disturbed'' input forms part of a pattern determined by the order in which the disturbances are applied to the multiplexer inputs. The data pattern formed by the interleaved test disturbances is again recognised by logic external to the protection system's computers. This fail-safe mode of operation of computer-based protection systems provides a powerful defence against common-mode failure. It also reduces the importance of software verification in the licensing procedure. (author)

  5. Fail-safe neutron shutter used for thermal neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, R.D.; Morris, R.A.

    1976-11-01

    A fail-safe, reliable, easy-to-use neutron shutter was designed, built, and put into operation at the Omega West Reactor, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The neutron shutter will be used primarily to perform thermal neutron radiography, but is also available for a highly collimated source of thermal neutrons [neutron flux = 3.876 x 10 6 (neutrons)/(cm 2 .s)]. Neutron collimator sizes of either 10.16 by 10.16 cm or 10.16 by 30.48 cm are available

  6. Fail-safe logic elements for use with reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobis, J.P.; McDowell, W.P.

    1976-01-01

    A complete fail-safe trip circuit is described which utilizes fail-safe logic elements. The logic elements used are analog multipliers and active bandpass filter networks. These elements perform Boolean operations on a set of AC signals from the output of a reactor safety-channel trip comparator

  7. Factors in the fail safe approach to pressure vessel assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connors, D.C.; Darlaston, B.J.L.; Hellen, R.A.J.

    1978-01-01

    The 'leak before break' concept is described in the context of pressure vessel assessment. The factors which determine whether a pipe containing an axial flaw will leak or break under pressure loading are discussed using a post-yield fracture mechanics method. A model is used in which it is assumed that initially the ligament beneath the flaw fails to form a full thickness defect in the pipe. The stability of the full thickness defect at the pressure causing ligament failure is then examined to ascertain whether it would remain at the snap through length or would propagate by fast fracture, to form a leak or a break. The method is used to analyse the results of a series of pipe rupture tests, and it is found that a distinction between leaks and breaks is achieved. (author)

  8. New Developments in FPGA: SEUs and Fail-Safe Strategies from the NASA Goddard Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie D.; Label, Kenneth A.; Pellish, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that, when exposed to radiation environments, each Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) device has unique error signatures. Subsequently, fail-safe and mitigation strategies will differ per FPGA type. In this session several design approaches for safe systems will be presented. It will also explore the benefits and limitations of several mitigation techniques. The intention of the presentation is to provide information regarding FPGA types, their susceptibilities, and proven fail-safe strategies; so that users can select appropriate mitigation and perform the required trade for system insertion. The presentation will describe three types of FPGA devices and their susceptibilities in radiation environments.

  9. New Developments in FPGA Devices: SEUs and Fail-Safe Strategies from the NASA Goddard Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Kenneth; Pellish, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that, when exposed to radiation environments, each Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) device has unique error signatures. Subsequently, fail-safe and mitigation strategies will differ per FPGA type. In this session several design approaches for safe systems will be presented. It will also explore the benefits and limitations of several mitigation techniques. The intention of the presentation is to provide information regarding FPGA types, their susceptibilities, and proven fail-safe strategies; so that users can select appropriate mitigation and perform the required trade for system insertion. The presentation will describe three types of FPGA devices and their susceptibilities in radiation environments.

  10. A dynamic fail-safe approach to the design of computer-based safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, I.C.; Miller, M.

    1994-01-01

    For over 30 years AEA Technology has carried out research and development in the field of nuclear instrumentation and protection systems. Throughout the course of this extensive period of research and development the dominant theme has been the achievement of fully fail-safe designs. These are defined as designs in which the failure of any single component will result in the unit output reverting to a demand for trip action status. At an early stage it was recognized that the use of dynamic rather than static logic could ease the difficulties inherent in achieving a fail-safe design. The first dynamic logic systems coupled logic elements magnetically. The paper outlines the evolution from these early concepts of a dynamic fail-safe approach to the design of computer-based safety systems. Details are given of collaboration between AEA Technology and Duke Power Co. to mount an ISAT TM demonstration at Duke's Oconee Nuclear Power Station

  11. Fail-safe system for activity cooled supersonic and hypersonic aircraft. [using liquid hydrogen fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. A.; Braswell, D. O.; Richie, C. B.

    1975-01-01

    A fail-safe-system concept was studied as an alternative to a redundant active cooling system for supersonic and hypersonic aircraft which use the heat sink of liquid-hydrogen fuel for cooling the aircraft structure. This concept consists of an abort maneuver by the aircraft and a passive thermal protection system (TPS) for the aircraft skin. The abort manuever provides a low-heat-load descent from normal cruise speed to a lower speed at which cooling is unnecessary, and the passive TPS allows the aircraft skin to absorb the abort heat load without exceeding critical skin temperature. On the basis of results obtained, it appears that this fail-safe-system concept warrants further consideration, inasmuch as a fail-safe system could possibly replace a redundant active cooling system with no increase in weight and would offer other potential advantages.

  12. When the science fails and the ethics works: 'Fail-safe' ethics in the FEM-PrEP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingori, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    This paper will explore the concept of 'fail safe' ethics in the FEM PrEP trial, and the practice of research and ethics on the ground. FEM-PrEP examined the efficacy of PrEP in African women after promising outcomes in research conducted with MSM. This was a hugely optimistic time and FEM-PrEP was mobilised using rights-based ethical arguments that women should have access to PrEP. This paper will present data collected during an ethnographic study of frontline research workers involved in FEM-PrEP. During our discussions, 'fail-safe' ethics emerged as concept that encapsulated their confidence that their ethics could not fail. However, in 2011, FEM-PrEP was halted and deemed a failure. The women involved in the study were held responsible because contrary to researcher's expectations they were not taking the oral PrEP being researched. This examination of FEM-PrEP will show that ethical arguments are increasingly deployed to mobilise, maintain and in some cases stop trials in ways which, at times, are superseded or co-opted by other interests. While promoting the interests of women, rights-based approaches are argued to indirectly justify the continuation of individualised, biomedical interventions which have been problematic in other women-centred trials. In this examination of FEM-PrEP, the rights-based approach obscured: ethical concerns beyond access to PrEP; the complexities of power relationships between donor and host countries; the operations of the HIV industry in research-saturated areas and the cumulative effect of unfilled expectations in HIV research and how this has shaped ideas of research and ethics.

  13. Assisting Driver Sovereignty : A Fail-Safe Design Approach to Driver Distraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gijssel, A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential of a fail-safe approach to driver distraction through novel interface concepts for integrated Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS). Traffic accidents are a negative side effect of the universal and economical desire for mobility. The year 2009 saw the

  14. 30 CFR 77.902-1 - Fail safe ground check circuits; maximum voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... voltage. 77.902-1 Section 77.902-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Low- and Medium-Voltage Alternating Current Circuits § 77.902-1 Fail safe ground check circuits; maximum voltage. The maximum voltage used for ground check circuits under § 77.902...

  15. 30 CFR 77.803-1 - Fail safe ground check circuits; maximum voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... voltage. 77.803-1 Section 77.803-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface High-Voltage Distribution § 77.803-1 Fail safe ground check circuits; maximum voltage. The maximum voltage used for ground check circuits under § 77.803 shall not...

  16. Water hydraulic manipulator for fail safe and fault tolerant remote handling operations at ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieminen, Peetu; Esque, Salvador; Muhammad, Ali; Mattila, Jouni; Vaeyrynen, Jukka; Siuko, Mikko; Vilenius, Matti

    2009-01-01

    Department of Intelligent Hydraulics and Automation (IHA) of Tampere University of Technology has been involved in the European Fusion program since 1994 within the ITER reactor maintenance activities. In this paper we discuss the design and development of a six degrees of freedom water hydraulic manipulator with a force feedback for teleoperation tasks. The manipulator is planned to be delivered to Divertor Test Platform 2 (DTP2) during year 2008. The paper also discusses the possibility to improve the fail safe and redundant operation of the manipulator. During the design of the water hydraulic manipulator, special provisions have been made in order to meet the safety requirements such as servo valve block for redundant operation and safety vane brakes for fail safe operation.

  17. A fail-safe design for X-ray safety shutters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, W.E.; Port, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of any safety shutter device is to help minimize radiation exposure to personnel. Many such devices for analytical X-ray work may fail in a mode with great potential for injury. The authors present a design that may be used to modify any existing mechanical or electro-mechanical system that utilizes a gate which blocks an aperture to control exposure. The system is of 'fail-safe' design, as defined in the National Bureau of Standards Handbook 111 (American National Standards Institute, 1972); One in which all reasonable anticipated failures of indicator or safety components will cause the equipment to respond in a mode ensuring that personnel are safe from exposure to radiation. The system has visible indicators that make the user aware that a particular failure has occurred; in addition, X-ray generation ceases. (Auth.)

  18. A fail-safe microprocessor-based protection system utilising low-level multiplexed sensor signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orme, S.; Evans, N.J.; Wey, B.O.

    1985-01-01

    The paper describes a fail-safe reactor protection system, called the individual sub-assembly temperature monitoring system (ISAT). It is being developed for the commercial demonstration fast reactor. The system incorporates recent advances in solid-state electronics and in particular microprocessors to implement time-shared data acquisition techniques to obtain and process data from around 1400 fast response thermocouples whilst meeting the required levels for reliability and availability. (author)

  19. Detection device for the failed position in fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Kensuke; Nomura, Teiji; Hiruta, Koji

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To detect the failed position of a fuel assembly with ease and safety. Constitution: A fuel assembly is tightly closed in a sipper tube equipped with a gas supply tube and a gas exhaust tube at the upper portion and a purified water injection tube and a draining tube at the lower end. Then, water in the sipper tube is drained to the lower portion of the fuel assembly by the pressure of gases while opening the gas supply tube and the draining tube, and closing the exhaust tube and the injection tube. Then, after closing the gas supply tube and the draining tube while opening theexhaust tube and the injection tube, purified water is injected into the sipper tube from the injection tube to an optional height till the fuel assembly is immersed. Then, after leaving for a predetermined of time, water is sampled and the radioactive material density therein is measured. By changing the injection level of the purified water, since the radioactive material density changes at the failed position, the failed position can be detected with ease. (Sekiya, K.)

  20. 30 CFR 75.803 - Fail safe ground check circuits on high-voltage resistance grounded systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... High-Voltage Distribution § 75.803 Fail safe ground check circuits on high-voltage resistance grounded systems. [Statutory Provisions] On and after September 30, 1970, high-voltage, resistance grounded systems... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fail safe ground check circuits on high-voltage...

  1. Time-saving and fail-safe dissection method for vestibulocochlear organs in gross anatomy classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryoji; Konno, Naoaki; Ishizawa, Akimitsu; Kanatsu, Yoshinori; Funakoshi, Kodai; Akashi, Hideo; Zhou, Ming; Abe, Hiroshi

    2017-09-01

    Because the vestibulocochlear organs are tiny and complex, and are covered by the petrous part of the temporal bone, they are very difficult for medical students to dissect and visualize during gross anatomy classes. Here, we report a time-saving and fail-safe procedure we have devised, using a hand-held hobby router. Nine en bloc temporal bone samples from donated human cadavers were used as trial materials for devising an appropriate procedure for dissecting the vestibulocochlear organs. A hand-held hobby router was used to cut through the temporal bone. After trials, the most time-saving and fail-safe method was selected. The performance of the selected method was assessed by a survey of 242 sides of 121 cadavers during gross anatomy classes for vestibulocochlear dissection. The assessment was based on the observation ratio. The best procedure appeared to be removal of the external acoustic meatus roof and tympanic cavity roof together with removal of the internal acoustic meatus roof. The whole procedure was completed within two dissection classes, each lasting 4.5 hr. The ratio of surveillance for the chorda tympani and three semicircular canals by students was significantly improved during 2013 through 2016. In our dissection class, "removal of the external acoustic meatus roof and tympanic cavity roof together with removal of the internal acoustic meatus roof" was the best procedure for students in the limited time available. Clin. Anat. 30:703-710, 2017. © 2017Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Scalable and fail-safe deployment of the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system Rucio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassnig, M.; Vigne, R.; Beermann, T.; Barisits, M.; Garonne, V.; Serfon, C.

    2015-12-01

    This contribution details the deployment of Rucio, the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system. The main complication is that Rucio interacts with a wide variety of external services, and connects globally distributed data centres under different technological and administrative control, at an unprecedented data volume. It is therefore not possible to create a duplicate instance of Rucio for testing or integration. Every software upgrade or configuration change is thus potentially disruptive and requires fail-safe software and automatic error recovery. Rucio uses a three-layer scaling and mitigation strategy based on quasi-realtime monitoring. This strategy mainly employs independent stateless services, automatic failover, and service migration. The technologies used for deployment and mitigation include OpenStack, Puppet, Graphite, HAProxy and Apache. In this contribution, the interplay between these components, their deployment, software mitigation, and the monitoring strategy are discussed.

  3. Circuit arrangement of an electronic component for the design of fail-safe protective circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centmaier, W.; Bernhard, U.; Friederich, B.; Heisecke, I.

    1974-01-01

    The critical parameters of reactors are controlled by safety circuits. These circuits are controlled designed as logic modules operating by the 'n-out-of-m' selection principle. In most cases, a combination of a '1-out-of-3' circuit with a '2-out-of-3' circuit and separate indication is sufficient for a dynamic fail-safe circuit. The basic logic elements are AND and OR gate circuits, respectively, which are triggered by pulse trains and in which the failure of a pulse train is indicated as an error at the output. The module allows the design of safety circuits offering various degrees of safety. If the indication of an error is made on the modules, faulty components can be exchanged by the maintenance crew right away. (DG) [de

  4. Scalable and fail-safe deployment of the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system Rucio

    CERN Document Server

    Lassnig, Mario; The ATLAS collaboration; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Beermann, Thomas Alfons; Serfon, Cedric; Garonne, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    This contribution details the deployment of Rucio, the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system. The main complication is that Rucio interacts with a wide variety of external services, and connects globally distributed data centres under different technological and administrative control, at an unprecedented data volume. It is therefore not possibly to create a duplicate instance of Rucio for testing or integration. Every software upgrade or configuration change is thus potentially disruptive and requires fail-safe software and automatic error recovery. Rucio uses a three-layer scaling and mitigation strategy based on quasi-realtime monitoring. This strategy mainly employs independent stateless services, automatic failover, and service migration. The technologies used for deployment and mitigation include OpenStack, Puppet, Graphite, HAProxy, Apache, and nginx. In this contribution, the reasons and design decisions for the deployment, the actual implementation, and an evaluation of all involved services and c...

  5. Scalable and fail-safe deployment of the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system Rucio

    CERN Document Server

    Lassnig, Mario; The ATLAS collaboration; Beermann, Thomas Alfons; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Garonne, Vincent; Serfon, Cedric

    2015-01-01

    This contribution details the deployment of Rucio, the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system. The main complication is that Rucio interacts with a wide variety of external services, and connects globally distributed data centres under different technological and administrative control, at an unprecedented data volume. It is therefore not possibly to create a duplicate instance of Rucio for testing or integration. Every software upgrade or configuration change is thus potentially disruptive and requires fail-safe software and automatic error recovery. Rucio uses a three-layer scaling and mitigation strategy based on quasi-realtime monitoring. This strategy mainly employs independent stateless services, automatic failover, and service migration. The technologies used for deployment and mitigation include OpenStack, Puppet, Graphite, HAProxy and Apache. In this contribution, the interplay between these component, their deployment, software mitigation, and the monitoring strategy are discussed.

  6. Active Fail-Safe Micro-Array Flow Control for Advanced Embedded Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Mace, James L.; Mani, Mori

    2009-01-01

    The primary objective of this research effort was to develop and analytically demonstrate enhanced first generation active "fail-safe" hybrid flow-control techniques to simultaneously manage the boundary layer on the vehicle fore-body and to control the secondary flow generated within modern serpentine or embedded inlet S-duct configurations. The enhanced first-generation technique focused on both micro-vanes and micro-ramps highly-integrated with micro -jets to provide nonlinear augmentation for the "strength' or effectiveness of highly-integrated flow control systems. The study focused on the micro -jet mass flow ratio (Wjet/Waip) range from 0.10 to 0.30 percent and jet total pressure ratios (Pjet/Po) from 1.0 to 3.0. The engine bleed airflow range under study represents about a 10 fold decrease in micro -jet airflow than previously required. Therefore, by pre-conditioning, or injecting a very small amount of high-pressure jet flow into the vortex generated by the micro-vane and/or micro-ramp, active flow control is achieved and substantial augmentation of the controlling flow is realized.

  7. Fail-safe ion chamber errant beam detector tailored for personnel protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plum, M.A.; Browman, A.A.; Brown, D.; Lee, D.M.; McCabe, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    This fail-safe ion chamber system is designed to be part of the personnel safety system (PSS) for the Los Alamos neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Its job is to protect the occupants of the experimental areas from large radiation doses caused by errant beam conditions during beam transport from the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) to the LANSCE neutron spallation target. Due to limited shielding between the beam transport line and the experimental area only if the beam losses in the transport line are very low. The worst case beam spill scenario is calculated to result in a personnel exposure of about 0.01 Gys/s (1 rad/s). Although the preferred solution is to increase the bulk shielding between the beam line and the experimental area, the physical dimensions of the site do not permit an adequate amount of shielding to be added. The solution adopted is a layered system of three types of highly reliable detector systems: a current limiter system located in the beam line, a neutron detector system located in the experimental areas, and an ion chamber system located on the walls of the beam line tunnels. The ion chamber system is capable of shutting off the beam in less than 0.5 s, resulting in a worst case personnel exposure of 0.005 Gys (0.5 rad). 4 figs

  8. 30 CFR 77.803 - Fail safe ground check circuits on high-voltage resistance grounded systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... circuits on high-voltage resistance grounded systems. On and after September 30, 1971, all high-voltage... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fail safe ground check circuits on high-voltage resistance grounded systems. 77.803 Section 77.803 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION...

  9. Considerations on Fail Safe Design for Design Basis Accident (DBA) vs. Design Extension Condition (DEC): Lesson Learnt from the Fukushima Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jun Su; Kim, Sungyeop

    2014-01-01

    The fail safety design is referred to as an inherently safe design concept where the failure of an SSC (System, Structure or Component) leads directly to a safe condition. Usually the fail safe design has been devised based on the design basis accident (DBAs), because the nuclear safety has been assured by securing the capability to safely cope with DBAs. Currently regards have been paid to the DEC (Design Extension Condition) as an extended design consideration. Hence additional attention should be paid to the concept of the fail safe design in order to consider the DEC, accordingly. In this study, a case chosen from the Fukushima accident is studied to discuss the issue associated with the fail safe design in terms of DBA and DEC standpoints. For the fail safe design to be based both on the DBA and the DEC, a Mode Changeable Fail Safe Design (MCFSD) is proposed in this study. Additional discussions on what is needed for the MCFSD to be applied in the nuclear safety are addressed as well. One of the lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident should include considerations on the fail-safe design in a changing regulatory framework. Currently the design extension condition (DEC) including severe accidents should be considered during designing and licensing NPPs. Hence concepts on the fail safe design need to be changed to be based on not only the DBA but also the DEC. In this study, a case on a fail-safe design chosen from the Fukushima accident is studied to discuss the issue associated with the fail safe design in terms of DBA and DEC conditions. For the fail safe design to be based both on the DBA and the DEC, a Mode Changeable Fail Safe Design (MCFSD) is proposed in this study. Additional discussions on what is needed for the MCFSD to be applied in the nuclear safety are addressed as well

  10. Quantitative assessment of probability of failing safely for the safety instrumented system using reliability block diagram method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Jianghong; Pang, Lei; Zhao, Shoutang; Hu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Models of PFS for SIS were established by using the reliability block diagram. • The more accurate calculation of PFS for SIS can be acquired by using SL. • Degraded operation of complex SIS does not affect the availability of SIS. • The safe undetected failure is the largest contribution to the PFS of SIS. - Abstract: The spurious trip of safety instrumented system (SIS) brings great economic losses to production. How to ensure the safety instrumented system is reliable and available has been put on the schedule. But the existing models on spurious trip rate (STR) or probability of failing safely (PFS) are too simplified and not accurate, in-depth studies of availability to obtain more accurate PFS for SIS are required. Based on the analysis of factors that influence the PFS for the SIS, using reliability block diagram method (RBD), the quantitative study of PFS for the SIS is carried out, and gives some application examples. The results show that, the common cause failure will increase the PFS; degraded operation does not affect the availability of the SIS; if the equipment was tested and repaired one by one, the unavailability of the SIS can be ignored; the corresponding occurrence time of independent safe undetected failure should be the system lifecycle (SL) rather than the proof test interval and the independent safe undetected failure is the largest contribution to the PFS for the SIS

  11. School Nurse Workload: Staffing for Safe Care. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatowski, Rosemary; Endsley, Patricia; Hiltz, Cynthia; Johansen, Annette; Maughan, Erin; Minchella, Lindsey; Trefry, Sharonlee

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that daily access to a registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as a school nurse) can significantly improve students' health, safety, and abilities to learn. To meet the health and safety needs of students, families, and school communities, school nurse…

  12. Safe, Positive and Queering Moments in Teaching Education and Schooling: A Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Tara; Russell, Vanessa; Daley, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    This article introduces a conceptual framework for thinking about the development of anti-homophobia education in teacher education and schooling contexts. We bring the safe, positive, and queering moments framework to bear on three distinct anti-homophobia education practices: coming out stories, homophobic name-calling analysis, and Pride Week…

  13. A positive view on road safety: Can 'car karma' contribute to safe driving styles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleisen, Lucienne M B

    2013-01-01

    Many studies in the field of road safety are occupied with studying road unsafety since it generally concentrates on traffic crashes, crash, risk, and aberrant driving behaviour, especially in relation to young drivers. However, this study shows there is scope for thinking about driving and driver training from a different vantage point, that is in terms of safe or normal driving. The findings are reported from four group interviews with young drivers (18-25 years of age); the young drivers discussed their ideas of safe driving and their reasons for using (or not using) safe driving styles. The data show a type of optimistic thinking among young drivers which they call 'car karma'. This finding offers an opportunity to reconceptualise driving in a way that is focused on normal, safe driving styles, a topic that has received less attention in the past. The paper argues that greater focus on safe driving styles could be more conducive to young drivers actually driving safely than focusing on, for instance, crashes, which on an individual level are relatively rare (Elander et al., 1993, p. 277). Based on empirical research, the first positively stated definition of road safety is proposed based on the notion of 'car karma'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. WNA position statement on safe management of nuclear waste and used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Pierre, S.

    2006-01-01

    This World nuclear association (W.N.A.) Position Statement summarizes the worldwide nuclear industry's record, progress and plans in safely managing nuclear waste and used nuclear fuel. The global industry's safe waste management practices cover the entire nuclear fuel-cycle, from the mining of uranium to the long-term disposal of end products from nuclear power reactors. The Statement's aim is to provide, in clear and accurate terms, the nuclear industry's 'story' on a crucially important subject often clouded by misinformation. Inevitably, each country and each company employs a management strategy appropriate to a specific national and technical context. This Position Statement reflects a confident industry consensus that a common dedication to sound practices throughout the nuclear industry worldwide is continuing to enhance an already robust global record of safe management of nuclear waste and used nuclear fuel. This text focuses solely on modern civil programmes of nuclear-electricity generation. It does not deal with the substantial quantities of waste from military or early civil nuclear programmes. These wastes fall into the category of 'legacy activities' and are generally accepted as a responsibility of national governments. The clean-up of wastes resulting from 'legacy activities' should not be confused with the limited volume of end products that are routinely produced and safely managed by today's nuclear energy industry. On the significant subject of 'Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities', which is integral to modern civil nuclear power programmes, the W.N.A. will offer a separate Position Statement covering the industry's safe management of nuclear waste in this context. The safe management of nuclear waste and used nuclear fuel is a widespread, well-demonstrated reality. This strong safety record reflects a high degree of nuclear industry expertise and of industry responsibility toward the well-being of current and future generations

  15. World Nuclear Association position statement: Safe management of nuclear waste and used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint-Pierre, Sylvain

    2006-01-01

    This WNA Position Statement summarises the worldwide nuclear industry's record, progress and plans in safely managing nuclear waste and used nuclear fuel. The global industry's safe waste management practices cover the entire nuclear fuel-cycle, from the mining of uranium to the long-term disposal of end products from nuclear power reactors. The Statement's aim is to provide, in clear and accurate terms, the nuclear industry's 'story' on a crucially important subject often clouded by misinformation. Inevitably, each country and each company employs a management strategy appropriate to a specific national and technical context. This Position Statement reflects a confident industry consensus that a common dedication to sound practices throughout the nuclear industry worldwide is continuing to enhance an already robust global record of safe management of nuclear waste and used nuclear fuel. This text focuses solely on modern civil programmes of nuclear-electricity generation. It does not deal with the substantial quantities of waste from military or early civil nuclear programmes. These wastes fall into the category of 'legacy activities' and are generally accepted as a responsibility of national governments. The clean-up of wastes resulting from 'legacy activities' should not be confused with the limited volume of end products that are routinely produced and safely managed by today's nuclear energy industry. On the significant subject of 'Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities', which is integral to modern civil nuclear power programmes, the WNA will offer a separate Position Statement covering the industry's safe management of nuclear waste in this context. The paper's conclusion is that the safe management of nuclear waste and used nuclear fuel is a widespread, well-demonstrated reality. This strong safety record reflects a high degree of nuclear industry expertise and of industry responsibility toward the well-being of current and future generations. Accumulating

  16. National Athletic Trainers' Association position statement: safe weight loss and maintenance practices in sport and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turocy, Paula Sammarone; DePalma, Bernard F; Horswill, Craig A; Laquale, Kathleen M; Martin, Thomas J; Perry, Arlette C; Somova, Marla J; Utter, Alan C

    2011-01-01

    To present athletic trainers with recommendations for safe weight loss and weight maintenance practices for athletes and active clients and to provide athletes, clients, coaches, and parents with safe guidelines that will allow athletes and clients to achieve and maintain weight and body composition goals. Unsafe weight management practices can compromise athletic performance and negatively affect health. Athletes and clients often attempt to lose weight by not eating, limiting caloric or specific nutrients from the diet, engaging in pathogenic weight control behaviors, and restricting fluids. These people often respond to pressures of the sport or activity, coaches, peers, or parents by adopting negative body images and unsafe practices to maintain an ideal body composition for the activity. We provide athletic trainers with recommendations for safe weight loss and weight maintenance in sport and exercise. Although safe weight gain is also a concern for athletic trainers and their athletes and clients, that topic is outside the scope of this position statement. Athletic trainers are often the source of nutrition information for athletes and clients; therefore, they must have knowledge of proper nutrition, weight management practices, and methods to change body composition. Body composition assessments should be done in the most scientifically appropriate manner possible. Reasonable and individualized weight and body composition goals should be identified by appropriately trained health care personnel (eg, athletic trainers, registered dietitians, physicians). In keeping with the American Dietetics Association (ADA) preferred nomenclature, this document uses the terms registered dietitian or dietician when referring to a food and nutrition expert who has met the academic and professional requirements specified by the ADA's Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education. In some cases, a registered nutritionist may have equivalent credentials and be the

  17. When compliments fail to flatter: American individualism and responses to positive stereotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siy, John Oliver; Cheryan, Sapna

    2013-01-01

    Five studies show that being the target of a positive stereotype is a negative interpersonal experience for those from individualistic cultures because positive stereotypes interfere with their desire to be seen as individuals separate from their groups. U.S.-born Asian Americans and women who heard a positive stereotype about their group in an intergroup interaction (e.g., "Asians are good at math," "women are nurturing") derogated their partner and experienced greater negative emotions than those who heard no stereotype. Negative reactions were mediated by a sense of being depersonalized, or "lumped together" with others in one's group, by the positive stereotype (Studies 1-3). Cross-cultural differences (Study 4) and an experimental manipulation of cultural self-construal (Study 5) demonstrated that those with an independent self-construal reacted more negatively to positive stereotypes than those with an interdependent self-construal. By bringing together research on stereotypes from the target's perspective with research on culture, this work demonstrates how cultural self-construals inform the way people interpret and respond to being the target of positive stereotypes.

  18. APIC position paper: Safe injection, infusion, and medication vial practices in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Susan A; Arias, Kathleen Meehan; Felizardo, Gwen; Barnes, Sue; Kraska, Susan; Patrick, Marcia; Bumsted, Amelia

    2016-07-01

    The transmission of bloodborne viruses and other microbial pathogens to patients during routine health care procedures continues to occur because of the use of improper injection, infusion, medication vial, and point-of-care testing practices by health care personnel. These unsafe practices occur in various clinical settings and result in unacceptable and devastating events for patients. This document updates the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology 2010 position paper on safe injection, infusion, and medication vial practices in health care. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Management of persistent occiput posterior position: a substantial role of instrumental rotation in the setting of failed manual rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerby, Paul; Allouche, Mickael; Simon-Toulza, Caroline; Vayssiere, Christophe; Parant, Olivier; Vidal, Fabien

    2018-01-01

    To compare the maternal and neonatal outcomes associated with Instrumental Rotation (IR) to operative vaginal delivery in occiput posterior (OP) position with Thierry's spatulas (TS), in the setting of failed manual rotation (MR). We led a prospective observational cohort study in a tertiary referral hospital in Toulouse, France. All women presenting in labor with persistent OP position at full cervical dilatation and who delivered vaginally after failed MR and with IR or OP assisted delivery were included from January 2014 to December 2015. The main outcomes measured were maternal morbidity parameters including episiotomy rate, incidence and severity of perineal lacerations, perineal hematomas and postpartum hemorrhage. Severe perineal tears corresponded to third and fourth degree lacerations. Fetal morbidity outcomes comprised neonatal Apgar scores, acidemia, fetal injuries, birth trauma and neonatal intensive care unit admissions. Among 9762 women, 910 (9.3%) presented with persistent OP position at full cervical dilatation and 222 deliveries were enrolled. Of 111 attempted IR, 97 were successful (87.4%). The incidence of anal sphincter injuries was significantly reduced after IR attempt (1.8% vs. 12.6%; p manual rotation.

  20. An effective and safe gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection in the right lateral position using an inverted overtube

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Hirohito; Rafiq, Kazi; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Fujihara, Shintaro; Yachida, Tatsuo; Ayagi, Maki; Tani, Joji; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported the efficacy of a newly developed inverted overtube in shortening the hemostatic time and obtaining a clear endoscopic view in emergency endoscopic hemostasis. This device also helped us to perform gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) more safely by changing the direction of gravity in the right lateral position. To perform a safe ESD, it is important to make an appropriate angle and distance between the electric knife and the gastric mucosa. In this position...

  1. Positioning of the patient during shoulder surgery: an inexpensive, safe and easy technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tongel, Alexander; Hardeman, François; Karelse, Anne; de Wilde, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge of shoulder pathology has improved tremendously in the last decades, and shoulder surgery is increasingly performed because of new treatment options and better operative results. Nowadays most surgical shoulder procedures are performed in the sitting or semi-sitting (beach chair) position. Stability of the patient and the ability to flex, extend and rotate the shoulder during surgery are crucial to improve exposure of the surgical field and lower the risk of perioperative complications. We developed an easy, safe and inexpensive surgical set-up providing a very good posterior, superior and anterior access to the shoulder in the sitting or semi-sitting position. In this technique, the patient is placed supine with the head at the foot end of the table and the body positioned slightly eccentrically with the back being supported by the leg plate contralateral to the operative side, avoiding any contact with the scapula of the operative side. A neck support is attached on an extra bar at the contralateral side and accommodated to the patient's lordosis. Next, the leg plate on the operative side is removed, and the head and the body are secured to the table with adhesive dressing. This way a stable positioning of the patient is obtained during the whole procedure, and the shoulder girdle is completely free. The set-up can accommodate patients of different stature and weight without the need to adapt the technique. This position also gives the possibility to provide an excellent radiographic view of the shoulder during operative fracture treatment. Our technique further allows a significant reduction in costs. A surgical table, extra bar, additional arm support and neck support are usually available and can be used in different settings, without the need for a specific shoulder table.

  2. Failing Failed States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Hans-Henrik

    2002-01-01

    coverage. A Danish survey of newsrooms shows that the national world-view and prevalent news criteria prevent consistent coverage. It is argued that politicians are the ones who determine national agendas: it is from political initiatives, rather than media coverage, that failing states and humanitarian......When states are failing, when basic state functions are no longer carried out, and when people have no security, humanitarian crises erupt. In confronting this problem, the stronger states have followed an ad hoc policy of intervention and aid. In some cases, humanitarian disasters have resulted...... from inaction. Often, the media are blamed. Politicians complain about the media when they interfere (the CNN effect), and when they do not. This article looks at how the media do cover failing states. Sierra Leone and Congo are used as examples. The analysis shows that there is little independent...

  3. Scale-Up of Safe & Civil Schools' Model for School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolkowski, Keith; Strycker, Lisa; Ward, Bryce

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the scale-up of a Safe & Civil Schools "Foundations: Establishing Positive Discipline Policies" positive behavioral interventions and supports initiative through 4 years of "real-world" implementation in a large urban school district. The study extends results from a previous randomized controlled trial…

  4. An effective and safe gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection in the right lateral position using an inverted overtube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hirohito; Rafiq, Kazi; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Fujihara, Shintaro; Yachida, Tatsuo; Ayagi, Maki; Tani, Joji; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2014-02-14

    Previously, we reported the efficacy of a newly developed inverted overtube in shortening the hemostatic time and obtaining a clear endoscopic view in emergency endoscopic hemostasis. This device also helped us to perform gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) more safely by changing the direction of gravity in the right lateral position. To perform a safe ESD, it is important to make an appropriate angle and distance between the electric knife and the gastric mucosa. In this position, the distance to gastric mucosa is reduced, and the angle of the electric knife changes from vertical to somewhat oblique, facilitating safer cutting.

  5. Correlation of Positive and Negative Reciprocity Fails to Confer an Evolutionary Advantage: Phase Transitions to Elementary Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2013-10-01

    Economic experiments reveal that humans value cooperation and fairness. Punishing unfair behavior is therefore common, and according to the theory of strong reciprocity, it is also directly related to rewarding cooperative behavior. However, empirical data fail to confirm that positive and negative reciprocity are correlated. Inspired by this disagreement, we determine whether the combined application of reward and punishment is evolutionarily advantageous. We study a spatial public goods game, where in addition to the three elementary strategies of defection, rewarding, and punishment, a fourth strategy that combines the latter two competes for space. We find rich dynamical behavior that gives rise to intricate phase diagrams where continuous and discontinuous phase transitions occur in succession. Indirect territorial competition, spontaneous emergence of cyclic dominance, as well as divergent fluctuations of oscillations that terminate in an absorbing phase are observed. Yet, despite the high complexity of solutions, the combined strategy can survive only in very narrow and unrealistic parameter regions. Elementary strategies, either in pure or mixed phases, are much more common and likely to prevail. Our results highlight the importance of patterns and structure in human cooperation, which should be considered in future experiments.

  6. Correlation of Positive and Negative Reciprocity Fails to Confer an Evolutionary Advantage: Phase Transitions to Elementary Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Szolnoki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Economic experiments reveal that humans value cooperation and fairness. Punishing unfair behavior is therefore common, and according to the theory of strong reciprocity, it is also directly related to rewarding cooperative behavior. However, empirical data fail to confirm that positive and negative reciprocity are correlated. Inspired by this disagreement, we determine whether the combined application of reward and punishment is evolutionarily advantageous. We study a spatial public goods game, where in addition to the three elementary strategies of defection, rewarding, and punishment, a fourth strategy that combines the latter two competes for space. We find rich dynamical behavior that gives rise to intricate phase diagrams where continuous and discontinuous phase transitions occur in succession. Indirect territorial competition, spontaneous emergence of cyclic dominance, as well as divergent fluctuations of oscillations that terminate in an absorbing phase are observed. Yet, despite the high complexity of solutions, the combined strategy can survive only in very narrow and unrealistic parameter regions. Elementary strategies, either in pure or mixed phases, are much more common and likely to prevail. Our results highlight the importance of patterns and structure in human cooperation, which should be considered in future experiments.

  7. The association between detected drug resistance mutations and CD4(+) T-cell decline in HIV-positive individuals maintained on a failing treatment regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultze, Anna; Paredes, Roger; Sabin, Caroline

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To analyse the effect of drug resistance mutations (DRM) on CD4 cell trends in HIV-positive people maintained on virologically failing antiretroviral therapy (ART). METHODS: Individuals from two large cohorts experiencing virological failure (VF) while maintained on ART with >1 CD4...

  8. What's Your Position? Strategies for Safely Reaching Patient Comfort Goals After Cardiac Catheterization via Femoral Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggs, Patricia M; Lewis, Rebecca; Hart, Ann C; Troutman-Jordan, Meredith; Hardin, Sonya R

    Patients frequently complain of back pain after cardiac catheterization, and there is a lack of evidence to guide practice regarding patient comfort while maintaining hemostasis at femoral access site after cardiac catheterization. The aim of this study was to examine if frequent position changes affect a patient's pain level or increase incidents of bleeding in the recovery period after cardiac catheterization. A quasi-experimental pretest/posttest design was used to evaluate a patient's reported pain levels and positioning changes during bed rest period postprocedure. Twenty charts were reviewed to note documentation of patient position, self-reported pain rating related to pain relief goals, and occurrence of bleeding at the procedure site. A survey was conducted to reveal nurse attitudes, knowledge, and beliefs regarding positioning and pain management for patients in the post-cardiac catheterization period. Results from this survey were used to develop education and data collection tools. Education regarding perceived barriers and importance of maximizing activity orders for patient comfort was provided to nursing staff. After nurse education, an additional 20 charts were reviewed to note if increasing frequency of position change affects pain levels reported by patients or if any increased incidence of bleeding was noted with greater frequency of position change. Data were analyzed using correlation analyses. Greater levels of pain were associated with higher pain ratings (r = 0.796, P position change only as a comfort measure was negatively associated with pain ratings; in other words, lower patient pain ratings were associated with use of positioning only without addition of medications to address complaint (r = -0.493, P position changes for comfort after cardiac catheterization. This initial analysis suggests position changes in conjunction with pain medication are beneficial in managing pain after cardiac catheterization. There was no increase in

  9. Yoga Communities and Eating Disorders: Creating Safe Space for Positive Embodiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Cottone, Catherine; Douglass, Laura Lee

    2017-11-01

    With adequate education and guidance, yoga communities, as part of the therapeutic landscape in the 21st century, can play a significant role promoting positive embodiment for those with, and at-risk for, eating disorders (EDs). To do this, yoga teachers need to know how to create a body-positive community and be able to recognize and respond to those at risk and struggling with EDs in their communities. In order to address yoga teaching methods associated with EDs and ED risk, broader conceptual approaches and specific practices associated with positive embodiment are offered. These include the broader conceptual approaches of: intentional inclusion and acceptance, experiential emphasis, supporting positive embodiment and inquiry. Studio pragmatics are also detailed as related to the body, breath, emotions, and community. Assessment, referral, and community engagement are also addressed.

  10. Safe sleeping positions: practice and policy for babies with cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Karen; Bruce, Iain A; Bannister, Patricia; Callery, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Guidance recommends 'back to sleep' positioning for infants from birth in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death. Exceptions have been made for babies with severe respiratory difficulties where lateral positioning may be recommended, although uncertainty exists for other conditions affecting the upper airway structures, such as cleft palate. This paper presents research of (i) current advice on sleep positioning provided to parents of infants with cleft palate in the UK; and (ii) decision making by clinical nurse specialists when advising parents of infants with cleft palate. A qualitative descriptive study used data from a national survey with clinical nurse specialists from 12 regional cleft centres in the UK to investigate current practice. Data were collected using semi-structured telephone interviews and analysed using content analysis. Over half the regional centres used lateral sleep positioning based on clinical judgement of the infants' respiratory effort and upper airway obstruction. Assessment relied upon clinical judgement augmented by a range of clinical indicators, such as measures of oxygen saturation, heart rate and respiration. Specialist practitioners face a clinical dilemma between adhering to standard 'back to sleep' guidance and responding to clinical assessment of respiratory effort for infants with cleft palate. In the absence of clear evidence, specialist centres rely on clinical judgement regarding respiratory problems to identify what they believe is the most appropriate sleeping position for infants with cleft palate. Further research is needed to determine the best sleep position for an infant with cleft palate. What is Known • Supine sleep positioning reduces the risk of sudden infant death in new born infants. • There is uncertainty about the benefits or risks of lateral sleep positioning for infants with upper airway restrictions arising from cleft palate. What is New • Variability exists in the information

  11. The recommended Threshold Limit Values for heat exposure fail to maintain body core temperature within safe limits in older working adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Dallon T; Meade, Robert D; D'Souza, Andrew W; Flouris, Andreas D; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Sigal, Ronald J; Boulay, Pierre; Kenny, Glen P

    2017-09-01

    temperature from exceeding 38°C in older workers. Furthermore, a stable core temperature was not achieved within safe limits (i.e., ≤38°C) indicating that the TLV® guidelines may not adequately protect all individuals during work in hot conditions.

  12. Position of nuclear power generation in the public and further enhancement of safe and stable operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Yozo

    1996-01-01

    In Japan, the first commercial light water reactor (LWR) started operation in 1970 when the International Exposition was held in Osaka, and now 50 nuclear power plants supply about 30 % of the total electricity and nuclear power plays the important role as a 'major power source'. Meanwhile, with the international transportation of plutonium and return shipment of vitrified HLW reprocessed abroad, nuclear power has closer relationship with the public in these days. We will review the history of nuclear power generation in Japan from the viewpoint of the safety culture and consider the safety culture under the present situation. The team of 'safety Charlotte's fixed its position since the occurrence of Chernobyl accident though the concept existed as expressed in words such as 'safety-first principle' and 'enhancement of morale'. The safety culture is a concept: high level 'safety Culture' cab be expected when 'the management of the organization' and 'individual consciousness concerning safety' are well balanced. The 'safety culture' has experienced various changes along with the development of nuclear power in Japan: at the initial period of the development, the management side invested excellent talents and funds to the nuclear division based on the 'safety-first principle' from the beginning. At the same time, the world of atom filled with dream appealed to those who had enthusiasm as pioneers and they were engaged in the development with enhanced morale

  13. The Fail-Safe Micro Research Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Mary Anne

    A key element in a research paper writing assignment modified for students of English as a second language to assure their success is teacher control over most of the process. A chronological plan for action for the micro research project includes these steps: creating an awareness of current events and controversial issues, practicing necessary…

  14. Needle Revision With 5-fluorouracil for the Treatment of Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Filtering Blebs: 5-Fluoruracil Needling Revision can be a Useful and Safe Tool in the Management of Failing Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Filtering Blebs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Luciano; Floriani, Irene; Hollander, Lital; Poli, Davide; Katsanos, Andreas; Konstas, Anastasios G P

    2016-04-01

    To determine the outcome of needling with adjunctive 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with a failing Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implant, and to identify predictors of long-term intraocular pressure (IOP) control. A prospective observational study was performed on consecutive patients with medically uncontrolled primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) with AGV encapsulation or fibrosis and inadequate IOP control. Bleb needling with 5-FU injection (0.1 mL of 50 mg/mL) was performed at the slit-lamp. Patients were examined 1 week following the needling, and then at months 1, 3, and 6. Subsequent follow-up visits were scheduled at 6-month intervals for at least 2 years. Needling with 5-FU was repeated no more than twice during the first 3 months of the follow-up. Procedure outcome was determined on the basis of the recorded IOP levels. Thirty-six patients with an encapsulated or fibrotic AGV underwent 67procedures (mean 1.86 ± 0.83). Complete success, defined as IOP ≤ 18 mm Hg without medications, was obtained in 25% at 24 months of observation. The cumulative proportion of cases achieving either qualified (ie, IOP ≤ 18 mm Hg with medications) or complete success at 24 months of observation was 72.2%. In a univariate Cox proportional hazards model, age was the only variable that independently influenced the risk of failing 5-FU needling revision. Fourteen eyes (38.8%) had a documented complication. Needling over the plate of an AGV supplemented with 5-FU is an effective and safe choice in a significant proportion of POAG patients with elevated IOP due to encapsulation or fibrosis.

  15. Dams designed to fail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penman, A. [Geotechnical Engineering Consultants, Harpenden (United Kingdom)

    2004-09-01

    New developments in geotechnical engineering have led to methods for designing and constructing safe embankment dams. Failed dams can be categorized as those designed to fail, and those that have failed unexpectedly. This presentation outlined 3 dam failures: the 61 m high Malpasset Dam in France in 1959 which killed 421; the 71 m high Baldwin Hills Dam in the United States in 1963 which killed 5; and, the Vajont Dam in Italy in 1963 which killed 2,600 people. Following these incidents, the International Commission for Large Dams (ICOLD) reviewed regulations on reservoir safety. The 3 dams were found to have inadequate spillways and their failures were due to faults in their design. Fuse plug spillways, which address this problem, are designed to fail if an existing spillway proves inadequate. They allow additional discharge to prevent overtopping of the embankment dam. This solution can only be used if there is an adjacent valley to take the additional discharge. Examples of fuse gates were presented along with their effect on dam safety. A research program is currently underway in Norway in which high embankment dams are being studied for overtopping failure and failure due to internal erosion. Internal erosion has been the main reason why dams have failed unexpectedly. To prevent failures, designers suggested the use of a clay blanket placed under the upstream shoulder. However, for dams with soft clay cores, these underblankets could provide a route for a slip surface and that could lead to failure of the upstream shoulder. It was concluded that a safe arrangement for embankment dams includes the use of tipping gates or overturning gates which always fail at a required flood water level. Many have been installed in old and new dams around the world. 14 refs., 19 figs.

  16. Failing Decision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Recently the Danish subway trains have begun to announce “on time” when they arrive at a station on time. This action reflects a worrying acceptance of the normality of failure. If trains were generally expected to be on time, there would be no reason to – triumphantly – announce it. This chapter...... by an interest in failure as one way of improving understanding of present-day decision making in organizations.......Recently the Danish subway trains have begun to announce “on time” when they arrive at a station on time. This action reflects a worrying acceptance of the normality of failure. If trains were generally expected to be on time, there would be no reason to – triumphantly – announce it. This chapter...... deals not with traffic delays, but with failing decisions in organizations. The assumption of this chapter is that failing decisions today are as normal as delayed trains. Instead of being the exception, failure is part of the everyday reproduction of organizations – as an uncontrolled effect but also...

