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Sample records for portsmouth site annual

  1. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant annual site environmental report for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horak, C.M. [ed.

    1994-11-01

    This calendar year (CY) 1993 annual report on environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth) and its environs consists of three separate documents: a summary pamphlet for the general public; a more detail discussion and of compliance status, data, and environmental impacts (this document); and a volume of detailed data that is available on request. The objectives of this report are to report compliance status during 1993; provide information about the plant site and plant operations; report 1993 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site; document information on input and assumptions used in calculations; provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on quality assurance for the environmental monitoring program.

  2. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant annual site environmental report for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    This calendar year (CY) 1993 annual report on environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth) and its environs consists of three separate documents: a summary pamphlet for the general public; a more detail discussion and of compliance status, data, and environmental impacts (this document); and a volume of detailed data that is available on request. The objectives of this report are to report compliance status during 1993; provide information about the plant site and plant operations; report 1993 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site; document information on input and assumptions used in calculations; provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on quality assurance for the environmental monitoring program

  3. US Department of Energy Portsmouth Site. Annual environmental data for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, D.W.; West, D.C.; Newman, S.C.; Sperling, P.A.; Horak, C.M.

    1996-03-01

    Environmental monitoring on the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site and its surroundings is conducted throughout the year. Monitoring ensures that the site is a safe place to work, that plant operations do not adversely affect neighboring communities, and that activities comply with federal and state regulations. This document is a compilation of the environmental monitoring data for calendar year 1994 and is intended as a tool for analysts in environmental monitoring, environmental restoration, and other related disciplines. The data in this document form the basis for the summary information in the Portsmouth Site Annual Environmental Report for 1994 (ES/ESH-63, POEF-3055)

  4. U.S. Department of Energy Portsmouth Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2012. Student Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutzel, Margaret [Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, OH (United States); Siegrist, Lindsey [Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, OH (United States); Wilson, Natalie [Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, OH (United States); Kloepfer, Daniel [Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, OH (United States)

    2015-12-31

    The report that follows is a summary of the U.S. Department of Energy Portsmouth Annual Site Environmental Report for 2012 (ASER), regarding PORTS located near Piketon, Ohio. The summary has been compiled by the 2015 WHS Environmental Science class, made up of juniors and seniors at WHS during the 2014-2015 school year. Even with most of the class having lived in this region for their entire lives, it became apparent how little of the workings of the plant were known by the members of the class. In the process of putting this summary together, we were able to gain a better understanding of the history, function, and possible future of the site. The presentations provided by Ohio University, Fluor-B&W Portsmouth LLC (FBP), U.S. DOE, and Rio Grande University were greatly appreciated and provided invaluable understanding of the materials which we were asked to summarize. Not only did we learn from the presentations, but we greatly enjoyed the opportunities to participate in the field studies that gave us a glimpse into what is being done at the plant site to ensure the environmental safety of people and wildlife of this region. Our goal from this summary has been to make the information concerning the monitoring and cleanup of the PORTS facility better understood by the people who it most affects. We hope that this summary makes the information useful to you and that you can gain a better understanding of the cleanup processes that are going on around the site to ensure your safety. Though it has been hard work, we appreciate the opportunity that we have been presented with to learn and share with the people of our community.

  5. US Department of Energy Portsmouth Site annual environmental report for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horak, C.M. [ed.] [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the status of compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and orders; effluent monitoring data; and environmental surveillance results associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities at the Portsmouth site. DOE requires that environmental monitoring be conducted and documented for all of its facilities under the purview of DOE Order 5400.1 {ital General Environmental Protection Program}. DOE activities at the Portsmouth site are environmental restoration and waste management. Production facilities for the separation of uranium isotopes are leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). USEC activities are not covered by this report. 18 refs., 48 figs., 21 tabs.

  6. US Department of Energy Portsmouth Site annual environmental report for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, C.M.

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the status of compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and orders; effluent monitoring data; and environmental surveillance results associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities at the Portsmouth site. DOE requires that environmental monitoring be conducted and documented for all of its facilities under the purview of DOE Order 5400.1 General Environmental Protection Program. DOE activities at the Portsmouth site are environmental restoration and waste management. Production facilities for the separation of uranium isotopes are leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). USEC activities are not covered by this report. 18 refs., 48 figs., 21 tabs

  7. Student Summary of the U.S. Department of Energy Portsmouth Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Shea [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States); Develin, Thomas [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States); Flores, Victor [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States); Gilbert, Tyler [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States); Heigley, Madison [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States); Johnson, Hayden [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States); Jones, Larry [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States); Keechle, Autumn [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States); Kelley, Abe [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States); Kritzwiser, Branson [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States); Lawless, Paige [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States); Montgomery, Nikki [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States); Newland, Dawndra [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States); Noble, Jeff [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States); Parsons, Abigail [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States); Riffe, Courtney [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States); Trego, Andrew [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States); Wicker, Drake [Waverly High School (WHS), Waverly, OH (United States)

    2016-10-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducts environmental monitoring at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site (PORTS) on an ongoing basis. Each year, the information collected is presented in a data volume and a comprehensive publication entitled the Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER). This year, a class at Waverly High School (WHS), located in Pike County, Ohio, developed this summary report. Both the ASER and this summary report are important as they allow DOE to clearly and concisely explain our environmental monitoring programs to our many stakeholders. The information presented in this summary shows that the PORTS site near Piketon, Ohio, is safe due in part to the Department’s focus on safety. The work at DOE facilities is highly detailed and technically complex, but DOE is committed to performing each of these activities safely. DOE’s first priority is to protect the well-being of our workers, the surrounding communities, and the environment. DOE would like to offer its sincerest appreciation to the students and faculty leader at Waverly High School who worked on this summary document. DOE congratulates each of you for your effort, enthusiasm, and willingness to support this project. DOE hopes you enjoy reading the PORTS 2013 Annual Site Environmental Report Summary.

  8. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report summary for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This report contains summaries of the environmental programs at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1993. The environmental monitoring program at Paducah includes effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is measurement of releases as they occur. Contaminants are released through either airborne emissions or liquids discharged from the plant. These releases occur as part of normal site operations, such as cooling water discharged from the uranium enrichment cascade operations or airborne releases from ventilation systems. In the event of system failure, this monitoring provides timely warning so that corrective action can be taken before releases reach an unsafe level. Environmental surveillance tracks the dispersion of materials into the environment after they have been released. This involves the collection of samples from various media, such as water, soil, vegetation, and food crops, and the analysis of these samples for certain radionuclides, chemicals, and metals

  9. Portsmouth annual environmental report for 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The Portsmouth plant is one of two US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned, contractor-managed uranium enrichment facilities in operation. As of July 1, 1993, responsibility for implementing environmental compliance at the facility was split between DOE, as site owner, and the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC), a government-owned corporation formed by the Energy Policy Act of 1992, to operate the nation`s uranium enrichment business. The management contractor for DOE in 1997 was Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, which was responsible for environmental restoration, waste management, removal of highly enriched uranium, and operation of nonleased facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE/PORTS). A new 5 1/2-year management and integration contract was awarded by DOE to Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC on December 18, 1997. Bechtel Jacobs Company officially assumed management responsibilities on April 1, 1998, when the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems contract expired. Lockheed Martin Utility Services provides management services for USEC. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission assumed direct oversight of USEC operations, formerly a DOE function, in March 1997.

  10. Portsmouth annual environmental report for 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    The Portsmouth plant is one of two US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned, contractor-managed uranium enrichment facilities in operation. As of July 1, 1993, responsibility for implementing environmental compliance at the facility was split between DOE, as site owner, and the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC), a government-owned corporation formed by the Energy Policy Act of 1992, to operate the nation's uranium enrichment business. The management contractor for DOE in 1997 was Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, which was responsible for environmental restoration, waste management, removal of highly enriched uranium, and operation of nonleased facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE/PORTS). A new 5 1/2-year management and integration contract was awarded by DOE to Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC on December 18, 1997. Bechtel Jacobs Company officially assumed management responsibilities on April 1, 1998, when the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems contract expired. Lockheed Martin Utility Services provides management services for USEC. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission assumed direct oversight of USEC operations, formerly a DOE function, in March 1997

  11. Student Summary of the U.S. Department of Energy Portsmouth Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Cameryn [Piketon High School (PHS), Pike County, OH (United States); Harris, Quincy [Piketon High School (PHS), Pike County, OH (United States); Pyle, Caitlin [Piketon High School (PHS), Pike County, OH (United States); Bair, Aundreana [Piketon High School (PHS), Pike County, OH (United States); Hutton, Alexys [Piketon High School (PHS), Pike County, OH (United States); Rigsby, Hannah [Piketon High School (PHS), Pike County, OH (United States); Berlin, Nicholas [Piketon High School (PHS), Pike County, OH (United States); Caelem, Caelem [Piketon High School (PHS), Pike County, OH (United States); Rockwell, Cecilia [Piketon High School (PHS), Pike County, OH (United States); Birkhimer, Alexis [Piketon High School (PHS), Pike County, OH (United States); Lightle, Grace [Piketon High School (PHS), Pike County, OH (United States)

    2017-08-29

    The purpose of the full ASER document is to provide details of environmental activities, primarily environmental monitoring, for calendar year 2014. This summary report of the full 2014 ASER provides details in which DOE demonstrates compliance with local, state and federal regulations within environmental programs - both radiological and non-radiological monitoring and groundwater monitoring (DOE, 2016). This report is not intended to present all of the monitoring activities at PORTS and more information can be found at the PORTS Environmental Information Center and website, which is http://energy.gov/pppo/portsmouth-environmental-center.

  12. 75 FR 7577 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... areas of environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda: Call to...

  13. 75 FR 65615 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... areas of environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda Call to...

  14. 76 FR 57981 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda Call to Order...

  15. 77 FR 2283 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda Call to Order...

  16. 76 FR 36100 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda Call to Order...

  17. 77 FR 29997 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda Call to Order...

  18. 77 FR 37390 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda: Call to Order...

  19. 75 FR 82003 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... areas of environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda: Call to...

  20. 75 FR 19379 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... areas of environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda Call to...

  1. 76 FR 78909 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... the areas of environmental restoration, waste management, and related activities. Tentative Agenda...

  2. 77 FR 6790 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda Call to Order...

  3. 75 FR 51026 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... the areas of environmental restoration, waste management and related activities. Tentative Agenda...

  4. US Department of Energy Portsmouth annual environmental report for 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The Portsmouth plant is one of two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned, contractor-managed uranium enrichment facilities in operation. As of July 1, 1993, responsibility for implementing environmental compliance at the facility was split between DOE, as site owner, and the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), a government-owned corporation formed by the National Energy Policy Act of 1992, to operate the nation's uranium enrichment business. The management contractor for DOE is Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (formerly Martin Marietta Energy Systems), which is responsible for waste management, environmental restoration, removal of highly enriched uranium (HEU), and operation of nonleased facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE/PORTS). Lockheed Martin Utility Services (formerly Martin Marietta Utility Services) provides management services for USEC. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission will assume direct oversight of USEC operations in 1997. Until then, DOE will provide oversight of nuclear safety and safeguards and security. DOE/PORTS is located on about six square miles in Pike County, Ohio. The County has approximately 24,250 residents. The total population within 50 miles of the plant is about 900,000. The main process at PORTS has been the separation of uranium isotopes through gaseous diffusion. Uranium is no longer enriched by DOE at PORTS. The uranium enrichment production operation facilities at the site are leased to USEC and are managed and operated by Lockheed Martin Utility Services

  5. US Department of Energy Portsmouth annual environmental report for 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The Portsmouth plant is one of two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned, contractor-managed uranium enrichment facilities in operation. As of July 1, 1993, responsibility for implementing environmental compliance at the facility was split between DOE, as site owner, and the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), a government-owned corporation formed by the National Energy Policy Act of 1992, to operate the nation`s uranium enrichment business. The management contractor for DOE is Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (formerly Martin Marietta Energy Systems), which is responsible for waste management, environmental restoration, removal of highly enriched uranium (HEU), and operation of nonleased facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE/PORTS). Lockheed Martin Utility Services (formerly Martin Marietta Utility Services) provides management services for USEC. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission will assume direct oversight of USEC operations in 1997. Until then, DOE will provide oversight of nuclear safety and safeguards and security. DOE/PORTS is located on about six square miles in Pike County, Ohio. The County has approximately 24,250 residents. The total population within 50 miles of the plant is about 900,000. The main process at PORTS has been the separation of uranium isotopes through gaseous diffusion. Uranium is no longer enriched by DOE at PORTS. The uranium enrichment production operation facilities at the site are leased to USEC and are managed and operated by Lockheed Martin Utility Services.

  6. US Department of Energy Portsmouth. Annual environmental report for 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes the 1995 environmental monitoring of DOE activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and its environs. This report consists of two separate documents: a discussion of compliance status, data, and environmental impacts (this document); and a volume of detailed data that is available on request. The objectives of this report are to (1) report compliance status during 1995, (2) provide information about the site and DOE operations, (3) report 1995 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by DOE operations on the site, (4) document information on input and assumptions used in calculations, (5) provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and (6) provide general information on quality assurance for the environmental monitoring program for DOE operations

  7. US Department of Energy Portsmouth. Annual environmental report for 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes the 1995 environmental monitoring of DOE activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and its environs. This report consists of two separate documents: a discussion of compliance status, data, and environmental impacts (this document); and a volume of detailed data that is available on request. The objectives of this report are to (1) report compliance status during 1995, (2) provide information about the site and DOE operations, (3) report 1995 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by DOE operations on the site, (4) document information on input and assumptions used in calculations, (5) provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and (6) provide general information on quality assurance for the environmental monitoring program for DOE operations.

  8. Portsmouth annual environmental report for 2003, Piketon, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none, none

    2004-11-30

    The Portsmouth & Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is located on a 5.8-square-mile site in a rural area of Pike County, Ohio. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities at PORTS include environmental restoration, waste 'management, and long-term'stewardship of nonleased facilities: Production facilities for the separation of uranium isotopes are leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), but most activities associated with the uranium enrichment process ceased in 2001. USEC activities are not covered by this document, with the exception of some environmental compliance information provided in Chap. 2 and radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring program information discussed in Chaps. 4 and 5.

  9. 75 FR 56526 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth AGENCY... Initiative Workshop of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The... recommendations to DOE-EM and site management in the areas of environmental restoration, waste management and...

  10. Depleted uranium hexafluoride management program : data compilation for the Portsmouth site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, H. M.

    2001-01-01

    This report is a compilation of data and analyses for the Portsmouth site, near Portsmouth, Ohio. The data were collected and the analyses were done in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 1999 Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DOE/EIS-0269). The report describes the affected environment at the Portsmouth site and summarizes potential environmental impacts that could result from conducting the following depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) management activities at the site: continued cylinder storage, preparation of cylinders for shipment, conversion, and long-term storage. DOE's preferred alternative is to begin converting the depleted UF 6 inventory as soon as possible to either uranium oxide, uranium metal, or a combination of both, while allowing for use of as much of this inventory as possible

  11. Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe past, present, and future activities undertaken to implement Environmental Restoration and Waste Management goals at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Environmental Restoration description of activities, resources, and milestones

  12. 78 FR 61348 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ...On September 16, 2013, in FR Doc. 2013-22453, on page 56871, the Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice of open meeting announcing a meeting on October 2, 2013 of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth (78 FR 56871). This notice announces the cancellation of this meeting.

  13. 77 FR 50488 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  14. 78 FR 69657 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  15. 77 FR 16021 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  16. 78 FR 22255 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  17. 78 FR 10611 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  18. 77 FR 63300 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-16

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  19. 77 FR 22566 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  20. 78 FR 36543 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  1. 78 FR 56871 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ...This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Portsmouth. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public notice of this meeting be announced in the Federal Register.

  2. 75 FR 4805 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... related activities. Purpose of the D&D Subcommittee: The purpose of the subcommittee is to focus on waste disposition and recycling issues at the Portsmouth site. Purpose of the Future Land Use Subcommittee: [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Board: The purpose of the Board is to make...

  3. Review of earthquake hazard assessments of plant sites at Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Members of the US Geological Survey staff in Golden, Colorado, have reviewed the submissions of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) staff and of Risk Engineering, Inc. (REI) (Golden, Colorado) for seismic hazard estimates for Department of Energy facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky. We reviewed the historical seismicity and seismotectonics near the two sites, and general features of the LLNL and EPRI/SOG methodologies used by LLNL and Risk Engineering respectively, and also the separate Risk Engineering methodology used at Paducah. We discussed generic issues that affect the modeling of both sites, and performed alternative calculations to determine sensitivities of seismic hazard results to various assumptions and models in an attempt to assign reasonable bounding values of the hazard. In our studies we find that peak acceleration values of 0.08 g for Portsmouth and 0.32 g for Paducah represent central values of the, ground motions obtained at 1000-year return periods. Peak accelerations obtained in the LLNL and Risk Engineering studies have medians near these values (results obtained using the EPRI/SOG methodology appear low at both sites), and we believe that these medians are appropriate values for use in the evaluation of systems, structures, and components for seismic structural integrity and for the seismic design of new and improved systems, structures, and components at Portsmouth and Paducah.

  4. Review of earthquake hazard assessments of plant sites at Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    Members of the US Geological Survey staff in Golden, Colorado, have reviewed the submissions of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) staff and of Risk Engineering, Inc. (REI) (Golden, Colorado) for seismic hazard estimates for Department of Energy facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky. We reviewed the historical seismicity and seismotectonics near the two sites, and general features of the LLNL and EPRI/SOG methodologies used by LLNL and Risk Engineering respectively, and also the separate Risk Engineering methodology used at Paducah. We discussed generic issues that affect the modeling of both sites, and performed alternative calculations to determine sensitivities of seismic hazard results to various assumptions and models in an attempt to assign reasonable bounding values of the hazard. In our studies we find that peak acceleration values of 0.08 g for Portsmouth and 0.32 g for Paducah represent central values of the ground motions obtained at 1000-year return periods. Peak accelerations obtained in the LLNL and Risk Engineering studies have medians near these values (results obtained using the EPRI/SOG methodology appear low at both sites), and we believe that these medians are appropriate values for use in the evaluation of systems, structures, and components for seismic structural integrity and for the seismic design of new and improved systems, structures, and components at Portsmouth and Paducah

  5. Review of earthquake hazard assessments of plant sites at Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Members of the US Geological Survey staff in Golden, Colorado, have reviewed the submissions of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) staff and of Risk Engineering, Inc. (REI) (Golden, Colorado) for seismic hazard estimates for Department of Energy facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky. We reviewed the historical seismicity and seismotectonics near the two sites, and general features of the LLNL and EPRI/SOG methodologies used by LLNL and Risk Engineering respectively, and also the separate Risk Engineering methodology used at Paducah. We discussed generic issues that affect the modeling of both sites, and performed alternative calculations to determine sensitivities of seismic hazard results to various assumptions and models in an attempt to assign reasonable bounding values of the hazard. In our studies we find that peak acceleration values of 0.08 g for Portsmouth and 0.32 g for Paducah represent central values of the, ground motions obtained at 1000-year return periods. Peak accelerations obtained in the LLNL and Risk Engineering studies have medians near these values (results obtained using the EPRI/SOG methodology appear low at both sites), and we believe that these medians are appropriate values for use in the evaluation of systems, structures, and components for seismic structural integrity and for the seismic design of new and improved systems, structures, and components at Portsmouth and Paducah

  6. Portsmouth On-Site Disposal Cell High Density Polyethylene Geomembrane Longevity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phifer, M.

    2012-01-01

    It is anticipated that high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembranes will be utilized within the liner and closure cap of the proposed On-Site Disposal Cell (OSDC) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The likely longevity (i.e. service life) of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service is evaluated within the following sections of this report: (1) Section 2.0 provides an overview of HDPE geomembranes, (2) Section 3.0 outlines potential HDPE geomembranes degradation mechanisms, (3) Section 4.0 evaluates the applicability of HDPE geomembrane degradation mechanisms to the Portsmouth OSDC, (4) Section 5.0 provides a discussion of the current state of knowledge relative to the longevity (service life) of HDPE geomembranes, including the relation of this knowledge to the Portsmouth OSDC, and (5) Section 6.0 provides summary and conclusions relative to the anticipated service life of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service. Based upon this evaluation it is anticipated that the service life of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service would be significantly greater than the 200 year service life assumed for the OSDC closure cap and liner HDPE geomembranes. That is, a 200 year OSDC HDPE geomembrane service life is considered a conservative assumption.

  7. PORTSMOUTH ON-SITE DISPOSAL CELL HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE GEOMEMBRANE LONGEVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phifer, M.

    2012-01-31

    It is anticipated that high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembranes will be utilized within the liner and closure cap of the proposed On-Site Disposal Cell (OSDC) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The likely longevity (i.e. service life) of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service is evaluated within the following sections of this report: (1) Section 2.0 provides an overview of HDPE geomembranes, (2) Section 3.0 outlines potential HDPE geomembranes degradation mechanisms, (3) Section 4.0 evaluates the applicability of HDPE geomembrane degradation mechanisms to the Portsmouth OSDC, (4) Section 5.0 provides a discussion of the current state of knowledge relative to the longevity (service life) of HDPE geomembranes, including the relation of this knowledge to the Portsmouth OSDC, and (5) Section 6.0 provides summary and conclusions relative to the anticipated service life of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service. Based upon this evaluation it is anticipated that the service life of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service would be significantly greater than the 200 year service life assumed for the OSDC closure cap and liner HDPE geomembranes. That is, a 200 year OSDC HDPE geomembrane service life is considered a conservative assumption.

  8. U.S. Department of Energy Portsmouth Annual Environmental Report for 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1999-12-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is one of two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned contractor-managed uranium enrichment facilities operating in the United States. Responsibility for implementing environmental compliance at PORTS is split between DOE, as site owner, and the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), a corporation formed by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to operate the nation's uranium enrichment business. The uranium enrichment production and operations facilities at the site are leased to USEC. Martin Marietta Energy Systems and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems were the management contractors for DOE from November 1986 through March 1998. On April 1, 1998, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC assumed responsibility as the management contractor for DOE. Bechtel Jacobs Company is responsible for environmental restoration, waste management, removal of highly enriched uranium, and operation of nonleased facilities (facilities that are not leased to USEC) at PORTS. This report does not cover USEC operations at PORTS.

  9. U.S. Department of Energy Portsmouth Annual Environmental Report for 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is one of two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned contractor-managed uranium enrichment facilities operating in the United States. Responsibility for implementing environmental compliance at PORTS is split between DOE, as site owner, and the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), a corporation formed by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to operate the nation's uranium enrichment business. The uranium enrichment production and operations facilities at the site are leased to USEC. Martin Marietta Energy Systems and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems were the management contractors for DOE from November 1986 through March 1998. On April 1, 1998, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC assumed responsibility as the management contractor for DOE. Bechtel Jacobs Company is responsible for environmental restoration, waste management, removal of highly enriched uranium, and operation of nonleased facilities (facilities that are not leased to USEC) at PORTS. This report does not cover USEC operations at PORTS

  10. Inadvertent Intruder Analysis For The Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Frank G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Phifer, Mark A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-22

    The inadvertent intruder analysis considers the radiological impacts to hypothetical persons who are assumed to inadvertently intrude on the Portsmouth OSWDF site after institutional control ceases 100 years after site closure. For the purposes of this analysis, we assume that the waste disposal in the OSWDF occurs at time zero, the site is under institutional control for the next 100 years, and inadvertent intrusion can occur over the following 1,000 year time period. Disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the OSWDF must meet a requirement to assess impacts on such individuals, and demonstrate that the effective dose equivalent to an intruder would not likely exceed 100 mrem per year for scenarios involving continuous exposure (i.e. chronic) or 500 mrem for scenarios involving a single acute exposure. The focus in development of exposure scenarios for inadvertent intruders was on selecting reasonable events that may occur, giving consideration to regional customs and construction practices. An important assumption in all scenarios is that an intruder has no prior knowledge of the existence of a waste disposal facility at the site. Results of the analysis show that a hypothetical inadvertent intruder at the OSWDF who, in the worst case scenario, resides on the site and consumes vegetables from a garden established on the site using contaminated soil (chronic agriculture scenario) would receive a maximum chronic dose of approximately 7.0 mrem/yr during the 1000 year period of assessment. This dose falls well below the DOE chronic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr. Results of the analysis also showed that a hypothetical inadvertent intruder at the OSWDF who, in the worst case scenario, excavates a basement in the soil that reaches the waste (acute basement construction scenario) would receive a maximum acute dose of approximately 0.25 mrem/yr during the 1000 year period of assessment. This dose falls well below the DOE acute dose limit of 500 mrem/yr. Disposal inventory

  11. Portsmouth Gasseous Diffusion Plant site, Piketon, Ohio. Final environmental impact statement. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    This environmental statement provides a detailed analysis of the environmental effects associated with continued operation of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, one of the three government-owned uranium enrichment plants operated by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The Portsmouth facility, which has been operating for over twenty years, is located in Pike County, Ohio, on a 4000-acre federally owned reservation. The uranium enrichment capacity of the plant is currently being increased through a cascade improvement program (CIP) and a cascade uprating program (CUP). This environmental statement evaluates the Portsmouth facility at the fully uprated CUP production level. Environmental impacts of the production of offsite electric power for the Portsmouth facility are also assessed. The bulk of this power is supplied by the Ohio Valley Electric Corporation (OVEC) from two coal-fired plants, the Clifty Creek Power Plant near Madison, Indiana, and the Kyger Creek Power Plant near Cheshire, Ohio. The remaining required power will be obtained on a system basis through OVEC from the 15 sponsoring utilities of OVEC. The draft statement was issued for public comment on February 15, 1977, and public hearing to afford the public further opportunity to comment was held in Cincinnati, Ohio, on April 5, 1977

  12. ALL-PATHWAYS DOSE ANALYSIS FOR THE PORTSMOUTH ON-SITE WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, F.; Phifer, M.

    2014-04-10

    A Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) All-Pathways analysis has been conducted that considers the radiological impacts to a resident farmer. It is assumed that the resident farmer utilizes a farm pond contaminated by the OSWDF to irrigate a garden and pasture and water livestock from which food for the resident farmer is obtained, and that the farmer utilizes groundwater from the Berea sandstone aquifer for domestic purposes (i.e. drinking water and showering). As described by FBP 2014b the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model (Schroeder et al. 1994) and the Surface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) model (White and Oostrom 2000, 2006) were used to model the flow and transport from the OSWDF to the Points of Assessment (POAs) associated with the 680-ft elevation sandstone layer (680 SSL) and the Berea sandstone aquifer. From this modeling the activity concentrations radionuclides were projected over time at the POAs. The activity concentrations were utilized as input to a GoldSimTM (GTG 2010) dose model, described herein, in order to project the dose to a resident farmer over time. A base case and five sensitivity cases were analyzed. The sensitivity cases included an evaluation of the impacts of using a conservative inventory, an uncased well to the Berea sandstone aquifer, a low waste zone uranium distribution coefficient (Kd), different transfer factors, and reference person exposure parameters (i.e. at 95 percentile). The maximum base case dose within the 1,000 year assessment period was projected to be 1.5E-14 mrem/yr, and the maximum base case dose at any time less than 10,000 years was projected to be 0.002 mrem/yr. The maximum projected dose of any sensitivity case was approximately 2.6 mrem/yr associated with the use of an uncased well to the Berea sandstone aquifer. This sensitivity case is considered very unlikely because it assumes leakage from the location of greatest concentration in the 680 SSL in to the

  13. Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF 6 and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF 6 PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF 6 inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF 6 PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF 6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF 6 conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF 6 cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by Perimeter Road, within the corridors

  14. Inorganic photocatalytic membranes for the remediation of VOCs in groundwater at the Portsmouth Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischoff, B.L.; Fain, D.E.; James, D.L. II

    1997-01-01

    A small-scale demonstration of a new photocatalytic membrane reactor was undertaken at the X-623 Groundwater Treatment Facility at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The photocatalytic membrane reactor initially removed between 60 and 65% of the TCE in a single pass. It also removed significant amounts of three additional compounds (including completely removing one of the compounds). It is believed that these compounds were vinyl chloride, and two isomers of dichloroethylene. Within three days from startup, high suspended solids (mainly bacteria) contained in the feedwater tank caused plugging of the system's prefilter. The high concentration of bacteria was the result of a previously unknown large amount of activated carbon present in the feed tank prior to addition of the groundwater. It was also later discovered that fine colloidal silt particles had fouled the photocatalytic membranes and reduced their activity yielding only about a 20% reduction of TCE. The silt particles were determined to be between 50 and 100 nm and were able to pass through the 500 nm (0.5 μm) diameter pores of the prefilter. The results of this field test demonstrated the potential for success of the deployment of this technology, the simplicity, flexibility, and operability of the process and that improvements to the system design are needed prior to any future demonstrations. 9 figs

  15. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Filley, T.H.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Cleland, J.H.

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. Initial facility operation is anticipated for 1999. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. The final evaluation, which included sensitivity studies, identified the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) site as having significant advantages over the other sites considered. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PORTS site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). This report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during site visits. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use. Socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3

  16. Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Filley, T.H.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Cleland, J.H.

    1991-09-01

    Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. Initial facility operation is anticipated for 1999. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. The final evaluation, which included sensitivity studies, identified the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) site as having significant advantages over the other sites considered. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PORTS site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). This report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during site visits. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use. Socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3.

  17. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Pilot test at the Clean Test Site Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muck, M.T.; Kearl, P.M.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of field testing a horizontal well recirculation system at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The recirculation system uses a pair of horizontal wells, one for groundwater extraction and treatment and the other for reinjection of treated groundwater, to set up a recirculation flow field. The induced flow field from the injection well to the extraction well establishes a sweeping action for the removal and treatment of groundwater contaminants. The overall purpose of this project is to study treatment of mixed groundwater contaminants that occur in a thin water-bearing zone not easily targeted by traditional vertical wells. The project involves several research elements, including treatment-process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and pilot testing at a contaminated site. The results of the pilot test at an uncontaminated site, the Clean Test Site (CTS), are presented in this report

  18. Rate of Contamination Removal of Two Phyto-remediation Sites at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes applications of phyto-remediation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), a Department of Energy (DOE) Facility that enriched uranium from the early 1950's until 2000. Phyto-remediation has been implemented to assist in the removal of TCE (trichloroethylene) in the groundwater at two locations at the PORTS facility: the X-740 area and the X-749/X-120 area. Phyto-remediation technology is based on the ability of certain plants species (in this case hybrid poplar trees) and their associated rhizo-spheric microorganisms to remove, degrade, or contain chemical contaminants located in the soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater, and possibly even the atmosphere. Phyto-remediation technology is a promising clean-up solution for a wide variety of pollutants and sites. Mature trees, such as the hybrid poplar, can consume up to 3,000 gallons of groundwater per acre per day. Organic compounds are captured in the trees' root systems. These organic compounds are degraded by ultraviolet light as they are transpired along with the water vapor through the leaves of the trees. The phyto-remediation system at the X-740 area encompasses 766 one-year old hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x nigra, Populus nigra x maximowiczii, and Populus deltoides x nigra) that were planted 10 feet apart in rows 10 feet to 20 feet apart, over an area of 2.6 acres. The system was installed to manage the VOC contaminant plume. At the X749/X-120 area, a phyto-remediation system of 2,640 hybrid poplar trees (Populus nigra x maximowiczii) was planted in seven areas/zones to manage the VOC contaminant plume. The objectives of these systems are to remove contamination from the groundwater and to prevent further migration of contaminants. The goal of these remediation procedures is to achieve completely mature and functional phyto-remediation systems within two years of the initial planting of the hybrid poplar trees at each planting location. There is a direct

  19. 2011 ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, A.; Eddy, T.; Jannik, T.; Terry, B.; Cauthen, K.; Coward, L.; Dunaway-Ackerman, J.; Wilson, M.; Hutchison, J.; O' Quinn, S.

    2012-10-01

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2011 (SRNS-STI-2012-00200) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1 B, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting." The annual SRS Environmental Report has been produced for more than 50 years. Several hundred copies are and interested individuals. The report’s purpose is to: present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; describe compliance status with respect to environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant programs and efforts.

  20. Wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF 6 and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF 6 PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF 6 inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF 6 PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF 6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF 6 conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF 6 cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11990 (''Protection of Wetlands'') and DOE regulations for implementing this Executive Order as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements]), to evaluate potential impacts to wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. Approximately 0.02 acre (0.009 ha) of a 0.08-acre (0.03-ha) palustrine emergent wetland would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material during facility construction at Location A. Portions of this wetland that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime because of the

  1. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    sabba, d

    2007-02-03

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2005 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. SLAC effectively applied environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety and environmental management system (ISEMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2005, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing ''greening of the government'' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. There were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations during 2005. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2005, in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and implementing a chemical management system (CMS) to better manage chemical use. Program-specific details are discussed.

  2. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

    2006-04-19

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2002 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded, research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. The most noteworthy information in this report is summarized in this section. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2002, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing ''greening of the government'' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC did not receive any notices of violation during 2002. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2002, in decreasing air emission rates, the storm drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a chemical management system to manage chemical use better.

  3. An aerial radiological survey of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area, Portsmouth, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from July 11--20, 1990, over an 83-square-kilometer (32-square-mile) area surrounding the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant located near Portsmouth, Ohio. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 91 meters (300 feet) with line spacings of 122 meters (400 feet). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph and a set of United States Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps of the area. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from about 7 to 14 microroentgens per hour (μR/h) at 1 meter above the ground. Analysis of the data for man-made sources and for the uranium decay product, protactinium-234m ( 234m Pa), showed five sites within the boundaries of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant with elevated readings. Spectra obtained in the vicinity of the buildings at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant showed the presence of 234m Pa, a uranium-238 ( 238 U) decay product. In addition, spectral analysis of the data obtained over the processing plant facility showed gamma activity indicative of uranium-235 ( 234 U). No other man-made gamma ray emitting radioactive material was detected, either on or off the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant property. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at five different locations within the survey boundlaries to support the aerial data

  4. Annual Site Environmental Report, 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

    2006-04-19

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2004 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded, research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. The most noteworthy information in this report is summarized in this section. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2004, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing ''greening of the government'' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. There were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations during 2004. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2004, in waste minimization, recycling, decreasing air emission rates, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a chemical management system to manage chemical use better. Program-specific details discussed are: (1) Air Quality--SLAC operates its air quality management program in compliance with its established permit conditions: 2004 was the seventh consecutive year the air quality management program operated without receiving any notices of violation

  5. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, H

    2008-01-01

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year (CY) of 2006 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year; i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2006/2007 (October 2006 through May 2007), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M and O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M and O contractor. SLAC continued to follow the path to self-declare an environmental management system under DOE Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program' and effectively applied environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that Worker safety and health are protected; The environment is protected; and Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2006, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems. These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing 'greening of the government' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. The SLAC Office of Assurance was created during 2006 in response to DOE Order 226.1. During 2006, there were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations, and there were no Notice of Violations issued to SLAC from any of the regulatory agencies that oversee SLAC. In addition, many improvements in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and SLAC's chemical management system (CMS) were continued during 2006 to better manage

  6. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

    2008-02-22

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year (CY) of 2006 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year; i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2006/2007 (October 2006 through May 2007), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. SLAC continued to follow the path to self-declare an environmental management system under DOE Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program' and effectively applied environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that Worker safety and health are protected; The environment is protected; and Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2006, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems. These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing 'greening of the government' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. The SLAC Office of Assurance was created during 2006 in response to DOE Order 226.1. During 2006, there were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations, and there were no Notice of Violations issued to SLAC from any of the regulatory agencies that oversee SLAC. In addition, many improvements in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and SLAC's chemical management system (CMS) were continued during

  7. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, C.M.

    1993-09-01

    This calendar year (CY) 1992 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: narrative, summaries, and conclusions (Part 1) and data presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are to: (1) report 1992 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, (2) provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, (3) provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, (4) provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and (5) provide general information on plant quality assurance

  8. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Environmental report for 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Counce-Brown, D. (ed.)

    1991-09-01

    This calendar year 1990 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the summary, discussion, and conclusions (Part 1) and the data presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are as follows: report 1990 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (when appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance.

  9. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

    2006-04-19

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2003 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the DOE for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management to meet the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2003, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were utilized by SLAC to implement such ''greening of the government'' initiatives like Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. There were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations during 2003. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2003 in waste minimization, recycling, decreasing air emission rates, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a system to better manage chemical use. Program-specific details discussed are: (1) Air Quality--SLAC operates its air quality management program in compliance with established permit conditions; 2003 was the sixth consecutive year the air quality management program operated without any NOVs issued by regulators. Nevertheless, SLAC has an active program to improve its environmental performance in air quality. (2) Hazardous Waste--The Environmental Health Division of the San Mateo County Health Services Agency is the California certified unified permitting agency (CUPA) responsible

  10. 2016 Annual Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, Virginia [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2017-09-26

    This report provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory’s (PPPL) operations. The results of the 2016 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for PPPL’s are presented and discussed. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and community involvement programs that were undertaken in 2016. PPPL has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The vision of the Laboratory is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality – a clean, alternative energy source. 2016 marked the eighteenth year of National Spherical Torus Experiment and the first year of NSTX-U (Upgrade) operations. The NSTX-U Project is a collaboration among national laboratories, universities, and national and international research institutions and is a major element in the US Fusion Energy Sciences Program. Its design tests the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas, playing an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion reactors. NSTX-U began operations after its first upgrade that installed the new center stack magnets and second neutral beam, which would allow for hotter plasmas and greater field strength to maintain the fusion reaction longer. Due to operational issues with a poloidal coil, NSTX-U operated briefly in 2016. In 2016, PPPL’s radiological environmental monitoring program measured tritium in the air at the NSTX-U Stack and at on -site sampling stations. Using highly sensitive monitors, PPPL is capable of detecting small changes in the ambient levels of tritium. The operation of an in- stack monitor located on D-site is used to demonstrate compliance with the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) regulations. Also included in PPPL’s radiological environmental monitoring program

  11. Nevada Test Site annual site environmental report, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wruble, D T; McDowell, E M [eds.

    1990-11-01

    Prior to 1989 annual reports of environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were prepared in two separate parts. Onsite effluent monitoring and environmental monitoring results were reported in an onsite report prepared by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). Results of the offsite radiological surveillance program conducted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada, were reported separately by that Agency. Beginning with this 1989 annual Site environmental report for the NTS, these two documents are being combined into a single report to provide a more comprehensive annual documentation of the environmental protection program conducted for the nuclear testing program and other nuclear and non-nuclear activities at the Site. The two agencies have coordinated preparation of this combined onsite and offsite report through sharing of information on environmental releases and meteorological, hydrological, and other supporting data used in dose-estimate calculations. 57 refs., 52 figs., 65 tabs.

  12. Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOMAN, N.A.

    2000-01-01

    The information contained in, and/or referenced in, this Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report addresses Permit Condition II.W (Other Permits and/or Approvals) of the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA7890008967). Condition II.W specifies that the Permittees are responsible for obtaining all other applicable federal, state, and local permits authorizing the development and operation of the Hanford Facility. This status report also addresses Permit Condition I.E.22, as interpreted in Section 12.1.25 of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, General Information Portion (DOE/RL-91-28, Rev. 4), that states this report will be prepared annually and a copy of this report will be placed in the Facility Operating Record, General Information file by October 1 of each year

  13. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, J.W. (ed.) (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

    1990-10-01

    This calendar year 1989 annual report on environmental surveillance of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and its environs consists of two parts: the Summary, Discussion, and Conclusions (Part 1) and the Data Presentation (Part 2). The objectives of this report are the following: report 1989 monitoring data for the installation and its environs that may have been affected by operations on the plant site, provide reasonably detailed information about the plant site and plant operations, provide detailed information on input and assumptions used in all calculations, provide trend analyses (where appropriate) to indicate increases and decreases in environmental impact, and provide general information on plant quality assurance. Routine monitoring and sampling for radiation, radioactive materials, and chemical substances on and off the DOE site are used to document compliance with appropriate standards, to identify trends, to provide information for the public, and to contribute to general environmental knowledge. The surveillance program assists in fulfilling the DOE policy of protecting the public, employees, and environment from harm that could be caused by its activities and reducing negative environmental impacts to the greatest degree practicable. Environmental-monitoring information complements data on specific releases, trends, and summaries. 26 refs.

  14. Paducah site annual environmental for 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belcher, G. [ed.

    1997-12-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, located in McCracken County, Kentucky, has been producing enriched uranium since 1952. In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) leased the production areas of the site to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). A subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, Lockheed Martin Utility Services, manages the leased facilities for USEC. The DOE maintains responsibility for the environmental restoration, waste management, and depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder program activities at the plant through its management contractor, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems. The purpose of this document is to summarize calendar year 1996 environmental monitoring activities for DOE activities at the Paducah Site. The DOE requires all of its facilities to conduct and document such activities annually. This report does not include USEC environmental activities.

  15. Paducah Site annual report for 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belcher, G. [ed.

    1997-01-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, located in McCracken County, Kentucky, has been producing enriched uranium since 1952. In July 1993, the US department of Energy (DOE) leased the production areas of the site to the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC). A new subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, Lockheed Martin Utility Services, manages the leased facilities for USEC. DOE maintains responsibility for the environmental restoration, waste management, and enrichment facilities activities at the plant through its management contractor, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems. The purpose of this document is to summarize calendar year 1995 environmental monitoring activities for DOE activities at the Paducah Site. DOE requires all of its facilities to conduct and document such activities annually. This report does not include USEC environmental activities.

  16. Paducah Site annual environmental report for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, C.M.

    1996-02-01

    Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, located in McCracken County, Kentucky, has been producing enriched uranium since 1952. In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) leased the production areas of the site to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). A new subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation (formerly Martin Marietta Corporation), Lockheed Martin Utility Services, manages the leased facilities for USEC. DOE maintains responsibility for the environmental restoration and waste management activities at the plant through its management contractor, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems. The purpose of this document is to summarize calendar year 1994 environmental monitoring activities for DOE activities at the Paducah site. DOE requires all of its facilities to conduct and document such activities annually. This report does not include USEC environmental activities

  17. Paducah Site 1997 annual environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, located in McCracken County, Kentucky, has been producing enriched uranium since 1952. In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) leased the production areas of the site to the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC). A subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, Lockheed Martin Utility Services, manages the leased facilities for USEC. The DOE maintains responsibility for the environmental restoration, waste management, and depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder program activities at the plant through its management contractor. The purpose of this document is to summarize calendar year 1997 environmental monitoring activities for DOE activities at the Paducah Site managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems. The DOE requires all of its facilities to conduct and document such activities annually. This report does not include USEC environmental activities.

  18. Paducah Site 1997 annual environmental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, located in McCracken County, Kentucky, has been producing enriched uranium since 1952. In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) leased the production areas of the site to the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC). A subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, Lockheed Martin Utility Services, manages the leased facilities for USEC. The DOE maintains responsibility for the environmental restoration, waste management, and depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder program activities at the plant through its management contractor. The purpose of this document is to summarize calendar year 1997 environmental monitoring activities for DOE activities at the Paducah Site managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems. The DOE requires all of its facilities to conduct and document such activities annually. This report does not include USEC environmental activities

  19. Paducah site annual environmental report for 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belcher, G.

    1997-12-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, located in McCracken County, Kentucky, has been producing enriched uranium since 1952. In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) leased the production areas of the site to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). A subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, Lockheed Martin Utility Services, manages the leased facilities for USEC. The DOE maintains responsibility for the environmental restoration, waste management, and depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinder program activities at the plant through its management contractor, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems. The purpose of this document is to summarize calendar year 1996 environmental monitoring activities for DOE activities at the Paducah Site. The DOE requires all of its facilities to conduct and document such activities annually. This report does not include USEC environmental activities

  20. Paducah Site annual report for 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belcher, G.

    1997-01-01

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, located in McCracken County, Kentucky, has been producing enriched uranium since 1952. In July 1993, the US department of Energy (DOE) leased the production areas of the site to the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC). A new subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, Lockheed Martin Utility Services, manages the leased facilities for USEC. DOE maintains responsibility for the environmental restoration, waste management, and enrichment facilities activities at the plant through its management contractor, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems. The purpose of this document is to summarize calendar year 1995 environmental monitoring activities for DOE activities at the Paducah Site. DOE requires all of its facilities to conduct and document such activities annually. This report does not include USEC environmental activities

  1. Aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    An airborne radiological survey was conducted in July 1976. It was centered on the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Two areas were surveyed: one 35 km 2 and the other 16 km 2 . Using Nal(Tl) scintillation detectors, measurements were made of the terrestrial gamma radiation over the areas with a series of north-south flight lines. The processed data indicated that on-site radioactivity was due to nuclear matterials currently or previously handled, processed, or stored. Off-site activities were found to be due wholly to the naturally occurring 40 K, the 238 U chain, and thorium chain gamma emitters

  2. Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SONNICHSEN, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The information contained in, and/or referenced in, this Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report addresses Permit Condition II.W (Other Permits and/or Approvals) of the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA7890008967). Condition II.W specifies that the Permittees are responsible for obtaining all other applicable federal, state, and local permits authorizing the development and operation of the Hanford Facility. Condition II.W further specifies that the Permittees are to use their best efforts to obtain such permits. For the purposes of this Permit Condition, ''best efforts'' mean submittal of documentation and/or approval(s) in accordance with schedules specified in applicable regulations, or as determined through negotiations with the applicable regulatory agencies

  3. Annual Site Environmental Report, 2007(ASER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabba, D

    2008-01-01

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year (CY) of 2007 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year, i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2007/2008 (October 2007 through May 2008), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M and O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M and O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423 and DOE Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', SLAC effectively implemented and integrated the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2007, SLAC focused on development and implementation of SLAC management systems to ensure continual improvement. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13148. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC continues to demonstrate significant progress in implementing and integrating EMS into day-to-day operations at SLAC. The annual management review and ranking of environmental aspects were completed this year by SLAC's EMS Steering Committee, the Environmental Safety Committee (ESC) and thirteen objectives and targets were established for 2007. For each objective and target, a work plan, or Environmental

  4. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan Kayser-Ames Laboratory

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2007. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies 11 buildings owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). See the Laboratory's Web page at www.external.ameslab.gov for locations and Laboratory overview. The Laboratory also leases space in ISU owned buildings. In 2007, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2007. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2007. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2003. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, styrofoam peanuts

  5. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Kayser-Ames Laboratory

    2007-12-31

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2007. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies 11 buildings owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). See the Laboratory's Web page at www.external.ameslab.gov for locations and Laboratory overview. The Laboratory also leases space in ISU owned buildings. In 2007, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2007. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2007. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2003. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil

  6. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2008 (ASER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabba, D.

    2009-01-01

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year of 2008 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year, i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2008/2009 (October 2008 through May 2009), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M and O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M and O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, and DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program, SLAC effectively implements and integrates the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2008, SLAC continued to improve its management systems. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13423 and DOE Orders 450.1A and 430.2B. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC continues to demonstrate significant progress in implementing and integrating EMS into day-to-day operations and construction activities at SLAC. The annual management review and ranking of environmental aspects were completed this year by SLAC's EMS Steering Committee, the Environmental Safety Committee (ESC), and twelve objectives and targets were

  7. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2008 (ASER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabba, D.

    2009-11-09

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year of 2008 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year, i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2008/2009 (October 2008 through May 2009), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, and DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program, SLAC effectively implements and integrates the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2008, SLAC continued to improve its management systems. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13423 and DOE Orders 450.1A and 430.2B. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC continues to demonstrate significant progress in implementing and integrating EMS into day-to-day operations and construction activities at SLAC. The annual management review and ranking of environmental aspects were completed this year by SLAC's EMS Steering Committee, the Environmental Safety Committee (ESC), and twelve objectives and targets

  8. Annual Site Environmental Report, 2007(ASER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabba, D

    2008-10-07

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year (CY) of 2007 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year, i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2007/2008 (October 2007 through May 2008), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423 and DOE Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', SLAC effectively implemented and integrated the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2007, SLAC focused on development and implementation of SLAC management systems to ensure continual improvement. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13148. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC continues to demonstrate significant progress in implementing and integrating EMS into day-to-day operations at SLAC. The annual management review and ranking of environmental aspects were completed this year by SLAC's EMS Steering Committee, the Environmental Safety Committee (ESC) and thirteen objectives and targets were established for 2007. For each objective and target, a work

  9. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2009(ASER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year of 2009 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year, i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2009/2010 (October 2009 through May 2010), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M and O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M and O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, EO 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program, SLAC effectively implements and integrates the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that Worker safety and health are protected, The environment is protected, and Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2009, SLAC continued to improve its management systems. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13423, EO 13514, and DOE Orders 450.1A and 430.2B. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC continues to demonstrate significant progress in implementing and integrating EMS into day-to-day operations and construction activities at SLAC. SLAC's EMS was audited by a review team from the DOE Oak Ridge Office and the DOE SLAC Site Office (SSO) on March 31, 2009. The review

  10. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2009(ASER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-10-01

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year of 2009 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year, i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2009/2010 (October 2009 through May 2010), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, EO 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program, SLAC effectively implements and integrates the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that Worker safety and health are protected, The environment is protected, and Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2009, SLAC continued to improve its management systems. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13423, EO 13514, and DOE Orders 450.1A and 430.2B. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC continues to demonstrate significant progress in implementing and integrating EMS into day-to-day operations and construction activities at SLAC. SLAC's EMS was audited by a review team from the DOE Oak Ridge Office and the DOE SLAC Site Office (SSO) on March 31, 2009

  11. Annual Hanford Site environmental permitting status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnichsen, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    The information contained and/or referenced in this Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report (Status Report) addresses the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) of 1971 and Condition II.W. of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 Permit, Dangerous Waste Portion (DW Portion). Condition II.W. of the RCRA Permit specifies the Permittees are responsible for all other applicable federal, state, and local permits for the development and operation of the Hanford Facility. Condition II.W. of the RCRA Permit specifies that the Permittees are to use their best efforts to obtain such permits. For the purposes of permit condition, 'best efforts' means submittal of documentation and/or approval(s) in accordance with schedules specified in applicable regulations, or as determined through negotiations with the applicable regulatory agencies. This Status Report includes information on all existing and anticipated environmental permitting. Environmental permitting required by RCRA, the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) of 1984, and non-RCRA permitting (solid waste handling, Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Clean Water Act Amendments of 1987, Washington State waste discharge, and onsite sewage system) is addressed. Information on RCRA and non-RCRA is current as of July 31, 1998. For the purposes of RCRA and the State of Washington Hazardous Waste Management Act of 1976 [as administered through the Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Active Code (WAC) 173-303], the Hanford Facility is considered a single facility. As such, the Hanford Facility has been issued one US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)/State Identification Number (WA7890008967). This EPA/State identification number encompasses over 60 treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) units. The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) has been delegated authority by the EPA to administer the RCRA, including mixed waste authority. The RCRA permitting approach for

  12. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan Kayser

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2005. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies 11 buildings owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). See the Laboratory's Web page at www.external.ameslab.gov for locations and Laboratory overview. The Laboratory also leases space in ISU owned buildings. In 2005, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled accordingly to all applicable EPA, State, Local and DOE Orders. The most recent RCRA inspection was conducted by EPA Region VII in January 1999. The Laboratory received a notice of violation (NOV) which included five citations. There have been no inspections since then. The citations were minor and were corrected by the Laboratory within the time allocated by the EPA. See correspondence in Appendix D. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2005. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2005. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. Pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs were implemented in 1990 and updated in 2003. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, styrofoam peanuts, batteries, CRTs, fluorescent lamps and telephone books. Ames Laboratory reported to DOE-CH, through the Laboratory's Self Assessment Report, on its Affirmative

  13. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayser, Dan

    2011-01-31

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2010. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. In 2010, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local regulations and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2010. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2010. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2010. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, miscellaneous electronic office equipment, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling and corrugated cardboard recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, foamed polystyrene peanuts, batteries, fluorescent lamps and telephone books. Ames Laboratory reported to DOE-Ames Site Office (AMSO), through the Laboratory's Performance Evaluation Measurement Plan, on its

  14. The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-02-28

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report is prepared and published each year to inform the public of the environmental activities that take place on the reservation and in the surrounding areas. It is written to comply with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. This document has been prepared to present the highlights of the Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report 2007 in an easy-to-read, summary format.

  15. Annual site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) has established a formal environmental protection, auditing, monitoring, and planning program that has been in effect since 1978. The significant environmental projects and issues Western was involved with in 1994 are discussed in this annual site environmental report. It is written to show the nature and effectiveness of the environmental protection program. The Department of Energy order 5400.1, Chapter II.4, requires the preparation of an annual site environmental report. Because Western has facilities located in 15 states, this report addresses the environmental activities in all the facilities as one ''site.''

  16. Hanford Site annual waste reduction report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, D.H.

    1992-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Field Office (RL) has developed and implemented a Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Plan that provides overall guidance and direction on waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness to the four contractors who manage and operate the Hanford Site for the RL. Waste reduction at the RL will be accomplished by following a hierarchy of environmental protection practices. First, waste generation will be eliminated or minimized through source reduction. Second, potential waste materials that cannot be eliminated or minimized will be recycled (i.e., used, reused, or reclaimed). Third, all waste that is nevertheless generated will be treated to reduce volume, toxicity, or mobility before storage or disposal. The scope of this waste reduction program will include nonhazardous, hazardous, radioactive mixed, and radioactive wastes

  17. Annual Site Environmental Report, 2000 (ASER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russak, Hillary M.

    2001-11-20

    This report provides information about environmental programs and compliance with environmental regulations during 2000 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In addition, updates that may be of special interest, which occurred beyond 2000, are included. The most noteworthy information in this report is summarized in this section. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management systems in meeting the site's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) goals.

  18. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan: Annual summary, January 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan published in December of 1998 (DOE/NV--518) describes the Nevada Test Site stewardship mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. As part of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, DOE Nevada Operations Office has committed to perform and publish an annual summary review of DOE Nevada Operations' stewardship of the Nevada Test Site. This annual summary includes a description of progress made toward the goals of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, pertinent monitoring data, actions that were taken to adapt to changing conditions, and any other changes to the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan

  19. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan: Annual summary, January 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan published in December of 1998 (DOE/NV--518) describes the Nevada Test Site stewardship mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. As part of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, DOE Nevada Operations Office has committed to perform and publish an annual summary review of DOE Nevada Operations' stewardship of the Nevada Test Site. This annual summary includes a description of progress made toward the goals of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, pertinent monitoring data, actions that were taken to adapt to changing conditions, and any other changes to the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan.

  20. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2010 (ASER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabba, D.

    2011-11-11

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year of 2010 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that overlap the calendar year - i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2010/2011 (October 2010 through May 2011) are also included. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, EO 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program, SLAC effectively implements and integrates the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2010, SLAC continued to improve its management systems. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13423, EO 13514, and DOE Orders 450.1A and 430.2B. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. During 2010, there were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations. In addition, many improvements in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater management, groundwater restoration, and SLAC's chemical management system (CMS) were continued. The following are among SLAC's environmental accomplishments for 2010. To facilitate management and identification of future potential greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction opportunities, SLAC voluntarily

  1. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2010 (ASER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabba, D.

    2011-01-01

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year of 2010 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that overlap the calendar year - i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2010/2011 (October 2010 through May 2011) are also included. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M and O contractor. Under Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, EO 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program, SLAC effectively implements and integrates the key elements of an Environmental Management System (EMS) to achieve the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that policies and procedures are understood and followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2010, SLAC continued to improve its management systems. These systems provided a structured framework for SLAC to implement 'greening of the government' initiatives such as EO 13423, EO 13514, and DOE Orders 450.1A and 430.2B. Overall, management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. During 2010, there were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations. In addition, many improvements in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater management, groundwater restoration, and SLAC's chemical management system (CMS) were continued. The following are among SLAC's environmental accomplishments for 2010. To facilitate management and identification of future potential greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction opportunities, SLAC voluntarily completed GHG inventories

  2. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 1998 Annual Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Berry, M.

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office (DOE- SR),has prepared the Site Treatment Plan (STP) for Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed wastes in accordance with RCRA Section 3021(b), and SCDHEC has approved the STP (except for certain offsite wastes) and issued an order enforcing the STP commitments in Volume I. DOE-SR and SCDHEC agree that this STP fulfills the requirements contained in the FFCAct, RCRA Section 3021, and therefore,pursuant to Section 105(a) of the FFCAct (RCRA Section 3021(b)(5)), DOE`s requirements are to implement the plan for the development of treatment capacities and technologies pursuant to RCRA Section 3021.Emerging and new technologies not yet considered may be identified to manage waste more safely, effectively, and at lower cost than technologies currently identified in the plan. DOE will continue to evaluate and develop technologies that offer potential advantages in public acceptance, privatization, consolidation, risk abatement, performance, and life-cycle cost. Should technologies that offer such advantages be identified, DOE may request a revision/modification of the STP in accordance with the provisions of Consent Order 95-22-HW.The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  3. Nevada Test Site, site treatment plan 1999 annual update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    A Site Treatment Plan (STP) is required for facilities at which the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) generates or stores mixed waste (MW), defined by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFC Act) as waste containing both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and a radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act. This STP was written to identify specific treatment facilities for treating DOE/NV generated MW and provides proposed implementation schedules. This STP was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and provided the basis for the negotiation and issuance of the FFC Act Consent Order (CO) dated March 6, 1996, and revised June 15, 1998. The FFC Act CO sets forth stringent regulatory requirements to comply with the implementation of the STP

  4. Oak Ridge reservation, annual site environmental report summary for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy requires annual site environmental reports from facilities that operate under its auspices. To fulfill that requirement, such an annual report is published for the Oak Ridge Reservation, which comprises three major sites, each of which has unique monitoring requirements in addition to many shared obligations. As a result, the report is complex and highly detailed. Annual site environmental reports are public documents that are read by government regulators, scientists, engineers, business people, special interest groups, and members of the public at large. For that reason, the reports need to be accessible to a variety of audiences in addition to being accurate and complete. This pamphlet summarizes environmental activities on the reservation, which for some readers may be adequate; for those who seek more detail, it will lend coherence to their approach to the report itself. The content of this summary was taken from Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report for 1993. Results of the many environmental monitoring and surveillance activities are detailed in this report

  5. Control of technetium at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraceno, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Technetium-99 entered the gaseous diffusion complex as a volatile impurity in recycled uranium that was fed to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Subsequently, it entered the Oak Ridge and Portsmouth cascades as an impurity in Paducah product feed. Most of the technetium was adsorbed on cascade equipment in increasingly high concentrations as it moved up the cascade. Since the low energy beta radiation produced by technetium cannot penetrate cascade equipment, it presents no significant hazard to workers as long as it remains inside of equipment. However, when equipment that contains high concentrations of technetium is opened for maintenance or change-out, precautions are taken to ensure worker safety. Traps containing activated alumina are used at the plant vent streams to limit radioactive emissions as far as possible. Annual vent stream emissions have been well below DOE limits. To allow continued compliance, other potential trapping agents have been tested. Several that limit emissions more effectively than activated alumina have been found. Other traps containing magnesium fluoride are used in the upper cascade to reduce the technetium concentration. Waste solutions from decontamination can also contain technetium. These solutions must either be stored for controlled discharge or treated to remove the technetium. To allow the latter, an ion exchange facility is being installed for operation by the end of FY-1982. Liquid discharges at Portsmouth have usually been less than 5% of the DOE imposed limits

  6. 2011 Annual Ecological Survey: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, James M.; Chamness, Michele A.

    2012-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE Orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory and the Physical Sciences Facility. This report describes the annual survey of biological resources found on the undeveloped upland portions of the PNNL site. The annual survey is comprised of a series of individual field surveys conducted on various days in late May and throughout June 2011. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the baseline surveys and a summary of the results of the surveys are presented. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified in the

  7. Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power DOE Operations Annual Site Environmental Report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuttle, R. J. [The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, CA (United States)

    1997-11-10

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power of Boeing North American. Inc. (formerly Rockwell International Corporation). These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL and the De Soto site. The sites have been used for manufacturing; R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site essentially comprises office space and light industry with no remaining radiological operations, and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2.668 acres), warrants comprehensive monitoring to ensure protection of the environment.

  8. Portsmouth Atmospheric Science School (PASS) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Clarence D.; Hathaway, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Portsmouth Atmospheric Science School Project (PASS) Project was granted a one-year no cost extension for 2001-2002. In year three of the project, objectives and strategies were modified based on the previous year-end evaluation. The recommendations were incorporated and the program was replicated within most of the remaining elementary schools in Portsmouth, Virginia and continued in the four middle schools. The Portsmouth Atmospheric Science School Project is a partnership, which includes Norfolk State University, Cooperating Hampton Roads Organizations for Minorities in Engineering (CHROME), NASA Langley Research Center, and the City of Portsmouth, Virginia Public Schools. The project seeks to strengthen the knowledge of Portsmouth Public Schools students in the field of atmospheric sciences and enhance teacher awareness of hands on activities in the atmospheric sciences. The project specifically seeks to: 1) increase the interest and participation of elementary and middle school students in science and mathematics; 2) strengthen existing science programs; and 3) facilitate greater achievement in core subjects, which are necessary for math, science, and technical careers. Emphasis was placed on providing training activities, materials and resources for elementary students (grades 3 - 5) and middle school students (grades 6 - 8), and teachers through a CHROME club structure. The first year of the project focused on introducing elementary students to concepts and activities in atmospheric science. Year two of the project built on the first year's activities and utilizes advanced topics and activities appropriate for middle school students. During the third year of the project, in addition to the approaches used in years one and two, emphasis was placed on activities that enhanced the Virginia Standards of Learning (SOL).

  9. R@P: developing and promoting the Referencing@Portsmouth service

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, J.; Gwyer, Roisin; Jones, Linda; Worden, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The library at the University of Portsmouth (UoP) has for some years been providing advice on referencing across the institution, either at enquiry desks or through subject/faculty librarians.In addition, annually updated short guidesto Vancouver and Harvard (American Psychological Association variant) were produced by thelibrary, and distributed to new students in their thousands. This sufficed for a time but in thelast three or four years the number of referencing enquiries being fielded by...

  10. 2003 Nevada Test Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Nevada Test Site. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  11. Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Years 2005-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finley, Virginia L.

    2010-01-01

    Contained in the following report are data for radioactivity in the environment collected and analyzed by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's Princeton Environmental, Analytical, and Radiological Laboratory (PEARL). The PEARL is located on-site and is certified for analyzing radiological and non-radiological parameters through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection's Laboratory Certification Program, Certification Number 12471. Non-radiological surface and ground water samples are analyzed by NJDEP certified subcontractor laboratories - QC, Inc. and Accutest Laboratory. To the best of our knowledge, these data, as contained in the 'Annual Site Environmental Report for 2005 and 2006,' are documented and certified to be correct.

  12. Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Years 2005-2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virginia L. Finley

    2010-01-25

    Contained in the following report are data for radioactivity in the environment collected and analyzed by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's Princeton Environmental, Analytical, and Radiological Laboratory (PEARL). The PEARL is located on-site and is certified for analyzing radiological and non-radiological parameters through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection's Laboratory Certification Program, Certification Number 12471. Non-radiological surface and ground water samples are analyzed by NJDEP certified subcontractor laboratories - QC, Inc. and Accutest Laboratory. To the best of our knowledge, these data, as contained in the "Annual Site Environmental Report for 2005 and 2006," are documented and certified to be correct.

  13. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2012 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: Characterize site environmental management performance; Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE Environmental Sustainability Goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS).

  14. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, JF

    2003-11-25

    The ''State-of-the-Environment'' on and around the Oak Ridge Reservation is a mission of highest importance to the Department of Energy and our contractors. In order to be fully aware of the consequences of our operations and cleanup, an annual multimillion-dollar monitoring and surveillance program collects and analyzes tens of thousands of samples from air, surface and groundwater, soil, mud, plants, and animals. A mission of equal importance is to provide our stakeholders a complete understanding of this program. To do this we publish a detailed Annual Site Environmental Report and this summary document. The raw data is published separately in the Data Volume. All three documents can be found on the web, along with past documents, at http://www.ornl.gov/aser. Though I work on numerous technical documents throughout the year, no document is more important to me than the Annual Site Environmental Report and its Summary because: (1) they represent the efforts of many dedicated environmental scientists who carry out this extensive program, and who work hard to protect and enhance the environment; (2) they set out the programs in great detail to our legislatures, stakeholders, and the public; and (3) the Summary is directed to the public with the hope that the information is understandable and of value in gaining an accurate picture of the Oak Ridge Reservation as a neighbor. I thank the Karns High School students and their teacher for accepting my challenge in writing this Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, for thinking out of the box, for doing such a fine job, and for all the artwork and photographs (the morning coffee in the classroom was greatly appreciated, leaks and all). They were an especially enjoyable class to work with, and I hope you, our stakeholders and the public, find their efforts of value.

  15. Oak Ridge Reservation: Annual Site Environmental Report for 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochelle, James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rogers, Ben [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Roche, Paula R. [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hughes, Joan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Coffey, Mike [East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report is prepared annually and presents summary environmental data to (1) characterize environmental performance, (2) summarize environmental occurrences reported during the year, (3) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and (4) highlight significant program activities. The report fulfills the requirement contained in DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting (DOE 2004) that an integrated annual site environmental report be prepared. The results summarized in this report are based on data collected prior to and through 2015. This report is not intended to nor does it present the results of all environmental monitoring associated with the ORR. Data collected for other site and regulatory purposes, such as environmental restoration/remedial investigation reports, waste management characterization sampling data, and environmental permit compliance data, are presented in other documents that have been prepared in accordance with applicable DOE guidance and/or laws and are referenced herein as appropriate. Environmental monitoring on the ORR consists primarily of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring involves the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid and gaseous effluents at the points of release to the environment; these measurements allow the quantification and official reporting of contaminant levels, assessment of radiation and chemical exposures to the public, and demonstration of compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements. Environmental surveillance consists of direct measurements and collection and analysis of samples taken from the site and its environs exclusive of effluents; these activities provide information on contaminant concentrations in air, water, groundwater, soil, foods, biota, and other media. Environmental surveillance data support determinations regarding

  16. Active sites environmental monitoring program FY 1997 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrissey, C.M.; Marshall, D.S.; Cunningham, G.R.

    1998-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities conducted by the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1996 through September 1997. The purpose of the program is to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 North. This report continues a series of annual and semiannual reports that present the results of ASEMP monitoring activities. This report details monitoring results for fiscal year (FY) 1997 from SWSA 6, including the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF) and the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF), and (2) TRU-waste storage areas in SWSA 5 N. This report presents a summary of the methodology used to gather data for each major area along with the FY 1997 results. Figures referenced in the text are found in Appendix A and data tables are presented in Appendix B

  17. Annual site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) has established a formal environmental protection, auditing, monitoring, and planning program that has been in effect since 1978. The significant environmental projects and issues Western was involved with in 1992 are discussed in this annual site environmental report. It is written to show the nature and effectiveness of the environmental protection program. The Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, Chapter II.4, requires the preparation of an annual site environmental report. Because Western has facilities located in 15 states, this report addresses the environmental activities in all the facilities as one ``site.`` In 1992, Western provided power to 612 wholesale power customers consisting of cooperatives, municipalities, public utility districts, investor-owned utilities, Federal and State agencies, irrigation districts, and project use customers. The wholesale power customers, in turn, provided service to millions of retail consumers in the States of California, Nevada, Montana, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Texas, North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, Colorado, Wyoming, Minnesota, Nebraska, and Kansas. Western is responsible for the operation and maintenance of more than 16,450 miles of transmission lines, 268 substations, 51 hydroelectric power plants, and a coal-fired power plant.

  18. Annual site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) has established a formal environmental protection, auditing, monitoring, and planning program that has been in effect since 1978. The significant environmental projects and issues Western was involved with in 1995 are discussed in this annual site environmental report. It is written to show the nature and effectiveness of the environmental protection program. Western operates and maintains nearly 17,000 miles of transmission lines, 257 substations, and various appurtenant power facilities in fifteen central and western states. Western is also responsible for planning, construction, and operation and maintenance of additional federal transmission facilities that may be authorized in the future. There is a combined total of 55 hydroelectric power generating plants in the service area. Additionally, Western markets the US entitlement from the Navajo coal-fired plant near Page, Arizona. The Department of Energy requires the preparation of an annual site environmental report. Because Western has over 400 facilities located in these states, this report addresses the environmental activities in all the facilities as one site

  19. Annual site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) has established a formal environmental protection, auditing, monitoring, and planning program that has been in effect since 1978. The significant environmental projects and issues Western was involved with in 1995 are discussed in this annual site environmental report. It is written to show the nature and effectiveness of the environmental protection program. Western operates and maintains nearly 17,000 miles of transmission lines, 257 substations, and various appurtenant power facilities in fifteen central and western states. Western is also responsible for planning, construction, and operation and maintenance of additional federal transmission facilities that may be authorized in the future. There is a combined total of 55 hydroelectric power generating plants in the service area. Additionally, Western markets the US entitlement from the Navajo coal-fired plant near Page, Arizona. The Department of Energy requires the preparation of an annual site environmental report. Because Western has over 400 facilities located in these states, this report addresses the environmental activities in all the facilities as one site.

  20. Annual site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) has established a formal environmental protection, auditing, monitoring, and planning program which has been in effect since 1978. The significant environmental projects and issues Western was involved with in 1991 are discussed in this annual site environmental report. It is written to demonstrate the nature and effectiveness of the environmental protection program. Western is responsible for the operation and maintenance of 16,664 miles of transmission lines, 265 substations, and various appurtenant power facilities in fifteen central and western states. Western also is responsible for planning, construction, and operation and maintenance of additional federal transmission facilities that may be authorized in the future. There is a combined total of 51 hydroelectric power generating plants in the service area. Additionally, Western markets the US entitlement from the Navajo coal-fired plant near Page, Arizona. The Department of Energy requires the preparation of an annual site environmental report. Because Western has numerous facilities located in these states, this report was written to address the environmental activities in all of the facilities as one site

  1. Pinellas Plant annual site environmental report for calendar year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Martin Marietta Specialty Components, Inc., and the US Department of Energy are committed to successfully administering a high quality Environmental Management Program at the Pinellas Plant in Pinellas County, Florida. Part of this commitment includes accurately documenting and communicating to the Pinellas Plant stakeholder the results of their environmental compliance and monitoring activities. The Annual Site Environmental Report presents a comprehensive summary of the results of the environmental monitoring, waste management, and environmental restoration programs at the Pinellas Plant for 1993. This report also includes the plant's performance in the areas of compliance with applicable regulatory requirements and standards and identifies major environmental management program initiatives and accomplishments for 1993

  2. Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report summary for 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) requires an annual site environmental report from each of the sites operating under its authority. The reports present the results from the various environmental monitoring and surveillance programs carried out during the year. In addition to meeting the DOE requirement, the reports also document compliance with various state and federal laws and regulations. This report was published to fulfill those requirements for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for calendar year 1995. The report is based on thousands of environmental samples collected on and around the ORR and analyzed during the year. The data on which the report is based are published in Environmental Monitoring and Surveillance on the Oak Ridge Reservation: 1995 Data (ES/ESH-71). Both documents are highly detailed. This summary report is meant for readers who are interested in the monitoring results but who do not need to review the details

  3. Annual site environmental report for calendar year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) has established a formal environmental protection, auditing, monitoring, and planning program that has been in effect since 1978. Because Western has over 400 facilities located in 15 states, this report addresses the environmental activities in all the facilities as one site. In March, 1996, Western established a team representing each of the four Regional Offices, the CRSP Customer Service Center and the Corporate Service Office to develop an Environmental Management System based on the guidelines in ISO 14001. The significant environmental projects and issues Western was involved with in 1997 are discussed in this annual site environmental report. This report is written to show the nature and effectiveness of the environmental protection program

  4. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program. FY 1993: Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrissey, C.M.; Ashwood, T.L.; Hicks, D.S.; Marsh, J.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report continues a series of annual and semiannual reports that present the results of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) monitoring activities. The report details monitoring data for fiscal year (FY) 1993 and is divided into three major areas: SWSA 6 [including tumulus pads, Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), and other sites], the low-level Liquid-Waste Solidification Project (LWSP), and TRU-waste storage facilities in SWSA 5 N. The detailed monitoring methodology is described in the second revision of the ASEMP program plan. This report also presents a summary of the methodology used to gather data for each major area along with the results obtained during FY 1993

  5. Epidemiologic surveillance. Annual report for Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    Epidemiologic surveillance at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities consists of regular and systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on absences due to illness and injury in the work force. Its purpose is to provide an early warning system for health problems occurring among employees at participating sites. In this annual report, the 1994 morbidity data for the Savannah River Site (SRS) are summarized. These analyses focus on absences of 5 or more consecutive workdays occurring among workers aged 16-75 years. They are arranged in five sets of tables that present: (1) the distribution of the labor force by occupational category and salary status; (2) the absences per person, diagnoses per absences, and diagnosis rates for the whole work force; (3) diagnosis rates by type of disease or injury; (4) diagnosis rates by occupational category; and (5) relative risks for specific types of disease or injury by occupational category.

  6. Colonie Interim Storage Site annual site environmental report for calendar year 1989, Colonie, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    IN 1984, Congress assigned the cleanup of the National Lead (NL) Industries site in Colonie, New York, to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a decontamination research and development project under the 1984 Energy and Water Appropriations Act. DOE then included the site in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), an existing DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain for the early years of the nation's atomic energy program. DOE instituted an environmental monitoring program at the site in 1984. Results are presented annually in reports such as this. Under FUSRAP, the first environmental monitoring report for this site presented data for calendar year 1984. This report presents the findings of the environmental monitoring program conducted during calendar year 1989. 16 refs., 17 figs., 14 tabs

  7. Colonie Interim Storage Site annual site environmental report for calendar year 1989, Colonie, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-05-01

    IN 1984, Congress assigned the cleanup of the National Lead (NL) Industries site in Colonie, New York, to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a decontamination research and development project under the 1984 Energy and Water Appropriations Act. DOE then included the site in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), an existing DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain for the early years of the nation's atomic energy program. DOE instituted an environmental monitoring program at the site in 1984. Results are presented annually in reports such as this. Under FUSRAP, the first environmental monitoring report for this site presented data for calendar year 1984. This report presents the findings of the environmental monitoring program conducted during calendar year 1989. 16 refs., 17 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report for 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-09-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) consists of three major government-owned, contractor-operated facilities: the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and East Tennessee Technology Park. The ORR was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project, a secret undertaking that produced materials for the first atomic bombs. The reservation’s role has evolved over the years, and it continues to adapt to meet the changing defense, energy, and research needs of the United States. Both the work carried out for the war effort and subsequent research, development, and production activities have involved, and continue to involve, the use of radiological and hazardous materials. The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report and supporting data are available at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/env_rpt or from the project director. This document is prepared annually to summarize environmental activities, primarily environmental monitoring activities, on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and within the ORR surroundings. The document fulfills the requirement of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, for an annual summary of environmental data to characterize environmental performance. The environmental monitoring criteria are described in DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. The results summarized in this report are based on data collected prior to and through 2008. This report is not intended to provide the results of all sampling on the ORR. Additional data collected for other site and regulatory purposes, such as environmental restoration/remedial investigation reports, waste management characterization sampling data, and environmental permit compliance data, are presented in other documents that have been prepared in accordance with applicable DOE guidance and/or laws and are referenced herein as appropriate. Corrections to the report for the previous year are found in Appendix

  9. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report for 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Sharon D [ORNL; Loffman, Regis S [ORNL

    2010-10-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report is prepared annually and presents summary environmental data to (1) characterize environmental performance, (2) summarize environmental occurrences reported during the year, (3) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and (4) highlight significant program activities. The report fulfills the requirement contained in DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting (DOE 2004) that an integrated annual site environmental report be prepared. The results summarized in this report are based on data collected prior to and through 2009. This report is not intended to nor does it present the results of all environmental monitoring associated with the ORR. Data collected for other site and regulatory purposes, such as environmental restoration/remedial investigation reports, waste management characterization sampling data, and environmental permit compliance data, are presented in other documents that have been prepared in accordance with applicable DOE guidance and/or laws and are referenced herein as appropriate. Appendix A to this report identifies corrections for the 2008 report. Appendix B contains a glossary of technical terms that may be useful for understanding the terminology used in this document. Environmental monitoring on the ORR consists primarily of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring involves the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid and gaseous effluents at the points of release to the environment; these measurements allow the quantification and official reporting of contaminant levels, assessment of radiation and chemical exposures to the public, and demonstration of compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements. Environmental surveillance consists of direct measurements and collection and analysis of samples taken from the site and its environs exclusive of effluents

  10. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Sharon D [ORNL

    2011-10-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report is prepared annually and presents summary environmental data to (1) characterize environmental performance, (2) summarize environmental occurrences reported during the year, (3) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and (4) highlight significant program activities. The report fulfills the requirement contained in DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting (DOE 2004) that an integrated annual site environmental report be prepared. The results summarized in this report are based on data collected prior to and through 2010. This report is not intended to nor does it present the results of all environmental monitoring associated with the ORR. Data collected for other site and regulatory purposes, such as environmental restoration/remedial investigation reports, waste management characterization sampling data, and environmental permit compliance data, are presented in other documents that have been prepared in accordance with applicable DOE guidance and/or laws and are referenced herein as appropriate. Appendix A to this report identifies corrections to the 2009 report. Appendix B contains a glossary of technical terms that may be useful for understanding the terminology used in this document. Environmental monitoring on the ORR consists primarily of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring involves the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid and gaseous effluents at the points of release to the environment; these measurements allow the quantification and official reporting of contaminant levels, assessment of radiation and chemical exposures to the public, and demonstration of compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements. Environmental surveillance consists of direct measurements and collection and analysis of samples taken from the site and its environs exclusive of effluents

  11. Waset Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data that: (a) Characterize site environmental management performance; (b) Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; (c) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; and (d) Highlight significant facility programs and efforts. The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP site. DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. This order requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) (No. NM4890139088-TSDF [treatment, storage, and disposal facility]) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  12. Waset Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-09-26

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data that: (a) Characterize site environmental management performance; (b) Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; (c) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; and (d) Highlight significant facility programs and efforts. The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP site. DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. This order requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) (No. NM4890139088-TSDF [treatment, storage, and disposal facility]) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  13. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Anderson [Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO), NM (United States); Basabilvazo, George T. [Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO), NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2016 (ASER) is to provide the information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC) maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP facility. DOE Order 231.1B; DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability; and DOE Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1B, which requires DOE facilities to submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer.

  14. The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Joan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thompson, Sharon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Page, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-09-30

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) consists of three major government-owned, contractor-operated facilities: the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and East Tennessee Technology Park. The ORR was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project, a secret undertaking that produced materials for the first atomic bombs. The reservation’s role has evolved over the years, and it continues to adapt to meet the changing defense, energy, and research needs of the United States. Both the work carried out for the war effort and subsequent research, development, and production activities have involved, and continue to involve, the use of radiological and hazardous materials. The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report and supporting data are available at Http://www.ornl.gov/sci/env_rpt or from the project director.

  15. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report for 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-09-30

    This document is prepared annually to summarize environmental activities, primarily environmental-monitoring activities, on the ORR and within the ORR surroundings. The document fulfills the requirement of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,” for an annual summary of environmental data to characterize environmental performance. The environmental monitoring criteria are described in DOE Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program.” The results summarized in this report are based on data collected prior to and through 2003. This report is not intended to provide the results of all sampling on the ORR. Additional data collected for other site and regulatory purposes, such as environmental restoration remedial investigation reports, waste management characterization sampling data, and environmental permit compliance data, are presented in other documents that have been prepared in accordance with applicable DOE guidance and/or laws. Corrections to the report for the previous year are found in Appendix A. Environmental monitoring on the ORR consists primarily of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring involves the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid and gaseous effluents at the point of release to the environment; these measurements allow the quantification and official reporting of contaminants, assessment of radiation and chemical exposures to the public, and demonstration of compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements. Environmental surveillance consists of the collection and analysis of environmental samples from the site and its environs; these activities provide direct measurement of contaminants in air, water, groundwater, soil, foods, biota, and other media subsequent to effluent release into the environment. Environmental surveillance data provide information regarding conformity with applicable DOE

  16. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, JF

    2004-08-24

    This document is prepared annually to summarize environmental activities, primarily environmental-monitoring activities, on the ORR and within the ORR surroundings. The document fulfills the requirement of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,'' for an annual summary of environmental data to characterize environmental performance. The environmental monitoring criteria are described in DOE Order 450.1, ''Environmental Protection Program''. The results summarized in this report are based on data collected prior to and through 2003. This report is not intended to provide the results of all sampling on the ORR. Additional data collected for other site and regulatory purposes, such as environmental restoration remedial investigation reports, waste management characterization sampling data, and environmental permit compliance data, are presented in other documents that have been prepared in accordance with applicable DOE guidance and/or laws. Corrections to the report for the previous year are found in Appendix A. Environmental monitoring on the ORR consists primarily of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring involves the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid and gaseous effluents at the point of release to the environment; these measurements allow the quantification and official reporting of contaminants, assessment of radiation and chemical exposures to the public, and demonstration of compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements. Environmental surveillance consists of the collection and analysis of environmental samples from the site and its environs; these activities provide direct measurement of contaminants in air, water, groundwater, soil, foods, biota, and other media subsequent to effluent release into the environment. Environmental surveillance data provide information regarding

  17. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Wayne [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Y-12 Complex; Hughes, Joan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Coffey, Mike [East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thompson, Sharon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2007-09-01

    This document is prepared annually to summarize environmental activities, primarily environmental-monitoring activities, on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and within the ORR surroundings. The document fulfills the requirement of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 23l.IA, 'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,' for an annual summary of environmental data to characterize environmental performance. The environmental-monitoring criteria are described in DOE Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program.' The results summarized in this report are based on data collected prior to and through 2006. This report is not intended to provide the results of all sampling on the ORR. Additional data collected for other site and regulatory purposes, such as environmental restoration remedial investigation reports, waste management characterization sampling data, and environmental permit compliance data, are presented in other documents that have been prepared in accordance with applicable DOE guidance and/or laws and are referenced herein as appropriate. Corrections to the report for the previous year are found in Appendix A. Environmental monitoring on the ORR consists primarily of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring involves the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid and gaseous effluents at the point of release to the environment; these measurements allow the quantification and official reporting of contaminants, assessment of radiation and chemical exposures to the public, and demonstration of compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements. Environmental surveillance consists of the collection and analysis of environmental samples from the site and its environs; these activities provide direct measurement of contaminant concentrations in air, water, groundwater, soil, foods, biota, and other media. Environmental surveillance data provide information regarding

  18. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report for 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2010-09-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report is prepared animally and presents summary environmental data to (1) characterize environmental performance, (2) summarize environmental occurrences reported during the year, (3) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and (4) highlight significant program activities. The report fulfills the requirement contained in DOE Order 231.1 A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting (DOE 2004) that an integrated annual site environmental report be prepared. The results summarized in this report are based on data collected prior to and through 2009. This report is not intended to nor does it present the results of all environmental monitoring associated with the ORR. Data collected for other site and regulatory purposes, such as environmental restoration/remedial investigation reports, waste management characterization sampling data, and environmental permit compliance data, are presented in other documents that have been prepared in accordance with applicable DOE guidance and/or laws and are referenced herein as appropriate. Appendix A to this report identifies corrections to the 2008 report. Appendix B contains a glossary of technical terms that may be useful for understanding the terminology used in this document. Environmental monitoring on the ORR consists primarily of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring involves the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid and gaseous effluents at the points of release to the environment; these measurements allow the quantification and official reporting of contaminant levels, assessment of radiation and chemical exposures to the public, and demonstration of compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements. Environmental surveillance consists of direct measurements and collection and analysis of samples taken from the site and its environs exclusive of effluents

  19. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Summary, 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, JF

    2005-11-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and our contractors strive to provide our stakeholders a comprehensive understanding of the consequences of DOE operations past and present. Toward this end a far-reaching multimillion-dollar annual monitoring and surveillance program collects and analyzes tens of thousands of air, surface and groundwater, soil, mud, plant, and animal samples. This effort represents the work of many dedicated environmental scientists who carry out these extensive programs and work hard to protect and enhance the environment. We publish the results in a detailed Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER), and a separate Data Volume for those who wish to see the supporting data. These documents present all the facts and figures, but are highly technical and not easily understood, and it's essential we provide a summary document simple to read and understand. So each year I team with Karns High School and ask students to write an Annual Site Environmental Report Summary that will be both informative and enjoyable to read. These environmental documents are perhaps the most important DOE reports because they explain the environmental monitoring programs and show the consequences of our operations in great detail to our legislatures, stakeholders, and the public. This ASER summary is written for you, the public, our most important stakeholder, with the hope that you find it comprehensible and of value in gaining an accurate understanding of the Oak Ridge Reservation. All three documents can be found on the web, along with previous publications, at http://www.ornl.gov/aser. It's a great pleasure to meet my new class each year and capture fresh creative ideas. I'm always delighted to see their interest and desire to learn and to produce a document for the public that reflects their personality and skills, and one the public will utilize and find of value. I sincerely thank these talented Karns High School students and their exceptional teacher

  20. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: (1) Characterize site environmental management performance. (2) Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year. (3) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements. (4) Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE Environmental Sustainability Goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS). The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP. DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, which requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number NM4890139088-TSDF (Permit) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  1. Oak Ridge Reservation, annual site environmental report for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    The US DOE currently oversees activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation, a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. Three sites compose the reservation; Y-12, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and K-25. This document contains a summary of environmental monitoring activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and its surroundings. The results summarized in this report are based on the data collected during calendar year (CY) 1993 and compiled in; Environmental Monitoring in the Oak Ridge Reservation: CY 1993 Results. Annual environmental monitoring on the ORR consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid, gaseous, or airborne effluents for the purpose of characterizing and quantifying contaminants and process stream characteristics, assessing radiation and chemical exposures to members of the public, and demonstrating compliance with applicable standards. Environmental surveillance is the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuffs, biota, and other media from DOE sites and their environs and the measurement of external radiation for purposes of demonstrating compliance with applicable standards, assessing radiation and chemical exposures to members of the public, and assessing effects, if any, on the local environment.

  2. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2010 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: (1) Characterize site environmental management performance. (2) Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year. (3) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements. (4) Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE Environmental Sustainability Goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS). The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the WIPP. DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, which requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number NM4890139088-TSDF (Permit) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED).

  3. 2014 annual site environmental report, Southwestern Power Administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-12-31

    Southwestern Power Administration’s Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) serves as the chief reporting mechanism for site environmental performance information within the Department of Energy and as a valuable resource for shared and collaborative environmental protection and performance information to Agency stakeholders and members of the public living near Southwestern Power Administration’s (Southwestern) facilities and transmission line rights-of-ways. This ASER meets the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.B. Southwestern’s key environmental involvement includes an emphasis on the protection of ecological resources which is effectively accomplished through environmental program elements such as protecting water resources, generation of clean hydropower energy, oil spill prevention practices, elimination of green-house gas emissions, and comprehensive project reviews to ensure the protection of living organisms, migratory birds, Federally threatened or endangered species, and historic or cultural resources. Southwestern continues to actively minimize effects to natural resources and strive for continual improvement in the area of environmental compliance and sustainability while achieving the agency mission to market and deliver Federal hydroelectric power.