  17. Safe sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sex; Sexually transmitted - safe sex; GC - safe sex; Gonorrhea - safe sex; Herpes - safe sex; HIV - safe sex; ... contact. STIs include: Chlamydia Genital herpes Genital warts Gonorrhea Hepatitis HIV HPV Syphilis STIs are also called ...

  18. Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger inhibition exerts a positive inotropic effect in the rat heart, but fails to influence the contractility of the rabbit heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, A S; Acsai, K; Nagy, N; Tóth, A; Fülöp, F; Seprényi, G; Birinyi, P; Nánási, P P; Forster, T; Csanády, M; Papp, J G; Varró, A; Farkas, A

    2008-05-01

    The Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) may play a key role in myocardial contractility. The operation of the NCX is affected by the action potential (AP) configuration and the intracellular Na(+) concentration. This study examined the effect of selective NCX inhibition by 0.1, 0.3 and 1.0 microM SEA0400 on the myocardial contractility in the setting of different AP configurations and different intracellular Na(+) concentrations in rabbit and rat hearts. The concentration-dependent effects of SEA0400 on I(Na/Ca) were studied in rat and rabbit ventricular cardiomyocytes using a patch clamp technique. Starling curves were constructed for isolated, Langendorff-perfused rat and rabbit hearts. The cardiac sarcolemmal NCX protein densities of both species were compared by immunohistochemistry. SEA0400 inhibited I(Na/Ca) with similar efficacy in the two species; there was no difference between the inhibitions of the forward or reverse mode of the NCX in either species. SEA0400 increased the systolic and the developed pressure in the rat heart in a concentration-dependent manner, for example, 1.0 microM SEA0400 increased the maximum systolic pressures by 12% relative to the control, whereas it failed to alter the contractility in the rabbit heart. No interspecies difference was found in the cardiac sarcolemmal NCX protein densities. NCX inhibition exerted a positive inotropic effect in the rat heart, but it did not influence the contractility of the rabbit heart. This implies that the AP configuration and the intracellular Na(+) concentration may play an important role in the contractility response to NCX inhibition.

  19. Method for repairing failed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakudo, Taketomi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To repair fuel elements that became failed during burnup in a reactor or during handling. Method: After the surface in the vicinity of a failed part of a fuel element is cleaned, a socket made of a shape-memory alloy having a ring form or a horseshoe form made by cutting a part of the ring form is inserted into the failed position according to the position of the failed fuel element. The shape memory alloy socket remembers a slightly larger inside diameter in its original phase (high-temperature side) than the outside diameter of the cladding tube and also a slightly larger inside diameter of the socket in the martensite phase (low-temperature side) than the outside diameter of the cladding tube, such that the socket can easily be inserted into the failed position. The socket, inserted into the failed part of the cladding tube, is heated by a heating jig. The socket recovers the original phase, and the shape also tends to recover a smaller diameter than the outside diameter of the cladding tube that has been remembered, and accordingly the failed part of the cladding tube is fastened with a great force and the failed part is fully closed with the socket, thus keeping radioactive materials from going out. (Horiuchi, T.)

  20. In-core sipping method for the identification of failed fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhongwang; Zhang Yajun

    2000-01-01

    The failed fuel assembly identification system is an important safety system which ensures safe operations of reactor and immediate treatment of failed fuel rod cladding. The system uses an internationally recognized method to identify failed fuel assemblies in a reactor with fuel element cases. The in-core sipping method is customary used to identify failed fuel assemblies during refueling or after fuel rod cladding failure accidents. The test is usually performed after reactor shutdown by taking samples from each fuel element case while the cases are still in their original core positions. The sample activity is then measured to identify failed fuel assemblies. A failed fuel assembly identification system was designed for the NHR-200 based on the properties of the NHR-200 and national requirements. the design provides an internationally recognized level of safety to ensure the safety of NHR-200

  1. How safe is safe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, C.F.; Flood, M.

    1996-01-01

    60 and 70 degree convexo-concave valve. Nine hundred and one valves were implanted in Australia. Twelve strut fractures were reported. Two other patients have been explanted and have demonstrated 'single leg separation'. This particular problem was only investigated when two patients died of a fractured valve in the same hospital on the same day. A retrospective study of all known patients in Australia has shown poor follow up, lack of knowledge and indeed lack of interest in device failure modes. Consequently, the Australian and New Zealand Heart Valve Registry was established to track all implanted valves and to notify physicians of any new information. This is perhaps the first device-specific register in Australia. The safety of individual devices is often not known by manufacturers, regulators and clinicians alike. No follow up is available and large volume long term studies are yet to be implemented for the majority of devices. Without such studies and without mandatory problem reporting, the relative safety of medical devices will continue to be measured by banner headlines, sensational TV 'grabs' and protracted law suits. At present, only schemes such as the Problem Reporting Scheme can tell us (albeit vaguely) 'how safe is safe'

  2. Bcl-2 over-expression fails to prevent age-related loss of calretinin positive neurons in the mouse dentate gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Mingbo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive performance declines with increasing age. Possible cellular mechanisms underlying this age-related functional decline remain incompletely understood. Early studies attributed this functional decline to age-related neuronal loss. Subsequent studies using unbiased stereological techniques found little or no neuronal loss during aging. However, studies using specific cellular markers found age-related loss of specific neuronal types. To test whether there is age-related loss of specific neuronal populations in the hippocampus, and subsequently, whether over-expression of the B-cell lymphoma protein-2 (Bcl-2 in these neurons could delay possible age-related neuronal loss, we examined calretinin (CR positive neurons in the mouse dentate gyrus during aging. Result In normal mice, there was an age-related loss of CR positive cells in the dentate gyrus. At the same region, there was no significant decrease of total numbers of neurons, which suggested that age-related loss of CR positive cells was due to the decrease of CR expression in these cells instead of cell death. In the transgenic mouse line over-expressing Bcl-2 in neurons, there was an age-related loss of CR positive cells. Interestingly, there was also an age-related neuronal loss in this transgenic mouse line. Conclusion These data suggest an age-related loss of CR positive neurons but not total neuronal loss in normal mice and this age-related neuronal change is not prevented by Bcl-2 over-expression.

  3. "It is easier for me to shoot up": stigma, abandonment, and why HIV-positive drug users in Russia fail to link to HIV care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriazova, Tetiana; Lunze, Karsten; Raj, Anita; Bushara, Natalia; Blokhina, Elena; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Bridden, Carly; Lioznov, Dmitry; Samet, Jeffrey H; Gifford, Allen L

    2017-05-01

    Many HIV-positive people who inject drugs (PWID) globally are not receiving HIV care. This represents a major challenge among key populations to end the global HIV epidemic. This qualitative study explored the process and associated barriers of linking HIV-positive PWID who are in addiction treatment to HIV care in St. Petersburg, Russia. We conducted three focus groups and seven semi-structured interviews with participants in the LINC ("Linking Infectious and Narcology Care") project at addiction and HIV hospitals in St. Petersburg. The sample consisted of 25 HIV-infected patients with opioid dependence and seven health-care providers, including addiction and infectious disease physicians and case managers. A variety of intertwining factors influence effective engagement of PWID with HIV treatment. Stigma, problematic patient-provider relationships, and fragmented health care were the main challenges for HIV care initiation by PWID, which were further exacerbated by injection drug use. Effective linkage of PWID to HIV care requires acknowledging and addressing stigma's role and different perspectives of patients and providers.

  4. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy can Safely and Durably Control Sites of Extra-Central Nervous System Oligoprogressive Disease in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Crizotinib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Gregory N., E-mail: gregory.gan@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Weickhardt, Andrew J.; Scheier, Benjamin; Doebele, Robert C. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E.; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Camidge, D. Ross [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze the durability and toxicity of radiotherapeutic local ablative therapy (LAT) applied to extra-central nervous system (eCNS) disease progression in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive NSCLC patients receiving crizotinib and manifesting ≤4 discrete sites of eCNS progression were classified as having oligoprogressive disease (OPD). If subsequent progression met OPD criteria, additional courses of LAT were considered. Crizotinib was continued until eCNS progression was beyond OPD criteria or otherwise not suitable for further LAT. Results: Of 38 patients, 33 progressed while taking crizotinib. Of these, 14 had eCNS progression meeting OPD criteria suitable for radiotherapeutic LAT. Patients with eCNS OPD received 1-3 courses of LAT with radiation therapy. The 6- and 12-month actuarial local lesion control rates with radiation therapy were 100% and 86%, respectively. The 12-month local lesion control rate with single-fraction equivalent dose >25 Gy versus ≤25 Gy was 100% versus 60% (P=.01). No acute or late grade >2 radiation therapy-related toxicities were observed. Median overall time taking crizotinib among those treated with LAT versus those who progressed but were not suitable for LAT was 28 versus 10.1 months, respectively. Patients continuing to take crizotinib for >12 months versus ≤12 months had a 2-year overall survival rate of 72% versus 12%, respectively (P<.0001). Conclusions: Local ablative therapy safely and durably eradicated sites of individual lesion progression in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive NSCLC patients receiving crizotinib. A dose–response relationship for local lesion control was observed. The suppression of OPD by LAT in patients taking crizotinib allowed an extended duration of exposure to crizotinib, which was associated with longer overall survival.

  5. Engaging Future Failing States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    military missions in the Middle East, the Balkans, Africa, Asia , and South America. There is an increasing proliferation of failed and failing states...disparity, overpopulation , food security, health services availability, migration pressures, environmental degradation, personal and 22 community

  6. Predicting the Permanent Safe Donor Area for Hair Transplantation in Koreans with Male Pattern Baldness according to the Position of the Parietal Whorl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Young Cheon; Moh, Jae Seong; Lee, Seung Yong; You, Seung Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Background The most crucial factor in hair transplantation for male pattern baldness (MPB) patients is the efficient utilization of the donor-recipient ratio. However, there is no known factor that scientifically predicts the rate of progression of alopecia or indicates a permanently safe donor area. Methods The study considered 1,008 Korean adult males with MPB; of these, it excluded 56 males with an absence of parietal whorls (PWs). The authors investigated the distance from the vertical bimeatal line (VM) to the PW, from the PW to the upper border of the helical rim (HR), and the distance from the PW to the occipital fringe (OF) in 952 subjects with a PW. Furthermore, we examined the distance from the PW to the OF considering the duration of alopecia and age in 322 subjects with vertex alopecia. Results The distance between the VM and PW varied from 1.5 to 11 cm, with an average distance of 6.25 cm. The PW-HR distance ranged from 3.4 to 17.5 cm, and the average distance was 7.79 cm. The PW-OF distance ranged from 0.5 to 5.5 cm, and the average distance was 2.37 cm. Conclusions For the PW, very large variations existed in the vertical direction. The position of the PW could predict the progression range of the total alopecia of the vertex. Alopecia mostly progresses within 6 cm of the PW toward the occipital side. PMID:24883280

  7. Predicting the Permanent Safe Donor Area for Hair Transplantation in Koreans with Male Pattern Baldness according to the Position of the Parietal Whorl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hyun Park

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The most crucial factor in hair transplantation for male pattern baldness (MPB patients is the efficient utilization of the donor-recipient ratio. However, there is no known factor that scientifically predicts the rate of progression of alopecia or indicates a permanently safe donor area. Methods The study considered 1,008 Korean adult males with MPB; of these, it excluded 56 males with an absence of parietal whorls (PWs. The authors investigated the distance from the vertical bimeatal line (VM to the PW, from the PW to the upper border of the helical rim (HR, and the distance from the PW to the occipital fringe (OF in 952 subjects with a PW. Furthermore, we examined the distance from the PW to the OF considering the duration of alopecia and age in 322 subjects with vertex alopecia. Results The distance between the VM and PW varied from 1.5 to 11 cm, with an average distance of 6.25 cm. The PW-HR distance ranged from 3.4 to 17.5 cm, and the average distance was 7.79 cm. The PW-OF distance ranged from 0.5 to 5.5 cm, and the average distance was 2.37 cm. Conclusions For the PW, very large variations existed in the vertical direction. The position of the PW could predict the progression range of the total alopecia of the vertex. Alopecia mostly progresses within 6 cm of the PW toward the occipital side.

  8. SAFE Newsletter

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The Center of Excellence SAFE – “Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe” – is a cooperation of the Center for Financial Studies and Goethe University Frankfurt. It is funded by the LOEWE initiative of the State of Hessen (Landes-Offensive zur Entwicklung wissenschaftlich-ökonomischer Exzellenz). SAFE brings together more than 40 professors and just as many junior researchers who are all dedicated to conducting research in support of a sustainable financial architecture. The Center has...

  9. Safe Haven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Gail

    2003-01-01

    Discusses school libraries as safe havens for teenagers and considers elements that foster that atmosphere, including the physical environment, lack of judgments, familiarity, leisure, and a welcoming nature. Focuses on the importance of relationships, and taking the time to listen to teens and encourage them. (LRW)

  10. Safe Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Edward T.; Stewart, Helen; Korsmeyer, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The biggest users of GRID technologies came from the science and technology communities. These consist of government, industry and academia (national and international). The NASA GRID is moving into a higher technology readiness level (TRL) today; and as a joint effort among these leaders within government, academia, and industry, the NASA GRID plans to extend availability to enable scientists and engineers across these geographical boundaries collaborate to solve important problems facing the world in the 21 st century. In order to enable NASA programs and missions to use IPG resources for program and mission design, the IPG capabilities needs to be accessible from inside the NASA center networks. However, because different NASA centers maintain different security domains, the GRID penetration across different firewalls is a concern for center security people. This is the reason why some IPG resources are been separated from the NASA center network. Also, because of the center network security and ITAR concerns, the NASA IPG resource owner may not have full control over who can access remotely from outside the NASA center. In order to obtain organizational approval for secured remote access, the IPG infrastructure needs to be adapted to work with the NASA business process. Improvements need to be made before the IPG can be used for NASA program and mission development. The Secured Advanced Federated Environment (SAFE) technology is designed to provide federated security across NASA center and NASA partner's security domains. Instead of one giant center firewall which can be difficult to modify for different GRID applications, the SAFE "micro security domain" provide large number of professionally managed "micro firewalls" that can allow NASA centers to accept remote IPG access without the worry of damaging other center resources. The SAFE policy-driven capability-based federated security mechanism can enable joint organizational and resource owner approved remote

  11. Failed endotracheal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheykhol Islami V

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of failed intubation is higher in obstetric than other surgical patients. Failed intubation was the 2nd commonest cause of mortality during anesthesia. Bearing in mind that failre to intubate may be unavoidable in certain circumstances, it is worth reviewing. The factors, which may contribute to a disastrous out come. Priorities of subsequent management must include maintaining oxygenation and preventing aspiration of gastric contents. Fiber optic intubation is now the technique of choice with a high success rate and with least trauma to the patient.

  12. Failed fuel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martucci, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    A failed fuel detection apparatus is described for a nuclear reactor having a liquid cooled core comprising a gas collection hood adapted to engage the top of the suspect assembly and means for delivering a stripping gas to the vicinity of the bottom of the suspect fuel assembly. (U.S.)

  13. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally...

  14. Who Really Failed? Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, Katherine M.; Leon, Raul A.

    2012-01-01

    Scott Jaschik's (2010) article "Who Really Failed?" details the experience of Dominique Homberger, a tenured faculty member at Louisiana State University (LSU) who was removed from teaching her introductory biology course citing student complaints in regards to "the extreme nature" of the grading policy. This removal has…

  15. FAILED FUEL DISPOSITION STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    THIELGES, J.R.

    2004-12-20

    In May 2004 alpha contamination was found on the lid of the pre-filter housing in the Sodium Removal Ion Exchange System during routine filter change. Subsequent investigation determined that the alpha contamination likely came from a fuel pin(s) contained in an Ident-69 (ID-69) type pin storage container serial number 9 (ID-69-9) that was washed in the Sodium Removal System (SRS) in January 2004. Because all evidence indicated that the wash water interacted with the fuel, this ID49 is designated as containing a failed fuel pin with gross cladding defect and was set aside in the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell until it could be determined how to proceed for long term dry storage of the fuel pin container. This ID49 contained fuel pins from the driver fuel assembly (DFA) 16392, which was identified as a Delayed Neutron Monitor (DNM) leaker assembly. However, this DFA was disassembled and the fuel pin that was thought to be the failed pin was encapsulated and was not located in this ID49 container. This failed fuel disposition study discusses two alternatives that could be used to address long term storage for the contents of ID-69-9. The first alternative evaluated utilizes the current method of identifying and storing DNM leaker fuel pin(s) in tubes and thus, verifying that the alpha contamination found in the SRS came from a failed pin in this pin container. This approach will require unloading selected fuel pins from the ID-69, visually examining and possibly weighing suspect fuel pins to identify the failed pin(s), inserting the failed pin(s) in storage tubes, and reloading the fuel pins into ID49 containers. Safety analysis must be performed to revise the 200 Area Interim Storage Area (ISA) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (Reference 1) for this fuel configuration. The second alternative considered is to store the failed fuel as-is in the ID-69. This was evaluated to determine if this approach would comply with storage requirements. This

  16. FAILED FUEL DISPOSITION STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    THIELGES, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    In May 2004 alpha contamination was found on the lid of the pre-filter housing in the Sodium Removal Ion Exchange System during routine filter change. Subsequent investigation determined that the alpha contamination likely came from a fuel pin(s) contained in an Ident-69 (ID-69) type pin storage container serial number 9 (ID-69-9) that was washed in the Sodium Removal System (SRS) in January 2004. Because all evidence indicated that the wash water interacted with the fuel, this ID49 is designated as containing a failed fuel pin with gross cladding defect and was set aside in the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell until it could be determined how to proceed for long term dry storage of the fuel pin container. This ID49 contained fuel pins from the driver fuel assembly (DFA) 16392, which was identified as a Delayed Neutron Monitor (DNM) leaker assembly. However, this DFA was disassembled and the fuel pin that was thought to be the failed pin was encapsulated and was not located in this ID49 container. This failed fuel disposition study discusses two alternatives that could be used to address long term storage for the contents of ID-69-9. The first alternative evaluated utilizes the current method of identifying and storing DNM leaker fuel pin(s) in tubes and thus, verifying that the alpha contamination found in the SRS came from a failed pin in this pin container. This approach will require unloading selected fuel pins from the ID-69, visually examining and possibly weighing suspect fuel pins to identify the failed pin(s), inserting the failed pin(s) in storage tubes, and reloading the fuel pins into ID49 containers. Safety analysis must be performed to revise the 200 Area Interim Storage Area (ISA) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (Reference 1) for this fuel configuration. The second alternative considered is to store the failed fuel as-is in the ID-69. This was evaluated to determine if this approach would comply with storage requirements. This

  17. Safe cycling!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    The HSE Unit will be running a cycling safety campaign at the entrances to CERN's restaurants on 14, 15 and 16 May. Pop along to see if they can persuade you to get back in the saddle!   With summer on its way, you might feel like getting your bike out of winter storage. Well, the HSE Unit has come up with some original ideas to remind you of some of the most basic safety rules. This year, the prevention campaign will be focussing on three themes: "Cyclists and their equipment", "The bicycle on the road", and "Other road users". This is an opportunity to think about the condition of your bike as well as how you ride it. From 14 to 16 May, representatives of the Swiss Office of Accident Prevention and the Touring Club Suisse will join members of the HSE Unit at the entrances to CERN's restaurants to give you advice on safe cycling (see box). They will also be organising three activity stands where you can test your knowle...

  18. Failed fuel detection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Urata, Megumu.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To detect failed fuel element in a reactor with high precision by measuring the radioactivity concentrations for more than one nuclides of fission products ( 131 I and 132 I, for example) contained in each sample of coolant in fuel channel. Method: The radioactivity concentrations in the sampled coolant are obtained from gamma spectra measured by a pulse height analyser after suitable cooling periods according to the half-lives of the fission products to be measured. The first measurement for 132 I is made in two hours after sampling, and the second for 131 I is started one day after the sampling. Fuel element corresponding to the high radioactivity concentrations for both 131 I and 132 I is expected with certainty to have failed

  19. Failed fuel detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Takayuki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable early and sure detection of failed fuels by automatically changing the alarm set value depending on the operation states of a nuclear reactor. Constitution: Gaseous fission products released into coolants are transferred further into cover gases and then introduced through a pipeway to a failed fuel detector. The cover gases introduced from the pipeway to the pipeway or chamber within the detection device are detected by a radiation detector for the radiation dose of the gaseous fission products contained therein. The detected value is converted and amplified as a signal and inputted to a comparator. While on the other hand, a signal corresponding to the reactor power is converted by an alarm setter into a set value and inputted to the comparator. In such a structure, early and sure detection can be made for the fuel failures. (Yoshino, Y.)

  20. Failed fuel rod detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Katsuya; Matsuda, Yasuhiko

    1984-05-02

    The purpose of the project is to enable failed fuel rod detection simply with no requirement for dismantling the fuel assembly. A gamma-ray detection section is arranged so as to attend on the optional fuel rods in the fuel assembly. The fuel assembly is adapted such that a gamma-ray shielding plate is detachably inserted into optional gaps of the fuel rods or, alternatively, the fuel assembly can detachably be inserted to the gamma-ray shielding plate. In this way, amount of gaseous fission products accumulated in all of the plenum portions in the fuel rods as the object of the measurement can be determined without dismantling the fuel assembly. Accordingly, by comparing the amounts of the gaseous fission products, the failed fuel rod can be detected.

  1. European Society of Cardiology - Acute Cardiovascular Care Association position paper on safe discharge of acute heart failure patients from the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, Òscar; Peacock, Frank W; McMurray, John J; Bueno, Héctor; Christ, Michael; Maisel, Alan S; Cullen, Louise; Cowie, Martin R; Di Somma, Salvatore; Martín Sánchez, Francisco J; Platz, Elke; Masip, Josep; Zeymer, Uwe; Vrints, Christiaan; Price, Susanna; Mebazaa, Alexander; Mueller, Christian

    2017-06-01

    Heart failure is a global public health challenge frequently presenting to the emergency department. After initial stabilization and management, one of the most important decisions is to determine which patients can be safely discharged and which require hospitalization. This is a complex decision that depends on numerous subjective factors, including both the severity of the patient's underlying condition and an estimate of the acuity of the presentation. An emergency department observation period may help select the correct option. Ideally, during an observation period, risk stratification should be carried out using parameters specifically designed for use in the emergency department. Unfortunately, there is little objective literature to guide this disposition decision. An objective and reliable definition of low-risk characteristics to identify early discharge candidates is needed. Benchmarking outcomes in patients discharged from the emergency department without hospitalization could aid this process. Biomarker determinations, although undoubtedly useful in establishing diagnosis and predicting longer-term prognosis, require prospective validation for emergency department disposition guidance. The challenge of identifying emergency department acute heart failure discharge candidates will only be overcome by future multidisciplinary research defining the current knowledge gaps and identifying potential solutions.

  2. Postpartum thyroid dysfunction in pregnant thyroid peroxidase antibody-positive women living in an area with mild to moderate iodine deficiency: is iodine supplementation safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, S B; Jørgensen, A; Pedersen, K M

    2000-01-01

    In moderately iodine-deficient, pregnant, thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab)-positive women the role of iodine supplementation in the development of postpartum thyroid dysfunction (PPTD) was studied in a placebo-controlled, randomized, double blind trial. Screening for TPO-Ab was performed......-Ab-positive women living in an area with mild to moderate iodine deficiency did not induce or worsen PPTD. The study confirmed that screening for TPO-Ab in early pregnancy can predict women at high risk for development of PPTD. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Sep...... microg iodine or no iodine. The +/+ group received iodine during pregnancy and the postpartum period, the +/- group received iodine during pregnancy only, and the -/- group received no iodine supplementation. A total of 66 TPO-Ab positive women were followed, and in the postpartum period sera were...

  3. How safe is safe enough?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desnoyers, B.; Chanzy, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, were historically established with the objective to reduce the probability that persons be exposed to unacceptable doses due to normal operation or accident situations during transport of radioactive material. Based on the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation (BSS), the definition, which was adopted for an unacceptable dose for an accident situation, is the excess of the maximum dose limits permissible in a single year for the occupational exposure of a worker in the BSS. Concerning the severity of accident situations, it has always be clearly stated that the objective of the tests for demonstrating ability to withstand accident conditions of transport was not to cover every accident condition, but solely most of them. The last available evaluations regarding the rate of accidents which are covered by the standardised accident conditions of transport defined in the IAEA Regulations give a range of about 80%, plus or minus 15% which depends on transport mode and studies. Consequently, slight variations in the capabilities of the packages to meet the specified performance would probably not have significant consequences on the protection level in case of accident. In the assessment of the compliance with the regulations, the tendency of experts, taking advantage of the enhanced performances of computer calculation codes, is to ask more and more calculations, with more and more accuracy, leading to more and more restrictions. Consequently, cost and delay are considerably increased without any evidence of an equivalent effect on the level of protection. This paper will initiate a reflection on the general objectives and principles when implementing the Regulations, in such a way that demonstrations remain cost effective, taking into account evolution of the techniques and a high level of safety

  4. Detector for failed fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masaru.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide automatic monitor for the separation or reactor water and sampling water, in a failed fuel element detector using a sipping chamber. Constitution: A positional detector for the exact mounting of a sipping chamber on a channel box and a level detector for the detection of complete discharge of cooling water in the sipping chamber are provided in the sipping chamber. The positional detector is contacted to the upper end of the channel box and operated when the sipping chamber is correctly mounted to the fuel assemblies. The level detector comprises a float and a limit switch and it is operated when the water in the sipping chamber is discharged by a predetermined amount. Isolation of reactor water and sampling water are automatically monitored by the signal from these two detectors. (Ikeda, J.)

  5. Failed fuel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogure, Sumio; Seya, Toru; Watanabe, Masaaki.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To enhance the reliability of a failed fuel detector which detects radioactivity of nuclear fission products leaked out from fuel elements in cooling water. Constitution: Collected specimen is introduced into a separator and co-existing material considered to be an impediment is separated and removed by ion exchange resins, after which this specimen is introduced into a container housing therein a detector to systematically measure radioactivity. Thereby, it is possible to detect a signal lesser in variation in background, and inspection work also becomes simple. (Kawakami, Y.)

  6. Failed fuel detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Hayashida, Yoshihisa; Niidome, Jiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent intrusion of background neutrons to neutron detectors thereby improve the S/N ratio of the detectors in the failed fuel detection device of LMFBR type reactors. Constitution: Neutrons from the reactor core pass through the gaps around the penetration holes in which the primary pipeways pass through the concrete shielding walls and pass through the gaps between the thermal shielding members and the neutron moderating shielding members of the failed fuel detection device and then intrude into the neutron detectors. In view of the above, inner neutron moderating shielding members and movable or resilient neutron shielding members are disposed to the inside of the neutron moderating shielding member. Graphite or carbon hydrides such as paraffin or synthetic resin with a large neutron moderation effect are used as the outer moderating shielding member and materials such as boron or carbon are used for the inner members. As a result, the background neutrons are shielded by the inner neutron moderating shielding members and the resilient neutron shielding members, by which the S/N ratio of the neutron detectors can be increased to 2 - 4 times. (Moriyama, K.)

  7. Failing by design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Rita Gunther

    2011-04-01

    It's hardly news that business leaders work in increasingly uncertain environments, where failures are bound to be more common than successes. Yet if you ask executives how well, on a scale of one to 10, their organizations learn from failure, you'll often get a sheepish "Two-or maybe three" in response. Such organizations are missing a big opportunity: Failure may be inevitable but, if managed well, can be very useful. A certain amount of failure can help you keep your options open, find out what doesn't work, create the conditions to attract resources and attention, make room for new leaders, and develop intuition and skill. The key to reaping these benefits is to foster "intelligent failure" throughout your organization. McGrath describes several principles that can help you put intelligent failure to work. You should decide what success and failure would look like before you start a project. Document your initial assumptions, test and revise them as you go, and convert them into knowledge. Fail fast-the longer something takes, the less you'll learn-and fail cheaply, to contain your downside risk. Limit the number of uncertainties in new projects, and build a culture that tolerates, and sometimes even celebrates, failure. Finally, codify and share what you learn. These principles won't give you a means of avoiding all failures down the road-that's simply not realistic. They will help you use small losses to attain bigger wins over time.

  8. Failed fuel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Koichi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reliability of detecting the failure of a fuel rod by imparting a wire disconnection detecting function to a central electrode at the center of a failure mode thereto. Constitution: A wire disconnection detecting terminal is provided at the terminal opposite to the signal output terminal of a central electrode in a failed fuel detector used for detecting the failure of a fuel rod in an atomic power plant using liquid metal as a coolant, and a voltage monitor for monitoring the terminal voltage is connected to the terminal. The disconnection of the central electrode is detected by the failure of the output of the voltage monitor, and an alarm is thus generated. (Aizawa, K.)

  9. A safe-repositioning maneuver for the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: Gans vs. Epley maneuver; a randomized comparative clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Alia; Nemati, Shadman; Sabnan, Salah; Mollahoseini, Fatemeh; Kazemnejad, Ehsan

    2017-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of peripheral vertigo. Some repositioning maneuvers have been described for its management. The aim of this study was comparing the therapeutic effect of Epley and Gans maneuvers in BPPV. This randomized clinical trial was performed from September to December 2015. 73 patients with true vertigo diagnosed as BPPV enrolled the study. They randomly assigned in quadripartite blocks to modified Epley maneuver group (E) or Gans maneuver group (G). 1 day and 1 week after intervention, the objective and subjective responses to treatment were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using the Chi-square test and regression model in the SPSS software version 21. Thirty patients enrolled each group with a mean age of 46.9 ± 13.4 (E group) and 46.7 ± 7.5 year (G group). 23.3 % of E group and 26.7 % of G group were men (p = 0.766). In E and G groups in the first day, subjective outcomes revealed 86.7 and 60 % rate of success (p = 0.02); and 86.7 and 56.7 % of patients exhibited objective improvement, respectively (p = 0.01). After 1 week, the subjective and objective outcomes revealed improvement among 70 % of E group and 46.7 % of G group (p = 0.067). The only complication with significant difference was cervical pain with a higher rate in E group (23.3 vs. 0.0 %, p = 0.005). These results revealed the similar long-term efficacy of Epley and Gans maneuver for the treatment of BPPV. Cervical pain was most frequent complication of Epley maneuver.

  10. Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Trastuzumab Is Safe and Effective in Older Women With Small, Node-Negative, HER2-Positive Early-Stage Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadoo, Karen A; Morris, Patrick G; Cowell, Elizabeth P; Patil, Sujata; Hudis, Clifford A; McArthur, Heather L

    2016-12-01

    The benefit of adjuvant trastuzumab with chemotherapy is well established for women with higher risk human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2 + ) breast cancer. However, its role in older patients with smaller, node-negative tumors is less clear. We conducted a retrospective, sequential cohort study of this population to describe the impact of trastuzumab on breast cancer outcomes and cardiac safety. Women ≥ 55 years with ≤ 2 cm, node-negative, HER2 + breast cancer were identified and electronic medical records reviewed. A no-trastuzumab cohort of 116 women diagnosed between January 1, 1999 and May 14, 2004 and a trastuzumab cohort of 128 women diagnosed between May 16, 2006 and December 31, 2010 were identified. Overall survival and distant relapse-free survival were estimated by Kaplan-Meier methods. The median ages of the trastuzumab and no-trastuzumab cohorts were 62 and 64 years, respectively. More patients in the trastuzumab cohort had grade III (P = .001), lymphovascular invasion (P = .001), or estrogen receptor-negative (P cancers. The majority of the trastuzumab cohort received chemotherapy versus one-half of the no-trastuzumab cohort (98% vs. 53%; P women in the trastuzumab cohort and 1 in the no-trastuzumab cohort developed symptomatic heart failure. There were no cardiac-related deaths in either arm. Following adjuvant trastuzumab with chemotherapy, selected older women with small, node-negative, HER2 + breast cancers have excellent disease control. The rate of cardiac events is low. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Failed fuel detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention concerns a failed fuel detection device for a nuclear reactor, such as an FBR type reactor, using electroconductive coolants. A sampling port is disposed at the upper portion of the fuel assembly so as to cover the assembly, so that coolants in the fuel assembly are sampled to improve a device for detecting fuel failure. That is, when coolants in the fuel assembly are sampled from the sampling port, the flow of electroconductive coolants in an sampling tube is detected by a flowmeter, to control an electromagnetic pump. The flow of electroconductive coolants is stopped against the waterhead pressure and dynamic pressure of the conductive coolants, and a predetermined amount of the coolants is pumped up to the sampling tank. Gas is supplied to the pumped up coolants so that fissile products are transferred from the coolants to a gas phase. Radiation in the gas in a gas recycling system is measured to detect presence of fuel failure. (I.S.)

  12. Examination of a failed fifth wheel coupling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fernandes, PJL

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Examination of a fifth wheel coupling which had failed in service showed that it had been modified and that the operating handle had been moved from its original design position. This modification completely eliminated the safety device designed...

  13. Traveling Safely with Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medications Safely My Medicine List How to Administer Traveling Safely with Medicines Planes, trains, cars – even boats ... your trip, ask your pharmacist about how to travel safely with your medicines. Make sure that you ...

  14. Safe Kids Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blog Videos Newsletter facebook twitter instagram pinterest gplus youtube Search Menu Why It Matters Who We Are What We Do Find Your Safe Kids Safe Kids Day Main menu Keeping All Kids Safe Safety Tips Get Involved 4 Star Charity Donate Text Burns and Scalds 4 tips ...

  15. Method and device for detecting failed fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shozo; Suzumura, Takeshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To shorten the time required for inspecting a failed fuel by providing a first outlet for exhausting cleaning liquid to a sampling pipe and a second outlet for exhausting sampled coolant, thereby safely setting a collecting means to the first outlet. Constitution: A sampling pipe is inserted into a fuel assembly loaded within a reactor core, and coolant flow is thus prevented from passing through the fuel assembly interior. Then, with the coolant flow stopped, it is allowed to stand for a predetermined time. Subsequently, cleaning liquid is supplied into the sampling tube and the interior of the sampling pipe is cleaned. Thereafter, the sampling liquid that was in the sampling pipe is exhausted from the first outlet of the sampling pipe. Then, the coolant in the fuel assembly is supplied from the second outlet of the sampling pipe to a collecting means. (Aizawa, K.)

  16. "Same Room, Safe Place".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene Woods, Nikki

    2017-04-01

    There are many different professional stances on safe sleep and then there is the reality of caring for a newborn. There is a debate among professionals regarding safe sleep recommendations. The continum of recommendations vary from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Safe Sleep Guidelines to the bed-sharing recommendations from the Mother-Baby Behavioral Sleep Laboratory. The lack of consistent and uniform safe sleep recommendations from health professionals has been confusing for families but has more recently raised a real professional ethical dilemma. Despite years of focused safe sleep community education and interventions, sleep-related infant deaths are on the rise in many communities. This commentary calls for a united safe sleep message from all health professionals to improve health for mothers and infants most at-risk, "Same Room, Safe Place."

  17. Failed Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt: Is Retrograde Ventriculosinus Shunt a Reliable Option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Matheus Fernandes de; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Reis, Rodolfo Casimiro; Petitto, Carlo Emanuel; Gomes Pinto, Fernando Campos

    2016-08-01

    Currently, the treatment of hydrocephalus is mainly carried out through a ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) insertion. However, in some cases, there may be surgical revisions and requirement of an alternative distal site for shunting. There are several described distal sites, and secondary options after VPS include ventriculopleural and ventriculoatrial shunt, which have technical difficulties and harmful complications. In this preliminary report we describe our initial experience with retrograde ventriculosinus shunt (RVSS) after failed VPS. In 3 consecutive cases we applied RVSS to treat hydrocephalus in shunt-dependent patients who had previously undergone VPS revision and in which peritoneal space was full of adhesions and fibrosis. RVSS was performed as described by Shafei et al., with some modifications to each case. All 3 patients kept the same clinical profile after RVSS, with no perioperative or postoperative complications. However, revision surgery was performed in the first operative day in 1 out of 3 patients, in which the catheter was not positioned in the superior sagittal sinus. We propose that in cases where VPS is not feasible, RVSS may be a safe and applicable second option. Nevertheless, the long-term follow-up of patients and further learning curve must bring stronger evidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Safe havens in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paldam, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Eleven safe havens exist in Europe providing offshore banking and low taxes. Ten of these states are very small while Switzerland is moderately small. All 11 countries are richer than their large neighbors. It is shown that causality is from small to safe haven to wealth, and that theoretically...... equilibriums are likely to exist where a certain regulation is substantially lower in a small country than in its big neighbor. This generates a large capital inflow to the safe havens. The pool of funds that may reach the safe havens is shown to be huge. It is far in excess of the absorptive capacity...... of the safe havens, but it still explains, why they are rich. Microstates offer a veil of anonymity to funds passing through, and Switzerland offers safe storage of funds....

  19. Creating Safe Spaces for Music Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Karin S.; Smith, Tawnya D.; Stanuch, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a practical model for fostering emotionally safe learning environments that instill in music students a positive sense of self-belief, freedom, and purpose. The authors examine the implications for music educators of creating effective learning environments and present recommendations for creating a safe space for learning,…

  20. DECOFF Probabilities of Failed Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gintautas, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    A statistical procedure of estimation of Probabilities of Failed Operations is described and exemplified using ECMWF weather forecasts and SIMO output from Rotor Lift test case models. Also safety factor influence is investigated. DECOFF statistical method is benchmarked against standard Alpha-factor...

  1. Are Detox Diets Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Are Detox Diets Safe? KidsHealth / For Teens / Are Detox Diets ... seguras las dietas de desintoxicación? What Is a Detox Diet? The name sounds reassuring — everyone knows that ...

  2. Chernobyl new safe confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, L.

    2011-01-01

    The author presents the new safe confinement that will be commissioned at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl NPP in 2015. The confinement will ensure that Chernobyl Unit 4 will be placed in an environmentally safe condition for at least next 100 years. The article highlights the current work status, future perspectives and the feasibility of confinement concept [ru

  3. Asymptotically Safe Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sannino, Francesco; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new paradigm for dark matter (DM) interactions in which the interaction strength is asymptotically safe. In models of this type, the coupling strength is small at low energies but increases at higher energies, and asymptotically approaches a finite constant value. The resulting...... searches are the primary ways to constrain or discover asymptotically safe dark matter....

  4. Diggers failing to become diggers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars

    Mining has in recent years emerged as a national discourse in Australia as the combined result of the mining boom and national anxieties over the GFC featured prominently in references to Australia as a failed competitive state (the folding of manufacturing, where the closure of car factories pla...... to the broader issue of how mining relates to the question of the society Australia wants to be – on the scale from ecological sanctuary to global quarry....

  5. Implications of inherent safe nuclear power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yo-Taik

    1987-01-01

    The safety of present day nuclear power reactors and research reactors depends on a combination of design features of passive and active systems, and the alert judgement of their operators. A few inherently safe designs of nuclear reactors for power plants are currently under development. In these designs, the passive systems are emphasized, and the active systems are minimized. Also efforts are made to eliminate the potential for human failures that initiate the series of accidents. If a major system fails in these designs, the core is flooded automatically with coolants that flow by gravity, not by mechanical pumps or electromagnetic actuators. Depending on the choice of the coolants--water, liquid metal and helium gas--there are three principal types of inherently safe reactors. In this paper, these inherently safe reactor designs are reviewed and their implications are discussed. Further, future perspectives of their acceptance by nuclear industries are discussed. (author)

  6. Safe Sleep for Babies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Safe Sleep for Babies Eliminating hazards Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Page Problem Every year, there are thousands of sleep-related deaths among babies. View large image and ...

  7. Safe operating envelope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliva, N [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1997-12-01

    Safe Operating Envelope is described representing: The outer bound of plant conditions within which day-to-day plant operation must be maintained in order to comply with regulatory requirements, associated safety design criteria and corporate nuclear safety goals. Figs.

  8. The first safe country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaela Puggioni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Dublin II Regulation makes the first safe country of refuge solelyresponsible for refugees and asylum seekers. In the case of Italy, thefirst responsible country has not been acting responsibly.

  9. Buying & Using Medicine Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reducers Safe Daily Use of Aspirin Medication Health Fraud Resources for You FDA Consumer Updates (Drugs) Page ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  10. Karate: Keep It Safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, David

    1981-01-01

    Safety guidelines for each phase of a karate practice session are presented to provide an accident-free and safe environment for teaching karate in a physical education or traditional karate training program. (JMF)

  11. Safe operating envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, N.

    1997-01-01

    Safe Operating Envelope is described representing: The outer bound of plant conditions within which day-to-day plant operation must be maintained in order to comply with regulatory requirements, associated safety design criteria and corporate nuclear safety goals. Figs

  12. Safe driving for teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driving and teenagers; Teens and safe driving; Automobile safety - teenage drivers ... months before taking friends as passengers. Teenage-related driving deaths occur more often in certain conditions. OTHER SAFETY TIPS FOR TEENS Reckless driving is still a ...

  13. Removing Hair Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Removing Hair Safely Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... related to common methods of hair removal. Laser Hair Removal In this method, a laser destroys hair ...

  14. Medications: Using Them Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Safely Give Ibuprofen Childproofing and Preventing Household Accidents Medicines for Diabetes Complementary and Alternative Medicine How Do Pain Relievers Work? What Medicines Are and What They Do Medicines ...

  15. DroidSafe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Massachusetts Avenue, Build E19-750 Cambridge , MA 02139-4307 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...Activity objects illustrating the challenges of points-to and information flow analysis...measure how many malicious flows Droid- Safe was able to detect). As these results illustrate , DroidSafe implements an analysis of unprece- dented

  16. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sue I [Berkeley, CA; Fergenson, David P [Alamo, CA; Srivastava, Abneesh [Santa Clara, CA; Bogan, Michael J [Dublin, CA; Riot, Vincent J [Oakland, CA; Frank, Matthias [Oakland, CA

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  17. Method of detecting failed fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Hideaki; Suzumura, Takeshi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable the settlement of the temperature of an adequate filling high temperature pure water by detecting the outlet temperature of a high temperature pure water filling tube to a fuel assembly to control the heating of the pure water and detecting the failed fuel due to the sampling of the pure water. Method: A temperature sensor is provided at a water tube connected to a sipping cap for filling high temperature pure water to detect the temperature of the high temperature pure water at the outlet of the tube, and the temperature is confirmed by a temperature indicator. A heater is controlled on the basis of this confirmation, an adequate high temperature pure water is filled in the fuel assembly, and the pure water is replaced with coolant. Then, it is sampled to settle the adequate temperature of the high temperature coolant used for detecting the failure of the fuel assembly. As a result, the sipping effect does not decrease, and the failed fuel can be precisely detected. (Yoshihara, H.)

  18. Safeness of radiological machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Shun

    1979-01-01

    The human factors affecting the safeness of radiological machinery, which are often very big and complicated machines, are described from the stand point of handling. 20 to 50% of the troubles on equipments seem to be caused by men. This percentage will become even higher in highly developed equipments. Human factors have a great influence on the safeness of radiological equipments. As the human factors, there are sensory factors and knowledge factors as well as psychological factors, and the combination of these factors causes mishandling and danger. Medical services at present are divided in various areas, and consist of the teamwork of the people in various professions. Good human relationship, education and control are highly required to secure the safeness. (Kobatake, H.)

  19. Why good projects fail anyway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Nadim F; Ashkenas, Ronald N

    2003-09-01

    Big projects fail at an astonishing rate--more than half the time, by some estimates. It's not hard to understand why. Complicated long-term projects are customarily developed by a series of teams working along parallel tracks. If managers fail to anticipate everything that might fall through the cracks, those tracks will not converge successfully at the end to reach the goal. Take a companywide CRM project. Traditionally, one team might analyze customers, another select the software, a third develop training programs, and so forth. When the project's finally complete, though, it may turn out that the salespeople won't enter in the requisite data because they don't understand why they need to. This very problem has, in fact, derailed many CRM programs at major organizations. There is a way to uncover unanticipated problems while the project is still in development. The key is to inject into the overall plan a series of miniprojects, or "rapid-results initiatives," which each have as their goal a miniature version of the overall goal. In the CRM project, a single team might be charged with increasing the revenues of one sales group in one region by 25% within four months. To reach that goal, team members would have to draw on the work of all the parallel teams. But in just four months, they would discover the salespeople's resistance and probably other unforeseen issues, such as, perhaps, the need to divvy up commissions for joint-selling efforts. The World Bank has used rapid-results initiatives to great effect to keep a sweeping 16-year project on track and deliver visible results years ahead of schedule. In taking an in-depth look at this project, and others, the authors show why this approach is so effective and how the initiatives are managed in conjunction with more traditional project activities.

  20. Keeping Food Safe

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-27

    This CDC Kidtastics podcast discusses things kids and parents can do to help prevent illness by keeping food safe.  Created: 5/27/2009 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 5/27/2009.

  1. Effective and Safe Ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Amdahl, Jørgen; Rutgersson, Olle

    1996-01-01

    A Joint Nordic Research project "Effecive and Safe Ships" is presented. The project is aiming to develop methods and tools for quantitative evaluation fo ship safety. This report is the report of the preliminary phase where the plan for the main project is developed. The objectives of the project...