  4. Oak Ridge Reservation, annual site environmental report for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The US DOE currently oversees activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation, a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. Three sites compose the reservation; Y-12, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and K-25. This document contains a summary of environmental monitoring activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and its surroundings. The results summarized in this report are based on the data collected during calendar year (CY) 1993 and compiled in; Environmental Monitoring in the Oak Ridge Reservation: CY 1993 Results. Annual environmental monitoring on the ORR consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid, gaseous, or airborne effluents for the purpose of characterizing and quantifying contaminants and process stream characteristics, assessing radiation and chemical exposures to members of the public, and demonstrating compliance with applicable standards. Environmental surveillance is the collection and analysis of samples of air, water, soil, foodstuffs, biota, and other media from DOE sites and their environs and the measurement of external radiation for purposes of demonstrating compliance with applicable standards, assessing radiation and chemical exposures to members of the public, and assessing effects, if any, on the local environment

  5. Nevada Test Site annual site environmental report for calendar year 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, S.C.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1999-01-01

    Prior to 1989, annual reports of environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were prepared in two separate parts. Onsite effluent monitoring and environmental monitoring results were reported in an onsite report prepared by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). Results of the Offsite Radiological Surveillance and Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Programs conducted by the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Laboratory (various names) in Las Vegas, Nevada, were reported separately by that Agency. Beginning with the 1989 Annual Site Environmental Report for the NTS, these two documents were combined into a single report to provide a more comprehensive annual documentation of the environmental protection activities conducted for the nuclear testing program and other nuclear and non-nuclear operations at the NTS. The two agencies have coordinated preparation of this tenth combined onsite and offsite report through sharing of information on environmental surveillance and releases as well as meteorological, hydrological, and other supporting data used in dose-estimation calculations

  6. Nevada Test Site Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year - 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, Y.E.; Grossman, R.F.

    2000-10-01

    Prior to 1989, annual reports of environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were prepared in two separate parts. Onsite effluent monitoring and environmental monitoring results were reported in an onsite report prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). Results of the Offsite Radiological Surveillance and Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring programs conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Laboratory (various names) in Las Vegas, Nevada, were reported separately by that Agency. Beginning with the 1989 Annual Site Environmental Report for the NTS, these two documents were combined into a single report to provide a more comprehensive annual documentation of the environmental protection activities conducted for the nuclear testing program and other nuclear and non-nuclear operations at the NTS. The two agencies have coordinated preparation of this eleventh combined onsite and offsite report through sharing of information on environmental surveillance and releases as well as meteorological, hydrological, and other supporting data used in dose-estimation calculations.

  7. Nevada Test Site Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, Y.E.; Grossman, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    Prior to 1989, annual reports of environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were prepared in two separate parts. Onsite effluent monitoring and environmental monitoring results were reported in an onsite report prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). Results of the Offsite Radiological Surveillance and Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring programs conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Laboratory (various names) in Las Vegas, Nevada, were reported separately by that Agency. Beginning with the 1989 Annual Site Environmental Report for the NTS, these two documents were combined into a single report to provide a more comprehensive annual documentation of the environmental protection activities conducted for the nuclear testing program and other nuclear and non-nuclear operations at the NTS. The two agencies have coordinated preparation of this eleventh combined onsite and offsite report through sharing of information on environmental surveillance and releases as well as meteorological, hydrological, and other supporting data used in dose-estimation calculations

  8. Nevada Test Site annual site environmental report for calendar year 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, S.C.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1999-10-01

    Prior to 1989, annual reports of environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were prepared in two separate parts. Onsite effluent monitoring and environmental monitoring results were reported in an onsite report prepared by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). Results of the Offsite Radiological Surveillance and Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Programs conducted by the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Laboratory (various names) in Las Vegas, Nevada, were reported separately by that Agency. Beginning with the 1989 Annual Site Environmental Report for the NTS, these two documents were combined into a single report to provide a more comprehensive annual documentation of the environmental protection activities conducted for the nuclear testing program and other nuclear and non-nuclear operations at the NTS. The two agencies have coordinated preparation of this tenth combined onsite and offsite report through sharing of information on environmental surveillance and releases as well as meteorological, hydrological, and other supporting data used in dose-estimation calculations.

  9. Rocketdyne division annual site environmental report, Santa Susana Field Laboratory and De Soto Site, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1992-12-03

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for manufacturing, R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site is essentially light industry with some laboratory-scale R&D and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2.668 acres), warranted comprehensive monitoring to assure protection of the environment. The purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring primarily for the regulatory agencies involved in controlling operations with nuclear fuel or nuclear reactors. i.e., the U.S. DOE and the California State Department of Health Services (DHS). Radiologic Health Branch (RHB). For that reason. information concentrates on Area IV at SSFL as this is the site of the former nuclear operations. While the major area of interest is radiological, this report also includes a discussion of nonradiological monitoring at SSFL.

  10. Rocketdyne division annual site environmental report, Santa Susana Field Laboratory and De Soto Sites, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1994-10-21

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for manufacturing, R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site is essentially light industry with some laboratory-scale R&D and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2,668 acres), warranted comprehensive monitoring to assure protection of the environment. The purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring primarily for the regulatory agencies involved in controlling environmental remediation, i.e., the U.S. DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the California State Department of Health Services (DHS) Radiologic Health Branch (RHB). For that reason, information concentrates on Area IV at SSFL as this is the site of the former nuclear operations. While the major area of interest is radiological, this report also includes a discussion of nonoradiological monitoring at SSFL.

  11. Rocketdyne division annual site environmental report, Santa Susana Field Laboratory and De Soto Sites, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1993-12-14

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for manufacturing, R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site is essentially light industry with some laboratory-scale R&D and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2,668 acres), warranted comprehensive monitoring to assure protection of the environment. The purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring primarily for the regulatory agencies involved in controlling environmental remediation, i.e., the U.S. DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the California State Department of Health Services (DHS) Radiologic Health Branch (RHB). For that reason, information concentrates on Area IV at SSFL as this is the site of the former nuclear operations. While the major area of interest is radiological, this report also includes a discussion of nonradiological monitoring at SSFL.

  12. CARETS: A prototype regional environmental information system. Volume 7: Land use information and air quality planning. [Norfolk and Portsmouth, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, R. H. (Principal Investigator); Reed, W. E.; Lewis, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The pilot air quality system provided data for updating information on the sources of point and area emissions of SO2 and particulate matter affecting the Norfolk-Portsmouth area of Virginia for 1971-72 winter and the annual 1972 period. During the 1971-72 winter, estimated SO2 amounts over an area with a SW-NE axis in the central section of Norfolk exceeded both primary and secondary levels.

  13. Pinellas Plant annual site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    Lockheed Martin Specialty Components, Inc., and the US Department of Energy are committed to successfully administering a high-quality Environmental, Safety and Health Program at the Pinellas Plant in Pinellas County, Florida. Part of this commitment includes accurately documenting and communicating to the Pinellas Plant stakeholders the results of the Pinellas Plant's environmental compliance and monitoring activities. The Annual Site Environmental Report presents a comprehensive summary of the results of the Environmental Monitoring, Waste Management, and Environmental Restoration Programs at the Pinellas Plant for 1995. This report also includes the plant's performance in the areas of compliance with applicable regulatory requirements and standards and identifies major Environmental, Safety and Health Program initiatives and accomplishments for 1995. As a result of the end of the Department of Energy's Defense Programs mission (weapons production) on September 30, 1994, considerable changes at the Pinellas Plant are occurring. The Department of Energy's Environmental Management is now the landlord of the Pinellas Plant to facilitate the plant's new mission of transition to alternate use in support of economic development and safe shutdown. The Department of Energy sold the Pinellas Plant to the Pinellas County Industry Council in March 1995, and it is leasing back a portion of the plant through September 1997, to complete the safe shutdown and transition activities

  14. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex (PUEC), conducted August 4 through August 15, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Team specialists are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at PUEC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the PUEC Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the PUEC Survey. 55 refs., 22 figs., 21 tabs

  15. Rocketdyne Division annual site environmental report Santa Susana Field Laboratory and Desoto sites 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-30

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation (Rocketdyne). These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and the DeSoto site. The sites have been used for manufacturing, R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The DeSoto site essentially comprises office space and light industry with no remaining radiological operations, and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2,668 acres), warrants comprehensive monitoring to assure protection of the environment. SSFL consists of four administrative areas used for research, development, and test operations as well as a buffer zone. A portion of Area I and all of Area II are owned by the U.S. Government and assigned to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). A portion of Area IV is under option for purchase by the Department of Energy (DOE).

  16. Rocketdyne Division annual site environmental report Santa Susana Field Laboratory and Desoto sites 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation (Rocketdyne). These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and the DeSoto site. The sites have been used for manufacturing, R ampersand D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The DeSoto site essentially comprises office space and light industry with no remaining radiological operations, and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2,668 acres), warrants comprehensive monitoring to assure protection of the environment. SSFL consists of four administrative areas used for research, development, and test operations as well as a buffer zone. A portion of Area I and all of Area II are owned by the U.S. Government and assigned to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). A portion of Area IV is under option for purchase by the Department of Energy (DOE)

  17. Military Construction: Renovation Plans at the Portsmouth Naval Medical Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    The Portsmouth Naval Medical Center is a teaching hospital that provides comprehensive health care services to active duty forces and, when space is available, provides medical services to other DOD beneficiaries (i.e...

  18. Radiation exposure assessment for Portsmouth Naval Shipyard health studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, R. D.; Taulbee, T. D.; Chen, P.

    2004-01-01

    Occupational radiation exposures of 13,475 civilian nuclear shipyard workers were investigated as part of a retrospective mortality study. Estimates of annual, cumulative and collective doses were tabulated for future dose-response analysis. Record sets were assembled and amended through range checks, examination of distributions and inspection. Methods were developed to adjust for administrative overestimates and dose from previous employment. Uncertainties from doses below the recording threshold were estimated. Low-dose protracted radiation exposures from submarine overhaul and repair predominated. Cumulative doses are best approximated by a hybrid log-normal distribution with arithmetic mean and median values of 20.59 and 3.24 mSv, respectively. The distribution is highly skewed with more than half the workers having cumulative doses 95% having doses <100 mSv. The maximum cumulative dose is estimated at 649.39 mSv from 15 person-years of exposure. The collective dose was 277.42 person-Sv with 96.8% attributed to employment at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. (authors)

  19. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Enviromental Report for 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2008 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to characterize site environmental management performance; summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant facility programs and efforts; and describe how compliance and environmental improvement is accomplished through the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS). The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, which requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) Number NM4890139088-TSDF (treatment, storage, and disposal facility) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WIPP mission is to safely dispose of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste generated by the production of nuclear weapons and other activities related to the national defense of the United States. In 2008, 5,265 cubic meters (m3) of TRU waste were disposed of at the WIPP facility, including 5,216 m3 of contact-handled (CH) TRU waste and 49 m3 of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. From the first

  20. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Enviromental Report for 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Regulatory and Enviromnetal Services

    2009-09-21

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2008 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to characterize site environmental management performance; summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant facility programs and efforts; and describe how compliance and environmental improvement is accomplished through the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS). The DOE Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the management and operating contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), maintain and preserve the environmental resources at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE Order 231.1A; DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program; and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, require that the affected environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and workers, and preservation of the environment. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, which requires that DOE facilities submit an ASER to the DOE Headquarters Chief Health, Safety, and Security Officer. The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) Number NM4890139088-TSDF (treatment, storage, and disposal facility) further requires that the ASER be provided to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WIPP mission is to safely dispose of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste generated by the production of nuclear weapons and other activities related to the national defense of the United States. In 2008, 5,265 cubic meters (m3) of TRU waste were disposed of at the WIPP facility, including 5,216 m3 of contact-handled (CH) TRU waste and 49 m3 of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. From the first

  1. Hazelwood Interim Storage Site annual site environmental report: Calendar year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    During 1986, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in the City of Hazelwood, Missouri. Originally known as the Cotter Corporation site on Latty Avenue in Hazelwood, the HISS is presently used for the storage of soils contaminated with residual radioactive material. As part of the decontamination research and development project authorized by Congress under the 1984 Energy and Water Appropriations Act, remedial action and environmental monitoring program are being conducted at the site and at vicinity properties by Bechtel National, Inc., Project Management Contractor for FUSRAP. The monitoring program at the HISS measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium, radium, and thorium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the scenario described in this report, the maximally exposed individual at the HISS would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 2% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. This exposure is less than the exposure a person would receive during a round-trip flight from New York to Los Angeles. The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the HISS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose that the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1986 monitoring show that the HISS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 11 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs

  2. Nevada National Security Site: Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) Fiscal Year 2015 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Howard A. [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States). Site-Directed Research and Development Program

    2016-04-01

    This report presents results of multiple research projects, new and ongoing, funded under the Site-Directed Research and Development Program for the Nevada National Security Site during federal fiscal year 2015. The Site's legacy capabilities in remote sensing combined with new paradigms for emergency response and consequence management help drive the need to develop advanced aerial sensor platforms. Likewise, dynamic materials science is a critical area of scientific research for which basic physics issues are still unresolved. New methods of characterizing materials in extreme states are vitally needed, and these efforts are paving the way with new knowledge. Projects selected in FY 2015 for the Exploratory Research portfolio exhibit a strong balance of NNSS mission relevance. Geoscience, seismology, and techniques for detecting underground nuclear events are still essential focus areas. Many of the project reports in the second major section of this annual report are ongoing continuations in multi-year lifecycles. Diagnostic techniques for stockpile and nuclear security science figured prominently as well, with a few key efforts coming to fruition, such as phase transition detection. In other areas, modeling efforts toward better understanding plasma focus physics has also started to pay dividends for major program needs.

  3. Hazelwood interim storage site: Annual site environmental report, Hazelwood, Missouri, Calendar Year 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    The monitoring program at Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium, radium, and thorium, concentrations in surface water, groundwater and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and assess its potential effect or public health, the radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. Based on the scenario described in this report, this hypothetical individual at HISS would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 1 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard. This exposure is less than the exposure a person receives during a flight from New York to Los Angeles (because of the greater amounts of cosmic radiation at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of HISS that results from radioactive materials present at the site is indistinguishable from the dose that the same population receives from naturally occurring radioactive sources. The results of 1988 monitoring show that HISS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 15 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs

  4. Nevada National Security Site. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2011 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This fiscal year 2011 annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development program, the 10th anniversary edition, recognizes a full decade of innovative R and D accomplishments in support of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Last year the NNSS itself was renamed to reflect a diversifying mission, and our R and D program has contributed significantly to shape emerging missions that will continue to evolve. New initiatives in stockpile stewardship science, nonproliferation, and treaty verification and monitoring have had substantial successes in FY 2011, and many more accomplishments are expected. SDRD is the cornerstone on which many of these initiatives rest. Historically supporting our main focus areas, SDRD is also building a solid foundation for new, and non-traditional, emerging national security missions. The program continues its charter to advance science and technology for a broad base of agencies including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and many others.

  5. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion: final environmental statement. Volume 2. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    Volume 2 is comprised of appendices: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Existing Facilities; Ecology; Civic Involvement; Social Analysis; Population Projections; Toxicity of Air Pollutants to Biota at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and Assessment of Noise Effects of an Add-On to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

  6. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion: final environmental statement. Volume 2. Appendices. [Appendices only

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liverman, James L.

    1977-09-01

    Volume 2 is comprised of appendices: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Existing Facilities; Ecology; Civic Involvement; Social Analysis; Population Projections; Toxicity of Air Pollutants to Biota at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant; and Assessment of Noise Effects of an Add-On to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. (LK)

  7. Maywood Interim Storage Site: Annual site environmental report, Maywood, New Jersey, Calendar year 1986: Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1987-06-01

    During 1986, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in the Borough of Maywood and the Township of Rochelle Park, New Jersey. The MISS is presently used for the storage of low-level radioactively contaminated soils. The MISS is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). As part of the decontamination research and development project authorized by Congress under the 1984 Energy and Water Appropriations Act, remedial action and environmental monitoring programs are being conducted at this site and at vicinity properties by Bechtel National, Inc., Project Management Contractor for FUSRAP. The monitoring program at the MISS measures thoron and radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and thorium, uranium, and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/y) and to assess the potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in the report, the maximally exposed individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 1% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/y. This exposure is less than the exposure a person would receive during a round-trip flight from New York to Los Angeles (due to greater amounts of cosmic radiation at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the MISS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1986 monitoring show that the MISS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 16 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  8. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2004. The report summarizes the environmental protection program at the West Valley Demonstration Project for CY 2004

  9. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNSCO) and URS Group, Inc.

    2005-09-30

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2004. The report summarizes the environmental protection program at the West Valley Demonstration Project for CY 2004.

  10. Paducah Site annual environmental report summary for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, C.M.

    1996-02-01

    This pamphlet contains summaries of the environmental programs at the Paducah Gaseous Plant site, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1994

  11. 1985 annual site environmental report for Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.; Sedlet, J.

    1986-03-01

    This is one in a series of annual reports prepared to provide DOE, environmental agencies, and the public with information on the level of radioactive and chemical pollutants in the environment and on the amounts of such substances, if any, added to the environment as a result of Argonne operations. Included in this report are the results of measurements obtained in 1985 for a number of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; for a variety of chemical constituents in surface and subsurface water; and for the external penetrating radiation dose

  12. Hazelwood Interim Storage Site, Hazelwood, Missouri: Annual site environmental report, Calendar year 1987: Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    The monitoring program at the HISS measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium, radium, and thorium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the scenario described in this report, the maximally exposed individual at the HISS would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 1 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. This exposure is less than the exposure a person would receive during a round-trip flight from New York to Los Angeles (because of the greater amounts of cosmic radiation at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the HISS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose that the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. The results of 1987 monitoring show that the HISS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 12 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs

  13. Analog site for fractured rock characterization. Annual report FY 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, J.C.S.; Loughty, C.; Faybishenko, B.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes the accomplishments of the Analog Site for Fracture Rock Characterization Project during fiscal year 1995. This project is designed to address the problem of characterizing contaminated fractured rock. In order to locate contaminant plumes, develop monitoring schemes, and predict future fate and transport, the project will address the following questions: What parts of the system control flow-geometry of a fracture network? What physical processes control flow and transport? What are the limits on measurements to determine the above? What instrumentation should be used? How should it be designed and implemented? How can field tests be designed to provide information for predicting behavior? What numerical models are good predictors of the behavior of the system? The answers to these question can be used to help plan drilling programs that are likely to intersect plumes and provide effective monitoring of plume movement. The work is done at an open-quotes analogueclose quotes site, i.e., a site that is not contaminated, but has similar geology to sites that are contaminated, in order to develop tools and techniques without the financial, time and legal burdens of a contaminated site. The idea is to develop conceptual models and investigations tools and methodology that will apply to the contaminated sites in the same geologic regimes. The Box Canyon site, chosen for most of this work represents a unique opportunity because the Canyon walls allow us to see a vertical plane through the rock. The work represents a collaboration between the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL), Stanford University (Stanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Parsons Environmental Engineering (Parsons). LBL and Stanford bring extensive experience in research in fractured rock systems. INEL and Parsons bring significant experience with the contamination problem at INEL

  14. Technical Feasibility Study for Deployment of Ground-Source Heat Pump Systems: Portsmouth Naval Shipyard -- Kittery, Maine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillesheim, M.; Mosey, G.

    2014-11-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Lands initiative, engaged the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct feasibility studies to assess the viability of developing renewable energy generating facilities on contaminated sites. Portsmouth Naval Shipyard (PNSY) is a United States Navy facility located on a series of conjoined islands in the Piscataqua River between Kittery, ME and Portsmouth, NH. EPA engaged NREL to conduct a study to determine technical feasibility of deploying ground-source heat pump systems to help PNSY achieve energy reduction goals.

  15. Annual site environmental report, period: January 1994 to June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The environmental management program at the US Department of Energy (DOE), Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), addresses all areas of environmental concern, including surface water and groundwater quality, air quality, and solid and hazardous waste disposal. The program focuses primarily on the treatment and disposal of industrial, contaminated, and sanitary wastewaters; the disposal of solid and hazardous wastes; minimizing air pollutant emissions; the monitoring of surface water, groundwater, and air quality on the METC site and in the surrounding area; the decommissioning, decontamination, and disposal of on-site research facilities no longer in use; and the identification, characterization, and cleanup of off-site property where METC sponsored research and development activities. The environmental management program is conducted to meet the requirements of all applicable Federal, state, and local laws and regulations.

  16. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site environmental report for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koncinski, W.S.

    1995-10-01

    This report presents the details of the environmental monitoring and management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Topics include: site and operations overview; environmental compliance strategies; environmental management program; effluent monitoring; environmental surveillance; radiation doses; chemical doses; ground water; and quality assurance

  17. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: FY 1990 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1991-10-01

    Chapter 3 of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A (DOE 1988) sets forth requirements for environmental monitoring of active low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites. Active sites are defined as those LLW facilities that were in use on or after the date of the order (September 1988). The transuranic (TRU) waste storage areas in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 5 North are covered by Chap. 2 of the order. In both chapters, monitoring is required to provide for early warning of leaks before those leaks pose a threat to human health or the environment. Chapter 3 also requires that monitoring be conducted to evaluate the short- and long-term performance of LLW disposal facilities. In accordance with this order, the Solid Waste Operations Department at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established an Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) that is implemented by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at ORNL. This report summarizes data from ASEMP monitoring activities for the final 6 months of FY 1990. A brief summary of the monitoring methodology for each site is presented also

  18. 1986 annual site environmental report for Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golchert, N.W.; Duffy, T.L.

    1987-03-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for 1986 are presented and discussed. To evaluate the effect of Argonne operations on the environment, measurements were made for a variety of radionuclides in air, surface water, ground water, soil, grass, bottom sediment, and milk; of the environmental penetrating radiation dose; and for a variety of chemical constituents in surface water, ground water, and Argonne effluent water. Sample collections and measurements were made on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site for comparison purposes. The results of the program are interpreted in terms of the sources and origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A US Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology based on recent International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations is required and used in this report. The radiation dose to off-site population groups is estimated. The average concentrations and total amounts of radioactive and chemical pollutants released by Argonne to the environment were all below appropriate standards. 21 refs., 7 figs., 52 tabs

  19. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site environmental report for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koncinski, W.S. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This report presents the details of the environmental monitoring and management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Topics include: site and operations overview; environmental compliance strategies; environmental management program; effluent monitoring; environmental surveillance; radiation doses; chemical doses; ground water; and quality assurance.

  20. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site environmental report summary for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document presents a summary of the information collected for the Oak Ridge Reservation 1994 site environmental report. Topics discussed include: Oak Ridge Reservation mission; ecology; environmental laws; community participation; environmental restoration; waste management; radiation effects; chemical effects; risk to public; environmental monitoring; and radionuclide migration

  1. An aerial radiological survey of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampoll-Ramirez, G.

    1994-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from August 10-16, 1993, over a 78-square-kilometer (30-square-mile) area of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area located near Portsmouth, Ohio. The survey was performed at a nominal altitude of 46 meters (150 feet) with a line spacing of 76 meters (250 feet). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter above ground level was prepared and overlaid on a set of United States Geological Survey topographic maps of the area and an aerial photograph of the plant. The terrestrial gamma exposure rates varied from about 7 to 14 microroentgens per hour at 1 meter above the ground. Protactinium-234m was observed at six sites within the boundaries of the plant. At a seventh site, only uranium-235 was observed. No other man-made, gamma ray-emitting radioactive material was present in a detectable quantity, either on or off the plant property. Soil sample and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries to support the aerial data. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to agree within ± 7.5%

  2. Annual Site Environmental Report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauer, R.O.; Schleimer, G.E.; Javendel, I. [eds.

    1992-05-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes LBL environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1991. The purpose of this Report is to present summary environmental data in order to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts.

  3. Annual report for Hanford Site: Epidemiologic surveillance - 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    Epidemiologic surveillance at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities consists of regular and systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on absences due to illness and injury in the work force. Its purpose is to provide an early warning system for health problems occurring among employees at participating sites. Data are collected by coordinators at each site and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and analyses are carried out. Rates of absences and rates of diagnoses associated with absences are analyzed by occupational and other relevant variables. They may be compared with the disease experience of different groups within the DOE work force and with populations that do not work for DOE to identify disease patterns or clusters that may be associated with work activities.This report provides the final summary for the Hanford Reservation.

  4. FY 2016 Site-Directed Research & Development Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Howard [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2017-04-01

    As the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) continues to evolve and transition its mission to a broader scope, significant challenges lie ahead that present unique opportunities for our research and development (R&D) enterprise. At the juncture, we are poised to create a different future investment strategy. Our decisions at the beginning of a new tri-decade span must be guided as expertly as possible given the greater complexity and multifaceted nature of our work.

  5. Paducah Site annual environmental report summary for 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belcher, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains summaries of the environmental programs at the Paducah Site, as well as the impacts of its operations on the environment and the public for 1995. The results of environmental monitoring are presented. The goal is to keep emissions as low as possible, enhance the strict safety controls that are in place and use state-of-the-art technology to complete environmental remediation projects in the most cost-effective and efficient manner possible

  6. Prioritizing and scheduling Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant safeguards upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmunds, T.; Saleh, R.; Zevanove, S.

    1992-02-01

    As part of the Site Safeguards and Security Plan (SSSP), facilities are required to develop a Resource Plan (RP). The Resource Plan provides documentation and justification for the facility's planned upgrades, including the schedule, priority, and cost estimates for the safeguards and security upgrades. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) management has identified and obtained funding approval for a number of safeguards and security upgrades, including line-item construction projects. These upgrade projects were selected to address a variety of concerns identified in the PORTS vulnerability assessments and other reviews performed in support of the SSSP process. However, budgeting and scheduling constraints do not make it possible to simultaneously begin implementation of all of the upgrade projects. A formal methodology and analysis are needed to explicitly address the trade-offs between competing safeguards objectives, and to prioritize and schedule the upgrade projects to ensure that the maximum benefit can be realized in the shortest possible time frame. The purpose of this report is to describe the methodology developed to support these upgrade project scheduling decisions. The report also presents the results obtained from applying the methodology to a set of the upgrade projects selected by PORTS S ampersand S management. Data for the analysis are based on discussions with personnel familiar with the PORTS safeguards and security needs, the requirements for implementing these upgrades, and upgrade funding limitations. The analysis results presented here assume continued highly enriched uranium (HEU) operations at PORTS. However, the methodology developed is readily adaptable for the evaluation of other operational scenarios and other resource allocation issues relevant to PORTS

  7. Annual site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report presents the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of the Weldon Spring site (WSS) on the surrounding region's groundwater, surface waters, and air quality through multiple pathways as well as monitoring for potential exposure to receptor human populations. Information is also presented on the environmental monitoring quality assurance program, waste management activities, audits, and reviews, and special environmental studies. The data reported have been collected from a growing complex of monitoring stations and a routine sampling program supplemented by the following: An air monitoring network of 22 stations located within and on the perimeters of the two operable remedial units of the site, and at critical receptor locations around the WSS: Six National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) locations and over 25 surface water sampling locations; twenty-two locations for measuring external gamma radiation; over 100 groundwater monitoring wells and piezometers; dozens of soil and ground surface scanning locations for potential direct contact exposure; and an on-site meteorological station. Comprehensive environmental monitoring data for 1990 show that emissions of radiological contamination from the WSS continue to decrease, and contaminant migration pathways and environmental variability are better understood. 26 figs., 34 tabs

  8. 1995 annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. A number of DOE sites participate in the Epidemiologic Surveillance Program. This program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from the Hanford Site from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at Hanford and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out. The information in the main body of the report provides a descriptive analysis of the data collected from the site, and the appendices provides additional detail. The report also contains an expanded Glossary and an Explanation of Diagnostic Categories which gives examples of health conditions in each of the diagnostic categories

  9. 1996 Savannah River Site annual epidemiologic surveillance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-03-01

    This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from Savannah River Site from January 1, 1996 through December 31, 1996. The data were collected by a coordinator at Savannah River Site and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and preliminary data analyses were carried out. The analyses were interpreted and the final report prepared by the DOE Office of Epidemiologic Studies. The information in this report provides highlights of the data analyses conducted on the 1996 data collected from Savannah River Site. The main sections of the report include: work force characteristics; absences due to injury or illness lasting 5 or more consecutive workdays; workplace illnesses, injuries, and deaths that were reportable to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (''OSHA-recordable'' events); and disabilities and deaths among current workers. The 1996 report includes a new section on time trends that provides comparative information on the health of the work force from 1994 through 1996.

  10. 1995 annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. A number of DOE sites participate in the Epidemiologic Surveillance Program. This program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from the Hanford Site from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at Hanford and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out. The information in the main body of the report provides a descriptive analysis of the data collected from the site, and the appendices provides additional detail. The report also contains an expanded Glossary and an Explanation of Diagnostic Categories which gives examples of health conditions in each of the diagnostic categories.

  11. 1997 Savannah River Site annual epidemiologic surveillance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-06-01

    This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from Savannah River Site from January 1, 1997 through December 31, 1997. The data were collected by a coordinator at Savannah River Site and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and preliminary data analyses were carried out. The analyses were interpreted and the final report prepared by the DOE Office of Epidemiologic Studies. The information in this report provides highlights of the data analyses conducted on the 1997 data collected from Savannah River Site. The main sections of the report include: work force characteristics; absences due to injury or illness lasting 5 or more consecutive workdays; workplace illnesses, injuries, and deaths that were reportable to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (''OSHA-recordable'' events); and disabilities and deaths among current workers. The 199 7 report includes a section on time trends that provides comparative information on the health of the work force from 1994 through 1997.

  12. Radioactive effluents, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, calendar year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acox, T.A.; Hary, L.F.; Klein, L.S.

    1983-03-01

    Radioactive discharges from the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are discussed and tabulated. Tables indicate both the location of the discharge and the nuclides discharged. All discharges for 1982 are well below the Radioactive Concentration Guide limits specified in DOE Order 5480.1, Chapter XI. 1 figure

  13. Plant air systems safety study: Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Air System facilities and operations are reviewed for potential safety problems not covered by standard industrial safety procedures. Information is presented under the following section headings: facility and process description (general); air plant equipment; air distribution system; safety systems; accident analysis; plant air system safety overview; and conclusion

  14. Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report for 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The US Department of Energy currently oversees activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. Three sites compose the reservation: the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the K-25 Site). The ORR was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project, a secret undertaking that produced the materials for the first atomic bombs. The reservation`s role has evolved over the years, and it continues to adapt to meet the changing defense, energy, and research needs of the US. Both the work carried out for the war effort and subsequent research, development, and production activities have produced (and continue to produce) radiological and hazardous wastes. This document contains a summary of environmental monitoring activities on the ORR and its surroundings. Environmental monitoring on the ORR consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring involves the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid and gaseous effluents prior to release into the environment; these measurements allow the quantification and official reporting of contaminants, assessment of radiation exposures to the public, and demonstration of compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements. Environmental surveillance consists of the collection and analysis of environmental samples from the site and its environs; this provides direct measurement of contaminants in air, water, groundwater, soil, foods, biota, and other media subsequent to effluent release into the environment. Environmental surveillance data verify ORR`s compliance status and, combined with data from effluent monitoring, allow the determination of chemical and radiation dose/exposure assessment of ORR operations and effects, if any, on the local environment.

  15. Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report for 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    The US Department of Energy currently oversees activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. Three sites compose the reservation: the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the K-25 Site). The ORR was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project, a secret undertaking that produced the materials for the first atomic bombs. The reservation's role has evolved over the years, and it continues to adapt to meet the changing defense, energy, and research needs of the US. Both the work carried out for the war effort and subsequent research, development, and production activities have produced (and continue to produce) radiological and hazardous wastes. This document contains a summary of environmental monitoring activities on the ORR and its surroundings. Environmental monitoring on the ORR consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring involves the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid and gaseous effluents prior to release into the environment; these measurements allow the quantification and official reporting of contaminants, assessment of radiation exposures to the public, and demonstration of compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements. Environmental surveillance consists of the collection and analysis of environmental samples from the site and its environs; this provides direct measurement of contaminants in air, water, groundwater, soil, foods, biota, and other media subsequent to effluent release into the environment. Environmental surveillance data verify ORR's compliance status and, combined with data from effluent monitoring, allow the determination of chemical and radiation dose/exposure assessment of ORR operations and effects, if any, on the local environment

  16. Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report for 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koncinski, W.S. [ed.

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the details of the environmental monitoring and management program for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Topics discussed include: site background, climate, and operations; environmental compliance strategies; effluent monitoring; environmental management program including environmental restoration, decontamination and decommissioning, technology development, and public involvement; effluent monitoring of airborne discharges, liquid discharges, toxicity control and monitoring, biological monitoring and abatement; environmental surveillance which encompasses meteorological monitoring, ambient air monitoring, surface water monitoring, soils monitoring, sediment monitoring, and contamination of food stuffs monitoring; radiation doses; chemical exposures; ground water monitoring; and quality assurance.

  17. Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report for 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koncinski, W.S.

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the details of the environmental monitoring and management program for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Topics discussed include: site background, climate, and operations; environmental compliance strategies; effluent monitoring; environmental management program including environmental restoration, decontamination and decommissioning, technology development, and public involvement; effluent monitoring of airborne discharges, liquid discharges, toxicity control and monitoring, biological monitoring and abatement; environmental surveillance which encompasses meteorological monitoring, ambient air monitoring, surface water monitoring, soils monitoring, sediment monitoring, and contamination of food stuffs monitoring; radiation doses; chemical exposures; ground water monitoring; and quality assurance

  18. Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 Site Environmental Report; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2000-01-01

    The CY1999 Site Environmental Report and Compliance Summary discusses environmental compliance activities for NPR-3 (Teapot Dome). All hazardous wastes that were stored in the hazardous waste accumulation at NPR-3 were removed in CY1999. NPR-3 maintains its status as a conditionally exempt small quantity generator. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) flares have not operated at NPR-3 since 1996; monitoring of H2S indicates readings well below limits. All underground storage tanks were removed in 1998. Wastewater samples were in compliance with applicable standards

  19. AHR-related activities in a creosote-adapted population of adult atlantic killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, two decades post-EPA superfund status at the Atlantic Wood Site, Portsmouth, VA USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojdylo, Josephine V. [Department of Biological Sciences, Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Vogelbein, Wolfgang [The College of William & Mary, Gloucester Point, VA 23062 (United States); Bain, Lisa J. [Department of Biological Sciences, Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Rice, Charles D., E-mail: cdrice@clemson.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • AHR-related activities in creosote-adapted adult killifish were examined. • Creosote-adapted adult killifish have elevated intestine CYP1A. • Creosote-adapted adult killifish have elevated liver COX2 mRNA expression. • Most creosote-adapted adult killifish have lesions varying in severity. • Liver lesions in creosote-adapted adult killifish express CYP1A and AHR2 proteins. - Abstract: Atlantic killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, are adapted to creosote-based PAHs at the US EPA Superfund site known as Atlantic Wood (AW) on the southern branch of the Elizabeth River, VA USA. Subsequent to the discovery of the AW population in the early 1990s, these fish were shown to be recalcitrant to CYP1A induction by PAHs under experimental conditions, and even to the time of this study, killifish embryos collected from the AW site are resistant to developmental deformities typically associated with exposure to PAHs in reference fish. Historically, however, 90 +% of the adult killifish at this site have proliferative hepatic lesions including cancer of varying severity. Several PAHs at this site are known to be ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). In this study, AHR-related activities in AW fish collected between 2011 and 2013 were re-examined nearly 2 decades after first discovery. This study shows that CYP1A mRNA expression is three-fold higher in intestines of AW killifish compared to a reference population. Using immunohistochemistry, CYP1A staining in intestines was uniformly positive compared to negative staining in reference fish. Livers of AW killifish were examined by IHC to show that CYP1A and AHR2 protein expression reflect lesions-specific patterns, probably representing differences in intrinsic cellular physiology of the spectrum of proliferative lesions comprising the hepatocarcinogenic process. We also found that COX2 mRNA expression levels were higher in AW fish livers compared to those in the reference population, suggesting a

  20. Ames Laboratory annual site environmental report, calendar year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 1996. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring programs. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies twelve buildings owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Laboratory also leases space in ISU owned buildings. Laboratory activities involve less than ten percent of the total chemical use and approximately one percent of the radioisotope use on the ISU campus. In 1996, the Office of Assurance and Assessment merged with the Environment, Safety and Health Group forming the Environment, Safety, Health and Assurance (ESH and A) office. In 1996, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of wastes under US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. Ames Laboratory submitted a Proposed Site Treatment Plan to EPA in December 1995. This plan complied with the Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA). It was approved by EPA in January 1996. The consent agreement/consent order was issued in February 1996. Pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs, implemented in 1990 and updated in 1994, continued through 1996. Included in these efforts were a waste white paper and green computer paper recycling program. Ames Laboratory also continued to recycle salvageable metal and used oil, and it recovered freon for recycling. All of the chemical and nearly all of the radiological legacy wastes were properly disposed by the end of 1996. Additional radiological legacy waste will be properly disposed during 1997

  1. 2014 Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Joan F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The US Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) is located in Roane and Anderson counties in East Tennessee, about 40 km (25 miles) from Knoxville. ORR is one of DOE’s most unique and complex sites. It encompasses three major facilities and thousands of employees that perform every mission in the DOE portfolio—energy research, environmental restoration, national security, nuclear fuel supply, reindustrialization, science education, basic and applied research in areas important to US security, and technology transfer. ORR was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project for the purposes of enriching uranium and pioneering methods for producing and separating plutonium. Today, scientists at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), DOE’s largest multipurpose national laboratory, conduct world-leading research in advanced materials, alternative fuels, climate change, and supercomputing. The Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 or Y-12 Complex) is vital to maintaining the safety, security, and effectiveness of the US nuclear weapons stockpile and reducing the global threat posed by nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), a former uranium enrichment complex, is being transitioned to a clean, revitalized industrial park.

  2. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2014 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, H. A. [Nevada Test Site/National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)

    2015-04-22

    The reports contained herein are for project activities that occurred from October 2013 through September 2014. Project life cycle is indicated under the title as well as the original proposal number (in the following format: site abbreviation--ID #--originating fiscal year; e.g., STL-03-14). Each of the reports describes in detail the discoveries, achievements, and challenges encountered by our principal investigators. As SDRD, by definition, invests in “high-risk” and hopefully “high-payoff” research, the element of uncertainty is inherent. While many of our efforts are “successful” and result in positive outcomes or technology utilization, some fall short of expectations, but cannot be construed as “failure” in the negative sense. The latter is a natural and valid part of the process of advanced research and often leads to unforeseen new pathways to future discovery. Regardless, either result advances our knowledge base and increases our ability to identify solutions and/or avoid costly and unwarranted paths for future challenges. In summary, the SDRD program continues to provide an unfettered mechanism for innovation that returns multifold to our customers, to national security, and to the general public. The program is a vibrant R&D innovation engine, benefited by its discretionary pedigree, enhanced mission spectrum, committed resources, and sound competitiveness to yield maximum taxpayer benefit. The 25 projects described exemplify the creativity and ability of a diverse scientific and engineering talent base. The efforts also showcase an impressive capability and resource that can be brought to find solutions to a broad array of technology needs and applications relevant to the NNSS mission and national security. Further SDRD performance metrics can be found in the appendix at the end of this report.

  3. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-03-01

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) in 2013 at 19 uranium mill tailings disposal sites established under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978.1 These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title I disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE operates 18 UMTRCA Title I sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.27 (10 CFR 40.27). As required under the general license, a long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for each site was prepared by DOE and accepted by NRC. The Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site, one of the 19 Title I sites, will not be included under the general license until the open, operating portion of the cell is closed. The open portion will be closed either when it is filled or in 2023. This site is inspected in accordance with an interim LTSP. Long-term surveillance and maintenance services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective actions; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder relations, and other regulatory stewardship functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific LTSPs and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up or contingency inspections, or corrective action in accordance with the LTSP. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available on the Internet at http://www.lm.doe.gov/.

  4. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management in 2013 at six uranium mill tailings disposal sites reclaimed under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title II disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE manages six UMTRCA Title II disposal sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established at Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.28. Reclamation and site transition activities continue at other sites, and DOE ultimately expects to manage approximately 27 Title II disposal sites. Long-term surveillance and maintenance activities and services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective action; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder services, and other regulatory functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific long-term surveillance plans (LTSPs) and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up inspections, or corrective action. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available online at http://www.lm.doe.gov

  5. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-11-01

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management in 2013 at six uranium mill tailings disposal sites reclaimed under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title II disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE manages six UMTRCA Title II disposal sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established at Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.28. Reclamation and site transition activities continue at other sites, and DOE ultimately expects to manage approximately 27 Title II disposal sites. Long-term surveillance and maintenance activities and services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective action; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder services, and other regulatory functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific long-term surveillance plans (LTSPs) and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up inspections, or corrective action. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available online at http://www.lm.doe.gov

  6. Annual Site Environmental Report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Calendar year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balgobin, D.A.; Javandel, I.; Pauer, R.O.; Schleimer, G.E.; Thorson, P.A. [eds.

    1993-05-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report summarizes LBL environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1992. The purpose of this Report is to present summary environmental information in order to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.``

  7. Annual Site Environmental Report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Calendar year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balgobin, D.A.; Javandel, I.; Pauer, R.O.; Schleimer, G.E.; Thorson, P.A.

    1993-05-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report summarizes LBL environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1992. The purpose of this Report is to present summary environmental information in order to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Program.''

  8. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Fritz, Brad G.; Tilden, Harold T.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Su-Coker, Jennifer; Stegen, Amanda; Moon, Thomas W.; Becker, James M.; Raney, Elizabeth A.; Chamness, Michele A.; Mendez, Keith M.

    2013-09-01

    The PNNL Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2012 was prepared pursuant to the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, "Environment, Safety and Health Reporting" to provide a synopsis of calendar year 2012 information related to environmental management performance and compliance efforts. It summarizes site compliance with federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, policies, directives, permits, and orders and environmental management performance.

  9. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West Valley Environmental Services LLC (WVES) and URS - Washington Division

    2008-12-17

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2007. The report summarizes the calendar year (CY) 2007 environmental protection program at the WVDP. Monitoring and surveillance of the facilities used by the DOE are conducted to verify protection of public health and safety and the environment.

  10. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2006. The report summarizes calendar year (CY) 2006 environmental monitoring data so as to describe the performance of the WVDP's environmental management system (EMS), confirm compliance with standards and regulations, and highlight important programs that protect public health and safety and the environment

  11. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2007. The report summarizes the calendar year (CY) 2007 environmental protection program at the WVDP. Monitoring and surveillance of the facilities used by the DOE are conducted to verify protection of public health and safety and the environment

  12. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West Valley Nuclear Services Company WVNSCO and URS Group, Inc.

    2006-01-01

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2005. The report summarizes calendar year (CY) 2005 environmental monitoring data so as to describe the performance of the WVDP's environmental management system (EMS), confirm compliance with standards and regulations, and highlight important programs

  13. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNSCO) and URS Group, Inc.

    2007-09-27

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2006. The report summarizes calendar year (CY) 2006 environmental monitoring data so as to describe the performance of the WVDP’s environmental management system (EMS), confirm compliance with standards and regulations, and highlight important programs that protect public health and safety and the environment.

  14. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendard Year 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNSCO) and URS Group, Inc.