  2. Are EU Banks Safe?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. Theissen (Roel)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ What exactly are the rules banks are subject to, and are they fit for purpose? These are the two questions addressed in this book ‘Are EU banks safe?’ and its descriptive companion book ‘EU banking supervision’. The full rulebook on banks is difficult to find

  3. The safe home project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arphorn, Sara; Jiraniratisai, Sopaphan; Rungtakul, Rungsri; Phutta, Nikom

    2011-12-01

    The Thai Health Promotion Foundation supported the Improvement of Quality of Life of Informal Workers project in Ban Luang District, Amphur Photaram, Ratchaburi Province. There were many informal workers in Ban Luang District. Sweet-crispy fish producers in Ban Luang were the largest group among the sweet-crispy fish producers in Thailand. This project was aimed at improving living and working conditions of informal workers, with a focus on the sweet-crispy fish group. Good practices of improved living and working conditions were used to help informal workers build safe, healthy and productive work environments. These informal workers often worked in substandard conditions and were exposed to various hazards in the working area. These hazards included risk of exposure to hot work environment, ergonomics-related injuries, chemical hazards, electrical hazards etc. Ergonomics problems were commonly in the sweet-crispy fish group. Unnatural postures such as prolonged sitting were performed dominantly. One hundred and fifty informal workers participated in this project. Occupational health volunteers were selected to encourage occupational health and safety in four groups of informal workers in 2009. The occupational health volunteers trained in 2008 were farmers, beauty salon workers and doll makers. The occupational health and safety knowledge is extended to a new informal worker group: sweet-crispy fish producer, in 2009. The occupational health and safety training for sweet-crispy fish group is conducted by occupational health volunteers. The occupational health volunteers increased their skills and knowledge assist in to make safe home and safe community through participatory oriented training. The improvement of living and working condition is conducted by using a modified WISH, Work Improvement for Safe Home, checklist. The plans of improvement were recorded. The informal workers showed improvement mostly on material handling and storage. The safe uses and safe

  4. Safe use of nanomaterials

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanomaterials  is on the increase worldwide, including at CERN. The HSE Unit has established a safety guideline to inform you of the main requirements for the safe handling and disposal of nanomaterials at CERN.   A risk assessment tool has also been developed which guides the user through the process of evaluating the risk for his or her activity. Based on the calculated risk level, the tool provides a list of recommended control measures.   We would therefore like to draw your attention to: Safety Guideline C-0-0-5 - Safe handling and disposal of nanomaterials; and Safety Form C-0-0-2 - Nanomaterial Risk Assessment   You can consult all of CERN’s safety rules and guidelines here. Please contact the HSE Unit for any questions you may have.   The HSE Unit

  5. Plutonium safe handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tvehlov, Yu.

    2000-01-01

    The abstract, prepared on the basis of materials of the IAEA new leadership on the plutonium safe handling and its storage (the publication no. 9 in the Safety Reports Series), aimed at presenting internationally acknowledged criteria on the radiation danger evaluation and summarizing the experience in the safe management of great quantities of plutonium, accumulated in the nuclear states, is presented. The data on the weapon-class and civil plutonium, the degree of its danger, the measures for provision of its safety, including the data on accident radiation consequences with the fission number 10 18 , are presented. The recommendations, making it possible to eliminate the super- criticality danger, as well as ignition and explosion, to maintain the tightness of the facility, aimed at excluding the radioactive contamination and the possibility of internal irradiation, to provide for the plutonium security, physical protection and to reduce irradiation are given [ru

  6. Modified hydraulic braking system limits angular deceleration to safe values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, R. S.; Council, M.; Green, P. M.

    1966-01-01

    Conventional spring actuated, hydraulically released, fail-safe disk braking system is modified to control the angular deceleration of a massive antenna. The hydraulic system provides an immediate preset pressure to the spring-loaded brake shoes and holds it at this value to decelerate the antenna at the desired rate.

  7. Efficacy of repeated 5-fluorouracil needling for failing and failed filtering surgeries based on simple gonioscopic examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashad MA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad A RashadOphthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, EgyptPurpose: To evaluate the success rate of a modified bleb needling technique in eyes with previous glaucoma surgery that had elevated intraocular pressure.Methods: A retrospective study of 24 eyes of 24 patients that underwent repeated bleb needling performed for failing and failed blebs on slit lamp with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU injections on demand. This was performed after gonioscopic examination to define levels of filtration block.Results: There was significant reduction of mean IOP from 36.91 mmHg to 14.73 mmHg at the final follow-up (P < 0.001. The overall success rate was 92%.Conclusion: Repeated needling with adjunctive 5-FU proved a highly effective, safe alternative to revive filtration surgery rather than another medication or surgery.Keywords: bleb, failure, 5-FU, needling, gonioscopy

  8. Proposed scheduling algorithm for deployment of fail-safe cloud services

    OpenAIRE

    Kollberg, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The cloud is a fairly new concept in computer science, altough almost everyone has been or is in contact with it on a regular basis. As more and more systems and applications are migrating from the desktop and into the cloud, keeping a high availability in cloud services is becoming increasingly important. Seeing that the cloud users are dependant on the cloud services being online and accessable via the Internet, creating fault tolerant cloud systems is key to keeping the cloud stable and tr...

  9. The development of functional fail-safe control for advanced robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosaka, Shigetaka; Shimizu, Yujiro; Hayashi, Tetsuji

    1990-01-01

    Advanced robots for the nuclear power plant maintenance are increasing the complexity in comparison with industrial robots, and severe in condition of use, and are increasing the importance of safety and reliability. In this paper, as a high reliability technology for Advanced Robot, Functional Failsafe control (FFC) is described. FFC isolates the faults, and keeps the minimum function of robot, using the remained potential redundancy of robot, with minimizing of additional parts to robot, at the occurrence of faults. We suggest the three reliability evaluation principles for Advanced robot, then define the FFC in these principles. In the proposed FFC, the method of using an amplifier between two servosystems in common, and the method of stucking the degrees of freedom of robot arm are studied and proved by experiments on the design of FFC. And, a new design method is showed, based on not only the reliability of time, but also the reliability of amount of working. So, we clarified some remained subjects to develop for the FFC. (author)

  10. Fatigue and fail-safe design features of the DC-10 airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M. E.

    1972-01-01

    The philosophy and methods used in the design of the DC-10 aircraft to assure structural reliability against cracks under repeated service loads are described in detail. The approach consists of three complementary parts: (1) the structure is designed to be fatigue resistant for a crack-free life of 60,000 flight hours; (2) inasmuch as small undetected cracks could develop from other sources, such as material flaws and manufacturing preloads, the structure also is designed to arrest and control cracks within a reasonable service-inspection interval; and (3) a meaningful service-inspection program has been defined on the basis of analysis and test experience from the design development program. This service-inspection program closes the loop to assure the structural integrity of the DC-10 airframe. Selected materials, fasteners, and structural arrangements are used to achieve these design features with minimum structural weight and with economy in manufacturing and maintenance. Extensive analyses and testing were performed to develop and verify the design. The basic design considerations for fatigue-resistant structure are illustrated in terms of material selection, design loads spectra, methods for accurate stress and fatigue damage analysis, and proven concepts for efficient detail design.

  11. Towards a Fail-Safe Air Force Culture: Creating a Resilient Future While Avoiding Past Mistakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    implement a mindful Page 3 approach to ensuring the Air Force can achieve its mission by maximizing our ability to ―fly, fight and win … in air...space and cyberspace.‖ 9 Tolerance-Based Culture A Tolerance-Based culture fundamentally embraces a Kantian belief in the inherent goodness of man

  12. Stress analysis and fail-safe design of bilayered tubular supported ceramic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwok, Kawai; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Søgaard, Martin

    2014-01-01

    . Stress distributions in two membrane systems have been analyzed and routes to minimize stress are proposed. For a Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3−δBa0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3−δ membrane supported on a porous substrate of the same material under pressure-vacuum operation, the optimal configuration in terms...... for both membrane systems at operating conditions in the range of practical interest....

  13. Fail-safe design criteria for computer-based reactor protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keats, A.B.

    1980-01-01

    The increasing quantity and complexity of the instrumentation required in nuclear power plants provides a strong incentive for using on-line computers as the basis of the control and protection systems. On-line computers using multiplexed sampled data are already well established but their application to nuclear reactor protection systems requires special measures to satisfy the very high reliability which is demanded in the interests of safety and availability. Some existing codes of practice relating to segregation of replicated subsysttems continue to be applicable and lead to division of the computer functions into two distinct parts. The first computer, referred to as the Trip Algorithm Computer may also control the multiplexer. Voting on each group of status inputs yielded by the trip algorithm computers is performed by the Vote Algorithm Computer. The conceptual disparities between hardwired reactor-protection systems and those employing computers also rise to a need for some new criteria. An important objective of these criteria, minimising the need for a failure-mode-and-effect-analysis of the computer software, but is achieved almost entirely by 'hardware' properties of the system: the systematic use of hardwired test inputs which cause excursions of the trip algorithms into the tripped state in a uniquely ordered but easily recognisable sequence, and the use of hardwired 'pattern recognition logic' which generates a dynamic 'healthy' stimulus for the shutdown actuators only in response to the unique sequence generated by the hardwired input signal pattern. The adoption of the proposed design criteria ensure not only failure-to-safety in the hardware but the elimination, or at least minimisation, of the dependence on the correct functioning of the computer software for the safety system. (auth)

  14. FAIL-SAFE: Fault Aware IntelLigent Software for Exascale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-13

    and that these programs can continue to correct solutions. To broaden the impact of this research, we also needed to be able to ameliorate errors...designing an interface between the application and an introspection framework for resilience ( IFR ) based on the inference engine SHINE; (4) using...the ROSE compiler to translate annotations into reasoning rules for the IFR ; and (5) designing a Knowledge/Experience Database, which will store

  15. How safe are nuclear plants? How safe should they be?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouts, H.

    1988-01-01

    It has become customary to think about safety of nuclear plants in terms of risk as defined by the WASH-1400 study that some of the implications for the non-specialist escape our attention. Yet it is known that a rational program to understand safety, to identify unsafe events, and to use this kind of information or analysis to improve safety, requires us to use the methods of quantitative risk assessment. How this process can be made more understandable to a broader group of nontechnical people and how can a wider acceptance of the results of the process be developed have been questions under study and are addressed in this report. These are questions that have been struggled with for some time in the world of nuclear plant safety. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission examined them for several years as it moved toward developing a position on safety goals for nuclear plants, a requirement that had been assigned it by Congress. Opinion was sought from a broad spectrum of individuals, within the field of nuclear power and outside it, on the topic that was popularly called, ''How safe is safe enough?'' Views were solicited on the answer to the question and also on the way the answer should be framed when it was adopted. This report discusses the public policy and its implementation

  16. Escola segura Safe school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Ferreira Liberal

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Revisão das estratégias para tornar o ambiente escolar seguro. Inicialmente os autores contextualizam a violência e os acidentes no ambiente escolar e fazem recomendações, baseadas em dados da literatura, para a implantação de escolas seguras. FONTE DE DADOS: Artigos publicados entre 1993 e 2005 na base de dados MEDLINE. Dados nacionais epidemiológicos e da literatura também foram pesquisados. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Há evidência crescente de que a intervenção tem múltiplos componentes. O foco político é a prática em educação em saúde com o envolvimento de toda a comunidade. O norte dessas intervenções é ajudar estudantes e toda a comunidade a adotar um comportamento seguro e saudável. As escolas estão assumindo um envolvimento crescente na promoção da saúde, prevenção de doenças e prevenção de trauma. Nesse contexto de prevenção de causas externas de morbimortalidade, é importante reconhecer o risco ambiental, locais e comportamentos de risco como favoráveis ao trauma e à violência, além de um novo conceito de acidentes como algo que possa ser evitado. CONCLUSÃO: A implementação da escola segura representa uma nova direção promissora para o trabalho preventivo baseado na escola. É importante notar que uma escola segura deve intervir não meramente na sua estrutura física, mas também torná-la tão segura quanto possível, trabalhando com a comunidade escolar por meio de educação em saúde, discutindo principalmente o comportamento saudável.OBJECTIVE: To review the strategies to make school a safe environment. The paper first addresses the social context of accidents and violence in the school environment, and makes recommendations, based on the literature data, for the implementation of safe schools. SOURCE OF DATA: Articles published between 1993 and 2005 in the MEDLINE database. Brazilian epidemiological and literature data have also been searched. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: There is

  17. Safe motherhood at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A

    1996-12-01

    Health professionals' negative attitudes toward clients often exacerbate the problems women face in terms of health status and access to health care. Thus, the health professionals can themselves be obstacles to women seeking the health care they need. A key challenge to midwives, in addition to providing technically competent services, is gaining insight into the people for whom they are responsible so that childbirth traditions are treated with respect and women are offered dignity. Safe motherhood requires intersectoral collaboration. Many innovative approaches to safe motherhood are based on the community's participation in planning services that meet the needs of women. Other approaches are based on decentralization of services. For example, a large university teaching hospital in Lusaka, Zambia, set up birthing centers around the city to take the pressure off the hospital. Midwives head up these centers, which are close to the women's homes. Decentralization of delivery services has improved the physical and emotional outcomes for mothers and newborns. Midwives must be prepared to articulate concerns about inequalities and deficiencies in the health care system in order to persuade the government to change. Women, including midwives, need to form multidisciplinary alliances to work together to effect change. The front-line workers in maternity care are midwives. They should adopt the following strategies to become even more effective in their efforts to make motherhood safer. They should listen to what women say about their needs. They should scale services to a manageable, human scale. They should learn the skills to become politically active advocates. They should work with other midwives, women, leaders, and other professional groups. Motherhood can be safe when women have more control over their own decision making, the education to liberate themselves to make their own decisions, and access to skilled care.

  18. Inherently safe reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maartensson, Anders

    1992-01-01

    A rethinking of nuclear reactor safety has created proposals for new designs based on inherent and passive safety principles. Diverging interpretations of these concepts can be found. This article reviews the key features of proposed advanced power reactors. An evaluation is made of the degree of inherent safety for four different designs: the AP-600, the PIUS, the MHTGR and the PRISM. The inherent hazards of today's most common reactor principles are used as reference for the evaluation. It is concluded that claims for the new designs being inherently, naturally or passively safe are not substantiated by experience. (author)

  19. Safe handling of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The main objective of this publication is to provide practical guidance and recommendations on operational radiation protection aspects related to the safe handling of tritium in laboratories, industrial-scale nuclear facilities such as heavy-water reactors, tritium removal plants and fission fuel reprocessing plants, and facilities for manufacturing commercial tritium-containing devices and radiochemicals. The requirements of nuclear fusion reactors are not addressed specifically, since there is as yet no tritium handling experience with them. However, much of the material covered is expected to be relevant to them as well. Annex III briefly addresses problems in the comparatively small-scale use of tritium at universities, medical research centres and similar establishments. However, the main subject of this publication is the handling of larger quantities of tritium. Operational aspects include designing for tritium safety, safe handling practice, the selection of tritium-compatible materials and equipment, exposure assessment, monitoring, contamination control and the design and use of personal protective equipment. This publication does not address the technologies involved in tritium control and cleanup of effluents, tritium removal, or immobilization and disposal of tritium wastes, nor does it address the environmental behaviour of tritium. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Vitamins, Are They Safe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Hamishehkar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of a daily multivitamin among people all over the world is dramatically increasing in recent years. Most of the people believe that if vitamins are not effective, at least they are safe. However, the long term health consequences of vitamins consumption are unknown. This study aimed to assess the side effects and possible harmful and detrimental properties of vitamins and to discuss whether vitamins can be used as safe health products or dietary supplements. We performed a MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus and Google Scholar search and assessed reference lists of the included studies which were published from 1993 through 2015. The studies, with an emphasis on RCTs (randomized controlled clinical trials, were reviewed. As some vitamins such as fat-soluble vitamins (vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E, and also some of the water-soluble vitamins like folic acid may cause adverse events and some like vitamin C is widely taken assuming that it has so many benefits and no harm, we included relevant studies with negative or undesired results regarding the effect of these vitamins on health. Our recommendation is that taking high-dose supplements of vitamins A, E, D, C, and folic acid is not always effective for prevention of disease, and it can even be harmful to the health.

  1. Cool and Safe: Multiplicity in Safe Innovation at Unilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penders, Bart

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the making of a safe innovation: the application of ice structuring protein (ISP) in edible ices. It argues that safety is not the absence of risk but is an active accomplishment; innovations are not "made safe afterward" but "safe innovations are made". Furthermore, there are multiple safeties to be accomplished in the…

  2. Numbers Speak Where Words Fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Albert Fei

    2017-01-01

    ’s decision making model, this study posits that the two forms of OCRs (i.e., numerical ratings and opinionated reviews) facilitate consumers’ decisional processes in terms of the effectiveness of constructing consideration sets and the efficiency of arriving at a final decision. Consumers’ performance......Consumers are increasingly relying on online consumer reviews (OCRs) to facilitate their decision making process as a credible source of information. This study seeks to explicate why consumers deem OCRs as helpful and how they make use of OCRs in their decision making process. By drawing on Simon...... in decisional process in turn determines the justifiability of and the confidence in their decisional outcomes. To empirically test all the hypotheses proposed in this study, a field survey was conducted on users of a custom-developed online restaurant review website equipped with OCR curation features...

  3. Safe pill-dispensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Massimiliano; Pollard, John

    2007-01-01

    Each patient is supplied with a smart-card containing a Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) chip storing a unique identification code. The patient places the Smart-card on a pill-dispenser unit containing an RFID reader. The RFID chip is read and the code sent to a Base-station via a wireless Bluetooth link. A database containing both patient details and treatment information is queried at the Base-station using the RFID as the search key. The patient's treatment data (i.e., drug names, quantities, time, etc.) are retrieved and sent back to the pill-dispenser unit via Bluetooth. Appropriate quantities of the required medications are automatically dispensed, unless the patient has already taken his/her daily dose. Safe, confidential communication and operation is ensured.

  4. A safe workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittsel, Hans; Andersson, Bengt A.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: The video 'A safe workplace' has been produced by ABB Atom in order to create a tool for showing different target audiences that ABB Atom Nuclear Fuel Production Plant is a safe workplace and to 'de-mystify' nuclear fuel production. The main target audiences are visitor groups and employees of the company, but the video also qualifies for use as an information tool for other target groups who ask for a proper explanation of the way nuclear fuel is produced. The summarized content of the video is as follows: All individual steps of the production process are described with focus on the safety, quality and environmental requirements. The first part shows the delivery of UF 6 (uranium hexafluoride) to the plant and the following process for the conversion to UO 2 (uranium dioxide). The conversion method used is wet conversion that includes evaporation, precipitation, filtration, washing, reduction and stabilization. The next part is a description of the fuel pellet manufacture including uranium oxide blending, pellet pressing, sintering, grinding and a final visual inspection. A separate part, describing the manufacture of fuel pellets with a burnable neutron absorber, is included. The third part shows how to produce fuel rods and complete assemblies. Some of the moments of quality supervision that support the entire manufacturing process are also shown. The last part of the video comprises a brief description of the manufacture of fuel channels and other reactor core components like control rods. The video is produced with a Swedish spoken narrative. The playing time is 15 minutes. The video will be delivered with a text printed in English and copies reproduced in the PAL/VHS system may be ordered from ABB Atom Communication Dept. telefax no +4621-11 41 90, at the price of USD 100.- or SEK 750.- each. (author)

  5. Strategies for safe motherhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, A

    1995-02-01

    The Safe Motherhood Initiative was launched in 1988 as a global effort to halve maternal mortality and morbidity by the year 2000. The program uses a combination of health and nonhealth strategies to emphasize the need for maternal health services, extend family planning services, and improve the status of women. The maternal mortality rate (per 100,000 live births) is 390 for the world, 20-30 for developed countries, 450 for developing countries, and 420 for Asia. This translates into 308,000 maternal deaths in Asia, of which 100,000 occur in India. The direct causes of maternal mortality include sepsis, hemorrhage, eclampsia, and ruptured uterus. Indirect causes occur when associated medical conditions, such as anemia and jaundice, are exacerbated by pregnancy. Underlying causes are ineffective health services, inadequate obstetric care, unregulated fertility, infections, illiteracy, early marriage, poverty, malnutrition, and ignorance. India's Child Survival and Safe Motherhood Program seeks to achieve immediate improvements by improving health care. Longterm improvements will occur as nutrition, income, education, and the status of women improve. Improvements in health care will occur in through the provision of 1) essential obstetric care for all women (which will be essentially designed for low-risk women), 2) early detection of complications during pregnancy and labor, and 3) emergency services. Services will be provided to pregnant women at their door by field staff, at a first referral hospital, perhaps at maternity villages where high risk cases can be housed in the latter part of their pregnancies, and through the continual accessibility of government vehicles. In addition, family planning services will be improved so that fertility regulation can have its expected beneficial effect on the maternal mortality rate. The professional health organizations in India will also play a vital role in the success of this effort to reduce maternal mortality.

  6. Coping Styles of Failing Brunei Vocational Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundia, Lawrence; Salleh, Sallimah

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the prevalence of two types of underachieving students (n = 246) (active failing (AF) and passive failing (PF)) in Brunei vocational and technical education (VTE) institutions and their patterns of coping. Design/methodology/approach: The field survey method was used to directly reach many…

  7. When Organization Fails: Why Authority Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaschke, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Review of: James R. Taylor and Elizabeth J. Van Every / When Organization Fails: Why Authority Matters. (New York: Routledge, 2014. 220 pp. ISBN: 978 0415741668)......Review of: James R. Taylor and Elizabeth J. Van Every / When Organization Fails: Why Authority Matters. (New York: Routledge, 2014. 220 pp. ISBN: 978 0415741668)...

  8. Neglected City Narratives And Failed Rebranding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousten, Birthe; Locmele, Gunta

    2017-01-01

    Rīga, Latvia went through a failed rebranding process as the forerunner of its status as a European Capital of Culture (2014). The same thing happened in Aarhus, Denmark. Aarhus will be a European Capital of Culture (2017) and leading to this, it went through a failed rebranding process. Based on...

  9. The Power of Positive Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español The Power of Positive Emotions KidsHealth / For Teens / The Power ... great one. 2. Practice Positivity Every Day Building habits that encourage us to feel more positive emotions ...

  10. Is journalism failing on climate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmstorf, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    How can we build a reliable and affordable energy supply based on renewables? How rapidly do we need to cut greenhouse gas emissions to keep climate change within manageable bounds? What does it take to maintain a stable common currency of different nations? These are just a few examples of questions that are critical for our future and that require an understanding of complex systems—the energy system, the climate system, the financial system. Finding sound answers to these questions requires sophisticated scientific analysis and expert knowledge; a lay person's intuition will clearly not suffice. Yet, decisions in a democracy are (and should be!) taken by politicians and the voting public who are not usually scientific experts. Hence the well-being of our societies—and even more so the living conditions of future generations, which are defined by the decisions we take today—depends on the wider public being well informed about the state of scientific knowledge and discourse. The media are the most important means by which lay people obtain their information about science. Good science journalism is therefore a decisive factor for the long-term success of modern society. Good science journalism clearly must be critical journalism, and it requires journalists who know what is what, who can put things into a perspective, and who are able to make well-informed judgements. After all, the role of science journalism is not simply to act as a 'translator' who conveys the findings of scientists in a language understandable to lay people. Rather, good science journalism will provide the public with a realistic impression of what is well established in science and what are current 'hot topics', uncertainties and controversies. It will also discuss the methods and social context of the scientific endeavour. There is ample evidence that in the area of climate science, journalism too often is failing to deliver this realistic picture to its audience, despite many good

  11. All-Arthroscopic Revision Eden-Hybinette Procedure for Failed Instability Surgery: Technique and Preliminary Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakos, Antonios; Vezeridis, Peter S; Schwartz, Daniel G; Jany, Richard; Lafosse, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    To describe the technique of an all-arthroscopic Eden-Hybinette procedure in the revision setting for treatment of a failed instability procedure, particularly after failed Latarjet, as well as to present preliminary results of this technique. Between 2007 and 2011, 18 shoulders with persistent instability after failed instability surgery were treated with an arthroscopic Eden-Hybinette technique using an autologous bicortical iliac crest bone graft. Of 18 patients, 12 (9 men, 3 women) were available for follow-up. The average follow-up was 28.8 months (range, 15 to 60 months). A Latarjet procedure was performed as an index surgery in 10 patients (83%). Two patients (17%) had a prior arthroscopic Bankart repair. Eight patients (67%) obtained a good or excellent result, whereas 4 patients (33%) reported a fair or poor result. Seven patients (58%) returned to sport activities. A positive apprehension test persisted in 5 patients (42%), including 2 patients (17%) with recurrent subluxations. The Rowe score increased from 30.00 to 78.33 points (P Instability Index score showed a good result of 28.71% (603 points). The average anterior flexion was 176° (range, 150° to 180°), and the average external rotation was 66° (range, 0° to 90°). Two patients (16.67%) showed a progression of glenohumeral osteoarthritic changes, with each patient increasing by one stage in the Samilson-Prieto classification. All 4 patients (33%) with a fair or poor result had a nonunion identified on postoperative computed tomography scan. An all-arthroscopic Eden-Hybinette procedure in the revision setting for failed instability surgery, although technically demanding, is a safe, effective, and reproducible technique. Although the learning curve is considerable, this procedure offers all the advantages of arthroscopic surgery and allows reconstruction of glenoid defects and restoration of shoulder stability in this challenging patient population. In our hands, this procedure yields good

  12. Intrinsically Safe and Economical Reactor (ISER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Hiroaki; Asahi, Yoshiro

    1991-01-01

    The Intrinsically Safe and Economical Reactor (ISER) is designed based on the principle of a process inherent ultimate safe reactor, PIUS, a so-called inherently safe reactor (ISR). ISER has been developed joingly by the members of the Kanagawa Institute of Technology, the University of Tokyo, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and several industrial firms in Japan. This paper describes the requirements for the next generation of power reactor, the safety design philosphy of ISR and ISER, the controllability of ISER and the results of analyses of some of the design-based accidents (DBA) of ISER, namely station blackout, accidents in which the pressurizer relief valve becomes jammed and stuck in open position and tube breaks in the steam generator. It is concluded that the ISER can ensure a wide range of contraollabitily and fuel integrity for all the analysed DBAs. (orig.)

  13. Sun Safe Mode Controller Design for LADEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Jesse C.; Swei, Sean S. M.; Nakamura, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of sun safe controllers which are designed to keep the spacecraft power positive and thermally balanced in the event an anomaly is detected. Employed by NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), the controllers utilize the measured sun vector and the spacecraft body rates for feedback control. To improve the accuracy of sun vector estimation, the least square minimization approach is applied to process the sensor data, which is proven to be effective and accurate. To validate the controllers, the LADEE spacecraft model engaging the sun safe mode was first simulated and then compared with the actual LADEE orbital fight data. The results demonstrated the applicability of the proposed sun safe controllers.

  14. Safe percutaneous suprapubic catheterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, N K; Goel, A; Sankhwar, S N

    2012-11-01

    We describe our technique of percutaneous suprapubic catheter insertion with special reference to steps that help to avoid common complications of haematuria and catheter misplacement. The procedure is performed using a stainless steel reusable trocar under local infiltrative anaesthesia, usually at the bedside. After clinical confirmation of a full bladder, the trocar is advanced into the bladder through a skin incision. Once the bladder is entered, the obturator is removed and the assistant inserts a Foley catheter followed by rapid balloon inflation. Slight traction is applied to the catheter for about five minutes. Patients with previous lower abdominal surgery, an inadequately distended bladder or acute pelvic trauma do not undergo suprapubic catheterisation using this method. The procedure was performed in 72 men (mean age: 42.4 years, range: 18-78 years) with urinary retention with a palpable bladder. The average duration of the procedure was less than five minutes. No complications were noted in any of the patients. Trocar suprapubic catheter insertion is a safe and effective bedside procedure for emergency bladder drainage and can be performed by resident surgeons. The common complications associated with the procedure can be avoided with a few careful steps.

  15. Making Our Food Safe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Full text: As civilization has progressed societies have strived to make food safer; from using fire to cook our food, and boiling our water to make it safe to drink, advances in technology have helped kill microorganisms that can make food unsafe. The FAO/IAEA Joint Division helps provide technical assistance to Member States that want to implement irradiation technology in making their food safer. Food and waterborne diarrhoeal diseases are estimated to kill roughly 2.2 million people annually, of which 1.9 million are children. Irradiating some of the foods we eat can save many of these lives by reducing the risk of food poisoning and killing the organisms that cause disease. Irradiation works by treating food with a small dose of ionizing radiation, this radiation disrupts the bacteria’s DNA and cell membranes structure stopping the organism from reproducing or functioning, but does not make the food radioactive. It can be applied to a variety of foods from spices and seasonings, to fruits and vegetables and is similar to pasteurization, but without the need for high temperatures that might impair food quality. (author)

  16. Safe Handling of Radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1958-01-01

    Under its Statute the International Atomic Energy Agency is empowered to provide for the application of standards of safety for protection against radiation to its own operations and to operations making use of assistance provided by it or with which it is otherwise directly associated. To this end authorities receiving such assistance are required to observe relevant health and safety measures prescribed by the Agency. As a first step, it has been considered an urgent task to provide users of radioisotopes with a manual of practice for the safe handling of these substances. Such a manual is presented here and represents the first of a series of manuals and codes to be issued by the Agency. It has been prepared after careful consideration of existing national and international codes of radiation safety, by a group of international experts and in consultation with other international bodies. At the same time it is recommended that the manual be taken into account as a basic reference document by Member States of the Agency in the preparation of national health and safety documents covering the use of radioisotopes.

  17. OPINION: Safe exponential manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, Chris; Drexler, Eric

    2004-08-01

    In 1959, Richard Feynman pointed out that nanometre-scale machines could be built and operated, and that the precision inherent in molecular construction would make it easy to build multiple identical copies. This raised the possibility of exponential manufacturing, in which production systems could rapidly and cheaply increase their productive capacity, which in turn suggested the possibility of destructive runaway self-replication. Early proposals for artificial nanomachinery focused on small self-replicating machines, discussing their potential productivity and their potential destructiveness if abused. In the light of controversy regarding scenarios based on runaway replication (so-called 'grey goo'), a review of current thinking regarding nanotechnology-based manufacturing is in order. Nanotechnology-based fabrication can be thoroughly non-biological and inherently safe: such systems need have no ability to move about, use natural resources, or undergo incremental mutation. Moreover, self-replication is unnecessary: the development and use of highly productive systems of nanomachinery (nanofactories) need not involve the construction of autonomous self-replicating nanomachines. Accordingly, the construction of anything resembling a dangerous self-replicating nanomachine can and should be prohibited. Although advanced nanotechnologies could (with great difficulty and little incentive) be used to build such devices, other concerns present greater problems. Since weapon systems will be both easier to build and more likely to draw investment, the potential for dangerous systems is best considered in the context of military competition and arms control.

  18. Aflatoxins & Safe Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe eVillers

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines both field experience and research on the prevention of the exponential growth of aflatoxins during multi-month post harvest storage in hot, humid countries. The approach described is the application of modern safe storage methods using flexible, Ultra Hermetic™ structures that create an unbreatheable atmosphere through insect and microorganism respiration alone, without use of chemicals, fumigants, or pumps. Laboratory and field data are cited and specific examples are given describing the uses of Ultra Hermetic storage to prevent the growth of aflatoxins with their significant public health consequences. Also discussed is the presently limited quantitative information on the relative occurrence of excessive levels of aflatoxin (>20 ppb before versus after multi-month storage of such crops as maize, rice and peanuts when under high humidity, high temperature conditions and, consequently, the need for further research to determine the frequency at which excessive aflatoxin levels are reached in the field versus after months of post-harvest storage. The significant work being done to reduce aflatoxin levels in the field is mentioned, as well as its probable implications on post harvest storage. Also described is why, with some crops such as peanuts, using Ultra Hermetic storage may require injection of carbon dioxide or use of an oxygen absorber as an accelerant. The case of peanuts is discussed and experimental data is described.

  19. Failed fuel action plan guidelines: Special report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    The objective of this document is to provide a generic guideline that can be used to formulate a failed fuel action plan (FFAP) for specific application by a utility. This document is intended to be part of a comprehensive fuel reliability monitoring, management, and improvement program. The utilities may utilize this document as one resource in developing a failed fuel action plan. This document is not intended to be used as a failed fuel action plan standard. This document is intended to provide guidance on: management responsibilities; fuel performance parameters; cost/benefit analysis; action levels; long-term improvement methods; and data collection, analysis, and trending. 3 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Asymptotically Safe Grand Unification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajc, Borut; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    the inclusion of gravity, by generating an interacting ultraviolet fixed point, similar to the one recently discovered in non-supersymmetric gauge-Yukawa theories. Employing a-maximization, a-theorem, unitarity bounds, as well as positivity of other central charges we nonperturbatively rule out this possibility...

  1. Safe Haven CDS Premiums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingler, Sven; Lando, David

    Credit Default Swaps can be used to lower capital requirements of dealer banks who enter into uncollateralized derivatives positions with sovereigns. We show in a model that the regulatory incentive to obtain capital relief makes CDS contracts valuable to dealer banks and empirically that...... support that CDS contracts are used for capital relief....

  2. Feeling safe during an inpatient hospitalization: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollon, Deene

    2014-08-01

    This paper aims to explore the critical attributes of the concept feeling safe. The safe delivery of care is a high priority; however; it is not really known what it means to the patient to 'feel safe' during an inpatient hospitalization. This analysis explores the topic of safety from the patient's perspective. Concept analysis. The data bases of CINAHL, Medline, PsychInfo and Google Scholar for the years 1995-2012 were searched using the terms safe and feeling safe. The eight-step concept analysis method of Walker and Avant was used to analyse the concept of feeling safe. Uses and defining attributes, as well as identified antecedents, consequences and empirical referents, are presented. Case examples are provided to assist in the understanding of defining attributes. Feeling safe is defined as an emotional state where perceptions of care contribute to a sense of security and freedom from harm. Four attributes were identified: trust, cared for, presence and knowledge. Relationship, environment and suffering are the antecedents of feeling safe, while control, hope and relaxed or calm are the consequences. Empirical referents and early development of a theory of feeling safe are explored. This analysis begins the work of synthesizing qualitative research already completed around the concept of feeling safe by defining the key attributes of the concept. Support for the importance of developing patient-centred models of care and creating positive environments where patients receive high-quality care and feel safe is provided. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Failed fuel detection and location of LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimoto, Yasuhide; Hukuda, Tooru; Nakamoto, Koichiro

    1974-01-01

    This is a summary report on Failed Fuel Detection and Location Methods of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors, and describes an outline of related research and development conducted by PNC. (auth.)

  4. Breaking the Failed-State Cycle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haims, Marla C; Gompert, David C; Treverton, Gregory F; Stearns, Brooke K

    2008-01-01

    In their research and field experience, the authors have observed a wide gulf separating the treatment of the security problems of failed states from the treatment of those states economic problems...

  5. Reliability testing of failed fuel location system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieru, G.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental reliability tests performed in order to prove the reliability parameters for Failed Fuel Location System (FFLS), equipment used to detect in which channel of a particular heat transport loop a fuel failure is located, and to find in which channel what particular bundle pair is failed. To do so, D20 samples from each reactor channel are sequentially monitored to detect a comparatively high level of delayed neutron activity. 15 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  6. Why Companies Fail? The Boiling Frog Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ozcan, Rasim

    2018-01-01

    Why nations fail? An answer is given by Acemoglu and Robinson (2012) by pointing out the importance of institutions for an economy that leads to innovations for economic growth. Christensen (2012) asks a similar question for a firm and diagnoses why companies fail. In this study, I relate Acemoglu and Robinson (2012) with Christensen (2012) in order to better understand how to make companies more prosperous, more powerful, healthier, and live longer via innovations.

  7. Disorganized junior doctors fail the MRCP (UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Adrian G; Khan, Khalid M; Hussain, Walayat; Tweed, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Career progression during undergraduate and early postgraduate years is currently determined by successfully passing examinations. Both academic factors (secondary school examination results, learning style and training opportunities) and non-academic factors (maturity, ethnic origin, gender and motivation) have been identified as predicting examination outcome. Few studies have examined organization skills. Disorganized medical students are more likely to perform poorly in end-of-year examinations but this observation has not been examined in junior doctors. This study asked whether organization skills relate to examination outcome amongst junior doctors taking the clinical Part II examination for the Membership of the Royal College of Physicians (Practical Assessment of Clinical Examination Skills). The study was conducted prospectively at four consecutive clinical courses that provided clinical teaching and practice to prepare trainees for the examination. Arrival time at registration for the course was the chosen surrogate for organization skills. Trainees were advised that they should arrive promptly at 8.00 a.m. for registration and it was explained that the course would start at 8.30 a.m. Recorded arrival times were compared with the pass lists published by the Royal College of Physicians. The mean arrival time was 8.17 a.m. A total of 81 doctors (53.3%) passed the examination with a mean arrival time of 8.14 a.m. However, 71 doctors failed the exam and arrived, on average, six minutes later than doctors who passed (p?=?0.006). Better-prepared junior doctors were more likely to pass the final examination. Arriving on time represents a composite of several skills involved in the planning of appropriate travel arrangements and is therefore a valid marker of organization skills and preparation. This novel study has shown that good time-keeping skills are positively associated with examination outcome.

  8. "Too big to fail" or "Too non-traditional to fail"?: The determinants of banks' systemic importance

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Kyle; Zhou, Chen

    2013-01-01

    This paper empirically analyzes the determinants of banks' systemic importance. In constructing a measure on the systemic importance of financial institutions we find that size is a leading determinant. This confirms the usual "Too big to fail'' argument. Nevertheless, banks with size above a sufficiently high level have equal systemic importance. In addition to size, we find that the extent to which banks engage in non-traditional banking activities is also positively related to ...

  9. Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Internal Temperature Chart Safe steps in food handling, cooking, and storage are essential in preventing foodborne illness. You can't see, smell, or taste harmful bacteria that may cause illness. In every step of food preparation, follow the four guidelines to keep food safe: ...

  10. More than a Safe Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, much of the conversation about LGBTQ students in schools has centered on safety--anti-bullying policies, the "safe space" of gay-straight alliances, and "safe zones" marked by rainbow-colored stickers on classroom doors. In this article, Michael Sadowski argues that it's time to move beyond safety…

  11. Staying Safe in the Water

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, Dr. Julie Gilchrist, a pediatrician and medical epidemiologist from CDC’s Injury Center, talks about staying safe in the water. Tips are for all audiences, with a focus on preventing drownings and keeping children safe in and around the pool, lake, or ocean.

  12. Asymptotically safe grand unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajc, Borut [J. Stefan Institute,1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sannino, Francesco [CP-Origins & the Danish IAS, University of Southern Denmark,Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Université de Lyon, France, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822 IPNL,F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2016-12-28

    Phenomenologically appealing supersymmetric grand unified theories have large gauge representations and thus are not asymptotically free. Their ultraviolet validity is limited by the appearance of a Landau pole well before the Planck scale. One could hope that these theories save themselves, before the inclusion of gravity, by generating an interacting ultraviolet fixed point, similar to the one recently discovered in non-supersymmetric gauge-Yukawa theories. Employing a-maximization, a-theorem, unitarity bounds, as well as positivity of other central charges we nonperturbatively rule out this possibility for a broad class of prime candidates of phenomenologically relevant supersymmetric grand unified theories. We also uncover candidates passing these tests, which have either exotic matter or contain one field decoupled from the superpotential. The latter class of theories contains a model with the minimal matter content required by phenomenology.

  13. Safe Anesthesia For Every Tot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Markus; Vutskits, Laszlo; Hansen, Tom G

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The term 'safe use of anesthesia in children is ill-defined and requires definition of and focus on the 'safe conduct of pediatric anesthesia'. RECENT FINDINGS: The Safe Anesthesia For Every Tot initiative (www.safetots.org) has been set up during the last year to focus...... on the safe conduct of pediatric anesthesia. This initiative aims to provide guidance on markers of quality anesthesia care. The introduction and implementation of national regulations of 'who, where, when and how' are required and will result in an improved perioperative outcome in vulnerable children....... The improvement of teaching, training, education and supervision of the safe conduct of pediatric anesthesia are the main goals of the safetots.org initiative. SUMMARY: This initiative addresses the well known perioperative risks in young children, perioperative causes for cerebral morbidity as well as gaps...

  14. Method of detecting a failed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Urata, Megumi; Uchida, Shunsuke.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To improve detection accuracy of a failed fuel by eliminating a coolant temperature distribution in a fuel assembly. Structure: A failed fuel is detected from contents of nuclear fission products in a coolant by shutting off an upper portion of a fuel assembly provided in the coolant and by sampling the coolant in the fuel assembly. Temperature distribution in the fuel assembly is eliminated, by injecting the higher temperature coolant than that of the coolant inside and outside the fuel assembly when sampling, and thereby replacing the existing coolant in the fuel assembly for the higher temperature coolant. The failed fuel is detected from contents of the fission products existing in the coolant, by sampling the higher temperature coolant of the fuel assembly after a temperature passed. (Moriyama, K.)

  15. Weeded Out? Gendered Responses to Failing Calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria, Tanya; Penner, Andrew

    2017-06-01

    Although women graduate from college at higher rates than men, they remain underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. This study examines whether women react to failing a STEM weed-out course by switching to a non-STEM major and graduating with a bachelor's degree in a non-STEM field. While competitive courses designed to weed out potential STEM majors are often invoked in discussions around why students exit the STEM pipeline, relatively little is known about how women and men react to failing these courses. We use detailed individual-level data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study (NELS) Postsecondary Transcript Study (PETS): 1988-2000 to show that women who failed an introductory calculus course are substantially less likely to earn a bachelor's degree in STEM. In doing so, we provide evidence that weed-out course failure might help us to better understand why women are less likely to earn degrees.

  16. Why did the League of Nations fail?

    OpenAIRE

    Jari Eloranta

    2011-01-01

    Why did the League of Nations ultimately fail to achieve widespread disarmament, its most fundamental goal? This article shows that the failure of the League of Nations had two important dimensions: (1) the failure to provide adequate security guarantees for its members (like an alliance); (2) the failure of this organization to achieve the disarmament goals it set out in the 1920s and 1930s. Thus, it was doomed from the outset to fail, due to built-in institutional contradictions. It can als...

  17. Politické násilí a koncept failed state - komparace Iráku a Somálska

    OpenAIRE

    Nemešová, Lucie

    2011-01-01

    There is recently growing interest, and also the political and academic debate connected to it, in the so called failed states. The problem of state failure in some of the world regions was securitized, particularly after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and the failed states began being understood as a security threat by the international community. This change in perception of the failed states reflects the concerns that such states' areas could serve as a "safe havens" of various terrorist grou...

  18. Ventilator-associated pneumonia: role of positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Torres, Antoni

    2011-02-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a lung infection commonly acquired following tracheal intubation. This review assesses the role of the supine semirecumbent and the prone position as VAP preventive strategies and calls attention for further investigation on novel body positions that could potentially reduce risks of VAP. The most recent studies on the semirecumbent position failed to achieve an orientation of the head of the bed higher than 30° and did not corroborate any benefit of the semirecumbent position on VAP, as reported in earlier studies. To date, there is clear evidence that the supine horizontal body position increases risks of pulmonary aspiration and VAP, particularly when patients are enterally fed. Laboratory reports are emphasizing the importance of an endotracheal tube-oropharynx-trachea axis below horizontal to avoid VAP. The prone position potentially increases drainage of oropharyngeal and airways secretions and recent evidence is supporting its beneficial effects. However, several associated adverse effects preclude its regular use as a VAP preventive strategy for patients other than those with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Body position greatly affects several pathogenetic mechanisms of VAP. The current evidence recommends avoidance of supine horizontal position in order to prevent aspiration of colonized gastric contents. The semirecumbent position has proven benefits and should be routinely used but there is still limited evidence to recommend the lowest orientation of the bed at which the patient can be safely maintained. Results from pioneering laboratory investigation call attention to new possible positions, that is lateral Trendelenburg position, aimed to avoid pulmonary aspiration and to enhance mucus clearance in intubated patients.

  19. Critical thinking: are the ideals of OBE failing us or are we failing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Critical thinking: are the ideals of OBE failing us or are we failing the ideals of OBE? K Lombard, M Grosser. Abstract. No Abstract. South African Journal of Education Vol. 28 (4) 2008: pp. 561-580. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  20. Underachievement, Failing Youth and Moral Panics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Emma

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers contemporary "moral panics" around the underachievement of boys in school examinations in the UK and America. In the UK, in particular, the underachievement of boys is central to current "crisis accounts" about falling standards and failing pupils. "Underachievement" is a familiar word to those…

  1. The Art of Saving a Failing School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Les

    2012-01-01

    While the debate continues over whether to close failing schools or attempt fixing them, the author asserts that the solution most often lies in assigning strong leaders to them who will take definite and immediate action. Reviewing his own success turning around schools, he says creating a sense of urgency, unloading poor performing staff, and…

  2. Merger incentives and the failing firm defense

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouckaert, J.M.C.; Kort, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    The merger incentives between profitable firms differ fundamentally from the incentives of a profitable firm to merge with a failing firm. We investigate these incentives under different modes of price competition and Cournot behavior. Our main finding is that firms strictly prefer exit of the

  3. Systems with randomly failing repairable components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Der Kiureghian, Armen; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Song, Junho

    2005-01-01

    Closed-form expressions are derived for the steady-state availability, mean rate of failure, mean duration of downtime and reliability of a general system with randomly and independently failing repairable components. Component failures are assumed to be homogeneous Poisson events in time and rep...

  4. Log-binomial models: exploring failed convergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Tyler; Eliasziw, Misha; Fick, Gordon Hilton

    2013-12-13

    Relative risk is a summary metric that is commonly used in epidemiological investigations. Increasingly, epidemiologists are using log-binomial models to study the impact of a set of predictor variables on a single binary outcome, as they naturally offer relative risks. However, standard statistical software may report failed convergence when attempting to fit log-binomial models in certain settings. The methods that have been proposed in the literature for dealing with failed convergence use approximate solutions to avoid the issue. This research looks directly at the log-likelihood function for the simplest log-binomial model where failed convergence has been observed, a model with a single linear predictor with three levels. The possible causes of failed convergence are explored and potential solutions are presented for some cases. Among the principal causes is a failure of the fitting algorithm to converge despite the log-likelihood function having a single finite maximum. Despite these limitations, log-binomial models are a viable option for epidemiologists wishing to describe the relationship between a set of predictors and a binary outcome where relative risk is the desired summary measure. Epidemiologists are encouraged to continue to use log-binomial models and advocate for improvements to the fitting algorithms to promote the widespread use of log-binomial models.

  5. I Failed the edTPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranishi, Adam; Oyler, Celia

    2017-01-01

    In this article, co-written by a teacher and a professor, the authors examine possible explanations for why Adam (first author), a New York City public school special educator, failed the edTPA, a teacher performance assessment required by all candidates for state certification. Adam completed a yearlong teaching residency where he was the special…

  6. Indoor Tanning Is Not Safe

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the sun is by using these tips for skin cancer prevention. Indoor tanning is not a safe way to get vitamin ... to previous findings on the association between indoor tanning and skin cancer. Only a small number of people reported ...

  7. Alcohol use and safe drinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001944.htm Alcohol use and safe drinking To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alcohol use involves drinking beer, wine, or hard liquor. ...

  8. Dukovany NPP - Safely 16 TERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlcek, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this presentation increasing of power output of the Dukovany NPP is reviewed. To operate all Dukovany Units safely with the perspective of long-term operation (LTO) of 50 - 60 years it is proposed.

  9. Safe drinking during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000060.htm Drinking water safely during cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. During and right after your cancer treatment, your body may not be able to protect ...