    2006-09-21

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2005. The report summarizes calendar year (CY) 2005 environmental monitoring data so as to describe the performance of the WVDP's environmental management system (EMS), confirm compliance with standards and regulations, and highlight important programs.

  15. Breached cylinder incident at the Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boelens, R.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31

    On June 16, 1990, during an inspection of valves on partially depleted product storage cylinders, a 14-ton partially depleted product cylinder was discovered breached. The cylinder had been placed in long-term storage in 1977 on the top row of Portsmouth`s (two rows high) storage area. The breach was observed when an inspector noticed a pile of green material along side of the cylinder. The breach was estimated to be approximately 8- inches wide and 16-inches long, and ran under the first stiffening ring of the cylinder. During the continuing inspection of the storage area, a second 14-ton product cylinder was discovered breached. This cylinder was stacked on the bottom row in the storage area in 1986. This breach was also located adjacent to a stiffening ring. This paper will discuss the contributing factors of the breaching of the cylinders, the immediate response, subsequent actions in support of the investigation, and corrective actions.

  16. Radioactive effluents, Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex, calendar year 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acox, T.A.; Klein, L.S.

    1984-03-01

    Radioactive discharges from the Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex are discussed and tabulated. Tables indicate both the location of the discharge and the nuclides discharged. Routine discharges for 1983 are well below the Radioactive Concentration Guide limits specified in DOE Order 5480.1, Chapter XI. There was, however, an unplanned release in December from the X-326 Building Side Purge which exceeded the limits. 1 figure

  17. Control of uranium hazards - Portsmouth uranium enrichment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes the Environmental, Safety and Health programs to control uranium hazards at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A description of the physical plant, the facility processes and the attendant uranium flows and effluents are provided. The hazards of uranium are discussed and the control systems are outlined. Finally, the monitoring programs are described and summaries of recent data are provided. 11 figs., 20 tabs

  18. Clean-out and Reuse of GCEP Facilities at Portsmouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, William; Hickman, Mark; Wiehle, Kristi

    2008-01-01

    PORTS began operations in 1956 to enrich uranium for both civilian and military use. It operated under Goodyear Atomic Corporation and Lockheed-Martin as a government-owned contractor-operated facility until the formation of the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) as a government corporation in 1993. In 1998, USEC was privatized as a publicly traded corporation. USEC leases the Portsmouth and Paducah GDPs from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Enrichment operations were terminated at Portsmouth in 2001, although USEC continues to lease and maintain the Portsmouth GDP in Cold Shutdown and conduct some DOE projects there. LPP found that removal of old equipment to allow reuse of a facility can present unexpected challenges. Classified components create significant logistics issues. In this case, teamwork and attention to detail by USEC, LATA/Parallax, and DOE resulted in solutions and success. Lessons learnt: - Transportation logistics are particularly important when shipping waste streams with special requirements. - Investment in extra equipment yields tangible benefits where other resources (cleared drivers) are scarce. - An early start to providing specially qualified drivers, in this case providing security clearances, is essential. Availability is limited, and the time required to qualify new drivers may be lengthy. - A dedicated communications station, rather than reliance on existing resources (shift superintendent), is invaluable

  19. Nevada Test Site 2000 Annual Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. E.Townsend

    2001-02-01

    This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2000 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). Contamination indicator data are presented in control chart and tabular form with investigation levels (IL) indicated. Gross water chemistry data are presented in graphical and tabular form. Other information in the report includes, the Cumulative Chronology for Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program, a brief description of the site hydrogeology, and the groundwater sampling procedure.

  20. Nevada Test Site 2000 Annual Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. E.Townsend

    2001-01-01

    This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2000 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). Contamination indicator data are presented in control chart and tabular form with investigation levels (IL) indicated. Gross water chemistry data are presented in graphical and tabular form. Other information in the report includes, the Cumulative Chronology for Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program, a brief description of the site hydrogeology, and the groundwater sampling procedure

  1. Annual Transportation Report for Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    In February 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Nevada Operations Office (now known as the Nevada Site Office) issued the Mitigation Action Plan which addressed potential impacts described in the 'Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada' (DOE/EIS 0243). The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office committed to several actions, including the preparation of an annual report, which summarizes waste shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at Area 5 and Area 3. No shipments were disposed of at Area 3 in fiscal year (FY) 2008. This document satisfies requirements regarding low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) transported to or from the NTS during FY 2008. No transuranic (TRU) waste shipments were made from or to the NTS during FY 2008

  2. Summary of annual site Environmental Monitoring Reports, January-December 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, K.A.; Washburn, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    This summary presents information obtained from 35 annual Environmental Monitoring Reports submitted to the US Department of Energy (DOE). These reports, covering calendar year 1983, contain data on 44 separate sites where work is conducted for DOE. The purpose of each document is to provide an assessment of the overall potential impact of DOE operations on people and the environment in the vicinity of each site. This summary document provides a general overview of the sites, their operations, and their potential impact on the environment, based on data in those annual reports. During the 1983 calendar year, estimated potential radiation exposures to offsite populations from Department of Energy nuclear facilities were consistently within DOE limits. The maximum reported invidual whole-body dose to a member of the public from any DOE nuclear site was calculated to be 34 mrem for the year. The combined population dose estimates for individuals living within an 80-km (50-mile) radius of these sites in 1983 was about 300 person-rem from DOE nuclear operations. Releases of nonradioactive pollutants in DOE nuclear or nonnuclear site effluents were generally within EPA regulatory and/or state limits. Several facilities had pollution abatement projects planned or under construction to ensure compliance with regulations. 8 figures, 9 tables

  3. 2004 Hanford Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised October 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-24

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program for 2004 for the Hanford site. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  4. 2004 Hanford Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised October 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-24

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2004 for the Hanford site. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  5. 2003 Savannah River Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-05

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Savannah River Site. DOE is commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The report monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  6. 2003 Hanford Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised October 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-24

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for the Hanford site. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers. The prpogram is part of DOE's commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers and includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers.

  7. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2014. Emended

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2014 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: Characterize site environmental management performance; Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year (CY); Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE environmental sustainability goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS).

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for 2014. Emended

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Annual Site Environmental Report for 2014 (ASER) is to provide information required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Specifically, the ASER presents summary environmental data to: Characterize site environmental management performance; Summarize environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year (CY); Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; Highlight significant environmental accomplishments, including progress toward the DOE environmental sustainability goals made through implementation of the WIPP Environmental Management System (EMS).

  9. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 1998 Annual Update (U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, B.; Berry, M.

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office (DOE- SR),has prepared the Site Treatment Plan (STP) for Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed wastes in accordance with RCRA Section 3021(b), and SCDHEC has approved the STP (except for certain offsite wastes) and issued an order enforcing the STP commitments in Volume I. DOE-SR and SCDHEC agree that this STP fulfills the requirements contained in the FFCAct, RCRA Section 3021, and therefore,pursuant to Section 105(a) of the FFCAct (RCRA Section 3021(b)(5)), DOE's requirements are to implement the plan for the development of treatment capacities and technologies pursuant to RCRA Section 3021.Emerging and new technologies not yet considered may be identified to manage waste more safely, effectively, and at lower cost than technologies currently identified in the plan. DOE will continue to evaluate and develop technologies that offer potential advantages in public acceptance, privatization, consolidation, risk abatement, performance, and life-cycle cost. Should technologies that offer such advantages be identified, DOE may request a revision/modification of the STP in accordance with the provisions of Consent Order 95-22-HW.The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information

  10. Nevada Test Site site treatment plan. Final annual update. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    A Site Treatment Plan (STP) is required for facilities at which the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) generates or stores mixed waste (MW), defined by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) as waste containing both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and a radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act. This STP was written to identify specific treatment facilities for treating DOE/NV generated MW and provides proposed implementation schedules. This STP was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and provided the basis for the negotiation and issuance of the FFCAct Consent Order (CO) dated March 6, 1996. The FFCAct CO sets forth stringent regulatory requirements to comply with the implementation of the STP

  11. Nevada Test Site annual site environmental report for calendar year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, S.C.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1998-10-01

    Monitoring and surveillance, on and around the Nevada Test Site, (NTS) by US Department of Energy (DOE) contractors and NTS user organizations during 1997, indicated that operations on the NTS were conducted in compliance with applicable DOE, state, and federal regulations and guidelines. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from diffusion, evaporation of liquid effluents, or resuspension of soil was not detectable offsite, and exposure above existing background to members of the offsite population was not measured by the offsite monitoring program. Using the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Clean Air Package 1988 (CAP88)-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions and environmental monitoring data, the calculated effective dose equivalent (EDE) to the maximally exposed individual offsite would have been 0.089 mrem. Hazardous wastes were shipped offsite to approved disposal facilities

  12. 2016 Inspection and Annual Site Status Report for the Site A/Plot M, Illinois, Decommissioned Reactor Site July 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murl, Jeffrey [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Miller, Michele [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The Site A/Plot M, Illinois, Decommissioned Reactor Site was inspected on May 17, 2016. The site, located within Cook County forest preserve that is open to the public, was found to be in good condition with one exception. Erosion on top of the grass-covered mound at Plot M continues to be a concern as presented in previous inspections. Ruts form in the soil on top of Plot M as a result of bike traffic using the open field as a pass thru between established bike trails within the forest preserve. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) who is contracted directly from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has filled in the ruts with top soil and reseeding remains an ongoing process. Reseeded areas from 2015 are progressing nicely. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. In 2015, ANL plugged and abandoned 8 of 25 monitoring wells (BH41, BH51, BH52, BH54, DH9, DH10, DH13, and DH17). The 17 groundwater monitoring wells remaining at the site were inspected to confirm that they were locked and in good condition. Preliminary environmental monitoring results for 2015 are provided in a draft report titled Surveillance of Site A and Plot M, Report for 2015, prepared by ANL. The report also contains results of an independent analysis conducted by the Illinois Emergency Management Agency on some of the samples collected by ANL in 2015. The draft report states that the results of the surveillance program continue to indicate that the impact of radioactivity at Site A/Plot M is very low and does not endanger the health of those living in the area or visiting the site. The ANL monitoring report will be made available to the public on the DOE Office of Legacy Management public website when it is issued as final. A new county forest preserve campsite opened in 2015 at Bull Frog Lake, which is east of Plot M. Hiking trails connect Bull Frog Lake with Site A/Plot M. The site might receive more traffic from forest preserve visitors now that this new campsite is opened.

  13. Reliability study: maintenance facilities Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, B.E.; Sikorski, P.A.; Fankell, R.; Johnson, O.; Ferryman, D.S.; Miller, R.L.; Gearhart, E.C.; Rafferty, M.J.

    1981-08-01

    A reliability study of the maintenance facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant has been completed. The reliability study team analyzed test data and made visual inspections of each component contributing to the overall operation of the facilities. The impacts of facilities and equipment failures were given consideration with regard to personnel safety, protection of government property, health physics, and environmental control. This study revealed that the maintenance facilities are generally in good condition. After evaluating the physical condition and technology status of the major components, the study team made several basic recommendations. Implementation of the recommendations proposed in this report will help assure reliable maintenance of the plant through the year 2000

  14. Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site Annual Report for Calendar Year 2015 June 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, Ken [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Legacy Management (LM); Deyo, Yvonne [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-01

    1.1 Purpose and Scope. This report summarizes the activities, compliance status, annual inspection, and environmental monitoring results from calendar year 2015 for the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepares this annual report as part of the site’s long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) activities, in accordance with the requirements of the Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site (LTS&M Plan) (DOE 2008a) and the Federal Facility Agreement for the Weldon Spring Site (DOE 2006). The Weldon Spring site is a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) site. 1.2 Site Description. The Weldon Spring site is located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 30 miles west of St. Louis, Missouri (Figure 1). The site comprises two geographically distinct, DOE-owned properties: the former Weldon Spring Chemical Plant and Raffinate Pit sites (Chemical Plant) and the former Weldon Spring Quarry (Quarry). The former Chemical Plant is located about 2 miles southwest of the junction of Missouri State Route 94 and Interstate 64. The Quarry is about 4 miles southwest of the former Chemical Plant. Both sites are accessible from Missouri State Route 94. During the early 1940s, the Department of the Army acquired 17,232 acres of private land in St. Charles County for the construction of the Weldon Spring Ordnance Works facility. The former Ordnance Works site has since been divided into several contiguous areas under different ownership, as depicted in Figure 2. Current land use of the former Ordnance Works site includes the former Chemical Plant and Quarry, the U.S. Army Reserve Weldon Spring Training Area, the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC), the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) Division of State Parks (MDNR-Parks), Francis Howell High School, a St. Charles County highway maintenance (formerly Missouri Department of Transportation [Mo

  15. Nevada Test Site annual site environmental report for calendar year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, S.C.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

    1998-10-01

    Monitoring and surveillance, on and around the Nevada Test Site, (NTS) by US Department of Energy (DOE) contractors and NTS user organizations during 1997, indicated that operations on the NTS were conducted in compliance with applicable DOE, state, and federal regulations and guidelines. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from diffusion, evaporation of liquid effluents, or resuspension of soil was not detectable offsite, and exposure above existing background to members of the offsite population was not measured by the offsite monitoring program. Using the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Clean Air Package 1988 (CAP88)-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions and environmental monitoring data, the calculated effective dose equivalent (EDE) to the maximally exposed individual offsite would have been 0.089 mrem. Hazardous wastes were shipped offsite to approved disposal facilities.

  16. Nevada test site annual site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by US Department of Energy (DOE) contractors and NTS user organizations during 1995 indicated that operations on the NTS were conducted in compliance with applicable federal and DOE regulations and guidelines. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from diffusion, evaporation of effluents, or resuspension was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped offsite to approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water effluents and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Cooperation with other agencies has resulted in seven different consent orders and agreements. Support facilities at off-NTS locations complied with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits.

  17. Annual dose at the exclusion area boundary of a multi-unit CANDU site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagnon, N.; Bobb, C.R.; Tsang, K.T.

    1997-01-01

    The annual dose to members of the public from CANDU nuclear power stations is dominated by the contribution from airborne effluents. The principal radionuclides contributing to the annual dose are tritium, carbon-14 and noble gases. The tritium is released as tritiated heavy-water vapour; the carbon-14 is released principally as carbon dioxide. To demonstrate compliance with the public dose limit, AECL has calculated the annual dose from airborne emissions from 10 CANDU units at an extended Wolsong site. The analysis has used the treatment of atmospheric dispersion described in the US Regulatory Guide 1.111 and programmed in the code XOQDOQ. The analysis has then modelled the transport of these airborne emissions through the environment as they expose the critical group using the US Regulatory Guide 1.109. the study takes account of the different annual emissions from each unit to reflect the different design features of the units. This study also includes a treatment of topography and makes allowances for building wake effects

  18. Calendar Year 2004 annual site environmental report : Tonopah Test Range, Nevada & Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, Amber L.; Wagner, Katrina; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2005-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2004. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004b).

  19. Calendar Year 2004 annual site environmental report : Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, Amber L.; Wagner, Katrina; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2005-01-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2004. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004b)

  20. Independent Technical Review of the X-740 Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio: Technical Evaluation and Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, B.; Rhia, B.; Jackson, D.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

    2010-01-01

    Two major remedial campaigns have been applied to a plume of trichloroethene (TCE) contaminated groundwater near the former X-740 facility at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon Ohio. The two selected technologies, phytoremediation using a stand of hybrid poplar trees from 1999-2007 and in situ chemical oxidation using modified Fenton's Reagent from 2008-2009, have proven ineffective in achieving remedial action objectives (RAOs). The 'poor' performance of these technologies is a direct result of site specific conditions and the local contaminant hydrogeology. Key among these challenges is the highly heterogeneous subsurface geology with a thin contaminated aquifer zone (the Gallia) - the behavior of the contamination in the Gallia is currently dominated by slow release of TCE from the clay of the overlying Minford formation, from the sandstone of the underlying Berea formation, and from clayey layers within the Gallia itself. In response to the remediation challenges for the X-740 plume, the Portsmouth team (including the US Department of Energy (DOE), the site contractor (CDM), and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA)) is evaluating the feasibility of remediation at this site and identifying specific alternatives that are well matched to site conditions and that would maximize the potential for achieving RAOs. To support this evaluation, the DOE Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-32) assembled a team of experts to serve as a resource and provide input and recommendations to Portsmouth. Despite the challenging site conditions and the failure of the previous two remediation campaigns to adequately move the site toward RAOs, the review team was unanimous in the conclusion that an effective combination of cost effective technologies can be identified. Further, the team expressed optimism that RAOs can be achieved if realistic timeframes are accepted by all parties. The initial efforts of the review team focused on reviewing the

  1. Nevada Test Site annual site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, S.C.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

    1997-10-01

    Monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by US Department of Energy (DOE) contractors and NTS user organizations during 1996 indicated that operations on the NTS were conducted in compliance with applicable DOE, state, and federal regulations and guidelines. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from diffusion, evaporation of liquid effluents, or resuspension of soil was not detectable offsite, and exposure above background to members of the offsite population was not measured by the offsite monitoring program. Using the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Clean Air Package 1988 (CAP88)PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions and environmental monitoring data, the calculated effective dose equivalent (EDE) to the maximally exposed individual offsite would have been 0.11 mrem. This value is less than 2 percent of the federal dose limit prescribed for radionuclide air emissions. Any person receiving this dose would also have received 144 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped offsite to approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water effluents and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Cooperation with other agencies has resulted in seven different consent orders and agreements. Support facilities at off-NTS locations have complied with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits as mandated for each location.

  2. Nevada Test Site annual site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, S.C.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1997-10-01

    Monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by US Department of Energy (DOE) contractors and NTS user organizations during 1996 indicated that operations on the NTS were conducted in compliance with applicable DOE, state, and federal regulations and guidelines. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from diffusion, evaporation of liquid effluents, or resuspension of soil was not detectable offsite, and exposure above background to members of the offsite population was not measured by the offsite monitoring program. Using the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Clean Air Package 1988 (CAP88)PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions and environmental monitoring data, the calculated effective dose equivalent (EDE) to the maximally exposed individual offsite would have been 0.11 mrem. This value is less than 2 percent of the federal dose limit prescribed for radionuclide air emissions. Any person receiving this dose would also have received 144 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped offsite to approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water effluents and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Cooperation with other agencies has resulted in seven different consent orders and agreements. Support facilities at off-NTS locations have complied with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits as mandated for each location

  3. 2016 Annual Inspection and Radiological Survey Results for the Piqua, Ohio, Decommissioned Reactor Site, July 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, Brian [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Miller, Michele [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report presents the findings of the annual inspection and radiological survey of the Piqua, Ohio, Decommissioned Reactor Site (site). The decommissioned nuclear power demonstration facility was inspected and surveyed on April 15, 2016. The site, located on the east bank of the Great Miami River in Piqua, Ohio, was in fair physical condition. There is no requirement for a follow-up inspection, partly because City of Piqua (City) personnel participated in a March 2016 meeting to address reoccurring safety concerns. Radiological survey results from 104 locations revealed no removable contamination. One direct beta activity reading in a floor drain on the 56-foot level (1674 disintegrations per minute [dpm]/100 square centimeters [cm2]) exceeded the minimum detectable activity (MDA). Beta activity has been detected in the past at this floor drain. The reading was well below the action level of 5000 dpm/100 cm2.

  4. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2015 (ASER) for the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabba, Dellilah [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report, prepared by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), SLAC Site Office (SSO), provides a comprehensive summary of the environmental program activities at SLAC for calendar year 2015. Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs) are prepared for all DOE sites with significant environmental activities, and distributed to relevant external regulatory agencies and other interested organizations or individuals. To the best of my knowledge, this report accurately summarizes the results of the 2015 environmental monitoring, compliance, and restoration programs at SLAC. This assurance can be made based on SSO and SLAC review of the ASER, and quality assurance protocols applied to monitoring and data analyses at SLAC.

  5. At site and regional analysis of maximum annual and seasonal discharges and precipitation depths in the upper Hron region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohnova, S.; Hlavcova, K.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation authors deal with the regional analysis of maximum annual and seasonal discharges and precipitation depths in the upper Hron region (Slovak Republic). This work has two objectives: (1) At site and regional analysis of annual and seasonal maximum design discharges in the upper Hron region; (2) Analysis of annual and seasonal maximum design precipitations in the connection of extreme runoff condition in the upper Hron region

  6. Niagara Falls Storage Site, Annual site environmental report, Lewiston, New York, Calendar year 1986: Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    During 1986, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York, presently used for the interim storage of radioactive residues and contaminated soils and rubble. The monitoring program is being conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. The monitoring program at the NFSS measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in the report, this individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 6% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. By comparison, the incremental dose received from living in a brick house versus a wooden house is 10 mrem/yr above background. The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the NFSS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose that the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1986 monitoring show that the NFSS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 14 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs

  7. Niagara falls storage site: Annual site environmental report, Lewiston, New York, Calendar Year 1988: Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    The monitoring program at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in this report, this hypothetical individual receives an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 6 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. This exposure is less than a person receives during two round-trip flights from New York to Los Angeles (because of the greater amounts of cosmic radiation at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the NFSS that results from radioactive materials present at the site is indistinguishable from the dose that the same population receives from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1988 monitoring show that the NFSS is in compliance with applicable DOE radiation protection standards. 17 refs., 31 figs., 20 tabs

  8. Niagara Falls Storage Site, Annual site environmental report, Lewiston, New York, Calendar year 1986: Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-01

    During 1986, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York, presently used for the interim storage of radioactive residues and contaminated soils and rubble. The monitoring program is being conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. The monitoring program at the NFSS measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in the report, this individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 6% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. By comparison, the incremental dose received from living in a brick house versus a wooden house is 10 mrem/yr above background. The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the NFSS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose that the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1986 monitoring show that the NFSS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 14 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.

  9. INDEPENDENT REVIEW OF THE X-701B GROUNDWATER REMEDY, PORTSMOUTH, OHIO: TECHNICAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Costanza, J.; Rossabi, J.; Early, T.; Skubal, K.; Magnuson, C.

    2008-12-15

    recommended, the team should identify the type of injection and target soil horizon for these injections; (2) Consider the feasibility of declaring Technical Impracticability and proceeding with the RCRA Cap for the X-701B; and (3) Provide a summary of other cost-effective technologies that could be implemented (especially for the lower Gallia). The Independent Technical Review team focused its evaluation solely on the X-701B source zone and contaminant plume. It did not review current or planned remedial activities at other plumes, waste areas, or landfills at the Portsmouth site, nor did it attempt to integrate such activities into its recommendations for X-701B. However, the ultimate selection of a remedy for X-701B by site personnel and regulators should take into account potentially synergistic efforts at other waste areas. Assessment of remedial alternatives in the context of site-wide management practices may reveal opportunities for leveraging and savings that would not otherwise be identified. For example, the cost of source-zone excavation or construction of a permeable reactive barrier at X-701B might be substantially reduced if contaminated soil could be buried on site at an existing or planned landfill. This allowance would improve the feasibility and competitiveness of both remedies. A comprehensive examination of ongoing and future environmental activities across the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant is necessary to optimize the selection and timing of X-701B remediation with respect to cleanup efficiency, safety, and economics. A selected group of technical experts attended the technical workshop at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant from November 18 through 21, 2008. During the first day of the workshop, both contractor and DOE site personnel briefed the workshop participants and took them on a tour of the X-701B site. The initial briefing was attended by representatives of Ohio EPA who participated in the discussions. On subsequent days, the team

  10. Measurement of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant criticality accident alarm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayloe, R.W. Jr.; D'Aquila, D.M.; McGinnis, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear criticality accident radiation alarm system installed at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant was tested extensively at critical facilities located at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The ability of the neutron scintillator radiation detection units to respond to a minimum accident of concern as defined in Standard ANSI/ANS-83.-1986 was demonstrated. Detector placement and the established trip point are based on shielding calculations performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and criticality specialists at the Portsmouth plant. Based on these experiments and calculations, a detector trip point of 5 mrad/h in air is used. Any credible criticality accident is expected to produce neutron radiation fields >5 mrad/h in air at one or more radiation alarm locations. Each radiation alarm location has a cluster of three detectors that employs a two-out-of-three alarm logic. Earlier work focused on testing the alarm logic latching circuitry. This work was directed toward measurements involving the actual audible alarm signal delivered

  11. Annual survival and site fidelity of northern pintails banded on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolai, Christopher A.; Flint, Paul L.; Wege, Michael L.

    2005-01-01

    We banded northern pintails (Anas acuta; n = 13,645) at a single site on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD), Alaska, USA, from 1990 to 2001. We used recaptures from our site in combination with hunter recoveries to model annual survival, recovery rates, and fidelity to our capture location. Most recoveries (>90%) occurred in the Pacific Flyway with 64% reported from California's Central Valley. Our top candidate models allowed survival to vary by sex but not by age or year. Estimated annual survival was 77.6% (95% CI: 73.9-81.0%) for males and 60.2% (95% CI: 53.2-67.0%) for females. Reporting rates varied by age, sex, and year; estimates for adult males exceeded those for adult females by 3.5 times. Within sexes, reporting rates of hatch-year pintails exceeded those of adults. Estimated recovery rates were considerably lower than those estimated during the 1950s-1970s for winter banded pintails (Hestbeck 1993b), but there were no differences in survival rates. This suggests that changes in harvest regulations may not have influenced annual survival in this population. The propensity of banded pintails to return to our capture site (fidelity rate) varied between sexes and was positively correlated with water conditions in prairie Canada. Our estimates of fidelity rates varied from 77.4% to 87.2% for males and 89.8% to 94.3% for females. Our fidelity estimates suggest that some level of subpopulation structuring may exist for northern pintails. Additionally, our estimates of fidelity support previous observations of northern pintails overflying poor wetland habitat conditions on the Canadian prairies.

  12. Annual Performance Report April 2015 Through March 2016 for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kautsky, Mark [USDOE Office of Legacy Management (LM), Washington, DC (United States); Miller, David [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This annual report evaluates the performance of the groundwater remediation system at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site (Shiprock site) for the period April 2015 through March 2016. The Shiprock site, a former uranium-ore processing facility remediated under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act, is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management. This annual report is based on an analysis of groundwater quality and groundwater level data obtained from site monitoring wells and the groundwater flow rates associated with the extraction wells, drains, and seeps. Background The Shiprock mill operated from 1954 to 1968 on property leased from the Navajo Nation. Remediation of surface contamination, including stabilization of mill tailings in an engineered disposal cell, was completed in 1986. During mill operation, nitrate, sulfate, uranium, and other milling-related constituents leached into underlying sediments and contaminated groundwater in the area of the mill site. In March 2003, DOE initiated active remediation of groundwater at the site using extraction wells and interceptor drains. At that time, DOE developed a baseline performance report that established specific performance standards for the Shiprock site groundwater remediation system. The Shiprock site is divided into two distinct areas: the floodplain and the terrace. The floodplain remediation system consists of two groundwater extraction wells, a seep collection drain, and two collection trenches (Trench 1 and Trench 2). The terrace remediation system consists of nine groundwater extraction wells, two collection drains (Bob Lee Wash and Many Devils Wash), and a terrace drainage channel diversion structure. All extracted groundwater is pumped into a lined evaporation pond on the terrace. Compliance Strategy and Remediation Goals As documented in the Groundwater Compliance Action Plan, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission–approved compliance strategy for the

  13. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L.; Stencel, J.R.

    1992-11-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY91. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health.

  14. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for Calendar Year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L.; Wieczorek, M.A.

    1994-03-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY92. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health.

  15. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for Calendar Year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finley, V.L.; Wieczorek, M.A.

    1994-03-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY92. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health

  16. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finley, V.L.; Stencel, J.R.

    1992-11-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY91. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health

  17. Colonie Interim Storage Site: Annual site environmental report, Colonie, New York, Calendar year 1986: Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    During 1986, the environmental monitoring program continued at the Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in Colonie, New York. The CISS is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has mandated DOE to remedy. As part of the decontamination research and development project authorized by Congress under the 1984 Energy and Water Appropriations Act, remedial action is being conducted at the site and at vicinity properties by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI), Project Management Contractor for FUSRAP. The environmental monitoring program is also carried out by BNI. The monitoring program at the CISS measures external gamma radiation levels as well as uranium and radium-226 concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess the potential effect of the site on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in the report, the maximally exposed individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 5% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/y. Results of 1986 monitoring show that the CISS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 14 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs

  18. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2010 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard Bender, comp.

    2011-04-04

    This annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program represents the highly significant R&D accomplishments conducted during fiscal year 2010. This year was noteworthy historically, as the Nevada Test Site was renamed to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This change not only recognizes how the site's mission has evolved, but also heralds a future of new challenges and opportunities for the NNSS. In many ways, since its inception in 2002, the SDRD program has helped shape that evolving mission. As we approach 2012, SDRD will also mark a milestone, having completed its first full decade of innovative R&D in support of the site and national security. The program continues to fund advanced science and technology development across traditional Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear security areas such as stockpile stewardship and non-proliferation while also supporting Department of Homeland Security (DHS) needs, and specialized work for government agencies like the Department of Defense (DoD) and others. The NNSS will also contribute technologies in the areas of treaty verification and monitoring, two areas of increasing importance to national security. Keyed to the NNSS's broadened scope, the SDRD program will continue to anticipate and advance R&D projects that will help the NNSS meet forthcoming challenges.

  19. Strategic Petroleum Reserve annual site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This report, provided annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, summarizes monitoring data collected to assess Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) impacts on the environment. The report serves as a management tool for mitigating such impacts, thus serving the public interest by ensuring environmentally sound operation of the SPR. Included in this report is a description of each site`s environment, an overview of the SPR environmental program, and a recapitulation of special environmental activities and events associated with each SPR site during 1992. The active permits and the results of the environmental monitoring program (i.e., air, surface water, ground water, and water discharges) are discussed within each section by site. The quality assurance program is presented which includes results from laboratory and field audits and studies performed internally and by regulatory agencies. In general, no significant adverse environmental impact resulted from any SPR activities during 1992. Environmental areas of concern, such as potential ground water contamination, are fully addressed in the applicable section by site. The SPR continues to maintain an overall excellent environmental record.

  20. Nevada Natonal Security Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2010 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Howard

    2011-01-01

    This annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program represents the highly significant R and D accomplishments conducted during fiscal year 2010. This year was noteworthy historically, as the Nevada Test Site was renamed to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This change not only recognizes how the site's mission has evolved, but also heralds a future of new challenges and opportunities for the NNSS. In many ways, since its inception in 2002, the SDRD program has helped shape that evolving mission. As we approach 2012, SDRD will also mark a milestone, having completed its first full decade of innovative R and D in support of the site and national security. The program continues to fund advanced science and technology development across traditional Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear security areas such as stockpile stewardship and non-proliferation while also supporting Department of Homeland Security (DHS) needs, and specialized work for government agencies like the Department of Defense (DoD) and others. The NNSS will also contribute technologies in the areas of treaty verification and monitoring, two areas of increasing importance to national security. Keyed to the NNSS's broadened scope, the SDRD program will continue to anticipate and advance R and D projects that will help the NNSS meet forthcoming challenges.

  1. Annual Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Calendar year 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agogino, Karen [National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Washington, DC (United States); Sanchez, Rebecca [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2008-09-30

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a government-owned/contractor-operated facility. Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, manages and operates the laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The DOE/NNSA Sandia Site Office (SSO) administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at the site. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation’s environmental protection and monitoring programs through December 31, 2007. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention (P2), environmental restoration (ER), oil and chemical spill prevention, and implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2007a) and DOE Manual 231.1-1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2007).

  2. Calendar Year 2009 Annual Site Environmental Report for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Karen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bailey-White, Brenda [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bonaguidi, Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, Mendy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Byrd, Caroline [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cabble, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Castillo, Dave [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Coplen, Amy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Curran, Kelsey [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Deola, Regina [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Duran, Leroy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Eckstein, Joanna [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evelo, Stacie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fitzgerald, Tanja [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); French, Chris [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gerard, Morgan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gonzales, Linda [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gorman, Susan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jackson, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jarry, Jeff [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Adrian [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lauffer, Franz [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mauser, Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mayeux, Lucie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McCord, Samuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Oborny, Stephanie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Perini, Robin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Puissant, Pamela [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reiser, Anita [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roma, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Salinas, Stephanie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Skelly, Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ullrich, Rebecca [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wagner, Katrina [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wrons, Ralph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2010-09-30

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a government-owned/contractor operated facility. Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC), manages and operates the laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The DOE/NNSA, Sandia Site O ffice (SSO) administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at the site. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation’s environmental protection and monitoring programs through December 31, 2009. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention (P2), environmental restoration (ER), oil and chemical spill prevention, and implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2008a) and DOE Manual 231.1-1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2007).

  3. Model calculating annual mean atmospheric dispersion factor for coastal site of nuclear power plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an atmospheric dispersion field experiment performed on the coastal site of nuclear power plant in the east part of China during 1995 to 1996. The three-dimension joint frequency are obtained by hourly observation of wind and temperature on a 100m high tower; the frequency of the “event day of land and sea breezes” are given by observation of surface wind and land and sea breezes; the diffusion parameters are got from measurements of turbulent and wind tunnel simulation test.A new model calculating the annual mean atmospheric dispersion factor for coastal site of nuclear power plant is developed and established.This model considers not only the effect from mixing release and mixed layer but also the effect from the internal boundary layer and variation of diffusion parameters due to the distance from coast.The comparison between results obtained by the new model and current model shows that the ratio of annual mean atmospheric dispersion factor gained by the new model and the current one is about 2.0.

  4. Annual low-cost monitoring of a coastal site in Greece by an unmanned aerial vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeister, Dirk; Bareth, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Coastal areas are under permanent change and are also the result of past processes. These processes are for example sediment transport, accumulation and erosion by normal and extreme waves (storms or tsunamis). As about 23% of the World's population lives within a 100 km distance of coasts, knowledge about coastal processes is important, in particular for possible changes in the nearby future. The past devastating tsunami events demonstrated profoundly the high vulnerability of coastal areas. In order to estimate the different effects, coastal monitoring approaches are of interest. Several different methods exist in order to determine changes in the sedimentary budget and coastline configuration. In order to estimate constant annual changes, we have applied terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in an annual monitoring approach (2009-2011). In 2014, we changed to an approach based on dense imaging and structure-from-motion, applying an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) in order to conduct an annual monitoring of a coastal site in western Greece. Therefore, a GoPro Hero 3+ and a Canon PowerShot S110 mounted on a DJI-Phantom 2 were used. All surveys were conducted in a manually structured image acquisition with a huge overlap. Ground control points (GCP) were measured by tachymetric surveying. This successful approach was repeated again in 2015 with the Canon camera. The measurements of 2014 were controlled by an additional TLS survey, which revealed the high accuracy and more suitable coverage for the UAV-based data. Likewise, the large picture datasets were artificially reduced in order to estimate the most efficient number of images for dense point cloud processing. In addition, also the number of GCPs was decreased for one dataset. Overall, high-resolution digital elevation models with a ground resolution of 10 mm and an equal accuracy were achieved with this low-cost equipment. The data reveals the slight changes on this selected site.

  5. Strategic Petroleum Reserve, annual site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    This report, provided annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, summarizes monitoring data collected to assess Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) impacts on the environment. The report serves as a management tool for mitigating such impacts, thus serving the public interest by ensuring environmentally sound operation of the SPR. Included in this report is a description of each site's environment, an overview of the SPR environmental program, and a recapitulation of special environmental activities and events associated with each SPR site during 1990. The active permits and the results of the environmental monitoring program (i.e., air, surface vater, groundwater, and water discharges) are discussed within each section by site. The quality assurance program is presented which includes results from laboratory and field audits and studies performed internally and by regulatory agencies. In general, no significant adverse environmental impact resulted from any SPR activities during 1990. Environmental areas of concern, such as potential groundwater contamination, are fully addressed in the applicable section by site. The SPR continues to maintain an overall excellent environmental record

  6. Strategic Petroleum Reserve annual site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This report, provided annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, summarizes monitoring data collected to assess Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) impacts on the environment. The report serves as a management tool for mitigating such impacts, thus serving the public interest by ensuring environmentally sound operation of the SPR. Included in this report is a description of each site's environment, an overview of the SPR environmental program, and a recapitulation of special environmental activities and events associated with each SPR site during 1992. The active permits and the results of the environmental monitoring program (i.e., air, surface water, ground water, and water discharges) are discussed within each section by site. The quality assurance program is presented which includes results from laboratory and field audits and studies performed internally and by regulatory agencies. In general, no significant adverse environmental impact resulted from any SPR activities during 1992. Environmental areas of concern, such as potential ground water contamination, are fully addressed in the applicable section by site. The SPR continues to maintain an overall excellent environmental record

  7. Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power DOE Operations annual site environmental report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, K.S.

    1998-01-01

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power of Boeing North American, Inc. These are identified as Area 4 of the SSFL and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for research and development (R and D), engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields primarily in energy research and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site had research and development laboratories involved with nuclear research. This work was terminated in 1995 and only D and D activities will have potential for impact on the environment. Since 1956, Area 4 has been used for work with nuclear materials, including fabricating nuclear reactor fuels, testing nuclear reactors, and dissembling used fuel elements. This work ended in 1988 and subsequent efforts have been directed toward decommissioning and decontamination of the former nuclear facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring of DOE-sponsored activities to the regulatory agencies responsible for oversight. Information presented here concentrates on Area 4 at SSFL, which is the only area at SSFL where DOE operations were performed

  8. 15 CFR 714.1 - Annual declaration requirements for plant sites that produce a Schedule 3 chemical in excess of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... plant sites that produce a Schedule 3 chemical in excess of 30 metric tons. 714.1 Section 714.1 Commerce... SCHEDULE 3 CHEMICALS § 714.1 Annual declaration requirements for plant sites that produce a Schedule 3... in the production of a chemical in any units within the same plant through chemical reaction...

  9. Measurement of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant criticality accident alarm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayloe, R.W. Jr.; McGinnis, B.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant's nuclear criticality accident radiation alarm signal response time, sound wave frequency, and sound volume levels were made to demonstrate compliance with ANSI/ANS-8.3-1986. A steady-state alarm signal is produced within one-half second of obtaining a two-out-of-three detector trip. The fundamental alarm sound wave frequency is 440 hertz. The sound volume levels are greater than 10 decibels above background and ranged from 100 to 125 A-weighted decibels. The requirements of the standard were met; however the recommended maximum sound volume level of 115 dBA was exceeded. Emergency procedures require immediate evacuation upon initiation of a facility's radiation alarm. Comparison with standards for allowable time of exposure at different noise levels indicate that the elevated noise level at this location does not represent an occupational injury hazard. 8 refs., 5 figs

  10. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Program surveillance and maintenance plan, FY 1993--2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schloesslin, W.

    1992-11-01

    The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Program at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is part of the Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) Programs (ERWM). The objective of the ER Program is to provide PORTS the capability to meet applicable environmental regulations through facility development activities and site remedial actions. The WM Program supports the ER Program. The D ampersand D Program provides collective management of the sites within the plant which require decontamination and decommissioning, prioritizes those areas in terms of health, safety and environmental concerns, and implements the appropriate level of remedial action. The D ampersand D Program provides support to facilities which formerly served one or more of the many Plant functions. Program activities include (1) surveillance and maintenance of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning safe and orderly facility decommissioning; and (3) implementing a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost effective, and timely manner. In order to achieve the first objective, a formal plan which documents the surveillance and maintenance needs for each inactive facility has been prepared. This report provides this documentation for the PORTS facilities currently included in the D ampersand D Program and includes projected resource requirements for the planning period of FY 1993 through FY 2002

  11. Monticello Mill Tailings Site, Operable Unit lll, Annual Groundwater Report, May 2015 Through April 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Jason [USDOE Office of Legacy Management (LM), Washington, DC (United States); Smith, Fred [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This report provides the annual analysis of water quality restoration progress, cumulative through April 2016, for Operable Unit (OU) III, surface water and groundwater, of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS). The MMTS is a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act National Priorities List site located in and near the city of Monticello, San Juan County, Utah. MMTS comprises the 110-acre site of a former uranium- and vanadium-ore-processing mill (mill site) and 1700 acres of surrounding private and municipal property. Milling operations generated 2.5 million cubic yards of waste (tailings) from 1942 to 1960. The tailings were impounded at four locations on the mill site. Inorganic constituents in the tailings drained from the impoundments to contaminate local surface water (Montezuma Creek) and groundwater in the underlying alluvial aquifer. Mill tailings dispersed by wind and water also contaminated properties surrounding and downstream of the mill site. Remedial actions to remove and isolate radiologically contaminated soil, sediment, and debris from the former mill site, Operable Unit I (OU I), and surrounding properties (OU II) were completed in 1999 with the encapsulation of the wastes in an engineered repository located on DOE property 1 mile south of the former mill site. This effectively removed the primary source of groundwater contamination; however, contamination of groundwater and surface water remains within OU III at levels that exceed water quality protection standards. Uranium is the primary contaminant of concern (COC). LM implemented monitored natural attenuation with institutional controls as the OU III remedy in 2004. Because groundwater restoration proceeded more slowly than expected and did not meet performance criteria established in the OU III Record of Decision (June 2004), LM implemented a contingency action in 2009 by an Explanation of

  12. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West Valley Environmental Services LLC (WVES) and URS Corporation

    2010-09-17

    The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for Calendar Year 2009. The report, prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Demonstration Project office (DOE-WVDP), summarizes the environmental protection program at the WVDP for calendar year (CY) 2009. Monitoring and surveillance of the facilities used by the DOE are conducted to verify protection of public health and safety and the environment. The report is a key component of DOE’s effort to keep the public informed of environmental conditions at the WVDP. The quality assurance protocols applied to the environmental monitoring program by the DOE ensure the validity and accuracy of the monitoring data. In addition to demonstrating compliance with environmental regulations and directives, evaluation of data collected in 2009 continued to indicate that WVDP activities pose no threat to public health or safety, or to the environment.

  13. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-09-27

    The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for Calendar Year 2011. The report, prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Demonstration Project office (DOE-WVDP), summarizes the environmental protection program at the WVDP for calendar year (CY) 2011. Monitoring and surveillance of the facilities used by the DOE are conducted to verify protection of public health and safety and the environment. The report is a key component of DOE’s effort to keep the public informed of environmental conditions at the WVDP. The quality assurance protocols applied to the environmental monitoring program ensure the validity and accuracy of the monitoring data. In addition to demonstrating compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and directives, evaluation of data collected in 2011 continued to indicate that WVDP activities pose no threat to public health or safety, or to the environment.

  14. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rendall, John D. [CH2M HILL • B& amp; W West Valley, LLC (CHBWV); Steiner, Alison F. [URS Professional Solutions (URSPS); Klenk, David P. [CH2M HILL • B& amp; W West Valley, LLC (CHBWV)

    2013-09-19

    The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for Calendar Year 2012. The report, prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Demonstration Project office (DOE-WVDP), summarizes the environmental protection program at the WVDP for calendar year (CY) 2012. Monitoring and surveillance of the facilities used by the DOE are conducted to verify protection of public health and safety and the environment. The report is a key component of DOE’s effort to keep the public informed of environmental conditions at the WVDP. The quality assurance protocols applied to the environmental monitoring program ensure the validity and accuracy of the monitoring data. In addition to demonstrating compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and directives, evaluation of data collected in 2012 continued to indicate that WVDP activities pose no threat to public health or safety, or to the environment.