  10. Safe handling of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Nasir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail

    2004-01-01

    This chapter discussed the subjects related to the safe handling of radiation sources: type of radiation sources, method of use: transport within premises, transport outside premises; Disposal of Gamma Sources

  11. Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society guidelines for the management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation in obstetrics*

    OpenAIRE

    Mushambi, M C; Kinsella, S M; Popat, M; Swales, H; Ramaswamy, K K; Winton, A L; Quinn, A C

    2015-01-01

    The Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society have developed the first national obstetric guidelines for the safe management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation during general anaesthesia. They comprise four algorithms and two tables. A master algorithm provides an overview. Algorithm 1 gives a framework on how to optimise a safe general anaesthetic technique in the obstetric patient, and emphasises: planning and multidisciplinary communication; how to prevent ...

  12. Towards Safe Robotic Surgical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Christoffer; Wisniewski, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    a controller for motion compensation in beating-heart surgery, and prove that it is safe, i.e., the surgical tool is kept within an allowable distance and orientation of the heart. We solve the problem by simultaneously finding a control law and a barrier function. The motion compensation system is simulated...... from several initial conditions to demonstrate that the designed control system is safe for every admissible initial condition....

  13. Safe use of ionizing radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1973-01-01

    Based on the ''Code of Practice for the protection of persons against ionizing radiations arising from medical and dental use'' (CIS 74-423), this handbook shows how hospital staff can avoid exposing themselves and others to these hazards. It is designed particularly for junior and student nurses. Contents: ionizing radiations, their types and characteristics; their uses and dangers; basic principles in their safe use; safe use in practice; explanation of terms.

  14. Staying Safe in the Water

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-05-15

    In this podcast, Dr. Julie Gilchrist, a pediatrician and medical epidemiologist from CDC’s Injury Center, talks about staying safe in the water. Tips are for all audiences, with a focus on preventing drownings and keeping children safe in and around the pool, lake, or ocean.  Created: 5/15/2008 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 5/19/2008.

  15. Efficacy of pneumodilation in achalasia after failed Heller myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, C M G; Ponds, F A M; Schijven, M P; Smout, A J P M; Bredenoord, A J

    2016-11-01

    were treated successfully (median: 5.5; IQR: 2) treated (p = 0.009). Furthermore, baseline barium column height at 5 min was higher in patients with failed (median: 6 cm; IQR: 6 cm) treatment than in patients with successful (median: 2.6 cm; IQR: 4.7 cm) treatment (p = 0.016). Baseline lower esophageal sphincter pressure was not different between patients who were treated successfully (median: 11 mmHg; IQR: 5 mmHg) and those that failed on PD (median: 17.5 mmHg; IQR: 10.8 mmHg) treatment (p > 0.05). Baseline symptom pattern was also not a predictor of successful treatment. No adverse events were recorded during or after PD. Pneumodilation for recurrent symptoms after previous Heller myotomy is safe and has a modest success rate of 57%, using 30- and 35-mm balloons. Patients with recurrent symptoms after PD with 35-mm balloon are likely to also fail after subsequent dilation with a 40-mm balloon. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A method of failed fuel detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Utamura, Motoaki; Urata, Megumu.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To keep the coolant fed to a fuel assembly at a level below the temperature of existing coolant to detect a failed fuel with high accuracy without using a heater. Structure: When a coolant in a coolant pool disposed at the upper part of a reactor container is fed by a coolant feed system into a fuel assembly through a cap to fill therewith and exchange while forming a boundary layer between said coolant and the existing coolant, the temperature distribution of the feed coolant is heated by fuel rods so that the upper part is low whereas the lower part is high. Then, the lower coolant is upwardly moved by the agitating action and fission products leaked through a failed opening at the lower part of the fuel assembly and easily extracted by the sampling system. (Yoshino, Y.)

  17. Method for detecting a failed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Urata, Megumu; Uchida, Shunsuke.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a method for the detection of failed fuel by pouring hot water, in which pouring speed of liquid to be poured and temperature of the liquid are controlled to prevent the leakage of the liquid. Constitution: The method comprises blocking the top of a fuel assembly arranged in coolant to stop a flow of coolant, pouring a liquid higher in temperature than that of coolant into the fuel assembly, sampling the liquid poured, and measuring the concentration of radioactivity of coolant already subjected to sampling to detect a failed fuel. At this time, controlling is made so that the pouring speed of the poured liquid is set to about 25 l/min, and an increased portion of temperature from the temperature of liquid to the temperature of coolant is set to a level less than about 15 0 C. (Furukawa, Y.)

  18. Analysis of failed nuclear plant components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diercks, D. R.

    1993-12-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted analyses of failed components from nuclear power- gener-ating stations since 1974. The considerations involved in working with and analyzing radioactive compo-nents are reviewed here, and the decontamination of these components is discussed. Analyses of four failed components from nuclear plants are then described to illustrate the kinds of failures seen in serv-ice. The failures discussed are (1) intergranular stress- corrosion cracking of core spray injection piping in a boiling water reactor, (2) failure of canopy seal welds in adapter tube assemblies in the control rod drive head of a pressurized water reactor, (3) thermal fatigue of a recirculation pump shaft in a boiling water reactor, and (4) failure of pump seal wear rings by nickel leaching in a boiling water reactor.

  19. Analysis of failed nuclear plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted analyses of failed components from nuclear power-generating stations since 1974. The considerations involved in working with an analyzing radioactive components are reviewed here, and the decontamination of these components is discussed. Analyses of four failed components from nuclear plants are then described to illustrate the kinds of failures seen in service. The failures discussed are (1) intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of core spray injection piping in a boiling water reactor, (2) failure of canopy seal welds in adapter tube assemblies in the control rod drive head of a pressurized water reactor, (3) thermal fatigue of a recirculation pump shaft in a boiling water reactor, and (4) failure of pump seal wear rings by nickel leaching in a boiling water reactor

  20. Analysis of failed nuclear plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.

    1992-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted analyses of failed components from nuclear power generating stations since 1974. The considerations involved in working with and analyzing radioactive components are reviewed here, and the decontamination of these components is discussed. Analyses of four failed components from nuclear plants are then described to illustrate the kinds of failures seen in service. The failures discussed are (a) intergranular stress corrosion cracking of core spray injection piping in a boiling water reactor, (b) failure of canopy seal welds in adapter tube assemblies in the control rod drive head of a pressure water reactor, (c) thermal fatigue of a recirculation pump shaft in a boiling water reactor, and (d) failure of pump seal wear rings by nickel leaching in a boiling water reactor

  1. Interior's Climate Science Centers: Focus or Fail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udall, B.

    2012-12-01

    After a whirlwind two years of impressive and critical infrastructure building, the Department of Interior's Climate Science Centers are now in a position to either succeed or fail. The CSCs have a number of difficult structural problems including too many constituencies relative to the available resources, an uneasy relationship among many of the constituencies including the DOI agencies themselves, a need to do science in a new, difficult and non-traditional way, and a short timeframe to produce useful products. The CSCs have built a broad and impressive network of scientists and stakeholders. These entities include science providers of the universities and the USGS, and decision makers from the states, tribes, DOI land managers and other federal agencies and NGOs. Rather than try to support all of these constituencies the CSCs would be better served by refocusing on a core mission of supporting DOI climate related decision making. The CSCs were designed to service the climate science needs of DOI agencies, many of which lost their scientific capabilities in the 1990s due to a well-intentioned but ultimately harmful re-organization at DOI involving the now defunct National Biological Survey. Many of these agencies would like to have their own scientists, have an uneasy relationship with the nominal DOI science provider, the USGS, and don't communicate effectively among themselves. The CSCs must not succumb to pursuing science in either the traditional mode of the USGS or in the traditional mode of the universities, or worse, both of them. These scientific partners will need to be flexible, learn how to collaborate and should expect to see fewer resources. Useful CSC processes and outputs should start with the recommendations of the 2009 NRC Report Informing Decisions in a Changing Climate: (1) begin with users' needs; (2) give priority to process over products; (3) link information producers and users; (4) build connections across disciplines and organizations

  2. Laparoscopic revision of failed antireflux operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, F M; Bloomston, M; Zervos, E; Muench, J; Albrink, M H; Murr, M; Rosemurgy, A S

    2001-01-01

    A small number of patients fail fundoplication and require reoperation. Laparoscopic techniques have been applied to reoperative fundoplications. We reviewed our experience with reoperative laparoscopic fundoplication. Reoperative laparoscopic fundoplication was undertaken in 28 patients, 19 F and 9 M, of mean age 56 years +/- 12. Previous antireflux procedures included 19 open and 12 laparoscopic antireflux operations. Symptoms were heartburn (90%), dysphagia (35%), and atypical symptoms (30%%). The mean interval from antireflux procedure to revision was 13 months +/- 4.2. The mean DeMeester score was 78+/-32 (normal 14.7). Eighteen patients (64%) had hiatal breakdown, 17 (60%) had wrap failure, 2 (7%) had slipped Nissen, 3 (11%) had paraesophageal hernias, and 1 (3%) had an excessively tight wrap. Twenty-five revisions were completed laparoscopically, while 3 patients required conversion to the open technique. Complications occurred in 9 of 17 (53%) patients failing previous open fundoplications and in 4 of 12 patients (33%) failing previous laparoscopic fundoplications and included 15 gastrotomies and 1 esophagotomy, all repaired laparoscopically, 3 postoperative gastric leaks, and 4 pneumothoraces requiring tube thoracostomy. No deaths occurred. Median length of stay was 5 days (range 2-90 days). At a mean follow-up of 20 months +/- 17, 2 patients (7%) have failed revision of their fundoplications, with the rest of the patients being essentially asymptomatic (93%). The results achieved with reoperative laparoscopic fundoplication are similar to those of primary laparoscopic fundoplications. Laparoscopic reoperations, particularly of primary open fundoplication, can be technically challenging and fraught with complications. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  3. Inherently safe light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ise, Takeharu

    1987-01-01

    Today's large nuclear power reactors of world-wise use have been designed based on the philosophy. It seems that recent less electricity demand rates, higher capital cost and the TMI accident let us acknowledge relative small and simplified nuclear plants with safer features, and that Chernobyl accident in 1983 underlines the needs of intrinsic and passive safety characteristics. In such background, several inherently safe reactor concepts have been presented abroad and domestically. First describing 'Can inherently safe reactors be designed,' then I introduce representative reactor concepts of inherently safe LWRs advocated abroad so far. All of these innovative reactors employ intrinsic and passive features in their design, as follows: (1) PIUS, an acronym for Process Inherent Ultimate Safety, or an integral PWR with passive heat sink and passive shutdown mechanism, advocated by ASEA-ATOM of Sweden. (2) MAP(Minimum Attention Plant), or a self-pressurized, natural circulation integral PWR, promoted by CE Inc. of the U.S. (3) TPS(TRIGA Power System), or a compact PWR with passive heat sink and inherent fuel characteristics of large prompt temperature coefficient, prompted by GA Technologies Inc. of the U.S. (4) PIUS-BWR, or an inherently safe BWR employing passively actuated fluid valves, in competition with PIUS, prompted by ORNL of the U.S. Then, I will describe the domestic trends in Japan and the innovative inherently safe LWRs presented domestically so far. (author)

  4. Revision surgery for failed thermal capsulorrhaphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Bin; Yokota, Atsushi; Gill, Harpreet S; El Rassi, George; McFarland, Edward G

    2005-09-01

    With the failure of thermal capsulorrhaphy for shoulder instability, there have been concerns with capsular thinning and capsular necrosis affecting revision surgery. To report the findings at revision surgery for failed thermal capsulorrhaphy and to evaluate the technical effects on subsequent revision capsular plication. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Fourteen patients underwent arthroscopic evaluation and open reconstruction for a failed thermal capsulorrhaphy. The cause of the failure, the quality of the capsule, and the ability to suture the capsule were recorded. The patients were evaluated at follow-up for failure, which was defined as recurrent subluxations or dislocations. The origin of the instability was traumatic (n = 6) or atraumatic (n = 8). At revision surgery in the traumatic group, 4 patients sustained failure of the Bankart repair with capsular laxity, and the others experienced capsular laxity alone. In the atraumatic group, all patients experienced capsular laxity as the cause of failure. Of the 14 patients, the capsule quality was judged to be thin in 5 patients and ablated in 1 patient. A glenoid-based capsular shift could be accomplished in all 14 patients. At follow-up (mean, 35.4 months; range, 22 to 48 months), 1 patient underwent revision surgery and 1 patient had a subluxation, resulting in a failure rate of 14%. Recurrent capsular laxity after failed thermal capsular shrinkage is common and frequently associated with capsular thinning. In most instances, the capsule quality does not appear to technically affect the revision procedure.

  5. Clinical Outcomes Associated with a Failed Infant Car Seat Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Malika D; Dookeran, Keith A; Khan, Janine Y

    2017-01-01

    To assess comorbid conditions and clinical outcomes among late preterm and low birth weight term infants (Baby Unit. This was a retrospective chart review of consecutive infants who failed ICSC on the Mother-Baby Unit and were subsequently admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit at Prentice Women's Hospital between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2015. Regression models were used to estimate risk differences (RDs) with 95% CIs for factors related to length of stay. A total of 148 infants were studied (43% male; 37% delivered via cesarean). ICSC failure in the Mother-Baby Unit was due to desaturation, bradycardia, and tachypnea in 59%, 37%, and 4% of infants, respectively. During monitoring on the neonatal intensive care unit, 39% of infants experienced apnea (48% in preterm vs 17% in term infants) in the supine position, 19% received phototherapy, and 2% and 6.8% received nasogastric and thermoregulatory support, respectively. Univariate predictors of increased duration of stay (days) were younger gestational age, apnea, nasogastric support, intravenous fluids, and antibiotics (all P < .05). In multivariable analysis adjusted for gestational age and discharge weight, only apnea (RD, 4.87; 95% CI, 2.99-6.74; P < .001), administration of antibiotics (RD, 3.25; 95% CI, 0.29-6.21; P < .032), and intravenous fluid support (RD, 4.87; 95% CI, 0.076-9.66; P < .047) remained independent predictors of a longer duration of stay. Infants who failed ICSC were at risk for comorbid conditions that prolonged hospital stay beyond the neonatal intensive care unit observation period. Almost one-half of late preterm infants who failed ICSC had apnea events in the supine position. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Why did occidental modernity fail in the Arab Middle East: the failed modern state?

    OpenAIRE

    Sardar, Aziz

    2011-01-01

    This thesis asks a straightforward but nevertheless a complex question, that is: Why did modernity fail in the Arab Middle East? The notion of modernity in this thesis signifies the occidental modernity which reached the region in many different forms and through various channels. This occidental modernity had an impact on many areas and changed the societies and politics of the region. But these changes stopped short of reaching modernity, in other words it failed to change the society from ...

  7. Prospects for inherently safe reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkenbus, J.N.

    1988-01-01

    Public fears over nuclear safety have led some within the nuclear community to investigate the possibility of producing inherently safe nuclear reactors; that is, reactors that are transparently incapable of producing a core melt. While several promising designs of such reactors have been produced, support for large-scale research and development efforts has not been forthcoming. The prospects for commercialization of inherently safe reactors, therefore, are problematic; possible events such as further nuclear reactor accidents and superpower summits, could alter the present situation significantly. (author)

  8. Is nuclear power safe enough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andresen, A F [Institutt for Atomenergi, Kjeller (Norway)

    1979-01-01

    The lecture formed a commentary on the report of the Norwegian Government's Commission on Nuclear power Safety which was published in October 1978. It was introductorily pointed out that 'safe' and 'safety' are not in themselves meaningful terms and that the probability of an occurrence is the real measure. The main items in the Commission's report have been core meltdown, releases during reprocessing, waste disposal, plutonium diversion and environmental impacts. The 21 members of the Commission were unanimous in 7 of the 8 chapters. In chapter 2, 'Summary and Conclusions', 3 members dissented from the majority opinion, that, subject to certain conditions, nuclear power was a safe and acceptable source of energy.

  9. Safe and Liquid Mortgage Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Jens; Gyntelberg, Jacob; Lund, Jesper

    This paper shows that strict match pass-through funding of covered bonds provides safe and liquid mortgage bonds. Despite a 30% drop in house prices during the 2008 global crisis Danish mortgage bonds remained as liquid as most European government bonds. The Danish pass-through system effectively...... eliminates credit risk from the investor's perspective. Similar to other safe bonds, funding liquidity becomes the main driver of mortgage bond liquidity and this creates commonality in liquidity across markets and countries. These findings have implications for how to design a robust mortgage bond system...

  10. SafeNet: a methodology for integrating general-purpose unsafe devices in safe-robot rehabilitation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicentini, Federico; Pedrocchi, Nicola; Malosio, Matteo; Molinari Tosatti, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    Robot-assisted neurorehabilitation often involves networked systems of sensors ("sensory rooms") and powerful devices in physical interaction with weak users. Safety is unquestionably a primary concern. Some lightweight robot platforms and devices designed on purpose include safety properties using redundant sensors or intrinsic safety design (e.g. compliance and backdrivability, limited exchange of energy). Nonetheless, the entire "sensory room" shall be required to be fail-safe and safely monitored as a system at large. Yet, sensor capabilities and control algorithms used in functional therapies require, in general, frequent updates or re-configurations, making a safety-grade release of such devices hardly sustainable in cost-effectiveness and development time. As such, promising integrated platforms for human-in-the-loop therapies could not find clinical application and manufacturing support because of lacking in the maintenance of global fail-safe properties. Under the general context of cross-machinery safety standards, the paper presents a methodology called SafeNet for helping in extending the safety rate of Human Robot Interaction (HRI) systems using unsafe components, including sensors and controllers. SafeNet considers, in fact, the robotic system as a device at large and applies the principles of functional safety (as in ISO 13489-1) through a set of architectural procedures and implementation rules. The enabled capability of monitoring a network of unsafe devices through redundant computational nodes, allows the usage of any custom sensors and algorithms, usually planned and assembled at therapy planning-time rather than at platform design-time. A case study is presented with an actual implementation of the proposed methodology. A specific architectural solution is applied to an example of robot-assisted upper-limb rehabilitation with online motion tracking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Safe-haven CDS Premia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingler, Sven; Lando, David

    We argue that Credit Default Swap (CDS) premia for safe-haven sovereigns, like Germany and the United States, are driven to a large extent by regulatory requirements under which derivatives dealing banks have an incentive to buy CDS to hedge counterparty credit risk of their counterparties. We...

  12. Thermodynamics of asymptotically safe theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rischke, Dirk H.; Sannino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic properties of a novel class of gauge-Yukawa theories that have recently been shown to be completely asymptotically safe, because their short-distance behaviour is determined by the presence of an interacting fixed point. Not only do all the coupling constants freeze...

  13. How Safe Are Our Libraries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Lifer, Evan

    1994-01-01

    Addresses issues of safety and security in libraries. Topics discussed include keeping library collections safe; patron behavioral problems; factoring loss into the budget; staff theft; access versus security; apathy regarding library crime; a need for a unified security apparatus; preventive measures; staff and patron safety; and a…

  14. Safe disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooker, P.; Metcalfe, R.; Milodowski, T.; Holliday, D.

    1997-01-01

    A high degree of international cooperation has characterized the two studies reported here which aim to address whether radioactive waste can be disposed of safely. Using hydrogeochemical and mineralogical surveying techniques earth scientists from the British Geological Survey have sought to identify and characterise suitable disposal sites. Aspects of the studies are explored emphasising their cooperative nature. (UK)

  15. Staying Safe on the Water

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-06-05

    In this podcast for all audiences, Dr. Julie Gilchrist from CDC's Injury Center outlines tips for safe boating.  Created: 6/5/2008 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 6/8/2008.

  16. Safe transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Delivering radioactive material to where it is needed is a vital service to industry and medicine. Millions of packages are shipped all over the world by all modes of transport. The shipments pass through public places and must meet stringent safety requirements. This video explains how radioactive material is safely transported and describes the rules that carriers and handlers must follow

  17. Working safely with ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    A small leaflet provides information on working safely with ionizing radiation. Topics covered include the types of radiation, radiological units, external radiation, contamination and internal radiation, methods of protection form radiation, radiation monitors, protective clothing for contamination, personal dosemeters, radiation dose limits for classified workers and finally the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985. (UK)

  18. Radiological evaluation of failed total hip replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raspa, V.; Aldrovandi, S.; Pompei, G.

    1988-01-01

    The retrospective study of 50 operated cases of cemented total hip replacement and a review of the literature enabled the authors to define the radiological features of the above-mentioned condition. These features include one or more of the following signs: calcar reabsorption, lacunar erosions, modified relatioships between the prosthesis components, sepsis and loosening, periarticular calcifications dislocation and fracture of prosthesis components. Careful evaluation of these radiological features is extremely important for both an early diagnosis of failed total hip replacement and the choice of an adequate surgical treatment

  19. Why Do Large Infrastructure Projects Often Fail?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lando, Henrik

    The paper reports, in a systematic manner, the views of a group of experienced practitioners on why large infrastructure projects often fail. The views, centering on the role played by the Owner (the Client or Buyer), can be summarized as follows:The owner should be aware of the need of clarity...... when it comes to own priorities, requirements, decision making authority, and risk allocation, and such clarity together with measures intended to secure a cooperative spirit, including a balanced sharing of risk and conflict resolution schemes that secure a quick resolution of conflicts, are central...... elements in securing successful projects....

  20. The Failed Image and the Possessed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Christian

    2015-01-01

    This article asks if the recurrent queries regarding the value of images in visual anthropology could find new answers by exploring responses to visual media in neo-orthodox Islam. It proposes that the visual display of the photographic image shares a curious resemblance to the bodies of people...... possessed by invisible spirits called jinn. The image as a failed example or model of reality works like the possessed body as an amplifier of invisibility pointing towards that which cannot be seen, depicted visually, or represented in writing. This suggests a negative epistemology in which images obtain...

  1. Investigating the Mediator role of Social Safeness on the Relationship between Forgiveness and Life Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umran Akin

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to examine the mediating effect of social safeness on the relationship between forgiveness and life satisfaction. Participants were 311 university students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Trait Forgiveness Scale, the Social Safeness and Pleasure Scale, and the Life Satisfaction Scale. According to the results, social safeness and life satisfaction were predicted positively by forgiveness. On the other hand, life satisfaction was predicted positively by social safeness. In addition, social safeness mediated on the relationship between forgiveness and life satisfaction. The results were discussed in the light of the related literature and dependent recommendations to the area were given.

  2. Patients with a failed renal transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcén, R; Teruel Briones, J L

    2011-03-01

    Despite the advances in the care of recipients and in immunosuppression, long-term graft survival has experienced little improvement in the last 10 years. An important number of recipients present progressive loss of graft function and have to be readmitted on dialysis therapy. Before starting dialysis, these patients are re-exposed to the complications of chronic renal failure but there are no specific guidelines for their treatment. The Kidney Disease Quality Initiative Advisory Board clinical practice guidelines given for the non-transplant chronic kidney disease patients have been recommended for ameliorating their clinical situation and the rate of progression of graft failure. The time when dialysis has to be restarted and the type of dialysis procedure, hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, are under discusion. But there is no evidence about the superiority of either type of dialysis procedure. Systematic graft nephrectomy has been considered to improve the inflammatory status of the patients with a failed graft which could contribute to a worse control of some complications such as anemia and to the increased rates of cardiovascular mortality. As in the patients with primary end-stage renal disease, retransplantation is the best treatment for a patient with a failed graft. Due to the shortage of organs for transplantation the number of patients who are retransplanted has remained stable. Recurrent diseases such as glomerulonephritis, lyphoproliferative diseases, BK virus nephopathy and previous non-adherence to the treatment do not necessarily preclude retransplantation.

  3. To fail is human: remediating remediation in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalet, Adina; Chou, Calvin L; Ellaway, Rachel H

    2017-12-01

    Remediating failing medical learners has traditionally been a craft activity responding to individual learner and remediator circumstances. Although there have been moves towards more systematic approaches to remediation (at least at the institutional level), these changes have tended to focus on due process and defensibility rather than on educational principles. As remediation practice evolves, there is a growing need for common theoretical and systems-based perspectives to guide this work. This paper steps back from the practicalities of remediation practice to take a critical systems perspective on remediation in contemporary medical education. In doing so, the authors acknowledge the complex interactions between institutional, professional, and societal forces that are both facilitators of and barriers to effective remediation practices. The authors propose a model that situates remediation within the contexts of society as a whole, the medical profession, and medical education institutions. They also outline a number of recommendations to constructively align remediation principles and practices, support a continuum of remediation practices, destigmatize remediation, and develop institutional communities of practice in remediation. Medical educators must embrace a responsible and accountable systems-level approach to remediation if they are to meet their obligations to provide a safe and effective physician workforce.

  4. Ensuring a Safe Technological Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    much lower, and the performance gained can dramatically reduce life -cycle costs. Validated cost data are scarce, and accurate AM cost models need to be...reduce costs, minimize obsolescence issues and improve both capability and readi- ness across the entire life cycle of naval systems—including both the...of naval weapon systems. The Navy is actively engaging its various communi- ties to align needs and ensure that AM can be safely acceler- ated and

  5. Transfer pricing and safe harbours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Solilová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfer prices are significant for both taxpayers and tax administrations because they determine in large part taxable profits of associated enterprises in different tax jurisdictions. Moreover, in the context of taxation, transfer prices must be complied with the arm’s length principle. However, Multinational Enterprises have been faced daily by conflicting rules and approaches to applying the arm’s length principle, burdensome documentation requirements, inconsistent audit standards and unpredictable competent authority outcomes. Therefore, the Committee on Fiscal Affairs launched another project on the administrative aspects of transfer pricing in 2010. On 16 May 2013 as a partial solution of this project was approved by the OECD Council the Revised Section E on Safe Harbours in Chapter IV of the Transfer Pricing Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises and Tax Authorities. The paper is focused on significant changes of newly approved chapter IV of the Transfer Pricing Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises and Tax Authorities, further on analysis of practice in this area, on advantages and disadvantages of safe harbours for taxpayers and competent authorities with aim to suggest recommendations on use of safe harbours in the Czech Republic.

  6. Very Preterm Infants Failing CPAP Show Signs of Fatigue Immediately after Birth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L Siew

    Full Text Available To investigate the differences in breathing pattern and effort in infants at birth who failed or succeeded on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP during the first 48 hours after birth.Respiratory function recordings of 32 preterm infants were reviewed of which 15 infants with a gestational age of 28.6 (0.7 weeks failed CPAP and 17 infants with a GA of 30.1 (0.4 weeks did not fail CPAP. Frequency, duration and tidal volumes (VT of expiratory holds (EHs, peak inspiratory flows, CPAP-level and FiO2-levels were analysed.EH incidence increased 9 ml/kg with higher peak inspiratory flows than CPAP-fail infants (71.8 ± 15.8 vs. 15.5 ± 5.2 ml/kg.s, p <0.05. CPAP-fail infants required higher FiO2 (0.31 ± 0.03 vs. 0.21 ± 0.01, higher CPAP pressures (6.62 ± 0.3 vs. 5.67 ± 0.26 cmH2O and more positive pressure-delivered breaths (45 ± 12 vs. 19 ± 9% (p <0.05.At 9-12 minutes after birth, CPAP-fail infants more commonly used lower VTs and required higher peak inspiratory flow rates while receiving greater respiratory support. VT was less variable and larger VT was infrequently used reflecting early signs of fatigue.

  7. Intranasal Oxytocin Failed to Affect Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) Social Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, Sarah E.; Burke, Kimberly; de Waal, Frans B. M.

    2017-01-01

    Oxytocin has been suggested as a treatment to promote positive social interactions in people with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). However, it is difficult to test this effect outside of the laboratory in realistic social situations. One way to resolve this issue is to study behavioral changes in closely related species with complex social relationships, such as chimpanzees. Here, we use captive, socially housed chimpanzees to evaluate the effects of oxytocin in a socially complex environment. After administering intranasal oxytocin or a placebo to an individual chimpanzee (total n = 8), she was returned to her social group. An experimenter blind to the condition measured the subject's social behavior. We failed to find a behavioral difference between conditions. As one of the goals for oxytocin administration as a treatment for ASD is increasing prosocial behaviors during ‘real world’ encounters, it is problematic that we failed to detect behavioral changes in our closest living relatives. However, our null findings may be related to methodological challenges such as determining an effective dose of oxytocin for chimpanzees and how long oxytocin takes to cross the blood-brain barrier. Thus, more research on intranasal oxytocin dosing and uptake are needed to continue exploring whether oxytocin changes social behavior in naturalistic settings and as a treatment for ASD. PMID:28845444

  8. Detection method of a failed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu; Uchida, Shunsuke; Utamura, Motoaki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To divide a tank arrangement into a heating tank for the exclusive use of heating and a mixing tank for the exclusive use of mixing to thereby minimize the purifying amount of reactor water pumped from the interior of reactor and to considerably minimize the capacity of a purifier. Structure: In a detection method of a failed fuel comprising stopping a flow of coolant within fuel assemblies arranged in the coolant in a reactor container, sampling said coolant within the fuel assemblies, and detecting a radioactivity level of sampling liquid, the improvement of the method comprising the steps of heating a part of said coolant removed from the interior of said reactor container, mixing said heated coolant into the remainder of said removed coolant, pouring said mixed liquid into said fuel assemblies, and after a lapse of given time, sampling the liquid poured into said fuel assemblies. (Kawakami, Y.)

  9. Analysis of Methods of Determining the Safe Ship Trajectory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Lisowski

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes six methods of optimal and game theory and artificial neural network for synthesis of safe control in collision situations at sea. The application of optimal and game control algorithms to determine the own ship safe trajectory during the passing of other encountered ships in good and restricted visibility at sea is presented. The comparison of the safe ship control in collision situation: multi-step matrix non-cooperative and cooperative games, multi-stage positional non-cooperative and cooperative games have been introduced. The considerations have been illustrated with examples of computer simulation of the algorithms to determine safe of own ship trajectories in a navigational situation during passing of eight met ships.

  10. Failed rib region prediction in a human body model during crash events with precrash braking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guleyupoglu, B; Koya, B; Barnard, R; Gayzik, F S

    2018-02-28

    The objective of this study is 2-fold. We used a validated human body finite element model to study the predicted chest injury (focusing on rib fracture as a function of element strain) based on varying levels of simulated precrash braking. Furthermore, we compare deterministic and probabilistic methods of rib injury prediction in the computational model. The Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) M50-O model was gravity settled in the driver position of a generic interior equipped with an advanced 3-point belt and airbag. Twelve cases were investigated with permutations for failure, precrash braking system, and crash severity. The severities used were median (17 kph), severe (34 kph), and New Car Assessment Program (NCAP; 56.4 kph). Cases with failure enabled removed rib cortical bone elements once 1.8% effective plastic strain was exceeded. Alternatively, a probabilistic framework found in the literature was used to predict rib failure. Both the probabilistic and deterministic methods take into consideration location (anterior, lateral, and posterior). The deterministic method is based on a rubric that defines failed rib regions dependent on a threshold for contiguous failed elements. The probabilistic method depends on age-based strain and failure functions. Kinematics between both methods were similar (peak max deviation: ΔX head = 17 mm; ΔZ head = 4 mm; ΔX thorax = 5 mm; ΔZ thorax = 1 mm). Seat belt forces at the time of probabilistic failed region initiation were lower than those at deterministic failed region initiation. The probabilistic method for rib fracture predicted more failed regions in the rib (an analog for fracture) than the deterministic method in all but 1 case where they were equal. The failed region patterns between models are similar; however, there are differences that arise due to stress reduced from element elimination that cause probabilistic failed regions to continue to rise after no deterministic failed region would be

  11. Failed pelvic pouch substituted by continent ileostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasmuth, H H; Tranø, G; Wibe, A; Endreseth, B H; Rydning, A; Myrvold, H E

    2010-07-01

    The long-term failure rate of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) is 10-15%. When salvage surgery is unsuccessful, most surgeons prefer pouch excision with conventional ileostomy, thus sacrificing 40-50 cm of ileum. Conversion of a pelvic pouch to a continent ileostomy (CI, Kock pouch) is an alternative that preserves both the ileal surface and pouch properties. The aim of the study was to evaluate clinical outcome after the construction of a CI following a failed IPAA. During 1984-2007, 317 patients were operated with IPAA at St Olavs Hospital and evaluated for failure, treatment and outcome. Seven patients with IPAA failure had CI. Four patients with IPAA failure referred from other hospitals underwent conversion to CI and are included in the final analysis. Seven patients had a CI constructed from the transposing pelvic pouch and four had the pelvic pouch removed and a new continent pouch constructed from the distal ileum. Median follow up after conversion to CI was 7 years (0-17 years). Two CI had to be removed due to fistulae. One patient needed a revision of the nipple valve due to pouch loosening. At the end of follow-up, 8 of the 11 patients were fully continent. One patient with Crohn's disease had minor leakage. In patients with pelvic pouch failure, the possibility of conversion to CI should be presented to the patient as an alternative to pouch excision and permanent ileostomy. The advantage is the continence and possibly a better body image. Construction of a CI on a new ileal segment may be considered, but the consequences of additional small bowel loss and risk of malnutrition if the Kock pouch fails should be appraised.

  12. Abnormal mitochondrial respiration in failed human myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharov, V G; Todor, A V; Silverman, N; Goldstein, S; Sabbah, H N

    2000-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is associated with morphologic abnormalities of cardiac mitochondria including hyperplasia, reduced organelle size and compromised structural integrity. In this study, we examined whether functional abnormalities of mitochondrial respiration are also present in myocardium of patients with advanced HF. Mitochondrial respiration was examined using a Clark electrode in an oxygraph cell containing saponin-skinned muscle bundles obtained from myocardium of failed explanted human hearts due to ischemic (ICM, n=9) or idiopathic dilated (IDC, n=9) cardiomyopathy. Myocardial specimens from five normal donor hearts served as controls (CON). Basal respiratory rate, respiratory rate after addition of the substrates glutamate and malate (V(SUB)), state 3 respiration (after addition of ADP, V(ADP)) and respiration after the addition of atractyloside (V(AT)) were measured in scar-free muscle bundles obtained from the subendocardial (ENDO) and subepicardial (EPI) thirds of the left ventricular (LV) free wall, interventricular septum and right ventricular (RV) free wall. There were no differences in basal and substrate-supported respiration between CON and HF regardless of etiology. V(ADP)was significantly depressed both in ICM and IDC compared to CON in all the regions studied. The respiratory control ratio, V(ADP)/V(AT), was also significantly decreased in HF compared to CON. In both ICM and IDC, V(ADP)was significantly lower in ENDO compared to EPI. The results indicate that mitochondrial respiration is abnormal in the failing human heart. The findings support the concept of low myocardial energy production in HF via oxidative phosphorylation, an abnormality with a potentially impact on global cardiac performance. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  13. Etiologic analysis of 100 anatomically failed dacryocystorhinostomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Tarjani Vivek; Mohammed, Faraz Ali; Ali, Mohammad Javed; Naik, Milind N

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the etiological factors contributing to the failure of a dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR). Patients and methods Retrospective review was performed in 100 consecutive patients who were diagnosed with anatomically failed DCR at presentation to a tertiary care hospital over a 5-year period from 2010 to 2015. Patient records were reviewed for demographic data, type of past surgery, preoperative endoscopic findings, previous use of adjuvants such as intubation and mitomycin C, and intraoperative notes during the re-revision. The potential etiological factors for failure were noted. Results Of the 100 patients with failed DCRs, the primary surgery was an external DCR in 73 and endoscopic DCR in 27 patients. Six patients in each group had multiple revisions. The mean ages at presentation in the external and endoscopic groups were 39.41 years and 37.19 years, respectively. All patients presented with epiphora. The most common causes of failure were inadequate osteotomy (69.8% in the external group and 85.1% in the endoscopic group, P=0.19) followed by inadequate or inappropriate sac marsupialization (60.2% in the external group and 77.7% in the endoscopic group, P=0.16) and cicatricial closure of the ostium (50.6% in the external group and 55.5% in the endoscopic group, P=0.83). The least common causes such as ostium granulomas and paradoxical middle turbinate (1.37%, n=1) were noted in the external group only. Conclusion Inadequate osteotomy, incomplete sac marsupialization, and cicatricial closure of the ostium were the most common causes of failure and did not significantly differ in the external and endoscopic groups. Meticulous evaluation to identify causative factors for failure and addressing them are crucial for subsequent successful outcomes. PMID:27555748

  14. Very Preterm Infants Failing CPAP Show Signs of Fatigue Immediately after Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Melissa L.; van Vonderen, Jeroen J.; Hooper, Stuart B.; te Pas, Arjan B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the differences in breathing pattern and effort in infants at birth who failed or succeeded on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) during the first 48 hours after birth. Methods Respiratory function recordings of 32 preterm infants were reviewed of which 15 infants with a gestational age of 28.6 (0.7) weeks failed CPAP and 17 infants with a GA of 30.1 (0.4) weeks did not fail CPAP. Frequency, duration and tidal volumes (VT) of expiratory holds (EHs), peak inspiratory flows, CPAP-level and FiO2-levels were analysed. Results EH incidence increased CPAP-fail and CPAP-success infants. At 9-12 minutes, CPAP-fail infants more frequently used smaller VTs, 0-9 ml/kg and required higher peak inspiratory flows. However, CPAP-success infants often used large VTs (>9 ml/kg) with higher peak inspiratory flows than CPAP-fail infants (71.8 ± 15.8 vs. 15.5 ± 5.2 ml/kg.s, p CPAP-fail infants required higher FiO2 (0.31 ± 0.03 vs. 0.21 ± 0.01), higher CPAP pressures (6.62 ± 0.3 vs. 5.67 ± 0.26 cmH2O) and more positive pressure-delivered breaths (45 ± 12 vs. 19 ± 9%) (p CPAP-fail infants more commonly used lower VTs and required higher peak inspiratory flow rates while receiving greater respiratory support. VT was less variable and larger VT was infrequently used reflecting early signs of fatigue. PMID:26052947

  15. Closed External Fixation for Failing or Failed Femoral Shaft Plating in a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbar, Adil; Witwit, Ibrahim; Al-Algawy, Alaa A Hussein

    2017-08-01

    Femoral shaft fractures are one of the common injuries that is treated by open reduction, with internal fixation by plate and screws or intramedullary nailing, which can achieve a high union rate. To evaluate the outcome of using closed external fixation to augment a failing plate; with signs of screw loosening and increasing bone/plate gap; a failed plate; broken plate; screws completely out of bone with redisplacement of fracture. A retrospective study on 18 patients, aged between 17-42 years, who presented between 6-18 weeks after initial surgical fixation, with pain, difficulty in limb function, deformity and abnormal movement at fracture site, was done. X-Rays showed plating failure with acceptable amount of callus, which unfortunately had refractured. Cases associated with infection and no radiological evidence of callus formation were excluded from this study. Closed reduction was done by manipulation, then fracture fixation by AO external fixator. The patients were encouraged for full weight bearing as early as possible with dynamization later on. Of the 18 patients who underwent external fixation after close reduction, 15 cases showed bone healing in a period between 11-18 weeks (mean of 14.27 weeks) with good alignment (Radiologically). Removal of external fixator was done followed by physical therapy thereafter. Closed external fixation for treatment of failing or failed femoral plating, achieves good success rate and has less complications, is a short time procedure, especially in a hospital with limited resources.

  16. Small intrinsically safe reactor implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Hiroaki

    1985-01-01

    Reviewing the history of nuclear power, it is found that peaceful uses of nuclear power are children of the war-like atom. Importance of special growth in a shielded environment is emphasized to exploit fully the advantages of nuclear power. Nuclear power reactors must be safe for their assimilation into society from the points of view of both technology and social psychology. ISR/ISER is identified as a missing link in the development of nuclear power reactors from this perspective and advocated for international development and utilization, being unleashed from the concerns of politicization, safety, and proliferation

  17. Mifrenz: Safe email for children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Hunt

    Full Text Available Products currently available for monitoring children\\'s email usage are either considered to encourage dubious ethical behaviour or are time consuming for parents to administer. This paper describes the development of a new email client application for children called Mifrenz. This new application gives parents the ability to let their children safely use email, with the minimum of intervention. It was developed using mostly free software and also with the desire to provide real first hand programming examples to demonstrate to students.

  18. Type-safe pattern combinators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhiger, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Macros still haven't made their way into typed higher-order programming languages such as Haskell and Standard ML. Therefore, to extend the expressiveness of Haskell or Standard ML, one must express new linguistic features in terms of functions that fit within the static type systems of these lan...... of these languages. This is particularly challenging when introducing features that span across multiple types and that bind variables. We address this challenge by developing, in a step by step manner, mechanisms for encoding patterns and pattern matching in Haskell in a type-safe way....

  19. 7 CFR 983.52 - Failed lots/rework procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Failed lots/rework procedure. 983.52 Section 983.52..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.52 Failed lots/rework procedure. (a) Substandard pistachios... committee may establish, with the Secretary's approval, appropriate rework procedures. (b) Failed lot...

  20. 77 FR 9846 - Source of Income From Qualified Fails Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... temporary regulations noted that no trading practice existed at that time for fails charges on securities other than Treasuries, but that if a fails charge trading practice pertaining to other securities was... sources within the United States, and the income from the qualified fails charge is treated as effectively...

  1. Fail-safe computer-aided operations control system for the transrapid maglev high-speed railway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkert, S [Siemens AG, Braunschweig (Germany); Eilers, H [Siemens AG, Braunschweig (Germany); Freitag, V [Siemens AG, Braunschweig (Germany); Knigge, R [Siemens AG, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    The wide variety of control and safety functions for the Transrapid need to be interlinked in the operations control system. These functions are grouped according to their main focus and located in the subsystems `operations control centre`, `decentralised operations control system` and `on-board operations control system`. The paper describes the operations control system OCS. (HW)

  2. Need for Robust Sensors for Inherently Fail-Safe Gas Turbine Engine Controls, Monitoring, and Prognostics (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Behbahani, Alireza R

    2006-01-01

    Sensor reliability is critical to turbine engine control. Today's aircraft engines demand more sophisticated sensors in the control systems, requiring advanced engine testing for component performance demonstration...

  3. Fail-Safe, Controllable Liquid Spring/Damper System for Improved Rover Space Vehicle Mobility, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is planning to return to the moon in 2020 to explore thousands of miles of the moon?s surface with individual missions, lasting six months or longer. Surface...

  4. Experiences from start-up and use of fail-safe reactor level meter with KNITU probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badiar, S.; Sipka, J.; Vanco, P.; Slanina, Marek; Liska, L.; Gavora, D.

    2001-01-01

    Within the framework of the reconstruction of both V1 Bohunice units with WWER-440/V-230 reactors, the VUJE-SIEMENS consortium implemented measurement systems for coolant level monitoring in reactor pressure vessels with 1E qualification, resp. with the qualification of category 1 according to NUSS RG1.97. The solution uses KNITU 11 probes made by Russian POZIT company. In operating plants, the installation causes problems in relation to the existing technology and quality assurance system. In the phase of implementation, the most important tasks were to resolve component quality, to commission the system, and to check its performance. (Authors)

  5. The Effect of Dexmedetomidine on Lumbar Epidural Injection for Failed Back Surgery Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Eskandr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Failed back surgery syndrome is a chronic pain condition requiring rapid, effective, and efficient management. This study evaluates the effect of adding dexmedetomidine to lumbar epidural steroids in patients with failed back surgery syndrome. Methods. Fifty patients suffering from failed back surgery syndrome were randomly assigned to one of two groups, receiving an epidural injection of 20 mL of either a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg and bupivacaine 0.5 mg (group C or a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg, bupivacaine 0.5 mg, and dexmedetomidine (0.5 μg/kg (group D adjusted to the volume with normal saline. The effect was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS, analgesic requirement, and Oswestry disability index 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks after injection. Results. VAS and ibuprofen consumption showed a significant reduction in group D. The Oswestry disability index was significantly improved in group D. There were no records of hypotension, bradycardia, sedation, or hypoxemia in both groups. Conclusion. The present study demonstrated potential safe and effective usage of adding dexmedetomidine to epidural steroid to control pain in patients with failed back surgery syndrome.

  6. Safe transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Recently the Agency redefined its policy for education and training in radiation safety. The emphasis is now on long-term strategic planning of general education and training programmes. In line with this general policy the Agency's Standing Advisory Group for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (SAGSTRAM) in its 7th meeting (April 1989) agreed that increased training activity should be deployed in the area of transport. SAGSTRAM specifically recommended the development of a standard training programme on this subject area, including audio-visual aids, in order to assist Member States in the implementation of the Agency's Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. This training programme should be substantiated by a biennial training course which is thought to be held either as an Interregional or a Regional Course depending on demand. This training manual, issued as a first publication in the Training Course Series, represents the basic text material for future training courses in transport safety. The topic areas covered by this training manual and most of the texts have been developed from the course material used for the 1987 Bristol Interregional Course on Transport Safety. The training manual is intended to give guidance to the lecturers of a course and will be provided to the participants for retention. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Safe Driving After Propofol Sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerlin-Grady, Lee; Austin, Paul N; Gabaldon, Dion A

    2017-10-01

    Propofol is a short-acting medication with fast cognitive and psychomotor recovery. However, patients are usually instructed not to drive a motor vehicle for 24 hours after receiving propofol. The purpose of this article was to review the evidence examining when it is safe to drive after receiving propofol for sedation for diagnostic and surgical procedures. This is a systematic review of the literature. A search of the literature was conducted using Google Scholar, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library for the time period 1990 to 2015. Two randomized controlled trials and two observational studies met the inclusion criteria. Using a simulator, investigators examined driving ability of subjects who received modest doses (about 100 mg) of propofol for endoscopic procedures and surveyed subjects who drove immediately after discharge. There were methodological concerns with the studies such as small sample sizes, modest doses of propofol, and three of the four studies were done in Japan by the same group of investigators limiting generalizability. This limited research suggests that it may be safe for patients to drive sooner than 24 hours after receiving propofol. However, large multicenter trials using heterogenous samples using a range of propofol doses are needed to support an evidence-based revision to the current discharge guidelines for patients receiving propofol. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Keeping you safe by making machine tools safe

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    CERN’s third safety objective for 2012 concerns the safety of equipment - and machine tools in particular.   There are three prerequisites for ensuring that a machine tool can be used safely: ·      the machine tool must comply with Directive 2009/104/EC, ·      the layout of the workshop must be compliant, and ·      everyone who uses the machine tool must be trained. Provided these conditions are met, the workshop head can grant authorisation to use the machine tool. To fulfil this objective, an inventory of the machine tools must be drawn up and the people responsible for them identified. The HSE Unit's Safety Inspection Service produces compliance reports for the machine tools. In order to meet the third objective set by the Director-General, the section has doubled its capacity to carry out inspections: ...