  15. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2011-09-28

    The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for Calendar Year 2010. The report, prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Demonstration Project office (DOE-WVDP), summarizes the environmental protection program at the WVDP for calendar year (CY) 2010. Monitoring and surveillance of the facilities used by the DOE are conducted to verify protection of public health and safety and the environment. The report is a key component of DOE's effort to keep the public informed of environmental conditions at the WVDP. The quality assurance protocols applied to the environmental monitoring program ensure the validity and accuracy of the monitoring data. In addition to demonstrating compliance with environmental laws, regulations and directives, evaluation of data collected in 2010 continued to indicate that WVDP activities pose no threat to public health or safety, or to the environment.

  16. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) Calendar Year (2016)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, Alison F. [CH2M Hill BWXT West Valley, LLC, NY (United States); Pendl, Michael P. [CH2M Hill BWXT West Valley, LLC, NY (United States); Steiner, II, Robert E. [CH2M Hill BWXT West Valley, LLC, NY (United States); Fox, James R. [CH2M Hill BWXT West Valley, LLC, NY (United States); Hoch, Jerald J. [CH2M Hill BWXT West Valley, LLC, NY (United States); Williams, Janice D. [CH2M Hill BWXT West Valley, LLC, NY (United States); Wrotniak, Chester M. [CH2M Hill BWXT West Valley, LLC, NY (United States); Werchowski, Rebecca L. [CH2M Hill BWXT West Valley, LLC, NY (United States)

    2017-09-12

    West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for Calendar Year 2016. The report, prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Demonstration Project office (DOE-WVDP), summarizes the environmental protection program at the WVDP for calendar year (CY) 2016. Monitoring and surveillance of the facilities used by the DOE are conducted to verify protection of public health and safety and the environment. The report is a key component of DOE’s effort to keep the public informed of environmental conditions at the WVDP. The quality assurance protocols applied to the environmental monitoring program ensure the validity and accuracy of the monitoring data. In addition to demonstrating compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and directives, evaluation of data collected in 2016 continued to indicate that WVDP activities pose no threat to public health or safety, or to the environment.

  17. 2016 Annual Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, Angela Maria [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Griffith, Stacy R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology & Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The DOE/NNSA Sandia Field Office administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at SNL, New Mexico. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of sustainability, environmental protection, and monitoring programs at SNL/NM during calendar year 2016. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial and ecological surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention, environmental restoration, oil and chemical spill prevention, and implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act. This ASER is prepared in accordance with and required by DOE O 231.1B, Admin Change 1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting.

  18. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for Calendar Year 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendall, John D.; Steiner, Alison F.; Pendl, Michael P.; Biedermann, Charles A.; Steiner II, Robert E.; Fox, James R.; Hoch, Jerald J.; Wrotniak, Chester M.; Werchowski, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for Calendar Year 2015. The report, prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Demonstration Project office (DOE-WVDP), summarizes the environmental protection program at the WVDP for calendar year (CY) 2015. Monitoring and surveillance of the facilities used by the DOE are conducted to verify protection of public health and safety and the environment. The report is a key component of DOE's effort to keep the public informed of environmental conditions at the WVDP. The quality assurance protocols applied to the environmental monitoring program ensure the validity and accuracy of the monitoring data. In addition to demonstrating compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and directives, evaluation of data collected in 2015 continued to indicate that WVDP activities pose no threat to public health or safety, or to the environment.

  19. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for Calendar Year 2010. The report, prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Demonstration Project office (DOE-WVDP), summarizes the environmental protection program at the WVDP for calendar year (CY) 2010. Monitoring and surveillance of the facilities used by the DOE are conducted to verify protection of public health and safety and the environment. The report is a key component of DOE's effort to keep the public informed of environmental conditions at the WVDP. The quality assurance protocols applied to the environmental monitoring program ensure the validity and accuracy of the monitoring data. In addition to demonstrating compliance with environmental laws, regulations and directives, evaluation of data collected in 2010 continued to indicate that WVDP activities pose no threat to public health or safety, or to the environment.

  20. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West Valley Environmental Services LLC (WVES) and URS - Washington Division

    2009-09-24

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2008. The report summarizes the calendar year (CY) 2008 environmental monitoring program data at the WVDP so as to describe the performance of the WVDP’s environmental management system (EMS), confirm compliance with standards and regulations, and highlight important programs. Monitoring and surveillance of the facilities used by the DOE are conducted to verify protection of the environment, continual improvement, prevention and/or minimization of pollution, public outreach, and stakeholder involvement. In addition to demonstrating compliance with environmental regulations and directives, evaluation of data collected in 2008 continued to indicate that WVDP activities pose no threat to public health or safety, or to the environment.

  1. Cancer and birth defects surveillance system for communities around the Savannah River Site. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunbar, J.B.

    1993-05-01

    This technical report presents the age-adjusted total, and race and sex specific geographic patterns of cancer mortality for South Carolina (SC) counties utilizing the 1953--1987 average annual age-adjusted mortality rates (AAMRs). The mortality information was obtained from the State Cancer Control Map and Data Program produced by the National Cancer Institute , Centers for Disease Control and the American Cancer Society. The AAMRs for selected primary sites are classified as significantly different or not significantly different from the corresponding United States and SC mortality rates. Categories for classification of the rates are determined using 95% confidence intervals. Geographic patterns of significantly high county AAMRs are identified and discussed. Individual county rates are not emphasized. The terminology, mortality rates used throughout this report pertains to the 1953--1987 AAMRS.

  2. Calendar year 2003 annual site environmental report for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2004-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and managed by the Sandia Site Office (SSO), Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates SNL/NM. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation's environmental protection and monitoring programs through December 31, 2003. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention (P2), environmental restoration (ER), oil and chemical spill prevention, and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, ''Environmental Protection Program'' (DOE 2003a) and DOE Order 231.1 Chg.2, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting'' (DOE 1996).

  3. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for Calendar Year 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rendall, John D. [CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC, West Valley, NY (United States); Steiner, Alison F. [CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC, West Valley, NY (United States); Pendl, Michael P. [CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC, West Valley, NY (United States); Biedermann, Charles A. [CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC, West Valley, NY (United States); Steiner, II, Robert E. [CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC, West Valley, NY (United States); Fox, James R. [CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC, West Valley, NY (United States); Hoch, Jerald J. [CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC, West Valley, NY (United States); Werchowski, Rebecca L. [CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC, West Valley, NY (United States)

    2015-09-15

    West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for Calendar Year 2014. The report, prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Demonstration Project office (DOE-WVDP), summarizes the environmental protection program at the WVDP for calendar year (CY) 2014. Monitoring and surveillance of the facilities used by the DOE are conducted to verify protection of public health and safety and the environment. The report is a key component of DOE’s effort to keep the public informed of environmental conditions at the WVDP. The quality assurance protocols applied to the environmental monitoring program ensure the validity and accuracy of the monitoring data. In addition to demonstrating compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and directives, evaluation of data collected in 2014 continued to indicate that WVDP activities pose no threat to public health or safety, or to the environment.

  4. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for Calendar Year 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rendall, John D. [CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC, West Valley, NY (United States); Steiner, Alison F. [CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC, West Valley, NY (United States); Pendl, Michael P. [CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC, West Valley, NY (United States); Biedermann, Charles A. [CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC, West Valley, NY (United States); Steiner, II, Robert E. [CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC, West Valley, NY (United States); Fox, James R. [CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC, West Valley, NY (United States); Hoch, Jerald J. [CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC, West Valley, NY (United States); Wrotniak, Chester M. [CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC, West Valley, NY (United States); Werchowski, Rebecca L. [CH2M HILL BWXT West Valley, LLC, West Valley, NY (United States)

    2016-09-15

    West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for Calendar Year 2015. The report, prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Demonstration Project office (DOE-WVDP), summarizes the environmental protection program at the WVDP for calendar year (CY) 2015. Monitoring and surveillance of the facilities used by the DOE are conducted to verify protection of public health and safety and the environment. The report is a key component of DOE’s effort to keep the public informed of environmental conditions at the WVDP. The quality assurance protocols applied to the environmental monitoring program ensure the validity and accuracy of the monitoring data. In addition to demonstrating compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and directives, evaluation of data collected in 2015 continued to indicate that WVDP activities pose no threat to public health or safety, or to the environment.

  5. Calendar Year 2013 Annual Site Environmental Report for Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Stacy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is a government-owned/contractor-operated facility. Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, manages and operates the laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The DOE/NNSA, Sandia Field Office administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at the site. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation’s sustainability, environmental protection, and monitoring programs through December 31, 2013. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention, environmental restoration, oil and chemical spill prevention, and implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2012).

  6. Calendar year 2004 annual site environmental report:Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, Amber L.; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Wagner, Katrina; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2005-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and managed by the Sandia Site Office (SSO), Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates SNL/NM. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation's environmental protection and monitoring programs through December 31, 2004. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention (P2), environmental restoration (ER), oil and chemical spill prevention, and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004a). (DOE 2004a).

  7. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for Calendar Year 2009. The report, prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Demonstration Project office (DOE-WVDP), summarizes the environmental protection program at the WVDP for calendar year (CY) 2009. Monitoring and surveillance of the facilities used by the DOE are conducted to verify protection of public health and safety and the environment. The report is a key component of DOE's effort to keep the public informed of environmental conditions at the WVDP. The quality assurance protocols applied to the environmental monitoring program by the DOE ensure the validity and accuracy of the monitoring data. In addition to demonstrating compliance with environmental regulations and directives, evaluation of data collected in 2009 continued to indicate that WVDP activities pose no threat to public health or safety, or to the environment.

  8. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2008. The report summarizes the calendar year (CY) 2008 environmental monitoring program data at the WVDP so as to describe the performance of the WVDP's environmental management system (EMS), confirm compliance with standards and regulations, and highlight important programs. Monitoring and surveillance of the facilities used by the DOE are conducted to verify protection of the environment, continual improvement, prevention and/or minimization of pollution, public outreach, and stakeholder involvement. In addition to demonstrating compliance with environmental regulations and directives, evaluation of data collected in 2008 continued to indicate that WVDP activities pose no threat to public health or safety, or to the environment.

  9. Calendar Year 2013 Annual Site Environmental Report for Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is a government-owned/contractor-operated facility. Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, manages and operates the laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The DOE/NNSA, Sandia Field Office administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at the site. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation's sustainability, environmental protection, and monitoring programs through December 31, 2013. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention, environmental restoration, oil and chemical spill prevention, and implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2012).

  10. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rendall, John D. [CH2MHILL • B& W West Valley, LLC (CHBWV); Steiner, Alison F. [CH2MHILL • B& W West Valley, LLC (CHBWV); Pendl, Michael P. [CH2MHILL • B& W West Valley, LLC (CHBWV)

    2014-09-16

    West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for Calendar Year 2013. The report, prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Demonstration Project office (DOE-WVDP), summarizes the environmental protection program at the WVDP for calendar year (CY) 2013. Monitoring and surveillance of the facilities used by the DOE are conducted to verify protection of public health and safety and the environment. The report is a key component of DOE’s effort to keep the public informed of environmental conditions at the WVDP. The quality assurance protocols applied to the environmental monitoring program ensure the validity and accuracy of the monitoring data. In addition to demonstrating compliance with environmental laws, regulations, and directives, evaluation of data collected in 2013 continued to indicate that WVDP activities pose no threat to public health or safety, or to the environment.

  11. Spawning site fidelity and apparent annual survival of walleye (Sander vitreus) differ between a Lake Huron and Lake Erie tributary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Todd A.; Binder, Thomas; Holbrook, Christopher; Vandergoot, Christopher; Fielder, David G.; Cooke, Steven J.; Dettmers, John M.; Krueger, Charles C.

    2018-01-01

    Fidelity to spawning habitats can maximise reproductive success of fish by synchronising movements to sites of previous recruitment. To determine the role of reproductive fidelity in structuring walleye Sander vitreus populations in the Laurentian Great Lakes, we used acoustic telemetry combined with Cormack–Jolly–Seber capture–recapture models to estimate spawning site fidelity and apparent annual survival for the Tittabawassee River in Lake Huron and Maumee River in Lake Erie. Walleye in spawning condition were tagged from the Tittabawassee River in Lake Huron and Maumee River in Lake Erie in 2011–2012. Site fidelity and apparent annual survival were estimated from return of individuals to the stream where tagged. Site fidelity estimates were higher in the Tittabawassee River (95%) than the Maumee River (70%) and were not related to sex or fish length at tagging. Apparent annual survival of walleye tagged in the Tittabawassee did not differ among spawning seasons but was higher for female than male walleye and decreased linearly as fish length increased. Apparent annual survival of walleye tagged in the Maumee River did not differ among spawning seasons but was higher for female walleye than male walleye and increased linearly as fish length increased. Greater fidelity of walleye tagged in the Tittabawassee River than walleye tagged in the Maumee River may be related to the close proximity to the Maumee River of other spawning aggregations and multiple spawning sites in Lake Erie. As spawning site fidelity increases, management actions to conserve population structure require an increasing focus on individual stocks.

  12. 2010 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2010. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2010 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

  13. 2010 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2010. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2010 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R and D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R and D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

  14. Annual site environmental monitoring report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Calendar year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reith, C.; Prince, K.; Fischer, T.; Rodriguez, A.; Uhland, D.; Winstanley, D.

    1986-04-01

    This is the first Annual Site Environmental Monitoring Report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP project is operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the purpose of providing a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive wastes generated by the defense activities of the U.S. Government. The report provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP during Calendar Year 1985, including: a description of the WIPP project and its mission; a description of the local environment, including demographics; a summary of environmental program information, including an update on the status of environmental permits and compliance activities; a presentation of the findings of the Radiological Baseline Program (RBP), which is a program to characterize radionuclide activities in the environment around the WIPP site; and a summary of findings of the Ecological Monitoring Program (EMP), which examines non-radiological impacts of WIPP construction on the surrounding ecosystem. The WIPP facility is under construction, and will not receive radioactive wastes before October 1988. Therefore, this report describes the status of preoperational (as opposed to operational) environmental activities. 29 refs., 17 figs., 22 tabs

  15. Annual report for RCRA groundwater monitoring projects at Hanford Site facilities for 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, M.J.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents the annual hydrogeologic evaluation of 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Although most of the facilities no longer receive dangerous waste, a few facilities continue to receive dangerous waste constituents for treatment, storage, or disposal. The 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act facilities comprise 29 waste management units. Nine of the units are monitored under groundwater quality assessment status because of elevated levels of contamination indicator parameters. The impact of those units on groundwater quality, if any, is being investigated. If dangerous waste or waste constituents have entered groundwater, their concentration profiles, rate, and extent of migration are evaluated. Groundwater is monitored at the other 20 units to detect leakage, should it occur. This report provides an interpretation of groundwater data collected at the waste management units between October 1994 and September 1995. Groundwater quality is described for the entire Hanford Site. Widespread contaminants include nitrate, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, tritium, and other radionuclides

  16. Annual report for RCRA groundwater monitoring projects at Hanford site facilities for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    This report presents the annual hydrogeologic evaluation of 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Although most of the facilities no longer receive dangerous waste, a few facilities continue to receive dangerous waste constituents for treatment, storage, or disposal. The 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act facilities comprise 29 waste management units. Nine of the units are monitored under groundwater quality assessment status because of elevated levels of contamination indicator parameters. The impact of those units on groundwater quality, if any, is being investigated. If dangerous waste or waste constituents have entered groundwater, their concentration profiles, rate, and extent of migration are evaluated. Groundwater is monitored at the other 20 units to detect leakage, should it occur. This report provides an interpretation of groundwater data collected at the waste management units between October 1993 and September 1994. Groundwater quality is described for the entire Hanford Site. Widespread contaminants include nitrate, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, tritium, and other radionuclides

  17. Animal Investigation Program: Nevada Test Site and Vicinity. Annual report, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Giles, Jr.; Bernhardt, D.E.

    1981-05-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalyses of tissues collected from cattle, mule deer, desert bighorn sheep, rabbits, chukar, golden eagles, and other wildlife that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site during 1979. Routine and special activities of the Animal Investigation Program are also discussed. Other than the naturally occurring potassium-40, gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected infrequently. Strontium-90 concentrations in bones from deer, cattle, and desert bighorn sheep were lower than those of recent years. Tritium concentrations were generally within expected environmental limits with the exception of animals exposed to known sources of contamination; e.g., drainage ponds from Area 12 tunnels or the Sedan Crater. Plutonium levels in all tissues from all species showed little variation to those levels in samples collected in recent years. Radionuclide tissue concentrations were generally higher in the tissues of animals residing in Area 15 than in similar animals collected from other Nevada Test Site areas. Hypothetical annual dose estimates to man were calculated on the basis of the daily consumption of 0.5 kilogra of liver or muscle from animals that contained peak radionuclide levels. The movements of 25 mule deer outfitted with collars containing a radio transmitter unit were monitored on a weekly basis. No gross or microscopic lesions were found in necropsied animals that could be directly attributed to the effects of ionizing radiation

  18. Nevada National Security Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2011 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard Bender, comp.

    2012-04-25

    This fiscal year 2011 annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development program, the 10th anniversary edition, recognizes a full decade of innovative R&D accomplishments in support of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Last year the NNSS itself was renamed to reflect a diversifying mission, and our R&D program has contributed significantly to shape emerging missions that will continue to evolve. New initiatives in stockpile stewardship science, nonproliferation, and treaty verification and monitoring have had substantial successes in FY 2011, and many more accomplishments are expected. SDRD is the cornerstone on which many of these initiatives rest. Historically supporting our main focus areas, SDRD is also building a solid foundation for new, and non-traditional, emerging national security missions. The program continues its charter to advance science and technology for a broad base of agencies including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and many others.

  19. Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power DOE operations annual site environmental report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuttle, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    Rocketdyne currently operates several facilities in the San Fernando Valley/Simi Valley area, for manufacturing, testing, and research and development (R and D). These operations include manufacturing liquid-fueled rocket engines, such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and engines used for expendable launch vehicles used to place artificial satellites into orbit. This work includes fabrication and testing of rocket engines, lasers, and heat-transfer systems; and R and D in a wide range of high-technology fields, such as the electrical power system for the Space Station. Previously, this work also included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials, under the Atomics International Division (AI). AI was merged into Rocketdyne in 1984 and many of the AI functions were transferred to existing Rocketdyne departments. This nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. The majority of this work is done for the Department of Energy (DOE). This Annual Site Environmental Report for 1996 concentrates on the environmental conditions related to DOE operations at Area IV of SSFL and at De Soto

  20. Foliage litter quality and annual net N mineralization: comparison across North American forest sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Neal A; Binkley, Dan

    1997-07-01

    The feedback between plant litterfall and nutrient cycling processes plays a major role in the regulation of nutrient availability and net primary production in terrestrial ecosystems. While several studies have examined site-specific feedbacks between litter chemistry and nitrogen (N) availability, little is known about the interaction between climate, litter chemistry, and N availability across different ecosystems. We assembled data from several studies spanning a wide range of vegetation, soils, and climatic regimes to examine the relationship between aboveground litter chemistry and annual net N mineralization. Net N mineralization declined strongly and non-linearly as the litter lignin:N ratio increased in forest ecosystems (r 2  = 0.74, P mineralization decreased linearly as litter lignin concentration increased, but the relationship was significant (r 2  = 0.63, P mineralization across this range of sites (r 2  litter lignin:N ratio and net N mineralization from forest floor and mineral soil was similar. The litter lignin:N ratio explained more of the variation in net N mineralization than climatic factors over a wide range of forest age classes, suggesting that litter quality (lignin:N ratio) may exert more than a proximal control over net N mineralization by influencing soil organic matter quality throughout the soil profile independent of climate.

  1. Niagara Falls storage site annual environmental report for calendar year 1990, Lewiston, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    Environmental monitoring of the US DOE Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and surrounding area began in 1981. NFSS is part of a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial, operations causing conditions the Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. Environmental monitoring systems at NFSS include sampling networks for radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and total uranium and radium-226 concentrations in surface water sediments, and groundwater. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are routinely measured in groundwater. During 1990, the average ambient air radon concentration (including background) at NFSS ranged from 0.3 to 0.7 pCi/L (0.01 to 0.03 Bq/L); the maximum at any location for any quarter was 1.6 pCi/L (0.06 Bq/L). The average on-site external gamma radiation exposure level was 69 mR/yr; the average at the property line was 68 mR/yr (including background). The average background radiation level in the area was 66 mR/yr. Average annual concentrations of radium-226 and total uranium in surface water ranged from 0.4E-9 to 0.9E-9 μCi/m1 (0.02 to 0.03 Bq/L) and from 5E-9 to 9E-9 μCi/m1 (0.2 to 0.3 Bq/L), respectively. Routine analyses of groundwater samples from NFSS included the indicator parameters total organic carbon, total organic halides, pH, and specific conductivity

  2. Niagara Falls storage site annual environmental report for calendar year 1990, Lewiston, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-08-01

    Environmental monitoring of the US DOE Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and surrounding area began in 1981. NFSS is part of a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial, operations causing conditions the Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. Environmental monitoring systems at NFSS include sampling networks for radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and total uranium and radium-226 concentrations in surface water sediments, and groundwater. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are routinely measured in groundwater. During 1990, the average ambient air radon concentration (including background) at NFSS ranged from 0.3 to 0.7 pCi/L (0.01 to 0.03 Bq/L); the maximum at any location for any quarter was 1.6 pCi/L (0.06 Bq/L). The average on-site external gamma radiation exposure level was 69 mR/yr; the average at the property line was 68 mR/yr (including background). The average background radiation level in the area was 66 mR/yr. Average annual concentrations of radium-226 and total uranium in surface water ranged from 0.4E-9 to 0.9E-9 {mu}Ci/m1 (0.02 to 0.03 Bq/L) and from 5E-9 to 9E-9 {mu}Ci/m1 (0.2 to 0.3 Bq/L), respectively. Routine analyses of groundwater samples from NFSS included the indicator parameters total organic carbon, total organic halides, pH, and specific conductivity.

  3. Colonie Interim Storage Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Colonie, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the environmental monitoring program at the Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring at CISS began in 1984 when Congress added the site to the US Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. CISS property and surrounding areas were radioactively contaminated by operations conducted by National Lead Industries, which manufactured various components from uranium and thorium from 1958 to 1984. The environmental monitoring program at CISS includes sampling networks for external gamma radiation exposure and for radium-226, thorium-232, and total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. In 1992 the program will also include sampling networks for radioactive and chemical contaminants in stormwater to meet permit application requirements under the Clean Water Act. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other requirements in DOE.orders. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment. Results of environmental monitoring during 1991 indicate that average concentrations of radioactive contaminants of concern were well below applicable standards and DCGS. Concentrations of some chemical contaminants in groundwater were above-the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (Class GA) and EPA guidelines for drinking water. The potential annual radiation exposure (excluding background) calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual is 0.23 mrem (milliroentgen equivalent man), which is less than an individual would receive while traveling in an airplane at 12,000 meters (39,000 feet) for one hour

  4. Maywood Interim Storage Site, Maywood, New Jersey: Annual site environmental report, Calendar year 1987: Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-04-01

    The monitoring program at the MISS measures thoron and radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and throium, uranium, and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and to assess the potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in this report, the maximally exposed individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 1% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. This exposure is less than the exposure a person would receive during a round-trip flight from New York to Los Angeles (because of the greater amounts of cosmic radiation present at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50 mile) radium of the MISS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1987 monitoring show that the MISS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 17 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  5. Annual Status Report (FY 2017): Composite Analysis for Low Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M. C.; Nichols, W. E.; Lehman, L. L.

    2018-04-05

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements in DOE M 435.1 Chg. 1, and as implemented by DOE/RL-2009-29, the DOE Richland Operations Office has prepared this annual summary of the Hanford Site Composite Analysis for fiscal year 2017.

  6. Annual Status Report (FY2015) Composite Analysis for Low Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W. E. [CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-24

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements in DOE O 435.1, and as implemented by DOE/RL-2000-29, the DOE Richland Operations Office has prepared this annual summary of the Hanford Site Composite Analysis for fiscal year 2015.

  7. Annual Status Report (FY2013 Composite Analysis of Low Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W. E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-03-25

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements in DOE O 435.1, 3 Chg. 11, and as implemented by DOE/RL-2000-29, Rev. 22, the DOE Richland Operations 4 Office (DOE-RL) has prepared this annual summary of the Hanford Site Composite Analysis 5 for fiscal year (FY) 2013.

  8. Annual Status Report (FY2016) Composite Analysis for Low Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M. C. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Nichols, W. E. [CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-03-14

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements in DOE O 435.1 and as implemented by DOE/RL-2009-29, the DOE Richland Operations Office has prepared this annual summary of the Hanford Site Composite Analysis for fiscal year 2016.

  9. Raffinate treatment at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acox, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    Raffinate solutions, which contain uranium, technetium, nitrates, and lesser amounts of heavy metals, are produced in the decontamination and uranium recovery operations at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. These solutions are presently being placed in temporary storage until three treatment facilities are constructed which will produce an environmentally acceptable effluent from the raffinate. These facilities are: (1) The Heavy Metals Precipitation Facility; (2) The Technetium Ion Exchange Facility; and (3) The Biodenitrification Pilot Plant. When the facilities are completed, the raffinate will be treated in 500 gallon batches. The first treatment is the heavy metals precipitation by caustic addition and filtering. The effluent proceeds to the ion exchange columns where the technetium is removed by adsorption onto a strongly basic, anion exchange resin which has been converted to the hydroxyl form. Following ion exchange, the solution is transported to the biodenitrification pilot plant. The biodenitrification column is a fluidized-bed using bacteria-laden coal particles as the denitrifying media. The resulting effluent should meet the limits established by the US EPA for all metals and nitrate. Technetium will be 98+% removed and the uranium concentration will be less than one milligram per liter. 13 references

  10. Air sampling program at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulett, S.H.

    1975-01-01

    An extensive air sampling program has been developed at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant for monitoring the concentrations of radioactive aerosols present in the atmosphere on plantsite as well as in the environs. The program is designed to minimize exposures of employees and the environment to airborne radioactive particulates. Five different air sampling systems, utilizing either filtration or impaction, are employed for measuring airborne alpha and beta-gamma activity produced from 235 U and 234 Th, respectively. Two of the systems have particle selection capabilities: a personal sampler with a 10-mm nylon cyclone eliminates most particles larger than about 10 microns in diameter; and an Annular Kinetic Impactor collects particulates greater than 0.4 microns in diameter which have a density greater than 12-15 gm/cm 3 . A Hi-Volume Air Sampler and an Eberline Model AIM-3 Scintillation Air Monitor are used in collecting short-term samples for assessing compliance with ''ceiling'' standards or peak concentration limits. A film-sort aperture IBM card system is utilized for continuous 8-hour samples. This sampling program has proven to be both practical and effective for assuring accurate monitoring of the airborne activity associated with plant operations

  11. IAEA verification experiment at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, D.M.; Subudhi, M.; Calvert, O.L.; Bonner, T.N.; Cherry, R.C.; Whiting, N.E.

    1998-01-01

    In April 1996, the United States (US) added the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to the list of facilities eligible for the application of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. At that time, the US proposed that the IAEA carry out a Verification Experiment at the plant with respect to the downblending of about 13 metric tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the form of UF 6 . This material is part of the 226 metric tons of fissile material that President Clinton has declared to be excess to US national-security needs and which will be permanently withdrawn from the US nuclear stockpile. In September 1997, the IAEA agreed to carry out this experiment, and during the first three weeks of December 1997, the IAEA verified the design information concerning the downblending process. The plant has been subject to short-notice random inspections since December 17, 1997. This paper provides an overview of the Verification Experiment, the monitoring technologies used in the verification approach, and some of the experience gained to date

  12. Calibration techniques and results for the Portsmouth Cf shuffler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, J.C.; Wines, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    As environmental concerns over radioactive waste disposal continue to rise, the importance of Californium shufflers as a versatile waste monitoring and segregation instrument also continue to increase. The extent to which different amounts and types of materials can be measured by the shuffler is directly related to the extent of its calibration. As shufflers become more common place and their waste management uses also rise, the importance of a wide ranging and thorough calibration becomes critical. This paper presents the techniques used at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant for calibrating the shuffler to detect levels of U-235 in radioactive waste. While the calibration techniques are similar to those used by Los Alamos, the standards that were used were constructed somewhat differently so that geometric effects are maximized. Also presented are shuffler transmission measurements that are used to determine the matrix type and the corresponding calibration. A discussion of the calibration data is given. This discussion includes specific aspects of the calibration such as overall range, high end limits, and poly shielding range and usefulness

  13. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2002-10-01

    No significant environmental problems were identified at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sites in Morgantown (MGN), Pittsburgh (PGH), Tulsa (NPTO) and Fairbanks (AEO) during 2001. No radionuclides were released from the sites during 2001. The sites maintain two major environmental programs: waste management, and environmental media and release management. These two programs encompass waste handling, storage, and disposal, waste minimization and pollution prevention, air quality emissions, surface-water discharges, groundwater impacts, industrial wastewater discharges, and spill control procedures. The Morgantown and Pittsburgh sites currently maintain complete monitoring programs for groundwater, stormwater discharge, laboratory wastewater discharge, and meteorological data. In addition, an annual air emissions inventory is prepared. A comprehensive Directives Program aimed at managing environmental, safety, health requirements, and risks was initiated in 1997, continued through subsequent years, and will be completed in 2003. The primary objective of the program is to identify and implement standards that will protect the health and safety of workers, public, and the environment. This program started with a careful and thorough analysis of risks confronting workers and the communities surrounding NETL sites. Following this analysis, requirements and best management practices were evaluated to determine how requirements could best be used to advance the mission of NETL. Teams of subject-matter experts analyzed the work assigned to determine potential hazards and identify ways to remove or control those hazards. In 2001, NETL developed or revised a series of directives in two major areas: safety analysis and review (SAR) processes, and integrated safety management (ISM) directives. SAR directives were issued for research and development (R&D) operations, support operations, and facilities. ISM directives were released on management processes, such

  14. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2002-01-01

    No significant environmental problems were identified at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sites in Morgantown (MGN), Pittsburgh (PGH), Tulsa (NPTO) and Fairbanks (AEO) during 2001. No radionuclides were released from the sites during 2001. The sites maintain two major environmental programs: waste management, and environmental media and release management. These two programs encompass waste handling, storage, and disposal, waste minimization and pollution prevention, air quality emissions, surface-water discharges, groundwater impacts, industrial wastewater discharges, and spill control procedures. The Morgantown and Pittsburgh sites currently maintain complete monitoring programs for groundwater, stormwater discharge, laboratory wastewater discharge, and meteorological data. In addition, an annual air emissions inventory is prepared. A comprehensive Directives Program aimed at managing environmental, safety, health requirements, and risks was initiated in 1997, continued through subsequent years, and will be completed in 2003. The primary objective of the program is to identify and implement standards that will protect the health and safety of workers, public, and the environment. This program started with a careful and thorough analysis of risks confronting workers and the communities surrounding NETL sites. Following this analysis, requirements and best management practices were evaluated to determine how requirements could best be used to advance the mission of NETL. Teams of subject-matter experts analyzed the work assigned to determine potential hazards and identify ways to remove or control those hazards. In 2001, NETL developed or revised a series of directives in two major areas: safety analysis and review (SAR) processes, and integrated safety management (ISM) directives. SAR directives were issued for research and development (R andD) operations, support operations, and facilities. ISM directives were released on management processes

  15. Animal investigation program 1980 annual report: Nevada Test Site and vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Giles, K.R.; Bernhardt, D.E.

    1982-08-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalyses of tissues collected from cattle, mule deer, desert bighorn sheep, rabbits, and a horse that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site during 1980. Routine and special activities of the Animal Investigation Program are also discussed. Other than the naturally occurring 40 K, gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected infrequently. 131 I was found in the thyroid of a deer 3 weeks after a nuclear test by the People's Republic of China. Concentrations of 90 Sr in bones from deer, cattle, and desert bighorn sheep were similar to those of recent years. Plutonium levels in all tissues from all species showed little variation from those levels in samples collected in recent years. Radionuclide concentrations were generally higher in the tissues of animals residing in Area 15 than in similar animals collected from other Nevada Test Site areas. Surface soil samples from the Area 15 farm contained 238 Pu and 239 Pu in nanocurie per kilogram concentrations. Hypothetical annual dose estimates to man were calculated on the basis of the daily consumption of 0.5 kilogram of liver or muscle from animals that contained peak radionuclide levels. The highest postulated dose was 0.4 millirems to whole body for 137 Cs in muscle obtained from cattle. This dose is about 0.1 percent of the 500 millirems per year radiation protection guide for individuals in the general population. All other postulated doses for consumption of tissues containing other radionuclides were less than 0.1 percent of the standard

  16. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stencel, J.R.; Finley, V.L.

    1991-12-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for CY90. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health. The PPPL has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951 and in 1990 had one of its two large tokamak devices in operation: namely, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. The Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification is undergoing new modifications and upgrades for future operation. A new machine, the Burning Plasma Experiment -- formerly called the Compact Ignition Tokamak -- is under conceptual design, and it is awaiting the approval of its draft Environmental Assessment report by DOE Headquarters. This report is required under the National Environmental Policy Act. The long-range goal of the US Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion power as an alternate energy source. 59 refs., 39 figs., 45 tabs.

  17. Animal investigation program, 1981 annual report: Nevada Test Site and vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Giles, K.R.

    1982-01-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalysis of tissues, collected from animals that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Other than naturally occurring potassium-40, cesium-137 was the only gamma-emitting radionuclide frequently detected and was within a narrow range of activity. For example, 12 of 14 cattle muscle samples contained 15 to 65 pCi of cesium-137 per kilogram. Strontium-90 and plutonium-238 or -239 tissue concentrations were similar to those of recent years. Nanocurie levels of tritium were found in tissue from two deer that drank contaminated water draining from the tunnel test areas. Annual dose estimates to man were calculated based on the daily consumption of 0.5 kg of tissue with peak radionuclide levels. The highest postulated dose was 45 millirems to the whole body from ingestion of deer muscle that drank from the tritium contaminated waters. This dose is about 9% of the radiation protection guide. Movement of deer on the NTS is discussed. In general, deer from Pahute Mesa winter in the Timber Mt. area with some movement off the NTS, while deer from Rainier Mesa winter in the Shoshone Mt. area. The sudden death of an offsite goat kid was investigated and death was attributed to enterotoxemia. No gross or microscopic lesions in necropsied animals were found that could be attributed to the effect of ionizing radiation

  18. 1998 Annual Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, D.K.; Fink, C.H.; Sanchez, R.V.

    1999-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is operated in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) mission to provide weapon component technology and hardware for national security needs. SNL/NM also conducts fundamental research and development to advance technology in energy research, computer science, waste management, microelectronics, materials science, and transportation safety for hazardous and nuclear components. In support of SNL's mission, the Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Center and the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at SNL/NM have established extensive environmental programs to assist SNL's line organizations in meeting all applicable local, State, and Federal environmental regulations and DOE requirements. This annual report for calendar year 1998 (CY98) summarizes the compliance status of environmental regulations applicable to SNL site operations. Environmental program activities include terrestrial surveillance; ambient air and meteorological monitoring hazardous, radioactive, and solid waste management; pollution prevention and waste minimization; environmental remediation; oil and chemical spill prevention; and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities. This report has been prepared in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990).

  19. Validation of KENO V.a for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felsher, H.D.; Fentiman, A.W.; Tayloe, R.W.; D'Aquila, D.

    1992-01-01

    At the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KENO V.a is used to make criticality calculations for complex configurations and a wide range of 235 U enrichments. It is essential that the calculated critical conditions either accurately reflect the true critical state or that the bias from the true critical conditions are well known. Accordingly, a study has been initiated to validate KENO V.a over the ranges of parameters expected to be used when modeling equipment and processes at Portsmouth. Preliminary results of that study are reported in this paper. The ultimate goal of this study is to identify a set of data from existing critical experiments that will exercise all KENO V.a parameters commonly used by Portsmouth's criticality safety personnel. A second goal is to identify a relatively small subset of those experiments that may be run frequently to ensure that KENO V.a provides consistent results

  20. WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CALENDAR YEAR 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This annual environmental monitoring report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP or Project) is published to inform those with interest about environmental conditions at the WVDP. In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting, the report summarizes calendar year (CY) 2002 environmental monitoring data so as to describe the performance of the WVDP's environmental management system, confirm compliance with standards and regulations, and highlight important programs. In 2002, the West Valley Demonstration Project, the site of a DOE environmental cleanup activity operated by West Valley Nuclear Services Co. (WVNSCO), was in the final stages of stabilizing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) that remained at the site after commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing had been discontinued in the early 1970s. The Project is located in western New York State, about 30 miles south of Buffalo, within the New York State-owned Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC). The WVDP is being conducted in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). Ongoing work activities at the WVDP during 2002 included: (1) completing HLW solidification and melter shutdown; (2) shipping low-level radioactive waste off-site for disposal; (3) constructing a facility where large high-activity components can be safely packaged for disposal; (4) packaging and removing spent materials from the vitrification facility; (5) preparing environmental impact statements for future activities; (6) removing as much of the waste left behind in waste tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2 as was reasonably possible; (7) removing storage racks, canisters, and debris from the fuel receiving and storage pool, decontaminating pool walls, and beginning shipment of debris for disposal; (8) ongoing decontamination in the general purpose cell and the process mechanical cell (also referred to as the head end cells); (9) planning

  1. WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CALENDAR YEAR 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-09-12

    This annual environmental monitoring report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP or Project) is published to inform those with interest about environmental conditions at the WVDP. In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting, the report summarizes calendar year (CY) 2002 environmental monitoring data so as to describe the performance of the WVDP's environmental management system, confirm compliance with standards and regulations, and highlight important programs. In 2002, the West Valley Demonstration Project, the site of a DOE environmental cleanup activity operated by West Valley Nuclear Services Co. (WVNSCO), was in the final stages of stabilizing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) that remained at the site after commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing had been discontinued in the early 1970s. The Project is located in western New York State, about 30 miles south of Buffalo, within the New York State-owned Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC). The WVDP is being conducted in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). Ongoing work activities at the WVDP during 2002 included: (1) completing HLW solidification and melter shutdown; (2) shipping low-level radioactive waste off-site for disposal; (3) constructing a facility where large high-activity components can be safely packaged for disposal; (4) packaging and removing spent materials from the vitrification facility; (5) preparing environmental impact statements for future activities; (6) removing as much of the waste left behind in waste tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2 as was reasonably possible; (7) removing storage racks, canisters, and debris from the fuel receiving and storage pool, decontaminating pool walls, and beginning shipment of debris for disposal; (8) ongoing decontamination in the general purpose cell and the process mechanical cell (also referred to as the head end cells); (9

  2. 2006 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory J, Shott, Vefa Yucel

    2007-03-01

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2006) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, with the results submitted as an annual summary report to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE, 2000; 2002). The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed annual reviews in fiscal year (FY) 2006 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PAs and CAs results. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2006 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors, such as the waste form and containers, facility design, waste receipts, and closure plans, as well as monitoring results and research and development (R&D) activities, were reviewed in FY 2006 for determination of the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed for determination of the adequacy of the CAs.

  3. 2006 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory J; Shott, Vefa Yucel

    2007-01-01

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2006) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, with the results submitted as an annual summary report to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE, 2000; 2002). The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed annual reviews in fiscal year (FY) 2006 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PAs and CAs results. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2006 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors, such as the waste form and containers, facility design, waste receipts, and closure plans, as well as monitoring results and research and development (R and D) activities, were reviewed in FY 2006 for determination of the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R and D activities were reviewed for determination of the adequacy of the CAs

  4. 2004 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vefa Yucel

    2005-01-01

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (Bechtel Nevada, 2000) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, and reports the results in an annual summary report to the U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE]). The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed annual reviews in fiscal year (FY) 2004 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PA and CA results. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2004 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors, such as the waste form and containers, facility design, waste receipts, closure plans, as well as monitoring results and research and development (R and D) activities were reviewed in FY 2004 for the determination of the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R and D activities were reviewed for the determination of the adequacy of the CAs

  5. In Situ Chemical Oxidation Through Lance Permeation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M.Z.

    2003-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation through lance permeation (ISCO-LP) is an emerging remediation technology in which chemical oxidants (such as potassium or sodium permanganate) are delivered to the subsurface using vertical lance-like injectors. It is applicable to sites with oxidizable contaminants such as chlorinated solvents and fuel hydrocarbons. Because vertical lance injections can be deployed at relatively close spacing, ISCO-LP potentially can be used to clean-up contamination in low-permeability media. This document provides information that can help potential users determine whether ISCO-LP would apply to a particular environmental management problem. It contains a general description of the technology (Section 2), performance data from a field demonstration (Section 3), an assessment of technology applicability (Section 4), a summary of cost elements (Section 5), and a list of regulatory, environmental safety and health issues (Section 6). It is patterned after the Innovative Technology Summary Reports (ITSR) published by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology under the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA). As in the previously published ITSRs, the technology described in this report was developed through funding from SCFA. Most of the information contained in this report was obtained from a field demonstration of ISCO-LP conducted in July-August 2000 at DOE's Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The field test was not completed due to an accident that caused a field worker serious injuries. Although performance assessment data are very limited, the field test highlighted important health and safety issues that must be considered by site managers and technology vendors interested in implementing ISCO-LP

  6. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finley, V.L.; Wiezcorek, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY93. The report is prepared to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1993. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion power as an alternate energy source. In 1993, PPPL had both of its two large tokamak devices in operation; the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M). PBX-M completed its modifications and upgrades and resumed operation in November 1991. TFTR began the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments in December 1993 and set new records by producing over six million watts of energy. The engineering design phase of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX), which replaced the cancelled Burning Plasma Experiment in 1992 as PPPL's next machine, began in 1993 with the planned start up set for the year 2001. In 1993, the Environmental Assessment (EA) for the TFRR Shutdown and Removal (S ampersand R) and TPX was prepared for submittal to the regulatory agencies

  7. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP or Project) is published to inform those with interest about environmental conditions at the WVDP. In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting, the report summarizes calendar year (CY) 2003 environmental monitoring data so as to describe the performance of the WVDP's environmental management system (EMS), confirm compliance with standards and regulations, and highlight important programs. During 2003, cleanup of radioactive waste from the former nuclear fuels reprocessing plant that shut down operations in the 1970s was continued at the WVDP. The Project is located in western New York State, about 30 miles south of Buffalo, within the New York State-owned Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC). The WVDP is being conducted in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. Work activities at the WVDP during 2003 included: (1) maintaining canisters of vitrified high-level waste in a shielded facility; (2) shipping low-level radioactive waste offsite for disposal; (3) shipping packaged spent nuclear fuel assemblies to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory; (4) constructing a facility where large high-activity components can be safely size-reduced and packaged for disposal; (5) decontaminating the fuel storage pool and the cask unloading pool; (6) decontaminating the general purpose cell and the process mechanical cell (also referred to as the head end cells); (7) cleanup of waste in the plutonium purification cell (south) and extraction cell number 2 in the main plant; (8) planning for decontamination and dismantlement of the vitrification facility; (9) continuing preparation of the Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship Environmental Impact Statement; and (10) monitoring the environment and managing contaminated areas within the Project facility premises

  8. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finley, V.L.; Wieczorek, M.A.