  9. Outcomes of reintervention after failed urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerhult, Teresa Olsen; Lindqvist, Klas; Peeker, Ralph; Grenabo, Lars

    2017-02-01

    Urethroplasty is a procedure that has a high success rate. However, there exists a small subgroup of patients who require multiple procedures to achieve an acceptable result. This study analyses the outcomes of a series of patients with failed urethroplasty. This is a retrospective review of 82 failures out of 407 patients who underwent urethroplasty due to urethral stricture during the period 1999-2013. Failure was defined as the need for an additional surgical procedure. Of the failures, 26 patients had penile strictures and 56 had bulbar strictures. Meatal strictures were not included. The redo procedures included one or multiple direct vision internal urethrotomies, dilatations or new urethroplasties, all with a long follow-up time. The patients underwent one to seven redo surgeries (mean 2.4 procedures per patient). In the present series of patients, endourological procedures cured 34% (28/82) of the patients. Ten patients underwent multiple redo urethroplasties until a satisfactory outcome was achieved; the penile strictures were the most difficult to cure. In patients with bulbar strictures, excision with anastomosis and substitution urethroplasty were equally successful. Nevertheless, 18 patients were defined as treatment failures. Of these patients, nine ended up with clean intermittent self-dilatation as a final solution, five had perineal urethrostomy and four are awaiting a new reintervention. Complicated cases need centralized professional care. Despite the possibility of needing multiple reinterventions, the majority of patients undergoing urethroplasty have a good chance of successful treatment.

  10. Why SDI failed: A different perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codevilla, A.

    1990-01-01

    Conventional wisdom is wrong. SDI did not fail simply because science could not supply the means to build an anti-missile shield. Rather, it floundered on a combination of unsatisfiable technical requirements and technical boondoggles, charges the author. Rather than building on current technology and doing what could be done with what was at hand, those who shaped SDI policy - both military and civilian - insisted on virtually starting over. He also charges they were either passionately against building anti-missile weapons or lacking in intellectual self-confidence and interest with regard to the subject. Work on using modern optics and computers for anti-missile purposes began in the late 1970s, and the technology already was in use in intelligence satellites - a fact either unknown or ignored by most SDI officials. As a result of the conflicting interests among officials and the organizational structure they put into place, the author says the SDI program could not possibly develop any weapon, even if the people involved wanted to, which they did not

  11. The British Model in Britain: Failing slowly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Steve

    2006-01-01

    In 1990, Britain reorganised its electricity industry to run on competitive lines. The British reforms are widely regarded as successful and the model used provides the basis for reforms of electricity industries worldwide. The main reason for this perception of success is major reductions in the real price of electricity with no reduction in service quality. This paper examines whether the reputation of the British reforms is justified. It concludes that the reputation is not justified and that serious fundamental problems are beginning to emerge. The central question is: have the British reforms resulted in the creation of efficient wholesale and retail markets? On this criterion, the reforms have failed. The wholesale market is dominated by obscure long-term contracts, privileged access to the market and self-dealing within integrated generator/retailers, leaving the spot markets with minimal liquidity and unreliable prices. The failure to develop an efficient wholesale market places the onus on consumers to impose competitive forces on electricity companies by switching regularly. Small consumers will not do this and they are paying too much for their power. For the future, there is a serious risk that the electricity industry will become a weakly regulated oligopoly with a veneer of competition

  12. Safe Is Not Enough: Better Schools for LGBTQ Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Michael

    2016-01-01

    "Safe Is Not Enough" illustrates how educators can support the positive development of LGBTQ students in a comprehensive way so as to create truly inclusive school communities. Using examples from classrooms, schools, and districts across the country, Michael Sadowski identifies emerging practices such as creating an LGBTQ-inclusive…

  13. Keeping It Safe: Aging in Place among Rural Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Gina G.; Bishop, Alex J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study addressed in this article was to identify ways to reduce risk and improve safe aging in place among rural older adults. Resident and Extension faculty and county educators visited study participants at home to assess functional capacity and the home environment. Extension professionals may be uniquely positioned to provide…

  14. Failed Retrieval of an Inferior Vena Cava Filter During Pregnancy Because of Filter Tilt: Report of Two Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConville, R. M.; Kennedy, P. T.; Collins, A. J.; Ellis, P. K.

    2009-01-01

    Thromboembolic disease during pregnancy is an important cause of obstetric morbidity and mortality. Pregnant patients with venous thromboembolism are usually managed by conventional anticoagulation. However, this must be discontinued during vaginal or caesarian delivery to avoid haemorrhage and to reduce the risk of possible epidural haematoma. Retrievable inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs) offer protection against pulmonary embolism during this high-risk period, when anticoagulation is discontinued, while avoiding potential long-term sequelae of a permanent IVCF. Here we report two patients who presented in the third trimester of pregnancy with floating ileofemoral deep vein thrombosis. Both patients were initially treated with standard anticoagulation; however, shortly before delivery both patients had a retrievable IVCF placed in a suprarenal position. In both patients, retrieval failed at 28 days after insertion because of filter tilt. The timing and mechanism of filter tilt remains uncertain. We believe that a number of factors could have been involved, including change in the anatomic configuration with lateral displacement of the IVCF as a result of the gravid uterus as well as forceful uterine contractions during labour, which modified the shape and diameter of the IVC. We showed that failure to retrieve the IVCF has had considerable implications for the two young patients regarding long-term anticoagulation and have highlighted the need for further clinical trials regarding the safe use of retrievable IVCFs during pregnancy.

  15. Failing States or Failing Models?: Accounting for the Incidence of State Collapse

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Doornbos

    2010-01-01

    In recent years the notion and phenomenon of .failingÿ states - states deemed incapable to fulfil the basic tasks of providing security for their populace -, has been rapidly drawing attention. I will start off with a closer look at the inci- dence of fragile states and state failure, more specifically of state collapse. Connected with this, I will raise the question of differential degrees of propensity to failure and collapse among contemporary state systems, and to point to apparent region...

  16. Fail-safety of the EBR-II steam generator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, P.S.; Stone, C.C.; Hutter, E.; Barney, W.K.; Staker, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Fail-safe analyses of the EBR-II steam-generator system show that a postulated non-instantaneous leak of water or steam into sodium, through a duplex tube or a tubesheet, at credible leak rates will not structurally damage the evaporators and superheaters. However, contamination of the system and possible shell wastage by sodium-water reaction products may render the system inoperable for a period exceeding six months. This period would be shortened to three months if the system were modified by adding a remotely operated water dump system, a steam vent system, a secondary sodium superheater relief line, and a tubesheet leak-detection system

  17. Training to Increase Safe Tray Carrying Among Cocktail Servers

    OpenAIRE

    Scherrer, Megan D; Wilder, David A

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of training on proper carrying techniques among 3 cocktail servers to increase safe tray carrying on the job and reduce participants' risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders. As participants delivered drinks to their tables, their finger, arm, and neck positions were observed and recorded. Each participant received individual safety training that focused on proper carrying positions and techniques after baseline data were collected. A multiple baseline design acr...

  18. Dementia - keeping safe in the home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000031.htm Dementia - keeping safe in the home To use the ... make sure the homes of people who have dementia are safe for them. Safety Tips for the ...

  19. Breastfeeding FAQs: Safely Storing Breast Milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search English Español Breastfeeding FAQs: Safely Storing Breast Milk KidsHealth / For Parents / Breastfeeding FAQs: Safely Storing Breast ... may have. How do I store my breast milk? You can freeze and/or refrigerate your pumped ( ...

  20. Surgery for failed cervical spine reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Melvin D; Albert, Todd J

    2012-03-01

    Review article. To review the indications, operative strategy, and complications of revision cervical spine reconstruction. With many surgeons expanding their indications for cervical spine surgery, the number of patients being treated operatively has increased. Unfortunately, the number of patients requiring revision procedures is also increasing, but very little literature exists reviewing changes in the indications or operative planning for revision reconstruction. Narrative and review of the literature. In addition to the well-accepted indications for primary cervical spine surgery (radiculopathy, myelopathy, instability, and tumor), we have used the following indications for revision surgery: pseudarthrosis, adjacent segment degeneration, inadequate decompression, iatrogenic instability, and deformity. Our surgical goal for pseudarthrosis is obviously to obtain a fusion, which can usually be performed with an approach not done previously. Our surgical goals for instability and deformity are more complex, with a focus on decompression of any neurologic compression, correction of deformity, and stability. Revision cervical spine reconstruction is safe and effective if performed for the appropriate indications and with proper planning.

  1. 4D monitoring of actively failing rockslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Nick; Williams, Jack; Hardy, Richard; Brain, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Assessing the conditions which promote rockfall to collapse relies upon detailed monitoring, ideally before, during and immediately after failure. With standard repeat surveys it is common that surveys do not coincide with or capture precursors, or that surveys are widely spaced relative to the timing and duration of driving forces such as storms. As a result gaining insight into the controls on failure and the timescales over which precursors operate remains difficult to establish with certainty, and establishing direct links between environmental conditions and rock-falls, or sequences of events prior to rockfall, remain difficult to define. To address this, we present analysis of a high-frequency 3D laser scan dataset captured using a new permanently installed system developed to constantly monitor actively failing rock slopes. The system is based around a time of flight laser scanner, integrated with and remotely controlled by dedicated controls and analysis software. The system is configured to capture data at 0.1 m spacing across > 22,000 m3 at up to 30 minute intervals. Here we present results captured with this system over a period of 9 months, spanning spring to winter 2015. Our analysis is focussed upon improving the understanding of the nature of small (volumetric measurement of rock face erosion. The results hold implications for understanding of rockfall mechanics, but also for how actively eroding surfaces can be monitored at high temporal frequency. Whilst high frequency data is ideal for describing processes that evolve rapidly through time, the cumulative errors that accumulate when monitored changes are dominated by inverse power-law distributed volumes are significant. To conclude we consider the benefits of defining survey frequency on the basis of the changes being detected relative to the accumulation of errors that inevitably arises when comparing high numbers of sequential surveys.

  2. Why Lumbar Artificial Disk Replacements (LADRs) Fail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettine, Kenneth; Ryu, Robert; Techy, Fernando

    2017-07-01

    A retrospective review of prospectively collected data. To determine why artificial disk replacements (ADRs) fail by examining results of 91 patients in FDA studies performed at a single investigational device exemption (IDE) site with minimum 2-year follow-up. Patients following lumbar ADR generally achieve their 24-month follow-up results at 3 months postoperatively. Every patient undergoing ADR at 1 IDE site by 2 surgeons was evaluated for clinical success. Failure was defined as <50% improvement in ODI and VAS or any additional surgery at index or adjacent spine motion segment. Three ADRs were evaluated: Maverick, 25 patients; Charité, 31 patients; and Kineflex, 35 patients. All procedures were 1-level operations performed at L4-L5 or L5-S1. Demographics and inclusion/exclusion criteria were similar and will be discussed. Overall clinical failure occurred in 26% (24 of 91 patients) at 2-year follow-up. Clinical failure occurred in: 28% (Maverick) (7 of 25 patients), 39% (Charité) (12 of 31 patients), and 14% (Kineflex) (5 of 35 patients). Causes of failure included facet pathology, 50% of failure patients (12 of 24). Implant complications occurred in 5% of total patients and 21% of failure patients (5 of 24). Only 5 patients went from a success to failure after 3 months. Only 1 patient went from a failure to success after a facet rhizotomy 1 year after ADR. Seventy-four percent of patients after ADR met strict clinical success after 2-year follow-up. The clinical success versus failure rate did not change from their 3-month follow-up in 85 of the 91 patients (93%). Overall clinical success may be improved most by patient selection and implant type.

  3. Imaging studies for failed back surgery syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosnard, G.; Cordoliani, Y.S.; Sarrazin, J.L.; Soulie, D.

    1995-01-01

    In patients with failed back surgery syndrome, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be the best first-line imaging study because it simplifies the diagnosis. This update is based on over 600 cases. MRI shows the scar tissue at the surgical site, persistent evidence of disk herniation for several weeks after surgery, and evidence of local and regional edema in one-fourth of cases. The edema is most marked between two months and two years after the operation and can misleadingly suggest discitis. MRI is the best investigation for detecting recurrent herniation at the same vertebral level or another level. Herniated disk material is seen as a mass that does not enhance after gadolinium, in contrast to the vascularized scar tissue. Free fragments are often clearly visible within the scar tissue. Fragments that migrate to the epidural space can give rise to granulomatous reactions. Scar tissue can be seen in the epidural space and within the disk; it can show enhancement after gadolinium for several years. The scar can be atrophic or hypertrophic and can encase or impinge on the dural sac and nerve roots. Pathological fibrosis cannot be differentiated from ordinary scar tissue. Arachnoiditis causing adherence of the nerve roots to the dura mater or to each other occurs in 5 % to 10 % of cases. Nerve root enhancement after gadolinium is seen in three-fourths of cases. Bone lesions are common, especially some time after surgery; they are usually accompanied with other lesions. Hematomas are seen in less than 10 % of cases. Infections are similarly rare (0.25 % each for discitis and epiduritis). The diagnosis of discitis is difficult and requires percutaneous biopsy of the disk, especially when MRI shows fluid within the disk, with decreased signal intensity on T2 images, and non enhancement after intravenous gadolinium. (authors). 19 refs., 7 figs

  4. Book Review: Why Nations fail – the origins of power, prosperity and poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz Kellecioglu

    2013-01-01

    Why nations fail is a compelling contribution to the classic question of why some countries are poor and some rich, but it is also marred from several shortcomings and under-representations, which cast doubts on the positive messages of creating better institutions and reducing poverty.

  5. Working safely with electronics racks

    CERN Document Server

    Simon Baird, HSE Unit Head

    2016-01-01

    Think of CERN and you’ll probably think of particle accelerators and detectors. These are the tools of the trade in particle physics, but behind them are the racks of electronics that include power supplies, control systems and data acquisition networks.   Inside an electronics rack: danger could be lurking if the rack is not powered off. In routine operation, these are no more harmful than the home entertainment system in your living room. But unscrew the cover and it’s a different matter. Even after following appropriate training, and with formal authorisation from your group leader or equivalent to carry out electrical work or any work in the vicinity of electrical hazards, and even with extensive experience of carrying out such operations, it’s important to incorporate safe working practices into your routine. At CERN, before the racks of electronics reach their operational configurations for the accelerators and detectors, they play a vital role in test set-ups ...

  6. Workshop on Developing Safe Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, J.D.

    1994-11-01

    The Workshop on Developing Safe Software was held July 22--23, 1992, at the Hotel del Coronado, San Diego, California. The purpose of the workshop was to have four world experts discuss among themselves software safety issues which are of interest to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These issues concern the development of software systems for use in nuclear power plant protection systems. The workshop comprised four sessions. Wednesday morning, July 22, consisted of presentations from each of the four panel members. On Wednesday afternoon, the panel members went through a list of possible software development techniques and commented on them. The Thursday morning, July 23, session consisted of an extended discussion among the panel members and the observers from the NRC. A final session on Thursday afternoon consisted of a discussion among the NRC observers as to what was learned from the workshop

  7. Workshop on developing safe software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The Workshop on Developing Safe Software was held July 22--23 at the Hotel del Coronado, San Diego, California. The purpose of the workshop was to have four world experts discuss among themselves software safety issues which are of interest to the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These issues concern the development of software systems for use in nuclear power plant protection systems. The workshop comprised four sessions. Wednesday morning, July 22, consisted of presentations from each of the four panel members. On Wednesday afternoon, the panel members went through a list of possible software development techniques and commented on them. The Thursday morning, July 23, session consisted of an extended discussion among the panel members and the observers from the NRC. A final session on Thursday afternoon consisted of a discussion among the NRC observers as to what was teamed from the workshop

  8. The Difference Safe Spaces Make

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendric Coleman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT students have become very visible at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs, but this visibility is not reflected in some colleges’ student programs and activities. Only a few notable HBCUs, such as Howard University and Spelman College, have made a concerted effort. Acknowledging that the LGBT community is significant and exists, and fostering such support, comes up against a steep wall of religious tradition and doctrines, and conservative administrations. It is imperative that HBCUs address LGBT issues and create and support a safe space for students to articulate their identity. Meanwhile, many LGBT students on these campuses find voice and understanding in Black scholars and writers such as Audre Lorde’s Zami: A New Spelling of My Name and Charles Michael Smith’s Fighting Words: Personal Essays by Black Gay Men.

  9. Safe Distribution of Declarative Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao; Slaats, Tijs

    2011-01-01

    of projections that covers a DCR Graph that the network of synchronously communicating DCR Graphs given by the projections is bisimilar to the original global process graph. We exemplify the distribution technique on a process identified in a case study of an cross-organizational case management system carried...... process model generalizing labelled prime event structures to a systems model able to finitely represent ω-regular languages. An operational semantics given as a transition semantics between markings of the graph allows DCR Graphs to be conveniently used as both specification and execution model....... The technique for distribution is based on a new general notion of projection of DCR Graphs relative to a subset of labels and events identifying the set of external events that must be communicated from the other processes in the network in order for the distribution to be safe.We prove that for any vector...

  10. Spark-safe power source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mester, I M; Konushkin, N A; Nevozinskiy, A K; Rubinshteyn, B Sh; Serov, V I; Vasnev, M A

    1981-01-01

    A shortcoming of the known power sources is their low reliability. The purpose of the invention is to improve the reliability of the device. This is achieved because the spark-safe power source is equipped with a by-passing transistor and potentiometer, and also a generator of control interruptions in the circuit, an I-element, first separating transformer, control block, second separating transformer whose secondary winding has a relay winding whose contacts are connected to the load circuit are connected in series. The generator of control separations of the circuit is connected to the base of the by-passing transistor and to the power source outlet, the potentiometer is connected in series to the main thyristor. The middle point of the potentiometer is connected to the second inlet of the I-element.

  11. Safe injection procedures, injection practices, and needlestick ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Safe injection procedures regarding final waste disposal were sufficiently adopted, while measures regarding disposable injection equipment, waste containers, hand hygiene, as well as injection practices were inadequately carried out. Lack of job aid posters that promote safe injection and safe disposal of ...

  12. Developing Safe Schools Partnerships with Law Enforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosiak, John

    2009-01-01

    Safe schools are the concern of communities throughout the world. If a school is safe, and if children feel safe, students "are better able to learn. But what are the steps to make" this happen? First, it is important to understand the problem: What are the threats to school safety? These include crime-related behaviors that find their way to…

  13. Safe Handover : Safe Patients - The Electronic Handover System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Alex; Sall, Hanish; Wilkinson, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Failure of effective handover is a major preventable cause of patient harm. We aimed to promote accurate recording of high-quality clinical information using an Electronic Handover System (EHS) that would contribute to a sustainable improvement in effective patient care and safety. Within our hospital the human factors associated with poor communication were compromising patient care and unnecessarily increasing the workload of staff due to the poor quality of handovers. Only half of handovers were understood by the doctors expected to complete them, and more than half of our medical staff felt it posed a risk to patient safety. We created a standardised proforma for handovers that contained specific sub-headings, re-classified patient risk assessments, and aided escalation of care by adding prompts for verbal handover. Sources of miscommunication were removed, accountability for handovers provided, and tasks were re-organised to reduce the workload of staff. Long-term, three-month data showed that each sub-heading achieved at least 80% compliance (an average improvement of approximately 40% for the overall quality of handovers). This translated into 91% of handovers being subjectively clear to junior doctors. 87% of medical staff felt we had reduced a risk to patient safety and 80% felt it increased continuity of care. Without guidance, doctors omit key information required for effective handover. All organisations should consider implementing an electronic handover system as a viable, sustainable and safe solution to handover of care that allows patient safety to remain at the heart of the NHS.

  14. One-stage dorsal lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty for the treatment of failed hypospadias repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Bin Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to retrospectively investigate the outcomes of patients who underwent one-stage onlay or inlay urethroplasty using a lingual mucosal graft (LMG after failed hypospadias repairs. Inclusion criteria included a history of failed hypospadias repair, insufficiency of the local skin that made a reoperation with skin flaps difficult, and necessity of an oral mucosal graft urethroplasty. Patients were excluded if they had undergone a failed hypospadias repair using the foreskin or a multistage repair urethroplasty. Between January 2008 and December 2012, 110 patients with failed hypospadias repairs were treated in our center. Of these patients, 56 underwent a one-stage onlay or inlay urethroplasty using LMG. The median age was 21.8 years (range: 4-45 years. Of the 56 patients, one-stage onlay LMG urethroplasty was performed in 42 patients (group 1, and a modified Snodgrass technique using one-stage inlay LMG urethroplasty was performed in 14 (group 2. The median LMG urethroplasty length was 5.6 ± 1.6 cm (range: 4-13 cm. The mean follow-up was 34.7 months (range: 10-58 months, and complications developed in 12 of 56 patients (21.4%, including urethrocutaneous fistulas in 7 (6 in group 1, 1 in group 2 and neourethral strictures in 5 (4 in group 1, 1 in group 2. The total success rate was 78.6%. Our survey suggests that one-stage onlay or inlay urethroplasty with LMG may be an effective option to treat the patients with less available skin after failed hypospadias repairs; LMG harvesting is easy and safe, irrespective of the patient′s age.

  15. Safe Handover : Safe Patients – The Electronic Handover System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Alex; Sall, Hanish; Wilkinson, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Failure of effective handover is a major preventable cause of patient harm. We aimed to promote accurate recording of high-quality clinical information using an Electronic Handover System (EHS) that would contribute to a sustainable improvement in effective patient care and safety. Within our hospital the human factors associated with poor communication were compromising patient care and unnecessarily increasing the workload of staff due to the poor quality of handovers. Only half of handovers were understood by the doctors expected to complete them, and more than half of our medical staff felt it posed a risk to patient safety. We created a standardised proforma for handovers that contained specific sub-headings, re-classified patient risk assessments, and aided escalation of care by adding prompts for verbal handover. Sources of miscommunication were removed, accountability for handovers provided, and tasks were re-organised to reduce the workload of staff. Long-term, three-month data showed that each sub-heading achieved at least 80% compliance (an average improvement of approximately 40% for the overall quality of handovers). This translated into 91% of handovers being subjectively clear to junior doctors. 87% of medical staff felt we had reduced a risk to patient safety and 80% felt it increased continuity of care. Without guidance, doctors omit key information required for effective handover. All organisations should consider implementing an electronic handover system as a viable, sustainable and safe solution to handover of care that allows patient safety to remain at the heart of the NHS. PMID:26734244

  16. Development of failed fuel detection system for PWR (III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Churl Kew; Kang, Hee Dong; Jeong, Seung Ho; Cho, Byung Sub; Yoon, Byeong Joo; Yoon, Jae Seong

    1987-12-01

    Ultrasonic transducers satisfying the conditions for failed fuel rod detection for failed fuel rod detection have been designed and built. And performance tests for them have been carried out. Ultrasonic signal processing units, a manipulator guiding the ultrasonic probe through the fuel assembly lanes and its control units have been constructed. The performance of the system has been verified experimentally to be successful in failed fuel rod detection. (Author)

  17. Rescue of failed filtering blebs with ab interno trephination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihadeh, Wisam A; Ritch, Robert; Liebmann, Jeffrey M

    2006-06-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of ab interno automated trephination as a technique for rescuing failed mature filtering blebs. A retrospective chart review of 40 failed blebs of 38 patients who had a posttrephination follow-up period of at least 3 months was done. With success defined as intraocular pressure (IOP) control with other modalities of management. Complications were few. We believe that ab interno trephination is an excellent option for rescuing selected failed filtering blebs.

  18. The failing firm defence: merger policy and entry

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, Robin; Weeds, Helen

    2003-01-01

    This Paper considers the 'failing firm defence'. Under this principle, found in most antitrust jurisdictions, a merger that would otherwise be blocked due to its adverse effect on competition is permitted when the firm to be acquired is a failing firm, and an alternative, less detrimental merger is unavailable. Competition authorities have shown considerable reluctance to accept the failing firm defence, and it has been successfully used in just a handful of cases. The Paper considers the def...

  19. Eye safe laser range finders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snir, M.; Margaliot, M.; Amitzi, A.

    2004-01-01

    During the 1970's, Ruby (Q switched) laser based range finders with a wavelength of 694nm were first used. These lasers operated in a pulse mode within the visible light range and produced a risk for the eye retina. The laser beam striking the macula could damage the eye and might cause blindness. Over the years, Nd:YAG (Q switched) lasers were developed (operating at 1064nm) for range finding and designation uses. The wavelength of these lasers, operating in the near Infra-Red range (invisible), is also focused tightly on the retina. The human eye does not respond to the invisible light so there is no natural protection (eye blink reflex) as in the visible light. The operation of these lasers worldwide, especially when the laser beam is exposed, causes occasional eye accidents. Another risk is stemming from the use of observation systems with a high optical gain, in the laser operation areas, which enlarge the range of risk quite significantly. Therefore, research and development efforts were invested in order to introduce eye safe lasers. One of the solutions for this problem is presented in following document

  20. Working safely with radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, Wynne

    1993-01-01

    In common with exposure to many other laboratory chemicals, exposure to ionising radiations and to radioactive materials carries a small risk of causing harm. Because of this, there are legal limits to the amount of exposure to ionising radiations at work and special rules for working with radioactive materials. Although radiation protection is a complex subject it is possible to simplify to 10 basic things you should do -the Golden Rules. They are: 1) understand the nature of the hazard and get practical training; 2) plan ahead to minimise time spent handling radioactivity; 3) distance yourself appropriately from sources of radiation; 4) use appropriate shielding for the radiation; 5) contain radioactive materials in defined work areas; 6) wear appropriate protective clothing and dosimeters; 7) monitor the work area frequently for contamination control; 8) follow the local rules and safe ways of working; 9) minimise accumulation of waste and dispose of it by appropriate routes, and 10) after completion of work, monitor, wash, and monitor yourself again. These rules are expanded in this article. (author)

  1. Materials for passively safe reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simnad, T.

    1993-01-01

    Future nuclear power capacity will be based on reactor designs that include passive safety features if recent progress in advanced nuclear power developments is realized. There is a high potential for nuclear systems that are smaller and easier to operate than the current generation of reactors, especially when passive or intrinsic characteristics are applied to provide inherent stability of the chain reaction and to minimize the burden on equipment and operating personnel. Taylor, has listed the following common generic technical features as the most important goals for the principal reactor development systems: passive stability, simplification, ruggedness, case of operation, and modularity. Economic competitiveness also depends on standardization and assurance of licensing. The performance of passively safe reactors will be greatly influenced by the successful development of advanced fuels and materials that will provide lower fuel-cycle costs. A dozen new designs of advanced power reactors have been described recently, covering a wide spectrum of reactor types, including pressurized water reactors, boiling water reactors, heavy-water reactors, modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs), and fast breeder reactors. These new designs address the need for passive safety features as well as the requirement of economic competitiveness

  2. Safe and green nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushwaha, H.S.

    2010-01-01

    Energy development plays an important role in the national economic growth. Presently the per capita consumption of energy in our country is about 750 kWh including captive power generation which is low in comparison to that in the developed countries like USA where it is about 12,000 kWh. As of now the total installed capacity of electricity generation is about 152,148 MW(e) which is drawn from Thermal (65%), Hydel (24%), Nuclear (3%) power plants and Renewables (8%). It is expected that by the end of year 2020, the required installed capacity would be more than 3,00,000 MW(e), if we assume per capita consumption of about 800-1000 kWh for Indian population of well over one billion. To meet the projected power requirement in India, suitable options need to be identified and explored for generation of electricity. For choosing better alternatives various factors such as availability of resources, potential to generate commercial power, economic viability, etc. need to be considered. Besides these factors, an important factor which must be taken into consideration is protection of environment around the operating power stations. This paper attempts to demonstrate that the nuclear power generation is an environmentally benign option for meeting the future requirement of electricity in India. It also discusses the need for creating the public awareness about the safe operations of the nuclear power plants and ionising radiation. (author)

  3. SAFE testing nuclear rockets economically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, Steven D.; Travis, Bryan; Zerkle, David K.

    2003-01-01

    Several studies over the past few decades have recognized the need for advanced propulsion to explore the solar system. As early as the 1960s, Werner Von Braun and others recognized the need for a nuclear rocket for sending humans to Mars. The great distances, the intense radiation levels, and the physiological response to zero-gravity all supported the concept of using a nuclear rocket to decrease mission time. These same needs have been recognized in later studies, especially in the Space Exploration Initiative in 1989. One of the key questions that has arisen in later studies, however, is the ability to test a nuclear rocket engine in the current societal environment. Unlike the Rover/NERVA programs in the 1960s, the rocket exhaust can no longer be vented to the open atmosphere. As a consequence, previous studies have examined the feasibility of building a large-scale version of the Nuclear Furnace Scrubber that was demonstrated in 1971. We have investigated an alternative that would deposit the rocket exhaust along with any entrained fission products directly into the ground. The Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust, or SAFE, concept would allow variable sized engines to be tested for long times at a modest expense. A system overview, results of preliminary calculations, and cost estimates of proof of concept demonstrations are presented. The results indicate that a nuclear rocket could be tested at the Nevada Test Site for under $20 M

  4. Baseline series fragrance markers fail to predict contact allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Jack; McFadden, John P; White, Jonathan M L; White, Ian R; Banerjee, Piu

    2014-05-01

    Negative patch test results with fragrance allergy markers in the European baseline series do not always predict a negative reaction to individual fragrance substances. To determine the frequencies of positive test reactions to the 26 fragrance substances for which labelling is mandatory in the EU, and how effectively reactions to fragrance markers in the baseline series predict positive reactions to the fragrance substances that are labelled. The records of 1951 eczema patients, routinely tested with the labelled fragrance substances and with an extended European baseline series in 2011 and 2012, were retrospectively reviewed. Two hundred and eighty-one (14.4%) (71.2% females) reacted to one or more allergens from the labelled-fragrance substance series and/or a fragrance marker from the European baseline series. The allergens that were positive with the greatest frequencies were cinnamyl alcohol (48; 2.46%), Evernia furfuracea (44; 2.26%), and isoeugenol (40; 2.05%). Of the 203 patients who reacted to any of the 26 fragrances in the labelled-fragrance substance series, only 117 (57.6%) also reacted to a fragrance marker in the baseline series. One hundred and seven (52.7%) reacted to either fragrance mix I or fragrance mix II, 28 (13.8%) reacted to Myroxylon pereirae, and 13 (6.4%) reacted to hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde. These findings confirm that the standard fragrance markers fail to identify patients with contact allergies to the 26 fragrances. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The SafeCOP ECSEL Project: Safe Cooperating Cyber-Physical Systems Using Wireless Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Paul; Scholle, Detlef; Hansson, Hans

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the ECSEL project entitled "Safe Cooperating Cyber-Physical Systems using Wireless Communication" (SafeCOP), which runs during the period 2016 -- 2019. SafeCOP targets safety-related Cooperating Cyber-Physical Systems (CO-CPS) characterised by use of wireless...... detection of abnormal behaviour, triggering if needed a safe degraded mode. SafeCOP will also develop methods and tools, which will be used to produce safety assurance evidence needed to certify cooperative functions. SafeCOP will extend current wireless technologies to ensure safe and secure cooperation...

  6. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-10-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective 'titanic'. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the 'Seven C's'. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm. © 2012 The Author. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Safe prescribing: a titanic challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routledge, Philip A

    2012-01-01

    The challenge to achieve safe prescribing merits the adjective ‘titanic’. The organisational and human errors leading to poor prescribing (e.g. underprescribing, overprescribing, misprescribing or medication errors) have parallels in the organisational and human errors that led to the loss of the Titanic 100 years ago this year. Prescribing can be adversely affected by communication failures, critical conditions, complacency, corner cutting, callowness and a lack of courage of conviction, all of which were also factors leading to the Titanic tragedy. These issues need to be addressed by a commitment to excellence, the final component of the ‘Seven C's’. Optimal prescribing is dependent upon close communication and collaborative working between highly trained health professionals, whose role is to ensure maximum clinical effectiveness, whilst also protecting their patients from avoidable harm. Since humans are prone to error, and the environments in which they work are imperfect, it is not surprising that medication errors are common, occurring more often during the prescribing stage than during dispensing or administration. A commitment to excellence in prescribing includes a continued focus on lifelong learning (including interprofessional learning) in pharmacology and therapeutics. This should be accompanied by improvements in the clinical working environment of prescribers, and the encouragement of a strong safety culture (including reporting of adverse incidents as well as suspected adverse drug reactions whenever appropriate). Finally, members of the clinical team must be prepared to challenge each other, when necessary, to ensure that prescribing combines the highest likelihood of benefit with the lowest potential for harm. PMID:22738396

  8. Steering teens safe: a randomized trial of a parent-based intervention to improve safe teen driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek-Asa, Corinne; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Yang, Jingzhen; Chande, Vidya; Young, Tracy; Ramirez, Marizen

    2014-07-31

    Crashes are the leading cause of death for teens, and parent-based interventions are a promising approach. We assess the effectiveness of Steering Teens Safe, a parent-focused program to increase safe teen driving. Steering Teens Safe aimed to improve parental communication with teens about safe driving using motivational interviewing techniques in conjunction with 19 safe driving lessons. A randomized controlled trial involved 145 parent-teen dyads (70 intervention and 75 control). Intervention parents received a 45-minute session to learn the program with four follow-up phone sessions, a DVD, and a workbook. Control parents received a standard brochure about safe driving. Scores were developed to measure teen-reported quantity and quality of parental communication about safe driving. The main outcome measure was a previously validated Risky Driving Score reported by teens. Because the Score was highly skewed, a generalized linear model based on a gamma distribution was used for analysis. Intervention teens ranked their parent's success in talking about driving safety higher than control teens (p = 0.035) and reported that their parents talked about more topics (non-significant difference). The Risky Driving Score was 21% lower in intervention compared to control teens (85% CI = 0.60, 1.00). Interaction between communication quantity and the intervention was examined. Intervention teens who reported more successful communication had a 42% lower Risky Driving Score (95% CI = 0.37, 0.94) than control parents with less successful communication. This program had a positive although not strong effect, and it may hold the most promise in partnership with other programs, such as Driver's Education or Graduated Driver's License policies. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01014923. Registered Nov. 16, 2009.

  9. An experience of bronchotomy and resectional procedures after failed bronchoscopic foerign body retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Y.S.; Majeed, F.A.

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body bronchus is a surgical emergency and is associated with a high mortality if neglected or complicated. The objective of this study was to analyse the outcome of bronchotomy and resectional procedures after failed bronchoscopic foreign body retrieval. Methods: This study of 24 cases of bronchotomy and resectional procedures after failed bronchoscopic foreign body retrieval was done from June 2008 to June 2009 and March 2010 to Sep 2013. Patients after failed retrieval of foreign body by bronchoscopy either by ENT specialists or thoracic surgeons underwent bronchotomy or resectional procedures were included in the study. We used the posterolateral thoracotomy approach for the surgical procedures. Results: Bronchotomy and resectional procedures were done in 24 cases. Age of patients ranged from 2 years to 51 years. Most patients were children and right side was mostly involved. Bronchotomy procedures were 10 (41%) and resectional surgeries were 13 (58%). Emergency lobectomies were 3 out of 13 resectional surgeries. Right intermedius bronchus was opened up and incision was extended in the direction of foreign body in 6 cases and left bronchus intermedius was opened in 4 cases. Haemoptysis was the main symptom in late presenters. Range of objects retrieved in our study was from pins, needles to whistles. Conclusion: Retention causes endobronchial obstruction with stasis leading to irreversible damaged parenchyma. Foreign body with structural changes require resection, others can be offered bronchotomy which is a safe procedure for retained non retrievable foreign bodies. (author)

  10. Transportation of failed or damaged foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, C.E.; Mustin, T.P.; Massey, C.D.

    1998-01-01

    Since resuming the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR SNF) Acceptance Program in 1996, the Program has had to deal with difficult issues associated with the transportation of failed or damaged spent fuel. In several instances, problems with failed or damaged fuel have prevented the acceptance of the fuel at considerable cost to both the Department of Energy (DOE) and research reactor operators. In response to the problems faced by the Acceptance Program, DOE has undertaken significant steps to better define the spent fuel acceptance criteria. DOE has worked closely with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to address failed or damaged research reactor spent fuel and to identify cask certificate issues which must be resolved by cask owners and foreign regulatory authorities. The specific issues associated with the transport of Materials Testing Reactor (MTR)-type FRR SNF will be discussed. The information presented will include U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory issues, cask certificate issues, technical constraints, and lessons learned. Specific information will also be provided on the latest efforts to revise DOE's Appendix B, Transport Package (Cask) Acceptance Criteria. The information presented in this paper will be important to foreign research reactor operators, shippers, and cask vendors, so that appropriate amendments to the Certificate of Compliance for spent fuel casks can be submitted in a timely manner to facilitate the safe and scheduled transport of FRR SNF

  11. SAFE/SNAP application to shipboard security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grady, L.M.; Walker, J.L.; Polito, J.

    1981-11-01

    An application of the combined Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation/Safeguards Network Analysis Procedure (SAFE/SNAP) modeling technique to a physical protection system (PPS) aboard a generic ship is described. This application was performed as an example of how the SAFE and SNAP techniques could be used. Estimates of probability of interruption and neutralization for the example shipboard PPS are provided by SAFE as well as an adversary scenario, which serves as input to SNAP. This adversary scenario is analyzed by SNAP through four cases which incorporate increasingly detailed security force tactics. Comparisons between the results of the SAFE and SNAP analyses are made and conclusions drawn on the validity of each technique. Feedback from SNAP to SAFE is described, and recommendations for upgrading the ship based on the results of the SAFE/SNAP application are also discussed

  12. Anticipating Terrorist Safe Havens from Instability Induced Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Robert; Marvin, Brett

    This chapter presents recent methods developed at the Center for Army Analysis to classify patterns of nation-state instability that lead to conflict. The ungoverned areas endemic to failed nation-states provide terrorist organizations with safe havens from which to plan and execute terrorist attacks. Identification of those states at risk for instability induced conflict should help to facilitate effective counter terrorism policy planning efforts. Nation-states that experience instability induced conflict are similar in that they share common instability factors that make them susceptible to experiencing conflict. We utilize standard pattern classification algorithms to identify these patterns. First, we identify features (political, military, economic and social) that capture the instability of a nation-state. Second, we forecast the future levels of these features for each nation-state. Third, we classify each future state’s conflict potential based upon the conflict level of those states in the past most similar to the future state.

  13. 7 CFR 983.152 - Failed lots/rework procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Failed lots/rework procedure. 983.152 Section 983.152..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Rules and Regulations § 983.152 Failed lots/rework procedure. (a) Inshell rework procedure for aflatoxin. If inshell rework is selected as a remedy to meet the aflatoxin regulations of this...

  14. Ultrasonics aids the identification of failed fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Over a number of years Brown Boveri Reaktor of West Germany has developed and commercialized an ultrasonic failed fuel rod detection system. Sipping has up to now been the standard technique for failed fuel detection, but sipping can only indicate whether or not an assembly contains defective rods; the BBR system can tell which rod is defective. (author)

  15. Simulating fail-stop in asynchronous distributed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Laura; Marzullo, Keith

    1994-01-01

    The fail-stop failure model appears frequently in the distributed systems literature. However, in an asynchronous distributed system, the fail-stop model cannot be implemented. In particular, it is impossible to reliably detect crash failures in an asynchronous system. In this paper, we show that it is possible to specify and implement a failure model that is indistinguishable from the fail-stop model from the point of view of any process within an asynchronous system. We give necessary conditions for a failure model to be indistinguishable from the fail-stop model, and derive lower bounds on the amount of process replication needed to implement such a failure model. We present a simple one-round protocol for implementing one such failure model, which we call simulated fail-stop.

  16. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep Apnea? Lifestyle change including weight loss and exercise can help to improve sleep apnea and its related health problems. Sleep positioning and oral appliances have also been found to be effective. In cases when non-invasive treatments fail, a ...

  17. SGLT2 inhibitors: are they safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippas-Ntekouan, Sebastian; Filippatos, Theodosios D; Elisaf, Moses S

    2018-01-01

    Sodium-glucose linked transporter type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a relatively new class of antidiabetic drugs with positive cardiovascular and kidney effects. The aim of this review is to present the safety issues associated with SGLT2 inhibitors. Urogenital infections are the most frequently encountered adverse events, although tend to be mild to moderate and are easily manageable with standard treatment. Although no increased acute kidney injury risk was evident in the major trials, the mechanism of action of these drugs requires caution when they are administered in patients with extracellular volume depletion or with drugs affecting renal hemodynamics. Canagliflozin raised the risk of amputations and the rate of fractures in the CANVAS trial, although more data are necessary before drawing definite conclusions. The risk of euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis seems to be minimal when the drugs are prescribed properly. Regarding other adverse events, SGLT2 inhibitors do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia even when co-administered with insulin, but a decrease in the dose of sulphonylureas may be needed. The available data do not point to a causative role of SGLT2 inhibitors on malignancy risk, however, these drugs should be used with caution in patients with known hematuria or history of bladder cancer. SGLT2 inhibitors seem to be safe and effective in the treatment of diabetes but more studies are required to assess their long-term safety.

  18. Endovascular recanalization of native chronic total occlusions in patients with failed lower-extremity bypass grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, Clinton W; Vance, Ansar; Niesen, Timothy; Grilli, Christopher; Velez, J Daniel; Agriantonis, Demetrios J; Kimbiris, George; Garcia, Mark J; Leung, Daniel A

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the feasibility, safety, and outcome of endovascular recanalization of native chronic total occlusions (CTOs) in patients with failed lower-extremity bypass grafts. Retrospective review of 19 limbs in 18 patients with failed lower-extremity bypass grafts that underwent recanalization of native arterial occlusions between February 2009 and April 2013 was performed. Nine of the limbs presented with acute ischemia and 10 presented with chronic ischemia, including eight with critical limb ischemia and two with disabling claudication. The mean patency of the failed bypass grafts (63% venous) was 27 months. All limbs had Transatlantic Inter-Society Consensus class D lesions involving the native circulation. Technical success of the endovascular recanalization procedure was achieved in all but one limb (95%). The mean ankle brachial indices before and after treatment were 0.34 and 0.73, respectively. There were no major complications or emergency amputations. Mean patient follow-up was 64 weeks, and two patients were lost to follow-up. Primary patency rates at 3, 6, and 12 months were 87%, 48%, and 16%, respectively. Successful secondary procedures were performed in seven patients, with secondary patency rates at 3, 6, and 12 months of 88%, 73%, and 44%, respectively. Limb salvage rates at 12 and 24 months were 94% and 65%, and amputation-free survival rates at 12 and 24 months were 87% and 60%, respectively. Endovascular recanalization of native CTOs in patients with failed lower-extremity bypass grafts is technically feasible and safe and results in acceptable limb salvage. Copyright © 2014 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Percutaneous Gastrostomy in Patients Who Fail or Are Unsuitable for Endoscopic Gastrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, Frank J.; Varghese, Jose C.; Haslam, Philip J.; McGrath, Frank P.; Keeling, Frank; Lee, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is not possible or fails in some patients. We aimed to categorize the reasons for PEG failure, to study the success of percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) in these patients, and to highlight the associated technical difficulties and complications.Methods: Forty-two patients (28 men, 14 women; mean age 60 years, range 18-93 years) in whom PEG failed or was not possible, underwent PRG. PEG failure or unsuitability was due to upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction or other pathology precluding PEG in 15 of the 42 patients, suboptimal transillumination in 22 of 42 patients, and advanced cardiorespiratory decompensation precluding endoscopy in five of 42 patients. T-fastener gastropexy was used in all patients and 14-18 Fr catheters were inserted.Results: PRG was successful in 41 of 42 patients (98%). CT guidance was required in four patients with altered upper gastrointestinal anatomy. PRG failed in one patient despite CT guidance. In the 16 patients with high subcostal stomachs who failed PEG because of inadequate transillumination, intercostal tube placement was required in three and cephalad angulation under the costal margin in six patients. Major complications included inadvertent placement of the tube in the peritoneal cavity. There was one case of hemorrhage at the gastrostomy site requiring transfusion and one case of superficial gastrostomy site infection requiring tube removal. Minor complications included superficial wound infection in six patients, successfully treated with routine wound toilette.Conclusion: We conclude that PRG is a safe, well-tolerated and successful method of gastrostomy and gastrojejunostomy insertion in the technically difficult group of patients who have undergone an unsuccessful PEG. In many such cases optimal clinical evaluation will suggest primary referral for PRG as the preferred option

  20. Virus Alert: Ten Steps to Safe Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Glenda A.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses computer viruses and explains how to detect them; discusses virus protection and the need to update antivirus software; and offers 10 safe computing tips, including scanning floppy disks and commercial software, how to safely download files from the Internet, avoiding pirated software copies, and backing up files. (LRW)

  1. Implementation of an Improved Safe Operating Envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prime, Robyn; McIntyre, Mark; Reeves, David

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of the paper presented at IYNC 2004 on 'The Definition of a Safe Operating Envelope'. The current paper concentrates on the implementation process of the Safe Operating Envelope employed at the Point Lepreau Generating Station. (authors)

  2. Implementation of an Improved Safe Operating Envelope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prime, Robyn; McIntyre, Mark [NB Power Nuclear, P.O. Box 600, Lepreau, NB (Canada); Reeves, David [Atlantic Nuclear Services Ltd., PO Box 1268 Fredericton, NB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This paper is a continuation of the paper presented at IYNC 2004 on 'The Definition of a Safe Operating Envelope'. The current paper concentrates on the implementation process of the Safe Operating Envelope employed at the Point Lepreau Generating Station. (authors)

  3. Pictorial essay: Role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Botchu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available USG has been used for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Scarring and incomplete decompression are the main causes for persistence or recurrence of symptoms. We performed a retrospective study to assess the role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression. Of 422 USG studies of the wrist performed at our center over the last 5 years, 14 were for failed carpal tunnel decompression. Scarring was noted in three patients, incomplete decompression in two patients, synovitis in one patient, and an anomalous muscle belly in one patient. No abnormality was detected in seven patients. We present a pictorial review of USG findings in failed carpal tunnel decompression.

  4. Pictorial essay: Role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botchu, Rajesh; Khan, Aman; Jeyapalan, Kanagaratnam

    2012-01-01

    USG has been used for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Scarring and incomplete decompression are the main causes for persistence or recurrence of symptoms. We performed a retrospective study to assess the role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression. Of 422 USG studies of the wrist performed at our center over the last 5 years, 14 were for failed carpal tunnel decompression. Scarring was noted in three patients, incomplete decompression in two patients, synovitis in one patient, and an anomalous muscle belly in one patient. No abnormality was detected in seven patients. We present a pictorial review of USG findings in failed carpal tunnel decompression.

  5. Childhood obesity: parents fail to recognise, general practitioners fail to act.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    White, A

    2012-01-01

    General Practitioners (GPs) have an important role to play in recognition of and intervention against childhood obesity in Ireland. Data were collected prospectively on a cohort of children aged 4-14 and their parents (n = 101 pairs) who attended consecutively to a semi-rural group general practice. Parents estimated their child\\'s weight status. Actual weight status was determined for both parent and child using the United States Centres\\' for Disease Control\\'s BMI-for-age references. 15 (14.9%) of the children and 49 (51.6%) of the parents were overweight or obese. While 71 (95.5%) of normal weight status children were correctly identified, parents showed poor concordance in identifying their children as overweight 2 (18.2%) or obese 0 (0%). BMI was only evidently recorded in the clinical records of 1 out of 15 cases of overweight children identified. With parents failing to recognise childhood obesity, GPs have a responsibility in tackling this problem at a family level.

  6. Earthquake recurrence models fail when earthquakes fail to reset the stress field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormann, Thessa; Wiemer, Stefan; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2012-01-01

    Parkfield's regularly occurring M6 mainshocks, about every 25 years, have over two decades stoked seismologists' hopes to successfully predict an earthquake of significant size. However, with the longest known inter-event time of 38 years, the latest M6 in the series (28 Sep 2004) did not conform to any of the applied forecast models, questioning once more the predictability of earthquakes in general. Our study investigates the spatial pattern of b-values along the Parkfield segment through the seismic cycle and documents a stably stressed structure. The forecasted rate of M6 earthquakes based on Parkfield's microseismicity b-values corresponds well to observed rates. We interpret the observed b-value stability in terms of the evolution of the stress field in that area: the M6 Parkfield earthquakes do not fully unload the stress on the fault, explaining why time recurrent models fail. We present the 1989 M6.9 Loma Prieta earthquake as counter example, which did release a significant portion of the stress along its fault segment and yields a substantial change in b-values.

  7. Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society guidelines for the management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushambi, M C; Kinsella, S M; Popat, M; Swales, H; Ramaswamy, K K; Winton, A L; Quinn, A C

    2015-11-01

    The Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society have developed the first national obstetric guidelines for the safe management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation during general anaesthesia. They comprise four algorithms and two tables. A master algorithm provides an overview. Algorithm 1 gives a framework on how to optimise a safe general anaesthetic technique in the obstetric patient, and emphasises: planning and multidisciplinary communication; how to prevent the rapid oxygen desaturation seen in pregnant women by advocating nasal oxygenation and mask ventilation immediately after induction; limiting intubation attempts to two; and consideration of early release of cricoid pressure if difficulties are encountered. Algorithm 2 summarises the management after declaring failed tracheal intubation with clear decision points, and encourages early insertion of a (preferably second-generation) supraglottic airway device if appropriate. Algorithm 3 covers the management of the 'can't intubate, can't oxygenate' situation and emergency front-of-neck airway access, including the necessity for timely perimortem caesarean section if maternal oxygenation cannot be achieved. Table 1 gives a structure for assessing the individual factors relevant in the decision to awaken or proceed should intubation fail, which include: urgency related to maternal or fetal factors; seniority of the anaesthetist; obesity of the patient; surgical complexity; aspiration risk; potential difficulty with provision of alternative anaesthesia; and post-induction airway device and airway patency. This decision should be considered by the team in advance of performing a general anaesthetic to make a provisional plan should failed intubation occur. The table is also intended to be used as a teaching tool to facilitate discussion and learning regarding the complex nature of decision-making when faced with a failed intubation. Table 2 gives practical considerations of how to

  8. Modified Mathieu repair for failed surgery for hypospadias ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A.Z.M. Anwar

    Received 24 June 2014; received in revised form 3 August 2014; accepted 31 August ... Objectives: To present our experience with the use of modified Mathieu urethroplasty for failed hypospadias ... Overall success was achieved in 31/38.

  9. Perceived adherence barriers among patients failing second-line ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceived adherence barriers among patients failing second-line antiretroviral therapy in Khayelitsha, South Africa. W Barnett, G Patten, B Kerschberger, K Conradie, DB Garone, G van Cutsem, CJ Colvin ...

  10. Securing Failed Inner-City Communities: The Military's Role

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khan, Oral

    1997-01-01

    This study examines the threat to internal security posed by violent gangs. This threat was found to be particularly acute in inner-city communities that have over time devolved to a status that the author classified as failed communities...

  11. InaSAFE applications in disaster preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranantyo, Ignatius Ryan; Fadmastuti, Mahardika; Chandra, Fredy

    2015-04-01

    Disaster preparedness activities aim to reduce the impact of disasters by being better prepared to respond when a disaster occurs. In order to better anticipate requirements during a disaster, contingency planning activities can be undertaken prior to a disaster based on a realistic disaster scenario. InaSAFE is a tool that can inform this process. InaSAFE is a free and open source software that estimates the impact to people and infrastructure from potential hazard scenarios. By using InaSAFE, disaster managers can develop scenarios of disaster impacts (people and infrastructures affected) to inform their contingency plan and emergency response operation plan. While InaSAFE provides the software framework exposure data and hazard data are needed as inputs to run this software. Then InaSAFE can be used to forecast the impact of the hazard scenario to the exposure data. InaSAFE outputs include estimates of the number of people, buildings and roads are affected, list of minimum needs (rice and clean water), and response checklist. InaSAFE is developed by Indonesia's National Disaster Management Agency (BNPB) and the Australian Government, through the Australia-Indonesia Facility for Disaster Reduction (AIFDR), in partnership with the World Bank - Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR). This software has been used in many parts of Indonesia, including Padang, Maumere, Jakarta, and Slamet Mountain for emergency response and contingency planning.

  12. Position Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Position Information Data Asset provides the ability to search for active SSA position descriptions using various search criteria. An individual may search by PD...

  13. What if the Doha Round Fails? Implications for Canadian Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Gifford, Michael N.; McCalla, Alex F.; Meilke, Karl D.

    2008-01-01

    Many commentators assume that the WTO Doha Round negotiations have already failed and that this failure will not matter for Canadian agriculture. Neither view is correct. Most countries appear willing to make the effort needed to bring the negotiations to a make or break point in early 2008. If the Doha Round does eventually fail, an important opportunity to make the agricultural trading system significantly less distorted, more open and fair will have been lost. For Canadian agriculture, the...

  14. National intelligence estimates and the Failed State Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, Martin

    2013-10-01

    Across 177 countries around the world, the Failed State Index, a measure of state vulnerability, was reliably negatively associated with the estimates of national intelligence. Psychometric analysis of the Failed State Index, compounded of 12 social, economic, and political indicators, suggested factorial unidimensionality of this index. The observed correspondence of higher national intelligence figures to lower state vulnerability might arise through these two macro-level variables possibly being proxies of even more pervasive historical and societal background variables that affect both.

  15. Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

  16. Safe actinide disposition in molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gat, U.

    1997-01-01

    Safe molten salt reactors (MSR) can readily accommodate the burning of all fissile actinides. Only minor compromises associated with plutonium are required. The MSRs can dispose safely of actinides and long lived isotopes to result in safer and simpler waste. Disposing of actinides in MSRs does increase the source term of a safety optimized MSR. It is concluded that the burning and transmutation of actinides in MSRs can be done in a safe manner. Development is needed for the processing to handle and separate the actinides. Calculations are needed to establish the neutron economy and the fuel management. 9 refs

  17. Failing the market, failing deliberative democracy: How scaling up corporate carbon reporting proliferates information asymmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar Lippert

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Corporate carbon footprint data has become ubiquitous. This data is also highly promissory. But as this paper argues, such data fails both consumers and citizens. The governance of climate change seemingly requires a strong foundation of data on emission sources. Economists approach climate change as a market failure, where the optimisation of the atmosphere is to be evidence based and data driven. Citizens or consumers, state or private agents of control, all require deep access to information to judge emission realities. Whether we are interested in state-led or in neoliberal ‘solutions’ for either democratic participatory decision-making or for preventing market failure, companies’ emissions need to be known. This paper draws on 20 months of ethnographic fieldwork in a Fortune 50 company’s environmental accounting unit to show how carbon reporting interferes with information symmetry requirements, which further troubles possibilities for contesting data. A material-semiotic analysis of the data practices and infrastructures employed in the context of corporate emissions disclosure details the situated political economies of data labour along the data processing chain. The explicit consideration of how information asymmetries are socially and computationally shaped, how contexts are shifted and how data is systematically straightened out informs a reflexive engagement with Big Data. The paper argues that attempts to automatise environmental accounting’s veracity management by means of computing metadata or to ensure that data quality meets requirements through third-party control are not satisfactory. The crossover of Big Data with corporate environmental governance does not promise to trouble the political economy that hitherto sustained unsustainability.

  18. Ubiquitous positioning

    CERN Document Server

    Mannings, Robin

    2008-01-01

    This groundbreaking resource offers a practical, in-depth understanding of Ubiquitous Positioning - positioning systems that identify the location and position of people, vehicles and objects in time and space in the digitized networked economy. The future and growth of ubiquitous positioning will be fueled by the convergence of many other areas of technology, from mobile telematics, Internet technology, and location systems, to sensing systems, geographic information systems, and the semantic web. This first-of-its-kind volume explores ubiquitous positioning from a convergence perspective, of

  19. Positioning consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkier, Bente; Keller, Margit

    2014-01-01

    positionings emerges based on empirical examples of research in parent–children consumption. Positionings are flexible discursive fixations of the relationship between the performances of the practitioner, other practitioners, media discourse and consumption activities. The basic positioning types...... are the practice maintenance and the practice change position, with different sorts of adapting in between. Media discourse can become a resource for a resistant position against social control or for an appropriating position in favour of space for action. Regardless of the current relation to a particular media......This article analyses the ways in which media discourses become a part of contested consumption activities. We apply a positioning perspective with practice theory to focus on how practitioners relate to media discourse as a symbolic resource in their everyday practices. A typology of performance...

  20. Conflict, Memory, and Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brescó, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to bring the dialogical and multivoiced dimension of conflict to the fore in the study of how people remember a particular event in the past. Drawing from different case studies, it contains analyses of how subjects identifying with different political actors in the Basque...... conflict adopted their respective positions, and interpretation of the conflict, and how, in light of same, they reconstruct the failed peace process that took place in 2006 between the terrorist group ETA (Euzkadi ta Azcatasuna, or Basque Country and Freedom in English) and the Spanish government. Results...... show that the positioning adopted by participants gives rise to a certain form of interpreting the conflict, which, in turn, affects how the peace process is remembered. This occurs within a particular argumentative context in which each version constitutes an implicit response to a competing...

  1. Mexico: a regional power or a failed State?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Derwich

    2015-10-01

    Caribbean region for many years. This opinion has strong foundations. Territory, geographical location, economy, and political influence are the key factors that predestine this country to the role of a regional power. The democratic transition that has taken place in Mexico in last decades and economic cooperation with the United States also allow it to play a role of regional leader. However, Mexico has significant problems that make it difficult for the country to play the role of a real leader. The most important one is the development of narcobusiness. This phenomenon brings not only the growing activity of drug cartels but also the eruption of narcoviolence in Mexico. This gives rise to grave problems for the Mexican authorities. The development of narcobusiness is partially the result of weakness of some of its institutions. For example, police forces do not carry out their tasks and are closely related to the drug cartels. As a result, the Mexican state is incapable of assuring security to its citizens – one of the most important functions of every state. Is it able to control its territory? It definitely does not have a monopoly for the use of violence on its territory. Huge corruption enables different non-state actors to influence decision making processes. All these problems make substantiated theses that the Mexican state is dysfunctional in some areas. Some analysts go much further in their opinions and describe Mexico as a failed state. The aim of the paper is to analyze the present position of Mexico in Latin America and the Caribbean region. Are the contemporary problems so big that they can lead to the collapse of the Mexican state or does Mexico have a real potential to play the role of a local leader and regional power? The author would like to analyze the impact of the present day internal problems in Mexico’s geopolitical position.

  2. Staying Safe on Social Network Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips Security Tip (ST06-003) Staying Safe on Social Networking Sites Original release date: January 26, 2011 | Last revised: ... so you should take certain precautions. What are social networking sites? Social networking sites, sometimes referred to as "friend- ...

  3. Implicit attitudes towards risky and safe driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Laila Marianne; Sømhovd, Mikael Julius; Møller, Mette

    ; further, self-reports of the intention to drive safely (or not) are socially sensitive. Therefore, we examined automatic preferences towards safe and risky driving with a Go/No-go Association Task (GNAT). The results suggest that (1) implicit attitudes towards driving behavior can be measured reliably...... with the GNAT; (2) implicit attitudes towards safe driving versus towards risky driving may be separable constructs. We propose that research on driving behavior may benefit from routinely including measures of implicit cognition. A practical advantage is a lesser susceptibility to social desirability biases......, compared to self-report methods. Pending replication in future research, the apparent dissociation between implicit attitudes towards safe versus risky driving that we observed may contribute to a greater theoretical understanding of the causes of unsafe and risky driving behavior....

  4. High-Protein Diets: Are They Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Nutrition and healthy eating Are high-protein diets safe for weight loss? Answers from Katherine ... L.D. For most healthy people, a high-protein diet generally isn't harmful, particularly when followed ...

  5. Safe delivery, Service utilization, Metekel Zone

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    decision making power of subjects were found to have a statistically significant association with preference of safe delivery ... Studies that focused on maternal mortality and proportion of ...... Anna M, Hannekee M, Frank Odhiambo et.al. Use.

  6. The safe transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messenger, W. de L.M.

    1979-02-01

    The hazards of radioactive materials in transport are surveyed. The system whereby they are safely transported between nuclear establishments in the United Kingdom and overseas is outlined. Several popular misconceptions are dealt with. (author)

  7. Layered Safe Motion Planning for Autonomous Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The major problem addressed by this research is how to plan a safe motion for autonomous vehicles in a two dimensional, rectilinear world. With given start and goal configurations, the planner performs motion planning which

  8. AFSC/REFM: Groundfish SAFE Economic Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Groundfish SAFE Economic Report, published annually as a supplement to the Stock Assessment and Fishery Evaluation Reports for Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands...

  9. Think Before You Ink: Are Tattoos Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Consumer Updates Think Before You Ink: Are Tattoos Safe? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... I be concerned about unsafe practices, or the tattoo ink itself? Both. While you can get serious ...

  10. Safe Eats - Eating Out and Bringing In

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to stay safe. What's On the Menu? When dining out: Remember that harmful bacteria can be hidden ... above the "danger zone." Remember the 2-Hour Rule : Discard any perishables (foods that can spoil or ...

  11. Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE) methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, L.D.; Grady, L.M.; Bennett, H.A.; Sasser, D.W.; Engi, D.

    1978-01-01

    The SAFE procedure is an efficient method of evaluating the physical protection system of a nuclear facility. Since the algorithms used in SAFE for path generation and evaluation are analytical, many paths can be evaluated with a modest investment in computer time. SAFE is easy to use because the information required is well-defined and the interactive nature of this procedure lends itself to straightforward operation. The modular approach that has been taken allows other functionally equivalent modules to be substituted as they become available. The SAFE procedure has broad applications in the nuclear facility safeguards field as well as in the security field in general. Any fixed facility containing valuable materials or components to be protected from theft or sabotage could be analyzed using this same automated evaluation technique

  12. SAFE users manual. Volume 4. Computer programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grady, L.M.

    1983-06-01

    Documentation for the Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE) computer programs is presented. The documentation is in the form of subprogram trees, program abstracts, flowcharts, and listings. Listings are provided on microfiche

  13. Failed common bile duct cannulation during pregnancy: Rescue with endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Vikas; Arora, Anil; Tyagi, Pankaj; Sharma, Praveen; Bansal, Naresh; Kumar, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Common bile duct (CBD) stones can lead to serious complications and require intervention with either endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or laparoscopic techniques for urgent relief. On an average 10%-20% of the patients with gall bladder stones can have associated CBD stones. CBD stones during pregnancy can be associated with hazardous complications for both the mother and the fetus. Failed cannulation while performing ERCP during pregnancy is a technically demanding situation, which requires immediate rescue with special techniques. Conventional rescue techniques may not be feasible and can be associated with hazardous consequences. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided rendezvous technique has now emerged as a safe alternative, and in one of our patients, this technique was successfully attempted. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature on EUS-guided rendezvous procedure during pregnancy.

  14. Salvage Flexor Hallucis Longus Transfer for a Failed Achilles Repair: Endoscopic Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Sérgio; Caetano, Rubén; Corte-Real, Nuno

    2015-10-01

    Flexor hallucis longus (FHL) transfer is a well-established treatment option in failed Achilles tendon (AT) repair and has been routinely performed as an open procedure. We detail the surgical steps needed to perform an arthroscopic transfer of the FHL for a chronic AT rupture. The FHL tendon is harvested as it enters in its tunnel beneath the sustentaculum tali; a tunnel is then drilled in the calcaneus as near to the AT footprint as possible. By use of a suture-passing device, the free end of the FHL is advanced to the plantar aspect of the foot. After adequate tension is applied to the construct, the tendon is fixed in place with an interference screw in an inside-out fashion. This minimally invasive approach is a safe and valid alternative to classic open procedures with the obvious advantages of preserving the soft-tissue envelope and using a biologically intact tendon.

  15. Standards for safe operation of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The safety of research reactors is based on many factors such as suitable choice of location, design and construction according to the international standards, it also depends on well trained and qualified operational staff. These standards determine the responsibilities of all who are concerned with the research reactors safe operation, and who are responsible of all related activities in all the administrative and technical stages in a way that insures the safe operation of the reactor

  16. Influencing behaviour for safe working environments

    OpenAIRE

    Boer, de, J. (Johannes); Teeuw, W.B. (Wouter)

    2011-01-01

    Safety at work The objective of the project Safety at Work is to increase safety at the workplace by applying and combining state of the art artefacts from personal protective equipment and ambient intelligence technology. In this state of the art document we focus on the developments with respect to how (persuasive) technology can help to influence behaviour in a natural, automatic way in order to make industrial environments safer. We focus on personal safety, safe environments and safe beh...

  17. Licensing issues for inherently safe fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Lee, S.; Okrent, D.

    1986-01-01

    There has been considerable interest recently in a new generation of liquid metal reactor (LMR) concepts in the US. Some significant changes in regulatory philosophy will be required if the anticipated cost advantages of inherently safe designs are to be achieved. The defense in depth philosophy will need to be significantly re-evaluated in the context of inherently safe reactors. It is the purpose of this paper to begin such a re-evaluation of this regulatory philosophy

  18. Interventions to Improve Safe Sleep Among Hospitalized Infants at Eight Children's Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Stephanie; Ahlers-Schmidt, Carolyn R; Lukasiewicz, Gloria; Truong, Therese Macasiray

    2016-02-01

    Within hospital pediatric units, there is a lack of consistent application or modeling of the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations for safe infant sleep. The purpose of this study was to improve safe sleep practices for infants in nonneonatal pediatric units with implementation of specific interventions. This multi-institutional study was conducted by using baseline observations collected for sleep location, position, and environment (collectively, "safe sleep") of infants admitted to pediatric units. Interventions consisted of: (1) staff education, including a commitment to promote safe sleep; (2) implementing site-generated safe sleep policies; (3) designating supply storage in patient rooms; and/or (4) caregiver education. Postintervention observations of safe sleep were collected. Eight hospitals participated from the Inpatient FOCUS Group of the Children's Hospital Association. Each site received institutional review board approval/exemption. Safe sleep was observed for 4.9% of 264 infants at baseline and 31.2% of 234 infants postintervention (Ppresent in 77% of cribs at baseline and 44% postintervention. However, the mean number of unsafe items observed in each sleeping environment was reduced by >50% (P=.001). Implementation of site-specific interventions seems to improve overall safe sleep in inpatient pediatric units, although continued improvement is needed. Specifically, extra items are persistently left in the sleeping environment. Moving forward, hospitals should evaluate their compliance with American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations and embrace initiatives to improve modeling of safe sleep. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. A 'simple anterior fish excluder' (SAFE for mitigating penaeid-trawl bycatch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J McHugh

    Full Text Available Various plastic strips and sheets (termed 'simple anterior fish excluders'-SAFEs were positioned across the openings of penaeid trawls in attempts at reducing the unwanted bycatches of small teleosts. Initially, three SAFEs (a single wire without, and with small and large plastic panels were compared against a control (no SAFE on paired beam trawls. All SAFEs maintained targeted Metapenaeus macleayi catches, while the largest plastic SAFE significantly reduced total bycatch by 51% and the numbers of Pomatomus saltatrix, Mugil cephalus and Herklotsichthys castelnaui by up to 58%. A redesigned SAFE ('continuous plastic' was subsequently tested (against a control on paired otter trawls, significantly reducing total bycatch by 28% and P. saltatrix and H. castelnaui by up to 42%. The continuous-plastic SAFE also significantly reduced M. macleayi catches by ~7%, but this was explained by ~5% less wing-end spread, and could be simply negated through otter-board refinement. Further work is required to refine the tested SAFEs, and to quantify species-specific escape mechanisms. Nevertheless, the SAFE concept might represent an effective approach for improving penaeid-trawl selectivity.

  20. Stock Photographs Do Not Comply With Infant Safe Sleep Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodstein, Michael H; Lagon, Elena; Bell, Theodore; Joyner, Brandi L; Moon, Rachel Y

    2018-04-01

    We evaluated images in popular stock photography websites for adherence with American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines for safe infant sleep practices. Three top stock photo websites were used to collect photographs generated from key phrases. All images depicting an infant sleep environment were analyzed for consistency with AAP guidelines. Descriptive statistics, chi-square and z test of proportions, were conducted. A total of 1233 of 1947 stock photographs showed sleeping infants on a flat surface. In all, 627 (50.8%) photographs showed the infant in the supine position and 79 (5%) of all infant sleep environments were adherent with AAP recommendations. Bedding inconsistent with safe sleep recommendations was identified in 1133 images (71.3%), with blankets noted in 49.5%. Images depicting sleeping infants on stock photography sites do not routinely adhere to AAP recommendations. Media messages inconsistent with health care messages create confusion and misinformation about infant sleep safety and may lead inadvertently to unsafe practices.

  1. Curiosity's Autonomous Surface Safing Behavior Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Tracy A.; Manning, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    The safing routines on all robotic deep-space vehicles are designed to put the vehicle in a power and thermally safe configuration, enabling communication with the mission operators on Earth. Achieving this goal is made a little more difficult on Curiosity because the power requirements for the core avionics and the telecommunication equipment exceed the capability of the single power source, the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator. This drove the system design to create an operational mode, called "sleep mode", where the vehicle turns off most of the loads in order to charge the two Li-ion batteries. The system must keep the vehicle safe from over-heat and under-heat conditions, battery cell failures, under-voltage conditions, and clock failures, both while the computer is running and while the system is sleeping. The other goal of a safing routine is to communicate. On most spacecraft, this simply involves turning on the receiver and transmitter continuously. For Curiosity, Earth is above the horizon only a part of the day for direct communication to the Earth, and the orbiter overpass opportunities only occur a few times a day. The design must robustly place the Rover in a communicable condition at the correct time. This paper discusses Curiosity's autonomous safing behavior and describes how the vehicle remains power and thermally safe while sleeping, as well as a description of how the Rover communicates with the orbiters and Earth at specific times.

  2. Managing Cassini Safe Mode Attitude at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft was launched on October 15, 1997 and arrived at Saturn on June 30, 2004. It has performed detailed observations and remote sensing of Saturn, its rings, and its satellites since that time. In the event safe mode interrupts normal orbital operations, Cassini has flight software fault protection algorithms to detect, isolate, and recover to a thermally safe and commandable attitude and then wait for further instructions from the ground. But the Saturn environment is complex, and safety hazards change depending on where Cassini is in its orbital trajectory around Saturn. Selecting an appropriate safe mode attitude that insures safe operation in the Saturn environment, including keeping the star tracker field of view clear of bright bodies, while maintaining a quiescent, commandable attitude, is a significant challenge. This paper discusses the Cassini safe table management strategy and the key criteria that must be considered, especially during low altitude flybys of Titan, in deciding what spacecraft attitude should be used in the event of safe mode.

  3. Thermal analysis of the failed equipment storage vault system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerrell, J.; Lee, S.Y.; Shadday, A.

    1995-07-01

    A storage facility for failed glass melters is required for radioactive operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). It is currently proposed that the failed melters be stored in the Failed Equipment Storage Vaults (FESV's) in S area. The FESV's are underground reinforced concrete structures constructed in pairs, with adjacent vaults sharing a common wall. A failed melter is to be placed in a steel Melter Storage Box (MSB), sealed, and lowered into the vault. A concrete lid is then placed over the top of the FESV. Two melters will be placed within the FESV/MSB system, separated by the common wall. There is no forced ventilation within the vault so that the melter is passively cooled. Temperature profiles in the Failed Equipment Storage Vault Structures have been generated using the FLOW3D software to model heat conduction and convection within the FESV/MSB system. Due to complexities in modeling radiation with FLOW3D, P/THERMAL software has been used to model radiation using the conduction/convection temperature results from FLOW3D. The final conjugate model includes heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation to predict steady-state temperatures. Also, the FLOW3D software has been validated as required by the technical task request

  4. Reactivity control system of a passively safe thorium breeder pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wols, F.J.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Lathouwers, D.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A worth of over 15,000 pcm ensures achieving long-term cold shutdown in thorium PBR. • Control rod worth in side reflector is insufficient due to low-power breeder zone. • 20 control rods, just outside the driver zone, can achieve long-term cold shutdown. • BF 3 gas can be inserted for reactor shutdown, but only in case of emergency. • Perturbation theory accurately predicts absorber gas worth for many concentrations. - Abstract: This work investigates the neutronic design of the reactivity control system for a 100 MW th passively safe thorium breeder pebble bed reactor (PBR), a conceptual design introduced previously by the authors. The thorium PBR consists of a central driver zone of 100 cm radius, surrounded by a breeder zone with 300 cm outer radius. The fissile content of the breeder zone is low, leading to low fluxes in the radial reflector region. Therefore, a significant decrease of the control rod worth at this position is anticipated. The reactivity worth of control rods in the side reflector and at alternative in-core positions is calculated using different techniques, being 2D neutron diffusion, perturbation theory and more accurate 3D Monte Carlo models. Sensitivity coefficients from perturbation theory provide a first indication of effective control rod positions, while the 2D diffusion models provide an upper limit on the reactivity worth achievable at a certain radial position due to the homogeneous spreading of the absorber material over the azimuthal domain. Three dimensional forward calculations, e.g. in KENO, are needed for an accurate calculation of the total control rod worth. The two dimensional homogeneous calculations indicate that the reactivity worth in the radial reflector is by far insufficient to achieve cold reactor shutdown, which requires a control rod worth of over 15 000 pcm. Three dimensional heterogeneous KENO calculations show that placing 20 control rods just outside the driver channel, between 100 cm

  5. Reactivity control system of a passively safe thorium breeder pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wols, F.J., E-mail: f.j.wols@tudelft.nl; Kloosterman, J.L.; Lathouwers, D.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A worth of over 15,000 pcm ensures achieving long-term cold shutdown in thorium PBR. • Control rod worth in side reflector is insufficient due to low-power breeder zone. • 20 control rods, just outside the driver zone, can achieve long-term cold shutdown. • BF{sub 3} gas can be inserted for reactor shutdown, but only in case of emergency. • Perturbation theory accurately predicts absorber gas worth for many concentrations. - Abstract: This work investigates the neutronic design of the reactivity control system for a 100 MW{sub th} passively safe thorium breeder pebble bed reactor (PBR), a conceptual design introduced previously by the authors. The thorium PBR consists of a central driver zone of 100 cm radius, surrounded by a breeder zone with 300 cm outer radius. The fissile content of the breeder zone is low, leading to low fluxes in the radial reflector region. Therefore, a significant decrease of the control rod worth at this position is anticipated. The reactivity worth of control rods in the side reflector and at alternative in-core positions is calculated using different techniques, being 2D neutron diffusion, perturbation theory and more accurate 3D Monte Carlo models. Sensitivity coefficients from perturbation theory provide a first indication of effective control rod positions, while the 2D diffusion models provide an upper limit on the reactivity worth achievable at a certain radial position due to the homogeneous spreading of the absorber material over the azimuthal domain. Three dimensional forward calculations, e.g. in KENO, are needed for an accurate calculation of the total control rod worth. The two dimensional homogeneous calculations indicate that the reactivity worth in the radial reflector is by far insufficient to achieve cold reactor shutdown, which requires a control rod worth of over 15 000 pcm. Three dimensional heterogeneous KENO calculations show that placing 20 control rods just outside the driver channel

  6. [Laparoscopic Heller myotomy after failed POEM and multiple balloon dilatations : Better late than never].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulini, L; Dubecz, A; Stein, H J

    2017-04-01

    Despite the lack of long-term results, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been increasingly propagated as a feasible alternative to pneumatic balloon dilatation (BD) and laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) in patients with achalasia. After a long-term follow-up, a large percentage of patients reported recurrence of dysphagia. It is unclear which kind of procedure (redo POEM or LHM) should be utilized in these patients with failed POEM. We report the case of a 37-year-old female patient with type I achalasia who was successfully treated with LHM after a failed POEM procedure. After the manometric diagnosis of type I achalasia, the patient was treated with six balloon dilatations within a period of 5 months. Because of the persistence of symptoms a POEM procedure was performed with no relief and the patient was referred for surgical treatment. An esophagography showed a pronounced widening of the middle and the distal esophagus with a persistent narrowing of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and because of these indications LHM was performed. The intraoperative examination revealed extensive scarring of the submucosal layer with the muscularis mucosae of the distal esophagus; nevertheless, it was possible to carry out a 5 cm long cardiomyotomy without mucosal injury. The operation was completed with a Dor fundoplication. There were no postoperative complications. After surgery the patient reported an immediate and complete relief of dysphagia. The published experiences with POEM seem to show promising short-term results in terms of dysphagia relief; however, the few available mid-term analyses demonstrated no essential advantages when compared to LHM; therefore, the LHM must still be considered the gold standard procedure for definitive treatment of achalasia. According to our case report, LHM was shown to be a safe and effective although laborious treatment option due to scarring even after failed treatment by POEM.

  7. [Fractographic analysis of clinically failed anterior all ceramic crowns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, Qian; Zhou, Min-bo; Zhang, Xin-ping; Zhao, Ke

    2012-04-01

    To identify the site of crack initiation and propagation path of clinically failed all ceramic crowns by fractographic analysis. Three clinically failed anterior IPS Empress II crowns and two anterior In-Ceram alumina crowns were retrieved. Fracture surfaces were examined using both optical stereo and scanning electron microscopy. Fractographic theory and fracture mechanics principles were applied to disclose the damage characteristics and fracture mode. All the crowns failed by cohesive failure within the veneer on the labial surface. Critical crack originated at the incisal contact area and propagated gingivally. Porosity was found within the veneer because of slurry preparation and the sintering of veneer powder. Cohesive failure within the veneer is the main failure mode of all ceramic crown. Veneer becomes vulnerable when flaws are present. To reduce the chances of chipping, multi-point occlusal contacts are recommended, and layering and sintering technique of veneering layer should also be improved.

  8. Position paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidbuchel, Hein; Papadakis, Michael; Panhuyzen-Goedkoop, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Sports cardiology is a new and rapidly evolving subspecialty. It aims to elucidate the cardiovascular effects of regular exercise and delineate its benefits and risks, so that safe guidance can be provided to all individuals engaging in sports and/or physical activity in order to attain the maximum...... potential benefit at the lowest possible risk. The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) advocates systematic preparticipation cardiovascular screening in an effort to identify competitive athletes at risk of exercise-related cardiovascular events and sudden cardiac death. However, the implementation...... that the curriculum would facilitate more uniform training and guideline implementation throughout Europe, and safeguard that evaluation and guidance of competitive athletes or individuals who wish to engage in leisure-time sports activities is performed by physicians with expertise in the field. The current...

  9. Assessing the potential cost of a failed Doha round

    OpenAIRE

    Antoine Bouet

    2010-01-01

    This study offers new conclusions on the economic cost of a failed Doha Development Agenda (DDA). We assess potential outcome of the Doha Round as well as four protectionist scenarios using the MIRAGE Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model. In a scenario where applied tariffs of World Trade Organization (WTO) economies would go up to currently bound tariff rates, world trade would decrease by 7.7 % and world welfare by US$353 billion. The economic cost of a failed DDA is here evaluated by...

  10. Failed State and the Mandate of Peacekeeping Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Eka Nizmi, Yusnarida

    2011-01-01

    By 1990, Somalia had become a good example of what was becoming known as a “failed state”- a people without a government strong enough to govern the country or represent it in International organizations; a country whose poverty, disorganization, refugee flows, political instability, and random warfare had the potential to spread across borders and threaten the stability of other states and the peace of the region.[1] At the end of the cold war there were several such failed states in Africa,...

  11. Safe taste memory consolidation is disrupted by a protein synthesis inhibitor in the nucleus accumbens shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroza-Llinás, R; Ramírez-Lugo, L; Guzmán-Ramos, K; Zavala-Vega, S; Bermúdez-Rattoni, F

    2009-07-01

    Consolidation is the process by which a new memory is stabilized over time, and is dependent on de novo protein synthesis. A useful model for studying memory formation is gustatory memory, a type of memory in which a novel taste may become either safe by not being followed by negative consequences (attenuation of neophobia, AN), or aversive by being followed by post-digestive malaise (conditioned taste aversion, CTA). Here we evaluated the effects of the administration of a protein synthesis inhibitor in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell for either safe or aversive taste memory trace consolidation. To test the effects on CTA and AN of protein synthesis inhibition, anisomycin (100microg/microl) was bilaterally infused into the NAc shell of Wistar rats' brains. We found that post-trial protein synthesis blockade impaired the long-term safe taste memory. However, protein synthesis inhibition failed to disrupt the long-term memory of CTA. In addition, we infused anisomycin in the NAc shell after the pre-exposure to saccharin in a latent inhibition of aversive taste. We found that the protein synthesis inhibition impaired the consolidation of safe taste memory, allowing the aversive taste memory to form and consolidate. Our results suggest that protein synthesis is required in the NAc shell for consolidation of safe but not aversive taste memories, supporting the notion that consolidation of taste memory is processed in several brain regions in parallel, and implying that inhibitory interactions between both taste memory traces do occur.

  12. 76 FR 12719 - Safe Schools/Healthy Students Program; Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools; Safe Schools/Healthy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Safe Schools/Healthy Students Program; Office of Safe and Drug- Free Schools; Safe Schools/Healthy Students Program; Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Numbers: 84... priorities, requirements, and definitions under the Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) program. Since...

  13. Researcher positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck, Line Lerche; Khawaja, Iram

    2009-01-01

    abstract  This article focuses on the complex and multi-layered process of researcher positioning, specifically in relation to the politically sensitive study of marginalised and ‘othered' groups such as Muslims living in Denmark. We discuss the impact of different ethnic, religious and racial...... political and personal involvement by the researcher, which challenges traditional perspectives on research and researcher positioning. A key point in this regard is the importance of constant awareness of and reflection on the multiple ways in which one's positioning as a researcher influences the research...

  14. What promotes sustainability in Safe Community programmes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordqvist, Cecilia; Timpka, Toomas; Lindqvist, Kent

    2009-01-08

    The theory and practice of safety promotion has traditionally focused on the safety of individuals. This study also includes systems, environments, and organizations. Safety promotion programmes are designed to support community health initiatives taking a bottom-up approach. This is a long-term and complex process. The aim of this study was to try to empirically identify factors that promote sustainability in the structures of programmes that are managed and coordinated by the local government. Four focus group sessions with local government politicians and administrators in designated Safe Communities were conducted and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Collaboration was found to be the basis for sustainability. Networks, enabling municipalities to exchange ideas, were reported to positively influence the programmes. Personal contacts rather than organizations themselves, determine whether collaboration is sustained. Participants reported an increase in cross-disciplinary collaboration among staff categories. Administrators and politicians were reported to collaborate well, which was perceived to speed up decision-making and thus to facilitate the programme work. Support from the politicians and the county council was seen as a prerequisite. Participants reported an increased willingness to share information between units, which, in their view, supports sustainability. A structure in which all local authorities' offices were located in close proximity to one another was considered to support collaboration. Appointing a public health coordinator responsible for the programme was seen as a way to strengthen the relational resources of the programme. With a public health coordinator, the 'external' negotiating power was concentrated in one person. Also, the 'internal' programme strength increased when the coordination was based on a bureaucratic function rather than on one individual. Increased relational resources facilitated the transfer of information

  15. What promotes sustainability in Safe Community programmes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindqvist Kent

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The theory and practice of safety promotion has traditionally focused on the safety of individuals. This study also includes systems, environments, and organizations. Safety promotion programmes are designed to support community health initiatives taking a bottom-up approach. This is a long-term and complex process. The aim of this study was to try to empirically identify factors that promote sustainability in the structures of programmes that are managed and coordinated by the local government. Methods Four focus group sessions with local government politicians and administrators in designated Safe Communities were conducted and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results Collaboration was found to be the basis for sustainability. Networks, enabling municipalities to exchange ideas, were reported to positively influence the programmes. Personal contacts rather than organizations themselves, determine whether collaboration is sustained. Participants reported an increase in cross-disciplinary collaboration among staff categories. Administrators and politicians were reported to collaborate well, which was perceived to speed up decision-making and thus to facilitate the programme work. Support from the politicians and the county council was seen as a prerequisite. Participants reported an increased willingness to share information between units, which, in their view, supports sustainability. A structure in which all local authorities' offices were located in close proximity to one another was considered to support collaboration. Appointing a public health coordinator responsible for the programme was seen as a way to strengthen the relational resources of the programme. Conclusion With a public health coordinator, the 'external' negotiating power was concentrated in one person. Also, the 'internal' programme strength increased when the coordination was based on a bureaucratic function rather than on one individual

  16. A mechanistic approach to safe igniter implementation for hydrogen mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitung, W.; Dorofeev, S.B.; Travis, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    A new methodology for safe igniter implementation in a full-scale 3-d containment is described. The method consists of the following steps: determination of bounding H 2 /steam sources; high-resolution analysis of the 3-d transport and mixing processes; evaluation of the detonation potential at the time of ignition; optimization of the igniter system such that only early ignition and nonenergetic combustion occurs; and modelling of the continuous deflagration processes during H 2 -release. The method was implemented into the GASFLOW code. The principle and the feasibility is demonstrated for a single room geometry. A full-scale 3-d reactor case is analyzed without and with deliberate ignition, assuming a severe dry H 2 release sequence (1200 kg). In the unmitigated case significant DDT potential in the whole containment develops, including the possibility of global detonations. The analysis with igniters in different positions predicted deflagration or detonation in the break compartment, depending on the igniter location. Igniter positions were found which lead to early ignition, effective H 2 -removal, and negligible pressure loads. The approach can be used to determine number, position and frequency of a safe igniter system for a given large dry containment. (author)

  17. Prostatic Artery Embolization After Failed Urological Interventions for Benign Prostatic Obstruction: A Case Series of Three Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, Shivank S., E-mail: sbhatia1@med.miami.edu; Dalal, Ravi, E-mail: rdalal@med.miami.edu [University of Miami – Miller School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (United States); Gomez, Christopher, E-mail: Cgomez7@med.miami.edu [University of Miami – Miller School of Medicine, Department of Urology (United States); Narayanan, Govindarajan, E-mail: gnarayanan@med.miami.edu [University of Miami – Miller School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Benign prostate obstruction with associated lower urinary tract symptoms is a common diagnosis with multiple minimally invasive treatment options available. Herein, the authors describe three patients who failed prior different urological interventions who underwent prostate artery embolization with a subsequent improvement in symptoms. The positive response suggests that embolization may be an effective treatment alternative in this subset of patients.

  18. THE CONSEQUENCES OF GLOBALIZATION UPON SAFE TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Mihić

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Globalization, a phenomenon on the rise, is characterized by the free cross-bor- der movement of individuals, technologies, and capital. It has far- reaching consequen- ces for tourism, too, as it implies travel for leisure and business, and correspondingly, financial transfers between various nation states. Startinf from the status quo in the field, the current paper sets out to analyze the consequences and implications of globalization upon safe tourism and conduct a marketing research into the perceptions of consumers upon Serbia as a safe vacation destination for the purpose of safe tourism. Finally the research results will be presented and several solutions will be provided for improving security in tourism zones

  19. From Safe Systems to Patient Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarts, J.; Nøhr, C.

    2010-01-01

    for the third conference with the theme: The ability to design, implement and evaluate safe, useable and effective systems within complex health care organizations. The theme for this conference was "Designing and Implementing Health IT: from safe systems to patient safety". The contributions have reflected...... and implementation of safe systems and thus contribute to the agenda of patient safety? The contributions demonstrate how the health informatics community has contributed to the performance of significant research and to translating research findings to develop health care delivery and improve patient safety......This volume presents the papers from the fourth International Conference on Information Technology in Health Care: Socio-technical Approaches held in Aalborg, Denmark in June 2010. In 2001 the first conference was held in Rotterdam, The Netherlands with the theme: Sociotechnical' approaches...

  20. Inherently safe technologies-chemical and nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assessments show an inverse relationship between the likelihood and the consequences of nuclear and chemical plant accidents, but the Bhopal accident has change public complacency about the safety of chemical plants to such an extent that public confidence is now at the same low level as with nuclear plants. The nuclear industry's response was to strengthen its institutions and improve its technologies, but the public may not be convinced. One solution is to develop reactors which do not depend upon the active intervention of humans of electromechanical devices to deal with emergencies, but which have physical properties that limit the possible temperature and power of a reactor. The Process Inherent Ultimately Safe and the modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled reactors are two possibilities. the chemical industry needs to develop its own inherently safe design precepts that incorporate smallness, safe processes, and hardening against sabotage. 5 references

  1. Virtually 'in the heat of the moment': insula activation in safe sex negotiation among risky men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin J; Xue, Feng; Droutman, Vita; Barkley-Levenson, Emily; Melrose, A James; Miller, Lynn C; Monterosso, John R; Bechara, Antoine; Appleby, Paul R; Christensen, John L; Godoy, Carlos G; Read, Stephen J

    2018-01-01

    HIV is most prevalent among men who have sex with men (MSM), and although most MSM use condoms consistently during casual sex, some take risks. To better understand the psychology of those risky decisions, we examined neural correlates of playing a virtual sexual 'hook up' game in an functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner in MSM who had, in the past 90 days, been sexually risky (N = 76) or safe (N = 31). We found that during potentially risky sexual choices, previously risky MSM had more right insula activity than previously safe MSM. Real-life sexual risk was related to trait positive and negative urgency. Insula activity that differentiated risky and safe MSM was related to trait positive and negative urgency. Future work should further examine if, and to what extent, insula activation during safe sex negotiation drives MSM's rash risky sexual decision-making. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Radiographic positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, R.L.; Dennis, C.A.; May, C.

    1989-01-01

    This book concentrates on the routine radiographic examinations commonly performed. It details the wide variety of examinations possible and their place in initial learning and in the radiology department as references for those occasions when an unusual examination is requested. This book provides information ranging from basic terminology to skeletal positioning to special procedures. Positions are discussed and supplemented with a picture of a patient, the resulting radiograph, and a labeled diagram. Immobilization and proper shielding of the patient are also shown

  3. Position encoder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goursky, Vsevolod

    1975-01-01

    A circuitry for deriving the quotient of signal delivered by position-sensitive detectors is described. Digital output is obtained in the form of 10- to 12-bit words. Impact position may be determined with 0.25% accuracy when the dynamic range of the energy signal is less 1:10, and 0.5% accuracy when the dynamic range is 1:20. The division requires an average time of 5μs for 10-bit words

  4. Position encoder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goursky, V.

    1975-05-01

    This paper describes circuitry for deriving the quotient of signals delivered by position-sensitive detectors. Digital output is obtained in the form of 10 to 12 bit words. Impact position may be determined with 0.25% accuracy when the dynamic range of the energy signal is less than 1:10, and 0.5% accuracy when the dynamic range is 1:20. The division requires an average time of 5μs for 10-bit words [fr

  5. The safe transport of radioactive materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, R

    1966-01-01

    The Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials is a handbook that details the safety guidelines in transporting radioactive materials. The title covers the various regulations and policies, along with the safety measures and procedures of radioactive material transport. The text first details the 1963 version of the IAEA regulation for the safe transport of radioactive materials; the regulation covers the classification of radionuclides for transport purposes and the control of external radiation hazards during the transport of radioactive materials. The next chapter deals with concerns in the im

  6. Ergonomics: safe patient handling and mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmark, Beth; Mechan, Patricia; Shores, Lynne

    2015-03-01

    This article reviews and investigates the issues surrounding ergonomics, with a specific focus on safe patient handling and mobility. The health care worker of today faces many challenges, one of which is related to the safety of patients. Safe patient handling and mobility is on the forefront of the movement to improve patient safety. This article reviews the risks associated with patient handling and mobility, and informs the reader of current evidence-based practice relevant to this area of care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Landscape planning for a safe city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ishikawa

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available To create a safe city free from natural disasters has been one of the important criteria in city planning. Since large cities have suffered from large fires caused by earthquakes, the planning of open spaces to prevent the spread of fires is part of the basic structure of city planning in Japan. Even in the feudal city of Edo, the former name of Tokyo, there had been open spaces to prevent fire disasters along canals and rivers. This paper discusses the historical evolution of open space planning, that we call landscape planning, through the experiences in Tokyo, and clarifies the characteristics and problems for achieving a safe city.

  8. Now, It's Your Turn: How You Can Take Medicine Safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Taking Medicines Safely Now, It's Your Turn: How You Can Take Medicine Safely ... medicine. The pharmacist has filled the prescription. Now it's up to you to take the medicine safely. ...

  9. Why Young People Fail To Get and Hold Jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Dept. of Labor, Albany.

    This booklet provides advice to young people seeking their first jobs on how to avoid the pitfalls that have caused others to lose jobs or fail to be hired. Topics discussed in short, one-page sections include appearance, attitude and behavior, ignorance of labor market facts, misrepresentation, sensitivity about a physical defect, unrealistic…

  10. Post-deportation risks for failed asylum seekers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Alpes

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available What happens to people who are deported after their asylum applications have failed? Many who are deported are at risk of harm when they return to their country of origin but there is little monitoring done of deportation outcomes.

  11. Fail forward: Mitigating failure in energy research and innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Almost three quarters of all innovation projects disappoint or fail. Instead of 'wasting' human and financial resources on energy projects that end up being terminated or ineffectual, this study offers a potential antidote coined the 'Origins of Failure in Energy Innovation' (OFEI) model. Based o...