    1996-02-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY94. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1994. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that PPPL's environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 195 1. The long-range goal of the US Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion power as an alternate energy source. In 1994, PPPL had one of its two large tokamak devices in operation-the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification or PBX-M completed its modifications and upgrades and resumed operation in November 1991 and operated periodically during 1992 and 1993; it did not operate in 1994 for funding reasons. In December 1993, TFTR began conducting the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments and set new records by producing over ten at sign on watts of energy in 1994. The engineering design phase of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (T?X), which replaced the cancelled Burning Plasma Experiment in 1992 as PPPL's next machine, began in 1993 with the planned start up set for the year 2001. In December 1994, the Environmental Assessment (EA) for the TFTR Shutdown and Removal (S ampersand R) and TPX was submitted to the regulatory agencies, and a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) was issued by DOE for these projects

  9. Seasonal and inter-annual variations of dissolved oxygen in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea (DYFAMED site)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Laurent; Legendre, Louis; Lefevre, Dominique; Prieur, Louis; Taillandier, Vincent; Diamond Riquier, Emilie

    2018-03-01

    Dissolved oxygen (O2) is a relevant tracer to interpret variations of both water mass properties in the open ocean and biological production in the surface layer of both coastal and open waters. Deep-water formation is very active in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea, where it influences intermediate and deep waters properties, nutrients replenishment and biological production. This study analyses, for the first time, the 20-year time series of monthly O2 concentrations at the DYFAMED long-term sampling site in the Ligurian Sea. Until the winters of 2005 and 2006, a thick and strong oxygen minimum layer was present between 200 and 1300 m because dense water formation was then local, episodic and of low intensity. In 2005-2006, intense and rapid deep convection injected 24 mol O2 m-2 between 350 and 2000 m from December 2005 to March 2006. Since this event, the deep layer has been mostly ventilated during winter time by newly formed deep water spreading from the Gulf of Lion 250 km to the west and by some local deep mixing in early 2010, 2012 and 2013. In the context of climate change, it is predicted that the intensity of deep convection will become weaker in the Mediterranean, which could potentially lead to hypoxia in intermediate and deep layers with substantial impact on marine ecosystems. With the exception of winters 2005 and 2006, the O2 changes in surface waters followed a seasonal trend that reflected the balance between air-sea O2 exchanges, changes in the depth of the mixed layer and phytoplankton net photosynthesis. We used the 20-year O2 time series to estimate monthly and annual net community production. The latter was 7.1 mol C m-2 yr-1, consistent with C-14 primary production determinations and sediment-trap carbon export fluxes at DYFAMED.

  10. Annual and latitudinal variations of surface fluxes and meteorological variables at Arctic terrestrial sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, Andrey; Uttal, Taneil; Persson, Ola; Konopleva-Akish, Elena; Crepinsek, Sara; Cox, Christopher; Fairall, Christopher; Makshtas, Alexander; Repina, Irina

    2016-04-01

    This study analyzes and discusses seasonal and latitudinal variations of surface fluxes (turbulent, radiative, and soil ground heat) and other ancillary surface/snow/permafrost data based on in-situ measurements made at two long-term research observatories near the coast of the Arctic Ocean located in Canada and Russia. The hourly averaged data collected at Eureka (Canadian territory of Nunavut) and Tiksi (East Siberia) located at two quite different latitudes (80.0 N and 71.6 N respectively) are analyzed in details to describe the seasons in the Arctic. Although Eureka and Tiksi are located at the different continents and at the different latitudes, the annual course of the surface meteorology and the surface fluxes are qualitatively very similar. The air and soil temperatures display the familiar strong seasonal trend with maximum of measured temperatures in mid-summer and minimum during winter. According to our data, variation in incoming short-wave solar radiation led the seasonal pattern of the air and soil temperatures, and the turbulent fluxes. During the dark Polar nights, air and ground temperatures are strongly controlled by long-wave radiation associated generally with cloud cover. Due to the fact that in average the higher latitudes receive less solar radiation than lower latitudes, a length of the convective atmospheric boundary layer (warm season) is shorter and middle-summer amplitude of the turbulent fluxes is generally less in Eureka than in Tiksi. However, since solar elevation angle at local midnight in the middle of Arctic summer is higher for Eureka as compared to Tiksi, stable stratification and upward turbulent flux for carbon dioxide is generally did not observed at Eureka site during summer seasons. It was found a high correlation between the turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat, carbon dioxide and the net solar radiation. A comprehensive evaluation of energy balance closure problem is performed based on the multi-year data sets

  11. Annual Transportation Report for Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site, Fiscal Year 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In February 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Nevada Operations Office (now known as the Nevada Site Office) issued the Mitigation Action Plan which addressed potential impacts described in the ''Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada'' (DOE/EIS 0243). The DOE, Nevada Operations Office committed to several actions, including the preparation of an annual report, which summarizes waste shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at Area 5 and Area 3. Since 2006, the Area 3 RWMS has been in cold stand-by. This document satisfies requirements regarding low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) transported to and from the NTS during FY 2009. In addition, this document provides shipment, volume, and route information on transuranic (TRU) waste shipped from the NTS to the Idaho National Laboratory, near Idaho Falls, Idaho.

  12. 2007 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of an annual review of conditions affecting the operation of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) and a determination of the continuing adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs). The Area 5 RWMS PA documentation consists of the original PA (Shott et al., 1998), referred to as the 1998 Area 5 RWMS PA and supporting addenda (Bechtel Nevada [BN], 2001b; 2006a). The Area 5 RWMS CA was issued as a single document (BN, 2001a) and has a single addendum (BN, 2001c). The Area 3 PA and CA were issued in a single document (Shott et al., 2000). The Maintenance Plan for the PAs and CAs (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2006) and the Disposal Authorization Statements (DASs) for the Area 3 and 5 RWMSs (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 2000; 2002) require preparation of an annual summary and a determination of the continuing adequacy of the PAs and CAs. The annual summary report is submitted to DOE Headquarters. Following the annual report format in the DOE PA/CA Maintenance Guide (DOE, 1999), this report presents the annual summary for the PAs in Section 2.0 and the CAs in Section 3.0. The annual summary for the PAs includes the following: Section 2.1 summarizes changes in waste disposal operations; Section 2.1.5 provides an evaluation of the new estimates of the closure inventories derived from the actual disposals through fiscal year (FY) 2007; Section 2.2 summarizes the results of the monitoring conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's (NNSA/NSO's) Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (BN, 2005), and the research and development (R&D) activities; Section 2.4 is a summary of changes in facility design, operation, or expected future conditions; monitoring and R&D activities; and the maintenance program; and

  13. 2007 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of an annual review of conditions affecting the operation of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) and a determination of the continuing adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs). The Area 5 RWMS PA documentation consists of the original PA (Shott et al., 1998), referred to as the 1998 Area 5 RWMS PA and supporting addenda (Bechtel Nevada [BN], 2001b; 2006a). The Area 5 RWMS CA was issued as a single document (BN, 2001a) and has a single addendum (BN, 2001c). The Area 3 PA and CA were issued in a single document (Shott et al., 2000). The Maintenance Plan for the PAs and CAs (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2006) and the Disposal Authorization Statements (DASs) for the Area 3 and 5 RWMSs (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 2000; 2002) require preparation of an annual summary and a determination of the continuing adequacy of the PAs and CAs. The annual summary report is submitted to DOE Headquarters. Following the annual report format in the DOE PA/CA Maintenance Guide (DOE, 1999), this report presents the annual summary for the PAs in Section 2.0 and the CAs in Section 3.0. The annual summary for the PAs includes the following: Section 2.1 summarizes changes in waste disposal operations; Section 2.1.5 provides an evaluation of the new estimates of the closure inventories derived from the actual disposals through fiscal year (FY) 2007; Section 2.2 summarizes the results of the monitoring conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's (NNSA/NSO's) Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (BN, 2005), and the research and development (R and D) activities; Section 2.4 is a summary of changes in facility design, operation, or expected future conditions; monitoring and R and D activities; and the maintenance program; and

  14. The Exponential Growth of Mathematics and Technology at the University of Portsmouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The number of students studying university mathematics in the UK has been increasing gradually and linearly since 2002. At the University of Portsmouth, number of students studying mathematics doubled from 30 to 60 between 2002 and 2007, then increased by 240% in just 1 year to over 140 in 2008. This article explains how learning technology has…

  15. Annual Transportation Report for Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site, Fiscal Year 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    In February 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office issued the Mitigation Action Plan which addressed potential impacts described in the ''Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada'' (DOE/EIS 0243). The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office committed to several actions, including the preparation of an annual report, which summarizes waste shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMS) at Area 3 and Area 5. This document satisfies requirements with regard to low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) transported to or from the NTS during fiscal year (FY) 2006

  16. Wayne Interim Storage Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Wayne, New Jersey. [Wayne Interim Storage Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the envirormental monitoring program at the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring of WISS and surrounding area began in 1984 when Congress added the site to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP is a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. WISS is a National Priorities List site. The environmental monitoring program at WISS includes sampling networks for radon and thoron concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, radium-228, thorium-232, and total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Several nonradiological parameters are also measured in groundwater. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency standards, DOE derived concentration guides, dose limits, and other requirements in DOE orders. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment.

  17. Niagara Falls Storage Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Lewiston, New York. [Niagara Falls Storage Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the environmental monitoring program at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring at NFSS began in 1981. The site is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is assigned to the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP is a program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental monitoring program at NFSS includes sampling networks for radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and total uranium and radium-226 concentrations in surface water, sediments, and groundwater. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters including seven metals are routinely measured in groundwater. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other requirements in DOE orders. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment.

  18. Maywood Interim Storage Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Maywood, New Jersey. [Maywood Interim Storage Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the environmental monitoring program at the Maywood Interim Storage Site (MISS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring of MISS began in 1984 when congress added the site to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP is a DOE program to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental monitoring program at MISS includes sampling networks for radon and thoron concentrations in air; external gamma radiation-exposure; and total uranium, radium-226, radium-228, thorium-232, and thorium-230 concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other requirements in DOE orders. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment.

  19. Calendar year 2007 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii,

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agogino, Karen [Department of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States). National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); Sanchez, Rebecca [Sandia Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2008-09-30

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Offi ce (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at TTR and KTF. Sandia manages and conducts operations at TTR in support of the DOE/NNSA’s Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Washington Group International subcontracts to Sandia in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2007. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA/Nevada Site Offi ce (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2007a) and DOE Manual 231.1-1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting Manual (DOE 2007).

  20. Calendar year 2002 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2003-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, oversees TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2002. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990) and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

  1. Middlesex Sampling Plant and Middlesex Municipal Landfill annual site environmental report, Middlesex, New Jersey: Calendar year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    During 1986, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the former Middlesex Sampling Plant (MSP) and former Middlesex Municipal Landfill (MML) sites, located in the Borough of Middlesex, New Jersey. The MSP and MML sites are part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residential radioactive materials remain from either the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has mandated DOE to remedy. The monitoring program at the MSP and MML measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that sites are in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and to assess their potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenarios described in the report, this individual, at the MSP, would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 10 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard. By comparison, the incremental dose received from living in a brick house versus a wooden house is about the same. At the MML, the annual external exposure to the maximally exposed individual would be less than 1% of the standard. The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the sites that would result from radioactive materials present at the MSP and MML would be indistinguishable from the dose that the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1986 monitoring show that the MSP and MML are in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 14 refs., 13 figs., 23 tabs

  2. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation

  3. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 2, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains information on hazardous materials at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation

  4. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 2, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous materials at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  5. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  6. Middlesex Sampling Plant and Middlesex Municipal Landfill, annual site environmental report, Middlesex, New Jersey, calendar year 1987: Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    The monitoring program at the Middlesex Sampling Plant (MSP) and Middlesex Municipal Landfill (MML) measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the sites are in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and to assess their potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenarios described in the report, this individual, at the MSP, would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 10 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard. By comparison, the incremental dose received from living in a brick house as opposed to a wooden house is about the same. At the MML, the annual external exposure to the maximally exposed individual would be less than 1 percent of the standard. The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the sites that would result from radioactive materials present at the MSP and MML would be indistinguishable from the dose that the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1987 monitoring show that the MSP and MML are in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 14 refs., 11 figs., 22 tabs

  7. Annual Report - FY 1998, Shipments to and from the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes waste shipments to the Nevada Test Site Radioactive Waste Management Sites at Area 3 and Area 5 during fiscal year 1998. In addition this report provides a summary evaluation of each shipping campaign by source (waste generator) which identifies observable incidents, if any, associated with the actual waste shipments

  8. Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Ecological Monitoring Program 1995 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Ecological Monitoring Program (ECMP) was established at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) in September 1992. At that time, EcMP staff developed a Program Plan that was peer-reviewed by scientists from western universities before submittal to DOE RFFO in January 1993. The intent of the program is to measure several quantitative variables at different ecological scales in order to characterize the Rocky Flats ecosystem. This information is necessary to document ecological conditions at the Site in impacted and nonimpacted areas to determine if Site practices have had ecological impacts, either positive or negative. This information can be used by managers interested in future use scenarios and CERCLA activities. Others interested in impact analysis may also find the information useful. In addition, these measurements are entered into a database which will serve as a long-term information repository that will document long-term trends and potential future changes to the Site, both natural and anthropogenic

  9. Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Ecological Monitoring Program 1995 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-31

    The Ecological Monitoring Program (ECMP) was established at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) in September 1992. At that time, EcMP staff developed a Program Plan that was peer-reviewed by scientists from western universities before submittal to DOE RFFO in January 1993. The intent of the program is to measure several quantitative variables at different ecological scales in order to characterize the Rocky Flats ecosystem. This information is necessary to document ecological conditions at the Site in impacted and nonimpacted areas to determine if Site practices have had ecological impacts, either positive or negative. This information can be used by managers interested in future use scenarios and CERCLA activities. Others interested in impact analysis may also find the information useful. In addition, these measurements are entered into a database which will serve as a long-term information repository that will document long-term trends and potential future changes to the Site, both natural and anthropogenic.

  10. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 3, Part 1, Waste Management Facility report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation, and amount of waste.

  11. Wayne Interim Storage Site: Annual environmental report for calendar year 1990, Wayne, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    Environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS) (a National Priorities List site) and surrounding area began in 1984. WISS is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental monitoring program at WISS includes sampling networks for radon and thoron concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, thorium-232, and total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Sediment samples were also analyzed for thorium-230, and several nonradiological parameters were measured in groundwater. 16 refs., 12 figs., 23 tabs

  12. 1993 annual report of hazardous waste activities for the Oak Ridge K-25 site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This report is a detailed listing of all of the Hazardous Waste activities occurring at Martin Marietta`s K-25 site. Contained herein are hazardous waste notification forms, waste stream reports, generator fee forms and various TSDR reports.

  13. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste

  14. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation

  15. 1993 annual report of hazardous waste activities for the Oak Ridge K-25 site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    This report is a detailed listing of all of the Hazardous Waste activities occurring at Martin Marietta's K-25 site. Contained herein are hazardous waste notification forms, waste stream reports, generator fee forms and various TSDR reports

  16. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 3, Part 1, Waste Management Facility report, dangerous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation, and amount of waste

  17. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 3, Part 2, Waste Management Facility report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1944-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste.

  18. Introduction to the nuclear criticality safety evaluation of facility X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report is the first in a series of documents that will evaluate nuclear criticality safety in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. It provides an overview of the facility, categorizes its functions for future analysis, reviews existing NCS documentation, and explains the follow-on effort planned for X-705. A detailed breakdown of systems, subsystems, and operational areas is presented and cross-referenced to existing NCS documentation

  19. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of Spray Booth Operations in X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report evaluates nuclear criticality safety for Spray Booth Operations in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A general description of current procedures and related hardware/equipment is presented. Control parameters relevant to nuclear criticality safety are explained, and a consolidated listing of administrative controls and safety systems is developed. Based on compliance with DOE Orders and MMES practices, the overall operation is evaluated, and recommendations for enhanced safety are suggested

  20. Annual status report on the inactive uranium mill tailings sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Assessments of inactive uranium mill tailings sites in the United States led to the designation of 25 processing sites for remedial action under the provisions of Section 102(a) Public Law 95-604. The Department of Energy assessed the potential health effects to the public from the residual radioactive materials on or near the 25 sites; and, with the advice of the Environmental Protection Agency, the Secretary established priorities for performing remedial action. In designating the 25 sites and establishing the priorities for performing remedial action, the Department of Energy consulted with the Environmental Protection Agency, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Department of the Interior, governors of the affected States, Navajo Nation, and appropriate property owners. Public participation in this process was encouraged. During Fiscal Year 1980, Department of Energy will be conducting surveys to verify the radiological characterization at the designated processing sites; developing cooperative agreements with the affected States; and initiating the appropriate National Environmental Policy Act documentation prior to conducting specific remedial actions.

  1. 2008 annual site restoration report of the BC Oil and Gas Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-15

    Oil and gas operators in British Columbia are responsible for all issues related to the surface reclamation of a site, including the management of contaminated sites. They require a certificate of restoration (CoR) for lands no longer required in the extraction of hydrocarbons. The CoR program ensures that the land used for oil and development is restored to a safe and productive state. The restoration process promotes the timely recovery of wellsite and facility locations and helps in managing environmental impacts. The BC Oil and Gas Commission oversees the restoration process by oil and gas operators through the application of regulations, compliance and enforcement. The Commission balances a broad range of environmental, economic and social considerations. Among its specific objectives are public safety, conservation of petroleum resources, promoting a healthy environment, and equitable participation in production. This report included a review of performance measures that have been developed to evaluate restoration programs, including well plugging. Site reclamation requirements for lands within the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR) were also described along with orphan site reclamation activities. A CoR is issued after a permit holder demonstrates that the remediation criteria have been met. There are currently 3,814 sites that have received a CoR in the province. refs., tabs., figs.

  2. Middlesex Sampling Plant [MSP] annual site environmental report, calendar year 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    The environmental monitoring program, which began in 1980, was continued in 1988 at the former Middlesex Sampling Plant (MSP) site, located in the Borough of Middlesex, New Jersey. The MSP site is part of the Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a Department of Energy (DOE) program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain either from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has mandated DOE to remedy. The environmental monitoring program is carried out by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), project management contractor for FUSRAP. The monitoring program at the MSP measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. Results of the 1988 monitoring show that the MSP is in compliance with applicable DOE radiation protection standards and with applicable requirements specified by New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection groundwater permits. 17 refs., 15 figs., 21 tabs

  3. Wayne Interim Storage Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Wayne, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the envirormental monitoring program at the Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring of WISS and surrounding area began in 1984 when Congress added the site to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP is a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. WISS is a National Priorities List site. The environmental monitoring program at WISS includes sampling networks for radon and thoron concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, radium-228, thorium-232, and total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Several nonradiological parameters are also measured in groundwater. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency standards, DOE derived concentration guides, dose limits, and other requirements in DOE orders. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment

  4. New Brunswick Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, New Brunswick, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the environmental monitoring program at the New Brunswick Site (NBS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. The site, near New Brunswick,, New Jersey, is a 5.6-acre vacant, fenced, and grass-covered area. Environmental monitoring of NBS began in 1981 when the site was part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Surplus Facilities Management Program. In 1990 responsibility for NBS was transferred to the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSP.4P). FUSRAP is a DOE program to identify and decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the,early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental monitoring program at NBS includes sampling networks for radon and thoron in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, radium-228, thorium-228, thorium-230, thorium-232, americium-241, cesium-137, plutonium-239, and total uranium in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Several nonradiological parameters are also measured in groundwater, surface water, and sediments. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency standards, DOE derived concentration guides, dose limits, and other requirements in DOE orders. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment

  5. Regional flood hazard assessment of the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.O.; Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Regional flood-hazard assessments performed for the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants are reviewed, compared, and contrasted to determine the relationship of probable maximum flood methodology with respect to US Department of Energy design and evaluation guidelines. The Paducah assessment was carried out using probable minimum flood methodology, while the Portsmouth assessment utilized probabilistic techniques. Results indicated that regional flooding along nearby rivers would not inundate either plant, and that the guidelines were satisfied. A comparison of results indicated that the probable minimum flood recurrence interval associated with the Paducah assessment exceeded the 10,000-year requirement of the guidelines, while recurrence intervals obtained in the Portsmouth assessment could be above or below 10,000 years depending on the choice of the probabilistic model used to perform the assessment. It was concluded, based on an analysis of two data points, that smaller watersheds driven by single event storms could be assessed using probabilistic techniques, while probable maximum flood methodology could be applied to larger drainage basins flooded by storm sequences

  6. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-01-01

    This Site Environmental Report was prepared by the Environment, Safety, and Health Division at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of this report is to inform the public and Department of Energy stakeholders of the environmental conditions at the NETL sites in Morgantown, West Virginia, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This report contains the most accurate information that could be collected during the period between January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2000. As stated in DOE Orders 5400.1 and 231.1, the purpose of the report is to: Characterize site environmental management performance; Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements and Highlight significant facility programs and efforts

  7. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-11-27

    This Site Environmental Report was prepared by the Environment, Safety, and Health Division at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of this report is to inform the public and Department of Energy stakeholders of the environmental conditions at the NETL sites in Morgantown, West Virginia, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This report contains the most accurate information that could be collected during the period between January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2000. As stated in DOE Orders 5400.1 and 231.1, the purpose of the report is to: Characterize site environmental management performance; Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements and Highlight significant facility programs and efforts.

  8. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2003-01-01

    This Site Environmental Report was prepared by the Environmental, Safety, and Health Division at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of this report is to inform the public and Department of Energy stakeholders of the environmental conditions at NETL sites in Morgantown (MGN), West Virginia, Pittsburgh (PGH), Pennsylvania, Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Fairbanks, Alaska. This report contains the most accurate information that could be collected during the period between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2002. As stated in DOE Orders 450.1 and 231.1, the purpose of the report is to: (1) Characterize site environmental management performance. (2) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements. (3) Highlight significant facility programs and efforts

  9. The National Energy Technology Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2003-10-30

    This Site Environmental Report was prepared by the Environmental, Safety, and Health Division at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of this report is to inform the public and Department of Energy stakeholders of the environmental conditions at NETL sites in Morgantown (MGN), West Virginia, Pittsburgh (PGH), Pennsylvania, Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Fairbanks, Alaska. This report contains the most accurate information that could be collected during the period between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2002. As stated in DOE Orders 450.1 and 231.1, the purpose of the report is to: (1) Characterize site environmental management performance. (2) Confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements. (3) Highlight significant facility programs and efforts.

  10. Seismic-reflection and ground penetrating radar for environmental site characterization. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plumb, R.; Steeples, D.W.

    1998-01-01

    'The project''s goals are threefold: (1) to examine the complementary site-characterization capabilities of modern, three-component shallow-seismic techniques and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) methods at depths ranging from 2 to 8 m at an existing test site; (2) to demonstrate the usefulness of the two methods when used in concert to characterize, in three-dimensions, the cone of depression of a pumping well, which will serve as a proxy site for fluid-flow at an actual, polluted site; and (3) to use the site as an outdoor mesoscale laboratory to validate existing three-dimensional ground-penetrating radar and seismic-reflection computer models developed at the Univ. of Kansas. To do this, useful seismic and GPR data are being collected along the same line(s) and within the same depth range. The principal investigators selected a site in central Kansas as a primary location and, although the site itself is not environmentally sensitive, the location chosen offers particularly useful attributes for this research and will serve as a proxy site for areas that are contaminated. As part of an effort to evaluate the strengths of each method, the authors will repeat the seismic and GPR surveys on a seasonal basis to establish how the complementary information obtained varies over time. Because the water table fluctuates at this site on a seasonal basis, variations in the two types of data over time also can be observed. Such noninvasive in-situ methods of identifying and characterizing the hydrologic flow regimes at contaminated sites support the prospect of developing effective, cost-conscious cleanup strategies in the near future. As of the end of May 1998, the project is on schedule. The first field work was conducted using both of the geophysical survey methods in October of 1997, and the second field survey employed both methods in March of 1998. One of the stated tasks is to reoccupy the same survey line on a quarterly basis for two years to examine change in both

  11. Animal investigation program 1974 annual report: Nevada Test Site and vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Giles, K.R.; Bernhardt, D.E.; Brown, K.R.

    1977-06-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalysis of tissues collected from cattle, deer, desert bighorn sheep, and other wildlife that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site during 1974. Routine activities and special investigations of the Animal Investigation Program are also discussed. Other than the naturally occurring potassium-40, gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected infrequently. For example, cesium-137 was found only in the muscle tissues from 3 of the 12 Nevada Test Site cattle sampled during 1974. Tritium concentrations in the tissues from most of the animals sampled are at background levels. Animals from the experimental farm tended to have slightly higher concentrations than those sampled at other locations on the Nevada Test Site. Strontium-90 levels in bones from deer, desert bighorn sheep, and cattle were slightly lower than those reported for the preceding year. A graph depicts the average levels found in the bones of the three species from 1956 through 1974

  12. 2013 Annual Site Environmental Report for Sandia National Laboratories Tonopah Test Range Nevada & Kauai Test Facility Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Stacy Rene [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Agogino, Karen [National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Washington, DC (United States); Li, Jun [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); White, Nancy [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Minitrez, Alexandra [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Avery, Penny [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bailey-White, Brenda [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bonaguidi, Joseph [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Catechis, Christopher [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); duMond, Michael [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Eckstein, Joanna [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evelo, Stacie [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Forston, William [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herring, III, Allen [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lantow, Tiffany [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martinez, Reuben [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mauser, Joseph [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Amy [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Mark [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Payne, Jennifer [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peek, Dennis [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reiser, Anita [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ricketson, Sherry [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roma, Charles [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Salinas, Stephanie [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ullrich, Rebecca [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities managed and operated by Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Field Office (SFO), in Albuquerque, New Mexico, administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at TTR and KTF. Sandia manages and conducts operations at TTR in support of the DOE/NNSA’s Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Navarro Research and Engineering subcontracts to Sandia in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report summarizes data and the compliance status of the sustainability, environmental protection, and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year 2013. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities, and the National Environmental Policy Act. Sandia is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA/Nevada Field Office retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of TTR ER sites. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2012).

  13. US Department of Energy Nevada Field Office annual site environmental report, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, S.C.; Latham, A.R.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1992-09-01

    These appendices contain 1991 Nevada Test Site (NTS) onsite and offsite milk environmental monitoring results. The onsite data presented are accompanied by summaries of statistical evaluation of the data. Other offsite data collected by the EPA are available from the US Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada

  14. Hazelwood Interim Storage Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Hazelwood, Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the environmental monitoring program at the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring of HISS began in 1984 when the site was assigned to the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the decontamination research and development project authorized by Congress under the 1984 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act. DOE placed responsibility for HISS under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental monitoring program at HISS includes sampling networks for radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, thorium-230, and total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other requirements in DOE orders. Environmental standards and DCGs are established to protect public health and the environment

  15. US Department of Energy Nevada Field Office annual site environmental report, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, S.C.; Latham, A.R.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1992-09-01

    Monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by DOE contractors and Site user organizations during 1991 indicated that underground nuclear testing operations were conducted in compliance with regulations, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.09 percent of the guideline for air exposure. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS Indicated that airborne radioactivity from test operations was not detectable off site, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. The calculated maximum effective dose equivalent off site would have been 8.6 x 10 -3 mrem. Any person receiving this dose was also exposed to 142 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped to EPA approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act Is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Non-NTS support facilities complied with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits

  16. Joint inversion of geophysical data for site characterization and restoration monitoring. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, P.A.; Berryman, J.G.; Roberts, J.J.; Wildenschild, D.

    1998-01-01

    'The purpose of this project is to develop a computer code for joint inversion of seismic and electrical data, to improve underground imaging for site characterization and remediation monitoring. The computer code developed in this project will invert geophysical data to obtain direct estimates of porosity and saturation underground, rather than inverting for seismic velocity and electrical resistivity or other geophysical properties. This is intended to be a significant improvement in the state-of-the-art of underground imaging, since interpretation of data collected at a contaminated site would become much less subjective. Potential users include DOE scientists and engineers responsible for characterizing contaminated sites and monitoring remediation of contaminated sites. In this three-year project, the authors use a multi-phase approach consisting of theoretical and numerical code development, laboratory investigations, testing on available laboratory and borehole geophysics data sets, and a controlled field experiment, to develop practical tools for joint electrical and seismic data interpretation. This report summarizes work after about 1.7 years of a 3-year project. Progress on laboratory measurements is described first, followed by progress on developing algorithms for the inversion code to relate geophysical data to porosity and saturation.'

  17. Hanford site near-facility environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, C.J.

    1997-08-05

    This document summarizes the results of the near-facility environmental monitoring results for 1996 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 areas of the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. The monitoring implements applicable portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 (DOE 1988a), 5400.5 (DOE 1990), and 5820.2A (DOE 1988b); Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247; and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with federal, state, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities can still be observed on the Hanford Site and radiation levels were slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

  18. Niagara Falls Storage Site annual environmental report for calendar year 1991, Lewiston, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the environmental monitoring program at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and surrounding area, implementation of the program, and monitoring results for 1991. Environmental monitoring at NFSS began in 1981. The site is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is assigned to the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP is a program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The environmental monitoring program at NFSS includes sampling networks for radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and total uranium and radium-226 concentrations in surface water, sediments, and groundwater. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters including seven metals are routinely measured in groundwater. Monitoring results are compared with applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards, DOE derived concentration guides (DCGs), dose limits, and other requirements in DOE orders. Environmental standards are established to protect public health and the environment

  19. Diurnal and Intra-Annual Variations in Greenhouse Gases at Fixed Sites in the San Francisco Bay Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, S.; Guha, A.; Martien, P. T.; Bower, J.; Perkins, I.; Randall, S.; Young, A.; Stevenson, E.; Hilken, H.

    2017-12-01

    The Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the San Francisco Bay Area's air quality regulatory agency, has set a goal to reduce the region's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by 2050, consistent with the State of California's climate goals. Recently, the Air District's governing board adopted a 2017 Clean Air Plan which lays out the agency's vision and includes actions to put the region on a path towards achieving the 2050 goal while also reducing air pollution and related health impacts. The Plan includes GHG rule-making efforts, policy initiatives, local government partnerships, outreach, grants, and incentives, encompassing over 250 specific implementation actions across all economic sectors to effect ambitious emission reductions in the region. To track trends in atmospheric observations of GHGs and associated species and monitor changes in regional emission patterns, the Air District has established a fixed site network (CO2, CH4, CO) of one generally upwind site (Bodega Bay - on the coast north of Marin County) and three receptor sites (Bethel Island - east of the major refineries, in the Sacramento River Delta; Livermore - east of the bulk of the East Bay cities; and San Martin - south of the major city of San Jose). Having collected over a year of data for each of the fixed sites, the Air District is now investigating spatial and temporal variations in GHG emissions. Concentrating on variations in diurnal cycles, we see the commonly observed pattern of seasonal changes in diurnal amplitude at all sites, with larger variations during the winter than the summer, consistent with seasonally varying daily changes in planetary boundary layer heights. Investigations explore the weekday/weekend effect on the diurnal patterns and the effect of seasonal wind direction changes on the intra-annual variations of the local enhancements. The Air District is beginning to investigate the ways in which the fixed site network reflects the dominant

  20. Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report for 1997: Color your tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, L.V. [and others

    1998-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy currently oversees activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. The reservation contains three major operating sites: the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the K-25 Site). The ORR was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project, a secret undertaking that produced the materials for the first atomic bombs. The reservation's role has evolved over the years, and it continues to adapt to meet the changing defense, energy, and research needs of the United States. Both the work carried out for the war effort and subsequent research, development, and production activities have involved (and continue to involve) radiological and hazardous materials.

  1. Colonie Interim Storage Site: Annual environmental report for calendar year 1990, Colonie, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    Environmental monitoring of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS) and surrounding area began in 1984. CISS is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sties where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The routine environmental monitoring program at CISS includes sampling networks for external gamma radiation exposures and for radium-226, throium-232, an total uranium concentrations in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, the nonradiological parameters volatile and semivolatile organics, pesticides/polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), metals, total organic carbon (TOC), total organic halides (TOX), specific conductivity, and pH are measured in groundwater. 14 refs., 20 figs., 25 tabs

  2. FY 2012 INL SITE SUSTAINABILITY PLAN WITH THE FY 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest L. Fossum; Steve A. Birrer

    2012-01-01

    It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that sustainable energy and transportation fuels management will be integrated into DOE operations to meet obligations under Executive Order (EO) 13423 "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," the Instructions for Implementation of EO 13423, as well as Guidance Documents issued in accordance thereto and any modifcations or amendments that may be issued from time to time. In furtherance of this obligation, DOE established strategic performance-based energy and transportation fuels goals and strategies through the Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Initiative, which were incorporated into DOE Order 430.2B "Departmental Energy, Renewable energy, and Transportation Management" and were also identified in DOE Order 450.1A, "Environmental Protection Program." These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of energy and transportation fuels management into site Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

  3. Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report for 1997: Color your tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, L.V.

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy currently oversees activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. The reservation contains three major operating sites: the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the K-25 Site). The ORR was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project, a secret undertaking that produced the materials for the first atomic bombs. The reservation's role has evolved over the years, and it continues to adapt to meet the changing defense, energy, and research needs of the United States. Both the work carried out for the war effort and subsequent research, development, and production activities have involved (and continue to involve) radiological and hazardous materials

  4. FY 2013 INL SITE SUSTAINABILITY PLAN WITH THE FY 2012 ANNUAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest L. Fossum; Steve A. Birrer

    2012-12-01

    It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that sustainable energy and transportation fuels management will be integrated into DOE operations to meet obligations under Executive Order (EO) 13423 "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," the Instructions for Implementation of EO 13423, as well as Guidance Documents issued in accordance thereto and any modifcations or amendments that may be issued from time to time. In furtherance of this obligation, DOE established strategic performance-based energy and transportation fuels goals and strategies through the Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Initiative, which were incorporated into DOE Order 430.2B "Departmental Energy, Renewable energy, and Transportation Management" and were also identified in DOE Order 450.1A, "Environmental Protection Program." These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of energy and transportation fuels management into site Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

  5. Application of at-site peak-streamflow frequency analyses for very low annual exceedance probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asquith, William H.; Kiang, Julie E.; Cohn, Timothy A.

    2017-07-17

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, has investigated statistical methods for probabilistic flood hazard assessment to provide guidance on very low annual exceedance probability (AEP) estimation of peak-streamflow frequency and the quantification of corresponding uncertainties using streamgage-specific data. The term “very low AEP” implies exceptionally rare events defined as those having AEPs less than about 0.001 (or 1 × 10–3 in scientific notation or for brevity 10–3). Such low AEPs are of great interest to those involved with peak-streamflow frequency analyses for critical infrastructure, such as nuclear power plants. Flood frequency analyses at streamgages are most commonly based on annual instantaneous peak streamflow data and a probability distribution fit to these data. The fitted distribution provides a means to extrapolate to very low AEPs. Within the United States, the Pearson type III probability distribution, when fit to the base-10 logarithms of streamflow, is widely used, but other distribution choices exist. The USGS-PeakFQ software, implementing the Pearson type III within the Federal agency guidelines of Bulletin 17B (method of moments) and updates to the expected moments algorithm (EMA), was specially adapted for an “Extended Output” user option to provide estimates at selected AEPs from 10–3 to 10–6. Parameter estimation methods, in addition to product moments and EMA, include L-moments, maximum likelihood, and maximum product of spacings (maximum spacing estimation). This study comprehensively investigates multiple distributions and parameter estimation methods for two USGS streamgages (01400500 Raritan River at Manville, New Jersey, and 01638500 Potomac River at Point of Rocks, Maryland). The results of this study specifically involve the four methods for parameter estimation and up to nine probability distributions, including the generalized extreme value, generalized

  6. US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office: Annual site environmental report, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, E.M.; Black, S.C.

    1991-09-01

    These appendices contain 1990 Nevada Test Site (NTS) onsite and offsite milk environmental monitoring results. The onsite data presented are accompanied by summaries of statistical evaluations of the data. Other offsite data collected by the EPA are available from the US Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada. The findings of these monitoring and surveillance efforts are described in volume one of this document. 59 figs., 37 tabs

  7. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, Joanne P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sackschewsky, Michael R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tilden, Harold T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Barnett, J. Matthew [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Su-Coker, Jennifer [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ballinger, Marcel Y. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fritz, Brad G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stoetzel, Gregory A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lowry, Kami L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moon, Thomas W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Becker, James M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mendez, Keith M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Raney, Elizabeth A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chamness, Michele A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Larson, Kyle B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), one of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science’s 10 national laboratories, provides innovative science and technology development in the areas of energy and the environment, fundamental and computational science, and national security. DOE’s Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) is responsible for oversight of PNNL at its Campus in Richland, Washington, as well as its facilities in Sequim, Seattle, and North Bonneville, Washington, and Corvallis and Portland, Oregon.

  8. Animal Investigation Program 1973 annual report: Nevada Test Site and vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Giles, K.R.; Bernhardt, D.E.

    1977-05-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalysis of tissues collected from cattle, deer, desert bighorn sheep, and other wildlife that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site during 1973. Routine activities and special investigations are discussed. Iodine-131 was detected in the thyroid of a Nevada Test Site mule deer. The postulated source was worldwide fallout from a nuclear detonation conducted by the People's Republic of China. Other than the naturally occurring potassium-40, cesium-137 was the only gamma-emitting radionuclide detected with any consistency in soft tissues. Nine muscle samples from the Nevada Test Site beef herd contained levels of cesium-137 ranging from 14 to 50 pCi/kilogram. Muscle from two deer contained 20 and 30 pCi/kilogram. Rabbit muscle contained 200 pCi/kilogram and muscle from a feral horse contained 40 pCi/kilogram. Tritium levels in all animal tissues sampled were at background except for animals residing at the Area 15 farm and for a feral horse. Postulated sources of these exposures are discussed. The strontium content in bones continued the downward trend observed during recent years

  9. Seismic surface-wave tomography of waste sites. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    'The objective of the Seismic Surface Wave Tomography of Waste Sites is to develop a robust technique for field acquisition and analysis of surface wave data for the interpretation of shallow structures, such as those associated with the burial of wastes. The analysis technique is to be developed and tested on an existing set of seismic data covering the K-901 burial site at the East Tennessee Technology Park. Also, a portable prototype for a field acquisition system will be designed and developed to obtain additional data for analysis and testing of the technique. The portable analysis system will display an image representing the shear-wave velocity structure. The image would be developed in the field from successive data samples. As of May 1998, the author established compatibility with computer programs at Georgia Tech and computed a preliminary singular value decomposition solution for the K-901 data. The analysis included modeling of surface wave dispersion and analysis of velocity structure. The analysis demonstrated that the authors needed additional field data to verify the conclusions and provide independent confirmation of velocity structure. The K-901 site data were obtained with 8 Hz geophones. The frequencies below 8 Hz are strongly attenuated in such recording instruments and are difficult to analyze. In particular, group velocities can have multiple answers for a given frequency. Consequently, without a record of the low-frequency energy, the authors found it difficult to identify the portion of the dispersion curve responsible for the seismogram. In particular, it was difficult to determine if the reverse dispersion observed in the frequencies above 8 Hz was caused by a low velocity layer or caused by observing only the frequencies above the group velocity minimum. In either model, synthetic seismograms can be made to match the observed data for the higher frequencies. The contract for the proposed work was completed in December. The field work was

  10. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virginia L. Finley

    2002-04-22

    The results of the 2000 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 2000. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality -- an alternative energy source. The year 2000 marked the second year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion power plants. With its completion within budget and ahead of its target schedule, NSTX first plasma occurred on February 12, 1999. In 2000, PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program measured tritium in the air at on-site and off-site sampling stations. PPPL is capable of detecting small changes in the ambient levels of tritium by using highly sensitive monitors. The operation of an in-stack monitor located on D-site is a requirement of the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) regulations with limits set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Also included in PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program, are precipitation, surface

  11. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virginia L. Finley

    2002-04-01

    The results of the 2000 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 2000. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality -- an alternative energy source. The year 2000 marked the second year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion power plants. With its completion within budget and ahead of its target schedule, NSTX first plasma occurred on February 12, 1999. In 2000, PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program measured tritium in the air at on-site and off-site sampling stations. PPPL is capable of detecting small changes in the ambient levels of tritium by using highly sensitive monitors. The operation of an in-stack monitor located on D-site is a requirement of the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) regulations with limits set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Also included in PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program, are precipitation, surface, ground, a nd

  12. Annual Waste Minimization Summary Report for the National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfred J. Karns

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the waste minimization efforts undertaken by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), during CY06. This report was developed in accordance with the requirements of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit ((number s ign)NEV HW0021) and as clarified in a letter dated April 21, 1995, from Paul Liebendorfer of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to Donald Elle of the DOE, Nevada Operations Office. The NNSA/NSO Pollution Prevention (P2) Program establishes a process to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by the NNSA/NSO and ensures that proposed methods of treatment, storage, and/or disposal of waste minimize potential threats to human health and the environment. The following information provides an overview of the P2 Program, major P2 accomplishments during the reporting year, a comparison of the current year waste generation to prior years, and a description of efforts undertaken during the year to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by the NNSA/NSO

  13. US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office: Annual site environmental report, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, E.M.; Black, S.C.

    1991-09-01

    Monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTA) by DOE contractors and Site user organizations during 1990 indicated that underground nuclear testing operations were conducted in compliance with regulations, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.05 percent of the guideline for air exposure. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from test operations was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the AIRDOS-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated maximum effective dose equivalent offsite would have been 4.7 x 10 -3 mrem. Any person receiving this dose was also exposed to 123 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped to EPA-approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Non-NTS support facilities complied with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits. 63 figs., 88 tabs

  14. The Federal Energy Technology Center annual site environmental report for calendar year 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-10-31

    A comprehensive Directives Program aimed at environmental, safety, and health requirements and risks was initiated in 1997 and will be completed in late 1999 or early 2000. The primary objective of the program is to identify or develop a set of standards that, when implemented, provides reasonable assurance that the health and safety of the workers, public, and the environment will be protected during the performance of the work. In conjunction with the Directives Program, the use of the voluntary environmental management system, ISO 14000, was evaluated. This includes the only environmental management standard to which an entity can be registered. Plans are to consider the specifications and guidance from this standard in the identification of an effective environmental management system for the merged FETC sites. A performance measurement system continued to be maintained during 1998 to assist in evaluating how effectively activities at FETC meet mission-critical goals and how well missions and strategies are connected in the DOE strategic plan. This system also provides data to assist in gauging performance against the DOE critical success factors, that is, performance against technical objectives. Various environmental milestones can be tracked to completion, thus giving the FETC measures by which to gauge the site's goals of remaining in regulatory compliance and achieving best-in-class environmental performance.

  15. Seismic surface wave tomography of waste sites. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    'The objective of the Seismic Surface Wave Tomography of Waste Sites is to develop a robust technique for field acquisition and analysis of surface wave data for the interpretation of shallow structures, such as those associated with the burial of wastes. The analysis technique is to be developed and tested on an existing set of seismic data covering the K-901 burial site at the East Tennessee Technology Park. Also, a portable prototype for a field acquisition system will be designed and developed to obtain additional data for analysis and testing of the technique. The K-901 data have been examined and a preliminary Single Valued Decomposition inversion has been obtained. The preliminary data indicates a need for additional seismic data to ground-truth the inversion. The originally proposed gravity data acquisition has been dropped because sufficient gravity data are now available for a preliminary analysis and because the seismic data are considered more critical to the interpretation. The proposed prototype for the portable acquisition and analysis system was developed during the first year and will be used in part of the acquisition of additional seismic data.'