  12. Winning Connections? Special Interests and the Sale of Failed Banks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Igan (Deniz); T. Lambert (Thomas); W.B. Wagner (Wolf); Q. Zhang (Quxian)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractWe study how lobbying affects the resolution of failed banks, using a sample of FDIC auctions between 2007 and 2014. We show that bidding banks that lobby regulators have a higher probability of winning an auction. In addition, the FDIC incurs higher costs in such auctions, amounting to

  13. Management of failed spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    based on an intent-to-treat analysis. Of these, 10 ... testing the level of a spinal block, nor is there an algorithm on how ... scenarios of failed spinal anaesthesia was distributed to 51 government hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa (SA).

  14. The ugly twins: Failed global sourcing projects and their substitutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiele, Holger; Horn, Philipp; Horn, Philipp; Werner, Welf

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the paper and literature addressed: Analyzing the impact of failed global sourcing projects on the entire commodity group and exploring isomorphism as potential antecedent to the observed phenomenon. The paper is embedded in the global sourcing literature, as well as isomorphism and total

  15. Delay factors in failed construction projects in southwestern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out with a view to showing the contribution of delay factors in the overall consideration of failed construction projects in south western Nigeria. This is considered necessary because the traditional view of construction project failure as consisting mainly of structural or functional failures tends to excuse ...

  16. Failed total carpometacarpal joint prosthesis of the thumb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben Bæk; Homilius, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Total joint prosthesis in carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb often fails. Loosening of the implant is often treated by resection arthroplasty, and we reviewed 10 patients, mean age 54 years (range 47-63) who were treated by resection arthroplasty after a failed total joint prosthesis. T...... in eight of 10 patients, but the mean Disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) scores, self-reported pinch-grip-related function, and pain were comparable with our earlier published results with the Elektra carpometacarpal total joint prosthesis.......Total joint prosthesis in carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb often fails. Loosening of the implant is often treated by resection arthroplasty, and we reviewed 10 patients, mean age 54 years (range 47-63) who were treated by resection arthroplasty after a failed total joint prosthesis....... The male:female ratio was 1:4 and the mean duration of observation 32 months (range 6-52). In three patients the revised implant was a MOJE uncemented carpometacarpal joint prosthesis and in seven patients an Elektra uncemented one. At follow-up grip strength was reduced to less than 90% of the other hand...

  17. Plasma Brightenings in a Failed Solar Filament Eruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D., E-mail: yingli@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2017-03-20

    Failed filament eruptions are solar eruptions that are not associated with coronal mass ejections. In a failed filament eruption, the filament materials usually show some ascending and falling motions as well as generating bright EUV emissions. Here we report a failed filament eruption (SOL2016-07-22) that occurred in a quiet-Sun region observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory . In this event, the filament spreads out but gets confined by the surrounding magnetic field. When interacting with the ambient magnetic field, the filament material brightens up and flows along the magnetic field lines through the corona to the chromosphere. We find that some materials slide down along the lifting magnetic structure containing the filament and impact the chromosphere, and through kinetic energy dissipation, cause two ribbon-like brightenings in a wide temperature range. There is evidence suggesting that magnetic reconnection occurs between the filament magnetic structure and the surrounding magnetic fields where filament plasma is heated to coronal temperatures. In addition, thread-like brightenings show up on top of the erupting magnetic fields at low temperatures, which might be produced by an energy imbalance from a fast drop of radiative cooling due to plasma rarefaction. Thus, this single event of a failed filament eruption shows the existence of a variety of plasma brightenings that may be caused by completely different heating mechanisms.

  18. The SVZ method: Why it works and why it fails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, B.; Whitenton, J.B.; Durand, L.

    1983-01-01

    We show in the context of potential theory, first, why the SVZ procedure for calculating hadronic masses succeeds phenomenologically: it provides a semiclassical interpolating formula which correctly relates input masses to output masses; and second, why it fails theoretically: the potential (or QCD) parameters derived from fits to masses are necessarily different from the true parameters. (orig.)

  19. 14C release from failed spent fuel containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, C.

    1989-01-01

    Partially failed containers may provide a meaningful barrier to the release of gaseous 14 CO 2 . A modeling approach is outlined and sample calculations are provided that show the effect on release due to a limited perforation area, to decreasing temperature, and to partial occlusion of the perforated area by corrosion products. 5 refs., 4 tabs

  20. Counselor Liability for Failing to Report Child Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Samuel

    1983-01-01

    Describes the laws regarding counselor liability for failure to report child abuse and state laws designating mandated reporters of suspected child abuse. Notes how the law protects mandated reporters. Discusses criminal penalties for those who fail to report suspected abuse. (RC)

  1. BENEFITS OF SHIRODKAR STITCH IN WOMEN WITH FAILED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-06

    Jun 6, 2011 ... This is a case series presentation of 14 cases where Shirodkar stitch was inserted after failed McDonald stitch. The patients were either self referrals or from Obstetricians in Eastern Africa region. All the patients were able to carry the pregnancies to term and were delivered by Caesarean section.

  2. 14C release from failed spent fuel containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, C.

    1990-01-01

    Partially failed containers may provide a meaningful barrier to the release of gaseous radionuclides. A modeling approach is outlined and sample calculations are provided that show the effects on release due to a limited perforation area, to decreasing temperature, and to the partial occlusion of the perforated area by corrosion products. 8 refs., 2 tabs

  3. Solutions for Failing High Schools: Converging Visions and Promising Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legters, Nettie; Balfanz, Robert; McPartland, James

    Promising solutions to the failings of traditional comprehensive high schools were reviewed to identify basic principles and strategies for improving high schools nationwide. Selected research studies, policy documents, and promising high school programs were reviewed. The review revealed the following principles for helping high schools better…

  4. Organization Theory: Bright Prospects for a Permanently Failing Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P.M.A.R. Heugens (Pursey)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractOrganization theory is a paradoxical field of scientific inquiry. It has struggled for more than fifty years to develop a unified theory of organizational effectiveness under girded by a coherent set of assumptions, and it has thus far failed to produce one. Yet, by other standards it is

  5. Why does Centralisation fail to internalise Policy Externalities?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Dur (Robert); H.J. Roelfsema (Hein)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractCentralisation of political decision making often fails to produce the desired results. For instance, it is frequently argued that decision making within the European Union results in overspending and overregulation in some policy areas, while too low spending and too little regulation

  6. Characteristics of failed fertilized oocytes in patients with severe obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E A Pigarova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Реферат по статье: Machtinger R, Combelles CM, Missmer SA, Correia KF, Fox JH, Racowsky C. The association between severe obesity and characteristics of failed fertilized oocytes. Hum Reprod. 2012 Nov;27(11:3198-207.

  7. "Badminton Player-Coach" Interactions between Failing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascret, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Background: Physical education teachers often use the player-coach dyad in individual opposition sports so that students can obtain information on their actions and then better regulate them. This type of work also develops methodological and social skills. However, the task of observing a partner often poses problems for failing students, who…

  8. Sexual risk behavior among HIV-positive persons in Jamaica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    positive status potentially place their partners at risk for HIV transmission and other sexually transmitted infections. The study findings highlight the need to promote safe sexual behaviors and a positive social environment for people living with ...

  9. Positional games

    CERN Document Server

    Hefetz, Dan; Stojaković, Miloš; Szabó, Tibor

    2014-01-01

    This text serves as a thorough introduction to the rapidly developing field of positional games. This area constitutes an important branch of combinatorics, whose aim it is to systematically develop an extensive mathematical basis for a variety of two-player perfect information games. These range from such popular games as Tic-Tac-Toe and Hex to purely abstract games played on graphs and hypergraphs. The subject of positional games is strongly related to several other branches of combinatorics such as Ramsey theory, extremal graph and set theory, and the probabilistic method. These notes cover a variety of topics in positional games, including both classical results and recent important developments. They are presented in an accessible way and are accompanied by exercises of varying difficulty, helping the reader to better understand the theory. The text will benefit both researchers and graduate students in combinatorics and adjacent fields.

  10. How safe are nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danzmann, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    The question 'how safe are nuclear power plants' can be answered differently - it depends on how the term 'safety' is understood. If the 'safety of supply' is left out as a possibility of interpretation, then the alternative views remain: Operational safety in the sense of reliability and safety of personnel and population. (orig.) [de

  11. Safe and Healthy Travel to China

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-09

    In this podcast, Dr. Phyllis Kozarsky, CDC Travel Medicine expert, discusses what travelers should do to ensure a safe and healthy trip to China.  Created: 10/9/2008 by National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases (NCPDCID), Division of Global Migration and Quarantine (DGMQ).   Date Released: 10/9/2008.

  12. Safe Space Oddity: Revisiting Critical Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by an incident in a social work graduate classroom in which she was a teaching assistant, the author reflects on her commitment to constructivist teaching methods, critical theory, and critical pedagogy. Exploring the educational utility of notions such as public space and safe space, the author employs this personal experience to examine…

  13. Safe reduction rules for weighted treewidth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkhof, F. van den; Bodlaender, H.L.; Koster, A.M.C.A.

    2002-01-01

    Several sets of reductions rules are known for preprocessing a graph when computing its treewidth. In this paper, we give reduction rules for a weighted variant of treewidth, motivated by the analysis of algorithms for probabilistic networks. We present two general reduction rules that are safe for

  14. Safe laparoscopic colorectal surgery performed by trainees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhoff, Peter Koch; Schultz, Martin; Harvald, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer is safe, but there have been hesitations to implement the technique in all departments. One of the reasons for this may be suboptimal learning possibilities since supervised trainees have not been allowed to do the operations to an adequate extent...

  15. Safe and secure: transportation of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, D.

    2015-01-01

    Western Waste Management Facility is Central Transportation Facility for Low and Intermediate waste materials. Transportation support for Stations: Reactor inspection tools and heavy water between stations and reactor components and single bundles of irradiated fuel to AECL-Chalk River for examination. Safety Track Record: 3.2 million kilometres safely travelled and no transportation accident - resulting in a radioactive release.

  16. Using over-the-counter medicines safely

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about OTC drugs. About OTC Medicines You can buy OTC medicines without a prescription in: Drug stores Grocery stores ... Safely You should: Examine the package before you buy it. Make sure it has not been tampered with. Never use medicine you have bought that does not look the ...

  17. Safe Sleep for Babies PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the January 2018 CDC Vital Signs report. Every year, there are about 3,500 sleep-related deaths among U.S. babies. Learn how to create a safe sleep environment for babies.

  18. Stay Safe and Healthy This Winter!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-11-23

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics offer some simple ways to stay safe and healthy during the winter holiday season.  Created: 11/23/2010 by CDC Office of Women’s Health.   Date Released: 11/23/2010.

  19. Safe injection procedures, injection practices, and needlestick ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nermine Mohamed Tawfik Foda

    2017-01-10

    Jan 10, 2017 ... Background: Of the estimated 384,000 needle-stick injuries occurring in hospitals each year, 23% occur in surgical settings. This study was conducted to assess safe injection procedures, injection practices, and circumstances contributing to needlestick and sharps injures (NSSIs) in operating rooms.

  20. Disabled Children: The Right to Feel Safe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mepham, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the fundamental right of disabled children to feel safe and be free from bullying, harassment and abuse. The article proposes that, 20 years since the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, disabled children are still facing barriers to securing this right. The article focuses on recent Mencap research that…

  1. School Counselors: Untapped Resources for Safe Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Connie J.

    2000-01-01

    Principals should consider redirecting school counselors' responsibilities to include directing safe-school teams; establishing networks to identify at-risk students and violent behavior signs; developing conflict-resolution activities; assessing and counseling misbehaving students; devising crisis- management plans; and helping staff predict and…

  2. How to Keep Your Sleeping Baby Safe

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first hour. After that, or when the mother needs to sleep or cannot do skin-to-skin, babies should ... Back is Best New Crib Standards: What Parents Need to Know Safe Sleep for Babies (Video) The Healthy Children Show: Sleep ( ...

  3. Education in Safe and Unsafe Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Recent student demands within the academy for "safe space" have aroused concern about the constraints they might impose on free speech and academic freedom. There are as many kinds of safety as there are threats to the things that human beings might care about. That is why we need to be very clear about the specific threats of which the…

  4. Asymptotically Safe Standard Model via Vectorlike Fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, R. B.; Meffe, J. R.; Sannino, F.; Steele, T. G.; Wang, Z. W.; Zhang, C.

    2017-12-01

    We construct asymptotically safe extensions of the standard model by adding gauged vectorlike fermions. Using large number-of-flavor techniques we argue that all gauge couplings, including the hypercharge and, under certain conditions, the Higgs coupling, can achieve an interacting ultraviolet fixed point.

  5. Have a Safe and Healthy Fall

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-14

    Fall is a great time to try new and healthy activities with your parents! Have a food tasting or a leaf raking contest! Whatever your plans, make sure to have fun and be safe!  Created: 10/14/2010 by CDC Office of Women’s Health.   Date Released: 10/14/2010.

  6. No safe place: parental alcoholism and adolescent suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, D C; Phillips, W M

    1990-10-01

    A child growing up in an alcoholic home develops either little self-consolidation (I-ness) and efficacy (I can) or a distorted self (I am insignificant). This results in a desperate search for a soothing-object (We-ness). The sadomasochistic behaviors, which a youth witnesses and is subjected to, become internalized as survival skills, but ultimately fail. These factors set the stage for a destructive modus operandi. When there is peer group attachment pressure, this teen does not find security when questioning, "Who am I?" because there is no "I" and no "We". Instead, this adolescent experiences fear, anxiety, and range, and wonders, "What's going to happen to me?" This propels the youth into frantic behaviors that are meant to confirm a sense of "We-ness" and competence. The result, however, is greater frustration and a mirroring of the opposite. Also, since there is a diminutive capacity for trust and an exiguous chance to reach out or respond to significant others, external soothingness becomes unobtainable. When the adolescent is confronted with aloneness, helplessness, and hopelessness, desperation results and a search for a safe place ensues. Suicide holds such an illusion. It is the embodiment of sadomasochism and permits the cognition "I am capable." A case study illustrates the problems.

  7. Elaboration of Safe Community Assessment System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birutė Mikulskienė

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to design an assessment system to monitor and evaluate safety parameters and administrative efforts with the purpose to increase safety in municipalities. The safety monitoring system considered is to be the most important tool for creation and development of safe communities in Lithuania. Several methods were applied to achieve this purpose. In order to determine the role of local government in ensuring the safety of people, property and environment at the local level of a meta-analysis of research reports, the Lithuanian national legislation, strategic planning documents of the state and local government were carried out. Analysis of statistical data, structural analysis, comparative analysis and synthesis methods were used while investigating the areas of safety uncertainty, risk groups, identifying safety risk factors, determining their relationship, and creating a safe community assessment system. A safe community assessment system, which consists of two types of criteria, has been elaborated. The assessment system is based on the multi-level criteria for safety monitoring and the multi-level criteria for the evaluation of municipal activities in the field of building safety. Links between the criteria, peculiarities of their application and advantages in the process of safe community creation and development are analyzed. Design and implementation of the safe community assessment system is one of the most important stages to implement the idea of safe communities. The proposed system integrates a variety of risk areas, the safety achievement criteria are linked to the criteria used in the strategic planning. Periodic assessment of the safety situation using the proposed system ensures possibility to monitor current local safety conditions and assess the changes and the trends. A safe community assessment system is proposed to be used as a tool to unified municipalities safety comprehensiveness and compare safety level in

  8. Elaboration of Safe Community Assessment System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algirdas Astrauskas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to design an assessment system to monitor and evaluate safety parameters and administrative efforts with the purpose to increase safety in municipalities. The safety monitoring system considered is to be the most important tool for creation anddevelopment of safe communities in Lithuania. Several methods were applied to achieve this purpose. In order to determine the role of local government in ensuring the safety of people, property and environment at the local level of a meta-analysis of research reports,the Lithuanian national legislation, strategic planning documents of the state and local government were carried out. Analysis of statistical data, structural analysis, comparative analysis and synthesis methods were used while investigating the areas of safety uncertainty, risk groups, identifying safety risk factors, determining their relationship, and creating a safe community assessment system.A safe community assessment system, which consists of two types of criteria, has been elaborated. The assessment system is based on the multi-level criteria for safety monitoring and the multi-level criteria for the evaluation of municipal activities in the field of building safety. Links between the criteria, peculiarities of their application and advantages in the process of safe community creation and development are analyzed.Design and implementation of the safe community assessment system is one of the most important stages to implement the idea of safe communities. The proposed system integrates a variety of risk areas, the safety achievement criteria are linked to the criteria used in thestrategic planning. Periodic assessment of the safety situation using the proposed system ensures possibility to monitor current local safety conditions and assess the changes and the trends. A safe community assessment system is proposed to be used as a tool to unified municipalities safety comprehensiveness and compare safety level in

  9. Towards intrinsically safe light-water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannerz, K

    1983-07-01

    Most of the present impediments to the rational use of the nuclear option have their roots in the reactor safety issue. The approach taken to satisfy the escalating safety concerns has resulted in excessively complex and expensive plant designs but has failed to create public confidence. This paper describes a new approach based on the principle of Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS). With the PIUS principle, ultimate safety is obtained by guaranteeing core integrity under all credible conditions. This is accomplished on the basis of the laws of gravity and thermohydraulics alone, interacting with the heat extraction process in an intact or damaged primary circuit, without recourse to engineered safety systems that may fail or dependence on error-prone human intervention. Application of the PIUS principle to the pressurized water reactor involves a substantial redesign of the reactor and primary system but builds on established PWR technology where long-term operation is needed for verification.

  10. Towards intrinsically safe light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannerz, K.

    1983-07-01

    Most of the present impediments to the rational use of the nuclear option have their roots in the reactor safety issue. The approach taken to satisfy the escalating safety concerns has resulted in excessively complex and expensive plant designs but has failed to create public confidence. This paper describes a new approach based on the principle of Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS). With the PIUS principle, ultimate safety is obtained by guaranteeing core integrity under all credible conditions. This is accomplished on the basis of the laws of gravity and thermohydraulics alone, interacting with the heat extraction process in an intact or damaged primary circuit, without recourse to engineered safety systems that may fail or dependence on error-prone human intervention. Application of the PIUS principle to the pressurized water reactor involves a substantial redesign of the reactor and primary system but builds on established PWR technology where long-term operation is needed for verification

  11. 'Normal' and 'failing' mothers: Women's constructions of maternal subjectivity while living with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Chloe; Katz, Terri; Ussher, Jane M

    2017-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis causes physical and cognitive impairment that can impact women's experiences of motherhood. This study examined how women construct their maternal subjectivities, or sense of self as a mother, drawing on a framework of biographical disruption. A total of 20 mothers with a multiple sclerosis diagnosis took part in semi-structured interviews. Transcripts were analysed using thematic decomposition to identify subject positions that women adopted in relation to cultural discourses of gender, motherhood and illness. Three main subject positions were identified: 'The Failing Mother', 'Fear of Judgement and Burdening Others' and 'The Normal Mother'. Women's sense of self as the 'Failing Mother' was attributed to the impact of multiple sclerosis, contributing to biographical disruption and reinforced through 'Fear of Judgement and Burdening Others' within social interactions. In accounts of the 'Normal Mother', maternal subjectivity was renegotiated by adopting strategies to manage the limitations of multiple sclerosis on mothering practice. This allowed women to self-position as 'good' mothers. Health professionals can assist women by acknowledging the embodied impact of multiple sclerosis on maternal subjectivities, coping strategies that women employ to address potential biographical disruption, and the cultural context of mothering, which contributes to women's experience of subjectivity and well-being when living with multiple sclerosis.

  12. Researcher Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khawaja, Iram; Mørck, Line Lerche

    2009-01-01

    involvement by the researcher, which challenges traditional perspectives onresearch and researcher positioning. A key point in this regard is the importance ofconstant awareness of and reflection on the multiple ways in which one's positioningas a researcher influences the research process. Studying the other...

  13. Position detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Toshifumi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to detect the position of an moving object in a control rod position detector, stably in a digital manner at a high accuracy and free from the undesired effects of circumstantial conditions such as the reactor temperature. Constitution: Coils connected in parallel with each other are disposed along the passage of a moving object and variable resistors and relays are connected in series with each of the coils respectively. Light emitting diodes is connected in series with the contacts of the respective relays. The resistance value of the variable resistors are adjusted depending on the changes in the circumstantial conditions and temperature distribution upon carrying out the positional detection. When the object is inserted into a coils, the relevant relay is deenergized, by which the relay contacts are closed to light up the diode. In the same manner, as the object is successively inserted into the coils, the diodes are lighted-up successively thereby enabling highly accurate and stable positional detection in a digital manner, free from the undesired effects of the circumstantial conditions. (Horiuchi, T.)

  14. Development of the delyed-neutron triangulation technique for locating failed fuel in LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryter, R.C.

    1975-01-01

    Two major accomplishments of the ORNL delayed neutron triangulation program are (1) an analysis of anticipated detector counting rates and sensitivities to unclad fuel and erosion types of pin failure, and (2) an experimental assessment of the accuracy with which the position of failed fuel can be determined in the FFTF (this was performed in a quarter-scale water mockup of realistic outlet plenum geometry using electrolyte injections and conductivity cells to simulate delayed-neutron precursor releases and detections, respectively). The major results and conclusions from these studies are presented, along with plans for further DNT development work at ORNL for the FFTF and CRBR. (author)

  15. Failed Pavlik harness treatment for DDH as a risk factor for avascular necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiruveedhula, Madhu; Reading, Isabel C; Clarke, Nicholas M P

    2015-03-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head is an irreversible complication seen in the treatment of developmental dysplasia of hip (DDH) with the Pavlik harness. Its incidence is reported to be low after successful reduction of the hip but high if the hip is not concentrically relocated. We aim to investigate its incidence after failed Pavlik harness treatment. We prospectively followed up a group of children who failed Pavlik harness treatment for DDH treated at our institution by the senior author between 1988 and 2001 and compared their rates of AVN with a group of children who presented late and hence were treated surgically. AVN was graded as described by Kalamchi and MacEwen and only grade 2 to 4 AVN was considered significant and included in the analysis. Thirty-seven hips were included in the failed Pavlik group (group 1) and 86 hips in the no Pavlik group (group 2). Ten hips in group 1 developed AVN (27%), whereas only 7 hips in group 2 (8%) developed AVN; the odds of developing AVN after failed Pavlik treatment was 4.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.3-14.1) (P=0.009) with a relative risk of 3.32 (range, 1.37 to 8.05). There was no statistically significant association observed with duration of splintage and severity of AVN (Spearman's correlation, -0.46; P=0.18). However, there was a positive correlation noted with age at presentation and severity of AVN. Therefore, we advise close monitoring of hips in the Pavlik harness and discontinue its use if the hips are not reduced within 3 weeks. Level III.

  16. LHC collimator controls for a safe LHC operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redaelli, S.; Assmann, R.; Losito, R.; Donze, M.; Masi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimation system is designed to protect the machine against beam losses and consists of 108 collimators, 100 of which are movable, located along the 27 km long ring and in the transfer lines. The cleaning performance and machine protection role of the system depend critically on accurate jaw positioning. A fully redundant control system has been developed to ensure that the collimators dynamically follow optimum settings in all phases of the LHC operational cycle. Jaw positions and collimator gaps are interlocked against dump limits defined redundantly as functions of time, beam energy and the β functions, which describe the focusing property of the beams. In this paper, the architectural choices that guarantee a safe LHC operation are presented. Hardware and software implementations that ensure the required performance are described. (authors)

  17. Study on the Post-Fire Safe-Shutdown Analysis for CANDU NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Hwan; Kim, Yun Jung; Park, Mun Hee [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this paper is to study a method of the Post-Fire Safe-Shutdown Analysis in order to apply to CANDU NPPs when one group of the Safety Structures, Systems and Components(SCCs) is failed by Fire. The purpose of Fire Protection is prevention, suppression of the fire and mitigation of the effect on the Nuclear Safety. When fire takes place at the Nuclear Power Plants(NPPs), the reactor should achieve and maintain safe shut-down condition and minimize radioactive material release to an environment. The purpose of the Post-Fire SSA process is an evaluation process during a fire at NPPs. At this study, the process was conceptually adopted for control room complex of CANDU NPPs. The Core Damage Frequency of the Reactor will be evaluated more accurately if the SSA is adopted adequately at a fire.

  18. An optimal inspection strategy for randomly failing equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelbi, Anis; Ait-Kadi, Daoud

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of generating optimal inspection strategies for randomly failing equipment where imminent failure is not obvious and can only be detected through inspection. Inspections are carried out following a condition-based procedure. The equipment is replaced if it has failed or if it shows imminent signs of failure. The latter state is indicated by measuring certain predetermined control parameters during inspection. Costs are associated with inspection, idle time and preventive or corrective actions. An optimal inspection strategy is defined as the inspection sequence minimizing the expected total cost per time unit over an infinite span. A mathematical model and a numerical algorithm are developed to generate an optimal inspection sequence. As a practical example, the model is applied to provide a machine tool operator with a time sequence for inspecting the cutting tool. The tool life time distribution and the trend of one control parameter defining its actual condition are supposed to be known

  19. Looked-but-failed-to-see-errors in traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Mai-Britt; Jørgensen, N O

    2003-01-01

    Danish studies of traffic accidents at priority intersections have shown a particular type of accidents. In these accidents a car driver supposed to give way has collided with a bicycle rider on the priority road. Often the involved car drivers have maintained that they did not see the bicycle...... looking in the direction where the other parties were but have not seen (i.e. perceived the presence of) the other road user. This paper describes two studies approaching this problem.One study is based on 10 self-reported near accidents. It does show that "looked-but-failed-to-see" events do occur...... until immediately before the collision even though the bicycle must have been clearly visible.Similar types of accidents have been the subject of studies elsewhere. In literature they are labelled "looked-but-failed-to-see", because it seems clear that in many cases the car drivers have actually been...

  20. Development of failed element monitoring system for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yupu; Liu Haojie

    2005-01-01

    Aiming at the existent problems of failed element monitoring system in the PWR, the detector, the spiral tube, the neutron-moderator and the shielding of neutron bas improved on in this task. These improvements decrease the backgrounds effectively, raise the work stability of the detectors and resolve the failed element error action problem which can not be resolved for the long time, and the detecting sensitivity is raise ten times. The γ-ray detector is arranged spiral with outside, so the γ-rays with shorter half-life can be detected. The structure of gross gamma detection station has improved, so the solid angle is expanded, the transmissivity of γ-rays and β-rays are increased, and the ratio of signal to background is raised. The measurement instrument has been intellectualized. This system is above criticism for the users in operation. (authors)

  1. The potential cost of a failed doha round:

    OpenAIRE

    Bouet, Antoine; Debucquet, David Laborde

    2009-01-01

    "In times of economic turmoil, countries might decide to increase current tariff rates to protect domestic industries or raise revenues in order to finance domestic programs. Using the highest applied or bound rate imposed by countries from 1995 to 2008 as an indicator, this study presents several scenarios regarding the economic costs of a failed Doha Round and a subsequent rush into protectionism. For example, in a scenario where the applied tariffs of major economies would go all the way u...

  2. 'HAs fail to consult Irish people in UK'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-10

    Health authorities are failing to consult local people on their health needs, a conference on the mental health of Irish people living in the UK heard last week. Consulting Irish people was often only 'symbolic', despite the requirements of the NHS and Community Care Act, conference Chair Padraic Kenna, Director of Innisfree Housing Association, told delegates. 'The Irish caught the boat in the 1950s only to miss the boat ever since,' he said.

  3. Trending a New Normal: Is Nigeria becoming a failed Nation?

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel Olusegun Stober

    2017-01-01

    Judging from every economic parameter, Nigeria will suggest being a failed nation. Not so long ago international investors identified Nigeria as one of the world’s most promising investment opportunities, but things have changed drastically in the meantime. The slump in the price of crude oil has hit Nigerian economy hard, the twin curses of insecurity and corruption have not gone away either. The Nigerian currency - naira has also lost its value by 170% from its value in 2015. The question m...

  4. Can the failing firm defence rule be counterproductive?

    OpenAIRE

    Helder Vasconcelos

    2013-01-01

    The present paper investigates the role of the failing firm defence (FFD) concept in the merger control process within a Cournot setting where (i) endogenous mergers are motivated by prospective efficiency gains and (ii) mergers must be submitted to an antitrust authority that might demand partial divestiture for approval. The findings show that when the FFD concept is one of the tools available for controlling the merger process, firms can strategically embark on a merger that makes other fi...

  5. Failed medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: Causes and surgical strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Montesinos-Berry, Erik; Ramirez-Fuentes, Cristina; Leal Blanquet, Joan; Gelber, Pablo-Eduardo; Monllau García, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Patellar instability is a common clinical problem encountered by orthopedic surgeons specializing in the knee. For patients with chronic lateral patellar instability, the standard surgical approach is to stabilize the patella through a medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. Foreseeably, an increasing number of revision surgeries of the reconstructed MPFL will be seen in upcoming years. In this paper, the causes of failed MPFL reconstruction are analyzed: (1) incorrect surgical ...

  6. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING IN FAILED BACK SURGERY SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    SEN, KK; SINGH, AMARJIT

    1999-01-01

    The failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is a severe, long-lasting, disabling and relatively frequent (5-10%) complication of lumbosacral spine surgery. Wrong level surgery, inadequate surgical techniques, vertebral instability, recurrent disc herniation, and lumbosacral fibrosis are the most frequent causes of FBSS. The results after repeated surgery on recurrent disc herniations are comparable to those after the first intervention, whereas repeated surgery for fibrosis gives only 30-35% succ...

  7. Failed back surgery syndrome: review and new hypotheses

    OpenAIRE

    Bordoni, Bruno; Marelli,Fabiola

    2016-01-01

    Bruno Bordoni,1,2 Fabiola Marelli2 1Department of Cardiology, Foundation Don Carlo Gnocchi, IRCCS, Institute of Hospitalization and Care, S Maria Nascente, Milan, 2School CRESO, Osteopathic Centre for Research and Studies, Falconara Marittima, Ancona, Italy Abstract: Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is a term used to define an unsatisfactory outcome of a patient who underwent spinal surgery, irrespective of type or intervention area, with persistent pain in the lumbosacral region with or ...

  8. Last bank standing : what do I gain if you fail?

    OpenAIRE

    Perotti, E.C.; Suarez, J.

    2001-01-01

    Banks are highly leveraged institutions, potentially attracted to speculative lending even without deposit insurance. A counterbalancing incentive to lend prudently is the risk of loss of charter value, which depends on future rents. We show in a dynamic model that current concentration does not reduce speculative lending, and may in fact increase it. In contrast, a policy of temporary increases in market concentration after a bank failure, by promoting a takeover of failed banks by a solvent...

  9. Maintaining positive

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Gh. IONESCU; Adina Letitia NEGRUSA

    2004-01-01

    Maintaining positive work-force relationships includes in effective labor-management relations and making appropriate responses to current employee issues. Among the major current employee issues are protection from arbitrary dismissal, drug and alcohol abuse, privacy rights and family maters and they impact work. In our paper we discus two problems: first, the meanings of industrial democracy; second, the three principal operational concepts of industrial democracy (1) industrial democracy t...

  10. Parenteral nutrition combined with rice soup can be a safe and effective intervention for congenital chylous ascites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yi; Yan, Weihui; Lu, Lina; Tao, Yijing; Lu, Wei; Chen, Yingwei; Tang, Qingya; Cai, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Congenital chylous ascites in the neonatal period is a rare entity. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN), medium chain triglyceride (MCT)-based diet, octreotide and repeated paracentesis are regarded as appropriate medical treatment for congenital chylous ascites, and surgery is recommended when conservative therapy has failed. We present two cases in which ascites were confirmed via an abdominal sonogram and diagnostic paracentesis. In our clinical experience, rice soup combined with PN can be a safe and effective intervention.

  11. Hip arthroplasty in failed intertrochanteric fractures in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javahir A Pachore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Failed intertrochanteric fractures in elderly patients are surgical challenge with limited options. Hip arthroplasty is a good salvage procedure even though it involves technical issues such as implant removal, bone loss, poor bone quality, trochanteric nonunion and difficulty of surgical exposure. Materials and Methods: 30 patients of failed intertrochanteric fractures where hip arthroplasty was done between May 2008 and December 2011 were included in study. 13 were males and 17 were females with average age of 67.3 years. There were 2 cemented bipolar arthroplasties, 19 uncemented bipolar, 4 cemented total hip arthroplasty and 5 uncemented total hip arthroplasties. 16 patients had a trochanteric nonunion, which was treated by tension band principles. Total hip was considered where there was acetabular damage due to the penetration of implant. Results: The average followup was 20 months (range 6-48 months. Patients were followed up from 6 to 48 months with average followup of 20 months. None of the patients were lost to followup. There was no dislocation. All patients were ambulatory at the final followup. Conclusion: A predictable functional outcome can be achieved by hip arthroplasty in elderly patients with failed intertrochanteric fractures. Though technically demanding, properly performed hip arthroplasty can be a good salvage option for this patient group.

  12. Failed tracheal intubation using a laryngoscope and intubating laryngeal mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, T; Hirose, T; Shingu, K

    2000-04-01

    To report unexpected failed tracheal intubation using a laryngoscope and an intubating laryngeal mask, and difficult ventilation via a facemask, laryngeal mask and intubating laryngeal mask, in a patient with an unrecognized lingual tonsillar hypertrophy. A 63-yr-old woman, who had undergone clipping of an aneurysm seven weeks previously, was scheduled for ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. At the previous surgery, there had been no difficulty in ventilation or in tracheal intubation. Her trachea remained intubated nasally for 11 days after surgery. Preoperatively, her consciousness was impaired. There were no restrictions in head and neck movements or mouth opening. The thyromental distance was 7 cm. After induction of anesthesia, manual ventilation via a facemask with a Guedel airway was suboptimal and the chest expanded insufficiently. At laryngoscopy using a Macintosh or McCoy device, only the tip of the epiglottis, but not the glottis, could be seen, and tracheal intubation failed. There was a partial obstruction during manual ventilation through either the intubating laryngeal mask or conventional laryngeal mask; intubation through each device failed. Digital examination of the pharynx, after removal of the laryngeal mask, indicated a mass occupying the vallecula. Lingual tonsillar hypertrophy (1 x 1 x 2 cm) was found to be the cause of the failure. Awake fibrescope-aided tracheal intubation was accomplished. Unexpected lingual tonsillar hypertrophy can cause both ventilation and tracheal intubation difficult, and neither the laryngeal mask nor intubating laryngeal mask may be helpful in the circumstances.

  13. Failed magnetic resonance imaging examinations due to claustrophobia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarji, S.A.; Abdullah, B.J.J.; Kumar, G.; Tan, A.H.; Narayanan, P.

    1998-01-01

    A recognised cause of incomplete or cancelled MRI examinations is anxiety and claustrophobic symptoms in patients undergoing MR scanning. This appears to be a problem in many MRI centres in Western Europe and North America, where it is said to be costly in terms of loss of valuable scan time, and has led to researchers suggesting several anxiety reducing approaches for MRI. To determine the incidence of failed MRI examination among our patients and if there are any associations with a patient's sex, age and education level, we studied claustrophobia that led to premature termination of the MRI examination in the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) in 3324 patients over 28 months. The incidence of failed MRI examinations due to claustrophobia in the UMMC was found to be only 0.54%. There are associations between claustrophobia in MRI with the patients' sex, age and level of education. The majority of those affected were male patients and young patients in the 25-45-year age group. The patients' education level appears to be the strongest association with failed MRI examinations due to claustrophobia, where the majority of the affected were highly educated individuals. Claustrophobia in MRI is more of a problem among the educated individuals or patients from a higher socio-economic group, which may explain the higher incidence in Western European and North American patients. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. Management of the failed posterior/multidirectional instability patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Brian; Ghodadra, Neil; Romeo, Anthony A; Provencher, Matthew T

    2010-09-01

    Although the results of operative treatment of posterior and multidirectional instability (P-MDI) of the shoulder have improved, they are not as reliable as those treated for anterior instability of the shoulder. This may be attributed to the complexities in the classification, etiology, and physical examination of a patient with suspected posterior and multidirectional instability. Failure to address the primary and concurrent lesion adequately and the development of pain and/or stiffness are contributing factors to the failure of P-MDI procedures. Other pitfalls include errors in history and physical examination, failure to recognize concomitant pathology, and problems with the surgical technique or implant failure. Patulous capsular tissues and glenoid version also play in role management of failed P-MDI patients. With an improved understanding of pertinent clinical complaints and physical examination findings and the advent of arthroscopic techniques and improved implants, successful strategies for the nonoperative and operative management of the patient after a failed posterior or multidirectional instability surgery may be elucidated. This article highlights the common presentation, physical findings, and radiographic workup in a patient that presents after a failed P-MDI repair and offers strategies for revision surgical repair.

  15. Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE) methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, L.D.; Grady, L.M.; Bennett, H.A.; Sasser, D.W.; Engi, D.

    1978-08-01

    An automated approach to facility safeguards effectiveness evaluation has been developed. This automated process, called Safeguards Automated Facility Evaluation (SAFE), consists of a collection of a continuous stream of operational modules for facility characterization, the selection of critical paths, and the evaluation of safeguards effectiveness along these paths. The technique has been implemented on an interactive computer time-sharing system and makes use of computer graphics for the processing and presentation of information. Using this technique, a comprehensive evaluation of a safeguards system can be provided by systematically varying the parameters that characterize the physical protection components of a facility to reflect the perceived adversary attributes and strategy, environmental conditions, and site operational conditions. The SAFE procedure has broad applications in the nuclear facility safeguards field as well as in the security field in general. Any fixed facility containing valuable materials or components to be protected from theft or sabotage could be analyzed using this same automated evaluation technique

  16. Method of safely operating nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Kanehiro.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a method of safely operating an nuclear reactor, comprising supporting a load applied to a reactor container partly with secondary container facilities thereby reducing the load borne by the reactor container when water is injected into the core to submerge the core in an emergency. Method: In a reactor emergency, water is injected into the reactor core thereby to submerge the core. Further, water is injected into a gap between the reactor container and the secondary container facilities. By the injection of water into the gap between the reactor container and the secondary container facilities a large apparent mass is applied to the reactor container, as a result of which the reactor container undergoes the same vibration as that of the secondary container facilities. Therefore, the load borne by the reactor container itself is reduced and stress at the bottom part of the reactor container is released. This permits the reactor to be operated more safely. (Moriyama, K.)

  17. Safe waste management practices in beryllium facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, P.N.; Soundararajan, S.; Sharma, D.N.

    2012-01-01

    Beryllium, an element with the atomic symbol Be, atomic number 4, has very high stiffness to weight ratio and low density. It has good electrical conductive properties with low coefficient of thermal expansion. These properties make the metal beryllium very useful in varied technological endeavours, However, beryllium is recognised as one of the most toxic metals. Revelation of toxic effects of beryllium resulted in institution of stringent health and safety practices in beryllium handling facilities. The waste generated in such facilities may contain traces of beryllium. Any such waste should be treated as toxic waste and suitable safe waste management practices should be adopted. By instituting appropriate waste management practice and through a meticulously incorporated safety measures and continuous surveillance exercised in such facilities, total safety can be ensured. This paper broadly discusses health hazards posed by beryllium and safe methods of management of beryllium bearing wastes. (author)

  18. Concept of an inherently-safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Masuro

    2012-01-01

    As the challenge to ensure no harmful release of radioactive materials at the accidents by deterministic approach instead to satisfy acceptance criteria or safety goal for risk by probabilistic approach, new concept of advanced reactor, an inherently-safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor, is proposed based on the experience of the operation of the actual High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) in Japan, High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), and the design of the commercial plant (GTHTR300), utilizing the inherent safety features of the HTGR (i.e., safety features based on physical phenomena). The safety design philosophy of the inherently-safe HTGR for the safety analysis of the radiological consequences is determined as the confinement of radioactive materials is assured by only inherent safety features without engineered safety features, AC power or prompt actions by plant personnel if the design extension conditions occur. Inherent safety features to prevent the loss or degradation of the confinement function are identified. It is proposed not to apply the probabilistic approach for the evaluation of the radiological consequences of the accidents in the safety analysis because no inherent safety features fail for the mitigation of the consequences of the accidents. Consequently, there are no event sequences to harmful release of radioactive materials if the design extension conditions occur in the inherently-safe HTGR concept. The concept and future R and D items for the inherently-safe HTGR are described in this paper.

  19. Advising Your Elderly Patients Concerning Safe Exercising

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Anita

    1987-01-01

    With the emergence of physical activity programs geared specifically to senior citizens, family physicians will increasingly be called on to provide advice or approval concerning their patients' suitability for participation. In addition, family physicians have been identified as having a key role to play in the promotion of exercise for sedentary older adults. To assist the family practitioner in advising elderly patients concerning safe exercise patterns, this article discusses the document...

  20. The Safe Transportation of Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megrahi, Abdulhafeed; Abu-Ali, Giuma; Enhaba; Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present the essential conditions that should be required for transporting the radioactive materials. We demonstrate the procedure for transporting the radioactive iodine-131 from the Centre of Renewable Energies and Desalination of Water in Tajoura, Libya to Tripoli Medical Center. The safe measures were taken during the process of the transportation of the isotope produced in the centre including dosimetry analysis and the thickness of the container. (author)

  1. Safe handling of plutonium in research laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The training film illustrates the main basic requirements for the safe handling of small amounts of plutonium. The film is intended not only for people setting up plutonium research laboratories but also for all those who work in existing plutonium research laboratories. It was awarded the first prize in the category ''Protection of Workers'' at the international film festival organized by the 4th World Congress of the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) in Paris in April 1977

  2. Procedure of safe handling with cytostatic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodžo Dragan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Working group for safe handling with cytostatic drugs has been formed by the Ministry of Health, and it consists of professionals from IORS, Federal Bureau of Weights and Measures, Industrial Medicine, Institute of Hematology, Military Medical Academy, and Crown Agents. The aim of this working group is to prepare procedures for safe handling with cytostatic drugs, as well as program for educational seminar for nurses, medical technicians, and pharmaceutical technicians. The procedures will serve as a guide of good practice of oncology health care, and will refer to all actions that health care professionals carry out from the moment of drugs arrival to the pharmacy to the moment of their application. In the first segment of this procedure, general rules are given for working with cytotoxic agents, control for risky exposures, safe system of work, control of working environment, monitoring of the employees' health condition adequate protection in the working environment, protective equipment of the employees (gloves, mask, cap, eyeglasses, shoe covers, coats and chambers for vertical laminary air stream. Storing of cytostatics, procedure in case of accident, and waste handling and removal are also described in this segment. Fifty-three standard operational procedures are described in detail in the second segment. Training scheme for preparation of chemotherapy is given in the third segment - education related to various fields and practical part, which would be carried out through workshops, and at the end of the course participants would pass a test and obtain certificate. After the procedures for safe handling with cytostatics are legally regulated employer will have to provide minimum of protective equipment, special rooms for the drugs dissolving, chambers with laminar airflow, 6 hours working time, rotation of the staff working with drugs dissolving in intervals of every five years, higher efficiency, better health control. In conclusion

  3. Safe Sleep for Babies PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2018-01-09

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the January 2018 CDC Vital Signs report. Every year, there are about 3,500 sleep-related deaths among U.S. babies. Learn how to create a safe sleep environment for babies.  Created: 1/9/2018 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 1/9/2018.

  4. Esomeprazole: a safe alternative to lansoprazole allergy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Muammer; Tanoglu, Alpaslan; Kutlu, Ali; Sirkeci, Ozgur; Kekilli, Murat

    2014-08-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely prescribed drugs in daily practice. Allergic reactions, even small number of anaphylactic reactions to PPIs have been reported. Omeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, rapeprazol and esomeprazole are classified in the same group. Despite the similarity of biochemical structures among these drugs, presence of cross-reactivity between PPIs is controversial.1,2 In this letter, we present 3 lansoprazole allergy cases, who were prescribed and took esomeprazole safely after allergic reactions to lansoprazole.

  5. Human cloning: can it be made safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhind, Susan M; Taylor, Jane E; De Sousa, Paul A; King, Tim J; McGarry, Michelle; Wilmut, Ian

    2003-11-01

    There are continued claims of attempts to clone humans using nuclear transfer, despite the serious problems that have been encountered in cloning other mammals. It is known that epigenetic and genetic mechanisms are involved in clone failure, but we still do not know exactly how. Human reproductive cloning is unethical, but the production of cells from cloned embryos could offer many potential benefits. So, can human cloning be made safe?

  6. Iser: an international inherently safe reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Hiroaki

    1988-01-01

    Iser is a modular standardised 200-300 MWe power reactor based on the PIUS principle. It differs from PIUS in being simpler, and making full use of existing steel-vessel-based LWR technology. Iser is an inherently safe reactor concept under development in Japan. It is a generic concept, not a patented commodity, and it is expected that an international association to develop the concept will be formed. (U.K.)

  7. SIR - small is safe [in reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayns, M.

    1989-01-01

    A joint USA-UK venture has been initiated to design a small nuclear reactor which offers low capital cost, greater flexibility and a potentially lower environmental impact. Called Safe Integral Reactor (SIR), the lead unit could be built in the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority's (UKAEA's) Winfrith site if the design is accepted by the UK Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII). This article describes the 320 MWe reactor unit that is the basis of the design being developed. (author)

  8. Safe handling of plutonium in research laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-12-31

    The training film illustrates the main basic requirements for the safe handling of small amounts of plutonium. The film is intended not only for people setting up plutonium research laboratories but also for all those who work in existing plutonium research laboratories. It was awarded the first prize in the category ``Protection of Workers`` at the international film festival organized by the 4th World Congress of the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) in Paris in April 1977

  9. Managing radioactive waste safely. Engaging Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elrick, D.; Boyes, L.; McCormick, J.

    2002-01-01

    Between January and May 2002 the Scottish Council Foundation undertook a research project to assess 1 the level of public awareness about and interest in engaging the public in decision-making on managing radioactive waste safely in Scotland. This paper presents the main findings from the research that involved 70 people from across Scotland, aged between 14 and over 65 years old, and a literature review of Scottish, UK and international experience in engaging the public

  10. Safe Cooperating Cyber-Physical Systems using Wireless Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Paul; Scholle, Detlef; Sljivo, Irfan

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the ECSEL project entitled ―Safe Cooperating Cyber-Physical Systems using Wireless Communication‖ (SafeCOP), which runs during the period 2016–2019. SafeCOP targets safety-related Cooperating Cyber-Physical Systems (CO-CPS) characterised by use of wireless...... detection of abnormal behaviour, triggering if needed a safe degraded mode. SafeCOP will also develop methods and tools, which will be used to produce safety assurance evidence needed to certify cooperative functions. SafeCOP will extend current wireless technologies to ensure safe and secure cooperation...

  11. Safe transport of radioactive material. Second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The transport of radioactive material embraces the carriage of radioisotopes for industrial, medical and research uses, and the movement of waste, in addition to consignments of nuclear fuel cycle material. It has been estimated that between eighteen and thirty-eight million package shipments take place each year. On the recommendation of the Standing Advisory Group on the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (SAGSTRAM), which enjoys wide representations from the Agency's Member States and international organizations, the Secretariat is preparing a training kit comprising this training manual and complementary visual aids. The kit is intended to be the basis for an extensive course on the subject and can be used in whole or in part for inter-regional, regional and even national training purposes. Member States can thus benefit from the material either through training courses sponsored by the Agency, or, alternatively, organized by themselves. As a step towards achieving that goal, the current training manual was compiled using material from the first Inter-Regional Training Course on the Safe Transport of Radioactive material that was held in co-operation with the Nuclear Power Training Centre of the then Central Electricity Generating Board at Bristol, United Kingdom. This Manual was initially published in 1990. On the recommendation of the Agency's Standing Advisory Group on the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (SAGSTRAM), the Manual has since been expanded and updated in time for the second Inter-Regional Training Course, that will in 1991 similarly be held in Bristol. Refs, figs, tabs

  12. Safe transport of radioactive materials in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shinawy, R.M.K.

    1994-01-01

    In Egypt the national regulations for safe transport of radioactive materials (RAM) are based on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) regulations. In addition, regulations for the safe transport of these materials through the Suez Canal (SC) were laid down by the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority (EAEA) and the Suez Canal Authority (SCA). They are continuously updated to meet the increased knowledge and the gained experience. The technical and protective measures taken during transport of RAM through SC are mentioned. Assessment of the impact of transporting radioactive materials through the Suez Canal using the INTERTRAN computer code was carried out in cooperation with IAEA. The transported activities and empty containers, the number of vessels carrying RAM through the canal from 1963 and 1991 and their nationalities are also discussed. The protective measures are mentioned. A review of the present situation of the radioactive wastes storage facilities at the Atomic Energy site at Inshas is given along with the regulation for safe transportation and disposal of radioactive wastes. (Author)

  13. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  14. Feasibility of liquid nitrogen cryotherapy after failed radiofrequency ablation for Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Arvind J; Inamdar, Sumant; Kothari, Shivangi; Berkowitz, Joshua; McKinley, Matthew; Kaul, Vivek

    2017-09-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for dysplastic Barrett's esophagus (BE) is highly effective. RFA failures are infrequent but can be a challenging cohort to manage. There are limited data on the feasibility of liquid nitrogen cryospray ablation for complete eradication of dysplasia (CE-D) and/or intestinal metaplasia (CE-IM) after RFA has failed to achieve CE-IM in patients with dysplastic BE. This is a retrospective review from two medical centers of prospectively maintained databases looking at patients that underwent liquid nitrogen cryospray ablation for refractory intestinal metaplasia post failed RFA. Eighteen patients were identified that met inclusion criteria. Eleven patients had persistent dysplasia and IM following RFA and seven had persistent non-dysplastic IM. More than 80% of patients were male with long-segment BE (median length 8 cm). Seventy two percent of patients with dysplasia achieved CE-D after cryotherapy. Fifty percent (9/18) of all RFA failures achieved CE-IM with cryotherapy. In comparison, RFA has a CE-IM of 78% in a less challenging treatment naïve cohort from a large-scale meta-analysis of 3802 patients. No adverse events occurred in our cohort. Cryospray ablation is feasible and safe for achieving CE-D and CE-IM after RFA failure. The CE-D rates are high with cryotherapy in this population. CE-IM with cryotherapy is acceptable in this difficult-to-treat cohort when compared to CE-IM rates with RFA in dysplastic BE treatment naïve patients (50% vs 78%). © 2017 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  15. Ab Interno Trabeculectomy With the Trabectome as a Valuable Therapeutic Option for Failed Filtering Blebs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wecker, Thomas; Neuburger, Matthias; Bryniok, Laura; Bruder, Kathrin; Luebke, Jan; Anton, Alexandra; Jordan, Jens F

    2016-09-01

    Uncontrolled intraocular pressure (IOP) after glaucoma filtration surgery is a challenging problem in the management of glaucoma patients. The Trabectome is a device for selective electroablation of the trabecular meshwork through a clear cornea incision without affecting the conjunctiva. Minimally invasive glaucoma surgery using the Trabectome is safe and effective as primary glaucoma surgery. Here we investigate the results of ab interno trabeculectomy with the Trabectome for IOP control in patients with a failed filtering bleb. A total of 60 eyes of 60 consecutive patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) or pseudoexfoliative glaucoma (PXG) were enrolled in this single center observational study. Trabectome surgery was performed alone or in combination with phacoemulsification by 2 experienced surgeons. IOP readings and number of IOP lowering medication as primary outcome parameters were taken by an independent examiner. Intraoperative and postoperative medication were recorded systematically. Mean IOP before surgery was 24.5±3.5 mm Hg and decreased to 15.7±3.4 (-36%) after mean follow-up of 415 days. The number of necessary IOP lowering medication dropped from 2.1±1.3 to 1.8±1.2 (14% reduction from baseline). A total of 25% (n=15) of cases reported here needed additional surgery after 517 days (range: 6 to 1563 d). No major complications were observed. After mean follow-up, we found a qualified success rate for PXG of 87% and 50% for POAG as revealed by the Kaplan-Meier analysis according to the definitions for success in advanced glaucoma cases according to the World Glaucoma Association (40% reduction from baseline IOP and maximum IOP of 15 mm Hg). Trabectome surgery for uncontrolled IOP after trabeculectomy is safe and effective especially in PXG patients. Given the demanding subgroup of patients studied here, it is not surprising that success rates are lower compared with previous studies investigating the Trabectome for primary glaucoma surgery

  16. The availability of relatively cheap hand-held Global Positioning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    conditions, so the approach failed to produce results ... Hand-held Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers provide opportunities for detailed and rapid mapping of features ..... TICKELL, W. L. N. 1968 — The biology of the great albatrosses,.

  17. Infant Safe Sleep Interventions, 1990-2015: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salm Ward, Trina C; Balfour, Giselle M

    2016-02-01

    Sleep-related infant deaths remain a major public health issue. Multiple interventions have been implemented in efforts to increase adherence to safe sleep recommendations. We conducted a systematic review of the international research literature to synthesize research on interventions to reduce the risk of sleep-related deaths and their effectiveness in changing infant sleep practices. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar for peer-reviewed articles published between 1990 and 2015 which described an intervention and reported results. Twenty-nine articles were included for review. Studies focused on infant caregivers, health care professionals, peers, and child care professionals. Targeted behaviors included sleep position, location, removing items from the crib, breastfeeding, smoke exposure, clothing, pacifier use, and knowledge of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Most articles described multi-faceted interventions, including: one-on-one or group education, printed materials, visual displays, videos, and providing resources such as cribs, pacifiers, wearable blankets, and infant t-shirts. Two described public education campaigns, one used an educative questionnaire, and one encouraged maternal note taking. Health professional interventions included implementing safe sleep policies, in-service training, printed provider materials, eliciting agreement on a Declaration of Safe Sleep Practice, and sharing adherence data. Data collection methods included self-report via surveys and observational crib audits. Over half of the studies utilized comparison groups which helped determine effectiveness. Most articles reported some degree of success in changing some of the targeted behaviors; no studies reported complete adherence to recommendations. Future studies should incorporate rigorous evaluation plans, utilize comparison groups, and collect demographic and collect follow-up data.

  18. Failed magmatic eruptions: Late-stage cessation of magma ascent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, S.C.; Newhall, C.; Roman, D.C.

    2011-01-01

    When a volcano becomes restless, a primary question is whether the unrest will lead to an eruption. Here we recognize four possible outcomes of a magmatic intrusion: "deep intrusion", "shallow intrusion", "sluggish/viscous magmatic eruption", and "rapid, often explosive magmatic eruption". We define "failed eruptions" as instances in which magma reaches but does not pass the "shallow intrusion" stage, i. e., when magma gets close to, but does not reach, the surface. Competing factors act to promote or hinder the eventual eruption of a magma intrusion. Fresh intrusion from depth, high magma gas content, rapid ascent rates that leave little time for enroute degassing, opening of pathways, and sudden decompression near the surface all act to promote eruption, whereas decreased magma supply from depth, slow ascent, significant enroute degassing and associated increases in viscosity, and impingement on structural barriers all act to hinder eruption. All of these factors interact in complex ways with variable results, but often cause magma to stall at some depth before reaching the surface. Although certain precursory phenomena, such as rapidly escalating seismic swarms or rates of degassing or deformation, are good indicators that an eruption is likely, such phenomena have also been observed in association with intrusions that have ultimately failed to erupt. A perpetual difficulty with quantifying the probability of eruption is a lack of data, particularly on instances of failed eruptions. This difficulty is being addressed in part through the WOVOdat database. Papers in this volume will be an additional resource for scientists grappling with the issue of whether or not an episode of unrest will lead to a magmatic eruption.

  19. Study protocol. IDUS - Instrumental delivery & ultrasound: a multi-centre randomised controlled trial of ultrasound assessment of the fetal head position versus standard care as an approach to prevent morbidity at instrumental delivery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Deirdre J

    2012-01-01

    Instrumental deliveries are commonly performed in the United Kingdom and Ireland, with rates of 12 - 17% in most centres. Knowing the exact position of the fetal head is a pre-requisite for safe instrumental delivery. Traditionally, diagnosis of the fetal head position is made on transvaginal digital examination by delineating the suture lines of the fetal skull and the fontanelles. However, the accuracy of transvaginal digital examination can be unreliable and varies between 20% and 75%. Failure to identify the correct fetal head position increases the likelihood of failed instrumental delivery with the additional morbidity of sequential use of instruments or second stage caesarean section. The use of ultrasound in determining the position of the fetal head has been explored but is not part of routine clinical practice.

  20. Failed manual removal of the placenta after vaginal delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjurström, Johanna; Collins, Sally; Langhoff-Roos, Jens

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: A retained placenta after vaginal delivery where manual removal of placenta fails is a clinical challenge. We present six cases that illustrate the heterogeneity of the condition and discuss the etiology and terminology as well as the clinical management. METHODS: Members of the European...... and the UK provide examples of various treatment strategies such as ultrasound-guided vaginal removal, removal of the placenta through a hysterotomy and just leaving the placenta in situ. The placentas were all retained, but it was only possible to diagnose abnormal invasion in the one case, which had...

  1. Designed to Fail: Modeling Terrorism’s Losing Battle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giti Zahedzadeh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Terrorism is costly and unlikely to survive any selection process that favors behaviors with higher payoffs. Our evolutionary game model and agent based computer simulations show that group benefits offset the within-group behavioral selection against terrorism. Only those displaying the fittest strategy choices will thrive and multiply. By increasing the number of alliances and the size of their membership, terror groups can contribute to their longevity. Fitness reducing strategies fail to pass on to the new generation. We conclude that costly terror campaigns may reduce popular support among terror organizations’ potential constituency and thus, hasten the demise of terror groups.

  2. Establishing Pass/Fail Criteria for Bronchoscopy Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Clementsen, Paul; Larsen, Klaus Richter

    2012-01-01

    Background: Several tools have been created to assess competence in bronchoscopy. However, educational guidelines still use an arbitrary number of performed procedures to decide when basic competency is acquired. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to define pass/fail scores for two...... method. In the first we compared bronchoscopy performance scores of 14 novices with the scores of 14 experienced consultants to find the score that best discriminated between the two groups. In the second we asked an expert group of 7 experienced bronchoscopists to judge how a borderline trainee would...

  3. The cost of failing states and the limits to sovereignty

    OpenAIRE

    Chauvet, Lisa; Collier, Paul; Hoeffler, Anke

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we estimate the costs of state failure, both for the failing state itself and for its neighbours. In our analysis, the cost of failure arises from two distinct sources: organized violence due to the incapacity of the state to ensure its own citizens’ security and low quality of regulation and public goods due to poor governance. To estimate the cost of failure, we proceed in two steps. First we estimate the annual loss of growth induced by state failure. Then we cumulate this l...

  4. Analysis of failed ramps during the RHIC FY09 run

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-15

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a versatile accelerator that supports operation with polarized protons of up to 250 GeV and ions with up to 100 GeV/nucleon. During any running period, various operating scenarios with different particle species, beam energies or accelerator optics are commissioned. In this report the beam commissioning periods for establishing full energy beams (ramp development periods) from the FY09 run are summarized and, for the purpose of motivating further developments, we analyze the reasons for all failed ramps.

  5. How energy efficiency fails in the building industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryghaug, Marianne; Sorensen, Knut H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines how energy efficiency fails in the building industry based on many years of research into the integration of energy efficiency in the construction of buildings and sustainable architecture in Norway. It argues that energy-efficient construction has been seriously restrained by three interrelated problems: (1) deficiencies in public policy to stimulate energy efficiency, (2) limited governmental efforts to regulate the building industry, and (3) a conservative building industry. The paper concludes that innovation and implementation of new, energy-efficient technologies in the building industry requires new policies, better regulations and reformed practices in the industry itself

  6. When modularization fails to occur: a developmental perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Dean; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2011-05-01

    We argue that models of adult cognition defined in terms of independently functioning modules cannot be applied to development, whether typical or atypical. The infant brain starts out highly interconnected, and it is only over developmental time that neural networks become increasingly specialized-that is, relatively modularized. In the case of atypical development, even when behavioural scores fall within the normal range, they are frequently underpinned by different cognitive and neural processes. In other words, in neurodevelopmental disorders the gradual process of relative modularization may fail to occur.

  7. A Perplexed Economist Confronts 'too Big to Fail'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherer, F. M.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines premises and data underlying the assertion that some financial institutions in the U.S. economy were "too big to fail" and hence warranted government bailout. It traces the merger histories enhancing the dominance of six leading firms in the U. S. banking industry and he sharp increases in the concentration of financial institution assets accompanying that merger wave. Financial institution profits are found to have soared in tandem with rising concentration. The paper advances hypotheses why these phenomena might be related and surveys relevant empirical literature on the relationships between market concentration, interest rates received and charged by banks, and economies of scale in banking.

  8. [Hospitals failing minimum volumes in 2004: reasons and consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraedts, M; Kühnen, C; Cruppé, W de; Blum, K; Ohmann, C

    2008-02-01

    In 2004 Germany introduced annual minimum volumes nationwide on five surgical procedures: kidney, liver, stem cell transplantation, complex oesophageal, and pancreatic interventions. Hospitals that fail to reach the minimum volumes are no longer allowed to perform the respective procedures unless they raise one of eight legally accepted exceptions. The goal of our study was to investigate how many hospitals fell short of the minimum volumes in 2004, whether and how this was justified, and whether hospitals that failed the requirements experienced any consequences. We analysed data on meeting the minimum volume requirements in 2004 that all German hospitals were obliged to publish as part of their biannual structured quality reports. We performed telephone interviews: a) with all hospitals not achieving the minimum volumes for complex oesophageal, and pancreatic interventions, and b) with the national umbrella organisations of all German sickness funds. In 2004, one quarter of all German acute care hospitals (N=485) performed 23,128 procedures where minimum volumes applied. 197 hospitals (41%) did not meet at least one of the minimum volumes. These hospitals performed N=715 procedures (3.1%) where the minimum volumes were not met. In 43% of these cases the hospitals raised legally accepted exceptions. In 33% of the cases the hospitals argued using reasons that were not legally acknowledged. 69% of those hospitals that failed to achieve the minimum volumes for complex oesophageal and pancreatic interventions did not experience any consequences from the sickness funds. However, one third of those hospitals reported that the sickness funds addressed the issue and partially announced consequences for the future. The sickness funds' umbrella organisations stated that there were only sparse activities related to the minimum volumes and that neither uniform registrations nor uniform proceedings in case of infringements of the standards had been agreed upon. In spite of the

  9. Analysis of failed ramps during the RHIC FY09 run

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minty, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a versatile accelerator that supports operation with polarized protons of up to 250 GeV and ions with up to 100 GeV/nucleon. During any running period, various operating scenarios with different particle species, beam energies or accelerator optics are commissioned. In this report the beam commissioning periods for establishing full energy beams (ramp development periods) from the FY09 run are summarized and, for the purpose of motivating further developments, we analyze the reasons for all failed ramps.

  10. Re-enactment of power economy legislation failed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, W.

    2002-01-01

    Comment on the failed vote in the German Federal Parliament about the re-enactment of power economy legislation. The amendments were mainly intended to translate into national law the EU Single Market Directive of June 22, 1998 about common regulations of the gas market. The legislative process had included a mediation procedure between the two chambers of parliament, i.e. the Bundestag and the Bundesrat, had been rejected once more by the Bundesrat, and was to have been adopted by an absolute majority vote of the Bundestag, the so-called Chancellor's majority, still in this parliamentary term. (orig.)

  11. MRI in 'failed back surgery syndrome': Comparison to computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trattnig, S.; Ungersboeck, K.; Cech, T.; Schindler, E.

    1990-01-01

    The term 'failed back surgery syndrome' (FBSS) includes a variety of clinical-neurological symptoms following disc surgery. In a prospective study 18 patients suffering from monoradicular symptoms after disc surgery were examined by MRI and CT (both prior to and following intravenous application of contrast material). Findings were then compared to microsurgery. MRI produced correct diagnoses in 17 cases, CT in 13 cases. Recurrent disc herniation caused symptoms four times, and epidural scar formation twice. In twelve cases there was herniated disc material as well as an epidural scar present; disc material preponderated nine times, scar formation in three instances. (orig.) [de

  12. Characteristics of axial splits in failed BWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysell, G.; Grigoriev, V.

    2000-01-01

    Secondary cladding defects in BWR fuel sometimes have the shape of long axial cracks or ''splits''. Due to the large open UO 2 surfaces exposed to the water, fission product and UO 2 release to the coolant can reach excessive levels leading to forced shut downs to remove the failed fuel rods. A number of such fuel rods have been examined in Studsvik over the last 10 years. The paper describes observations from the PIE of long cracks and discusses the driving force of the cracks. Details such as starting cracks, macroscopic and microscopic fracture surface appearance, cross sections of cracks, hydride precipitates, location and degree of plastic deformation are given. (author)

  13. Sipping test on a failed MTR fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac; Zeituni, Carlos Alberto; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Perrotta, Jose Augusto; Silva, Jose Eduardo Rosa da

    2002-01-01

    This work describes sipping tests performed on MTR fuel elements of the IEA-R1 research reactor, in order to determinate which one failed in the core during a routine operation of the reactor. radioactive iodine isotopes 131 I and 133 I, employed as failure indicators, were detected in samples corresponding to the fuel element IEA-156. The specific activity of each sample, as well as the average leaking rate, were measured for 137 Cs. The nuclear fuels U 3 O 8 - Al dispersion and U - Al alloy were compared concerning their measured average leaking rates of 137 Cs. (author)

  14. Laparoscopic reoperation with total fundoplication for failed Heller myotomy: is it a possible option? Personal experience and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Gianluca; del Genio, Gianmattia; Maffettone, Vincenzo; Fei, Landino; Brusciano, Luigi; Limongelli, Paolo; Pizza, Francesco; Tolone, Salvatore; Di Martino, Maria; del Genio, Federica; del Genio, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Laparoscopic Heller myotomy with antireflux procedure seems the procedure of choice in the treatment of patients with esophageal achalasia. Persistent or recurrent symptoms occur in 10% to 20% of patients. Few reports on reoperation after failed Heller myotomy have been published. No author has reported the realization of a total fundoplication in these patient groups. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of laparoscopic reoperation with the realization of a total fundoplication after failed Heller myotomy for esophageal achalasia. From 1992 to December 2007, 5 out of a series of 242 patients (2.1%), along with 2 patients operated elsewhere, underwent laparoscopic reintervention for failed Heller myotomy. Symptoms leading to reoperation included persistent dysphagia in 3 patients, recurrent dysphagia in another 3, and heartburn in 1 patient. Mean time from the first to the second operation was 49.7 months (range, 4-180 months). Always, the intervention was completed via a laparoscopic approach and a Nissen-Rossetti fundoplication was realized or left in place after a complete Heller myotomy. Mean operative time was 160 minutes (range, 60-245 minutes). Mean postoperative hospital stay was 3.1 +/- 1.5 days. No major morbidity or mortality occurred. At a mean follow-up of 16.1 months, reoperation must be considered successful in 5 out of 7 patients (71.4%). The dysphagia DeMeester score fell from 2.71 +/- 0.22 to 0.91 +/- 0.38 postoperatively. The regurgitation score changed from 2.45 +/- 0.34 to 0.68 +/- 0.23. Laparoscopic reoperation for failed Heller myotomy with the realization of a total fundoplication is safe and is associated with good long-term results if performed by an experienced surgeon in a center with a long tradition of esophageal surgery.

  15. The Positive Side of Negative Labelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van Y.K.; Jonge, de J.

    2015-01-01

    Ethical labels signal positive ethical quality of a product but fail to create massive demand for such products. Based on regulatory focus theory and prospect theory, it is argued that negative signalling of low ethical quality would have a stronger effect on the adoption of ethical products than

  16. Libertarianism and Positive Rights: Comments on Katz's Reply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Maloberti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In “Why Libertarians Should Reject Positive Rights,” Joshua Katz offers a critical response to the argument developed by Nicolás Maloberti in “Libertarianism and the Possibility of the Legitimate State.” In this rejoinder, Maloberti argues that Katz’s response fails on two accounts. First, it fails to grasp the nature of the problem his article was ultimately concerned with. Second, it fails to present a solid case for the rejection of the type of positive right that it was argued libertarians should endorse as a solution to that problem.

  17. Potential safe termination by injection of polypropylene pellets in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, G.L.; Ali-Arshad, S.; Bartlett, D.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal energy and the magnetic field energy associated with the plasma current must be dissipated safely when a tokamak discharge is terminated in a disruption. Magnetic energy can be dissipated by impurity radiation if position control is maintained. Prior to the dissipation of magnetic energy, thermal energy is usually conducted to the plasma contact points on a 1ms time scale in a thermal quench. A resistive, highly radiating plasma formed prior to the thermal quench, might dissipate both the thermal and magnetic energy by radiation minimizing damage due to local deposition. High speed injection of a low Z material can produce a resistive, highly radiating plasma on a 1ms time scale. Neon has recently been used in such an application on JT60-U. A large carbon pellet producing dilution temperatures < 1 keV is a possible alternative. This paper summarizes the results of an initial experiment performed in JET using carbon injected at high speed, as a 6mm polypropylene pellet, to investigate this potential approach to a safe plasma termination

  18. Inherently safe passive gas monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Bellamy, John Stephen; Shuler, James M.; Shull, Davis J.; Leduc, Daniel R.

    2016-09-06

    Generally, the present disclosure is directed to gas monitoring systems that use inductive power transfer to safely power an electrically passive device included within a nuclear material storage container. In particular, the electrically passive device can include an inductive power receiver for receiving inductive power transfer through a wall of the nuclear material storage container. The power received by the inductive power receiver can be used to power one or more sensors included in the device. Thus, the device is not required to include active power generation components such as, for example, a battery, that increase the risk of a spark igniting flammable gases within the container.

  19. Managing radioactive waste safely. Engaging Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elrick, D.; Boyes, L.; McCormick, J.

    2002-01-01

    The report presents findings from a study to explore how best to engage the public and other stakeholders in decision-making processes on the safe management of radioactive waste. Scottish Council Foundation conducted extended focus groups with the Scottish public in 4 locations, as well as group and one-to-one interviews with stakeholders from the nuclear industry, environment non-governmental organisations (NGOs), bodies experienced in using other public engagement methods, Community Planning partners and media reporters. A review of literature on public involvement in radioactive waste issues and public engagement more generally was also conducted

  20. The journey from safe yield to sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, William M; Leake, Stanley A

    2004-01-01

    Safe-yield concepts historically focused attention on the economic and legal aspects of ground water development. Sustainability concerns have brought environmental aspects more to the forefront and have resulted in a more integrated outlook. Water resources sustainability is not a purely scientific concept, but rather a perspective that can frame scientific analysis. The evolving concept of sustainability presents a challenge to hydrologists to translate complex, and sometimes vague, socioeconomic and political questions into technical questions that can be quantified systematically. Hydrologists can contribute to sustainable water resources management by presenting the longer-term implications of ground water development as an integral part of their analyses.

  1. Safe handling of plutonium: a panel report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-01-01

    This guide results from a meeting of a Panel of Experts held by the International Atomic Energy Agency on 8 to 12 November 1971. It is directed to workers in research laboratories handling plutonium in gram amounts. Contents: aspects of the physical and chemical properties of plutonium; metabolic features of plutonium; facility design features for safe handling of plutonium (layout of facility, working zones, decontamination room, etc.); glove boxes; health surveillance (surveillance of environment and supervision of workers); emergencies; organization. Annexes: types of glove boxes; tables; mobile ..cap alpha.. air sampler; aerosol monitor; bio-assay limits of detection; examples of contamination control monitors.

  2. A Safe Protocol for Amalgam Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana G. Colson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today's environment has different impacts on our body than previous generations. Heavy metals are a growing concern in medicine. Doctors and individuals request the removal of their amalgam (silver mercury restorations due to the high mercury content. A safe protocol to replace the silver mercury filling will ensure that there is minimal if any absorption of materials while being removed. Strong alternative white composite and lab-processed materials are available today to create a healthy and functioning mouth. Preparation of the patient prior to the procedure and after treatment is vital to establish the excretion of the mercury from the body.

  3. Safe 15 Terawatt of Temelin NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sula, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this work author presents a project Safe 15 Terawatt realised on the Temelin NPP. This project is one of the eight key projects of the CEZ group, associated in the 'Programme of efficiency'. The project started in June 2007 with long-term goals for horizon of year 2012. The safety indicators will be reached of the first quarter level of world's nuclear power plant - by the end of the first decade. By the end of year 2012 we will have achieved annual production of 15 billion kWh - in the Czech Republic: 15 Terawatt.

  4. Manufacturing development for the SAFE 100 kW core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, Robert; Roman, Jose; Salvail, Pat

    2002-01-01

    In stark contrast to what is sometimes considered the norm in traditional manufacturing processes, engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) arc in the practice of altering the standard in an effort to realize other potential methods in core manufacturing. While remaining within the bounds of the materials database, we are researching into core manufacturing techniques that may have been overlooked in the past due to funding and/or time constraints. To augment proven core fabrication capabilities we are pursuing plating processes as another possible method for core build-up and assembly. Although brazing and a proprietary HIP cycle are used for module assembly (proven track record for stability and endurance), it is prudent to pursue secondary or backup methods of module and core assembly. For this reason heat tube manufacture and module assembly by means of plating is being investigated. Potentially, the plating processes will give engineers the ability to manufacture replacement modules for any module that might fail to perform nominally, and to assemble/disassemble a complete core in much less time than would be required for the conventional Braze-HIP process. Another area of improvement in core manufacturing capabilities is the installation of a sodium and lithium liquid metal heat pipe fill machine. This, along with the ability to Electron Beam Weld heat pipe seals and wet-in the pipes in the necessary vacuum atmosphere, will eliminate the need to ship potentially hazardous components outside for processing. In addition to developing core manufacturing techniques, the SAFE manufacturing team has been evaluating the thermal heat transfer characteristics, and manufacturability of several heat exchanger design concepts

  5. Women's authority during childbirth and Safe Motherhood in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempe, Annica; Noor-Aldin Alwazer, Fatoom A; Theorell, Töres

    2010-11-01

    In the effort to increase utilization of professional care during childbirth in low-income countries, few studies have taken a holistic approach to investigating women's perspective of safety and the link to perceived own authority at birth. The aim of the study was to examine women's authority at birth with reference to the intrapartum factors, the level of training of staff and the social and demographic background of women. A multistage (stratified-purposive-random) sampling process was used. We interviewed 220 women with childbirth experience in urban/rural Yemen. We performed bivariate chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression analysis. Women who had their questions answered and requests met during childbirth had 83% higher probability (95% CI 1.66-2.02) to perceive own authority. Women who reported skin-to-skin contact/newborn in arms had 28% higher (95% CI 1.03-1.59) and those who had more distant contact 15% lower (95% CI 0.75-0.95) probability. A graded negative association was found between the perceived authority of the woman in childbirth and the level of biomedical training of staff (pauthority at birth. This paper argues that supporting Yemeni women to exercise their own authority during childbirth would significantly facilitate their ability to give birth successfully and with personal satisfaction. In a country where women are routinely disempowered, their personal empowerment at birth is very important to them. Skilled birth assistants often, in women's perceptions, work against their personal power and authority, most especially MDs but also midwives. This failure results in women failing to seek medical care when needed. Supporting women to experience their own authority at birth would facilitate the accomplishment of both the Millennium Development Goals and those of the Safe Motherhood Initiative. We call for increased cooperation between modern and traditional methods of care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative Riftology: Insights into the Evolution of Passive Continental Margins and Continental Rifts from the Failed Midcontinent Rift (MCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elling, R. P.; Stein, C. A.; Stein, S.; Kley, J.; Keller, G. R.; Wysession, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    Continental rifts evolve to seafloor spreading and are preserved in passive margins, or fail and remain as fossil features in continents. Rifts at different stages give insight into these evolutionary paths. Of particular interest is the evolution of volcanic passive margins, which are characterized by seaward dipping reflectors, volcanic rocks yielding magnetic anomalies landward of the oldest spreading anomalies, and are underlain by high-velocity lower crustal bodies. How and when these features form remains unclear. Insights are given by the Midcontinent Rift (MCR), which began to form during the 1.1 Ga rifting of Amazonia from Laurentia, but failed when seafloor spreading was established elsewhere. MCR volcanics are much thicker than other continental flood basalts, due to deposition in a narrow rift rather than a broad region, giving a rift's geometry but a LIP's magma volume. The MCR provides a snapshot of the deposition of a thick and highly magnetized volcanic section during rifting. Surface exposures and reflection seismic data near Lake Superior show a rift basin filled by inward-dipping flood basalt layers. Had the rift evolved to seafloor spreading, the basin would have split into two sets of volcanics with opposite-facing SDRs, each with a magnetic anomaly. Because the rift formed as a series of alternating half-grabens, structural asymmetries between conjugate margins would have naturally occurred had it gone to completion. Hence the MCR implies that many passive margin features form prior to seafloor spreading. Massive inversion of the MCR long after it failed has provided a much clearer picture of its structure compared to failed rifts with lesser degrees of inversion. Seismic imaging as well as gravity and magnetic modeling provide important insight into the effects of inversion on failed rifts. The MCR provides an end member for the evolution of actively extending rifts, characterized by upwelling mantle and negative gravity anomalies, to failed

  7. In situ repair of a failed compression fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbert, Ronald R.; Jandrasits, Walter G.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the in situ repair of a failed compression fitg is provided. Initially, a portion of a guide tube is inserted coaxially in the bore of the compression fitting and locked therein. A close fit dethreading device is then coaxially mounted on the guide tube to cut the threads from the fitting. Thereafter, the dethreading device and guide tube are removed and a new fitting is inserted onto the dethreaded fitting with the body of the new fitting overlaying the dethreaded portion. Finally, the main body of the new fitting is welded to the main body of the old fitting whereby a new threaded portion of the replacement fitting is precisely coaxial with the old threaded portion. If needed, a bushing is located on the dethreaded portion which is sized to fit snugly between the dethreaded portion and the new fitting. Preferably, the dethreading device includes a cutting tool which is moved incrementally in a radial direction whereby the threads are cut from the threaded portion of the failed fitting in increments.

  8. The cost of operating with failed fuel at Virginia power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Virginia Power has completed a study of the costs incurred due to fuel failures in its pressurized water reactors. This study was prompted by histories of high primary coolant activity and subsequent fuel inspections at the North Anna and Surry power stations. The study included an evaluation of the total costs of fuel failures as well as an evaluation of the economics of postirradiation fuel inspections. The major costs of fuel failures included personnel radiation exposure, permanently discharged failed fuel, radwaste generation, increased labor requirements, containment entry delays due to airborne radioactivity, and ramp rate restrictions. Although fuel failures affect a utility in several other areas, the items evaluated in the study were thought to be the most significant of the costs. The study indicated that performing a postirradiation failed fuel examination can be economically justified at tramp-corrected 131 I levels of > 0.015 μCi/g. The savings to the utility can be on the order of several million dollars. Additionally, the cost penalty of performing a fuel inspection at lower iodine levels is generally in the range of $200,000. This economic penalty is expected to be outweighed by the intangible benefits of operating with a defect-free core

  9. Why nuclear power failed the market test in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesshire, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Conservative Party's manifesto for the general election of May 1987 contained two pledges of relevance to the UK electricity supply industry (ESI). These were to privatize the industry; and to continue to support the development of civil nuclear power in the private sector. As anticipated by some independent commentators, in the event these objectives proved incompatible. The costs of nuclear power have long been a vexed issue and UK nuclear costs have been higher than those in many other countries. While most of the UK ESI has now been privatized, nuclear generation remains in the public sector. This article seeks to explore the reasons for this fundamental and politically embarrassing policy reversal, a rarity under three successive Conservative administrations since 1979. It would be incorrect to argue that private ownership and nuclear power are inherently incompatible. Rather the specific - competitive - form of privatization proposed for the UK failed to provide sufficient guarantees for the London capital market. Thus, at least in this specific case, nuclear power failed the market test. The implications of this for the UK nuclear industry have been profound. As a result, the UK case has wider international lessons as the pressures for privatization, liberalization and greater cost transparency bear down upon electric utilities in other countries. (author)

  10. A Physical Model of Mass Ejection in Failed Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Eric R.; Quataert, Eliot; Fernández, Rodrigo; Kasen, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    During the core collapse of massive stars, the formation of the protoneutron star is accompanied by the emission of a significant amount of mass-energy (˜0.3 M⊙) in the form of neutrinos. This mass-energy loss generates an outward-propagating pressure wave that steepens into a shock near the stellar surface, potentially powering a weak transient associated with an otherwise-failed supernova. We analytically investigate this mass-loss-induced wave generation and propagation. Heuristic arguments provide an accurate estimate of the amount of energy contained in the outgoing sound pulse. We then develop a general formalism for analyzing the response of the star to centrally concentrated mass loss in linear perturbation theory. To build intuition, we apply this formalism to polytropic stellar models, finding qualitative and quantitative agreement with simulations and heuristic arguments. We also apply our results to realistic pre-collapse massive star progenitors (both giants and compact stars). Our analytic results for the sound pulse energy, excitation radius, and steepening in the stellar envelope are in good agreement with full time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations. We show that prior to the sound pulses arrival at the stellar photosphere, the photosphere has already reached velocities ˜20 - 100% of the local sound speed, thus likely modestly decreasing the stellar effective temperature prior to the star disappearing. Our results provide important constraints on the physical properties and observational appearance of failed supernovae.

  11. Untrained chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii fail to imitate novel actions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Tennie

    Full Text Available Social learning research in apes has focused on social learning in the technical (problem solving domain - an approach that confounds action and physical information. Successful subjects in such studies may have been able to perform target actions not as a result of imitation learning but because they had learnt some technical aspect, for example, copying the movements of an apparatus (i.e., different forms of emulation learning.Here we present data on action copying by non-enculturated and untrained chimpanzees when physical information is removed from demonstrations. To date, only one such study (on gesture copying in a begging context has been conducted--with negative results. Here we have improved this methodology and have also added non-begging test situations (a possible confound of the earlier study. Both familiar and novel actions were used as targets. Prior to testing, a trained conspecific demonstrator was rewarded for performing target actions in view of observers. All but one of the tested chimpanzees already failed to copy familiar actions. When retested with a novel target action, also the previously successful subject failed to copy--and he did so across several contexts.Chimpanzees do not seem to copy novel actions, and only some ever copy familiar ones. Due to our having tested only non-enculturated and untrained chimpanzees, the performance of our test subjects speak more than most other studies of the general (dis-ability of chimpanzees to copy actions, and especially novel actions.

  12. Untrained Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) Fail to Imitate Novel Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennie, Claudio; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Social learning research in apes has focused on social learning in the technical (problem solving) domain - an approach that confounds action and physical information. Successful subjects in such studies may have been able to perform target actions not as a result of imitation learning but because they had learnt some technical aspect, for example, copying the movements of an apparatus (i.e., different forms of emulation learning). Methods Here we present data on action copying by non-enculturated and untrained chimpanzees when physical information is removed from demonstrations. To date, only one such study (on gesture copying in a begging context) has been conducted – with negative results. Here we have improved this methodology and have also added non-begging test situations (a possible confound of the earlier study). Both familiar and novel actions were used as targets. Prior to testing, a trained conspecific demonstrator was rewarded for performing target actions in view of observers. All but one of the tested chimpanzees already failed to copy familiar actions. When retested with a novel target action, also the previously successful subject failed to copy – and he did so across several contexts. Conclusion Chimpanzees do not seem to copy novel actions, and only some ever copy familiar ones. Due to our having tested only non-enculturated and untrained chimpanzees, the performance of our test subjects speak more than most other studies of the general (dis-)ability of chimpanzees to copy actions, and especially novel actions. PMID:22905102

  13. Mass ejection in failed supernovae: variation with stellar progenitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Rodrigo; Quataert, Eliot; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Coughlin, Eric R.

    2018-05-01

    We study the ejection of mass during stellar core-collapse when the stalled shock does not revive and a black hole forms. Neutrino emission during the protoneutron star phase causes a decrease in the gravitational mass of the core, resulting in an outward going sound pulse that steepens into a shock as it travels out through the star. We explore the properties of this mass ejection mechanism over a range of stellar progenitors using spherically symmetric, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations that treat neutrino mass-loss parametrically and follow the shock propagation over the entire star. We find that all types of stellar progenitor can eject mass through this mechanism. The ejected mass is a decreasing function of the surface gravity of the star, ranging from several M⊙ for red supergiants to ˜0.1 M⊙ for blue supergiants and ˜10-3 M⊙ for Wolf-Rayet stars. We find that the final shock energy at the surface is a decreasing function of the core-compactness, and is ≲ 1047-1048 erg in all cases. In progenitors with a sufficiently large envelope, high core-compactness, or a combination of both, the sound pulse fails to unbind mass. Successful mass ejection is accompanied by significant fallback accretion that can last from hours to years. We predict the properties of shock breakout and thermal plateau emission produced by the ejection of the outer envelope of blue supergiant and Wolf-Rayet progenitors in otherwise failed supernovae.

  14. We still fail to account for Mendel's observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteous, John W

    2004-08-16

    The present article corrects common textbook accounts of Mendel's experiments by re-establishing what he wrote and how he accounted for his observations. It notes the long-established tests for the validity of any explanations that purport to explain observations obtained by experiment. Application of these tests to Mendel's paper shows that the arguments he used to explain his observations were internally consistent but were, on one crucial issue, implausible. The same tests are applied to the currently accepted explanation for Mendel's observations. The currently favoured explanation for Mendel's observations is untenable. It misrepresents Mendel, fails to distinguish between the parameters and the variables of any system of interacting components, its arguments are inconsistent, it repeats the implausibility in Mendel's paper, fails to give a rational explanation for his observed 3:1 trait ratio and cannot explain why this ratio is not always observed in experimental practice. A rational explanation for Mendel's observations is initiated. Readers are challenged to complete the process before a further article appears.

  15. We still fail to account for Mendel's observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porteous John W

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present article corrects common textbook accounts of Mendel's experiments by re-establishing what he wrote and how he accounted for his observations. It notes the long-established tests for the validity of any explanations that purport to explain observations obtained by experiment. Application of these tests to Mendel's paper shows that the arguments he used to explain his observations were internally consistent but were, on one crucial issue, implausible. The same tests are applied to the currently accepted explanation for Mendel's observations. Conclusions The currently favoured explanation for Mendel's observations is untenable. It misrepresents Mendel, fails to distinguish between the parameters and the variables of any system of interacting components, its arguments are inconsistent, it repeats the implausibility in Mendel's paper, fails to give a rational explanation for his observed 3:1 trait ratio and cannot explain why this ratio is not always observed in experimental practice. A rational explanation for Mendel's observations is initiated. Readers are challenged to complete the process before a further article appears.

  16. Modified rerouting procedure for failed peroneal tendon dislocation surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulke, R; Hildebrand, F; Panzica, M; Hüfner, T; Krettek, C

    2010-04-01

    Recurrent dislocation of the peroneal tendons following operative treatment is relatively uncommon, but can be difficult to treat. We asked whether subligamental transposition of the peroneus brevis tendon, fibular grooving, and reattachment of the superior peroneal retinaculum for failed peroneal tendon dislocation surgery would achieve a stable fixation of the peroneal tendons and whether there would be restrictions of ROM or instability of the hindfoot. We reviewed six female patients (mean age, 24.5 years) with general laxity of joints preoperatively and at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Within 1 year postoperatively no recurrence was found. In two ankles the extension was restricted 5 degrees to 10 degrees . In another pronation and supination was restricted 5 degrees each. Stability of the ankle increased in four patients and stayed unchanged in two. AOFAS score increased from a mean value of 36 +/- 20.6 preoperatively to 90 +/- 7 postoperatively at 1 year. We conclude transposition of the peroneus brevis tendon is a reasonable treatment for failed peroneal tendon dislocation surgery. Level IV, therapeutic study (prospective case series). See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  17. A PKM2 signature in the failing heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Meredith L.; Subramaniam, Janani; Li, Yuanteng; Hamilton, Dale J.; Frazier, O. Howard; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    A salient feature of the failing heart is metabolic remodeling towards predominant glucose metabolism and activation of the fetal gene program. Sunitinib is a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor used for the treatment of highly vascularized tumors. In diabetic patients, sunitinib significantly decreases blood glucose. However, a considerable proportion of sunitinib-treated patients develop cardiac dysfunction or failure. We asked whether sunitinib treatment results in shift towards glycolysis in the heart. Glucose uptake by the heart was increased fivefold in mice treated with sunitinib. Transcript analysis by qPCR revealed an induction of genes associated with glycolysis and reactivation of the fetal gene program. Additionally, we observed a shift in the enzyme pyruvate kinase from the adult M1 (PKM1) isoform to the fetal M2 (PKM2) isoform, a hallmark of the Warburg Effect. This novel observation led us to examine whether a similar shift occurs in human heart failure. Examination of tissue from patients with heart failure similarly displayed an induction of PKM2. Moreover, this phenomenon was partially reversed following mechanical unloading. We propose that pyruvate kinase isoform switching represents a novel feature of the fetal gene program in the failing heart. PMID:25735978

  18. Mechanical and Spectroscopic Analysis of Retrieved/Failed Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Daood

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine surface alterations and bone formation on the surface of failed dental implants (Straumann [ST] and TiUnite [TiUn] removed due to any biological reason. In addition, failure analysis was performed to test mechanical properties. Dental implants (n = 38 from two manufacturers were collected and subjected to chemical cleaning. The presence of newly formed hydroxyapatite bone around failed implants was evaluated using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy was used to identify surface defects. Mechanical testing was performed using a Minneapolis servo-hydraulic system (MTS along with indentation using a universal testing machine and average values were recorded. A statistical analysis of mechanical properties was done using an unpaired t test, and correlation between observed defects was evaluated using Chi-square (p = 0.05. Apatite-formation was evident in both implants, but was found qualitatively more in the ST group. No significant difference was found in indentation between the two groups (p > 0.05. The percentage of “no defects” was significantly lower in the ST group (71%. Crack-like and full-crack defects were observed in 49% and 39% of TiUn. The ST group showed 11,061 cycles to failure as compared with 10,021 cycles in the TiUnite group. Implant failure mechanisms are complex with a combination of mechanical and biological reasons and these factors are variable with different implant systems.

  19. Integrated identification and control for nanosatellites reclaiming failed satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Nan; Luo, Jianjun; Ma, Weihua; Yuan, Jianping

    2018-05-01

    Using nanosatellites to reclaim a failed satellite needs nanosatellites to attach to its surface to take over its attitude control function. This is challenging, since parameters including the inertia matrix of the combined spacecraft and the relative attitude information of attached nanosatellites with respect to the given body-fixed frame of the failed satellite are all unknown after the attachment. Besides, if the total control capacity needs to be increased during the reclaiming process by new nanosatellites, real-time parameters updating will be necessary. For these reasons, an integrated identification and control method is proposed in this paper, which enables the real-time parameters identification and attitude takeover control to be conducted concurrently. Identification of the inertia matrix of the combined spacecraft and the relative attitude information of attached nanosatellites are both considered. To guarantee sufficient excitation for the identification of the inertia matrix, a modified identification equation is established by filtering out sample points leading to ill-conditioned identification, and the identification performance of the inertia matrix is improved. Based on the real-time estimated inertia matrix, an attitude takeover controller is designed, the stability of the controller is analysed using Lyapunov method. The commanded control torques are allocated to each nanosatellite while the control saturation constraint being satisfied using the Quadratic Programming (QP) method. Numerical simulations are carried out to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed integrated identification and control method.

  20. A physical model of mass ejection in failed supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Eric R.; Quataert, Eliot; Fernández, Rodrigo; Kasen, Daniel

    2018-06-01

    During the core collapse of massive stars, the formation of the proto-neutron star is accompanied by the emission of a significant amount of mass energy (˜0.3 M⊙) in the form of neutrinos. This mass-energy loss generates an outward-propagating pressure wave that steepens into a shock near the stellar surface, potentially powering a weak transient associated with an otherwise-failed supernova. We analytically investigate this mass-loss-induced wave generation and propagation. Heuristic arguments provide an accurate estimate of the amount of energy contained in the outgoing sound pulse. We then develop a general formalism for analysing the response of the star to centrally concentrated mass loss in linear perturbation theory. To build intuition, we apply this formalism to polytropic stellar models, finding qualitative and quantitative agreement with simulations and heuristic arguments. We also apply our results to realistic pre-collapse massive star progenitors (both giants and compact stars). Our analytic results for the sound pulse energy, excitation radius, and steepening in the stellar envelope are in good agreement with full time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations. We show that prior to the sound pulses arrival at the stellar photosphere, the photosphere has already reached velocities ˜ 20-100 per cent of the local sound speed, thus likely modestly decreasing the stellar effective temperature prior to the star disappearing. Our results provide important constraints on the physical properties and observational appearance of failed supernovae.