  16. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virginia L. Finley

    2004-04-07

    The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's (PPPL) operations. The results of the 2001 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for PPPL are presented and discussed. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 2001. PPPL has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The vision of the Laboratory is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality--a clean, alternative energy source. The Year 2001 marked the third year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion reactors. In 2001, PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program measured tritium in the air at on- and off-site sampling stations. PPPL is capable of detecting small changes in the ambient levels of tritium by using highly sensitive monitors. The operation of an in-stack monitor located on D-site is a requirement of the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) regulations; also included in PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program, are water monitoring--precipitation, ground-, surface-, and waste-waters. PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and from the D-site stack; the data are presented in this report. Groundwater monitoring

  17. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finley, Virginia L.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's (PPPL) operations. The results of the 2001 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for PPPL are presented and discussed. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 2001. PPPL has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The vision of the Laboratory is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality--a clean, alternative energy source. The Year 2001 marked the third year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion reactors. In 2001, PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program measured tritium in the air at on- and off-site sampling stations. PPPL is capable of detecting small changes in the ambient levels of tritium by using highly sensitive monitors. The operation of an in-stack monitor located on D-site is a requirement of the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) regulations; also included in PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program, are water monitoring--precipitation, ground-, surface-, and waste-waters. PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and from the D-site stack; the data are presented in this report. Groundwater monitoring continue d under a

  18. Overall Analysis of Meteorological Information in the KAERI Site (2006 Annual Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, E. H.; Choi, G. S.; Choi, S. D

    2007-07-15

    Inspection and repair of tower structure and lift, instrument calibration have been done in the scope of 'Environmental Radiation Monitoring Around the Nuclear Facilities' project. Wind direction, wind speed, temperature, humidity at 67m, 27m, and 10m height and temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, solar radiation, precipitation, and visibility at surface have been measured and analyzed with statistical methods. At the site, the prevailing wind directions were N in winter, SW in 2nd, E in 3rd quaters. The calm distributed 14.7% at 67m, 33.2% at 27m, 57.3% at 10m height. Wireless data transmission to MIPS(Meteorological Information Processing System) has been done after collection in the DAS where environmental assessment can be done by the developed simulation programs in both cases of normal operation and emergency.

  19. US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report: 1993. Volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, S.C.; Glines, W.M.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1994-09-01

    This report is comprised of appendices which support monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during 1993. Appendix A contains onsite Pu-238, gross beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides in air. Appendix B contains onsite tritium in air. Appendix C contains onsite Pu-238, Sr-90, gross alpha and beta, gamma-emitting radionuclides, Ra-226, Ra-228 and tritium in water. A summary of 1993 results of offsite radiological monitoring is included in Appendix D. Appendix E contains radioactive noble gases in air onsite. Appendix F contains onsite thermoluminescent dosimeter data. Historical trends in onsite thermoluminescent dosimeter data are contained in Appendix G. Appendix H summarizes 1993 compliance at the DOE/NV NTS and non-NTS facilities. Appendix I summarizes the 1993 results of non radiological monitoring.

  20. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Annual Site Environmental Report summary for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This report contains summaries of the environmental programs at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, environmental monitoring and the results, and the impact of operations on the environment and the public for 1993. The environmental monitoring program at Paducah includes effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is measurement of releases as they occur. Contaminants are released through either airborne emissions or liquids discharged from the plant. These releases occur as part of normal site operations, such as cooling water discharged from the uranium enrichment cascade operations or airborne releases from ventilation systems. In the event of system failure, this monitoring provides timely warning so that corrective action can be taken before releases reach an unsafe level. Environmental surveillance tracks the dispersion of materials into the environment after they have been released. This involves the collection of samples from various media, such as water, soil, vegetation, and food crops, and the analysis of these samples for certain radionuclides, chemicals, and metals

  1. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Annual progress report for 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, S.H.

    1988-09-01

    This report describes progress during 1987 of five Hanford Site ground water monitoring projects. Four of these projects are being conducted according to regulations based on the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and the state Hazardous Waste Management Act. The fifth project is being conducted according to regulations based on the state Solid Waste Management Act. The five projects discussed herein are: 300 Area Process Trenches; 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins; 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds; Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill; Solid Waste Landfill. For each of the projects, there are included, as applicable, discussions of monitoring well installations, water-table measurements, background and/or downgradient water quality and results of chemical analysis, and extent and rate of movement of contaminant plumes. 14 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs

  2. US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report: 1993. Volume 2: Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, S.C.; Glines, W.M.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1994-09-01

    This report is comprised of appendices which support monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during 1993. Appendix A contains onsite Pu-238, gross beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides in air. Appendix B contains onsite tritium in air. Appendix C contains onsite Pu-238, Sr-90, gross alpha and beta, gamma-emitting radionuclides, Ra-226, Ra-228 and tritium in water. A summary of 1993 results of offsite radiological monitoring is included in Appendix D. Appendix E contains radioactive noble gases in air onsite. Appendix F contains onsite thermoluminescent dosimeter data. Historical trends in onsite thermoluminescent dosimeter data are contained in Appendix G. Appendix H summarizes 1993 compliance at the DOE/NV NTS and non-NTS facilities. Appendix I summarizes the 1993 results of non radiological monitoring

  3. Animal investigation program 1980 annual report: Nevada Test Site and vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Bernhardt, D.E.; Giles, K.R.

    1982-07-01

    This report summarizes the data collected through the Animal Investigation Program during 1980. A major goal of the Program is to assess the radionuclide burden in the tissues of wild and domesticated animals around the Nevada Test Site and to detect pathological effects resulting from the burdens. Other than naturally occurring potassium-40, gamma emitting radionuclides were detected infrequently. Strontium-90 and plutonium concentrations in tissues from deer, cattle, and desert bighorn sheep were similar to those found in samples collected during recent years. Lesions found in necropsied animals were similar to those found in animals from other areas of the U.S. and would not be attributable to ionizing radiation exposure. The report also describes other activities of the program, including the deer migration study and census

  4. US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report, 1992. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, S.C.; Latham, A.R.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

    1993-09-01

    This report contains the environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site for 1992. Monitoring and surveillance on and around the NTS by DOE contractors and Site user organizations during 1992 indicated that underground nuclear testing operations were conducted in compliance with regulations, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.15 percent of the guideline for air exposure. All 1992 nuclear events took place during the first three quarters of the calendar year prior to the Congressional testing moratorium. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from test operations was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the CAP88-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated maximum effective dose equivalent offsite would have been 0.012 mrem. Any person receiving this dose was also exposed to 78 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped to EPA-approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Non-NTS support facilities complied with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits.

  5. Animal investigation program: Nevada test site and vicinity. Annual report, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Crockett, A.B.; Bernhardt, D.E.; Giles, K.R.; Kinnison, R.R.

    1979-07-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalysis of tissues collected from cattle, mule deer, desert bighorn sheep, rabbits, feral horses, and other wildlife that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site. Routine activities and special investigations of the Animal Investigation Program are also discussed. Other than potassium-40, gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected infrequently. Strontium-90 concentrations in bones from deer, cattle, and desert bighorn sheep continued the downward trend of recent years. Tritium concentrations were generally within expected environmental limits with the exception of animals exposed to sources of contamination. Radionuclide tissue concentrations were generally higher in the tissues of animals residing in Area 15 than in other areas. Statistical analyses made of plutonium-239 levels reported in cattle tissue collected from 1971 through 1977 reveal that activity levels in lungs, liver, and bone are significantly related to age. Activity levels did not change significantly in the ingesta and lungs during this time but did tend to increase for bone and liver. Activity levels in the ingesta are significantly higher in the fall than in the spring. Hypothetical dose estimates to man were calculated on the basis of liver or muscle from animals that contained peak radionuclide levels. The highest postulated dose was 8.6 millirems for tritium in tissues from a mule deer. The movements of 17 mule deer were monitored on a weekly basis.During the winter months, all deer left their summer range on the mesas of the Nevada Test Site and migrated 40 to 60 kilometers south and west. A statistical estimate was made of the deer population in selected areas utilizing the marked deer as a basis for this estimate. No gross or microscopic lesions were found in necropsied animals that could be directly attributed to the effects of ionizing radiation

  6. Animal investigation program 1978 annual report: Nevada Test Site and vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Bernhardt, D.E.; Giles, K.R.

    1980-12-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalyses of tissues collected from cattle, mule deer, desert bighorn sheep, rabbits, golden eagles, and other wildlife that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site during 1978. Routine and special activities of the Animal Investigation Program are also discussed. Other than the naturally occurring Potassium-40, gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected infrequently with the exception of short-lived radionuclides found in samples from animals collected soon after March 14 (the date of a nuclear test by the People's Republic of China). Strontium-90 concentrations in bones from deer, cattle, and desert bighorn sheep were consistent with those of recent years. Tritium concentrations were generally within expected environmental limits with the exception of animals exposed to sources of contamination; e.g., drainage ponds from Area 12 tunnels. Plutonium levels in all tissues from all species showed little variation from recent years. However, cattle tissue sampled in the fall were higher than those collected in the spring. Radionuclide tissue concentrations were generally higher in the tissues of animals residing in Area 15 than in similar animals collected from other Nevada Test Site areas. Hypothetical dose estimates to man were calculated on the basis of the daily consumption of 0.5 kilogram of liver or muscle from animals that contained peak radionuclide levels. The movements of 13 mule deer outfitted with collars containing a radio transmitter unit were monitored on a weekly basis. No gross or microscopic lesions were found in necropsied animals that could be directly attributed to the effects of ionizing radiation

  7. Animal Investigation Program 1976 annual report: Nevada test site and vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Giles, K.R.; Bernhardt, D.E.; Brown, K.W.

    1978-11-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalysis of tissues collected from cattle and mule deer, desert bighorn sheep, feral horses, and other wildlife that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site during 1976. Other than the naturally occurring potassium-40, gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected infrequently with the exception of 131 I in animal thyroid samples collected after September 25 (the date of a Chinese nuclear test). Strontium-90 concentrations in bones from deer, cattle, and desert bighorn sheep continued the downward trend of recent years. Tritium concentrations were generally within ambient limits with the exception of animals exposed to sources of contamination; e.g., Sedan Crater, drainage ponds from Area 12 tunnels, etc. Analysis of actinide in tissues was emphasized during 1976. Graphs illustrate the 239 P levels in lungs, livers, and femurs from Nevada Test Site beef cattle for the years 1971 through 1976. Femur and lung residue data are nearly identical for each year with liver concentrations being a factor of 2 or 3 lower. Hypothetical dose estimates to man were calculated on the basis of the daily consumption of 0.5 kilogram of liver or muscle from animals that contained peak actinide levels. The highest postulated dose was 11 millirem from tritium from tissues for a mule deer. This dose is about 2% of the 500 millirems/year guide for radiation doses to an individual in the general public. All other postulated doses for consumption of the tissue containing other radionuclides are less than 0.1% of this guide. The food habits of desert bighorn sheep were discussed according to the geographic locations of the animals at time of collection. Grasses made up approximately 60% of the diet at all locations, with shrubs content approaching 30%, and the remainder consisting of various forbs. The movement of 13 mule deer fitted with collars containing a radiotransmitter unit was monitored on a weekly basis

  8. Western Area Power Administration annual site environmental report for calendar year 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-12-31

    This document outlines the accomplishments and status of the environmental program of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) for calendar year 2005. In 2005, Western submitted 190 reports to state and local emergency response personnel and had 60 California Hazardous Materials Business Plans in place as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act. These reports identify the hazardous substances contained at these sites. At sites where potential oil spills could harm surrounding ecosystems and waterways, Western prepares Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) plans. These plans identify measures to prevent spills from harming the environment, such as identifying the need for secondary containment at facilities. Western currently has SPCC plans for 154 facilities in 13 states. In 2005, Western updated 19 SPCC plans and prepared one new plan. Western operated under 107 environmental permits in 2005. Western evaluates the impact of its planned actions on the environment by preparing National Environmental Policy Act documentation. In 2005, Western completed or was working on 60 categorical exclusions, 18 environmental assessments and eight environmental impact statements, issued six Findings of No Significant Impact, and prepared four Mitigation Action Plans. Western held several public workshops/meetings and consulted with 70 American Indian Tribes for various projects. In 2005, Western was working on or had completed 11 Section 7 consultations under the Endangered Species Act. In 2005, Western recycled more than 3,600 metric tons of electrical equipment, mineral oil dielectric fluid, asphalt, fluorescent and metal halide light bulbs, wood poles and crossarms, and other items as well as office waste. Western made $437,816 worth of purchases containing recovered content materials. Western met the requirement of Executive Order 13148, Greening the Government through Leadership in Environmental Management to have its

  9. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant annual site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Operational Environmental Monitoring Plan (OEMP) defined a comprehensive set of parameters which are monitored to detect potential environmental impacts and establish baselines for future environmental evaluations. Surface water and groundwater, air, soil, and biotics are monitored for radioactivity levels. Nonradiological environmental monitoring activities include air, water quality, soil properties, meteorological measurements and determination of the status of the local biological community. Ecological studies focus on the immediate area surrounding the WIPP site with emphasis on the salt storage pile. The baseline radiological surveillance covers a broader geographic area including nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Since the WIPP is still in its preoperational phase (i.e., no waste has been received) certain operational requirements of DOE Orders 5400.1, 5400.5, and the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T) are not relevant. Therefore, this report does not discuss items such as radionuclide emissions and effluents and subsequent doses to the public

  10. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant annual site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Operational Environmental Monitoring Plan (OEMP) defined a comprehensive set of parameters which are monitored to detect potential environmental impacts and establish baselines for future environmental evaluations. Surface water and groundwater, air, soil, and biotics are monitored for radioactivity levels. Nonradiological environmental monitoring activities include air, water quality, soil properties, meteorological measurements and determination of the status of the local biological community. Ecological studies focus on the immediate area surrounding the WIPP site with emphasis on the salt storage pile. The baseline radiological surveillance covers a broader geographic area including nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Since the WIPP is still in its preoperational phase (i.e., no waste has been received) certain operational requirements of DOE Orders 5400.1, 5400.5, and the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T) are not relevant. Therefore, this report does not discuss items such as radionuclide emissions and effluents and subsequent doses to the public.

  11. Animal investigation program 1975 annual report: Nevada Test Site and vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Giles, K.R.; Bernhardt, D.E.; Brown, K.W.

    1978-02-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalysis of tissues collected from cattle, deer, desert bighorn sheep, and other wildlife that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site during 1975. Routine activities and special investigations of the Animal Investigation Program are also discussed. Other than the naturally occurring potassium-40, gamma-emitting radionuclides are detected infrequently. Tritium concentrations in the tissues from most of the animals sampled were at background levels. Strontium-90 levels in bones from deer and cattle were slightly lower than those reported for the preceding year while levels in desert bighorn sheep bones were elevated. A graph depicts the average levels found in the bones of the three species from 1956 through 1975. The gross and microscopic lesions found in necropsied animals are discussed. In general, these lesions are consistent with the physical condition of the animal and type of population sampled. No gross or microscopic lesions were detected that could be directly attributed to the effects of ionizing radiation

  12. 2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Mike

    2012-01-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  13. Solar total energy: large scale experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia Site. Annual report, June 1978-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ney, E.J.

    1979-07-01

    A background summary and a complete description of the progress and current status of activities relative to the Cooperative Agreement for the Solar Total Energy - Large Scale Experiment at the Bleyle Knitwear Plant at Shenandoah, Georgia are presented. A statement of objectives and an abstract of progress to date are included. This is followed by a short introduction containing a project overview, a summary of the participants and their respective roles, a brief description of the Solar Total Energy System (STES) design concept, and a chronological summary of progress to date. A general description of the site is given, a detailed report of progress is reported, and drawings and equipment lists are included. The closed-loop solar energy system planned for Shenandoah begins with circulation of Syltherm 800, a heat transfer fluid of the Dow-Corning Corporation, through the receiver tubes of a parabolic dish solar collector field. As solar energy is focused on the receivers, the heat transfer fluid is heated to approximately 399/sup 0/C (750/sup 0/F) and is pumped to a heat exchanger for immediate use, or to a thermal storage system for later use. Once in the heat exchanger, the fluid heats a working fluid that produces the steam required for operating the turbine. After performing this task, the heat transfer fluid returns to the collectors to repeat the cycle, while the steam turbine-generator system supplies the electrical demands for the knitwear plant and the STES. During STES operation, maximum thermal and electrical requirements of the application are expected to be at 1.08 MWth and 161 kWe, respectively. During the power generation phase, some of the steam is extracted for use as process steam in the knitwear manufacturing process, while exhaust steam from the turbine is passed through a condenser to produce hot water for heating, domestic use, and absorption air conditioning. (WHK)

  14. Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1987.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B. (Idaho Dept. of Fish and Game, Boise, ID (USA)

    1988-04-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game has been monitoring and evaluating existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for steelhead (Salmo gairdneri) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages over the last four years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. A mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production at full seeding as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed nature of upriver anadromous stocks have precluded attainment of full benefit of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit will be credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration. According to the BPA Work Plan, project implementors have the primary responsibility for measuring physical habitat and estimating habitat change. To date, Idaho habitat projects have been implemented primarily by the US Forest Service (USFS). The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) have sponsored three projects (Bear Valley Mine, Yankee Fork, and the proposed East Fork Salmon River projects). IDFG implemented two barrier-removal projects (Johnson Creek and Boulder Creek) that the USFS was unable to sponsor at that time. The role of IDFG in physical habitat monitoring is primarily to link habitat quality and habitat change to changes in actual, or potential, fish production. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

  15. US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report: 1993. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, S.C.; Glines, W.M.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

    1994-09-01

    Monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by DOE contractors and NTS user organizations during 1993 indicated that operations on the NTS were conducted in compliance with applicable federal and DOE guidelines, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.04 percent of the 10 mrem per year guide for air exposure. No nuclear tests were conducted due to the moratorium. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from diffusion, evaporation of effluents, or resuspension was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the CAP88-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual offsite would have been 0.004 mrem. Any person receiving this dose would also have received 97 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped offsite to approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Support facilities at off-NTS locations compiled with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits.

  16. US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report: 1993. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, S.C.; Glines, W.M.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1994-09-01

    Monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by DOE contractors and NTS user organizations during 1993 indicated that operations on the NTS were conducted in compliance with applicable federal and DOE guidelines, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.04 percent of the 10 mrem per year guide for air exposure. No nuclear tests were conducted due to the moratorium. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from diffusion, evaporation of effluents, or resuspension was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the CAP88-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual offsite would have been 0.004 mrem. Any person receiving this dose would also have received 97 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped offsite to approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Support facilities at off-NTS locations compiled with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits

  17. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L. and Levine, J.D.

    1999-01-10

    The results of the 1997 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants, if any, that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. During Calendar Year 1997, PPPL's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) completed fifteen years of fusion experiments begun in 1982. Over the course of three and half years of deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma experiments, PPPL set a world record of 10.7 million watts of controlled fusion power, more than 700 tritium shots pulsed into the reactor vessel generating more than 5.6 x 1020 neutron and 1.6 gigajoules of fusion energy and researchers studied plasma science experimental data, which included "enhanced reverse shear techniques." As TFTR was completing its historic operations, PPPL participated with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Columbia University, and the University of Washington (Seattle) in a collaboration effort to design the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). This next device, NSTX, is located in the former TFTR Hot Cell on D site, and it is designed to be a smaller and more economical torus fusion reactor. Construction of this device began in late 1997, and first plasma in scheduled for early 1999. For 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy in its Laboratory Appraisal report rated the overall performance of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory as "excellent." The report cited the Laboratory's consistently excellent scientific and technological achievements and its successful management practices, which included high marks for environmental management, employee health and safety, human resources administration, science education, and communications. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey

  18. Agricultural aspects of monitoring and stabilization of shallow land-burial sites. Annual report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, A.; Schulz, R.K.; Romney, E.M.; Nishita, H.; Herman, D.J.

    1980-02-01

    The year FY 1979 was a transition year between start up of work at the low level waste burial site at Maxey Flats, Kentucky and completion of previous work involving laboratory studies with radionuclides. All of our studies are designed to solve problems or verify situations that exist in the field. The thrust at Maxey Flats by this group involves soil moisture and radionuclide movement at that burial site in a humid region. Vegetation cover is being manipulated, rooting depth is being studied, water penetration and flow are being measured, radionuclide uptake by plants and concentration in components of soil moisture are being measured. Goals are to determine how water is penetrating trenches and how to minimize such penetration. Laboratory studies involve fission and transuranic radionuclides with a future focus placed primarily upon field problems related to low level waste burial problems and soils. Some past studies being completed involved transuranic elements and a cross-section of USA soils. Different sized containers have been involved in the studies so that results can be extrapolated to field conditions. Analytical work is almost completed and the data are being synthesized. Some preliminary organization of the data is included in this annual report. Concentration ratios, plant part discrimination ratios and radionuclide ratios are included in the initial evaluation. The laboratory phase of this study is to be completed in the next fiscal year with more effort being redirected toward field studies at the shallow land waste burial site. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 9 items in this report for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  19. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion, Piketon, Ohio. Volume 1. Draft environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    Subject to authorizing legislation and funding, ERDA will proceed with steps for additional uranium enrichment capacity at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant near Piketon, Ohio. This environmental statement was prepared by ERDA to cover this action. The statement was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, and ERDA's implementing regulations, 10 CFR Chapter III, Part 711. The statement describes the reasonably foreseeable environmental, social, economic and technological costs and benefits of the construction and operation of the expanded enrichment plant and its reasonably available alternatives and their anticipated effects

  20. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion, Piketon, Ohio. Volume 2. Draft environmental statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, W. H.

    1976-06-01

    The need for additional uranium enrichment facilities and the environmental impacts of the add-on gaseous diffusion plant proposed for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are discussed. A detailed description of the proposed facilities is included and unavoidable adverse environmental effects, possible alternatives, and anticipated benefits from the proposed facilities are considered. The flora and fauna of the area are tabulated and possible effects of air and water pollution on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are postulated. The extent of anticipated noise impact on the vicinity and the anticipated extent of civic envolvement are discussed. (CH)

  1. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion, Piketon, Ohio. Volume 1. Draft environmental statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-06-01

    Subject to authorizing legislation and funding, ERDA will proceed with steps for additional uranium enrichment capacity at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant near Piketon, Ohio. This environmental statement was prepared by ERDA to cover this action. The statement was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, and ERDA's implementing regulations, 10 CFR Chapter III, Part 711. The statement describes the reasonably foreseeable environmental, social, economic and technological costs and benefits of the construction and operation of the expanded enrichment plant and its reasonably available alternatives and their anticipated effects.

  2. Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal.

  3. Study of technetium uptake in vegetation in the vicinity of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acox, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Technetium-99 was measured in vegetation and soil collected on and near the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to obtain an estimate of the soil-to-vegetation concentration factors. The concentration factors appear to be lognormally distributed with a geometric mean of 3.4 (Bq/kg dry wt. tissue per Bq/kg dry wt. soil) and a geometric standard deviation of 4.7. A dose commitment was calculated using a hypothetical 3.7 x 10 10 Bq Tc-99/year release and the actual CY-1981 concentration release of Tc-99. The radiological significance of Tc-99 in the terrestial food chain is substantially less than previously believed

  4. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of large cylinder cleaning operations in X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.; Lutz, H.F.

    1995-06-01

    This report evaluates nuclear criticality safety for large cylinder cleaning operations in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A general description of current cleaning procedures and required hardware/equipment is presented, and documentation for large cylinder cleaning operations is identified and described. Control parameters, design features, administrative controls, and safety systems relevant to nuclear criticality are discussed individually, followed by an overall assessment based on the Double Contingency Principle. Recommendations for enhanced safety are suggested, and issues for increased efficiency are presented

  5. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant expansion, Piketon, Ohio. Volume 2. Draft environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    The need for additional uranium enrichment facilities and the environmental impacts of the add-on gaseous diffusion plant proposed for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are discussed. A detailed description of the proposed facilities is included and unavoidable adverse environmental effects, possible alternatives, and anticipated benefits from the proposed facilities are considered. The flora and fauna of the area are tabulated and possible effects of air and water pollution on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are postulated. The extent of anticipated noise impact on the vicinity and the anticipated extent of civic envolvement are discussed

  6. Solar heating and hot water system installed at James Hurst Elementary School, Portsmouth, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Solar heating and a hot water system installed in an elementary school in Portsmouth, Virginia are examined. The building is zoned into four heating/cooling areas. Each area is equipped with an air handling unit that is monitored and controlled by central control and monitoring system. The solar system for the building uses a collector area of 3,630 sq. ft. of flat plate liquid collectors, and a 6,000 gallon storage tank. System descriptions, maintenance reports, detailed component specifications, and design drawings to evaluate this solar system are reported.

  7. Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal

  8. Local seismic network at the Olkiluoto site. Annual Report for 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saari, J.; Lakio, A.

    2007-05-01

    In February 2002, Posiva Oy established a local seismic network of six stations on the island of Olkiluoto. Later, in June 2004, the seismic network was expanded with two new seismic stations. At that time started the excavation of the underground characterisation facility (the ONKALO) and the basic operation procedure was changed more suitable for the demands of the new situation. The purpose of the microearthquake measurements at Olkiluoto is to improve understanding of the structure, behaviour and long term stability of the bedrock. The studies include both tectonic and excavation-induced microearthquakes. An additional task of monitoring is related to safeguarding of the ONKALO. This report gives the results of microseismic monitoring during the year 2006. Also the changes in the structure and the operation procedure of the network are described. The network has operated continuously in 2006. In the beginning of 2006, the target area of the seismic monitoring expanded to semi-regional scale. Four new seismic stations started in the beginning of February 2006. At the end of the year, two new borehole geophones were installed in order to improve the sensitivity and the depth resolution of the measurements inside the ONKALO block. This report presents also new interpretations of the excavation induced earthquakes that occurred in the ONKALO in 2005. Altogether 2041 events have been located in the Olkiluoto area, in reported time period. The magnitudes of the observed events range from ML = -1.1 to ML = 3.1 (ML magnitude in local Richter's scale). Most of them are explosions. Two of the observed events are be classified as microearthquakes. Evidence of activity that would have influence on the safety of the ONKALO, have not been found. The observed earthquakes occurred in 2006 were small, ML = -0.6 and ML= -0.9. The earthquakes relate to small movements in brittle deformation zones OL-BFZ043 and OL-BFZ034 presented in the geological model of the Olkiluoto site

  9. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Annual Groundwater Report May 2014 Through April 2015, October 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Jason [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Smith, Fred [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report provides the annual analysis of water quality restoration progress, cumulative through April 2015, for Operable Unit (OU) III, surface water and groundwater, of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS). The MMTS is a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act National Priorities List site located in and near the city of Monticello, San Juan County, Utah. MMTS comprises the 110-acre site of a former uranium- and vanadium-ore-processing mill (mill site) and 1,700 acres of surrounding private and municipal property. Milling operations generated 2.5 million cubic yards of waste (tailings) from 1942 to 1960. The tailings were impounded at four locations on the mill site. Inorganic constituents in the tailings drained from the impoundments to contaminate local surface water (Montezuma Creek) and groundwater in the underlying alluvial aquifer. Mill tailings dispersed by wind and water also contaminated properties surrounding and downstream of the mill site. Remedial actions to remove and isolate radiologically contaminated soil, sediment, and debris from the former mill site (OU I) and surrounding properties (OU II) were completed in 1999 with the encapsulation of the wastes in an engineered repository located on DOE property 1 mile south of the former mill site. Contamination of groundwater and surface water remains within OU III at levels that exceed water quality protection standards. Uranium is the primary contaminant of concern. LM implemented monitored natural attenuation with institutional controls as the OU III remedy in 2004. Because groundwater restoration proceeded more slowly than expected and did not meet performance criteria established in the OU III Record of Decision (June 2004), LM implemented a contingency action in 2009 by an Explanation of Significant Difference to include a pump-and-treat system using a single extraction well and treatment by zero

  10. DOE site performance assessment activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions

  11. 2008 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-03-30

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) performed an annual review in fiscal year (FY) 2008 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PAs and CAs. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2008 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

  12. 2008 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) performed an annual review in fiscal year (FY) 2008 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PAs and CAs. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2008 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R and D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R and D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

  13. The Health Experts onLine at Portsmouth (HELP) system: One-year review of adult and Pediatric Asynchronous Telehealth Consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Andrew H; Cole, Jacob H; Chin, John C; Mahnke, Chirstopher Becket

    2016-01-01

    The Health Experts onLine at Portsmouth teleconsultation system is designed to connect health providers in the Navy Medicine East Region to specialists at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth. A review of the first year of the Health Experts onLine at Portsmouth system was performed. Data on each teleconsultation were extracted from the Health Experts onLine at Portsmouth system database and analyzed. From June 2014 to May 2015 there have been 585 teleconsultations. Providers stationed on 36 ships/submarines and at 28 remote military treatment facilities have utilized the Health Experts onLine at Portsmouth system. Over 280 specialists in 34 different specialties were consulted. The median time to first response from a specialist was 6 h and 8 min, with 75% of all consults being addressed within 24 h. Eighteen medevacs were recommended. Thirty-nine potential medevacs were prevented, and 100 potential civilian network deferrals were prevented, resulting in an estimated savings of over US$580,000. Based on the 1-year metrics, Health Experts onLine at Portsmouth has provided improved access and quality of care to service members and their families throughout the Navy Medicine East Region. It has helped avoid over US$580,000 in unnecessary cost burden. Further review at the 2-year time interval will demonstrate the continued growth and effectiveness of the Health Experts onLine at Portsmouth system.

  14. Annual variation in canopy openness, air temperature and humidity inthe understory of three forested sites in southern Bahia State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marayana Prado Pinheiro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at contributing to the knowledge of physical factors affecting community structure in Atlantic Forest remnants of southern Bahia state, Brazil, we analyzed the annual variation in the understory microclimate of a hillside forest fragment in the ‘Reserva Particular do Patrimônio Natural Serra do Teimoso’ (RST and a rustic cacao agroforestry system (Cabruca, located nearby the RST. Canopy openness (CO, air temperature (Ta, air relative humidity (RH and vapor pressure deficit (VPD data were collected between April, 2005 and April, 2006 at the base (RSTB, 340 m and the top (RSTT, 640 m of the RST and at the Cabruca (CB, 250 m. Data of rainfall, Ta, RH and VPD were also collected in an open area (OA, 270 m. The highest rainfalls (> 100 mm occurred in November, 2005 and April, 2006, whereas October, 2005 was the driest month (< 20 mm. CO ranged between 2.5 % in the CB (April, 2006 and 7.7 % in the RST (October, 2005. Low rainfall in October, 2005 affected VPDmax in all sites. Those effects were more pronounced in OA, followed by CB, RSTB and RSTT. During the period of measurements, the values of Ta, RH and VPD in CB were closer to the values measured in OA than to the values measured inside the forest.

  15. Development of NF3 Deposit Removal Technology for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheele, R.D.; McNamara, B.K.; Rapko, B.M.; Edwards, M.K.; Kozelisky, A.E.; Daniel, R.C.; McSweeney, T.I.; Maharas, S.J.; Weaver, P.J.; Iwamasa, K.J.; Kefgen, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes the Battelle, Stoller, and WASTREN (BSW) team's efforts, to date, in support of the United States Department of Energy's plans to remove uranium and technetium deposits before decommissioning the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The BSW team investigated nitrogen trifluoride (NF 3 ) as a safer yet effective alternative gaseous treatment to the chlorine trifluoride (ClF 3 )-elemental fluorine (F 2 ) treatment currently used to remove uranium and technetium deposits from the uranium enrichment cascade. Both ClF 3 and F 2 are highly reactive, toxic, and hazardous gases, while NF 3 , although toxic [1], is no more harmful than moth balls [2]. BSW's laboratory thermo-analytical and laboratory-scale prototype studies with NF 3 established that thermal NF 3 can effectively remove likely and potential uranium (UO 2 F 2 and UF 4 ) and technetium deposits (a surrogate deposit material, TcO 2 , and pertechnetates) by conversion to volatile compounds. Our engineering evaluations suggest that NF 3 's effectiveness could be enhanced by combining with a lesser concentration of ClF 3 . BSW's and other's studies indicate compatibility with Portsmouth materials of construction (aluminum, copper, and nickel). (authors)

  16. Sealing of process valves for the HEU downblending verification experiment at Portsmouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, G.T.; Bartberger, J.C.; Jenkins, C.D.; Perlinski, A.W.; Schoeneman, J.L.; Gordon, D.M.; Whiting, N.E.; Bonner, T.N.; Castle, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    At the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio, USA, excess inventory of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) from US defense programs is being diluted to low-enriched uranium (LEU) for commercial use. The conversion is subject to a Verification Experiment overseen by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The Verification Experiment is making use of monitoring technologies developed and installed by several DOE laboratories. One of the measures is a system for sealing valves in the process piping, which secures the path followed by uranium hexafluoride gas (UF 6 ) from cylinders at the feed stations to the blend point, where the HEU is diluted with LEU. The Authenticated Item Monitoring System (AIMS) was the alternative proposed by Sandia National Laboratories that was selected by the IAEA. Approximately 30 valves were sealed by the IAEA using AIMS fiber-optic seals (AFOS). The seals employ single-core plastic fiber rated to 125 C to withstand the high-temperature conditions of the heated piping enclosures at Portsmouth. Each AFOS broadcasts authenticated seal status and state-of-health messages via a tamper-protected radio-frequency transmitter mounted outside of the heated enclosure. The messages are received by two collection stations, operated redundantly

  17. Annual Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, Virginia [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2014-10-02

    This report provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory’s (PPPL) operations. The results of the 2013 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for PPPL’s are presented and discussed. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and community involvement programs that were undertaken in 2013.

  18. Annual Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Gene

    1999-09-23

    This report provides information about environmental programs and compliance with environmental regulations in calendar year 1998 (CY98) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The most significant information in this report is summarized in the following sections: (1) Environmental Compliance--Section 2 contains the complete Environmental Compliance information; (2) Environmental Non-Radiological Program--Section 3 contains the complete Environmental Non-Radiological information; and (3) Environmental Radiological Program--Section 4 contains the complete Environmental Radiological information.

  19. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Field demonstration at X-701B Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.; Muck, M.; Kearl, P.; Siegrist, R.; Schlosser, R.; Zutman, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Houk, T. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Piketon, OH (United States). Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    1998-08-01

    This report describes the field-scale demonstration performed as part of the project, In Situ Treatment of Mixed Contaminants in Groundwater. This project was a 3{1/2} year effort comprised of laboratory work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and fieldwork performed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The overall goal of the project was to evaluate in situ treatment of groundwater using horizontal recirculation coupled with treatment modules. Specifically, horizontal recirculation was tested because of its application to thin, interbedded aquifer zones. Mixed contaminants were targeted because of their prominence at DOE sites and because they cannot be treated with conventional methods. The project involved several research elements, including treatment process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and full-scale testing at a contaminated site. This report presents the results of the work at the contaminated site, X-701B at PORTS. Groundwater contamination at X-701B consists of trichloroethene (TCE) (concentrations up to 1800 mg/L) and technetium-998 (Tc{sup 99}) (activities up to 926 pCi/L).

  20. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Field demonstration at X-701B Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korte, N.; Muck, M.; Kearl, P.; Siegrist, R.; Schlosser, R.; Zutman, J.; Houk, T.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the field-scale demonstration performed as part of the project, In Situ Treatment of Mixed Contaminants in Groundwater. This project was a 3 1/2 year effort comprised of laboratory work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and fieldwork performed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The overall goal of the project was to evaluate in situ treatment of groundwater using horizontal recirculation coupled with treatment modules. Specifically, horizontal recirculation was tested because of its application to thin, interbedded aquifer zones. Mixed contaminants were targeted because of their prominence at DOE sites and because they cannot be treated with conventional methods. The project involved several research elements, including treatment process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and full-scale testing at a contaminated site. This report presents the results of the work at the contaminated site, X-701B at PORTS. Groundwater contamination at X-701B consists of trichloroethene (TCE) (concentrations up to 1800 mg/L) and technetium-998 (Tc 99 ) (activities up to 926 pCi/L)

  1. Annual variation in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure in tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) eggs and nestlings at Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) study sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Christine M.; Custer, Thomas W.; Dummer, Paul; Goldberg, Diana R.; Franson, J. Christian

    2018-01-01

    Tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) eggs and nestlings were collected from 16 sites across the Great Lakes to quantify normal annual variation in total polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure and to validate the sample size choice in earlier work. A sample size of five eggs or five nestlings per site was adequate to quantify exposure to PCBs in tree swallows given the current exposure levels and variation. There was no difference in PCB exposure in two randomly selected sets of five eggs collected in the same year, but analyzed in different years. Additionally, there was only modest annual variation in exposure, with between 69% (nestlings) and 73% (eggs) of sites having no differences between years. There was a tendency, both statistically and qualitatively, for there to be less exposure in the second year compared to the first year.

  2. DOE/RL Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Annual Compliance Certification Report for the Period July 2 2001 through December 31 2001 [SEC 1 & 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREEN, W.E.

    2002-05-22

    The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit (AOP), Number 00-05-006, became effective on July 2, 2001. The AOP, Section 4.3.4, ''Annual Compliance Certification'', requires submittal of an annual compliance certification report no later than 12 months following the effective date of the permit. This report is to be certified for truth, accuracy, and completeness by a Responsible Official. This first annual compliance certification report contains information for the period from July 2, 2001 through December 31, 2001. Hereafter, the annual compliance certification report will contain information for the period from January 1 through December 31, as required by the AOP Section 4.3, ''Submittals''. Copies of the annual compliance certification reports are transmitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), the Benton Clean Air Authority (BCAA), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. For the applicable reporting period, Section 4.3.3, ''Annual Compliance Certification'', requires the following content for the annual compliance certification report: (1) The identification of each term or condition of the permit that is the basis of the certification; (2) The compliance status; (3) Whether compliance was continuous or intermittent; (4) The method(s) used to determine the compliance status of the source over the reporting period consistent with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173401 -61 5(3)(a); and (5) Such other facts as Ecology, WDOH, or BCAA might be required to determine the compliance status of the source. According to WAC 173-401-630(5), no certification is required for insignificant emission units. The specific terms and conditions for this annual compliance certification report consist of all emission point specific terms and conditions contained in the AOP Attachment 1 and Attachment 2 tables, plus Attachment 3 for

  3. DOE/RL Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Annual Compliance Certification Report for the Period July 2 2001 through December 31 2001 [SEC 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREEN, W.E.

    2002-01-01

    The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit (AOP), Number 00-05-006, became effective on July 2, 2001. The AOP, Section 4.3.4, ''Annual Compliance Certification'', requires submittal of an annual compliance certification report no later than 12 months following the effective date of the permit. This report is to be certified for truth, accuracy, and completeness by a Responsible Official. This first annual compliance certification report contains information for the period from July 2, 2001 through December 31, 2001. Hereafter, the annual compliance certification report will contain information for the period from January 1 through December 31, as required by the AOP Section 4.3, ''Submittals''. Copies of the annual compliance certification reports are transmitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), the Benton Clean Air Authority (BCAA), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. For the applicable reporting period, Section 4.3.3, ''Annual Compliance Certification'', requires the following content for the annual compliance certification report: (1) The identification of each term or condition of the permit that is the basis of the certification; (2) The compliance status; (3) Whether compliance was continuous or intermittent; (4) The method(s) used to determine the compliance status of the source over the reporting period consistent with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173401 -61 5(3)(a); and (5) Such other facts as Ecology, WDOH, or BCAA might be required to determine the compliance status of the source. According to WAC 173-401-630(5), no certification is required for insignificant emission units. The specific terms and conditions for this annual compliance certification report consist of all emission point specific terms and conditions contained in the AOP Attachment 1 and Attachment 2 tables, plus Attachment 3 for asbestos and open burning

  4. Annual CO2 budget and seasonal CO2 exchange signals at a high Arctic permafrost site on Spitsbergen, Svalbard archipelago

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luërs, J.; Westermann, Signe; Piel, K.

    2014-01-01

    -lasting snow cover, and several months of darkness. This study presents a complete annual cycle of the CO2 net ecosystem exchange (NEE) dynamics for a high Arctic tundra area at the west coast of Svalbard based on eddy covariance flux measurements. The annual cumulative CO2 budget is close to 0 g C m-2 yr-1...

  5. 2009 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-03-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Wate Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2009. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2009 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

  6. 2009 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2009. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2009 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R and D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R and D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

  7. Approach to IAEA material-balance verification at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, D.M.; Sanborn, J.B.; Younkin, J.M.; DeVito, V.J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a potential approach by which the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) might verify the nuclear-material balance at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP). The strategy makes use of the attributes and variables measurement verification approach, whereby the IAEA would perform independent measurements on a randomly selected subset of the items comprising the U-235 flows and inventories at the plant. In addition, the MUF-D statistic is used as the test statistic for the detection of diversion. The paper includes descriptions of the potential verification activities, as well as calculations of: (1) attributes and variables sample sizes for the various strata, (2) standard deviations of the relevant test statistics, and (3) the detection sensitivity which the IAEA might achieve by this verification strategy at GCEP

  8. Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plant environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.E.; Netzer, W.D.

    1976-01-01

    At the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant the ambient atmosphere and all effluent streams are sampled and analyzed regularly for conformance to applicable environmental standards. Although neither the State of Ohio nor the federal government has established standards for fluorides in the ambient atmosphere or in vegetation, these parameters also are monitored because fluoride compounds are used extensively in the gaseous diffusion process. Radioactivity is measured in air, water, food, soil, and sediments; and radiation doses are calculated for the public. All public radiation doses are well within federal standards. Non-radioactive effluent parameters either comply with federal standards, or there are projects planned to allow compliance. A disposal facility to remove chromium from recirculating cooling water blowdown will begin operation in June 1976. Also, pH adjustment facilities for liquid effluents and electrostatic precipitators for a coal-fired steam plant are planned for the near future

  9. A probabilistic safety analysis of UF{sub 6} handling at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, G.J.; Lewis, S.R.; Summitt, R.L. [Safety and Reliability Optimization Services (SAROS), Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    A probabilistic safety study of UF{sub 6} handling activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant has recently been completed. The analysis provides a unique perspective on the safety of UF{sub 6} handling activities. The estimated release frequencies provide an understanding of current risks, and the examination of individual contributors yields a ranking of important plant features and operations. Aside from the probabilistic results, however, there is an even more important benefit derived from a systematic modeling of all operations. The integrated approach employed in the analysis allows the interrelationships among the equipment and the required operations to be explored in depth. This paper summarizes the methods used in the study and provides an overview of some of the technical insights that were obtained. Specific areas of possible improvement in operations are described.

  10. Local drainage analyses of the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants during an extreme storm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.O.; Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    Local drainage analyses have been performed for the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants during an extreme storm having an approximate 10,000-yr recurrence interval. This review discusses the methods utilized to accomplish the analyses in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) design and evaluation guidelines, and summarizes trends, results, generalizations, and uncertainties applicable to other DOE facilities. Results indicate that some culverts may be undersized, and that the storm sewer system cannot drain the influx of precipitation from the base of buildings. Roofs have not been designed to sustain ponding when the primary drainage system is clogged. Some underground tunnels, building entrances, and ground level air intakes may require waterproofing

  11. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for CAU 112: Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the period October 2000-July 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobiason, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit, located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 2000--July 2001 monitoring period. Inspections of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches RCRA unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the covers, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. Physical inspections of the closure were completed quarterly and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. An annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted in July 2001. There has been no subsidence at any of the markers since monitoring began eight years ago. Precipitation for the period October 2000 through July 2001 was 9.42 centimeters (cm) (3.71 inches [in]) (U.S. National Weather Service, 2001). The prior year annual rainfall (January 2000 through December 2000) was 10.44 cm (4.1 1 in.). The recorded average annual rainfall for this site from 1972 to January 2000 is 14.91 cm (5.87 in.). The objective of the neutron logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along 30 neutron access tubes and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement at a point located directly beneath each trench. All monitored access tubes are within the compliance criteria of less than 5 percent residual volumetric moisture content at the compliance point directly beneath each respective trench. Soil conditions remain dry and stable underneath the trenches

  12. Annual Status Report (FY2009) Composite Analysis of Low-Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W. E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2010-02-10

    In accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements in DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and implemented by DOE/RL-2000-29, Maintenance Plan for the Composite Analysis of the Hanford Site, Southeast Washington, the DOE Richland Operations Office has prepared this annual status report for fiscal year (FY) 2009 of PNNL-11800, Composite Analysis for the Low-Level Waste Disposal in the 200-Area Plateau of the Hanford Site, hereafter referred to as the Composite Analysis.

  13. Annual Status Report (FY2010) Composite Analysis of Low-Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W. E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2011-01-11

    In accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements in DOE O 435.1 Chg 1, Radioactive Waste Management, and implemented by DOE/RL-2000-29, Maintenance Plan for the Composite Analysis of the Hanford Site, Southeast Washington, the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), also known as RL, has prepared this annual status report for fiscal year (FY) 2010 of PNNL-11800, Composite Analysis for Low-Level Waste Disposal in the 200 Area Plateau of the Hanford Site, hereafter referred to as the Composite Analysis.

  14. Annual report on the U.S. Department of Energy's cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites for October 1995--September 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of cultural resource activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado for the period of October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996. The inactive uranium mill tailings sites in Colorado are at Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. On December 6, 1984, the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) entered into a programmatic memorandum of understanding (PMOU). This PMOU requires the DOE to fulfillment of its obligations under various state and federal regulations for the protection and preservation of cultural resources. This report provides the state of Colorado with an annual report on the cultural resource activities performed for all UMTRA Project sites in Colorado. Due to the completion of surface activities at the UMTRA Project sites, this will be the last annual report to the state of Colorado. Cultural resources activities subsequent to this report will be reported to the state through site-specific correspondence

  15. Proceedings of the eighth annual DOE low-level waste management forum: Technical Session 2, Site closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This volume on site closure or site stabilization and closure, centers on a number of major issues which have been identified by the contractor community as requiring resolution before the topic of site stabilization and closure can be laid to rest. All papers, seven total, in this volume have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (AT)

  16. Annual report on the U.S. Department of Energy's Cultural Resource Activities at Colorado UMTRA Project Sites for October 1993 through September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of cultural resource activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado for the period of October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The UMTRA Project is a cooperative (state and federal) program mandated by the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act, Public Law 95-604 (42 USC section 7901 et seq.). This law requires the timely cleanup of 24 inactive uranium mill tailings sites throughout the United States. Nine of these inactive uranium mill tailings sites are in Colorado at Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. On December 6, 1984, the DOE, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) entered into a programmatic memorandum of agreement (PMOA) (DOE, 1984). This PMOA specifies requirements for the DOE's fulfillment of its obligations under various state and federal regulations for the protection and preservation of cultural resources. This report fulfills the requirement for the DOE to provide the state of Colorado with an annual report on the cultural resource activities performed for all of the UMTRA Project sites in Colorado. This report is organized by UMTRA Project site. For each site, the general remedial action activities and cultural resource activities performed during the period of record are summarized. When known, the DOE's plans for future cultural resource activities at the site are summarized

  17. 15 CFR 713.2 - Annual declaration requirements for plant sites that produce, process or consume Schedule 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... an earlier year (i.e., during the course of any other calendar year within the past three calendar... calendar years. For example, for the 2004 annual declaration on past activities period, if you determine... (question 2-3.1), production data for calendar year 2004. You would declare “0” production because you did...

  18. Annual Status Report (FY2008) Composite Analysis of Low-Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-12-18

    In accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements in DOE 0 435.1, Radioactive to be considered or purposes of Waste Management, and implemented by DOE/RL-2000-292, Maintenance Plan for the Composite Analysis of the Hanford Site, Southeast Washington, the DOE Richland Operations Office has prepared this annual report for fiscal year 2008 of PNNL-1 1800, Composite Analysis for the Low-Level Waste Disposal in the 200-Area Plateau of the Hanford Site, hereafter referred to as the Composite Analysis. The main emphasis of DOE/RL-2000-29 Is to identify additional data and information to enhance the Composite Analysis and the subsequent PNNL- 11800 Addendum, Addendum to Composite Analysis for Low-Level Waste Disposal in the 200 Area Plateau of the Hanford Site, hereafter referred to as the Addendum, and to address secondary issues identified during the review of the Composite Analysis.

  19. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Groundwater Program Office. Annual report for fiscal year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This edition of the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) Groundwater Program Annual Report summarizes the work carried out by the Energy Systems Groundwater Program Office (GWPO) for fiscal year (FY) 1994. The GWPO is responsible for coordination and oversight for all components of the groundwater programs at the three Oak Ridge facilities [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site], as well as the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants (PGDP and PORTS, respectively.) This report describes the administrative framework of the GWPO including staffing, organization, and funding sources. In addition, summaries are provided of activities involving the Technical Support staff at the five facilities. Finally, the results of basic investigations designed to improve our understanding of the major processes governing groundwater flow and contaminant migration on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are reported. These investigations are conducted as part of the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Studies (ORRHAGS) program. The relevance of these studies to the overall remediation responsibilities of Energy Systems is discussed

  20. Solar total energy-large scale experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia site. Annual report, June 1977--June 1978. [For Bleyle Knitwear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1978-06-01

    The site was described in terms of location, suitably, accessibility, and other factors. Detailed descriptions of the Solar Total Energy-Large Scale Experiment Application (STE-LSE) (Bleyle of America, Inc., Knitwear Plant), the DOE owned Meteorology Station operating at the site, and the instrumentation provided by the Georgia Power Company to measure energy usage within the knitwear plant are included. A detailed report of progress is given at the Shenandoah Site, introduced by the STE-LSE schedule and the Cooperative Agreement work tasks. Progress is described in terms of the following major task areas: site/application; instrumentation/data acquisition; meteorology station; site to STES interface; information dissemination. A brief overview of milestones to be accomplished is given, followed by these appendices: solar easement agreement, interface drawing set, and additional site background data. (MHR)

  1. Experimental study of a model and parameters calculating annual mean atmospheric dispersion factor for a nuclear power plant to be build in coastal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Erbang; Chen Jiayi; Zhang Maoshuan; Gao Zhanrong; Yao Rentai; Jia Peirong; Qiao Qingdang

    1999-01-01

    The author tries to develop a new model calculating annual mean atmospheric dispersion factor for a nuclear power plant to be build in coastal site based on field experiments. This model considers not only the difference between shore ward and off-shore but also the comprehensive effect of following factors: mixed layer and thermal internal boundary layer, mixing release and variation of diffusion parameters due to the distance from coast and so on. The various parameters needed in the model are obtained from the field atmospheric experiments done on the NPP site during 1995∼1996. There dimension joint frequency is got from wind and temperature measurements at 4 heights of a tower of 100 m; diffusion parameters shore ward and off-shore from turbulent measurement and wind tunnel simulation test; the parameters relative to sea and land breeze and thermal internal boundary layer are obtained from tests with low altitude radiosonde and lost balloon at 3 sites during two periods of Summer and Winter. Finally a comparison of the results given by this model and commonly used model provided by relative guides is done. The comparison shows that about 1 times under estimation is found for the maximum of annual mean atmospheric dispersion factor in common model because the effect from thermal internal boundary layer and other factors are neglected

  2. Proceedings of the tenth annual DOE low-level waste management conference: Session 2: Site performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-12-01

    This document contains twelve papers on various aspects of low-level radioactive waste management. Topics of this volume include: performance assessment methodology; remedial action alternatives; site selection and site characterization procedures; intruder scenarios; sensitivity analysis procedures; mathematical models for mixed waste environmental transport; and risk assessment methodology. Individual papers were processed separately for the database. (TEM)

  3. 2015 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Michael George

    2016-01-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2014, through October 31, 2015.

  4. Proceedings of the tenth annual DOE low-level waste management conference: Session 2: Site performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This document contains twelve papers on various aspects of low-level radioactive waste management. Topics of this volume include: performance assessment methodology; remedial action alternatives; site selection and site characterization procedures; intruder scenarios; sensitivity analysis procedures; mathematical models for mixed waste environmental transport; and risk assessment methodology. Individual papers were processed separately for the database

  5. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for CAU 112: Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the Period October 1999-October 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. F. Emer

    2001-03-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit, located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 1999-October 2000 period. Inspections of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches RCRA unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the covers, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. Physical inspections of the closure were completed quarterly and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. An annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted in August 2000. There has been no subsidence at any of the markers since monitoring began seven years ago. The objective of the neutron logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along 30 neutron access tubes and detect changes that maybe indicative of moisture movement at a point located directly beneath each trench. Precipitation for the period October 1999 through October 2000 was 10.44 centimeters (cm) (4.11 inches [in.]) (U.S. National Weather Service, 2000). The prior year annual rainfall (January 1999 through December 1999) was 10.13cm (3.99 in.). The highest 30-day cumulative rainfall occurred on March 8, 2000, with a total of 6.63 cm (2.61 in.). The heaviest daily precipitation occurred on February 23,2000, with a total of 1.70 cm (0.67 in.) falling in that 24-hour period. The recorded average annual rainfall for this site, from 1972 to January 1999, is 15.06 cm (5.93 in.). All monitored access tubes are within the compliance criteria of less than 5 percent residual volumetric moisture content at the compliance point directly beneath each respective trench. Soil conditions remain dry and stable underneath the

  6. Annual Status Report (Fiscal Year 2012) Composite Analysis of Low-Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W. E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-12-27

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements in DOE O 435.1, Chg. 1,1 and as implemented by DOE/RL-2000-29, Rev. 2,2 the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) has prepared this annual summary of the Hanford Site Composite Analysis for fiscal year (FY) 2012, as originally reported in PNNL-118003 and PNNL-11800, Addendum 14 (hereafter these reports are referred to collectively as the Composite Analysis), and to address secondary issues identified during the review of the Composite Analysis.

  7. Uranium hexafluoride packaging tiedown systems overview at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.L.; Green, D.J.; Lindquist, M.R.

    1993-07-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Piketon, Ohio, is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the US Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) for the US Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Nuclear Energy. The PORTS conducts those operations that are necessary for the production, packaging, and shipment of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ). Uranium hexafluoride enriched uranium than 1.0 wt percent 235 U shall be packaged in accordance with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations of Title 49 CFR Parts 173 (Reference 1) and 178 (Reference 2), or in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or US Department of Energy (DOE) certified package designs. Concerns have been expressed regarding the various tiedown methods and condition of the trailers being used by some shippers/carriers for international transport of the UF 6 cylinders/overpacks. Because of the concerns about international shipments, the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Nuclear Energy, through DOE-HQ Transportation Management Division, requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) to review UF 6 packaging tiedown and shipping practices used by PORTS, and where possible and appropriate, provide recommendations for enhancing these practices. Consequently, a team of two individuals from Westinghouse Hanford visited PORTS on March 5 and 6, 1990, for the purpose of conducting this review. The paper provides a brief discussion of the review activities and a summary of the resulting findings and recommendations. A detailed reporting of the is documented in Reference 4

  8. Characterization of process holdup material at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, D.E.; Miller, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The cascade material balance area at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant is characterized by continuous, large, in-process inventories of gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) and very large inputs and outputs of UF 6 over a complete range of 235 U enrichments. Monthly inventories are conducted to quantify the in-place material, but the inventory techniques are blind to material not in the gas phase. Material is removed from the gas phase by any one of four mechanisms: (1) freeze-outs which are the solidification of UF 6 , (2) inleakage of wet air which produces solid uranium oxyfluorides, (3) consumption of uranium through UF 6 reaction with internal metal surfaces, and (4) adsorption of UF 6 on internal surfaces. This presentation describes efforts to better characterize and, where possible, to eliminate or reduce the effects of these mechanisms on material accountability. Freeze-outs and wet air deposits occur under absormal operating conditions, and techniques are available to prevent, detect and reverse them. Consumption and adsorption occur under normal operating conditions and are more complex to manage, however, computer models have been developed to quantify monthly the net effects due to consumption and adsorption. These models have shown that consumption and adsorption effects on inventory differences are significant

  9. Operating experience with aluminum bearings at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langebrake, C.O.

    1975-01-01

    Considerable operating experience has been gained at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant over the last 15 years in the use of aluminum bearings in process related and auxiliary equipment. All of this experience has been excellent and, in several cases, the use of this type of bearing material has solved significant operating problems. Aluminum 850-T101 alloy was first used as a bearing material in purge cascade (PC-9) centrifugal compressors where a fatigue problem was being experienced with babbitt-type bearings. Good experience in this application led to the extended use of this bearing material in other equipment including process related as well as auxiliary equipment. Since 1961 aluminum bearings have been installed in approximately 21 Type PC-9 (centrifugal), 97 Type 9 (centrifugal), 262 Type X-29 (axial), and 101 Type 31 (axial) compressors, and 3 speed increasers in the X-330 Evacuation Booster Station. Based on successful operation of these bearings, continued and expanded use of aluminum bearings is recommended as a means of obtaining a high fatigue resistant bearing at a cost lower than that for babbitt-type bearings. (U.S.)

  10. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acox, T.A.; Anderson, R.E.; Hary, L.F.; Klein, L.S.; Vausher, A.L.

    1982-04-01

    At the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant all effluent streams are sampled regularly and analyzed to assess compliance with applicable environmental standards. Radioactivity is measured in air, water, food, soil, and sediments; and radiation doses to the public are calculated. All public radiation doses from process effluents are well within Department of Energy and US EPA standards. Non-radioactive effluents either presently comply with federal standards or will comply upon completion of planned projects. The environmental impact of effluents from cleaning and decontamination operations has been reduced through flow reduction and improved chemical treatment. CY-1981 was the first full year under a new National Pollutant Discharge. Elimination System (NPDES) permit for liquid effluents; compliance with the permit's discharge limits did not present any significant problems. Engineering is proceeding on projects to be constructed through 1985 to further reduce the impact of liquid effluents. A new licensed sanitary landfill utilizing the area fill method went into operation in July 1981. Although neither the State of Ohio nor the federal government has established standards for fluoride in the atmosphere or in vegetation, fluorides are monitored because they are used extensively in the gaseous diffusion process

  11. Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-05-01

    At the Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex all effluent streams are sampled regularly and analyzed to assess compliance with applicable environmental standards. Radioactivity is measured in air, water, fish, produce, soil, and sediments; and radiation doses to the public are calculated. The calculated public radiation doses from process effluents are within US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Environmental Protection Agency standards. An extensive amount of engineering effort is underway to modify existing airborne radioactivity emissions sources to further reduce emissions in compliance with DOE policy. Non-radioactive effluents either presently comply with federal standards or will comply upon completion of planned projects. CY-1984 was the fourth full year under the current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for liquid effluents, and the second year the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) assumed responsibility for administering the NPDES program. Compliance with the permit's discharge limits, with the exception of violations due to the startup of two new wastewater treatment facilities, did not present any significant problems. Overall compliance was 94.7%

  12. Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    At the Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex all effluent streams are sampled regularly and analyzed to assess compliance with applicable environmental standards. Radioactivity is measured in air, water, fish, produce, soil, sediments and vegetation; and radiation doses to the public are calculated. The calculated public radiation doses from process effluents are within US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Environmental protection Agency (USEPA) standards. An extensive amount of engineering effort is underway to modify existing airborne radioactivity emissions sources to further reduce emissions in compliance with DOE policy. Non-radioactive effluents either presently comply with federal standards or will comply upon completion of planned projects. CY-1985 was the fifth full year under the current National Pullutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for liquid effluents, and the third year since the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA) assumed responsibility for administering the NPDES program. Compliance with the permit's discharge limits, with the exception of violations due to the Coal Pile Treatment Facility and the Biodenitrification Plant for which projects to improve performance are currently underway, did not present any significant problems. Overall compliance was 95.5%. There was increased activity in the areas of groundwater monitoring, hazardous waste and PCB waste management to comply with Federal regulations

  13. Annual CO2 budget and seasonal CO2 exchange signals at a High Arctic permafrost site on Spitsbergen, Svalbard archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüers, J.; Westermann, S.; Piel, K.; Boike, J.

    2014-01-01

    The annual variability of CO2 exchange in most ecosystems is primarily driven by the activities of plants and soil microorganisms. However, little is known about the carbon balance and its controlling factors outside the growing season in arctic regions dominated by soil freeze/thaw-processes, long-lasting snow cover, and several months of darkness. This study presents a complete annual cycle of the CO2 net ecosystem exchange (NEE) dynamics for a High Arctic tundra area on the west coast of Svalbard based on eddy-covariance flux measurements. The annual cumulative CO2 budget is close to zero grams carbon per square meter per year, but shows a very strong seasonal variability. Four major CO2 exchange seasons have been identified. (1) During summer (ground snow-free), the CO2 exchange occurs mainly as a result of biological activity, with a predominance of strong CO2 assimilation by the ecosystem. (2) The autumn (ground snow-free or partly snow-covered) is dominated by CO2 respiration as a result of biological activity. (3) In winter and spring (ground snow-covered), low but persistent CO2 release occur, overlain by considerable CO2 exchange events in both directions associated with changes of air masses and air and atmospheric CO2 pressure. (4) The snow melt season (pattern of snow-free and snow-covered areas), where both, meteorological and biological forcing, resulting in a visible carbon uptake by the high arctic ecosystem. Data related to this article are archived under: http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.809507.

  14. Inter-annual variability of surface ozone at coastal (Dumont d'Urville, 2004–2014 and inland (Concordia, 2007–2014 sites in East Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Legrand

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface ozone has been measured since 2004 at the coastal East Antarctic site of Dumont d'Urville (DDU, and since 2007 at the Concordia station located on the high East Antarctic plateau. This paper discusses long-term changes, seasonal and diurnal cycles, as well as inter-annual summer variability observed at these two East Antarctic sites. At Concordia, near-surface ozone data were complemented by balloon soundings and compared to similar measurements done at the South Pole. The DDU record is compared to those obtained at the coastal site of Syowa, also located in East Antarctica, as well as the coastal sites of Neumayer and Halley, both located on the coast of the Weddell Sea in West Antarctica. Surface ozone mixing ratios exhibit very similar seasonal cycles at Concordia and the South Pole. However, in summer the diurnal cycle of ozone is different at the two sites with a drop of ozone in the afternoon at Concordia but not at the South Pole. The vertical distribution of ozone above the snow surface also differs. When present, the ozone-rich layer located near the ground is better mixed and deeper at Concordia (up to 400 m than at the South Pole during sunlight hours. These differences are related to different solar radiation and wind regimes encountered at these two inland sites. DDU appears to be the coastal site where the impact of the late winter/spring bromine chemistry is the weakest, but where the impact of elevated ozone levels caused by NOx snow emissions from the high Antarctic plateau is the highest. The highest impact of the bromine chemistry is seen at Halley and Neumayer, and to a lesser extent at Syowa. These three sites are only weakly impacted by the NOx chemistry and the net ozone production occurring on the high Antarctic plateau. The differences in late winter/spring are attributed to the abundance of sea ice offshore from the sites, whereas those in summer are related to the topography of East Antarctica that promotes

  15. A new method for evaluating annual absorbed gamma dose rates in an archaeological site by combining the SSNTD technique with Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Misdaq, M A; Erramli, H; Mikdad, A; Rzama, A; Yousif-Charif, M L

    1998-01-01

    Uranium and thorium contents in different layers of an archaeological site have been determined by using CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) and calculating the probabilities for alpha-particles emitted by the uranium and thorium series to reach and be registered on the SSNTD films. A new method has been developed based on calculating the self-absorption coefficient of the gamma-photons emitted by the uranium ( sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U), thorium ( sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th) and their corresponding decay products as well as the potassium-40 ( sup 4 sup 0 K) isotope for evaluating the annual absorbed gamma dose rates in the considered material samples. Results obtained have been compared with data obtained by using the TL dosimetry and Bell's methods. Ceramic samples belonging to the studied archaeological site have been dated.

  16. Annual report on the US Department of Energy's cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites for October 1991--September 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the US Department of Energy's (DOE) cultural resource studies that were undertaken in support of the DOE's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in the state of Colorado for the period of October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report fulfills the DOE's obligation to provide an annual report to the state of Colorado on the status and results of cultural resource studies conducted during the above period of record. This requirement is stated in a programmatic memorandum of agreement executed between the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer in December 1984. Previous reports were based on a calendar year reporting period. However, in order to be more consistent with the programmatic memorandum of agreement, the period of record for this and subsequent annual reports has been changed to the Federal fiscal year. The current status and summaries of 1992 cultural resource surveys are provided for all UMTRA Project sites in Colorado. The sites are Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock

  17. Hanford annual second quarter seismic report, fiscal year 1998: Seismicity on and near the Hanford Site, Pasco, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartshorn, D.C.; Reidel, S.P.; Rohay, A.C.

    1998-06-01

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the US Department of Energy and its contractors. The staff also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of an earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (ENN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The operational rate for the second quarter of FY98 for stations in the HSN was 99.92%. The operational rate for the second quarter of FY98 for stations of the EWRN was 99.46%. For the second quarter of FY98, the acquisition computer triggered 159 times. Of these triggers 14 were local earthquakes: 7 (50%) in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 3 (21%) in the pre-basalt sediments, and 4 (29%) in the crystalline basement. The geologic and tectonic environments where these earthquakes occurred are discussed in this report. The most significant seismic event for the second quarter was on March 23, 1998 when a 1.9 Mc occurred near Eltopia, WA and was felt by local residents. Although this was a small event, it was felt at the surface and is an indication of the potential impact on Hanford of seismic events that are common to the Site.

  18. 1993 Annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1, Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkendall, J.R.; Engel, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    More important than waste generation numbers, the pollution prevention and waste minimization successes achieved at Hanford in 1993 have reduced waste and improved operations at the Site. Just a few of these projects are: A small research nuclear reactor, unused and destined for disposal as low level radioactive waste, was provided to a Texas University for their nuclear research program, avoiding 25 cubic meters of waste and saving $116,000. By changing the slope on a asphalt lot in front of a waste storage pad, run-off rainwater was prevented from becoming mixed low level waste water, preventing 40 cubic meters of waste and saving $750,000. Through more efficient electrostatic paint spraying equipment and a solvent recovery system, a paint shop reduced hazardous waste by 3,500 kilograms, saving $90,800. During the demolition of a large decommissioned building, more than 90% of the building's material was recycled by crushing the concrete for use on-Site and selling the steel to an off-Site recycler, avoiding a total of 12,600 metric tons of waste and saving $450,000. Additionally, several site-wide programs have avoided large quantities of waste, including the following: Through expansion of the paper and office waste recycling program which includes paper, cardboard, newspaper, and phone books, 516 metric tons of sanitary waste was reduced, saving $68,000. With the continued success of the excess chemicals program, which finds on-Site and off-Site customers for excess chemical materials, hazardous waste was reduced by 765,000 liters of liquid chemicals and 50 metric tons of solid chemicals, saving over $700,000 in disposal costs

  19. Hanford annual first quarter seismic report, fiscal year 1998: Seismicity on and near the Hanford Site, Pasco Basin, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartshorn, D.C.; Reidel, S.P.; Rohay, A.C.

    1998-02-01

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the US Department of Energy and its contractors. The staff also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of an earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The operational rate for the first quarter of FY98 for stations in the HSN was 98.5%. The operational rate for the first quarter of FY98 for stations of the EWRN was 99.1%. For the first quarter of FY98, the acquisition computer triggered 184 times. Of these triggers 23 were local earthquakes: 7 in the Columbia River Basalt Group, and 16 in the crystalline basement. The geologic and tectonic environments where these earthquakes occurred are discussed in this report. The most significant earthquakes in this quarter were a series of six events which occurred in the Cold Creek depression (approximately 4 km SW of the 200 West Area), between November 6 and November 11, 1997. All events were deep (> 15 km) and were located in the crystalline basement. The first event was the largest, having a magnitude of 3.49 M{sub c}. Two events on November 9, 1997 had magnitudes of 2.81 and 2.95 M{sub c}, respectively. The other events had magnitudes between 0.7 and 1.2 M{sub c}.

  20. 2010 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mike lewis

    2011-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2010 permit year, approximately 2.2 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

  1. Underground Test Area Calendar Year 2014 Annual Sampling Analysis Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnham, Irene [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report presents the analytical data for the 2014 fiscal year (FY) and calendar year (CY) (October 1, 2013, through December 31, 2014), and an evaluation of the data to ensure that the Sampling Plan’s objectives are met. In addition to samples collected and analyzed for the Sampling Plan, some NNSS wells are monitored by NNSA/NFO to demonstrate compliance with State-issued water discharge permits; with protection of groundwater from ongoing radiological waste disposal activities (compliance wells); and to demonstrate that the onsite drinking water supply is below SDWA maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) (public water system [PWS] wells). While not all sampled locations are required by the Sampling Plan, these samples are relevant to its objectives and are therefore presented herein for completeness purposes. Special investigations that took place in 2014 that are relevant to the Sampling Plan are also presented. This is the first annual report released to support Sampling Plan implementation.

  2. Underground Test Area Calendar Year 2014 Annual Sampling Analysis Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnham, Irene

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the analytical data for the 2014 fiscal year (FY) and calendar year (CY) (October 1, 2013, through December 31, 2014), and an evaluation of the data to ensure that the Sampling Plan's objectives are met. In addition to samples collected and analyzed for the Sampling Plan, some NNSS wells are monitored by NNSA/NFO to demonstrate compliance with State-issued water discharge permits; with protection of groundwater from ongoing radiological waste disposal activities (compliance wells); and to demonstrate that the onsite drinking water supply is below SDWA maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) (public water system [PWS] wells). While not all sampled locations are required by the Sampling Plan, these samples are relevant to its objectives and are therefore presented herein for completeness purposes. Special investigations that took place in 2014 that are relevant to the Sampling Plan are also presented. This is the first annual report released to support Sampling Plan implementation.

  3. Annual survival estimation of migratory songbirds confounded by incomplete breeding site-fidelity: study designs that may help

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall, M. R.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Many species of bird exhibit varying degrees of site–fidelity to the previous year’s territory or breeding area, a phenomenon we refer to as incomplete breeding site–fidelity. If the territory they occupy is located beyond the bounds of the study area or search area (i.e., they have emigrated from the study area, the bird will go undetected and is therefore indistinguishable from dead individuals in capture–mark–recapture studies. Differential emigration rates confound inferences regarding differences in survival between sexes and among species if apparent survival rates are used as estimates of true survival. Moreover, the bias introduced by using apparent survival rates for true survival rates can have profound effects on the predictions of population persistence through time, source/sink dynamics, and other aspects of life–history theory. We investigated four study design and analysis approaches that result in apparent survival estimates that are closer to true survival estimates. Our motivation for this research stemmed from a multi–year capture–recapture study of Prothonotary Warblers (Protonotaria citrea on multiple study plots within a larger landscape of suitable breeding habitat where substantial inter–annual movements of marked individuals among neighboring study plots was documented. We wished to quantify the effects of this type of movement on annual survival estimation. The first two study designs we investigated involved marking birds in a core area and resighting them in the core as well as an area surrounding the core. For the first of these two designs, we demonstrated that as the resighting area surrounding the core gets progressively larger, and more “emigrants” are resighted, apparent survival estimates begin to approximate true survival rates (bias < 0.01. However, given observed inter–annual movements of birds, it is likely to be logistically impractical to resight birds on sufficiently large

  4. 1997 annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1, Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segall, P.

    1998-01-01

    Hanford's missions are to safely clean up and manage the site's legacy wastes, and to develop and deploy science and technology. Through these missions Hanford will contribute to economic diversification of the region. Hanford's environmental management or cleanup mission is to protect the health and safety of the public, workers, and the environment; control hazardous materials; and utilize the assets (people, infra structure, site) for other missions. Hanford's science and technology mission is to develop and deploy science and technology in the service of the nation including stewardship of the Hanford Site. Pollution Prevention is a key to the success of these missions by reducing the amount of waste to be managed and identifying/implementing cost effective waste reduction projects. Hanford's original mission, the production of nuclear materials for the nation's defense programs, lasted more than 40 years, and like most manufacturing operations, Hanford's operations generated large quantities of waste and pollution. However, the by-products from Hanford operations pose unique problems like radiation hazards, vast volumes of contaminated water and soil, and many contaminated structures including reactors, chemical plants and evaporation ponds. The cleanup activity is an immense and challenging undertaking, which includes characterization and decommissioning of 149 single shell storage tanks, treating 28 double shell tanks, safely disposing of over 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel stored on site, removing numerous structures, and dealing with significant solid waste, ground water, and land restoration issues

  5. Annual Status Report (FY2104) Composite Analysis of Low Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W. E. [CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-24

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy requirements in DOE O 435.1 and as implemented by DOE/RL-2009-29, the DOE Richland Operations Office has prepared this annul summary of the Hanford Site Composite Analysis for fiscal year 2014.

  6. 2015 Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title ll Annual Report, L-Bar, New Mexico Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazier, William [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Johnson, Dick [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The L-Bar, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title II Disposal Site was inspected on August 18, 2015. The tailings impoundment was in excellent condition. Erosion and vegetation measurements to monitor the condition of the impoundment cover indicated that no erosion is occurring, and perennial vegetation foliar cover at the measurement plots increased substantially compared to previous years due to above-average precipitation for the year. A short segment of the perimeter fence near the site entrance was realigned in spring 2015 because a gully was undermining the fence corner. Loose fence strands at another location were repaired during the inspection, and a section of fence needs to be realigned to avoid areas affected by deep gullies and sediment deposition. Inspectors identified no other maintenance needs or cause for a follow-up inspection. Groundwater monitoring is required every 3 years. The next monitoring event will be in 2016.

  7. 1994 Annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1, Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Many Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention successes at the Hanford Site occur every day without formal recognition. A few of the successful projects are: T-Plant helps facilities reuse equipment by offering decontamination services for items such as gas cylinders, trucks, and railcars, thus saving disposal and equipment replacement costs. Custodial Services reviewed its use of 168 hazardous cleaning products, and, through a variety of measures, replaced them with 38 safer substitutes, one for each task. Scrap steel contaminated with low level radioactivity from the interim stabilization of 107-K and 107-C was decontaminated and sold to a vendor for recycling. Site-wide programs include the following: the Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (P2OA) program at the Hanford site was launched during 1994, including a training class, a guidance document, technical assistance, and goals; control over hazardous materials purchased was achieved by reviewing all purchase requisitions of a chemical nature; the Office Supply Reuse Program was established to redeploy unused or unwanted office supply items. In 1994, pollution prevention activities reduced approximately 274,000 kilograms of hazardous waste, 2,100 cubic meters of radioactive and mixed waste, 14,500,000 kilograms of sanitary waste, and 215,000 cubic meters off liquid waste and waste water. Pollution Prevention activities also saved almost $4.2 million in disposal, product, and labor costs. Overall waste generation increased in 1994 due to increased work and activity typical for a site with an environmental restoration mission. However, without any Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention activities, solid radioactive waste generation at Hanford would have been 25% higher, solid hazardous waste generation would have been 30% higher, and solid sanitary waste generation would have been 60% higher

  8. Uranium hexafluoride packaging tiedown systems overview at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.L.; Lindquist, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Piketon, Ohio, is operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the US Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) for the US Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Nuclear Energy. The PORTS conducts those operations that are necessary for the production, packaging, and shipment of enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ). Uranium hexafluoride enriched greater than 1.0 wt percent 235 U shall be packaged in accordance with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations of Title 49 CFR Parts 173 and 178, or in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or US Department of Energy (DOE) certified package designs. Concerns have been expressed regarding the various tiedown methods and condition of the trailers being used by some shippers/carriers for international transport of the UF 6 cylinders/overpacks. International shipments typically are not made using dedicated trailers, and numerous trailers have been received at PORTS with improperly and potentially dangerously secured overpacks. Because of the concerns about international shipments, the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Nuclear Energy, through DOE-HQ Transportation Management Division, requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) to review UF 6 packaging tiedown and shipping practices used by PORTS; and where possible and appropriate, provide recommendations for enhancing these practices. Consequently, a team of two individuals from Westinghouse Hanford visited PORTS on March 5 and 6, 1990, for the purpose of conducting this review. The paper provides a brief discussion of the review activities and a summary of the resulting findings and recommendations

  9. Structural inspection and wind analysis of redwood cooling towers at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, T.; Solack, T.; Hortel, J.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the plant upgrade program, structural analyses and field inspections were performed on four redwood cooling towers at the DOE Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plant located in Piketon, Ohio. The cooling towers are categorized as important hazard facilities. The loadings are derived from UCRL-15910 according to the pertinent hazard category. In addition to the seismic and wind loadings, the wood cooling towers are constantly subject to adverse environmental effects such as elevated temperature, chemical attack, icing and snow load, and motor vibrations. A thorough structural evaluation for all load combinations was performed for each of the cooling towers based on the structural code requirements of the Cooling Tower Institute and National Forest Products Association. Most stress criteria are unique for the redwood material. This evaluation was performed using finite element techniques on the global structural integrity and supplemented by hand calculations on the individual connection joints. Overloaded wood structural members and joints are identified by the analysis. The rectangular tower structure sits on a concrete basin that span across 60 ft by 200 ft. A major part of the cooling towers upgrading program involved field inspections of the individual cells of each tower. The primary purpose of these inspections was to identify any existing structural damage or deficiencies such as failed members, degraded wood, and deficiencies resulting from poor construction practice. Inspection of 40 cells identified some generic deficiencies that mostly are consistent with the analytical finding. Based on the analysis, some effective but inexpensive upgrading techniques were developed and recommended to bring the cooling towers into compliance with current DOE requirements

  10. 2016 Annual Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Michael George

    2017-01-01

    This report describes conditions and information, as required by the state of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality Reuse Permit I-161-02, for the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Ponds located at Idaho National Laboratory from November 1, 2015-October 31, 2016. The effective date of Reuse Permit I-161-02 is November 20, 2014 with an expiration date of November 19, 2019. This report contains the following information: · Facility and system description · Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates · Permit required groundwater monitoring data · Status of compliance activities · Issues · Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2016 permit year, 180.99 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Ponds. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest in well USGS-065, which is the closest downgradient well to the Cold Waste Ponds. Sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations decrease rapidly as the distance downgradient from the Cold Waste Ponds increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are significantly higher in well USGS-065 than in the other monitoring wells, both parameters remained below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in well USGS-065. The facility was in compliance with the Reuse Permit during the 2016 permit year.

  11. Increased concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Alpine streams during annual snowmelt: investigating effects of sampling method, site characteristics, and meteorology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahpoury, Pourya; Hageman, Kimberly J; Matthaei, Christoph D; Alumbaugh, Robert E; Cook, Michelle E

    2014-10-07

    Silicone passive samplers and macroinvertebrates were used to measure time-integrated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in alpine streams during annual snowmelt. The three sampling sites were located near a main highway in Arthur's Pass National Park in the Southern Alps of New Zealand. A similar set of PAH congeners, composed of 2-4 rings, were found in silicone passive samplers and macroinvertebrates. The background PAH concentrations were similar at all sites, implying that proximity to the highway did not affect concentrations. In passive samplers, an increase of PAH concentrations by up to seven times was observed during snowmelt. In macroinvertebrates, the concentration changes were moderate; however, macroinvertebrate sampling did not occur during the main pulse observed in the passive samplers. The extent of vegetation in the catchment appeared to affect the concentration patterns seen at the different stream sites. A strong correlation was found between PAH concentrations in passive samplers and the amount of rainfall in the study area, indicating that the washout of contaminants from snowpack by rainfall was an important process.

  12. Design and construction of deinococcus radiodurans for biodegradation of organic toxins at radioactive DOE waste sites. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, M.J.; Minton, K.W.; Wackett, L.P.

    1998-01-01

    'A 1992 survey of DOE waste sites indicates that about 32% of soils and 45% of groundwaters at these sites contain radionuclides and metals plus an organic toxin class. The most commonly reported combinations of these hazardous compounds being radionuclides and metals (e.g., U, Pu, Cs, Pb, Cr, As) plus chlorinated hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene), fuel hydrocarbons (e.g., toluene), or polychlorinated biphenyls (e.g., Arochlor 1248). These wastes are some of the most hazardous pollutants and pose an increasing risk to human health as they leach into the environment. The objective of this research is to develop novel organisms, that are highly resistant to radiation and the toxic effects of metals and radionuclides, for in-situ bioremediation of organic toxins. Few organisms exist that are able to remediate such environmental organic pollutants, and among those that can, the bacteria belonging to the genus Pseudomonas are the most characterized. Unfortunately, these bacteria are very radiation sensitive. For example, Pseudomonas spp. is even more sensitive than Escherichia coli and, thus, is not suitable as a bioremediation host in environments subjected to radiation. By contrast, D. radiodurans, a natural soil bacterium, is the most radiation resistant organism yet discovered; it is several thousand times more resistant to ionizing radiation than Pseudomonas. The sophisticated gene transfer and expression systems the authors have developed for D. radiodurans over the last eight years make this organism an ideal candidate for high-level expression of genes that degrade organic toxins, in radioactive environments. The authors ultimate aim is to develop organisms and approaches that will be useful for remediating the large variety of toxic organic compounds found in DOE waste sites that are too radioactive to support other bioremediation organisms. This report summarizes work after the first 6 months of a 3-year project.'

  13. Environmental Performance Report 2013: Annual Site Environmental Report per the U.S. Department of Energy Order 231.1-1B (Management Publication)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlomberg, K.; Eickhoff, J.; Beatty, B.; Braus, G.; Durbin, L.; Fiehweg, R.; Ray, M.; Ryon, T.; Schmitz, E.

    2014-08-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Environmental Performance Report provides a description of the laboratory's environmental management activities for 2013, including information on environmental and sustainability performance, environmental compliance activities and status, and environmental protection programs, highlights, and successes. The purpose of this report is to ensure that U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public receive timely, accurate information about events that have affected or could adversely affect the health, safety, and security of the public or workers; the environment; or the operations of DOE facilities. This report meets the requirements of the Annual Site Environmental Report and is prepared in accordance with the DOE Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting.

  14. 2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Mike

    2011-01-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2009 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: (1) Facility and system description; (2) Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates; (3) Groundwater monitoring data; (4) Status of compliance activities; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2010 permit year, approximately 164 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  15. Joint inversion of geophysical data for site characterization and restoration monitoring. FY97 annual progress report for EMSP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, P.A.; Berryman, J.G.; Bonner, B.P.; Roberts, J.J.; Wildenschild

    1997-01-01

    'The purpose of this project is to develop a computer code for joint in-version of seismic and electrical data, to improve underground imaging for site characterization and remediation monitoring. The computer code developed in this project will invert geophysical data to obtain direct estimates of porosity and saturation underground, rather than inverting for seismic velocity and electrical resistivity or other geophysical properties. This is intended to be a significant improvement in the state-of-the-art of under-ground imaging, since interpretation of data collected at a contaminated site would become much less subjective. The schedule of this project is as follows: In the first year, investigators perform laboratory measurements of elastic and electrical properties of sand-clay mixtures containing various fluids. Investigators also develop methods of relating measurable geophysical properties to porosity and saturation by using rock physics theories, geostatistical, and empirical techniques together with available laboratory measurements. In the second year, investigators finish any necessary laboratory measurements and apply the methods developed in the first year to invert available borehole log data to predict measured properties of cores and sediments from a borehole. Investigators refine the inversion code in the third year and carry out a field experiment to collect seismic and electrical data. Investigators then use the inversion code to invert the field data to produce estimates of porosity and saturation in the field area where the data were collected. This report describes progress made in the first year of this three-year project.'

  16. Assessing Emergency Preparedness and Response Capacity Using Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response Methodology: Portsmouth, Virginia, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkjian, Katie M; Winz, Michelle; Yang, Jun; Corvese, Kate; Colón, Ana; Levine, Seth J; Mullen, Jessica; Ruth, Donna; Anson-Dwamena, Rexford; Bayleyegn, Tesfaye; Chang, David S

    2016-04-01

    For the past decade, emergency preparedness campaigns have encouraged households to meet preparedness metrics, such as having a household evacuation plan and emergency supplies of food, water, and medication. To estimate current household preparedness levels and to enhance disaster response planning, the Virginia Department of Health with remote technical assistance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted a community health assessment in 2013 in Portsmouth, Virginia. Using the Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) methodology with 2-stage cluster sampling, we randomly selected 210 households for in-person interviews. Households were questioned about emergency planning and supplies, information sources during emergencies, and chronic health conditions. Interview teams completed 180 interviews (86%). Interviews revealed that 70% of households had an emergency evacuation plan, 67% had a 3-day supply of water for each member, and 77% had a first aid kit. Most households (65%) reported that the television was the primary source of information during an emergency. Heart disease (54%) and obesity (40%) were the most frequently reported chronic conditions. The Virginia Department of Health identified important gaps in local household preparedness. Data from the assessment have been used to inform community health partners, enhance disaster response planning, set community health priorities, and influence Portsmouth's Community Health Improvement Plan.

  17. California Energy Incentive Programs: An Annual Update on Key Energy Issues and Financial Opportunities for Federal Sites in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-12-01

    A spate of recently enacted energy legislation and associated program changes is providing numerous opportunities to help California federal energy managers cut costs and meet their renewables, energy efficiency and GHG emissions goals. In April 2011, Governor Jerry Brown approved the nation’s most ambitious renewable portfolio standard (RPS), which requires 33% of the state’s electricity to come from renewable energy sources by 2020. Policy changes that will support the RPS include expanded eligibility rules that fill previous gaps in incentives for certain sizes of on-site renewable energy systems. Program updates described in this document include: $200 million more in funding for California Solar Initiative rebates to commercial and industrial customers; an increase in the eligible system size for the Feed-In-Tariff (FIT) from 1.5MW to 3MW; and pending changes that may allow customer-side systems to sell tradable renewable energy credits (TRECs) to entities with RPS compliance obligations in California.

  18. Marine biomass: New York State species and site studies. Annual report 1 Dec 80-30 Nov 81

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squires, D.F.; McKay, L.; Brinkhuis, B.; Davies, D.; Hanisak, D.

    1982-03-01

    Nine species of indigenous New York seaweeds were surveyed for potential as feedstock for methanogenesis. Laminaria and Gracilaria are primary candidates on the basis of growth studies and gas yield data provided by General Electric. Agardhiella, Codium and Fucus merit further study. A two species (warm and cool water) cropping system appears feasible in terms of year-round sustained yield. Initial data suggest nitrogen is not limiting in New York coastal waters. Preliminary data from raft culture experiments suggest that some species' yields may be higher in the field than in the laboratory. Important technical gains were made in affixing attached-growth-mode species to substrates. Sites for use in larger scale experimental structures around Long Island were evaluated for their environmental and use-conflict parameters.

  19. Development of monitoring and diagnostic methods for robots used in remediation of waste sites. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tecza, J.

    1998-01-01

    'Safe and efficient clean up of hazardous and radioactive waste sites throughout the DOE complex will require extensive use of robots. This research effort focuses on developing Monitoring and Diagnostic (M and D) methods for robots that will provide early detection, isolation, and tracking of impending faults before they result in serious failure. The utility and effectiveness of applying M and D methods to hydraulic robots has never been proven. The present research program is utilizing seeded faults in a laboratory test rig that is representative of an existing hydraulically-powered remediation robot. This report summarizes activity conducted in the first 9 months of the project. The research team has analyzed the Rosie Mobile Worksystem as a representative hydraulic robot, developed a test rig for implanted fault testing, developed a test plan and agenda, and established methods for acquiring and analyzing the test data.'

  20. Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnham, Irene [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Marutzky, Sam [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This report is mandated by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities for fiscal year (FY) 2012. All UGTA organizations—U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—conducted QA activities in FY 2012. The activities included conducting assessments, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, revising the QAPP, and publishing documents. In addition, processes and procedures were developed to address deficiencies identified in the FY 2011 QAPP gap analysis.